WorldWideScience

Sample records for coal premium liquids

  1. Alkaloid-derived molecules in low rank Argonne premium coals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winans, R. E.; Tomczyk, N. A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2000-11-30

    Molecules that are probably derived from alkaloids have been found in the extracts of the subbituminous and lignite Argonne Premium Coals. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) have been used to characterize pyridine and supercritical extracts. The supercritical extraction used an approach that has been successful for extracting alkaloids from natural products. The first indication that there might be these natural products in coals was the large number of molecules found containing multiple nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms. These molecules are much less abundant in bituminous coals and absent in the higher rank coals.

  2. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, lik...

  3. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  4. Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, Frank J; Schields, Gene L; Jha, Mehesh C; Moro, Nick

    1997-09-26

    The ash in six common bituminous coals, Taggart, Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Indiana VII, Sunnyside and Hiawatha, could be liberated by fine grinding to allow preparation of clean coal meeting premium fuel specifications (< 1- 2 lb/ MBtu ash and <0.6 lb/ MBtu sulfur) by laboratory and bench- scale column flotation or selective agglomeration. Over 2,100 tons of coal were cleaned in the PDU at feed rates between 2,500 and 6,000 lb/ h by Microcel™ column flotation and by selective agglomeration using recycled heptane as the bridging liquid. Parametric testing of each process and 72- hr productions runs were completed on each of the three test coals. The following results were achieved after optimization of the operating parameters: The primary objective was to develop the design base for commercial fine coal cleaning facilities for producing ultra- clean coals which can be converted into coal-water slurry premium fuel. The coal cleaning technologies to be developed were advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration, and the goal was to produce fuel meeting the following specifications.

  5. Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the

  6. Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorres, K.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Samples provides the recipients of those samples with information that will enhance the value of the samples, to permit greater opportunities to compare their work with that of others, and aid in correlations that can improve the value to all users. It is hoped that this document will foster a spirit of cooperation and collaboration such that the field of basic coal chemistry may be a more efficient and rewarding endeavor for all who participate. The different sections are intended to stand alone. For this reason some of the information may be found in several places. The handbook is also intended to be a dynamic document, constantly subject to change through additions and improvements. Please feel free to write to the editor with your comments and suggestions.

  7. Efficient direct coal liquefaction of a premium brown coal catalyzed by cobalt-promoted fumed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, M.; Loewe, A.; Traa, Y. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2013-11-01

    The search for alternatives in the fuel sector is an important technological challenge. An interim solution could be provided by direct coal liquefaction. Hydrogen economy and the lack of an efficient catalyst are the main obstacles for this process. We used a premium German brown coal with a high H/C molar ratio of 1.25 and nanostructured cobalt catalysts to improve the efficiency of direct coal liquefaction. We were able to recover and recycle the catalyst efficiently and reached good brown coal conversions and oil yields with single-stage coal liquefaction. The oil quality observed almost reached that of a conventional crude oil considering higher heating value (HHV), H/C molar ratio and aliphatic content. (orig.)

  8. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, R.H.

    1997-04-25

    The goal of this project is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Its scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design and construction of a 2 t/h process development unit (PDU). Large lots of clean coal are to be produced in the PDU from three project coals. Investigation of the near-term applicability of the two advanced fine coal cleaning processes in an existing coal preparation plant is another goal of the project and is the subject of this report.

  9. Hydrotreating of coal-derived liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lott, S.E.; Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    To develop a database relating hydrotreating parameters to feed and product quality by experimentally evaluating options for hydrotreating whole coal liquids, distillate cuts of coal liquids, petroleum, and blends of coal liquids with petroleum.

  10. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-08-28

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

  11. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1997-06-01

    Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program "Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications," (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R

  12. Liquidity in the Foreign Exchange Market: Measurement, Commonality, and Risk Premiums

    OpenAIRE

    Loriano Mancini; Angelo Ranaldo; Jan Wrampelmeyer

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a liquidity measure tailored to the foreign exchange (FX) market, quantifies the amount of commonality in liquidity across exchange rates, and determines the extent of liquidity risk premiums embedded in FX returns. The new liquidity measure utilizes ultra high frequency data and captures cross-sectional and temporal variation in FX liquidity during the financial crisis of 2007-2008. Empirical results show that liquidity co-moves across currency pairs and that systematic F...

  13. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, heptanol, 1-hexadecanol, 2-methyl-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-penthanol (methylisobutyl carbinol), n-octanol, s-octanol, and cyclohexanol as probe compounds are utilized to evaluate hydrophilicity of coals and coal minerals. N-alkanes such as hexane, heptane and octane, and stearic acid are employed as probe compounds to evaluate hydrophobicity of coals and coal minerals. Aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene as probe compounds are used to examine aromaticity of coal surface. Aromatic acids such as o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, phenol and B-naphthol are used to detect aromatic acidic sites of coal surface. Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromaticity of surfaces for either raw coals or treated coals in water are relatively determined by evaluating both equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption and dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on various raw coals and treated coals to compare affinities of coals for water.

  14. Engineering development of advance physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, M.C.; Smit, F.J.; Shields, G.L. [AMAX R& D Center/ENTECH Global Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to develop the engineering design base for prototype fine coal cleaning plants based on Advanced Column Flotation and Selective Agglomeration processes for premium fuel and near-term applications. Removal of toxic trace elements is also being investigated. The scope of the project includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing of each process on six coals followed by design, construction, and operation of a 2 tons/hour process development unit (PDU). Three coals will be cleaned in tonnage quantity and provided to DOE and its contractors for combustion evaluation. Amax R&D (now a subsidiary of Cyprus Amax Mineral Company) is the prime contractor. Entech Global is managing the project and performing most of the research and development work as an on-site subcontractor. Other participants in the project are Cyprus Amax Coal Company, Arcanum, Bechtel, TIC, University of Kentucky and Virginia Tech. Drs. Keller of Syracuse and Dooher of Adelphi University are consultants.

  15. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  16. Structural elucidation of Argonne premium coals: Molecular weights, heteroatom distributions and linkages between clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winans, R.E.,; Kim, Y.; Hunt, J.E.; McBeth, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to create a statistically accurate picture of important structural features for a group of coals representing a broad rank range. Mass spectrometric techniques are used to study coals, coal extracts and chemically modified coals and extracts. Laser desorption mass spectrometry is used to determine molecular weight distributions. Desorption chemical ionization high resolution mass spectrometry provides detailed molecular information on compound classes of molecules is obtained using tandem mass spectrometry. These results are correlated with other direct studies on these samples such as solid NMR, XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. From the complex sets of data, several general trends are emerging especially for heteroatom containing species. From a statistical point of view, heteroatoms must play important roles in the reactivity of all coals. Direct characterization of sulfur containing species in the Argonne coals has been reported from XANES analysis. Indirect methods used include: TG-FTIR and HRMS which rely on thermal desorption and pyrolysis to vaporize the samples. Both XANES and XPS data on nitrogen has been reported, but at this time, the XPS information is probably more reliable. Results from HRMS are discussed in this paper. Most other information on nitrogen is limited to analysis of liquefaction products. However, nitrogen can be important in influencing characteristics of coal liquids and as a source of NO{sub x}`s in coal combustion.

  17. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    A large number of bacterial enrichments have been developed for their ability to utilize nitrogen and sulfur in coal liquids and the model compound naphtha. These bacteria include the original aerobic bacteria isolated from natural sources which utilize heteroatom compounds in the presence of rich media, aerobic nitrogen-utilizing bacteria and denitrifying bacteria. The most promising isolates include Mix M, a mixture of aerobic bacteria; ER15, a pyridine-utilizing isolate; ERI6, an aniline-utilizing isolate and a sewage sludge isolate. Culture optimization experiments have led to these bacteria being able to remove up to 40 percent of the sulfur and nitrogen in naphtha and coal liquids in batch culture. Continuous culture experiments showed that the coal liquid is too toxic to the bacteria to be fed without dilution or extraction. Thus either semi-batch operation must be employed with continuous gas sparging into a batch of liquid, or acid extracted coal liquid must be employed in continuous reactor studies with continuous liquid flow. Isolate EN-1, a chemical waste isolate, removed 27 percent of the sulfur and 19 percent of the nitrogen in fed batch experiments. Isolate ERI5 removed 28 percent of the nitrogen in coal liquid in 10 days in fed batch culture. The sewage sludge isolate removed 22.5 percent of the sulfur and 6.5 percent of the nitrogen from extracted coal liquid in continuous culture, and Mix M removed 17.5 percent of the nitrogen from medium containing extracted coal liquid. An economic evaluation has been prepared for the removal of nitrogen heteroatom compounds from Wilsonville coal liquid using acid extraction followed by fermentation. Similar technology can be developed for sulfur removal. The evaluation indicates that the nitrogen heteroatom compounds can be removed for $0.09/lb of coal liquid treated.

  18. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  1. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  2. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  3. Coal Liquids: Manufacture and Properties. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    digestion/atomic ab- sorption spectroscopy. Trace elements of copper, chromium, nickel, man- ganese and zinc were determined by silic -free ash fusion...characterize coal liquids, tar sand bitumens and shale oils. 170. Rumsfeld, D., "Department of Defense Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuel Policy for Equipment

  4. Catalytic combustion of coal-derived liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested with three grades of SRC 2 coal derived liquids, naphtha, middle distillate, and a blend of three parts middle distillate to one part heavy distillate. A petroleum derived number 2 diesel fuel was also tested to provide a direct comparison. The catalytic reactor was tested at inlet temperatures from 600 to 800 K, reference velocities from 10 to 20 m/s, lean fuel air ratios, and a pressure of 3 x 10 to the 5th power Pa. Compared to the diesel, the naphtha gave slightly better combustion efficiency, the middle distillate was almost identical, and the middle heavy blend was slightly poorer. The coal derived liquid fuels contained from 0.58 to 0.95 percent nitrogen by weight. Conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx was approximately 75 percent for all three grades of the coal derived liquids.

  5. Coal + Biomass → Liquids + Electricity (with CCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, Matt Aitken applies the MARKet ALlocation energy system model to evaluate the market potential for a class of technologies that convert coal and biomass to liquid fuels and electricity (CBtLE), paired with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The technology is ...

  6. HINDERED DIFFUSION OF COAL LIQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore T. Tsotsis; Muhammad Sahimi; Ian A. Webster

    1996-01-01

    It was the purpose of the project described here to carry out careful and detailed investigations of petroleum and coal asphaltene transport through model porous systems under a broad range of temperature conditions. The experimental studies were to be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms and a more accurate concept of the asphaltene structure. The following discussion describes some of our accomplishments.

  7. Thermodynamics of coal liquid/solid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, G. D.; Lee, Chang-Ha.

    1989-08-01

    Thermodynamic data for many organic systems have been developed for the petroleum industry. This data, however, is limited to the paraffinic compounds while the liquids produced in coal liquefaction are highly aromatic and may contain heteroatoms such as sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen. An effort to generate data bases for these aromatic compounds has been recently made. One of the goals of this work is to expand the data bases so that the properties of coal liquefaction products are accurately determined. This effort has three basic components: pure component physical properties; binary vapor pressure data which enables phase behavior to be calculated for binary and, assuming the interaction of unlike molecules are independent of the presence of a third species, multicomponent systems; and vapor pressures of solid-liquid systems as a function of the solids content. This allows the effect that solids have on the distribution of liquids between phases to be calculated. 20 refs., 3 figs., 55 tabs.

  8. Enzymantic Conversion of Coal to Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Troiano

    2011-01-31

    The work in this project focused on the conversion of bituminous coal to liquid hydrocarbons. The major steps in this process include mechanical pretreatment, chemical pretreatment, and finally solubilization and conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons. Two different types of mechanical pretreatment were considered for the process: hammer mill grinding and jet mill grinding. After research and experimentation, it was decided to use jet mill grinding, which allows for coal to be ground down to particle sizes of 5 {mu}m or less. A Fluid Energy Model 0101 JET-O-MIZER-630 size reduction mill was purchased for this purpose. This machine was completed and final testing was performed on the machine at the Fluid Energy facilities in Telford, PA. The test results from the machine show that it can indeed perform to the required specifications and is able to grind coal down to a mean particle size that is ideal for experimentation. Solubilization and conversion experiments were performed on various pretreated coal samples using 3 different approaches: (1) enzymatic - using extracellular Laccase and Manganese Peroxidase (MnP), (2) chemical - using Ammonium Tartrate and Manganese Peroxidase, and (3) enzymatic - using the live organisms Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Spectral analysis was used to determine how effective each of these methods were in decomposing bituminous coal. After analysis of the results and other considerations, such as cost and environmental impacts, it was determined that the enzymatic approaches, as opposed to the chemical approaches using chelators, were more effective in decomposing coal. The results from the laccase/MnP experiments and Phanerochaete chrysosporium experiments are presented and compared in this final report. Spectra from both enzymatic methods show absorption peaks in the 240nm to 300nm region. These peaks correspond to aromatic intermediates formed when breaking down the coal structure. The peaks then decrease in absorbance over time

  9. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 16, July--September, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, G.L.; Moro, N.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-10-30

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. 28 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Process for converting coal into liquid fuel and metallurgical coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Richard A.; Im, Chang J.; Wright, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method of recovering coal liquids and producing metallurgical coke utilizes low ash, low sulfur coal as a parent for a coal char formed by pyrolysis with a volatile content of less than 8%. The char is briquetted and heated in an inert gas over a prescribed heat history to yield a high strength briquette with less than 2% volatile content.

  11. Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

    1997-09-29

    The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a

  12. Liquid CO2/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasigan, Jose [Electric Power Research Institute, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Goldstein, Harvey [Electric Power Research Institute, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Dooher, John [Electric Power Research Institute, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This study investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO2/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas™ gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration. Liquid CO2 has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal gasification-based power plants. First, the viscosity of liquid CO2 is much lower than water. This means it should take less energy to pump liquid CO2 through a pipe compared to water. This also means that a higher solids concentration can be fed to the gasifier, which should decrease the heat requirement needed to vaporize the slurry. Second, the heat of vaporization of liquid CO2 is about 80% lower than water. This means that less heat from the gasification reactions is needed to vaporize the slurry. This should result in less oxygen needed to achieve a given gasifier temperature. And third, the surface tension of liquid CO2 is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than water, which should result in finer atomization of the liquid CO2 slurry, faster reaction times between the oxygen and coal particles, and better carbon conversion at the same gasifier temperature. EPRI and others have recognized the potential that liquid CO2 has in improving the performance of an IGCC plant and have previously conducted systemslevel analyses to evaluate this concept. These past studies have shown that a significant increase in IGCC performance can be achieved with liquid CO2 over water with certain gasifiers. Although these previous analyses had produced some positive results, they were still based on various assumptions for liquid CO2/coal slurry properties.

  13. Sonic velocities for gases from coal-derived liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodner, A.J.; Jett, O.J.

    1982-10-01

    Accurate predictions of choking velocities for three-phase mixtures are needed to properly size coal-slurry letdown valves. The sonic velocity of the gas phase of the coal slurry must be known to evaluate this choking velocity. A FORTRAN computer program, based on the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state, was developed to predict sonic velocities for both pure and pseudocomponent gaseous mixtures. Predictions of the sonic velocity for methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene deviated 0 to 25% from experimental data. The sonic velocity predictions were also more accurate than those with the reduced-property correlation of Pitzer and Curl. The predicted sonic velocity at 700 K for a mixture of gases from coal-derived liquids at conditions typical of coal-slurry letdown valves ranged from 100 to 330 m/s.

  14. Deashing of coal liquids with ceramic membrane microfiltration and diafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R. [CeraMem Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Removal of mineral matter from liquid hydrocarbons derived from the direct liquefaction of coal is required for product acceptability. Current methods include critical solvent deashing (Rose{sup {reg_sign}} process from Kerr-McGee) and filtration (U.S. Filter leaf filter as used by British Coal). These methods produce ash reject streams containing up to 15% of the liquid hydrocarbon product. Consequently, CeraMem proposed the use of low cost, ceramic crossflow membranes for the filtration of coal liquids bottoms to remove mineral matter and subsequent diafiltration (analogous to cake washing in dead-ended filtration) for the removal of coal liquid from the solids stream. The use of these ceramic crossflow membranes overcomes the limitations of traditional polymeric crossflow membranes by having the ability to operate at elevated temperature and to withstand prolonged exposure to hydrocarbon and solvent media. In addition, CeraMem`s membrane filters are significantly less expensive than competitive ceramic membranes due to their unique construction. With these ceramic membrane filters, it may be possible to reduce the product losses associated with traditional deashing processes at an economically attractive cost. The performance of these ceramic membrane microfilters is discussed.

  15. Erosion of Premium Connection Cross-over Joint in Solid-liquid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yong’an

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a new technique which is used in oil yield to maximize its own production. The pumping of fracturing slurry flow through tubing collar can cause considerable mass loss of inner surface materials. This may pose a significantly potential risk even a well loss. Especially, the erosion phenomenon is particularly serious in the structure of variable diameter. Numerical simulation in this paper was used to get particle impact parameters, and it is combined with jet experiments to find out the main factors of BG-13Cr mass loss. Finally, the equation with experimental data was applied to predict erosion rate of premium connection cross-over joint inner wall.

  16. Liquidity in the foreign exchange market : Measurement, commonality, and risk premiums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancini, Loriano; Ranaldo, Angelo; Wrampelmeyer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first systematic study of liquidity in the foreign exchange market. We find significant variation in liquidity across exchange rates, substantial illiquidity costs, and strong commonality in liquidity across currencies and with equity and bond markets. Analyzing the impact of

  17. Characterization of extracts of coals and coal-derived products by liquid chromatography using optical activity detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbitt, D.R.; Aida, T.; Chen, Y.Y.; Reitsma, B.H.; Rougvie, A.; Smith, B.F.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts from various coals and coal-derived products were studied using liquid chromatography with optical activity detection. The chromatograms show that there are substantial numbers of optically active components in these samples. Since both dextrorotatory and laevorotatory components are present, some mutual cancellation would result if only the bulk optical rotation were measured. The chromatograms are generally rich in structure and contain distinct features which may be good fingerprints for establishing the origins of the coals and monitoring coal processing.

  18. Symbiotic Nuclear—Coal Systems for Production of Liquid Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taczanowski, S.

    The notion of safety is not confined to the technological or non-proliferation aspects. It covers also the elements of energy policy: irrational reactions of societies, emotions, egoistic interests of more or less powerful pressure of economical and external political factors. One should be conscious that the country's privilege of being equipped by the Nature with rich resources of oil or gas is not solely economical, but even more a political one. Simultaneously, the gradual depletion of world hydrocarbons that draws behind irrevocable price increase has to be expected within the time scale of exploitation of power plants (now amounted to ~60 years). Therefore consequences of energy policy last much longer than the perspectives the political or economical decision makers are planning and acting within and the public is expecting successes and finally evaluating them. The world oil and gas resources are geopolitically very non-uniformly distributed, in contrast to coal and uranium. Since the level of energy self-sufficiency of the EU is highest for coal, the old idea of synfuels production from coal is recalled. Yet, in view of limits to the CO2 emissions in the EU another method has to be used here than the conventional coal liquefaction just applied in China. Simultaneously, an interesting evolution of energy prices was be observed, namely an increase in that of motor fuels in contrast to that of electricity remaining well stable. This fact suggests that the use of electricity (mainly the off-peak load), generated without emissions of CO2 for production of liquid fuels can prove reasonable. Thus, the essence of the presented idea of coal-nuclear symbiosis lies in the supply of energy in the form of H2, necessary for this process, from a nuclear reactor. Particularly, in the present option H2 is obtained by electrolytic water splitting supplying also O2 as a precious by-product in well mature and commercially available already since decades, Light Water Reactors

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-09-29

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting

  1. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we will study a novel process concept, i.e., the use of ceramic membrane reactors in upgrading of coal model compounds and coal derived liquids. In general terms, the USC research team is responsible for constructing and operating the membrane reactor apparatus and for testing various inorganic membranes for the upgrading of coal derived asphaltenes and coal model compounds. The USC effort will involve the principal investigator of this project and two graduate research assistants. The ALCOA team is responsible for the preparation of the inorganic membranes, for construction and testing of the ceramic membrane modules, and for measurement of their transport properties. The ALCOA research effort will involve Dr. Paul K. T. Liu, who is the project manager of the ALCOA research team, an engineer and a technician. UNOCAL's contribution will be limited to overall technical assistance in catalyst preparation and the operation of the laboratory upgrading membrane reactor and for analytical back-up and expertise in oil analysis and materials characterization. UNOCAL is a no-cost contractor but will be involved in all aspects of the project, as deemed appropriate.

  2. The impact of liquidity and size premium on equity price formation in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minović Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to examine the impact of an overall market factor, the factor related to the firm size, the factor related to the ratio of book to market value of companies, and the factor of liquidity risk on expected asset returns in the Serbian market. For this market we estimated different factor models: Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM by Sharpe, 1964, Fama-French (FF model (1992, 1993, Liquidity-augmented CAPM (LCAPM by Liu (2006, and combination LCAPM with FF factors. We used daily data for the period from 2005 to 2009. Using a demanding methodology and complex dataset, we found that liquidity and firm size had a significant impact on equity price formation in Serbia. On the other hand, our results suggest that the factor related to the ratio of book to market value of companies does not have an important role in asset pricing in Serbia. We found that Liu’s two factor LCAPM model performs better in explaining stock returns than the standard CAPM and the Fama-French three factor model. Additionally, Liu’s LCAPM may indeed be a good tool for realistic assessment of the expected asset returns. The combination of the Fama-French model and the LCAPM could improve the understanding of equilibrium in the Serbian equity market. Even though previous papers have mostly dealt with examining different factor models of developed or emerging markets worldwide, none of them has tested factor models on the countries of former Yugoslavia. This paper is the first to test the FF model and LCAPM with FF factors in the case of Serbia and the area of ex-Yugoslavia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179015: Challenges and Prospects of Structural Changes in Serbia: Strategic Directions for Economic Development and Harmonization With EU Requirements

  3. Thermodynamics of coal liquid/solid systems: Quarterly progress report, January 16, 1987--April 16, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, G. D.

    1989-05-01

    The effluent streams of coal liquefaction processes often contain both liquids and solids (THF or pyridine insolubles). The solids appear to affect the physical properties of these liquids due to the adsorption of the heavy liquid components on the coal surface. The design of liquefaction reactors and separation units is dependent to a great extent on the thermodynamics of these multicomponent, multiphase mixtures. We are currently investigating the effect of coal solids on the vapor pressure of multicomponent systems containing coal solids. The results obtained thus far indicate a dramatic effect of the coal solids on vapor pressure of coal liquids. This effect is attributed to the adsorption of heavier liquid components on the coal surface, as these heavies are preferentially absorbed, leaving a lighter liquid solution with a higher vapor pressure. The adsorption of heavy components results in sharper and easier separation of the lighter unadsorbed liquid. Chemical reactions are also affected by the adsorption of the heavier components as they become unavoidable for conversion to lighter compounds. This work aims to quantify the effect of this adsorption through a methodical study of the properties of both heavy liquid model compounds and actual coal liquids with and without coal solids. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Refining effect of the liquid phase (in coal hydrogenation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1942-11-07

    Experiments were run in a 10-liter oven at 600 atm. on various starting materials to determine what percentage of the original content of nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur impurities were removed during liquid-phase processing. It was determined that the liquid phase removed most of these impurities, with nitrogen being affected to a lesser extent than the other two. In general, the raw materials which could most easily be hydrogenated had the greatest percentage of impurities removed. Also, in general, the more drastic the processing, the more effective the impurity-removal, especially in the case of nitrogen. Removal of oxygen as oxides of carbon happened in the case of brown coal to about twice the extent that it did in the case of bituminous coal, and happened to an even greater extent in the case of high-temperature tar. In the case of sulfur, the following percentages were removed in the following processes: 79% in processing low-temperature-carbonization tar to heavy oil, 75% to 87% in processing high-temperature-carbonization tar to heavy oil, 82% to 92% in processing high-temperature-carbonization tar to gasoline and middle oil, 80% to 97% in processing bituminous coal to gasoline and middle oil, and 86% to 89% in processing brown coal to gasoline and middle oil. In the case of oxygen, the corresponding figures (in the same order) were 73%, 36% to 70%, 44% to 70%, 86% to 91%, and 89% to 92%. In the case of nitrogen, they were 56%, 38% to 51%, 53% to 73%, 60% to 67%, and 64% to 79%. 1 table.

  5. Refining and end use study of coal liquids II - linear programming analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, C.; Tam, S.

    1995-12-31

    A DOE-funded study is underway to determine the optimum refinery processing schemes for producing transportation fuels that will meet CAAA regulations from direct and indirect coal liquids. The study consists of three major parts: pilot plant testing of critical upgrading processes, linear programming analysis of different processing schemes, and engine emission testing of final products. Currently, fractions of a direct coal liquid produced form bituminous coal are being tested in sequence of pilot plant upgrading processes. This work is discussed in a separate paper. The linear programming model, which is the subject of this paper, has been completed for the petroleum refinery and is being modified to handle coal liquids based on the pilot plant test results. Preliminary coal liquid evaluation studies indicate that, if a refinery expansion scenario is adopted, then the marginal value of the coal liquid (over the base petroleum crude) is $3-4/bbl.

  6. Thermodynamics of coal liquid/solid systems: Progress report, September 16, 1988--January 16, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, G. D. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1989-03-01

    The effluent streams of coal liquefaction processes often contain both liquids and solids (THF or pyridine insolubles). The solids appear to affect the physical properties of these liquids due to the adsorption of the heavy liquid components on the coal surface. The design of liquefaction reactors and separation units is dependent to a great extent on the thermodynamics of these multicomponent, multiphase mixtures. Thermodynamic data for many organic systems have been developed for the petroleum industry. This data, however, is limited to the paraffinic compounds, while the liquids produced in coal liquefaction are highly aromatic and may contain heteroatoms such as sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen. One of the goals of this work is to expand the data bases so that the properties of coal liquefaction products are accurately determined. We are currently investigating the effect of coal solids on the vapor pressure of multicomponent systems containing coal solids. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Phase-equilibrium properties of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, January-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1981-07-01

    On July 1, 1980, work was initiated on a program for experimental vapor liquid equilibrium measurements on coal derived liquids. During the last six months design of the equilibrium flash vaporization system was completed and all major equipment was delivered. Most of the construction work of the system was also completed. Construction and evaluation of the equipment should be completed by the end of the summer. Work was also started on the gas-liquid chromatography analytical procedures. Coal derived liquids are a new and vital class of industrial compounds for which there are limited thermodynamic data. The principal investigators have conducted a program in the measurement and correlation of the enthalpy of coal derived liquids. Programs have also been undertaken to measure volumetric properties and K values of light gas-model compound systems and to measure dew points, vapor pressures and hydrogen solubilities in model compound and coal derived liquid systems. The objective of the present study is to measure equilibrium K values of coal derived liquids and model compounds representative of coal liquids, and to use the results in the development of engineering correlations. The program is divided into three major areas: (1) design, construction, and evaluation of an equilibrium flash vaporization system for temperatures between 70 and 700/sup 0/F, at pressures up to 2000 psia; (2) measurements on samples of both coal derived liquids and mixtures of model compounds; and (3) preparation of engineering correlations for the measured K values and vapor liquid equilibria.

  8. Heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lu; Chengyun, Xin; Xinyu, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been working as an important medium in fire extinguishing and prevention, due to its efficiency in oxygen exclusion and heat removal. Such a technique is especially crucial for coal industry in China. We built a tunnel model with a temperature monitor system (with 36 thermocouples installed) to experimentally study heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in non-homogeneous coal porous media (CPM), and expected to optimize parameters of liquid nitrogen injection in engineering applications. Results indicate that injection location and amount of liquid nitrogen, together with air leakage, significantly affect temperature distribution in CPM, and non-equilibrium heat inside and outside of coal particles. The injection position of liquid nitrogen determines locations of the lowest CPM temperature and liquid nitrogen residual. In the deeper coal bed, coal particles take longer time to reach thermal equilibrium between their surface and inside. Air leakage accelerates temperature increase at the bottom of the coal bed, which is a major reason leading to fire prevention inefficiency. Measurement fluctuation of CPM temperature may be caused by incomplete contact of coal particles with liquid nitrogen flowing in the coal bed. Moreover, the secondary temperature drop (STD) happens and grows with the more injection of liquid nitrogen, and the STD phenomenon is explained through temperature distributions at different locations.

  9. Thermodynamic and rheological properties of solid-liquid systems in coal processing. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1995-06-30

    The work on this project was initiated on September 1, 1991. The project consisted of two different tasks: (1) Development of a model to compute viscosities of coal derived liquids, and (2) Investigate new models for estimation of thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid compounds of the type that exist in coal, or are encountered during coal processing. As for task 1, a model for viscosity computation of coal model compound liquids and coal derived liquids has been developed. The detailed model is presented in this report. Two papers, the first describing the pure liquid model and the second one discussing the application to coal derived liquids, are expected to be published in Energy & Fuels shortly. Marginal progress is reported on task 2. Literature review for this work included compilation of a number of data sets, critical investigation of data measurement techniques available in the literature, investigation of models for liquid and solid phase thermodynamic computations. During the preliminary stages it was discovered that for development of a liquid or solid state equation of state, accurate predictive models for a number of saturation properties, such as, liquid and solid vapor pressures, saturated liquid and solid volumes, heat capacities of liquids and solids at saturation, etc. Most the remaining time on this task was spent in developing predictive correlations for vapor pressures and saturated liquid volumes of organic liquids in general and coal model liquids in particular. All these developments are discussed in this report. Some recommendations for future direction of research in this area are also listed.

  10. Search for a solvent using the UNIFAC method for separation of coal tar distillate by liquid-liquid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egashira, R.; Watanabe, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Firstly, the functional groups composing the solvent predicted to be appropriate for the separation of coal tar distillate were selected. Secondly, liquid-liquid equilibria between coal tar distillates and solvents containing fictitious components consisting of the above selected functional groups were estimated by UNIFAC to determine the effects of these groups on the distribution coefficients. Finally, according to these results, solvents containing real components were selected and compared. These results provide useful information for the selection of appropriate extracting solvents.

  11. Development of sustainable coal to liquid processes: Minimising process CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kauchali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional coal-to-liquid (CTL plants are synonymous with the production of carbon dioxide. Coal may be gasified in the presence of steam and oxygen to produce gas comprising carbon dioxide (CO2, carbon monoxide (CO, methane (CH4, hydrogen (H2 and steam (H2O. The gases can be reacted to a myriad of chemicals and fuels via the Fischer-Tropsch (FT reaction. However, excess carbon dioxide is generated via the Water-Gas-Shift reaction during preparation of CO:H2 ratios for FT. Here, a process development is represented on a CHO phase diagram, where unique regions are identified for autothermal operations for coal conversion. Considerations are given to develop idealised processes for the production of liquid chemicals from coal which emit minimal process CO2, require minimal energy input and do not require steam. This is achieved by co-feeding coal with methane and identifying endothermic-exothermic process pairs for methane-coal dry reforming. Furthermore, it is shown that a preferred method to produce liquid fuels from coal is by first creating dimethyl ether (DME as an intermediate, followed by the dehydration of DME to liquid fuels (gasoline range. For this route, via DME, the CO2 emission was found to be four times less than idealised CTL processes. Keywords: Gasification, Reforming, Coal to liquid, Carbon dioxide, Autothermal, Fischer tropsch

  12. Measurement and correlation of the enthalpy of coal-derived liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1982-03-01

    An apparatus termed the Freon 11 reference fluid boil-off calorimeter described in previous publication is illustrated, and enthalpy data obtained with the calorimeter for numerous coal-derived liquid samples are tabulated. Enthalpy data for certain model compounds representative of the coal-derived liquids are presented for comparison. Association of heteroatomic compounds in coal-derived liquids appeared to cause positive errors in the enthalpy data. A method of determining the degree of association from the slope of the molecular weight versus the concentration curve appears to be applicable to the correction of the enthalpy data. 17 refrerences. (BLM)

  13. Liquid column fractionation: a method of solvent fractionation of coal liquefaction and petroleum products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Wooton, D.L.

    1979-07-01

    A method is described for the solvent fractionation of coal liquefaction and petroleum products which is both reproducible and considerably more rapid than many conventional solvent fractionation techniques. This method involves sequential elution of a sample injected onto an inert liquid chromatographic column. Applications of this method to coal liquefaction and petroleum products are given.

  14. Calculating analysis of firing different composition artificial coal liquid fuels (ACLF) in the cyclone primary furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsepenok, A. [Novosibirsk State Technological Univ. (Russian Federation); Joint Stock company ' ' ZiO-COTES' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikov, Yu. [Novosibirsk State Technological Univ. (Russian Federation); Serant, F. [Joint Stock company ' ' ZiO-COTES' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    This chapter describes the preparation technologies, results of computer simulation of combustion processes in a cyclone primary furnace during firing of artificial coal liquid fuels prepared from different coal grades and results of live testing. As a result the values of unburned carbon, NO{sub x} emissions and other concentrations in the outlet section primary furnace were estimated.

  15. Prospects for production of synthetic liquid fuel from low-grade coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevyrev, Sergei; Bogomolov, Aleksandr; Alekssev, Maksim

    2015-01-01

    In the paper, we compare the energy costs of steam and steam-oxygen gasification technologies for production of synthetic liquid fuel. Results of mathematic simulation and experimental studies on gasification of low-grade coal are presented.

  16. Hydrogen bonding in asphaltenes and coal liquids. Quarterly report, 1 February-30 April 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, N. C.; Jones, L.; Yaggi, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the nature and strength of hydrogen bonding and other molecular interactions in coal liquids and their fractions. Determinations are made of the molecular interactions involving the preasphaltene, asphaltent and oil, together with their separated fractions, obtained from coal liquids after hydroprocessing under different processing conditions and accelerated aging. NMR, IR, GC/MS, calorimetric, GPC, ESR, viscosity methods are used to determine structural changes caused by upgrading and aging of coal liquids. The upgraded coal liquids, derived from catalytic hydroprocessing of a 30 to 70 weight percent blend of solid solvent refined coal product (SRC-I) with liquid solvent-refined coal product (SRC-II) were analyzed as a function of contact time and temperature, and the observed variations of structural parameters were correlated with the physical properties of the liquid products. The oxidative degradation of a SRC-II middle distillate, which is an oil, free of asphaltenes and benzene-insolubles, was investigated to determine the molecular types of compounds responsible for the viscosity change and postulate mechanisms. Since the middle distillate is relatively stable to oxidative degradation, copper shavings were added to accelerate the process. Results and discussion are presented in detail.

  17. The Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor: Energy Cheaper Than Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Cavan

    2011-11-01

    This century, we face significant environmental challenges. Our demand for limited natural resources is rapidly increasing and much of humanity is concerned about the consequences. Our unsustainably growing population drives these challenges, and humanely stabilizing it would alleviate these pressures. Demographic data clearly shows that prosperity stabilizes population and it also shows that prosperity critically requires energy. In spite of the pressing and demonstrable nature of these challenges however, politically there is no international consensus on global energy policy. Developing nations simply will not accept a policy that will hamper their economic growth. Yet, we do have a solution to these challenges, an idea conceived and experimentally tested by Alvin Weinberg at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor. Presently, various laboratories and start-up companies, including the Chinese Academy of Sciences have begun efforts to commercialize the technology. By delivering the promise of inexpensive energy it will be in the economic interest of the developing nations to use this carbon-free energy source. By delivering superior performance on longstanding public concerns about nuclear energy, it will be technologically and politically feasible for developing nations to stabilize their population with the bounty of energy cheaper than coal.

  18. Thermal processing of Khoot coal and characterization of obtained solid and liquid products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Batbileg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available On 21st January 2015, the abstract of this paper was replaced with the correct abstract.The coal of Khoot deposit have been investigated and determined the technical characteristics, elemental and petrographical maceral compositions. On the basis of proximate, ultimate, petrographic and IR analysis results have been confirmed that the Khoot coal is a sub-bituminous coal. The hard residue after pyrolysis have been activated by heated water steam and determined the iodine and methylene blue adsorption of initial coal and activated carbon samples from pyrolysis hard residue. The porosity structure of initial coal, activated carbon of pyrolysis hard residue and hard residue after thermolysis (thermal dissolution have been determined by SEM analysis. The liquid tar product of thermolysis of Khoot coal was investigated by FTIR, 13C and 1H NMR spectrometric analysis. The results of thermolysis of Khoot coal in tetralin with constant mass ratio between coal and tetralin (1:1.8 at 450°C show that 60.8% of liquid product can be obtained after thermolysis of the coal organic mass.DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.326 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p66-72

  19. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  20. Shape-selective catalysis for synthesis of high-value chemicals from aromatics in coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Liquids derived from coals contain numerous aromatic compounds. Many of the one- to four-ring aromatic and polar compounds can be converted into valuable chemicals. Economic analysis of the viability of liquefaction (and related conversion processes) may well produce a different result if some of the aromatics and phenolics are used for making high-value chemicals and some of the liquids for making high-quality fuels such as thermally stable aviation fuels. To make effective use of aromatics in coal liquids, we are studying shape-selective catalytic conversion of multi-ring compounds. The products of such reactions are intermediates for making value-added chemicals, monomers of advanced polymer materials, or components of advanced jet fuels. Two broad strategic approaches can be used for making chemicals and materials from coals. The first is the indirect approach: conversion of coals to liquids, followed by transformation of compounds in the liquids into value-added products. The second is direct conversion of coals to materials and chemicals. Both approaches are being explored in this laboratory. In this paper, we will give an account of our recent work on (1) shape-selective catalysis which demonstrates that high-value chemicals can be obtained from aromatic compounds by catalytic conversion over certain zeolites; and (2) catalytic graphitization of anthracites, which reveals that using some metal compounds promotes graphitization at lower temperatures and may lead to a more efficient process for making graphites from coals.

  1. HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

    2010-10-01

    As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal

  2. Separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, John M.

    1979-06-26

    Slurryform products of coal liquefaction are treated with caustic soda in presence of H.sub.2 O in an inline static mixer and then the treated product is separated into a solids fraction and liquid fractions, including liquid hydrocarbons, by gravity settling preferably effected in a multiplate settling separator with a plurality of settling spacings.

  3. Phase-equilibrium properties of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, January-June 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1982-07-01

    On July 1, 1980, work was initiated on a program for experimental vapor liquid equilibrium measurements on coal-derived liquids. During the last six months, data for the binary system water-ethanol were obtained at 150/sup 0/C, 200/sup 0/C, and 250/sup 0/C. At 150/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/C or low ethanol concentrations, there was substantial agreement between our data and data in the literature. At 250/sup 0/C or ethanol concentrations greater than 0.4 mole fraction, there is disagreement, which is probably due to uncertainties in the literature data. Work was begun on the m-cresol-quinoline binary system, which is a system that should be of significance in coal-derived liquid studies. Work is continuing on characterizing coal-derived liquid boiling point fractions.

  4. Phase equilibrium properties of coal derived liquids. Technical progress report, July-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to measure equilibrium K values of coal derived liquids and model compounds representative of coal liquids, and to use the results in the development of engineering correlations. The program is divided into three major areas: (1) Design, construction, and evaluation of an equilibrium flash vaporization system for temperatures between 70 and 700/sup 0/F, at pressures up to 2000 psia. (2) Measurements on samples of both coal derived liquids and mixtures of model compounds. (3) Preparation of engineering correlations for the measured K values and vapor liquid equilibria. On July 1, 1980, work was initiated on a program for experimental vapor liquid equilibrium measurements on coal derived liquids. During the last six months calibration of the pressure and temperature measuring equipment was completed. The system was tested for a single component system by reproducing the vapor pressure curve for pure water. Work was started on the water-ethanol binary system and one data point was obtained. These components were selected because reliable data for these components are available for comparison.

  5. Variable-Rate Premiums

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — These interest rates are used to value vested benefits for variable rate premium purposes as described in PBGC's regulation on Premium Rates (29 CFR Part 4006) and...

  6. Decreasing Relative Risk Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    We consider the risk premium demanded by a decision maker with wealth x in order to be indifferent between obtaining a new level of wealth y1 with certainty, or to participate in a lottery which either results in unchanged present wealth or a level of wealth y2 > y1. We define the relative risk...... premium as the quotient between the risk premium and the increase in wealth y1–x which the decision maker puts on the line by choosing the lottery in place of receiving y1 with certainty. We study preferences such that the relative risk premium is a decreasing function of present wealth, and we determine...... relative risk premium in the small implies decreasing relative risk premium in the large, and decreasing relative risk premium everywhere implies risk aversion. We finally show that preferences with decreasing relative risk premium may be equivalently expressed in terms of certain preferences on risky...

  7. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

  8. LIQUID COAL CHARACTERISTIC ANALYSIS WITH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRA RED (FTIR AND DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETER (DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ATUS BUKU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the value of compounds contained in liquid coal by using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC. FTIR was used to analyse the components contained in liquid coal, while the DSC is done to observe the heat reaction to the environment. Based on the Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR test results it is shown that the compound contained in the liquid Coal consisting of alkanes, alkenes and alkyne. These compounds are similar compounds. The alkanes, alkenes and alkynes compounds undergo complete combustion reaction with oxygen and would produce CO2 and water vapour [H2O (g]. If incomplete combustion occurs, the reaction proceeds in the form of Carbon Monoxide CO gas or solid carbon andH2O. Combustion reaction that occurs in all these three compounds also produces a number of considerable energy. And if it has higher value of Carbon then the boiling point would be higher. From the Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC test results obtained some of the factors that affect the reaction speed, which are the temperature, the reaction mixture composition, and pressure. Temperature has a profound influence in coal liquefaction, because if liquid coal heated with high pressure, the carbon chain would break down into smaller chains consisting of aromatic chain, hydro-aromatic, or aliphatic. This then triggers a reaction between oil formation and polymerization reactions to form solids (char.

  9. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, November 1982-January 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1983-02-22

    The objective of this research is to measure the enthalpy for representative coal-derived liquids and model compounds over the pressure and temperature regions most likely to be encountered in both liquefaction and processing systems, and to prepare from the data an enthalpy correlation suitable for process design calculations. The correlational effort this past quarter on the enthalpy of coal-derived syncrudes and model compounds has emphasized the experimental determination of a correlating factor for association in coal liquids. As in previous work, the degree of association is to be related to cryoscopic molecular weight determinations on the coal liquids. To this end, work on and an evaluationof a cryoscopic molecular weight apparatus was completed this quarter. Molecular weights of coal liquids determined by the standard Beckman freezing point depression apparatus were consistently low (5 to 10%). After modifications of the apparatus, it was tested with the following compounds: hexane, dodecane, m-xylene and naphthalene. Benzene was the solvent used. However, the molecular weight measurements were again consistently lower than the true values, and in many cases the experimental error was greater than that of the Beckman apparatus.

  10. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The presence of heteroatom and aromatic compounds in liquids obtained from coal liquefaction processes requires expensive hydrogenation treatment to derive an acceptable liquid fuel. This project will develop a simple biological process for removing N, O and S and reducing the aromaticity of coal liquids. Microorganisms, employing biocatalysts, are known to degrade aromatic heteroatom compounds in nature to NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup =} and CO{sub 2}. Preliminary experiments in the ERI laboratories to determine the feasibility of biological removal of N, O and S from coal and shale oil liquids have shown up to 20 percent nitrogen removal, 40 percent sulfur removal and 100 percent oxygen removal in a simple one stage incubation. A biological process for upgrading of coal liquids would offer significant advantages, such as operation at ordinary temperature and pressure with better energy efficiency. Of greater importance is the fact that microorganisms do not require an external supply of hydrogen for heteroatom removal, obtaining the required hydrogen from water. Furthermore, the biocatalysts are continuously regenerated by growth on the heteroatom compounds. Ring structures are degraded as the heteroatoms are removed. The heteroatoms are in an innocuous form, such as NH{sub 3}, S0{sub 4}{sup =}, C0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}0. Therefore, there is significant potential for the development of an economical biological process for upgrading coal liquids. This project will screen known bacteria and develop isolates for N, O and S removal and aromaticity reduction. The performance of the best of these cultures will be optimized for complete heteroatom removal in a single step. Continuous reactor experiments will be conducted with the optimal cultures to determine reaction kinetics and reactor design. The design and economics of this process, including product recovery, will be projected to define economic feasibility and high cost areas.

  11. Prospects for production of synthetic liquid fuel from low-grade coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevyrev Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we compare the energy costs of steam and steam-oxygen gasification technologies for production of synthetic liquid fuel. Results of mathematic simulation and experimental studies on gasification of low-grade coal are presented.

  12. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, October-December 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1985-01-31

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the second quarter efforts were limited to ordering and installing equipment to improve the operability of the calorimeter and phase behavior system. The program is now up to full staffing levels and data collection will begin this next quarter. The objectives of this program are to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of a selected ternary model compound system, representative of interactions present in coal derived liquids. Measurements will be made in a Freon 11 reference fluid boil off calorimeter, and an equilibrium flash vaporization apparatus. These experimental systems have already been developed. Previous studies have indicated that existing data and correlations developed for petroleum fluids are not applicable to coal derived liquids. This is due to the presence of significant concentrations of polar associating heteroatomics in the predominantly aromatic coal liquids. Thus, the ternary system will include an aromatic, a basic nitrogen compound, and a cresol. It is presently planned to study the tetralin/quinoline/m-cresol ternary mixture. Measurements will be made over a wide range of temperature (200 to 700/sup 0/C) and pressure (20 to 1500 psia), for the three pure compounds.

  13. Permeability evolution model and numerical analysis of coupled coal deformation, failure and liquid nitrogen cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui ZHANG

    Full Text Available How to quantitatively evaluate the permeability change of coalbed subjected to liquid nitrogen cooling is a key issue of enhanced-permeability technology of coalbed. To analyze the evolution process of permeability of coupled coal deformation, failure and liquid introgen cooling, the coal is supposed as elastic, brittle and plastic material. Its deformation process includes elastic deformation stage, brittle strength degradation stage and residual plastic flow stage. Combined with strength degradation index, dilatancy index of the element and Mohr-Column strength criterion, the element scale constitutive model with the effects of confining pressure on peak-post mechanical behaviors is built. Based on the deformation process of coal rock, there exist two stages of permeability evolution of the element including decrease of permeability due to elastic contraction and increase due to coal rock element's failure. The relationships between the permeability and elastic deformation, shear failure and tension failure for coal are studied. The permeability will be influenced by the change of pore space due to elastic contraction or tension of element. Conjugate shear zones appear during the shear failure of the element, in which the flow follows so-called cubic law between smooth parallel plates. The calculation formulas of the permeability and the aperture of the fractures are given out based on the volumetric strain. When tension failure criterion is satisfied with the rock element fails and two orthogonal fractures appear. The calculation formulas of the permeability and the width of the fractures are given out based on the volumetric strain. Further, combined with the thermal conduction theory the permeability evolution model of coupled coal deformation, failure and liquid nitrogen cooling is presented. Then Fish function method in FLAC is employed to perform the model. The permeability's evolution process for coal bed cryogenically stimulated

  14. Decreasing relative risk premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    such that the corresponding relative risk premium is a decreasing function of present wealth, and we determine the set of associated utility functions. We find a new characterization of risk vulnerability and determine a large set of utility functions, closed under summation and composition, which are both risk vulnerable...... and have decreasing relative risk premium. We finally introduce the notion of partial risk neutral preferences on binary lotteries and show that partial risk neutrality is equivalent to preferences with decreasing relative risk premium...

  15. A numerical model for the liquid flow in a Sputnik coal distributor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.Y.; Dong, K.; Chu, K.W.; Yu, A.B.; Vince, A.; Brake, I. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School for Material Science and Engineering

    2009-01-15

    Sputnik coal distributors are widely applied in coal separation plants and biased outputs are frequently encountered. The present paper aims to develop a numerical model for simulating the flow of the carrier liquid within a distributor chamber. The model uses simple homogeneous multi-phase flow model and performs well in terms of successfully predicting the important phenomena within the distributor chamber, such as the strong vortex in the upper chamber and channeling through the slots on the orifice plate, as observed experimentally. The model provides necessary information for particle flow modeling and offers a useful tool to trouble-shooting of operations and optimization of design for such type of devices.

  16. Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

  17. Refining and end use study of coal liquids I - pilot plant studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Office of Fossil Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center is examining the ways in which coal liquids may best be integrated into the refinery of the 2000-2015 time frame and what performance and emission properties will prevail among the slate of fuels produced. The study consists of a Basic Program administered by Bechtel Group, Inc. to build a linear programming refinery model and provide processing and fuel properties data through subcontractors Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and M.W. Kellogg Company. The model will be used in an Option 1 to devise a slate of test fuels meeting advanced specifications, which will be produced and tested for physical ASTM-type properties, engine performance, and vehicle emissions. Three coal liquids will be included: a direct liquid from bituminous coal, another from subbituminous, and a Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction product. This paper reports the work to date on fractions of the first direct liquid including naphtha hydrotreating, heavy distillate hydrotreating, FCC of the heavy distillate hydrotreater products. Also reported are the first stages of work on the indirect liquefaction wax including feed preparation and FCC tests of blends with petroleum FCC feed.

  18. Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Gary H.; Knell, Everett W.; Shaw, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yue G.

    1981-04-21

    In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

  19. Technogenic effect of liquidation of coal mines on earth’s entrails: hydrogeochemical aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, I. A.; Zinkov, A. V.; Chudaev, O. V.; Vetoshkina, A. V.; Holodilov, I. I.

    2017-10-01

    The authors of the paper have established the geochemical features of the composition of underground waters and regularities of their formation in the areas of the liquidated coal mines of Russia and Ukraine. It is shown that the mine flood resulted in the formation of technogenic waters which geochemical specificity originates in the feeding field and is transformed in the direction of the filtration flow. It depends on the geological structure of sedimentary basins and the presence in the coal and supra-coal beds of the marine, salt-bearing and freshwater groups of geological formations. The water types are distinguished characterizing the conditions and processes of their formation that may be the regional markers in the hydrochemical and geological constructions. The technogenic waters influenced the safety of the underground waters, sources of water supply of the regions, and surface water channels. The pollutions are of local character in space.

  20. Refining and end use study of coal liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, G.

    1998-05-01

    A conceptual design and ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation model was developed for a Battelle biomass-based gasification, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefaction and combined-cycle power plant. This model was developed in a similar manner to those coal liquefaction models that were developed under DOE contract DE-AC22-91PC90027. As such, this process flowsheet simulation model was designed to be a research guidance tool and not a detailed process design tool. However, it does contain some process design features, such as sizing the F-T synthesis reactors. This model was designed only to predict the effects of various process and operating changes on the overall plant heat and material balances, utilities, capital and operating costs.

  1. COAL CLEANING VIA LIQUID-FLUIDIZED CLASSIFICAITON (LFBC) WITH SELECTIVE SOLVENT SWELLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Calo

    2000-12-01

    The concept of coal beneficiation due to particle segregation in water-fluidized beds, and its improvement via selective solvent-swelling of organic material-rich coal particles, was investigated in this study. Particle size distributions and their behavior were determined using image analysis techniques, and beneficiation effects were explored via measurements of the ash content of segregated particle samples collected from different height locations in a 5 cm diameter liquid-fluidized bed column (LFBC). Both acetone and phenol were found to be effective swelling agents for both Kentucky No.9 and Illinois No.6 coals, considerably increasing mean particle diameters, and shifting particle size distributions to larger sizes. Acetone was a somewhat more effective swelling solvent than phenol. The use of phenol was investigated, however, to demonstrate that low cost, waste solvents can be effective as well. For unswollen coal particles, the trend of increasing particle size from top to bottom in the LFBC was observed in all cases. Since the organic matter in the coal tends to concentrate in the smaller particles, the larger particles are typically denser. Consequently, the LFBC naturally tends to separate coal particles according to mineral matter content, both due to density and size. The data for small (40-100 {micro}m), solvent-swollen particles clearly showed improved beneficiation with respect to segregation in the water-fluidized bed than was achieved with the corresponding unswollen particles. This size range is quite similar to that used in pulverized coal combustion. The original process concept was amply demonstrated in this project. Additional work remains to be done, however, in order to develop this concept into a full-scale process.

  2. Composition, morphology, properties of coal fly ash microspheres and their application for conditioning liquid radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anshits, N.N. [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, SB RAS (ICCT SB RAS), Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: anshits@icct.ru; Salanov, A.N.; Vereshchagina, T.A.; Kruchek, D.M.; Bajukov, O.A.; Tretyakov, A.A.; Revenko, Yu.A.; Anshits, A.G

    2006-07-01

    Using methods of the Moessbauer spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and thermodynamic analysis of phase formation in silicate multi-component melts, the detailed study of composition, morphology, and properties of fly ash microspheres resulting from combustion of three coals (Irsha-Borodinskii, Kuznetskii and Ekibastuzskii) was carried out. About 60 microspherical products with an iron content of 2-94 wt.% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were obtained. The ranges of microsphere composition, suitable for liquid radioactive waste solidification in the forms of iron phosphate (36-94 wt.% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and aluminosilicate (2-20 wt.% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) ceramics were determined. The possibility of producing porous materials and specific microspherical sorbents, based on coal fly ash cenospheres and their application for mobilisation of liquid radioactive waste solidification was demonstrated. (author)

  3. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, July-September 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1984-10-30

    Work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. Calorimetric measurements were made on pure quinoline. These measurements extended the range of previous measurements which had been made on quinoline, and improved the accuracy of previously measured results in the vapor phase when the quinoline sample used was believed to contain considerable quantities of water. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, February 1983-April 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1983-05-31

    This quarter's work has concentrated on two primary areas. The first was the completion of experimental measurements of the associated factor. The second area was a look at current equation of state application. The work has progressed smoothly so far and should in future emphasize the computational work. The significant systems looked at this quarter were the C/sub 2/-C/sub 6/ alcohols, cresol, quinoline, and cresol-quinoline mixtures. The alcohols and cresols are important because the hydroxyl hydrogen bonding which is believed to be the primary association mechanism in coal liquids. Quinoline is significant because it is an excellent model for nitrogen containing constituents of coal liquids. The cresol-quinoline system, which was measured for range of system compositions, was studied because enthalpy data for a similar range of compositions was available. The results for most of these systems were reasonable and make important additions to previous data. The results for the quinoline-cresol mixture systems were curious and very different from anything previous to these measurements. The causes of these results are currently not well understood. Clearly they are due to complex interaction phenomena occurring in these systems. Since this behavior is not generally seen in complex mixtures, it is felt that the behavior is due to the fact that the cresol-quinoline system is a simple binary system which allows complex composition dependent solute-solute-solvent interactions to occur. This effect would also probably occur in ternary, quartenary, and maybe even higher systems. This behavior would tend to washout in coal liquids which have hundreds of components. As a result, it is felt that pure component systems are more valid models for coal liquid associations and that binary, etc., systems are too great a complexity to be currently understood.

  5. Bioconversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, M. K.; Worden, R. M.; Grethlein, A.

    1994-07-01

    The overall objective of the project is to develop an integrated two-stage fermentation process for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to a mixture of alcohols. This is achieved in two steps. In the first step, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum converts carbon monoxide (CO) to butyric and acetic acids. Subsequent fermentation of the acids by Clostridium acetobutylicum leads to the production of butanol and ethanol. The tasks for this quarter were: development/isolation of superior strains for fermentation of syngas; evaluation of bioreactor configuration for improved mass transfer of syngas; recovery of carbon and electrons from H2-CO2; initiation of pervaporation for recovery of solvents; and selection of solid support material for trickle-bed fermentation. Technical progress included the following: butyrate production was enhanced during H2/CO2 (50/50) batch fermentation; isolation of CO-utilizing anaerobic strains is in progress; pressure (15 psig) fermentation was evaluated as a means of increasing CO availability; polyurethane foam packing material was selected for trickle bed solid support; cell recycle fermentation on syngas operated for 3 months. Acetate was the primary product at pH 6.8; trickle bed and gas lift fermentor designs were modified after initial water testing; and pervaporation system was constructed (No alcohol selectivity was shown with the existing membranes during initial start-up).

  6. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, January-March 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1986-04-30

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the seventh quarter, preliminary enthalpy measurements for the 5/6:1/6 m-cresol/tetralin binary mixture have been completed and are included in Appendix A at the end of this report. Vapor liquid equilibria VLE measurements for the m-cresol/tetralin system have been completed for four isotherms; 250, 275, 300, 325/sup 0/C. These results and a summary of progress to date for the VLE apparatus are in the appendix at the end of this report. 10 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, July-September 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1985-10-31

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the fifth quarter, preliminary enthalpy measurements for the 50/50 mole percent m-cresol/tetralin binary mixture have almost been completed and figure illustrating the preliminary results have been included in this report. Vapor liquid equilibria measurements for the m-cresol/quinoline system have been completed for four isotherms. Results have been included in this report. 6 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Investigation of wetting behavior of coal-chars with liquid iron by sessile drop method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Sahajwalla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the sessile drop approach, the wettability of four non-graphitic coal-chars with electrolytic iron and Fe-2 % C-0.01 % S alloy has been determined at 1550°C, in a horizontal tube resistance furnace with an argon atmosphere. The ash concentration in chars ranged between 9.04 to 12.61 wt %, with alumina and silica as predominant ash components. The contact angles of these chars with liquid Fe-2 % C-0.01 % S alloy showed lesser variations with time as compared to corresponding angles with electrolytic iron. While the initial contact angles ranged between 106° and 137°, the contact angles for all coal-chars were quite similar after 60 minutes of contact (105 - 110°. While no well defined correlations could be observed between the initial char structure (Lc values and ash concentration / composition and contact angles in the initial stages of contact, the contact angles over extended periods were significantly affected by the presence of reaction products and impurity deposits in the interfacial region. With coal-chars generally showing a non-wetting behavior with liquid iron, these results are discussed in terms of the transfer of carbon and sulphur by mass transport across the interface, the formation of an enriched interfacial layer containing calcium, sulphur and alumina, reduction of reducible oxides such as silica and iron oxides, and possible transfer of these elements into the liquid iron.

  9. Phase equilibrium properties of coal-derived liquids. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1983-12-22

    An experimental apparatus capable of making accurate high temperature, high pressure vapor-liquid equilibria measurements was designed, constructed, and evaluated. The basic system is a flow equilibrium flash vaporization apparatus similar to those used for petroleum liquids. The final equilibrium cell is a visual cell using a sapphire window with a gold o-ring for sealing. Vapor pressures of pure water were measured from 126 to 307/sup 0/C to test the equipment. The system was next evaluated using the ethanol-water binary system. Data were obtained at 150, 200, and 250/sup 0/C. At 150/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/C or at low ethanol concentrations there was substantial agreement between our data and data in the literature. At higher ethanol concentrations approaching the azeotrope there was some disagreement which was later found to be due to inconsistencies in the literature data. These results established the reliability of the equipment for binary mixture vapor liquid equilibrium measurements. The first system studied of relevance to coal-derived liquid properties was the m-cresol/quinoline binary system. This system was selected since these compounds are typical of the hetero-atomic species present in coal-derived liquids. Numerous difficulties were encountered. After resolving the experimental difficulties, reliable data were obtained for the system at 250/sup 0/C. An azeotrope was found in the system at a m-cresol composition in the region of 5 mole percent. 47 references, 19 figures, 16 tables.

  10. Small-Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh K. [Southern Research Institute, Durham, NC (United States); McCabe, Kevin [Southern Research Institute, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The research project advanced coal-to-liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes by testing and validating Chevron’s highly selective and active cobalt-zeolite hybrid Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst to convert gasifier syngas predominantly to gasoline, jet fuel and diesel range hydrocarbon liquids, thereby eliminating expensive wax upgrading operations The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) operated by Southern Company (SC) at Wilsonville, Alabama served as the host site for the gasifier slip-stream testing/demonstration. Southern Research designed, installed and commissioned a bench scale skid mounted FT reactor system (SR-CBTL test rig) that was fully integrated with a slip stream from SC/NCCC’s transport integrated gasifier (TRIGTM). The test-rig was designed to receive up to 5 lb/h raw syngas augmented with bottled syngas to adjust the H2/CO molar ratio to 2, clean it to cobalt FT catalyst specifications, and produce liquid FT products at the design capacity of 2 to 4 L/day. It employed a 2-inch diameter boiling water jacketed fixed-bed heat-exchange FT reactor incorporating Chevron’s catalyst in Intramicron’s high thermal conductivity micro-fibrous entrapped catalyst (MFEC) packing to efficiently remove heat produced by the highly exothermic FT reaction.

  11. Role of the Liquids From Coal process in the world energy picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, J.P.; Knottnerus, B.A. [ENCOAL Corp., Gillette, WY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    ENCOAL Corporation, a wholly owned indirect subsidiary of Zeigler Coal Holding Company, has essentially completed the demonstration phase of a 1,000 Tons per day (TPD) Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) plant near Gillette, Wyoming. The plant has been in operation for 4{1/2} years and has delivered 15 unit trains of Process Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}), the low-sulfur, high-Btu solid product to five major utilities. Recent test burns have indicated the PDF{trademark} can offer the following benefits to utility customers: lower sulfur emissions, lower NO{sub x} emissions, lower utilized fuel costs to power plants, and long term stable fuel supply. More than three million gallons of Coal Derived Liquid (CDL{trademark}) have also been delivered to seven industrial fuel users and one steel mill blast furnace. Additionally, laboratory characteristics of CDL{trademark} and process development efforts have indicated that CDL{trademark} can be readily upgraded into higher value chemical feedstocks and transportation fuels. Commercialization of the LFC{trademark} is also progressing. Permit work for a large scale commercial ENCOAL{reg_sign} plant in Wyoming is now underway and domestic and international commercialization activity is in progress by TEK-KOL, a general partnership between SGI International and a Zeigler subsidiary. This paper covers the historical background of the project, describes the LFC{trademark} process and describes the worldwide outlook for commercialization.

  12. A Novel Acoustic Liquid Level Determination Method for Coal Seam Gas Wells Based on Autocorrelation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In coal seam gas (CSG wells, water is periodically removed from the wellbore in order to keep the bottom-hole flowing pressure at low levels, facilitating the desorption of methane gas from the coal bed. In order to calculate gas flow rate and further optimize well performance, it is necessary to accurately monitor the liquid level in real-time. This paper presents a novel method based on autocorrelation function (ACF analysis for determining the liquid level in CSG wells under intense noise conditions. The method involves the calculation of the acoustic travel time in the annulus and processing the autocorrelation signal in order to extract the weak echo under high background noise. In contrast to previous works, the non-linear dependence of the acoustic velocity on temperature and pressure is taken into account. To locate the liquid level of a coal seam gas well the travel time is computed iteratively with the non-linear velocity model. Afterwards, the proposed method is validated using experimental laboratory investigations that have been developed for liquid level detection under two scenarios, representing the combination of low pressure, weak signal, and intense noise generated by gas flowing and leakage. By adopting an evaluation indicator called Crest Factor, the results have shown the superiority of the ACF-based method compared to Fourier filtering (FFT. In the two scenarios, the maximal measurement error from the proposed method was 0.34% and 0.50%, respectively. The latent periodic characteristic of the reflected signal can be extracted by the ACF-based method even when the noise is larger than 1.42 Pa, which is impossible for FFT-based de-noising. A case study focused on a specific CSG well is presented to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, and also to demonstrate that signal processing with autocorrelation analysis can improve the sensitivity of the detection system.

  13. Continuous process for the pressure hydrogenation of coals, tars, and mineral oils in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-05-25

    In the continuous pressure hydrogenation of coals, tars, and mineral oils in liquid phase as, for example, of coal or oil pastes, the liquid together with the hydrogen required for the reaction was, at the time of this report, preheated under pressure in a special preheater and brought to the reaction temperature. At this temperature, the mixture then entered the reaction vessel. Here, due to the absorption of hydrogen by the hydrogenation feed, so much heat was generated that in practical operations, cooling had to be provided for. This report dealt with an investigation that solved this problem. In this process hydrogenation feed, together with hydrogen, entered at the bottom of one section of a reaction vessel which was divided by separating walls into two vertical sections, which were connected with each other at the top and the bottom, so that hydrogenation feed was given a circulating motion between the two sections of the vessel, whereby the greatest part of the hydrogen mass, together with the vaporous mass, and as a rule, also a part of the liquid, was drawn off at the top. A description of the operation and the equipment involved was given. A sketch containing six figures was also included showing the flow of the materials.

  14. A novel concept for high conversion of coal to liquids. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W.H.; Shabtai, J.

    1994-04-01

    A batch microreactor was designed and fabricated as a means of investigating maximum yields of liquids obtainable in very short reaction times of the order of a few seconds, and the maximum ratios of liquids/hydrocarbon (HC) gases obtainable under those conditions. A Wyodak sub-bituminous coal, crushed and sieved to {minus}200 mesh particle size, was used in the experiments, with a temperature of 500{degrees}C and a pressure of 1500 psi. The fine coal particles were fed dry to the reactor and heated to reaction temperature in times of one to two seconds. At a time of 3 seconds at reaction temperature, in a single pass a liquid yield of 60% by weight of the coal was obtained, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/(HC) gases of 30/1. When the unreacted solids were recycled to the reactor, and the results combined with those of the first pass, a liquid yield of 82% by weight of the coal was achieved, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/HC gases of 30/1. This ratio represents only about 3 wt percent HC gases, much lower that is produced in current advanced technologies, and represents a large saving in hydrogen consumption. A simulated distillation technique was applied to the liquids. The liquid product contained 86% by weight (of the liquids) total distillables (boiling point below 538{degrees}C), including 70% by weight of low-boiling fractions in the gasoline, kerosene and gas oil range (boiling point up to 325{degrees}C). The liquid product exhibited a H/C ratio of 1.5, which is considerably higher than observed in current advanced technologies for the primary liquids. Several catalysts were investigated. Iron catalysts, specifically ferric chloride hexahydrate and ferric sulfate pentahydrate, each produced these high conversions and high ratios of liquids/HC gases.

  15. Feasibilities of a Coal-Biomass to Liquids Plant in Southern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Debangsu [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); DVallance, David [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Henthorn, Greg [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Grushecky, Shawn [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This project has generated comprehensive and realistic results of feasibilities for a coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) plant in southern West Virginia; and evaluated the sensitivity of the analyses to various anticipated scenarios and parametric uncertainties. Specifically the project has addressed economic feasibility, technical feasibility, market feasibility, and financial feasibility. In the economic feasibility study, a multi-objective siting model was developed and was then used to identify and rank the suitable facility sites. Spatial models were also developed to assess the biomass and coal feedstock availabilities and economics. Environmental impact analysis was conducted mainly to assess life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas emission. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were also investigated in this study. Sensitivity analyses on required selling price (RSP) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of CBTL fuels were conducted according to feedstock availability and price, biomass to coal mix ratio, conversion rate, internal rate of return (IRR), capital cost, operational and maintenance cost. The study of siting and capacity showed that feedstock mixed ratio limited the CBTL production. The price of coal had a more dominant effect on RSP than that of biomass. Different mix ratios in the feedstock and conversion rates led to RSP ranging from $104.3 - $157.9/bbl. LCA results indicated that GHG emissions ranged from 80.62 kg CO2 eq to 101.46 kg CO2 eq/1,000 MJ of liquid fuel at various biomass to coal mix ratios and conversion rates if carbon capture and storage (CCS) was applied. Most of water and fossil energy were consumed in conversion process. Compared to petroleum-derived-liquid fuels, the reduction in GHG emissions could be between -2.7% and 16.2% with CBTL substitution. As for the technical study, three approaches of coal and biomass to liquids, direct, indirect and hybrid, were considered in the analysis. The process models including

  16. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, January-March 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1985-04-30

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the third quarter modifications to both the calorimeter and the phase equilibria system were completed. The phase equilibria system was checked out against literature data for methanol/ethanol. Results of these tests are included in this report. The calorimeter was evaluated using previously confirmed heptane data and published data by Thinh, et al. These results are also reported. Initial calorimetry data have been obtained for tetralin and the data will be reported when the data set has been completed. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.S.

    1989-12-21

    We have examined changes in Argonne Premium samples of Wyodak coal following 30 min treatment in liquid water at autogenous pressures at 150{degrees}, 250{degrees}, and 350{degrees}C. In most runs the coal was initially dried at 60{degrees}C/1 torr/20 hr. The changes were monitored by pyrolysis field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS) operating at 2.5{degrees}C/min from ambient to 500{degrees}C. We recorded the volatility patterns of the coal tars evolved over that temperature range, and in all cases the tar yields were 25%--30% of the starting coal on mass basis. There was essentially no change after the 150{degrees}C treatment. Small increases in volatility were seen following the 250{degrees}C treatment, but major effects were seen in the 350{degrees} work. The tar quantity remained unchanged; however, the volatility increased so the temperature of half volatility for the as-received coal of 400{degrees}C was reduced to 340{degrees}C. Control runs with no water showed some thermal effect, but the net effect from the presence of liquid water was clearly evident. The composition was unchanged after the 150{degrees} and 250{degrees}C treatments, but the 350{degrees} treatment brought about a 30% loss of oxygen. The change corresponded to loss of the elements of water, although loss of OH'' seemed to fit the analysis data somewhat better. The water loss takes place both in the presence and in the absence of added water, but it is noteworthy that the loss in the hydrothermal runs occurs at p(H{sub 2}O) = 160 atm. We conclude that the process must involve the dehydration solely of chemically bound elements of water, the dehydration of catechol is a specific, likely candidate.

  18. Chemistry and catalysis of coal liquefaction: catalytic and thermal upgrading of coal liquid and hydrogenation of CO to produce fuels. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W.H.

    1980-08-01

    Analysis of a group of coal liquids produced by catalytic hydrogenation of Utah coals with ZnCl/sub 2/ catalyst was begun. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography techniques will be used to correlate chemical properties with hydrogenation reactivity. Equipment previously used for downflow measurements of heat and momentum transfer in a gas-coal suspension was modified for upflow measurements. The catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of methyl benzoate has been studied to elucidate the reactions of ester during upgrading of coal-derived liquids. The kinetics of hydrogenation of phenanthrene have also been determined. The catalytic cracking mechanism of octahydroanthracene is reported in detail. Studies of the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene indicate that some thiophene is strongly adsorbed as a hydrogen-deficient polymer on cobalt-molybdate catalyst. Part of the polymer can be desorbed as thiophene by hydrogenation. Poisoning of the catalyst inhibits the hydrosulfurization activity to a greater degree than the hydrogenation activity. Iron-manganese catalysts for carbon monoxide hydrogenation is studied to determine the role of iron carbide formation on selectivity. Pure iron catalyst forms a Hagg iron carbide phase under reaction conditions.

  19. Oviposition of Tanytarsus dissimilis (Diptera:Chironomidae) in avoidance trails with coal liquid water-soluble components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauble, D.D.; Skalski, J.R.

    1983-12-01

    Oviposition site preference (OSP) of the chironomid Tanytarsus dissimilis (Johannsen) was evaluated in avoidance trials with acutely toxic concentrations of a coal liquid water-soluble fraction (WSF). Tests conducted with groups and with single organisms indicated that ovipositing adults had no significant preference (..cap alpha.. = 0.05) for either river water (control) or a coal liquid WSF. Egg strand size was reduced in the coal liquid WSF, suggesting that toxicant detection occurred despite lack of avoidance. The OSP trials conducted with single organisms were advantageous because of lack of independence in group tests and because greater sample size could be obtained with less effort. This type of behavioral study may have an application to hazard evaluation of other toxic substances.

  20. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, April-June 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1985-07-31

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the fourth quarter enthalpy measurements and a preliminary analysis on tetralin data were completed. A new pump was installed eliminating the need for a pressure adjuster in the pressure system. This pump provides pulse free flow even at a pressure of 1500 psia. During the next quarter, measurements on the binary system m-cresol/tetralin will begin. Vapor liquid equilibria measurements for the m-cresol/quinoline system have begun for four isotherms. Preliminary results have been included in this report. These measurements will be completed in the next quarter and work will be started on the m-cresol/tetralin system. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. The Potency of Fire and Explosion Hazard on Premium Oil Storage Tank at Depot X 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Lestari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Premium oil storage tanks have fire and explosion risk because Premium oil is flammable liquid. Because of that, fire and explosion risk assessment on Premium oil storage tank at Depot X is needed as foundation to fire and explosion risk management, and comply with regulations. Method of this research is Dow’s Fire and Explosion Index. This research indicate that F&EI value for Premium oil storage tank is 118,82. Based on that F&EI value, level of risk at Premium oil storage tank is intermediate risk.

  2. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.

  3. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, August-October 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1982-11-30

    The correlational effort on the coal syncrudes and model compounds has been proceeding along two fronts. The first involves experimental work on a correlating factor for association in the liquids and the second involves an investigation of the modeling capabilities of cubic equations of state. The first area of investigation is the experimental measurement of a correlating factor for assocition in coal liquids. The procedure involves molecular weight measurement by freezing point depression. To facilitate these measurements, a simple Beckman freezing point depression apparatus is being currently modified to increase the accuracy, speed, and ease of measurement. The second area of effort has involved establishing a set of cubic equations of state which can adequately model the enthalpy departures of quinoline and m-cresol. To this effort, a number of standard and association specific equations of state have been tested against a data base of previously measured enthalpy departures of m-cresol and quinoline. It has been found that these equations do quantitatively a poor job on m-cresol and quinoline. These problems are probably due to the highly polar nature of m-cresol and to a lesser extent quinoline, and to the poor quality of critical parameters for quinoline.

  4. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 10, December 18, 1994--March 17, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Webster, I.A. [UNOCAL Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. Throughout the experimental runs we will utilize a high pressure, high temperature diffusion of cell system. This diffusion system has been tested through the measurement of the diffusivity of a number of model coal liquids. The following were accomplished this quarter: During this quarter, we have initiated a series of transport investigations under high temperature (360{degrees}) high pressure (500 psi, H{sub 2}) reactive conditions. We have also continued our studies of formation and precipitation of fractal molecular aggregates in porous media. Small-angle scattering as well as precipitation data are analyzed to delineate the structure of the molecular colloidal aggregates that are formed, when a fluid is injected into the pore space of a porous medium to react with, or displace the in-place fluid. The results suggest that these colloidal structures are diffusion-limited particle and cluster aggregates. This is the first conclusive evidence for fractality of such molecular aggregates, which has important implications for their stability and molecular weight distribution, as well as modelling their flow and precipitation in a porous medium.

  5. Fractional distillation as a strategy for reducing the genotoxic potential of SRC-II coal liquids: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of studies on the effects of fractional distillation on the genotoxic potential of Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-II) liquids. SRC-II source materials and distilled liquids were provided by Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. Fractional distillations were conducted on products from the P-99 process development unit operating under conditions approximating those anticipated at the SRC-II demonstration facility. Distillation cuts were subjected to chemical fractionation, in vitro bioassay and initial chemical analysis. Findings are discussed as they relate to the temperature at which various distillate cuts were produced. This document is the first of two status reports scheduled for 1981 describing these studies.

  6. Where is the value premium?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phalippou, L.

    2008-01-01

    The value premium is driven by 7 percent of the stock market. The 93 percent of market capitalization held most by institutional investors is value premium free. In contrast, in stocks held most by individual investors, the value premium, even when the stocks are value weighted, reaches a staggering

  7. Report of National Research Institute for Pollution and Resources for fiscal 1979. Research on conversion of coal to petroleum, research on coal liquefaction, high pressure liquid phase hydrogenation of coal by continuous test equipment, and manufacture of coal chemicals; 1979 nendo sekitan no yuka no kenkyu / sekitan no ekika no kenkyu / renzoku shiken sochi ni yoru sekitan no koatsu ekiso suisoka bunkai / coal chemicals no seizo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-07-01

    Research was conducted on conversion of coal to petroleum for the purpose of securing substitute liquid fuel. Recovery of hydrogen from the waste gas from the conversion process was explained, as were the conversion results from various coals produced in Japan. In coal liquefaction researches with the aim of manufacturing artificial petroleum, a report was made on each of the researches, i.e., the experiment results of coal liquefaction using various catalysts, manufacture of hydrogen by water gas reaction, catalytic action against coal paste, action of mixed oil and pressure against coal paste, result of hydrogen adding test for coal paste using an intermediate scale device, test result of secondary hydrogen addition for coal liquefied oil, and the test result of continuous secondary hydrogen addition for the liquefied oil. In the manufacture of fuel oil by hydro-cracking of coal or tar, a report was made on high pressure liquid phase hydrogenation of coal using a continuous testing device. Aromatic chemicals useful as chemical materials are supposed to be obtained by cutting inter-polymerized-unit bonding to make low molecules from the chemical structure of coal, removing surrounding radicals and simplifying it. A report was also made on the experiment of manufacturing coal chemicals by combination of high pressure liquid phase hydrogenation and hydro-dealkylation. (NEDO)

  8. Characterization of liquid products obtained from co-cracking of petroleum vacuum residue with coal and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2008-01-15

    Co-processing of the petroleum vacuum residue (XVR) with coal and biomass (a Calotropis procera) has been performed in batch reactor under isothermal conditions at atmospheric pressure. The liquids obtained by co-processing have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) analyses. FT-IR analysis showed that the liquid products derived from co-cracking of XVR + SC contained a few phenols, indicating that the higher hydrogen content of the XVR acted as a hydrogenation medium for the coal product in the co-cracking of the mixture. NMR analysis indicated that aromatic carbon contents decreased (about 10.8%) in the liquid products obtained from the co-cracking of XVR + SC compared to their theoretical average. GPC analysis showed that liquid products derived from co-cracking of XVR + SC are much more similar (having the almost same molecular weight distribution as XVR) to the liquid products from XVR than to the liquid products from coal, reflecting synergy in the co-cracking reaction. However, the liquid products derived from co-cracking of XVR + CL showed the liquids are comparatively more viscous than that of XVR indicating that there is a definite interaction when they are co-cracked together. It is also interesting that the liquid products obtained from co-cracking with coal and biomass contained less than 1 ppm of Ni and V, respectively. The detailed results obtained are being reported. (author)

  9. Achieving a production goal of 1 million B/D of coal liquids by 1990. [Impediments and constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Charles; LaRosa, Dr., P. J.; Coles, E. T.; Fein, H. L.; Petros, J. J.; Iyer, R. S.; Merritt, R. T.

    1980-03-01

    Under this contract, Bechtel analyzed the resource requirements and reviewed major obstacles to the daily production of several million barrels of synthetic coal liquids. Further, the study sought to identify the industry infrastructure needed to support the commercial readiness of the coal liquefaction process. A selected list of critical resource items and their domestic/international availability was developed and examined, and the impact of their supply on the various synthetic coal liquids programs was evaluated. The study approach was to develop representative, or generic, direct and indirect coal liquefaction conceptual designs from available technology and costs data. The generic processes were to employ technology that would be considered commercial by the mid- or late-1980s. The size of the generic construction mobilization was considered reasonable at the outset of the program. The product slate was directed toward unrefined liquid fuels rather than diesel oil or gasoline. The generic processes were to use a wide range of coals to permit siting in most coal-producing regions across the country. Because of the dearth of conceptual design data in the literature, Bechtel developed generic plant designs by using in-house design expertise. Bechtel assumed that because it is first generation technology, the indirect process will be used at the outset of the liquids program, and the direct process will be introduced two to four years later as a second generation technology. The products of either of these processes will be limited to boiler fuels and/or other liquid products which require further upgrading. Cost estimates were developed from equipment lists, as well as material and labor estimates, which enabled the determination of an order-of-magnitude cost estimate and target plant construction schedule for both processes.

  10. Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts for H{sub 2} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Renhe, E-mail: yinrh@staff.shu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhao Yonggang, E-mail: zhaoyonggang8210@163.co [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu Shiyin; Wang Haomin; Cao Weimin [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Fan Qinbai, E-mail: fan@gastechnology.or [Gas Technology Institute, 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd., Des Plaines, IL 60018 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal/metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts is systematically investigated as a method of producing hydrogen at the cathode. The composition of the liquid catalyst was varied to determine its effect on the coal electrolysis. A spectrum of byproducts from the coal oxidation at the anode was analyzed. The Ti-supported metal oxide electrodes were prepared by thermal decomposition and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction results show that the composition of the electrodes was Ti/Pt, Ti/RuO{sub 2}, Ti/IrO{sub 2} and Ti/IrO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 2}. Coal oxidation tests on these electrodes indicate that Ti/IrO{sub 2} has the best electrocatalytic activity. Polarization curves reveal that redox catalysts, such as Fe{sup 3+}, K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6}, KBr and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, bridge the coal particles and the solid electrode surface, thus increasing the rates of coal oxidation. The dynamic transition of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} is proven by a KMnO{sub 4} titration experiment, and the possible catalytic mechanism is discussed. Product analysis shows that pure H{sub 2} is generated at the cathode and that CO{sub 2} is the main product at the anode.

  11. Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts for H{sub 2} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, R.H.; Zhao, Y.G.; Lu, S.Y.; Wang, H.M.; Cao, W.M.; Fan, Q.B. [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-12-15

    Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal/metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts is systematically investigated as a method of producing hydrogen at the cathode. The composition of the liquid catalyst was varied to determine its effect on the coal electrolysis. A spectrum of byproducts from the coal oxidation at the anode was analyzed. The Ti-supported metal oxide electrodes were prepared by thermal decomposition and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction results show that the composition of the electrodes was Ti/Pt, Ti/RuO{sub 2}, Ti/IrO{sub 2} and Ti/IrO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 2}. Coal oxidation tests on these electrodes indicate that Ti/IrO{sub 2} has the best electrocatalytic activity. Polarization curves reveal that redox catalysts, such as Fe{sup 3+}, K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sup 6}, KBr and V2O5, bridge the coal particles and the solid electrode surface, thus increasing the rates of coal oxidation. The dynamic transition of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} is proven by a KMnO{sub 4} titration experiment, and the possible catalytic mechanism is discussed. Product analysis shows that pure H{sub 2} is generated at the cathode and that CO{sub 2} is the main product at the anode.

  12. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal-Derived Liquids. Volume 2. Characterization of Liquid By-Products from the Great Plains Gasification Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    against acetanilide , although other appropriate standards could be used. Equipment calibrated for the elemental analysis of coal liquids provides high...distributions of the THF solubles of non- distillables were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). GPC analysis showed a larger amount of lower

  13. Spin liquid in a single crystal of the frustrated diamond lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaharko, O.; Christensen, Niels Bech; Cervellino, A.

    2011-01-01

    We study the evidence for spin liquid in the frustrated diamond lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4 by means of single-crystal neutron scattering in zero and applied magnetic fields. The magnetically ordered phase appearing below T-N = 8 K remains nonconventional down to 1.5 K. The magnetic Bragg pea...

  14. Chemically authentic surrogate mixture model for the thermophysical properties of a coal-derived liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.L. Huber; E.W. Lemmon; V. Diky; B.L. Smith; T.J. Bruno [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Division

    2008-09-15

    We developed a surrogate mixture model to represent the physical properties of a coal-derived liquid fuel using only information obtained from a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the fuel and a recently developed 'advanced distillation curve'. We then predicted the density, speed of sound, and viscosity of the fuel and compared them to limited experimental data. The surrogate contains five components (n-propylcyclohexane, trans-decalin, {alpha}-methyldecalin, bicyclohexane, and n-hexadecane), yet comparisons to limited experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to represent the density, sound speed, and viscosity to within 1, 4, and 5%, respectively. 102 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Ninth quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1986-10-31

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid moedl compound mixtures. During the ninth quarter, enthalpy measurements on the pure component 1-methylnaphthalene were obtained. Also, during this quarter ternary vapor liquid equilibrium measurements for m-cresol/quinoline/tetralin have begun for the isotherms; 250, 275, 300, 325/sup 0/C. A maximum likelihood algorithm applicable for implicit constraints has been developed. The method was applied to the determination of interaction parameters for temperature and density dependent mixing rules from our binary vapor liquid equilibrium data. 16 refs., 51 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume III. Coal resource depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, E.M.; Yabroff, I.W.; Kroll, C.A.; White, R.K.; Walton, B.L.; Ivory, M.E.; Fullen, R.E.; Weisbecker, L.W.; Hays, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    While US coal resources are known to be vast, their rate of depletion in a future based predominantly on coal has not been examined analytically heretofore. The Coal Depletion Model inventories the coal resource on a regional basis and calculates the cost of coal extraction by three technologies - strip and underground mining and in-situ combustion. A plausible coal demand scenario extending from 1975 to the year 2050 is used as a basis in applying the model. In the year 2050, plants in operation include 285 syncrude plants, each producing 100,000 B/D; 312 SNG plants, each producing 250 million SCF/D and 722 coal-fired electric power plants, each of 1000 MW capacity. In addition, there is 890 million tons per year of industrial coal consumption. Such a high level of coal use would deplete US coal resources much more rapidly than most people appreciate. Of course, the actual amount of US coal is unknown, and if the coal in the hypothetical reliability category is included, depletion is delayed. Coal in this category, however, has not been mapped; it is only presumed to exist on the basis of geological theory. The coal resource depletion model shows that unilateral imposition of a severance tax by a state tends to shift production to other coal producing regions. Boom and bust cycles are both delayed and reduced in their magnitude. When several states simultaneously impose severance taxes, the effect of each is weakened.Key policy issues that emerge from this analysis concern the need to reduce the uncertainty of the magnitude and geographic distribution of the US coal resource and the need to stimulate interaction among the parties at interest to work out equitable and acceptable coal conversion plant location strategies capable of coping with the challenges of a high-coal future.

  17. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, October-December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1986-01-31

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the sixth quarter, preliminary enthalpy measurements for the 1/3:2/3, 1/2:1/2, 2/3:1/3 m-cresol tetralin binary mixtures have been completed and are included in a section at the end of this report. Vapor liquid equilibria measurements for the m-cresol/tetralin system are in progress for four isotherms. Tetralin vapor pressures are reported in this report from both the VLE apparatus and the calorimeter. In addition, ongoing research into the modeling of polar systems has led to an approach for modifying the Soave equation of state. This equation of state introduces a polar parameter which appears to be related to the expected strength of polar interactions for different compounds. The appendix contains the paper on this work titled ''Approach for extending Van de Waals equations of state for polar, hydrogen bonding fluids applied to the Soave equation of state''. This article has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  18. Effects of Coal Fly Ash Particulate Matter on the Antimicrobial Activity of Airway Surface Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Buonfiglio, Luis G; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Vanegas Calderón, Oriana G; Borcherding, Jennifer A; Gerke, Alicia K; Zabner, Joseph; Grassian, Vicki H; Comellas, Alejandro P

    2017-07-05

    Sustained exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) is a global cause of mortality. Coal fly ash (CFA) is a byproduct of coal combustion and is a source of anthropogenic PM with worldwide health relevance. The airway epithelia are lined with fluid called airway surface liquid (ASL), which contains antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs). Cationic AMPs bind negatively charged bacteria to exert their antimicrobial activity. PM arriving in the airways could potentially interact with AMPs in the ASL to affect their antimicrobial activity. We hypothesized that PM can interact with ASL AMPs to impair their antimicrobial activity. We exposed pig and human airway explants, pig and human ASL, and the human cationic AMPs β-defensin-3, LL-37, and lysozyme to CFA or control. Thereafter, we assessed the antimicrobial activity of exposed airway samples using both bioluminescence and standard colony-forming unit assays. We investigated PM-AMP electrostatic interaction by attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and measuring the zeta potential. We also studied the adsorption of AMPs on PM. We found increased bacterial survival in CFA-exposed airway explants, ASL, and AMPs. In addition, we report that PM with a negative surface charge can adsorb cationic AMPs and form negative particle-protein complexes. We propose that when CFA arrives at the airway, it rapidly adsorbs AMPs and creates negative complexes, thereby decreasing the functional amount of AMPs capable of killing pathogens. These results provide a novel translational insight into an early mechanism for how ambient PM increases the susceptibility of the airways to bacterial infection. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP876.

  19. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustion gas using high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, N. [Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industry Co Ltd, Tokyo (Japan). Research Institution

    2002-11-01

    The study describes a sampling and analysis procedure for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at high temperatures in flue gas. Particulate matter sampling was used in conjunction with gas phase sampling. Particulates were collected on quartz fiber filter heated at the same temperature as flue gas. Vaporous PAHs not retained by the filter were cooled at 55{sup o}C and trapped from the gas phase on Tenax-GC polymer beads of 10 g. The sample volume was about 1 m{sup 3}. Tenax-GC has demonstrated high collection efficiency for benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) generated at 375{sup o}C under a stream of nitrogen. PAH were extracted with n-pentane for 4 h by a continuous PAH extractor. It demonstrated 99% extraction efficiency for B(a)P spiked on the adsorbent and it was more effective than Soxhlet extraction. The extracts were concentrated to 1 ml of n-pentane in a Kuderna Danish evaporator. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the extracts were performed by high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) with ultraviolet/fluorescence detection. Eight PAH (3,4,5,6-dibenzocarbazole, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, 2-methylanthracene, benz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene) were determined in coal combustion gas on reducing NOx procedures. It was demonstrated that the tendency to reduce NOx levels leads to an increase in the PAH present. Moreover total concentration of four PAH (phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) in this study is satisfactory agreement with those measured in the emissions of coal-fired power stations in the literature.

  20. Low-temperature pyrolysis of coal to produce diesel-fuel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, T.B.; Jett, O.J.; Wu, J.S.

    1982-10-01

    Low-temperature (623 to 773/sup 0/K) coal pyrolysis was investigated in a bench-scale retort. Factorially designed experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature, coal-particle size, and nitrogen flow rate on the yield of liquid products. Yield of condensable organic products relative to the proximate coal volatile matter increased by 3.1 and 6.4 wt % after increasing nitrogen purge flow rate from 0.465 to 1.68 L/min and retort temperature from 623 to 723/sup 0/K, respectively. The liquid product may be suitable for blending with diesel fuel. The viscosity and density of coal liquids produced at 723/sup 0/K were compared with those of diesel fuel. The coal liquids had a higher carbon-to-hydrogen ratio and a lower aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio than premium quality No. 2 diesel fuel. It was recommended that liquids from coal pyrolysis be blended with diesel fuel to determine stability of the mixture and performance of the blend in internal combustion engines.

  1. Economic and environmental evaluation of coal-and-biomass-to-liquids-and-electricity plants equipped with carbon capture and storage (data for figures and tables)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data used in the manuscript's tables and figures. Most data represent the modeled optimal capacity of the coal-and-biomass-to-liquid fuels-and-electricity (CBTLE)...

  2. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1977. [155 to 742 degrees F and 150, 200, 500, 1000 and 1500 psia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1977-10-15

    Coal-derived liquids are a new and vital class of industrial compounds, but have thermodynamic properties that are largely unknown and, presently, unpredictable. The objective of this research is to measure one of the most important thermodynamic properties, the enthalpy, for representative coal-derived liquids over the pressure and temperature regions most likely to be encountered in both liquefaction and processing systems. Experimental measurements were made on a distillate from a coal-derived liquid sample produced with the Synthoil process. The measurements extend from 155 to 742/sup 0/F at pressures of 150, 200, 500, 1000, and 1500 psia. Enthalpy measurements were also started on a naphtha cut from a coal-derived liquid produced by the SRC-I process. These naphtha measurements are approximately 60 percent complete.

  3. Structure of coal: new approaches to characterizing organonitrogen and organosulfur functionalities in coal and coal liquids. Final report. [Finnigan triple quadrupole mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the application of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to the analysis of coal-related materials. A Finnigan Triple State Quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for most of the results obtained in this study. Both collision energy (0 to 30 eV) and collision gas pressure (0 to 2.5 mtorr, typically argon) have significant effects on the spectra. Increasing the collision energy or collision pressure results in an increased fragmentation of the selected ion. The analytical utility of different chemical ionization (CI) reagent gases is shown. The MS/MS spectra of a selected ion obtained by isobutane and ammonia CI are identical, which paves the way for development of MS/MS libraries. A library is being developed especially for the analysis of coal-related materials. Three principal MS/MS scan modes (daughter, parent and neutral loss) are utilized in the analysis of coal-related materials. Parent and neutral loss scans characterize the complex mixture for particular chemical moieties (functional groups, structure type), while daughter scans are used for identification of specific components. SRC II was the principal sample studied by CI. Laser desorption methodology for coal analysis was developed. Other fuel-related materials were examined to generalize the analytical methodology being developed for the coal-related materials, including shale oil and diesel exhaust particulates. 35 references, 50 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Carbonization and liquid-crystal (mesophase) development. 8. The co-carbonization of coals with acenaphthylene and decacyclene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochida, I.; Marsh, H.; Grint, A.

    1979-09-01

    Several coals of different rank have been carbonized singly and also co-carbonized with acenaphthylene and decacyclene. The resultant cokes were mounted in resin and polished surfaces were examined for optical texture using a polarized-light optical microscope fitted with a half-wave retarder plate. The optical texture can be assessed qualitatively (visually) or quantitatively by a point-counting technique in terms of size and shape of constituent isochromatic anisotropic units. Some cokes from coals were isotropic. Acenaphthylene was only able to exert a smaller influence than decacyclene on the optical texture of the resultant cokes from co-carbonizations. Decacyclene was able to modify the optical texture for both the low-rank non-fusible and the caking coals. The effects of changing the proportions of coal to additive were examined. Results are interpreted in terms of 'depolymerization' of the coal by the action of the additive (as solvent) and also by the action of the additive in modifying the processes of formation of semi-coke via nematic liquid crystals.

  5. Continuous thermodynamics and group contribution methods for coal liquids: Final report, October 1, 1986--October 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D. T.; Behmanesh, N.; Vajdi, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    Structural profiles of narrow-boiling range fractions from three coal liquefaction processes were determined by identifying the major functional groups in the distillates and estimating their concentrations. The structural profiles were based on an extensive set of analytical data including results from elemental analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and liquid chromatography. The functional group distributions were then interfaced with group contribution methods for property estimation. Heat capacities, critical constants, activity coefficients, hydrogen solubilities and vapor pressures were estimated for the narrow boiling fractions. The predictions have been compared to the predictions of more conventional property estimation methods and to experimental data. In addition, sensitivity analyses have been performed to determine which structural features in the coal derived liquids are most important in estimating the values of thermodynamic properties. 43 refs., 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  6. Effects of association on enthalpy of coal-derived liquids: cryoscopic molecular weight as a function of concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Kinday, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1983-05-01

    A major difficulty in estimating physical and thermophysical properties of petroleum fractions and coal-derived liquids is the fact that such mixtures represent an essentially infinite continua of components and as such they cannot be defined by component mole or mass fraction. In the petroleum industry, this problem has been overcome by the use of easy to measure characterization variables such as density (or API gravity) and the Watson Characterization Factor, K, which this paper defines.

  7. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures: Final technical report. [Tetralin/m-cresol/quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.; Flanigan, D.A.; Niesen, V.G.; DiGiacinto, S.S.; Joyce, T.P.; Yanaki, J.S.

    1988-04-15

    Measurements were made in a Freon 11, reference fluid, boil-off calorimeter, and an equilibrium flash vaporization apparatus, experimental systems which had already been developed. Previous studies had indicated that existing data and correlations developed for petroleum fluids are not applicable to coal derived liquids. This was due to the presence of significant concentrations of polar associating heteroatomics in the predominantly aromatic coal liquids. Thus, the ternary system was selected to include an aromatic, a basic nitrogen compound, and a cresol. Measurements were made over a wide range of temperature (200 to 700/degrees/) and pressure (20 to 1500 psia), for the three pure compounds, the three binary mixtures and selected compositions of the ternary. Both enthalpy and phase behavior measurements were made. This set of data will be useful as a standard for fitting and evaluating thermodynamic correlations and equations of state that are applicable to associating fluid mixtures, and thus to coal derived liquids. In addition efforts were and continue to be made at developing equation of state correlations which are applicable to these highly nonideal mixtures. 46 refs., 43 figs., 41 tabs.

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  9. Coal-fired open-cycle liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic topping cycle for retrofit of steam power plants. [Two-phase working fluid composed of coal combustion products and liquid copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, E. S.; Herman, H.; Petrick, M.; Boom, R. W.; Carlson, L.; Cohen, D.; Dubey, G.; Grammel, S. J.; Schreiner, F.; Snyder, B. K.; Zinneman, T.

    1980-12-01

    The application of the new, coal-fired open-cycle liquid-metal MHD (OC-LMMHD) energy-conversion system to the retrofit of an existing, oil- or gas-fired conventional steam power plant is evaluated. The criteria used to evaluate the retrofit are the new plant efficiency and the cost benefit relative to other options, i.e., continuing to burn oil, a conventional retrofit to burn coal (if possible), and an over-the-fence gasifier for boilers that cannot burn coal directly. The OC-LMMHD cycle and the existing steam plant used in the study are discussed, and a detailed description of the retrofit plant is presented. The latter includes plant drawings, description of the coupling of the OC-LMMHD topping cycle and the steam boiler, drawings and descriptions of the major components in the retrofit plant, and costs. The unique capability of the OC-LMMHD cycle to control the pollutants normally associated with burning coal is discussed. The net plant output powers and efficiencies are calculated, with allowances for the required auxiliary powers and component inefficiencies, and a plant lifetime economic analysis performed by an architect/engineer. The efficiency and cost results are compared with the values for the other options.

  10. Curb Your Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral-Garcia, Sofia; Grembi, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    We study a policy aimed at increasing the level of information on medical malpractice costs and the risk exposure of local public healthcare providers. The policy is based on enhanced monitoring of medical malpractice claims by the level of government that rules providers in a multilevel institut......We study a policy aimed at increasing the level of information on medical malpractice costs and the risk exposure of local public healthcare providers. The policy is based on enhanced monitoring of medical malpractice claims by the level of government that rules providers in a multilevel...... Regions. Our results show that this information-enhancing policy reduces paid premiums by around 15%. This reduced-form effect might arise by higher bargaining power on the demand side or increased competition on the supply side of the insurance market. Validity tests show that our findings are not driven...

  11. 34 CFR 682.505 - Insurance premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance premium. 682.505 Section 682.505 Education... § 682.505 Insurance premium. (a) General. The Secretary charges the lender an insurance premium for each Federal GSL Program loan that is guaranteed, except that no insurance premium is charged on a Federal...

  12. 12 CFR 1410.5 - Delinquent premium payments and premium overpayments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Delinquent premium payments and premium overpayments. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION PREMIUMS § 1410.5 Delinquent premium payments and premium overpayments. (a) Delinquent payments. Each insured bank...

  13. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 10, December 21, 1991--March 20, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-07-01

    In this project we will study a novel process concept, i.e., the use of ceramic membrane reactors in upgrading of coal model compounds and coal derived liquids. In general terms, the USC research team is responsible for constructing and operating the membrane reactor apparatus and for testing various inorganic membranes for the upgrading of coal derived asphaltenes and coal model compounds. The USC effort will involve the principal investigator of this project and two graduate research assistants. The ALCOA team is responsible for the preparation of the inorganic membranes, for construction and testing of the ceramic membrane modules, and for measurement of their transport properties. The ALCOA research effort will involve Dr. Paul K. T. Liu, who is the project manager of the ALCOA research team, an engineer and a technician. UNOCAL`s contribution will be limited to overall technical assistance in catalyst preparation and the operation of the laboratory upgrading membrane reactor and for analytical back-up and expertise in oil analysis and materials characterization. UNOCAL is a no-cost contractor but will be involved in all aspects of the project, as deemed appropriate.

  14. Utilization of coal-water liquid fuel mixtures in heavy fuel oil burning boiler installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuletic, V. (Rudarski Institut, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Zavod za Termotehniku)

    1989-01-01

    Describes preliminary laboratory tests carried out to assess the feasibility of a project to be organized by the Mining Institute of Belgrade on construction of a pilot semi-industrial plant to investigate substitution of heavy fuel oil used in many thermal power plants with a coal/water or coal/water/oil mix. Tests were conducted using brown coal from the Kolubara surface mine made up in three formats: coal powder/water, coal powder/fuel oil and coal powder/water/fuel oil. Thermodynamic computations were made on each mix in order to predict their effectiveness when used to fuel TE-101 and TE-106 steam generating boilers that would normally consume 1 and 5 t fuel oil per hour respectively. Results are presented in tabular form. Concludes that the coal/oil and coal/oil/water mixes could be used as a substitute fuel with only minor modifications necessary to the boilers. Recommends proceeding with pilot plant construction. 4 refs.

  15. RISK PREMIUM IN MOTOR VEHICLE INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BANU ÖZGÜREL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The pure premium or risk premium is the premium that would exactly meet the expected cost of the risk covered ignoring management expenses, commissions, contingency loading, etc. Claim frequency rate and mean claim size are required for estimation in calculating risk premiums. In this study, we discussed to estimate claim frequency rate and mean claim size with several methods and calculated risk premiums. Data, which supported our study, is provided by insurance company involving with motor vehicle insurance.

  16. Thermodynamic and rheological properties of solid-liquid systems in coal processing. Quarterly technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.; Ilias, S.

    1993-12-31

    Very little data is available on the thermodynamic properties of coal model compounds in liquid phase at high pressures. The authors present preliminary compilations of available data. It is anticipated that they will require vapor pressure and saturated liquid density data for coal model compounds in their high pressure liquid equation of state development. These data sets have also been compiled and are presented. They have at this time completed a review of techniques for high pressure density measurements. Some thought is being given to the possibility of building an apparatus to carry out density measurements for selected model compounds. Finally, they reproduce the Thomson et al equation and describe their preliminary procedure to test this equation with available high pressure thermodynamic data. They acknowledge the possibility that a number of modifications of the Thomson equation will be necessary before a reasonably accurate liquid state equation of state for coal model compound emerges.

  17. NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF BUBBLE SIZE AND INTERFACIAL AREA CONCENTRATION IN THE LIQUID BATH OF AN ENTRAINED-FLOW COAL GASIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wu

    Full Text Available Abstract A CFD-ABND coupling model was used to study the flow characteristic of gas-liquid two-phase flow in the process of gas passing through the liquid bath of a water-coal-slurry entrained-flow gasifier. In this model, an average bubble number density (ABND approach was employed and merged with the two-fluid model. A two-phase version of the RNG k-ε turbulence model was used for the liquid and gas, respectively. Comparisons of computational results with experimental data are done. The results show that the gas gathers along the outer wall of the cooling pipe and rises. The higher turbulent kinetic energy of gas and liquid, the larger bubble and the higher interfacial area concentration exist mainly near the exit and outer wall of the cooling pipe. The existence of a separator inserter is very helpful to strengthen the turbulence between gas and liquid; this can reduce the bubble diameter and increase the interfacial area effectively.

  18. Coal-oil coprocessing at HTI - development and improvement of the technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalzer, R.H.; Lee, L.K.; Hu, J.; Comolli, A. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Co-Processing refers to the combined processing of coal and petroleum-derived heavy oil feedstocks. The coal feedstocks used are those typically utilized in direct coal liquefaction: bituminous, subbituminous, and lignites. Petroleum-derived oil, is typically a petroleum residuum, containing at least 70 W% material boiling above 525{degrees}C. The combined coal and oil feedstocks are processed simultaneously with the dual objective of liquefying the coal and upgrading the petroleum-derived residuum to lower boiling (<525{degrees}C) premium products. HTI`s investigation of the Co-Processing technology has included work performed in laboratory, bench and PDU scale operations. The concept of co-processing technology is quite simple and a natural outgrowth of the work done with direct coal liquefaction. A 36 month program to evaluate new process concepts in coal-oil coprocessing at the bench-scale was begun in September 1994 and runs until September 1997. Included in this continuous bench-scale program are provisions to examine new improvements in areas such as: interstage product separation, feedstock concentrations (coal/oil), improved supported/dispersed catalysts, optimization of reactor temperature sequencing, and in-line hydrotreating. This does not preclude other ideas from DOE contracts and other sources that can lead to improved product quality and economics. This research work has led to important findings which significantly increased liquid yields, improved product quality, and improved process economics.

  19. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures: Technical progress report for the period October-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of a selected ternary model compound system, representative of interactions present in coal derived liquids. Measurements have been made in a Freon 11 reference fluid-boil-off calorimeter, and an equilibrium flash vaporization apparatus. During the tenth quarter, enthalpy measurements for the m-cresol/quinoline/tetralin ternary system have been initiated and are included in Appendix A. Vapor liquid equilibria measurements for the m-cresol/quinoline/tetralin ternary system have been completed for four isotherms: 250, 275, 300, 325/sup 0/C, at various pressures. These results and a summary of progress to date for the VLE apparatus are in Appendix B. Also, predictions for the ternary system using the binary interaction parameters generated from previously obtained binary data were completed, and these results are also presented in Appendix B.

  20. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures: Technical progress report for the period July-September 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1987-10-31

    The objectives of this program are to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of a selected ternary model compound system, representative of interactions present in coal derived liquids. Measurements were made in a Freon 11 reference fluid boil-off calorimeter, and an equilibrium flash vaporization apparatus. The ternary system included an aromatic, a basic nitrogen compound, and a cresol: the m-cresol/quinoline/tetralin ternary mixture. Measurements were made over a wide range of temperature (200 to 750/sup 0/F) and pressure (20 to 1500 psia), for the three pure compounds, the three binary mixtures and selected compositions of the ternary. Both enthalpy and phase behavior measurements were made. Equation of state parameters obtained from binary enthalpy data are more reliable when extrapolated to the ternary system, than parameters obtained from vapor liquid equilibrium data. Furthermore, the more complex mixing rules generally gave poorer predictions when extrapolated to ternary systems. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. SUBTASK 3.12 – GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Curran, Tyler; Henderson, Ann

    2014-06-30

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the performance of Illinois No. 6 coal blended with biomass in a small-scale entrained-flow gasifier and demonstrate the production of liquid fuels under three scenarios. The first scenario used traditional techniques for cleaning the syngas prior to Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis, including gas sweetening with a physical solvent. In the second scenario, the CO2 was not removed from the gas stream prior to FT synthesis. In the third scenario, only warm-gas cleanup techniques were used, such that the feed gas to the FT unit contained both moisture and CO2. The results of the testing showed that the liquid fuels production from the FT catalyst was significantly hindered by the presence of moisture and CO2 in the syngas. Further testing would be needed to determine if this thermally efficient process is feasible with other FT catalysts. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  2. 42 CFR 408.20 - Monthly premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... September. (d) Limitation on increase of standard premium: 1987 and 1988. If there is no cost-of-living... for— (A) The fact that the cost-of-living increase was less than the increase in the standard premium... December 1968, to determine and promulgate the standard monthly premium for the 12-month period beginning...

  3. Phase-equilibrium properties of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, January-July 1983. [70 to 700/sup 0/F; up to 2000 psia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1983-07-01

    Thermodynamic property research is justly recognized as invaluable by process and design engineers in the petroleum, chemical, and allied industries. Thermodynamic data for pure fluids or complex mixtures are essential in the optimum design of both physical and chemical processing units. Coal-derived liquids are a new and vital class of industrial compounds for which there are limited thermodynamic data. Programs have been undertaken to measure volumetric properties and K values of light gas-model compound systems and to measure dew points, vapor pressures, and hydrogen solubilities in model compound and coal-derived liquid systems. The objective of the present study is to measure equilibrium K values of coal-derived liquids and model compounds representative of coal liquids, and to use the results in the development of engineering correlations. The program is divided into three major areas: design, construction, and evaluation of an equilibrium flash vaporization system for temperatures between 70 and 700/sup 0/F and pressures up to 2000 psia; measurements on samples of both coal-derived liquids and mixtures of model compounds; and preparation of engineering correlations for the measured K values and vapor liquid equilibria. Due to continued leaks of potentially harmful cresol and quinoline in the flash-vaporization cell it became necessary for us to shut down the equipment for reasons of safety. Efforts to seal the original cell over the large temperature cycles required proved ineffective. Thus, the major effort during the past six months was the design, construction, and development of a new equilibrium cell that would maintain the seal between the cell and the sight window over many temperature cycles. The final design which accomplishes this objective uses a custom-fabricated sapphire window with custom gold o-rings used for the seals. Due to the unanticipated equipment development, the data-collection effort has been delayed.

  4. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures: Technical progress report for the period April-June 1987. [1-methylnaphthalene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1987-07-31

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. During the twelfth quarter, enthalpy measurements for the compound of 1-methylnaphthalene have been completed and are included in Table 1. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Liquid chromatographic separation of sediment rock, and coal extracts and crude oil into compound classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willsch, H.; Clegg, H.; Horsfield, B.; Radke, M.; Wilkes, H. [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdoel und Organische Geochimie

    1997-10-15

    A method is described for the rapid fractionation of sediment, rock, coal extracts and crude oils into compound classes. The method is based on combined polarity/affinity chromatography of soluble organic matter. Five heterocompound fractions are obtained in addition to the conventional saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions, Model compound studies show that these fractions are chemically well-defined. The applicability to a variety of geological materials is demonstrated by analysing a North Sea crude oil and solvent extracts of Posidonia shale, coal, and recent lake sediment samples. The total recoveries vary between 76% and 57%, depending on the sample type. The method is shown to be well-suited for the bulk compositional characterization of soluble organic matter. Isolated fractions are amenable directly or after derivatization to qualitative and quantitative anlaysis by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  6. Influence of the fineness of grinding coal on the results in liquid-phase hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.

    1944-02-08

    This short note reported older results of experiments on brown coal from Boehlen, of which two different samples were hydrogenated at 250 atm, with each sample ground to a different degree of fineness. In sieving with a sieve of 16,900 mesh, 76.8% of one sample went through, whereas only 63.4% of the other sample went through. The more finely ground sample gave better values of coal decomposition (98.8% vs. 97.7%), yield of gasoline and middle oil (0.30 kg/liter/hr vs. 0.26), and losses to gas formation (19.3% vs. 20.7%). The experiments were carried out in a 10-liter oven.

  7. Bioconversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. [Butyribacterium methylotrophicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    The use of coal-derived synthesis gas as an industrial feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals has become an increasingly attractive alternative to present petroleum-based chemicals production. However, one of the major limitations in developing such a process is the required removal of catalyst poisons such as hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and other trace contaminants from the synthesis gas. Purification steps necessary to remove these are energy intensive and add significantly to the production cost, particularly for coals having a high sulfur content such as Illinois coal. A two-stage, anaerobic bioconversion process requiring little or no sulfur removal is proposed, where in the first stage the carbon monoxide (CO) gas is converted to butyric and acetic acids by the CO strain of Butyribacterium methylotrophicum. In the second stage, these acids along with the hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas are converted to butanol, ethanol, and acetone by an acid utilizing mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum. 18 figs., 18 tabs.

  8. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures: Technical progress report for the period January-March 1987. [M-cresol/quinoline/tetralin ternary mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1987-04-30

    On July 15, 1984, work was initiated on a program to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid model compound mixtures. The objectives of this program are to study the enthalpy and phase behavior of a selected ternary model compound system, representative of interactions present in coal derived liquids. Measurements will be made in a Freon 11 reference fluid boil-off calorimeter, and an equilibrium flash vaporization apparatus. These experimental systems have already been developed. Previous studies have indicated that existing data and correlations developed for petroleum fluids are not applicable to coal derived liquids. This is due to the presence of significant concentrations of polar associating heteroatomics in the predominantly aromatic coal liquids. Thus, the ternary system will include an aromatic, a basic nitrogen compound, and a cresol. It is presently planned to study the m-cresol/quinoline/tetralin ternary mixture. Measurements will be made over a wide range of temperature (200 to 750/sup 0/F) and pressure (20 to 1500 psia), for the three pure compounds, the three binary mixtures and selected compositions of the ternary. Both enthalpy and phase behavior measurements will be made. This set of data will be useful as a standard for fitting and evaluating thermodynamic correlations and equations of state that are applicable to associating fluid mixtures, and thus to coal derived liquids. In particular we will attempt to fit both the enthalpy and phase behavior data with a single equation of state using local composition mixing rules and common interaction parameters. During the eleventh quarter, enthalpy measurements have been obtained for the ternary mixtures of m-cresol/quinoline/tetralin with molar ratios 2/3:1/6:1/6 and 1/6:2/3:1/6 m-cresol:quinoline:tetralin. The results are presented in Appendix A. The project has progressed very will during this quarter, and the enthalpy measurements have been completed. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Combined quarterly technical progress reports, April-June 1979 and July-September 1979. [Effect of association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Enthalpy measurements on a coal-derived naphtha and middle distillate, both produced by the SRC-II process, were made using flow calorimetry. The accuracy of the measurements, as reported by Omid, was within +- 1% of the measured enthalpy differences, ..delta..H. Experimental data for the naphtha were obtained over a pressure range of 100-300 psia and temperatures from 148/sup 0/ to 456/sup 0/F. The middle distillate enthalpy measurements were made in the pressure and temperature ranges of 130 to 1000 psia, and 157/sup 0/ to 675/sup 0/F, respectively. The methods of prediction of enthalpy developed for petroleum fractions were unsatisfactory when applied to the above data. A negative bias was observed in the predicted enthalpy values for several of the coal-liquids. Based on these results, it was theorized that the high experimental enthalpy values for coal-liquids were due to an energy of association attributed, primarily, to hydrogen-bonding effects. The petroleum-fraction enthalpy correlations were then tested on the experimental data for pure compounds, both associating and non-associating. The predicted values compared very well with the experimental results for non-associating model compounds. However, for associating model compounds the predicted enthalpy values were considerably lower than their experimental data. This served to confirm the basic premise that the high experimental enthalpy values, for model compounds and coal liquids, were a direct consequence of an energy of association attributed, primarily, to hydrogen-bonding effects.

  10. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry.

  11. Coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

  12. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal

  13. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal

  14. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 3 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal

  15. Phase equilibrium properties of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, July-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A wide variety of methods have been used to study the phase behavior of mixtures, including: Measuring the phase boundary of binary mixtures, observing property discontinuities from volumetric measurements, and thermal measurements of mixtures, measuring the composition of samples in batch systems, measuring the composition of samples from continuous remixing and separation in recirculating systems, gas-liquid chromatography, and measuring the composition of samples from a once-through flow system. A major difficulty associated with measuring phase behavior of complex mixtures is the need to characterize the vapor and liquid sample products. This generally requires the collection of considerable quantities of the liquid and vapor products. Of all the methods listed, the only method which can generate significant quantities of both liquid and vapor products is the once-through flow method. This method has been used previously in determining the K values for petroleum fractions. For these reasons, we have designed a flow equilibrium flash vaporization system similar to the ones previously used on petroleum liquids.

  16. The Envy Premium in Product Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Niels van de Ven; Marcel Zeelenberg; Rik Pieters

    2011-01-01

    Consumers are willing to pay a premium for products that elicit their envy. The more people compared themselves to a superior other, the higher the envy premium was. Yet, the emotion envy and not the upward comparison drove the final effects. The envy premium only emerged for a desirable product that the superior other owned (iPhone) when people experienced benign envy. Benign envy is elicited when the other's superior position is deserved, and malicious envy when it is undeserved. When peopl...

  17. Does Specialization Explain Marriage Penalties and Premiums?

    OpenAIRE

    Killewald, Alexandra; Gough, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Married men’s wage premium is often attributed to within-household specialization: men can devote more effort to wage-earning when their wives assume responsibility for household labor. We provide a comprehensive evaluation of the specialization hypothesis, arguing that, if specialization causes the male marriage premium, married women should experience wage losses. Furthermore, specialization by married parents should augment the motherhood penalty and the fatherhood premium for married as c...

  18. Magnetic relaxation - coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1994-10-26

    The aim of the contract was to employ electron and nuclear magnetic relaxation techniques to investigate solvent swelling of coals, solvent extraction of coals and molecular interaction with solvent coal pores. Many of these investigations have appeared in four major publications and a conference proceedings. Another manuscript has been submitted for publication. The set of Argonne Premium Coals was chosen as extensively characterized and representative samples for this project.

  19. Characterization of liquid products from the co-cracking of ternary and quaternary mixture of petroleum vacuum residue, polypropylene, Samla coal and Calotropis Procera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ahmaruzzaman; D.K. Sharma [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India). Centre for Energy Studies

    2008-08-15

    The co-cracking of the petroleum vacuum residue (XVR) with polypropylene (PP), Samla coal (SC) and Calotropis procera (CL) has been carried out in a batch reactor under isothermal conditions at atmospheric pressure. The liquids obtained by co-cracking have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and inductively coupled argon plasma analyses. It was found that the liquid products obtained from the co-cracking of ternary and quaternary mixtures of the petroleum vacuum residue with polypropylene, coal and C. procera contained less than 1 ppm of Ni and V. The HPLC analyses indicates that the liquids obtained from the cracking of ternary mixture of XVR+PP+CL were mainly aliphatic in nature (saturates content 87.4%). NMR analyses showed that the aromatic carbon contents decreased (15.0%) in the liquid products derived from the co-cracking of quaternary mixtures of XVR+PP+SC+CL compared to their theoretical averages (taking the averages of aromatic carbon contents of the liquids from XVR, PP, SC and CL individually). The overall results indicated that there exists a definite interaction of reactive species when XVR, PP, SC and CL were co-cracked together. 27 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. 76 FR 57082 - Premium Penalty Relief; Alternative Premium Funding Target Election Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... alternative premium funding target to calculate its variable rate premium (VRP). The regulations require that such an election be filed with PBGC before the VRP due date. A plan makes an election by ] checking box... funding target is not in effect, the plan must calculate its VRP using the standard premium funding target...

  1. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.

  2. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Final report, April 1981-September 1983. [517 to 10342 kPa; 340 to 664 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1983-11-10

    This report summarizes the results of experimental measurements of enthalpies for quinoline using a freon boil-off flow calorimeter, and an investigation of the applicability of cubic equations of state to correlating the enthalpy of coal-liquids. In Part A the compound quinoline is discussed. Process flow in the flow calorimeter, operational problems, and equipment modifications are described. Procedural modifications, including a new sample purification procedure, are described. Part B discusses the correlational effort. This includes a discussion of past correlational work and the difficulties associated with a general correlation for coal liquid enthalpy. In addition experimental data and computer generated predictions are presented. Three equations of state were used to predict vapor pressures and enthalpies for ten pure component systems previously studied in the lab. In general, the results were encouraging. All three equations were found to be effective in predicting both enthalpies and vapor pressures. In addition, the equations worked well when fit to mixture enthalpies. The Modified SRK equation was found to be superior to the other equations and modeled all properties for both associating and nonassociating systems well. The Modified SRK equation did have a drawback in that it was not readily generalized since it required two parameters which must be fit to data for best results. In sum, it was shown that a four parameter equation of state could be used successfully to correlate the enthalpy of coal-liquid model compounds.

  3. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  4. Premium adjustment: actuarial analysis on epidemiological models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we analyse insurance premium adjustment in the context of an epidemiological model where the insurer's future financial liability is greater than the premium from patients. In this situation, it becomes extremely difficult for the insurer since a negative reserve would severely increase its risk of insolvency, ...

  5. Novel catalytic methods for heteroatom removal in coal liquids upgrading. Quarterly report No. 3, March 1, 1983-June 1, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, R.M.; Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The goal of this project is to optimize the reaction conditions for upgrading coal liquids. Our results for this quarter are summarized: Last quarter we found that H/sub 2/S aids in the HDN process. During this quarter, we have undertaken an H/sub 2/S concentration study on this reaction and found a direct correlation between the amount of added H/sub 2/S and the reduction in nitrogen content. For comparison, we also used H/sub 2/O and Na/sub 2/S as additives; however, neither appears to be as effective as H/sub 2/S in the HDN process. We initiated syntheses of some organometallic molybdenum cluster complexes (Mo/sub 2/(OAc)/sub 4/ and cluster complexes Mo/sub 2/(allyl)/sub 4/) and have reacted these complexes with an alumina support. Preliminary tests reveal that these complexes have, as expected, less hydrogenation activity than the activated CoMo catalyst. However, we have not yet tested them for HDN activities. We began experiments on the addition of added Bronsted acids (C/sub 3/FCOOH) to the reaction system. So far, the results have been promising and indicate a direct correlation between the amount of added acid and the amount of HDN activity. 3 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  6. Catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crynes, B L

    1980-07-15

    Five experimental runs were conducted in the newly constructed trickle-bed reactor. The experiments were designed to obtain data on zoned catalyst beds. This new reactor system demonstrated satisfactory performance in temperature, pressure and flow control. High desulfurization and denitrogenation were achieved on both catalysts tested at conditions of 815F, 1500 psig. These catalysts were a CoMo/Al and NiMo/Al. Zoned bed of 50-50 volume percent of the two catalysts tested revealed no advantages with respect to desulfurization, denitrogenation and activity decay. The level of nitrogen removal was initially high, but activity decay was significant over the operational interval of 100 hours. Two experimental runs were completed in the Catalyst Life Test Unit (CLTU) utilizing a liquid containing 50% Synthoil and 50% Raw Anthracene Oil. This fluid has a 0.54 weight percent sulfur and a 1.21 weight percent nitrogen. The catalyst used in this study was a Ni-Mo-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (Shell 324). The objective of the experiments was to demonstrate the effect of diluting the catalyst bed with a small size inert particle to improve gas-liquid contact and reduce channeling. No difference could be distinguished between the use of particle sizes in the range of 0.25 to 1.00 mm diameter. One run was terminated prematurely because the small particles plugged the catalyst support screens. Precipitous catalyst activity decay was noted for both nitrogen and sulfur removal.

  7. Vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements for design of coal gasification plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A.H.; Anderson, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported on vapor-liquid equilibrium compositions of two synthetic mixtures - H/sub 2/+CO+CO/sub 2/+CH/sub 4/+C/sub 2/H/sub 6/+Benzene and H/sub 2/+CO+CH/sub 4/+C/sub 2/H/sub 6/+C/sub 2/H/sub 4/+CO/sub 2/+H/sub 2/S+COS+Benzene. The equilibrium conditions investigated range from 323 to 479 K and 2280 to 19720 kPa. Based on this study, the Peng-Robinson correlation appears to be slightly better than the Soave-Redlich-Kwong correlation in predicting the phase equilibrium behavior of these complex mixtures. Both correlations are superior to the Grayson-Streed and Chao-Seader correlations. However, the Peng-Robinson correlation still shows some areas where improvements can be made. Specifically, for this six-component system it was observed that - actual hydrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide solubility in the liquid phase is greater than that predicted by the Peng-Robinson correlation under all conditions, and actual benzene, carbon dioxide, and ethane solubility in the gas phase is greater than that predicted under all conditions. 19 references, 7 figures, 10 tables.

  8. Enthalpy and phase behavior of coal derived liquid mixtures. Technical progress report, April-June 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1986-07-31

    Enthalpy measurements for the m-cresol/tetralin binary system, and the quinoline/tertralin binary system have been completed and are included. A calibration check on the calorimeter was performed and is presented in Appendix C. Vapor liquid equilibria measurements for the quinoline/tetralin system have been completed for four isotherms; 250, 275, 300, and 325/sup 0/C. These results and a summary of progress to date for the VLE apparatus are in the appendix at the end of this report. Also, preliminary work has begun on the quinoline/m-cresol/tetralin ternary system. Correlational work has consisted of the development of mathematical expressions for fugacity and enthalpy using various combinations of mixing rules and equations of state discussed in earlier reports. Also maximum likelihood routines has been written to determine the necessary parameters for binary data obtained in this investigation.

  9. [Characterization and supply of coal based fuels]. Quarterly technical report, February 1, 1988--April 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-31

    Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements; Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is described.

  10. Carbonization and liquid-crystal (mesophase) development. 21. Replacement of low-volatile caking coal by petroleum pitch in coal blends for metallurgical coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grint, A.; Marsh, H.

    1981-06-01

    Cokes were prepared in a 7 kg oven from blends of high-volatile and low-volatile caking coals, using ratios of 1:1 and 3:7 To the 1:1 blend was added 7.5% of either Ashland A240 or A170 petroleum pitch or SFBP petroleum pitch 1. Micum m$SUB$3$SUB$0 and m$SUB$1$SUB$0 indices were determined on cokes from the 7 kg oven, using the 1/5 micum drum. Optical textures were assessed using polarized light microscopy of polished surfaces of cokes. The effect of additive is to increase the strength of cokes. The pitch can be an effective replacement of low-volatile caking coal. The analysis by optical microscopy shows that with the stronger cokes from the 7 kg oven there has occurred an interaction between the coal and pitch at the interface of coal particles to produce a solution or fluid phase which carbonizes to a coke with an optical texture of fine-grained mozaics. This material could be responsible for the enhancement of coke strength, being associated with pore wall material rather than with a change in porosity. The results agree with previous work using cokes prepared in the laboratory on a small scale. (17 refs.)

  11. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal at HTI: Bench-scale studies in coal/waste plastics coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The development of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction (CMSL) at HTI has focused on both bituminous and sub-bituminous coals using laboratory, bench and PDU scale operations. The crude oil equivalent cost of liquid fuels from coal has been curtailed to about $30 per barrel, thus achieving over 30% reduction in the price that was evaluated for the liquefaction technologies demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties. Contrary to the common belief, the new generation of catalytic multistage coal liquefaction process is environmentally very benign and can produce clean, premium distillates with a very low (<10ppm) heteroatoms content. The HTI Staff has been involved over the years in process development and has made significant improvements in the CMSL processing of coals. A 24 month program (extended to September 30, 1995) to study novel concepts, using a continuous bench scale Catalytic Multi-Stage unit (30kg coal/day), has been initiated since December, 1992. This program consists of ten bench-scale operations supported by Laboratory Studies, Modelling, Process Simulation and Economic Assessments. The Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction is a continuation of the second generation yields using a low/high temperature approach. This paper covers work performed between October 1994- August 1995, especially results obtained from the microautoclave support activities and the bench-scale operations for runs CMSL-08 and CMSL-09, during which, coal and the plastic components for municipal solid wastes (MSW) such as high density polyethylene (HDPE)m, polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polythylene terphthlate (PET) were coprocessed.

  12. Life-Cycle Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Water Consumption – Effects of Coal and Biomass Conversion to Liquid Fuels as Analyzed with the GREET Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianfeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The vast reserves of coal in the U.S. provide a significant incentive for the development of processes for coal conversion to liquid fuels (CTL). Also, CTL using domestic coal can help move the U.S. toward greater energy independence and security. However, current conversion technologies are less economically competitive and generate greater greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than production of petroleum fuels. Altex Technologies Corporation (Altex, hereinafter) and Pennsylvania State University have developed a hybrid technology to produce jet fuel from a feedstock blend of coal and biomass. Collaborating with Altex, Argonne National Laboratory has expanded and used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model to assess the life-cycle GHG emissions and water consumption of this hybrid technology. Biomass feedstocks include corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw. The option of biomass densification (bales to pellets) is also evaluated in this study. The results show that the densification process generates additional GHG emissions as a result of additional biomass process energy demand. This process coproduces a large amount of char, and this study investigates two scenarios to treat char: landfill disposal (Char-LF) and combustion for combined heat and power (CHP). Since the CHP scenarios export excess heat and electricity as coproducts, two coproduct handling methods are used for well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis: displacement (Char-CHP-Disp) and energy allocation (Char-CHP-EnAllo). When the feedstock contains 15 wt% densified wheat straw and 85 wt% lignite coal, WTWa GHG emissions of the coal-and-biomass-to-liquid pathways are 116, 97, and 137 gCO2e per megajoule (MJ) under the Char-LF, Char-CHP-Disp, and Char-CHP-EnAllo scenarios, respectively, as compared to conventional jet fuel production at 84 gCO2e/MJ. WTWa water consumption values are 0.072, -0.046, and 0.044 gal/MJ for Char-LF, Char-CHP-Disp, and Char

  13. Phase-equilibrium properties of coal-derived liquids. Technical progress report, July-December 1982. [300/sup 0/C; 40 to 1200 psia; M-cresol-quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesavage, V.F.; Kidnay, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    On July 1, 1980, work was initiated on a program for experimental vapor liquid equilibrium measurements on coal-derived liquids. During the last six months, effort was devoted to data collection for the m-cresol-quinoline binary system, which is a system that should be of significance in coal-derived liquid studies. Major equipment difficulties were ecnountereed with this system including continued deterioration of the seal in the back pressure regulator (which eventually had to be replaced with a different model) and continued leakage from the cell at high temperatures across the graphoil gasket. A new cell using a quartz or sapphire window and a gold seal has been designed and will be constructed shortly to replace the existing cell. In addition, analysis of the samples was hampered due to lack of reproducibility of the capillary column gas-liquid chromatograph for this system. Although our progress is less than expected, our rate of expenditure has also been low, and we hope to attain our project objectives in a longer period of time.

  14. 75 FR 9247 - Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family AGENCY: Office of the Chief... the Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem-Upfront (SFPCS-U) to remit the upfront premium to... manage and process upfront single family mortgage insurance premium collections and corrections to submit...

  15. 12 CFR 1410.4 - Payment of premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment of premiums. 1410.4 Section 1410.4 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION PREMIUMS § 1410.4 Payment of premiums. (a) Payments. Each insured bank shall pay to the Corporation the amount of the premium due to the Corporation...

  16. Properties of Foreign Exchange Risk Premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarno, Lucio; Schneider, Paul; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We study the properties of foreign exchange risk premiums that can explain the forward bias puzzle, defined as the tendency of high-interest rate currencies to appreciate rather than depreciate. These risk premiums arise endogenously from the no-arbitrage condition relating the term structure...... of interest rates and exchange rates. Estimating affine (multi-currency) term structure models reveals a noticeable tradeoff between matching depreciation rates and accuracy in pricing bonds. Risk premiums implied by our global affine model generate unbiased predictions for currency excess returns...

  17. Dynamic jump intensities and risk premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Ornthanalai, Chayawat; Jacobs, Kris

    2012-01-01

    We build a new class of discrete-time models that are relatively easy to estimate using returns and/or options. The distribution of returns is driven by two factors: dynamic volatility and dynamic jump intensity. Each factor has its own risk premium. The models significantly outperform standard...... models without jumps when estimated on S&P500 returns. We find very strong support for time-varying jump intensities. Compared to the risk premium on dynamic volatility, the risk premium on the dynamic jump intensity has a much larger impact on option prices. We confirm these findings using joint...

  18. Employer Contribution and Premium Growth in Health Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Yiyan Liu; Ginger Zhe Jin

    2013-01-01

    We study whether employer premium contribution schemes could impact the pricing behavior of health plans and contribute to rising premiums. Using 1991-2011 data before and after a 1999 premium subsidy policy change in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP), we find that the employer premium contribution scheme has a differential impact on health plan pricing based on two market incentives: 1) consumers are less price sensitive when they only need to pay part of the premium incr...

  19. 38 CFR 8.2 - Payment of premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of premiums. 8.2 Section 8.2 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Premiums § 8.2 Payment of premiums. (a) What is a premium? A premium is a payment that a policyholder is required to make for an...

  20. Electricity from Coal Combustion: Improving the hydrophobicity of oxidized coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehra, Mohindar; Singh, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    To reduce pollution and improve efficiency, undesirable mineral impurities in coals are usually removed in coal preparation plants prior to combustion first by crushing and grinding coals followed by gravity separation using surfactant aided water flotation. However certain coals in the US are not amendable to this process because of their poor flotation characteristics resulting in a major loss of an energy resource. This problem has been linked to surface oxidation of mined coals which make these coals hydrophilic. In this project, we are investigating the surface and water flotation properties of the eight Argonne Premium (AP) coals using x-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. The role of the surface functional groups, (phenolic -OH and carboxylic -COOH), produced as a result of chemisorptions of O2 on coals in determining their flotation behavior is being explored. The isoelectric point (IEP) in zeta potential measurements of good vs. poor floaters is being examined in order to improved the hydrophobicity of poor floating coals (e.g. Illinois #6). Results from XRD and IR will be presented along with recent findings from zeta potential measurements, and use of additives to improve hydrophobicity. Supported by USDOE/CAST, Contract #DE-FC26-05NT42457.

  1. Comparative Study of Graphite-Supported LDI- and ESI-FT-ICR-MS of a Pyrolysis Liquid from a German Brown Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathsack, Philipp; Wolf, Bianca; Kroll, Marius M; Otto, Matthias

    2015-08-04

    Pyrolysis liquids from coal are complex mixtures of organic compounds with low to high molecular mass and low to high polarity. Compared to low-molecular-weight compounds, little information is available regarding high-molecular-weight compounds in pyrolysis liquids, although their characterization is important for the elucidation of degradation pathways. In this study, laser desorption ionization (LDI) using graphite powder as the support material has been used in conjunction with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) for the analysis of a pyrolysis liquid from brown coal. The acquired data is compared to previous results of the same sample using electrospray ionization (ESI). Using LDI, compounds with masses between 300 and 900 Da were detected by LDI. An evaluation of the spectra was based on the frequency of molecular formulas with a different number of heteroatoms. Hydrocarbon compounds and heteroatomic compounds containing oxygen and sulfur were found. A comparison to ESI results shows that the numbers of observed molecular formulas are virtually the same, but a higher quantity of molecular formulas with a low number of oxygen can be detected by LDI. The observation of molecular formulas without oxygen is a unique feature of the LDI spectra. A more detailed investigation was possible by the utilization of double bond equivalent plots versus carbon number, which revealed a prevalence of LDI for the ionization of compounds with higher DBE.

  2. Employee responses to health insurance premium increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Leibowitz, Arleen A; Robalino, David A

    2004-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity of employees' health insurance decisions--including the decision to not choose health maintenance organization or fee-for-service coverage--during periods of rapidly escalating healthcare costs. A retrospective cohort study of employee plan choices at a single large firm with a "cafeteria-style" benefits plan wherein employees paid all the additional cost of purchasing more generous insurance. We modeled the probability that an employee would drop coverage or switch plans in response to employee premium increases using data from a single large US company with employees across 47 states during the 3-year period of 1989 through 1991, a time of large premium increases within and across plans. Premium increases induced substantial plan switching. Single employees were more likely to respond to premium increases by dropping coverage, whereas families tended to switch to another plan. Premium increases of 10% induced 7% of single employees to drop or severely cut back on coverage; 13% to switch to another plan; and 80% to remain in their existing plan. Similar figures for those with family coverage were 11%, 12%, and 77%, respectively. Simulation results that control for known covariates show similar increases. When faced with a dramatic increase in premiums--on the order of 20%--nearly one fifth of the single employees dropped coverage compared with 10% of those with family coverage. Employee coverage decisions are sensitive to rapidly increasing premiums, and single employees may be likely to drop coverage. This finding suggests that sustained premium increases could induce substantial increases in the number of uninsured individuals.

  3. The private premium in public bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kovner; Chenyang Wei

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the first to document the presence of a private premium in public bonds. We find that spreads are 31 basis points higher for public bonds of private companies than for bonds of public companies, even after controlling for observable differences, including rating, financial performance, industry, bond characteristics and issuance timing. The estimated private premium increases to 40-50 basis points when a propensity matching methodology is used or when we control for fixed issuer...

  4. Field performance of a premium heating oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa, T. [Santa Fuels, Inc., Bridgeport, CT (United States); Jetter, S.M. [Mobil Oil R & D Corp., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)

    1996-07-01

    As part of our ongoing research to provide quality improvements to heating oil, Mobil Oil together with Santa Fuel, Inc., conducted a field trial to investigate the performance of a new premium heating oil. This premium heating oil contains an additive system designed to minimize sludge related problems in the fuel delivery system of residential home heating systems. The additive used was similar to others reported at this and earlier BNL conferences, but was further developed to enhance its performance in oil heat systems. The premium heating oil was bulk additized and delivered to a subset of the customer base. Fuel related, unscheduled service calls were monitored in this test area, as well as in a similar baseline area that did not receive the premium heating oil. Overall, the premium fuel provided a 45% reduction in the occurrence of fuel related, unscheduled service calls as compared to the baseline area. Within this population, there was a reduction of 38% in systems with 275 gallon tanks, and 55% in systems that had >275 gallon tanks showing that the additive is effective in the various configurations of residential oil heat systems. In addition, photographic documentation collected at two accounts supported this improvement by clearly showing that the equipment remained cleaner with the premium heating oil than with regular heating oil. Based on these results, a full marketing trial of this new product has been initiated by Mobil and Santa Fuel, Inc., during the 1995-1996 heating season.

  5. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal-Derived Liquids. Volume 12. Preliminary Process Design and Cost Estimate and Production Run Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Sulfolane Process licensed by Universal Oil Products. Referring to Drawings D5571-701A and B the flow is as follows: Stabilized Naphtha from the Naphtha...DTIC FILE COPY AD-A218 507 AFWAL-TR-87-2042 Volume XII PRODUCTION OF JET FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS VOL XII--PRELIMINARY PROCESS DESIGN AND COST...XII--Preliminary Process Design and Cost Estimate and Production Run Recommendation 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M. W. Furlong, J. D. Fox, J. G. Masin 13a

  6. The External Finance Premium and the Financial Accelerator: The Case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Cambazoğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The monetary transmission mechanisms have influence on saving and investment decisions of firms and households by affecting their balance sheets. This study examines the effects of monetary policy through the balance sheet channel (also known as 'financial accelerator', which affects net worth, liquidity and spending of firms and households through external financepremium. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of monetary contraction which raised the external finance premium and thus the effect of the increase in the external finance premium which diminishes output for Turkey over the period of 2003:01-2010:08 by using VAR (vector autoregressive models, impulse-response analysis and forecast error variance decomposition. The results indicate that contractionary monetary policy shock, which led to increased external finance premium, negatively affected the manufacturing sector and decreased total output. In other words, the monetary shock negatively affected firms' balance sheets in the short-run.

  7. Coal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroenig, W.

    1944-02-11

    Some considerations in the selection of a catalyst for the liquid phase of coal hydrogenation are discussed. Some of the previous history of such selections is mentioned. At one stage of the development, the principal catalyst had been iron sulfate (FeSO/sub 4/.7H/sub 2/O). Later, for reasons of cost and availability of large supplies, selections had turned to mixtures of iron sulfate and one or another of some iron oxide- and aluminum oxide-containing byproducts of aluminum manufacture, namely Bayermasse, Luxamsse, or Lautamasse. Much of the discussion centered on optimal proportions for such mixtures, particularly as related to pH values of resulting coal pastes. Upper Silesian coal was more alkaline than Ruhr coal, and Bayermasse, etc., were quite alkaline. Thus, since the iron sulfate served as a partial neutralizer for the coal as well as a catalyst, it seemed necessary to increase the proportions of iron sulfate in the catalyst mixture when processing coal of greater alkalinity. A further reason for a greater proportion of iron sulfate seemed to be that most of the catalytic activity of the iron came from the ferrous iron of iron sulfate rather than from the ferric iron of the other materials. Ferrous-ferric ratios also seemed to indicate that Luxmasse or Lautamasse might be better catalyst components than Bayermasse but their water content sometimes caused handling problems, so Bayermasse had been more widely used. Formation of deposits in the preheater was more likely due to the Bayermasse than to the iron sulfate; sodium sulfide could help to prevent them.

  8. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1980. [107 references; effect and extent of assoiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1980-09-15

    Cryoscopic molecular weight determinations were made on 5 pure compounds and 7 coal liquids. The accuracy of the measurements, based on the data for pure compounds, was estimated to be within +- 10% of the actual value. A linear relationship between the molecular weight and concentration of sample in the benzene solvent was observed. It was found that the slope of the line correlated directly with the absolute error, between the predicted and experimental enthalpy values, for all the liquids studied. As the slope increased, the absolute error also increased. Thus, the cryoscopic molecular weight determinations, as a function of concentration, were found to be an excellent indication of the extent and effect of association in any given fluid; and, as such, should be preferred as a characterizing tool, over the viscosity measurements, or any combination of the two.

  9. Reactivity of coal in direct hydrogenation processes: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, R. M.; Miller, R. L.

    1989-07-01

    This research program consisted of two facets dealing with fundamental and applied studies on coal reactivity under direct hydroliquefaction conditions. The first facet was concerned with an investigation of the relationship between coal reactivity and coal properties. Data on the rate and extent of direct coal hydroliquefaction for 5 bituminous coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Bank were measured. Data on rate of conversion of coal to THF and toluene solubles were modeled with a simple reversible rate expression, and activation energies for conversion to each solvent solubility class determined. Data on carbon and proton distribution in the coals were obtained by /sup 1/H-NMR and /sup 13/C-NMR. A strong correlation of activation energy with the aliphatic hydrogen content of the coal was found for conversion to THF solubles. The second facet of the program dealt with a mechanistic study of the effect of hydrogen on the rate and extent of coal liquefaction. The objective was to investigate the effect of radical quenching by aromatic and hydroaromatic vehicles on the activity and selectivity of hydrogen under conditions relevant to direct coal hydroliquefaction. The experimental portion of the program consisted of a series of runs on a model compound system, followed by experiments utilizing 5 bituminous coals from the Argonne Premium Coal sample bank. 45 refs., 14 figs., 17 tabs.

  10. Does Specialization Explain Marriage Penalties and Premiums?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killewald, Alexandra; Gough, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Married men’s wage premium is often attributed to within-household specialization: men can devote more effort to wage-earning when their wives assume responsibility for household labor. We provide a comprehensive evaluation of the specialization hypothesis, arguing that, if specialization causes the male marriage premium, married women should experience wage losses. Furthermore, specialization by married parents should augment the motherhood penalty and the fatherhood premium for married as compared to unmarried parents. Using fixed-effects models and data from the NLSY79, we estimate within-gender differences in wages according to marital status and between-gender differences in the associations between marital status and wages. We then test whether specialization on time use, job traits, and tenure accounts for the observed associations. Results for women do not support the specialization hypothesis. Childless men and women both receive a marriage premium. Marriage augments the fatherhood premium but not the motherhood penalty. Changes in own and spousal employment hours, job traits, and tenure appear to benefit both married men and women, although men benefit more. Marriage changes men’s labor market behavior in ways that augment wages, but these changes do not appear to occur at the expense of women’s wages. PMID:24039271

  11. Does Specialization Explain Marriage Penalties and Premiums?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killewald, Alexandra; Gough, Margaret

    2013-06-01

    Married men's wage premium is often attributed to within-household specialization: men can devote more effort to wage-earning when their wives assume responsibility for household labor. We provide a comprehensive evaluation of the specialization hypothesis, arguing that, if specialization causes the male marriage premium, married women should experience wage losses. Furthermore, specialization by married parents should augment the motherhood penalty and the fatherhood premium for married as compared to unmarried parents. Using fixed-effects models and data from the NLSY79, we estimate within-gender differences in wages according to marital status and between-gender differences in the associations between marital status and wages. We then test whether specialization on time use, job traits, and tenure accounts for the observed associations. Results for women do not support the specialization hypothesis. Childless men and women both receive a marriage premium. Marriage augments the fatherhood premium but not the motherhood penalty. Changes in own and spousal employment hours, job traits, and tenure appear to benefit both married men and women, although men benefit more. Marriage changes men's labor market behavior in ways that augment wages, but these changes do not appear to occur at the expense of women's wages.

  12. Clean coal initiatives in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, B.H.; Irwin, M.W.; Sparrow, F.T.; Mastalerz, Maria; Yu, Z.; Kramer, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - Indiana is listed among the top ten coal states in the USA and annually mines about 35 million short tons (million tons) of coal from the vast reserves of the US Midwest Illinois Coal Basin. The implementation and commercialization of clean coal technologies is important to the economy of the state and has a significant role in the state's energy plan for increasing the use of the state's natural resources. Coal is a substantial Indiana energy resource and also has stable and relatively low costs, compared with the increasing costs of other major fuels. This indigenous energy source enables the promotion of energy independence. The purpose of this paper is to outline the significance of clean coal projects for achieving this objective. Design/methodology/approach - The paper outlines the clean coal initiatives being taken in Indiana and the research carried out at the Indiana Center for Coal Technology Research. Findings - Clean coal power generation and coal for transportation fuels (coal-to-liquids - CTL) are two major topics being investigated in Indiana. Coking coal, data compilation of the bituminous coal qualities within the Indiana coal beds, reducing dependence on coal imports, and provision of an emissions free environment are important topics to state legislators. Originality/value - Lessons learnt from these projects will be of value to other states and countries.

  13. Design and construction of coal/biomass to liquids (CBTL) process development unit (PDU) at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placido, Andrew [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Liu, Kunlei [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Challman, Don [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Jacques, David [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-10-30

    This report describes a first phase of a project to design, construct and commission an integrated coal/biomass-to-liquids facility at a capacity of 1 bbl. /day at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) – specifically for construction of the building and upstream process units for feed handling, gasification, and gas cleaning, conditioning and compression. The deliverables from the operation of this pilot plant [when fully equipped with the downstream process units] will be firstly the liquid FT products and finished fuels which are of interest to UK-CAER’s academic, government and industrial research partners. The facility will produce research quantities of FT liquids and finished fuels for subsequent Fuel Quality Testing, Performance and Acceptability. Moreover, the facility is expected to be employed for a range of research and investigations related to: Feed Preparation, Characteristics and Quality; Coal and Biomass Gasification; Gas Clean-up/ Conditioning; Gas Conversion by FT Synthesis; Product Work-up and Refining; Systems Analysis and Integration; and Scale-up and Demonstration. Environmental Considerations - particularly how to manage and reduce carbon dioxide emissions from CBTL facilities and from use of the fuels - will be a primary research objectives. Such a facility has required significant lead time for environmental review, architectural/building construction, and EPC services. UK, with DOE support, has advanced the facility in several important ways. These include: a formal EA/FONSI, and permits and approvals; construction of a building; selection of a range of technologies and vendors; and completion of the upstream process units. The results of this project are the FEED and detailed engineering studies, the alternate configurations and the as-built plant - its equipment and capabilities for future research and demonstration and its adaptability for re-purposing to meet other needs. These are described in

  14. Economic and environmental evaluation of coal-and-biomass-to-liquids-and-electricity plants equipped with carbon capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among various clean energy technologies, one innovative option for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions involves pairing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with the production of synthetic fuels and electricity from co-processed coal and biomass. With a relatively pure CO2 strea...

  15. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Tenth Quartery report, October 1996--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, R.L. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences; Bumpus, J.A. [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-28

    It has long been known that low rank coal such as leonardite can be solubilized by strong base (>pH 12). Recent discoveries have also shown that leonardite is solubilized by Lewis bases at considerably lower pH values and by fungi that secrete certain Lewis bases (i.e., oxalate ion). During the current reporting period we have studied the ability of a strong base (sodium hydroxide, pH 12), and two fungi, Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Trametes versicolor, to solubilize Argonne Premium Coals. In general, Argonne Premium Coals were relatively resistant to base mediated solubilization. However, when these coals were preoxidized (150{degrees}C for seven days), substantial amounts of several coals were solubilized. Most affected were the Lewiston-Stockton bituminous coal, the Beulah-Zap lignite, the Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal and the Blind Canyon bituminous coal. Argonne Premium Coals were previously shown by us to be relatively resistant to solubilization by sodium oxalate. When preoxidized coals were treated with sodium oxalate, only the Beulah-Zap lignite was substantially solubilized. Although very small amounts of the other preoxidized coals were solubilized by treatment with oxalate, the small amount of solubilization that did take place was generally increased relative to that observed for coals that were not preoxidized. None of the Argonne Premium Coals were solubilized by P. chrysosporium or T. versicolor. Of considerable interest, however, is the observation that P. chrysosporium and T. versicolor mediated extensive solubilization of Lewiston-Stockton bituminous coal, the Beulah-Zap lignite and the Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal.

  16. Examining Determinants of Foreign Wage Premiums in China

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa M. Greaney; Yao Li

    2014-01-01

    We estimate foreign ownership wage premiums for every 3-digit manufacturing industry in China and discover a wide range of premiums both for so-called "foreign" ownership and for overseas Chinese ownership of firms. Foreign ownership generates larger and more prevalent wage premiums than overseas Chinese ownership of firms, but both types of foreign ownership produce wage premiums that respond similarly in hypothesis testing of determinants. Using the number of computers per worker as an indi...

  17. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  18. 24 CFR 266.604 - Mortgage insurance premium: Other requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgage insurance premium: Other... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER... Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 266.604 Mortgage insurance premium: Other...

  19. 24 CFR 266.602 - Mortgage insurance premium: Insured advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgage insurance premium: Insured... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER... Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 266.602 Mortgage insurance premium: Insured...

  20. 38 CFR 8.17 - Discontinuance of premium waiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discontinuance of premium waiver. 8.17 Section 8.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Premium Waivers and Total Disability § 8.17 Discontinuance of premium waiver. (a) The Secretary may require proof of...

  1. 76 FR 50931 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal.... SUMMARY: This document contains proposed regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit... individuals who enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and claim the premium...

  2. 49 CFR 260.17 - Credit risk premium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Credit risk premium analysis. 260.17 Section 260... Financial Assistance § 260.17 Credit risk premium analysis. (a) When Federal appropriations are not available to cover the total subsidy cost, the Administrator will determine the Credit Risk Premium...

  3. The Marriage Earnings Premium as a Distributed Fixed Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Wage equations using cross-sectional data typically find an earnings premium in excess of 10 percent for married men. One leading hypothesis for the premium is that marriage facilitates specialization that enables married men to become more productive than single men. Another is that the premium is attributable to an unobserved fixed effect,…

  4. Clearwood quality and softwood lumber prices: what's the real premium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Waggener; Roger D. Fight

    1999-01-01

    Diminishing quantities of appearance grade lumber and rising price premiums for it have accompanied the transition from old-growth to young-growth timber. The price premiums for better grades are an incentive for producers to undertake investments to increase the yield of those higher valued products. Price premiums, however, are also an incentive for users to...

  5. 26 CFR 1.823-4 - Net premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net premiums. 1.823-4 Section 1.823-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME....823-4 Net premiums. Net premiums are one of the items used, together with the gross amount of income...

  6. Cleaning and dewatering fine coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Eraydin, Mert K.; Freeland, Chad

    2017-10-17

    Fine coal is cleaned of its mineral matter impurities and dewatered by mixing the aqueous slurry containing both with a hydrophobic liquid, subjecting the mixture to a phase separation. The resulting hydrophobic liquid phase contains coal particles free of surface moisture and droplets of water stabilized by coal particles, while the aqueous phase contains the mineral matter. By separating the entrained water droplets from the coal particles mechanically, a clean coal product of substantially reduced mineral matter and moisture contents is obtained. The spent hydrophobic liquid is separated from the clean coal product and recycled. The process can also be used to separate one type of hydrophilic particles from another by selectively hydrophobizing one.

  7. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal. Quarterly report No. 1, September 21--December 15, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.S.

    1989-12-21

    We have examined changes in Argonne Premium samples of Wyodak coal following 30 min treatment in liquid water at autogenous pressures at 150{degrees}, 250{degrees}, and 350{degrees}C. In most runs the coal was initially dried at 60{degrees}C/1 torr/20 hr. The changes were monitored by pyrolysis field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS) operating at 2.5{degrees}C/min from ambient to 500{degrees}C. We recorded the volatility patterns of the coal tars evolved over that temperature range, and in all cases the tar yields were 25%--30% of the starting coal on mass basis. There was essentially no change after the 150{degrees}C treatment. Small increases in volatility were seen following the 250{degrees}C treatment, but major effects were seen in the 350{degrees} work. The tar quantity remained unchanged; however, the volatility increased so the temperature of half volatility for the as-received coal of 400{degrees}C was reduced to 340{degrees}C. Control runs with no water showed some thermal effect, but the net effect from the presence of liquid water was clearly evident. The composition was unchanged after the 150{degrees} and 250{degrees}C treatments, but the 350{degrees} treatment brought about a 30% loss of oxygen. The change corresponded to loss of the elements of water, although loss of ``OH`` seemed to fit the analysis data somewhat better. The water loss takes place both in the presence and in the absence of added water, but it is noteworthy that the loss in the hydrothermal runs occurs at p(H{sub 2}O) = 160 atm. We conclude that the process must involve the dehydration solely of chemically bound elements of water, the dehydration of catechol is a specific, likely candidate.

  8. Second Thoughts on the Exporter Productivity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp; Sørensen, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the prevailing interpretation, this paper shows that the central models of trade with heterogeneous firms [Melitz (2003) and Bernard et al.(2003)] exhibit ambiguous predictions for the exporter productivity premium. This prospect arises due to differences between theoretical and empir...

  9. The Skill Premium, Technological Change and Appropriability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahuis, R.; Smulders, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    In the US the skill premium and the non-production/production wage differential increased strongly from the late 1970s onwards.Skill-biased technological change is now generally seen as the dominant explanation, which calls for theories to explain the bias.This paper shows that the increased supply

  10. Modeling foreign exchange risk premium in Armenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poghosyan, Tigran; Kocenda, Evnen; Zemcik, Petr

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies stochastic discount factor methodology to modeling the foreign exchange risk premium in Armenia. We use weekly data on foreign and domestic currency deposits, which coexist in the Armenian banking system. This coexistence implies elimination of the cross-country risks and

  11. World Equity Premium based Risk Aversion Estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.G. Pozzi (Lorenzo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe equity premium puzzle holds that the coefficient of relative risk aversion estimated from the consumption based CAPM under power utility is excessively high. Moreover, estimates in the literature vary considerably across countries. We gauge the uncertainty pertaining to the country

  12. 28 CFR 345.52 - Premium pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) are notified by the FPI Manager or by a posted list on the FPI bulletin board. A record of the... traits supportive of morale and good institutional adjustment. It is not a form of bonus or incentive pay... for failure to demonstrate the premium pay selection traits or for failure to abide by the inmate...

  13. 24 CFR 203.443 - Insurance premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance premium. 203.443 Section... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Rehabilitation Loans § 203.443 Insurance...

  14. Bioconversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.

    1991-12-31

    The use of coal-derived synthesis gas as an industrial feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals has become an increasingly attractive alternative to present petroleum-based chemicals production. However, one of the major limitations in developing such a process is the required removal of catalyst poisons such as hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and other trace contaminants from the synthesis gas. Purification steps necessary to remove these are energy intensive and add significantly to the production cost, particularly for coals having a high sulfur content such as Illinois coal. A two-stage, anaerobic bioconversion process requiring little or no sulfur removal is proposed, where in the first stage the carbon monoxide (CO) gas is converted to butyric and acetic acids by the CO strain of Butyribacterium methylotrophicum. In the second stage, these acids along with the hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas are converted to butanol, ethanol, and acetone by an acid utilizing mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum. 18 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Health Insurance Marketplaces: Premium Trends in Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Abigail R; Kemper, Leah M; McBride, Timothy D; Meuller, Keith J

    2016-05-01

    Since 2014, when the Health Insurance Marketplaces (HIMs) authorized by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) were implemented, considerable premium changes have been observed in the marketplaces across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. This policy brief assesses the changes in average HIM plan premiums from 2014 to 2016, before accounting for subsidies, with an emphasis on the widening variation across rural and urban places. Since this brief focuses on premiums without accounting for subsidies, this is not intended to be an analysis of the "affordability" of ACA premiums, as that would require assessment of premiums, cost-sharing adjustments, and other factors.

  16. Molecular characterization of flash pyrolysates of two Carboniferous coals and their constituting maceral fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hartgers, W.A.; Ling, Y.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Dyrckacz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two high-volatile bituminous Upper Carboniferous coals from the Argonne Premium Coal Set and their constituting liptinite, vitrinite, and inertinite fractions, obtained by density gradient centrifugation (DGC), were characterized by Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A

  17. The evaluation of a coal-derived liquid as a feedstock for the production of high-density aviation turbine fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.P.; Hunter, D.E.

    1989-08-01

    The conversion of coal-derived liquids to transportation fuels has been the subject of many studies sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the US Department of Defense. For the most part, these studies evaluated conventional petroleum processes for the production of specification-grade fuels. Recently, however, the interest of these two departments expanded to include the evaluation of alternate fossil fuels as a feedstock for the production of high-density aviation turbine fuel. In this study, we evaluated five processes for their ability to produce intermediates from a coal-derived liquid for the production of high-density turbine fuel. These processes include acid-base extraction to reduce the heteroatom content of the middle distillate and the atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, solvent dewaxing to reduce the paraffin (alkane) content of the atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, Attapulgus clay treatment to reduce the heteroatom content of the middle distillate, coking to reduce the distillate range of the vacuum gas oil, and hydrogenation to remove heteroatoms and to saturate aromatic rings in the middle distillate and atmospheric gas oil. The chemical and physical properties that the US Air Force considers critical for the development of high-denisty aviation turbine fuel are specific gravity and net heat of combustion. The target minimum values for these properties are a specific gravity of at least 0.85 and a net heat of combustion of at least 130,000 Btu/gal. In addition, the minimum hydrogen content is 13.0 wt %, the maximum freeze point is {minus}53{degrees}F ({minus}47{degrees}C), the maximum amount of aromatics is about 25 to 30 vol %, and the maximum amount of paraffins is 10 vol %. 13 refs., 20 tabs.

  18. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  19. [Morphological verification problems of Chernobyl factor influence on the testis of coal miners of Donbas-liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Iu V; Motkov, K V; Shevchenko, T I

    2013-01-01

    Problem of a diagnostic of Chernobyl factor influences on different organs and systems of Chernobyl accident liquidators are remain actually until now. Though morbidly background which development at unfavorable work conditions in underground coalminers prevents from objective identification features of Chernobyl factor influences. The qualitative and quantitative histological and immunohistochemical law of morphogenesis changes in testis of Donbas's coalminer - non-liquidators Chernobyl accident in comparison with the group of Donbas's coalminers-liquidators Chernobyl accident, which we were stationed non determined problem. This reason stipulates to development and practical use of mathematical model of morphogenesis of a testis changes.

  20. Industrial coal utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the National Energy Act on the use of coal in US industrial and utility power plants are considered. Innovative methods of using coal in an environmentally acceptable way are discussed: furnace types, fluidized-bed combustion, coal-oil-mixtures, coal firing in kilns and combustion of synthetic gas and liquid fuels. Fuel use in various industries is discussed with trends brought about by uncertain availability and price of natural gas and fuel oils: steel, chemical, cement, pulp and paper, glass and bricks. The symposium on Industrial Coal Utilization was sponsored by the US DOE, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, April 3 to 4, 1979. Twenty-one papers have been entered individually into the EDB. (LTN)

  1. Coal/Biomass-to-Liquids Demonstration Testing for DLA Energy: Report on Project Tests, Evaluations, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Wheat straw 6,964 - 8,148 Hulls, shells, prunings 6,81 1 - 8,838 Fruit pits 8,950 - 10,000 Forest Residues Hardwood wood 8,017 - 8,920 Softwood...blend (162.0 Btu/scf) which is most likely due to the plastics in the MSW/coal feedstock blend. It is expected that product gas heating value will be...cardboard, plastics , rubber, textiles, metal, and glass. Because the plant capital cost, operating cost, and the MSW tipping fee are based on feeding

  2. Heteroatom speciation in coal liquefaction via FTIR coupled with liquid chromatography. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.T.

    1984-05-01

    The objectives of the research are (1) evaluate the potential of FT-IR for qualitative functional group detection in chromatographic fractions of highly polar materials, (2) develop separation techniques with the aid of FT-IR detection for concentration of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur functionalities in synfuels, (3) describe and quantify the various heteroatom functionalities in selected solvent refined coal fractions, (4) place speciation techniques on-line with chromatographic separations, (5) compare quantitative speciation information obtained from LC-FTIR with established fluorine tagging techniques regarding model compounds and synfuels. 23 figures, 5 tables.

  3. A novel oxidative method for the absorption of Hg(0) from flue gas of coal fired power plants using task specific ionic liquid scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Zach; Sachs, Tatyana; Chidambaram, Mandan; Sasson, Yoel

    2013-01-15

    A simple continuous process is described for the removal of mercury from gas streams (such as flue gas of a coal fired power stations) using imidazolium based Task Specific Ionic Liquids [TSILs] with the general structure ([RMIM][XI(2)(-)]) where X=Cl, Br or I. The latter are formed by blending dialkylimidazolium halide salts with iodine. When applied in a gas/liquid scrubber, these salts were shown to absorb >99% of elemental mercury originally present in a gas stream in concentration of 75-400 ppb. The mercury abatement is attained by oxidating the mercury to HgI(2) which is bound as a stable IL complex ([RMIM(+)][XHgI(2)(-)]. The novel absorption system exhibits a remarkable mercury concentration factor of seven orders of magnitude. The final solution obtained contains up to 50% (w/w) mercury in the IL. Upon exposure to sodium formate, directly added to the saturated IL at 45 °C, reduced metallic mercury swiftly precipitated from the solution and could be quantitatively separated and collected. The free IL could be fully recycled. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Country Value Premiums and Financial Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Zaremba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concentrates on the value premium across countries and contributes to the investment and asset pricing literature in three ways. First, I provide fresh evidence that the high-value countries perform significantly better than the low-value countries. Additionally, this phenomenon is indifferent to the choice of the computational currency, representative index or value indicator. Second, I demonstrate that the value effect can be successfully amplified by combining with country-level size and momentum effects. Third, I show that returns to the high-value countries deteriorate in financial crisis conditions, because the country-level value premium is negatively correlated with the credit spreads, TED spread and expected volatility. I examine data from 66 markets between years 2000 and 2013.

  5. Risk premium and insalubrity; Periculosidade e insalubridade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portela, Josmael [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil); Figueira, Rosania Lucia [Universidade Severino Sombra (USS), Vassouras, RJ (Brazil). Dept. Juridico

    2005-07-01

    The risk premium and insalubrity have been widely discussed in the legal universe/labor. The social and economic impacts interfere on the right of the professional exposed to ionizing radiation to have or not additional rights. Due to the large accidents, with world repercussion, which occurred in recent times, involving workers undergoing these radiation, these professionals are receiving special attention by the competent bodies on the right or not to risk premium and insalubrity. The professional who operates equipment that emit ionising radiation, or those working directly with radioisotopes are undoubtedly under imminent risk, even if they complied with all safety requirements, thus deserving a more careful analysis by our lawyers with respect to receive additional percentages. Recent decisions of higher Courts begin to consolidate a more just and logical reasoning on the subject.

  6. Coal geology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Larry

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the field of coal geology. All aspects of coal geology are covered in one volume, bridgint the gap between the academic aspects and the practical role of geology in the coal industry...

  7. Social Security and the Equity Premium Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Olovsson, Conny

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that social security may be an important factor in explaining the equity premium puzzle. In the absence of shortselling constraints, the young shortsell bonds to the middle-aged and buy equity. Social security reduces the bond demand of the middle-aged, thereby restricting the possibilities of the young to finance their equity purchases. Their equity demand increases as does the average return to equity. Social security also increases the covariance between future consumption...

  8. Risk Premium and Expectations in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Castex

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes the risk of college participation into context when evaluating the return to college education. College dropout and a higher permanent income shock for those who graduate from college accounts for 51% of the excess return to college education. Using a simple risk premium approach, I reconcile the observed high average returns to schooling with relatively low attendance rates. A high dropout risk has two important effects on the estimated average returns to college education: ...

  9. Employer contribution and premium growth in health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyan; Jin, Ginger Zhe

    2015-01-01

    We study whether employer premium contribution schemes could impact the pricing behavior of health plans and contribute to rising premiums. Using 1991-2011 data before and after a 1999 premium subsidy policy change in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP), we find that the employer premium contribution scheme has a differential impact on health plan pricing based on two market incentives: 1) consumers are less price sensitive when they only need to pay part of the premium increase, and 2) each health plan has an incentive to increase the employer's premium contribution to that plan. Both incentives are found to contribute to premium growth. Counterfactual simulation shows that average premium would have been 10% less than observed and the federal government would have saved 15% per year on its premium contribution had the subsidy policy change not occurred in the FEHBP. We discuss the potential of similar incentives in other government-subsidized insurance systems such as the Medicare Part D and the Health Insurance Marketplace under the Affordable Care Act. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bioconversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Annual report, September 29, 1992--September 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, H.E.

    1993-10-21

    The overall objective of the project is to develop and optimize a two-stage fermentation process for the conversion of coal derived synthesis gas in an mixture of alcohols. The goals include the development of superior strains with high product tolerance and productivity, optimization of process conditions for high volumetric productivity and product concentrations, integration and optimization of two stage syngas fermentation, evaluation of bioreactor configurations for enhanced mass transfer, evaluation of syngas conversion by a culture of Butyribacterium methyltrophicum and Clostridium acetobutylicum, development of a membrane based pervaporation system for in situ removal of alcohols, and development of a process for reduction of carbon and electron loss. The specific goals for year one (September 1992 - September 1993) were (1) development of a project work plan, (2) development of superior CO-utilizing strains, (3) optimization of process conditions for conversion of synthesis gas to a mixture of acids in a continuously stirred reactor (CSTR), (4) evaluation of different bioreactor configurations for maximization of mass transfer of synthesis gas, (5) development of a membrane based pervaporation system, and (6) reduction of carbon and electron loss via H{sub 2}CO{sub 2} fermentation. Experimentation and progress toward these goals are described in this report.

  11. Size-exclusion chromatography of large molecules from coal liquids, petroleum residues, soots, biomass tars and humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herod, Alan A; Zhuo, Yuqun; Kandiyoti, Rafael

    2003-06-30

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) as eluent has been calibrated using various standard polymers and model compounds and applied to the analysis of extracts of coal, petroleum and kerogens, to petroleum vacuum residues, soots, biomass tars and humic substances. Three separate columns of different molecular mass (MM) ranges were used, with detection by UV absorption; an evaporative light scattering detector was used for samples with no UV absorption. Fractionation was useful to separate signal from the less abundant high-mass material, which was normally masked by the strong signal from the more abundant low-mass material in the absence of fractionation. Fractionation methods used to isolate high-mass materials before SEC analysis included planar chromatography, column chromatography and solvent solubility. The apparently large molecules were concentrated into the fractions not soluble in common solvents and were relatively immobile in planar chromatography. All samples and fractions contained some material excluded from the column porosity. Evidence from other techniques suggests that the excluded material is of different structures from that of the resolved material rather than consisting of aggregates of small molecules. We speculate that the excluded material may elute early because the structures of this material are three-dimensional rather than planar or near planar.

  12. Who Is Afraid of Liquidity Risk? : Dynamic Portfolio Choice with Stochastic Illiquidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.A.G. Driessen (Joost); R. Xing (Rang)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecent empirical work documents large liquidity risk premiums in stock markets. We calculate the liquidity risk premiums demanded by large investors by solving a dynamic portfolio choice problem with stochastic price impact of trading, CRRA utility and a time-varying investment

  13. Full blast on 'premium' fuels; A pleins tubes sur les carburants premium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, V

    2006-04-15

    BP, Total and Shell companies are multiplying the commercial offers around their best quality ('premium') automotive fuels. The stake is to become competitive with commercial centers using technical products with a strong added value (better efficiency and lower environmental impact). Short paper. (J.S.)

  14. 78 FR 44056 - Premium Rates; Payment of Premiums; Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... undue opportunity for error and attendant inconvenience. For example, a filer that inadvertently..., understand, and follow. Less complexity means less chance for mistakes and the time and expense of correcting... premium due date is currently four months after the end of the plan year. The difference in approach...

  15. Hydroliquefaction of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Morgan C.; Schindler, Harvey D.

    1982-01-01

    Coal is catalytically hydroliquefied by passing coal dispersed in a liquefaction solvent and hydrogen upwardly through a plurality of parallel expanded catalyst beds, in a single reactor, in separate streams, each having a cross-sectional flow area of no greater than 255 inches square, with each of the streams through each of the catalyst beds having a length and a liquid and gas superficial velocity to maintain an expanded catalyst bed and provide a Peclet Number of at least 3. If recycle is employed, the ratio of recycle to total feed (coal and liquefaction solvent) is no greater than 2:1, based on volume. Such conditions provide for improved selectivity to liquid product to thereby reduce hydrogen consumption. The plurality of beds are formed by partitions in the reactor.

  16. Carbonization and liquid-crystal (mesophase) development. 20. Co-carbonization of a high-volatile caking coal with several petroleum pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grint, A.; Marsh, H.

    1981-06-01

    A high-volatile caking coal and five petroleum pitches were carbonized singly and coal/pitch systems were co-carbonized to 1273 K in the ratio of 75 wt% coal and 25 wt% pitch. Optical textures of cokes from the single carbonizations and co-carbonizations are assessed in terms of modification to the coal-coke by the pitch and unmodified pitch-coke using a point-counting technique. The pitches differ considerably in their carbonization behaviour. Each pitch can be placed into one of three groups defined in terms of their interaction with the high-volatile caking coal. A passive pitch does not modify the coal-coke but apparently carbonizes independently of the coal. An active pitch modified some of the coal-coke. No pitch-coke can be detected. A super-active pitch modifies the coal-coke extensively beyond the extent expected from a 25% addition. No pitch-coke can be detected. The effects are related to the ability of the pitch to cause depolymerization of the coal. Quinoline-insoluble material in pitch may inhibit modification. (8 refs.)

  17. Risk premiums in cap rates of investment property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, T.M.; Wouwe, van M.; Tansens, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Our research wants to establish links and patterns over time between the constituent components of the cap rates, and between real interest and risk premium in particular. We developed a statistical model to predict and explain the risk premium asked for by investors buying properties throughout

  18. A Comment on: Storage and the Electricity Forward Premium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bloys van Treslong (Adriaan); R. Huisman (Ronald)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the robustness of the results found by Douglas and Popova (2008). They examine the electricity forward premium in relation to gas storage inventories and find that, although electricity is not directly storable, electricity forward premiums are lower when gas storage

  19. The Risk Premium for Equity : Explanations and Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grant, S.; Quiggin, J.

    2001-01-01

    The equity premium puzzle shows that using standard parameters and setup, the Consumption-based Capital Asset Pricing Model's (CCAPM's) prediction of the premium associated with systematic risk is out by an order of magnitude.The object of this paper is to consider the implications of each of the

  20. The Phantom Gender Difference in the College Wage Premium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, William H. J.

    2011-01-01

    A growing literature seeks to explain why so many more women than men now attend college. A commonly cited stylized fact is that the college wage premium is, and has been, higher for women than for men. After identifying and correcting a bias in estimates of college wage premiums, I find that there has been essentially no gender difference in the…

  1. Structure and Properties of Thermite Welds in Premium Rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Thermite welds were used to join combinations of premium rails and AREA Controlled Cooled Carbon rails (i.e., standard rails). The premium rails comprised head-hardened rails and CrMo, CrV and Cr alloy rails. A major objective was to determine the fe...

  2. 5 CFR 410.402 - Paying premium pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paying premium pay. 410.402 Section 410... for Training Expenses § 410.402 Paying premium pay. (a) Prohibitions. Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, an agency may not use its funds, appropriated or otherwise available, to pay...

  3. A meta-analysis of the equity premium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ewijk, C.; de Groot, H.L.F.; Santing, C.

    2010-01-01

    The equity premium is a key parameter in asset allocation policies. There is a vigorous debate in the literature regarding the actual measurement of the equity premium, its size and the determinants of its variation. This study aims to take stock of this literature by means of a meta-analysis. We

  4. Premium auctions and risk preferences: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, C.; Hu, A.; Oechssler, J.

    2014-01-01

    In premium auctions, the highest losing bidder receives a reward from the seller. This paper studies the private value English premium auction (EPA) for different risk attitudes of bidders. We explicitly derive the symmetric equilibrium for bidders with CARA utilities and conduct an experimental

  5. 77 FR 41048 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction AGENCY..., 2012 (77 FR 30377). The final regulations relate to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of...

  6. 77 FR 30377 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY... regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and... guidance to individuals who enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges...

  7. 78 FR 7264 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BL49 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal... regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and... coverage and who wish to enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges...

  8. 42 CFR 60.14 - The insurance premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the loan. (5) Except in cases of error, premiums are not refundable by the Secretary, and need not be... LOAN PROGRAM The Loan § 60.14 The insurance premium. (a) General. (1) The Secretary insures each lender... dischargeability of the HEAL loan; or defaults on his or her loan. For this insurance, the Secretary charges the...

  9. 24 CFR 207.252 - First, second and third premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... one percent nor more than one percent as the Secretary shall determine of the original face amount of... premium equal to not less than one-fourth of one percent nor more than one percent as the Secretary shall... mortgagee shall pay a third premium equal to not less than one-fourth of one percent nor more than one...

  10. Premium Motorsi priimad päevad / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2007-01-01

    Automüüja Premium Motors on edu saavutanud luksusmaasturi Hummer ning teiste USA eksklusiivsete automarkide müügiõigusega. Tabel: Rentaabel äri. Vt. samas: Palun kaks roosat Hummerit; Premium Motors hakkab sügisel Hiina maastureid müüma.

  11. 26 CFR 1.822-11 - Net premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net premiums. 1.822-11 Section 1.822-11 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME... Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis of Perpetual Policies Or Premium Deposits) § 1...

  12. 26 CFR 1.823-1 - Net premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net premiums. 1.823-1 Section 1.823-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME... Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis of Perpetual Policies Or Premium Deposits) § 1...

  13. The equity risk premium : emerging versus developed markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, R.M.; Grootveld, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper gives an empirical view of the ex-post equity risk premium in a number of international markets with special attention to emerging ones. Our study yields interesting implications for finance. Firstly, we find that the equity risk premium in emerging markets is significantly higher than in

  14. 45 CFR 152.21 - Premiums and cost-sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Premiums and cost-sharing. 152.21 Section 152.21...-EXISTING CONDITION INSURANCE PLAN PROGRAM Benefits § 152.21 Premiums and cost-sharing. (a) Limitation on... the applicable standard risk rate that would apply to the coverage offered in the State or States. The...

  15. Green-House-Gas-Reduced Coal-and-Biomass-to-Liquid-Based Jet Fuel (GHGR-CBTL) Process - Final Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Kenneth [Altex Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Imam, Thamina [Altex Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Chevanan, Nehru [Altex Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Namazian, Mehdi [Altex Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-11-03

    This Final Technical Report describes the work and accomplishments of the project entitled, “Green-House-Gas-Reduced Coal-and-Biomass-to-Liquid-Based Jet Fuel (GHGR-CBTL) Process”. The main objective of the project was to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the GHGR-CBTL fuel-production technology from TRL 4 to TRL 5 by producing a drop-in synthetic Jet Propellant 8 (JP-8) with a greenhouse-gas footprint less than or equal to petroleum-based JP-8 by utilizing mixtures of coal and biomass as the feedstock. The system utilizes the patented Altex fuel-production technology, which incorporates advanced catalysts developed by Pennsylvania State University. While the system was not fabricated and tested, major efforts were expended to design the 1-TPD and a full-scale plant. The system was designed, a Block-Flow Diagram (BFD), a Process-Flow Diagram (PFD), and Piping-and-Instrumentation Diagrams (P&IDs) were produced, a Bill of Materials (BOM) and associated spec sheets were produced, commercially available components were selected and procured, custom components were designed and fabricated, catalysts were developed and screened for performance, and permitting activities were conducted. Optimization tests for JP-8 production using C2 olefin as the feed were performed over a range of temperatures, pressures and WHSVs. Liquid yields of between 63 to 65% with 65% JP-8 fraction (41-42% JP-8 yield) at 50 psig were achieved. Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA) was performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and a GHGR-CBTL module was added to the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model. Based upon the experimental results, the plant design was reconfigured for zero natural-gas imports and minimal electricity imports. The LCA analysis of the reconfigured process utilizing the GREET model showed that if the char from the process was utilized to produce combined heat and power (CHP) then a feed containing 23 wt% biomass and

  16. The study of glycemic index of Gen-Premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyavarakul, Apussanee

    2013-08-01

    To determine the glycemic index of Gen-Premium. Ten healthy volunteers were included for testing glycemic index of Gen-Premium. After the overnight fast, the subjects consumed 50 grams of glucose (reference food) within five minutes. The blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes for measuring of plasma glucose. One day later the same subjects consumed 50 grams of carbohydrate from Gen-Premium (test food) within five minutes. After complete the data, the glycemic index was calculated by the standard method. The glycemic index of Gen-Premium was 27.29, which classify in low GI food. According to the methodology of glycemic index determination, the glycemic index of Gen-Premium is 27.29, which is considered to be favorably low.

  17. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels. Volume 1, Final report and appendix A (Topical report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.

  18. Coal liquefaction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, N.R.; Blazek, C.F.; Tison, R.R.

    1979-07-01

    Coal liquefaction is an emerging technology receiving great attention as a possible liquid fuel source. Currently, four general methods of converting coal to liquid fuel are under active development: direct hydrogenation; pyrolysis/hydrocarbonization; solvent extraction; and indirect liquefaction. This work is being conducted at the pilot plant stage, usually with a coal feed rate of several tons per day. Several conceptual design studies have been published recently for large (measured in tens of thousands of tons per day coal feed rate) commercial liquefaction plants, and these reports form the data base for this evaluation. Products from a liquefaction facility depend on the particular method and plant design selected, and these products range from synthetic crude oils up through the lighter hydrocarbon gases, and, in some cases, electricity. Various processes are evaluated with respect to product compositions, thermal efficiency, environmental effects, operating and maintenance requirements, and cost. Because of the large plant capacities of current conceptual designs, it is not clear as to how, and on what scale, coal liquefaction may be considered appropriate as an energy source for Integrated Community Energy Systems (CES). Development work, both currently under way and planned for the future, should help to clarify and quantify the question of applicability.

  19. Chemicals from coal. Utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1999-07-01

    This article provides an overview for possible utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are abundant in coal-derived liquids. Coal-derived phenolic compounds include phenol, cresol, catechol, methylcatechol, naphthol, and their derivatives. Liquids from coal liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, and carbonization are potential sources of phenolic chemicals, although certain processing and separation are needed. There are opportunities for coal-based phenolic chemicals, because there are existing industrial applications and potential new applications. Currently the petrochemical industry produces phenol in multi-step processes, and new research and development has resulted in a one-step process. Selective methylation of phenol can produce a precursor for aromatic engineering plastics. Catalytic oxidation of phenol has been commercialized recently for catechol production. There are potential new uses of phenol that could replace large-volume multi-step chemical processes that are based on benzene as the starting material. New chemical research on coal and coal-derived liquids can pave the way for their non-fuel uses for making chemicals and materials.

  20. Separation of coal-tar constituents from soil particles in a two-liquid-phase slurry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, J H Berg; Mattiasson, B

    2003-06-01

    An evaluation has been made of the capability of rapeseed oil to dissolve polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) crystals in a biphasic system and of its capability to extract PAHs from polluted soil in a two-liquid-phase (TLP) slurry system. Up to 220 g l(-1) of the crystalline hydrocarbons could be dissolved in the organic phase, indicating oil/water-partitioning coefficients of 10(5). When soil from a former gasworks site was treated in a TLP slurry system, it was found that a certain critical amount of vegetable oil had to be added in order to form a free oil phase. Single and multiple extractions gave similar results for multiple short-term and single long-term treatments, with a maximum of 87% for pyrene release. Following a 30-day bioslurry treatment, the total concentration of the 16 EPA PAHs in the soil decreased from 2740 mg kg(-1) to 1366 mg kg(-1). This was followed by one of three different 12-day post-bioslurry treatments. Further bioslurry treatment reduced the final concentration to 1002 mg kg(-1). Abiotic treatment with a surfactant (Brij 30) achieved a reduction to 797 mg kg(-1). Treatment with rapeseed oil gave the best reduction to 343 mg kg(-1).

  1. Fluidised bed gasification of low grade South African coals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    North, BC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available -going investigation into one potential Clean Coal Technology (CCT), namely fluidised bed gasification. Coal gasification holds the potential benefits of increased efficiency, reduced water consumption and co-production of liquid and gaseous fuels and chemicals...

  2. MOLECULAR ACCESSIBILITY IN OXIDIZED AND DRIED COALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell D. Kispert

    1999-07-01

    Changes in physical and chemical structure of the micropore system in eight solvent swelled Argonne Premium Coal Sample (APCS) coals upon weathering were studied using the EPR spin probe method. Spin probes, which are allowed to diffuse into the coal structure during swelling, are trapped when the swelling solvent is removed. Excess spin probes are removed from the coal surface and larger pores so that only the presence of spin probes trapped in pores which closely approximate the size of the spin probe are detected. Detailed explanations and illustrations of the experimental procedure used are given. Careful examination of the weathering process on coal as a function of rank was accomplished using the EPR spin probe method. The retention of spin probes in eight APCS coals provided valuable insight into both the loss of water and the oxidation which occur during the weathering process. The results could be explained in terms of the autoxidation process observed in other polymeric systems. It was shown that initial oxidation of coal can result in increased cross-linking in the coal structure. As the oxidation process continued, both the covalent and hydrogen bonded character of the coal were significantly altered. The retention character of some coals during oxidation was shown to change by as much as three orders of magnitude. Experiments were performed to study the effects of short term oxidation and dehydration on coal structure by exposing the coal samples to argon or oxygen for time periods up to five minutes. The results indicate that the structure of coal is extremely sensitive to environmental changes and exhibits significant changes in as little as 30 seconds. Exposure of Illinois No.6 coal to argon or oxygen for 30 seconds caused a decrease in the retention of polar spin probes by as much as an order of magnitude. The studies presented here suggest that the structure of coal is dynamic in nature, and has an intimate relationship with the nature of its

  3. Coal desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, William H. (Inventor); Vasilakos, Nicholas P. (Inventor); Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method for enhancing solubilizing mass transport of reactive agents into and out of carbonaceous materials, such as coal. Solubility parameters of mass transfer and solvent media are matched to individual peaks in the solubility parameter spectrum of coals to enhance swelling and/or dissolution. Methanol containing reactive agent carriers are found particularly effective for removing organic sulfur from coals by chlorinolysis.

  4. HIV, wages, and the skill premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Ioana

    2014-09-01

    The HIV epidemic has dramatically decreased labor supply among prime-age adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using within-country variation in regional HIV prevalence and a synthetic panel, I find that HIV significantly increases the capital-labor ratio in urban manufacturing firms. The impact of HIV on average wages is positive but imprecisely estimated. In contrast, HIV has a large positive impact on the skill premium. The impact of HIV on the wages of low skilled workers is insignificantly different from 0, and is strongly dampened by competition from rural migrants. The HIV epidemic disproportionately increases the incomes of high-skilled survivors, thus increasing inequality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 12 CFR 1410.3 - Calculation and reporting of premiums due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calculation and reporting of premiums due. 1410.3 Section 1410.3 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION PREMIUMS § 1410.3 Calculation and reporting of premiums due. (a) Reporting. For purposes of computing premiums, each insured...

  6. 26 CFR 1.822-10 - Amortization of premium and accrual of discount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of premium and accrual of discount... Perpetual Policies Or Premium Deposits) § 1.822-10 Amortization of premium and accrual of discount. (a) In... decreased by the appropriate amortization of premium and increased by the appropriate accrual of discount...

  7. Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

    2005-12-05

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding

  8. Medical Malpractice Reform and Employer‐Sponsored Health Insurance Premiums

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Nelson, Leonard (Jack)

    2008-01-01

    ...‐sponsored health insurance. Data Sources/Study Setting. Employer premium data and plan/establishment characteristics were obtained from the 1999 through 2004 Kaiser/HRET Employer Health Insurance Surveys...

  9. Premium growth and its effect on employer-sponsored insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistnes, Jessica; Selden, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    We use variation in premium inflation and general inflation across geographic areas to identify the effects of downward nominal wage rigidity on employers' health insurance decisions. Using employer level data from the 2000 to 2005 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component, we examine the effect of premium growth on the likelihood that an employer offers insurance, eligibility rates among employees, continuous measures of employee premium contributions for both single and family coverage, and deductibles. We find that small, low-wage employers are less likely to offer health insurance in response to increased premium inflation, and if they do offer coverage they increase employee contributions and deductible levels. In contrast, larger, low-wage employers maintain their offers of coverage, but reduce eligibility for such coverage. They also increase employee contributions for single and family coverage, but not deductibles. Among high-wage employers, all but the largest increase deductibles in response to cost pressures.

  10. The Value Premium on the Danish Stock Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    for more than half a century. We report in particular on the insights obtained when portfolios are formed on the basis of the price-earnings multiple. The paper shows that there is a value premium. The paper also analyzes whether the premium is likely to be due to risk (Fama and French (1992......A number of influential studies have documented a strong value premium for US stocks over the period 1963 to 1990 (Fama and French (1992), Lakonishok et al. (1994)). Stocks with low price-earnings multiples, price-book values and other measures of value are reported to have given a higher mean...... return than the high multiple growth firms. Work by Basu (1997) and others have shown that the value dominance is also a feature of the earlier market history of the United States. The value premium is reported also to exist in a number of other countries over the period 1975 to 1995 (Fama and French...

  11. The Effects of Premium Changes on ALL Kids

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Effects of Premium Changes on ALL Kids, Alabamas CHIP Program Unlike many other CHIP programs, ALL Kids is a standalone program that provides year long...

  12. Investigation on characterization of Ereen coal deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jargalmaa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ereen coal deposit is located 360 km west from Ulaanbaatar and 95 km from Bulgan town. The coal reserve of this deposit is approximately 345.2 million tons. The Ereen coal is used directly for the Erdenet power plant for producing of electricity and heat. The utilization of this coal for gas and liquid product using gasification and pyrolysis is now being considered. The proximate and ultimate analysis show that the Ereen coal is low rank D mark hard coal, which corresponds to subbituminous coal. The SEM images of initial coal sample have compact solid pieces. The SEM image of carbonized and activated carbon samples are hard material with high developed macro porosity structure. The SEM images of hard residue after thermal dissolution in autoclave characterizes hard pieces with micro porous structure in comparison with activated carbon sample. The results of the thermal dissolution of Ereen coal in tetralin with constant weight ratio between coal and tetralin (1:1.8 at the 450ºC show that 38% of liquid product can be obtained by thermal decomposition of the COM (coal organic matter.Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 16 (42, 2015, 18-21

  13. Analysis of photographic records of coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodoo, J.N.D.

    1991-10-01

    Bituminous coals upon heating undergo melting and pyrolytic decomposition with significant parts of the coal forming an unstable liquid that can escape from the coal by evaporation. The transient liquid within the pyrolyzing coal causes softening or plastic behavior that can influence the chemistry and physics of the process. Bubbles of volatiles can swell the softened coal mass in turn affecting the combustion behavior of the coal particles. The swelling behavior of individual coal particles has to be taken into account both as the layout as well as for the operation of pyrolysis, coking and performance of coal-fired boilers. Increased heating rates generally increase the amount of swelling although it is also known that in some cases, even highly swelling coals can be transformed into char with no swelling if they are heated slowly enough. The swelling characteristics of individual coal particles have been investigated by a number of workers employing various heating systems ranging from drop tube and shock tube furnaces, flow rate reactors and electrical heating coils. Different methods have also been employed to determine the swelling factors. The following sections summarize some of the published literature on the subject and outline the direction in which the method of analysis will be further extended in the study of the swelling characteristics of hvA bituminous coal particles that have been pyrolyzed with a laser beam.

  14. Flotation and flocculation chemistry of coal and oxidized coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaran, P.; Ramesh, R.

    1989-01-01

    This project is designed to develop an understanding of the fundamentals involved in flotation and flocculation of coal, and of coal in various states of oxidation. The main objective of this study is to accurately characterize the coal surface and elucidate mechanisms by which surface interactions between coal and various reagents enhance beneficiation of coals. Effects of oxidation on the modification of surface characteristics of coal by various reagents will also be studied. This quarter, the following studies were conducted in order to further develop our understanding of the role of heterogeneity in interfacial phenomena. (1) Since surface characterization is an important aspect in this project, ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) study of the coal surface was conducted. Surface derivatization, a technique often used in the preparation of organic compounds for gas-liquid chromatography, uses site specific molecular tags'' that bond to key chemical groups on the surface. Application of derivatization in conjunction with ESCA is a relatively new technique for quantifying functional groups on the surface which has not been possible till now. (2) A distribution of contact angles on the surface of coal (pseudo theta map) is presented based on our earlier results and other published information. The role of heterogeneity in contact angle studies is also examined. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Coal: Energy for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  16. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  18. Advanced bioreactor systems for gaseous substrates: Conversion of synthesis gas to liquid fuels and removal of SO{sub X} and NO{sub X} from coal combustion gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, P.T.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this research program is the development and demonstration of a new generation of gaseous substrate based bioreactors for the production of liquid fuels from coal synthesis gas and the removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} species from combustion flue gas. This R&D program is a joint effort between the staff of the Bioprocessing Research and Development Center (BRDC) of ORNL and the staff of Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology report entitled {open_quotes}Biotechnology for the 21st Century{close_quotes} and the recent Energy Policy Act of 1992 emphasizes research, development, and demonstration of the conversion of coal to gaseous and liquid fuels and the control of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in effluent streams. This R&D program presents an innovative approach to the use of bioprocessing concepts that will have utility in both of these identified areas.

  19. Clean coal-preparation barriers in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaschke, W.; Nycz, R. [Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland). Mineral & Energy Economic Research Institution

    2003-04-01

    Poland is the second biggest European producer of hard coal. This raw product is cleaned in 49 preparation plants. Production capacities of the preparation plants depend on the demand for coal. The clean-coal production mostly depends on the quality demands of customers. Polish hard-coal is of good quality. It is enough to remove grains of clean stone to get saleable products of ash content between 8 and 12%. Rarely the ash content is up to 15%. The coal can be cleaned to 4-6% ash content, but there is a very small demand for this type of coal. Gravity separation (via heavy liquids, jigs, cyclones) removes the grains of pure stone. Currently, no preparation of the coal after grinding is conducted.

  20. CO2 Sequestration in Unmineable Coal Seams: Potential Environmental Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee; McCarthy Jones, J.R.; Harrison, D.K.; Irdi, G.A.; Frommell, E.A.; Dilmore, R.M.; Pique, P.J.; Brown, T.D

    2005-09-01

    An initial investigation into the potential environmental impacts of CO2 sequestration in unmineable coal seams has been conducted, focusing on changes in the produced water during enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production using a CO2 injection process (CO2-ECBM). Two coals have been used in this study, the medium volatile bituminous Upper Freeport coal (APCS 1) of the Argonne Premium Coal Samples series, and an as-mined Pittsburgh #8 coal, which is a high volatile bituminous coal. Coal samples were reacted with either synthetic produced water or field collected produced water and gaseous carbon dioxide at 40 οC and 50 bar to evaluate the potential for mobilizing toxic metals during CO2-ECBM/sequestration. Microscopic and x-ray diffraction analysis of the post-reaction coal samples clearly show evidence of chemical reaction, and chemical analysis of the produced water shows substantial changes in composition. These results suggest that changes to the produced water chemistry and the potential for mobilizing toxic trace elements from coalbeds are important factors to be considered when evaluating deep, unmineable coal seams for CO2 sequestration.

  1. Desulfurization of Coal in Fluidized Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddury, R.; Kalvinskas, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental dry chemical process for removing sulfur from coal-and thereby reducing harmful sulfur emissions from coal-fired electric powerplants-promises more economical and effective than older wet chemical processes. New process faster, requires smaller amounts of chemical reagents, and produces no liquid effluents, which poses disposal problem.

  2. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  3. [Study on Microwave Co-Pyrolysis of Low Rank Coal and Circulating Coal Gas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Zhe; Liu, Xiao-feng; Wu, Lei; Tian, Yu-hong; Zhao, Xi-cheng

    2016-02-01

    The pyrolysis of low rank coal to produce bluecoke, coal tar and gas is considered to be the optimal method to realize its clean and efficient utilization. However, the current mainstream pyrolysis production technology generally has a certain particle size requirements for raw coal, resulting in lower yield and poorer quality of coal tar, lower content of effective components in coal gas such as H₂, CH₄, CO, etc. To further improve the yield of coal tar obtained from the pyrolysis of low rank coal and explore systematically the effect of microwave power, pyrolysis time and particle size of coal samples on the yield and composition of microwave pyrolysis products of low rank coal through the analysis and characterization of products with FTIR and GC-MS, introducing microwave pyrolysis of low rank coal into the microwave pyrolysis reactor circularly was suggested to carry out the co-pyrolysis experiment of the low rank coal and coal gas generated by the pyrolysis of low rank coal. The results indicated that the yield of the bluecoke and liquid products were up to 62.2% and 26.8% respectively when the optimal pyrolysis process conditions with the microwave power of 800W, pyrolysis time of 40 min, coal samples particle size of 5-10 mm and circulating coal gas flow rate of 0.4 L · min⁻¹ were selected. The infrared spectrogram of the bluecoke under different microwave power and pyrolysis time overlapped roughly. The content of functional groups with -OH, C==O, C==C and C−O from the bluecoke through the pyrolysis of particle size coal samples had a larger difference. To improve microwave power, prolonging pyrolysis time and reducing particle size of coal samples were conducive to converting heavy component to light one into coal tar.

  4. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  5. Medical malpractice reform and employer-sponsored health insurance premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Nelson, Leonard Jack

    2008-12-01

    Tort reform may affect health insurance premiums both by reducing medical malpractice premiums and by reducing the extent of defensive medicine. The objective of this study is to estimate the effects of noneconomic damage caps on the premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance. Employer premium data and plan/establishment characteristics were obtained from the 1999 through 2004 Kaiser/HRET Employer Health Insurance Surveys. Damage caps were obtained and dated based on state annotated codes, statutes, and judicial decisions. Fixed effects regression models were run to estimate the effects of the size of inflation-adjusted damage caps on the weighted average single premiums. State tort reform laws were identified using Westlaw, LEXIS, and statutory compilations. Legislative repeal and amendment of statutes and court decisions resulting in the overturning or repealing state statutes were also identified using LEXIS. Using a variety of empirical specifications, there was no statistically significant evidence that noneconomic damage caps exerted any meaningful influence on the cost of employer-sponsored health insurance. The findings suggest that tort reforms have not translated into insurance savings.

  6. Modeling and Analyzing Taxi Congestion Premium in Congested Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion is a significant problem in many major cities. Getting stuck in traffic, the mileage per unit time that a taxicab travels will decline significantly. Congestion premium (or so-called low-speed fare has become an increasingly important income source for taxi drivers. However, the impact of congestion premium on the taxicab market is not widely understood yet. In particular, modeling and analyzing of the taxi fare structure with congestion premium are extremely limited. In this paper, we developed a taxi price equilibrium model, in which the adjustment mechanism of congestion premium on optimizing the taxi driver’s income, balancing the supply and demand, and eventually improving the level of service in the whole taxicab market was investigated. In the final part, we provided a case study to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed model. The results indicated that the current taxi fare scheme in Beijing is suboptimal, since the gain from the raise of congestion premium cannot compensate for the loss from the demand reduction. Conversely, the optimal fare scheme suggested by our model can effectively reduce the excessive demand and reach the supply-demand equilibrium, while keeping the stability of the driver’s income to the maximum extent.

  7. Selection and the marriage premium for infant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Kasey S; Price, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has found a positive relationship between marriage and infant health, but it is unclear whether this relationship is causal or a reflection of positive selection into marriage. We use multiple empirical approaches to address this issue. First, using a technique developed by Gelbach (2009) to determine the relative importance of observable characteristics, we show how selection into marriage has changed over time. Second, we construct a matched sample of children born to the same mother and apply panel data techniques to account for time-invariant unobserved characteristics. We find evidence of a sizable marriage premium. However, this premium fell by more than 40 % between 1989 and 2004, largely as a result of declining selection into marriage by race. Accounting for selection reduces ordinary least squares estimates of the marriage premiums for birth weight, prematurity, and infant mortality by at least one-half.

  8. Business Cycle and Risk Premium in the Colombian Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mauricio Gómez Sánchez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the Hodrick-Prescott methodology this paper presents a review about the relationship between the ex post risk premium of the stock market and business cycles observed in Colombia. Through quarterly information from the fourth quarter of 2001 to the third quarter of 2012, statistical evidence shows that the increase and decrease of ex post risk premium follow a countercyclical behavior in tune with existing research conducted about the United States and emerging economies, although with non-contemporary relationships with private consumption. In addition, it is found that in the last decade the Colombian risk premium follows a process of Auto Regressive Moving Average Models (ARMA, showing that there is no variation in at least two consecutive quarters and whose behavior is generated in part by external events at the domestic economic activity level experienced in near past periods.

  9. 76 FR 40741 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Mortgage Insurance Premiums for Multifamily Housing Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Mortgage Insurance Premiums for Multifamily...: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the mortgage insurance premiums (MIPs) for FHA Multifamily Housing...: Iris Agubuzo, Office of Multifamily Development, Office of Housing, Department of Housing and Urban...

  10. Premium subsidies and social health insurance: substitutes or complements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifmann, Mathias; Roeder, Kerstin

    2011-12-01

    Premium subsidies have been advocated as an alternative to social health insurance. These subsidies are paid if expenditure on health insurance exceeds a given share of income. In this paper, we examine whether this approach is superior to social health insurance from a welfare perspective. We show that the results crucially depend on the correlation of health and productivity. For a positive correlation, we find that combining premium subsidies with social health insurance is the optimal policy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Premium Forecasting of an Insurance Company: Automobile Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Fouladvand, M. Ebrahim; Darooneh, Amir H.

    2002-01-01

    We present an analytical study of an insurance company. We model the company's performance on a statistical basis and evaluate the predicted annual income of the company in terms of insurance parameters namely the premium, total number of the insured, average loss claims etc. We restrict ourselves to a single insurance class the so-called automobile insurance. We show the existence a crossover premium p_c below which the company is loss-making. Above p_c, we also give detailed statistical ana...

  12. Price premium of organic salmon in Danish retail sale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankamah Yeboah, Isaac; Nielsen, Max; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    for organic salmon in Danish retail sale using consumer panel scanner data from households by applying a random effect hedonic price model that permits unobserved household heterogeneity. A price premium of 20% was identified for organic salmon. The magnitude of this premium is comparable to organic labeled......The year 2016 will be pivotal for organic aquaculture producers in EU, because it represents the deadline for implementing the complete organic life cycle in aquaculture production. Depending on the sturdiness of farms already producing, such a shift in the industry may affect production costs...

  13. CoalVal-A coal resource valuation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbacher, Timothy J.; McIntosh, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    ; operating cost per ton; and discounted cash flow cost per ton to mine and process the resources. Costs are calculated as loaded in a unit train, free-on-board the tipple, at a rate of return prescribed by the evaluator. The recoverable resources (in short tons) may be grouped by incremental cost over any range chosen by the user. For example, in the Gillette coalfield evaluation, the discounted cash flow mining cost (at an 8 percent rate of return) and its associated tonnage may be grouped by any applicable increment (for example, $0.10 per ton, $0.20 per ton, and so on) and using any dollar per ton range that is desired (for example, from $4.00 per ton to $15.00 per ton). This grouping ability allows the user to separate the coal reserves from the nonreserve resources and to construct cost curves to determine the effects of coal market fluctuations on the availability of coal for fuel whether for the generation of electricity or for coal-to-liquids processes. Coking coals are not addressed in this report.

  14. 29 CFR 825.210 - Employee payment of group health benefit premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... premiums which had been paid by the employee prior to FMLA leave must continue to be paid by the employee... the new premium rates. Maintenance of health insurance policies which are not a part of the employer's... unpaid FMLA leave. (b) If the FMLA leave is substituted paid leave, the employee's share of premiums must...

  15. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(9)-1 - Amortization of bond discount or premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of bond discount or premium. 1.381... bond discount or premium. (a) Carryover requirement. If, in a transaction to which section 381(a... transferor corporation which were issued at a discount or premium, then under the provisions of section 381(c...

  16. 26 CFR 1.822-3 - Amortization of premium and accrual of discount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of premium and accrual of discount... Perpetual Policies Or Premium Deposits) § 1.822-3 Amortization of premium and accrual of discount. Section... discount, attributable to the taxable year, on bonds, notes, debentures or other evidences of indebtedness...

  17. 26 CFR 1.822-7 - Amortization of premium and accrual of discount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of premium and accrual of discount... Perpetual Policies Or Premium Deposits) § 1.822-7 Amortization of premium and accrual of discount. Section... discount, attributable to the taxable year, on bonds, notes, debentures, or other evidences of indebtedness...

  18. 24 CFR 203.462 - Pro rata payment of premium before termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata payment of premium before... Pro rata payment of premium before termination. No contract of insurance shall be terminated until the lender has paid to the Commissioner the pro rata portion of the current annual insurance premium. ...

  19. 26 CFR 1.264-2 - Single premium life insurance, endowment, or annuity contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single premium life insurance, endowment, or..., directly or indirectly, to purchase or to continue in effect a single premium life insurance or endowment... payee of such annuity contract. A contract is considered a single premium life insurance, endowment, or...

  20. The impact of instant reward programs and bonus premiums on consumer purchase behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnema, Alec; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Non, Marielle C.

    This study examines the impact of an instant reward program (IRP) with bonus premiums on consumer purchase behavior. An IRP is a rapidly growing form of short-term program that rewards consumers instantly with small premiums per fixed spending, where these premiums are part of a larger set of

  1. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September, 1978. [148 to 459/sup 0/F; 100 to 300 psia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1978-12-01

    Experimental measurements were completed on a naphtha sample (1046) furnished by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Company. A total of 38 measurements were made in the temperature region 148 to 459/sup 0/F, and at pressures of 100 and 300 psia. Additional analytical work was also completed on the SRC-I naphtha whose enthalpy measurements were reported in previous progress reports. Comparisons are given between the experimental SRC-I naphtha enthalpies and the available petroleum enthalpy correlations.

  2. Novel Fuel Cells for Coal Based Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Tao

    2011-12-31

    The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data required to assess the feasibility of a Direct Coal power plant based upon an Electrochemical Looping (ECL) of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC). The objective of Phase 1 was to experimentally characterize the interaction between the tin anode, coal fuel and cell component electrolyte, the fate of coal contaminants in a molten tin reactor (via chemistry) and their impact upon the YSZ electrolyte (via electrochemistry). The results of this work will provided the basis for further study in Phase 2. The objective of Phase 2 was to extend the study of coal impurities impact on fuel cell components other than electrolyte, more specifically to the anode current collector which is made of an electrically conducting ceramic jacket and broad based coal tin reduction. This work provided a basic proof-of-concept feasibility demonstration of the direct coal concept.

  3. Coal preparation and coal cleaning in the dry process; Kanshiki sentaku to coal cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Z.; Morikawa, M.; Fujii, Y. [Okayama University, Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-09-01

    Because the wet process has a problem such as waste water treatment, coal cleaning in the dry process was discussed. When a fluidized bed (using glass beads and calcium carbonate) is utilized instead of the heavy liquid, the fluidized bed will have apparent density as the liquid does, whereas the relative relationship therewith determines whether a substance having been put into the fluidized bed will float or sink. This is utilized for coals. In addition, two powder constituents of A and B may be wanted to be separated using the fluidized extraction process (similar to the liquid-liquid extraction process). In such a case, a fluidized bed in which both constituents are mixed is added with a third constituent C (which will not mix with A, but mix well with B), where the constituents are separated into A and (B + C), and the (B + C) constituent is separated further by using a sieve. If coal has the coal content mixed with ash content and pulverized, it turns into particle groups which have distributions in grain size and density. Groups having higher density may contain more ash, and those having lower density less ash. In addition, the ash content depends also on the grain size. The ash content may be classified by using simultaneously wind classification (for density and grain size) and a sieve (for grain size). This inference may be expanded to consideration of constructing a multi-stage fluidized bed classification tower. 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Qualitative characterization of SRM 1597a coal tar for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and methyl-substituted derivatives via normal-phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Walter B; Hayes, Hugh V; Sander, Lane C; Campiglia, Andres D; Wise, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    A normal-phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) fractionation procedure was developed for the characterization of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a coal tar sample (Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1597a). Using a semi-preparative aminopropyl (NH2) LC column, the coal tar sample was separated using NPLC based on the number of aromatic carbons; a total of 14 NPLC fractions were collected. SRM 1597a was analyzed before and after NPLC fractionation by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with a 50% phenyl stationary phase. The NPLC-GC/MS method presented in this study allowed for the identification of 72 PAHs and 56 MePAHs. These identifications were based on the NPLC retention times for authentic reference standards, GC retention times for authentic reference standards, and the predominant molecular ion peak in the mass spectrum. Most noteworthy was the determination of dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, which could not be measured directly by GC/MS because of low concentration and co-elution with dibenzo[j,l]fluoranthene. The NPLC-GC/MS procedure also allowed for the tentative identification of 74 PAHs and 117 MePAHs based on the molecular ion peak only. This study represents the most comprehensive qualitative characterization of SRM 1597a to date. Graphical abstract NPLC-GC/MS analysis for the six-ring MM 302 Da PAH isomers in SRM 1597a.

  5. ANALYSIS OF COAL TAR COMPOSITIONS PRODUCED FROM SUB-BITUMINOUS KALIMANTAN COAL TAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Selvia Fardhyanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coal tar is a liquid by-product of coal pyrolysis processes. This liquid oil mixture contains various kind of useful compounds such as benzoic aromatic compounds and phenolic compounds. These compounds are widely used as raw material for insecticides, dyes, medicines, perfumes, coloring matters, and many others. The coal tar was collected by pyrolysis process of coal obtained from PT Kaltim Prima Coal and Arutmin-Kalimantan. The experiments typically occurred at the atmospheric pressure in a laboratory furnace at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550oC with a heating rate of 10oC/min and a holding time of 1 hour at the pyrolysis temperature. The Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GCMS was used to analyze the coal tar components. The obtained coal tar has the viscosity of 3.12 cp, the density of 2.78 g/cm3, the calorific value of 11,048.44 cal/g, and the molecular weight of 222.67. The analysis result showed that the coal tar contained more than 78 chemical compounds such as benzene, cresol, phenol, xylene, naphtalene, etc. The total phenolic compounds contained in coal tar is 33.25% (PT KPC and 17.58% (Arutmin-Kalimantan. The total naphtalene compounds contained in coal tar is 14.15% (PT KPC and 17.13% (ArutminKalimantan.

  6. 24 CFR 221.254 - Mortgage insurance premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgage insurance premiums. 221... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES LOW COST AND MODERATE INCOME MORTGAGE INSURANCE-SAVINGS CLAUSE Contract Rights and Obligations-Low...

  7. 24 CFR 241.1030 - Mortgage insurance premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgage insurance premiums. 241... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SUPPLEMENTARY FINANCING FOR INSURED PROJECT MORTGAGES Insurance for Equity Loans and Acquisition...

  8. 24 CFR 213.253 - Premiums upon initial endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Premiums upon initial endorsement... upon initial endorsement. (a) Management and Sales Types and Investor Sponsored Projects. The mortgagee, upon the initial endorsement of the mortgage for insurance, shall pay to the Commissioner a first...

  9. A theoretical and practical perspective on the equity risk premium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, Roelof

    In historical perspective, equity returns have been higher than interest rates but have also varied a good deal more. However, the average excess return has been larger than what could be expected based on classical equilibrium theory: the equity risk premium (ERP) puzzle. This paper has two

  10. 'Benefits cycle' replacing premium cycle as consumerism takes hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    The traditional premium cycle of ups and downs in rates is giving way to a new phenomenon--driven by the advent of consumerism in health care--termed the "benefits cycle" by one consultant. Rather than shifts in rates, he argues, the future will see shifts in benefits packages.

  11. 77 FR 41270 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit Correction In rule document 2012-12421 appearing on pages 30377-30400 in the issue of Wednesday, May 23, 2012...

  12. College wage premiums and skills: a cross-country analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Rolf; Bijlsma, Ineke

    2016-01-01

    Workers with a college degree earn substantially more than workers with no such degree. Using recent data from 22 OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, we estimate this college wage premium at 28 per cent for male full-time working employees, on average, ranging

  13. 44 CFR 61.7 - Risk premium rate determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Insurance Administrator is authorized to undertake studies and investigations to enable him/her to estimate the risk premium rates necessary to provide flood insurance in accordance with accepted actuarial... subchapter as “actuarial rates.” (b) The Federal Insurance Administrator is also authorized to prescribe by...

  14. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two different co-processed fuel oils were tested: one that had been partially hydrotreated, and the other a product of fractionation before hydrotreating. Task 5 focused on examining refining methods that would utilize coal and produce thermally stable jet fuel, included delayed coking and solvent extraction. Delayed coking was done on blends of decant oil and coal, with the goal to produce a premium carbon product and liquid fuels. Coking was done on bench scale and large laboratory scale cokers. Two coals were examined for co-coking, using Pittsburgh seam coal and Marfork coal product. Reactions in the large, laboratory scaled coker were reproducible in yields of products and in quality of products. While the co-coke produced from both coals was of sponge coke quality, minerals left in the coke made it unacceptable for use as anode or graphite grade filler.

  15. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  16. Hydrogenation balances for bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelscher

    1944-02-11

    This report was intended to set up predictive curves concerning how certain variables involved in coal hydrogenation output would change in response to changes in certain operational or input variables, for hydrogenation of Gelsenberg coal. The particular dependences investigated in the article were the following: (1) for liquid phase, the dependence of oil output, amount of product to be distilled, and hydrogen use upon the ash content of the coal, the carbon content of the coal, and the percentage of formation of gases, and (2) for vapor phase, the dependence of gasoline yield, hydrogen use, and excess hydrocarbon gas products on the percentage of gasification in the 6434 step. Within certain limits of validity, these dependences seemed mostly to be linear and were illustrated in graphs in the report (most of which were very hard to read on the microfilm image). The limits of validity were 2 to 8% ash content, 80 to 86.2% carbon content, 20 to 25% gasification in liquid phase, and 17 to 25% gasification in the 6434 vapor phase. As an example of the data and calculations, it was observed that at 2% ash content, there was 628 kg of oil output in the liquid phase, at 4% ash content, there was 621 kg oil output, and at 8% ash content, there was 607 kg oil output, so it was calculated that oil output would decrease by 0.56% for each percent increase in ash content between 2% and 8%. 7 tables, 2 graphs.

  17. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1978. [148 to 459/sup 0/F and 100 to 300 psia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1978-12-01

    Experimental measurements were completed on a naphtha sample (1046) furnished by the Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Company. A total of 38 measurements were made in the temperature region 148 to 459/sup 0/F, and at pressures of 100 and 300 psia. Additional analytical work was completed on the SRC-I naphtha whose enthalpy measurements were reported previously. Comparisons are given between the experimental SRC-I naphtha enthalpies and the available enthalpy data on petroleum fractions, including Kesler and Lee's correlation of these data. (LTN)

  18. Preliminary experimental studies of waste coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, S.; Jin, Y.G.; Yu, X.X.; Worrall, R. [CSIRO, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Advanced Coal Technology

    2013-07-01

    Coal mining is one of Australia's most important industries. It was estimated that coal washery rejects from black coal mining was approximately 1.82 billion tonnes from 1960 to 2009 in Australia, and is projected to produce another one billion tonnes by 2018 at the current production rate. To ensure sustainability of the Australian coal industry, we have explored a new potential pathway to create value from the coal waste through production of liquid fuels or power generation using produced syngas from waste coal gasification. Consequently, environmental and community impacts of the solid waste could be minimized. However, the development of an effective waste coal gasification process is a key to the new pathway. An Australian mine site with a large reserve of waste coal was selected for the study, where raw waste coal samples including coarse rejects and tailings were collected. After investigating the initial raw waste coal samples, float/sink testing was conducted to achieve a desired ash target for laboratory-scale steam gasification testing and performance evaluation. The preliminary gasification test results show that carbon conversions of waste coal gradually increase as the reaction proceeds, which indicates that waste coal can be gasified by a steam gasification process. However, the carbon conversion rates are relatively low, only reaching to 20-30%. Furthermore, the reactivity of waste coal samples with a variety of ash contents under N{sub 2}/air atmosphere have been studied by a home-made thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus that can make the sample reach the reaction temperature instantly.

  19. Development of a New Type of Alkali-Free Liquid Accelerator for Wet Shotcrete in Coal Mine and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address issues such as large rebound rate, high dust concentration, and low compressive strength of shotcrete when adding liquid accelerator during wet spraying, the factors influencing the efficiency of liquid accelerator were experimentally analyzed. The single-admixture, combination, and orthogonal tests were conducted on the five fundamental raw materials required to develop the new liquid accelerator. The WT-1 type liquid accelerator, which had better adaptability to different kinds of cement, was developed with the mass concentration ratio of 55% aluminum sulfate octadecahydrate, 4% sodium fluoride, 2.5% triethanolamine, 0.5% polyacrylamide, 5% bentonite, and 33% water. Experimental investigation showed that the initial setting time of the reference cement with 6% mass content of this liquid accelerator was 2 minutes and 15 seconds, and the final setting time was 7 minutes and 5 seconds. The compressive strength after 1 day of curing was 13.6 MPa and the strength ratio after 28 days of curing was 94.8%, which met the first grade product requirements of the China National Standard. Compared with the conventional type liquid accelerator, the proposed type WT-1 accelerator is capable of effectively reducing the rebound rate and dust concentration while significantly increasing the compressive strength of the shotcrete.

  20. Mutual Fund Flight-to-Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    for the market; the market driven flight-toliquidity places upward pressure on the liquidity premium. I examine the underlying mechanisms driving fund behaviour. I show that market volatility is associated with lower fund performance and withdrawals, which causes funds to adjust the composition...

  1. Effects of moisture and pressure cycling on sorption capacity of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, V.N.; Goodman, A.L.; Soong, Yee

    2005-09-01

    Variability of the data for CO2 absorption on coal reported by different research groups suggests that it strongly depends on experimental conditions. We investigated the effects of moisture content and pressure cycling history on temporal changes in the coal sorptive capacity for Pocahontas #3, Illinois #6, and Beulah Zap powders of Argonne premium coals. The samples were tested as received and moisture equilibrated at 96-97% RH and 55°C for 48 hours. It was demonstrated that the magnitude and dynamics of the changes are affected by the coal type (maceral) and rank. Correlation between the sample volume change (swelling/shrinkage) and the variations in absorption-desorption patterns may indicate the relationship between coal structural relaxation and kinetics of CO2 absorption. Experimental and theoretical methods are proposed to study these effects.

  2. Stock Market Integration: Are Risk Premiums of International Assets Equal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusdhianto Setiawan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies previous research on capital market integration and applies a simple international capital asset pricing model by considering the incompleteness in market integration and heteroscedasticity of the market returns. When we disregarded those two factors, we found that stock markets were integrated and the law of one price on risk premiums prevails. However, when the factors were considered, the markets were just partially integrated.

  3. Portfolio size as funktion of the premium: modeling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Søren; Christensen, Bent Jesper; Taksar, Michael I

    An insurance company has a large number N of potential customers characterized by i.i.d. r.v.'s A1,…,AN giving the arrival rates of claims. Customers are risk averse, and a customer accepts an offered premium p according to his A-value. The modeling further involves a discount rate d>r of customers...... on their A and stochastic discount rates....

  4. The value premium and time-varying volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X.; Brooks, C.; Miffre, J.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the failure of the static and conditional capital asset pricing models to explain the difference in returns between value and growth stocks. This paper examines the post-1963 value premium by employing a model that captures the time-varying total risk of the value-minus-growth portfolios. Our results show that the time-series of value premia is strongly and positively correlated with its volatility. This conclusion is robust to the criterion used to sort stock...

  5. The Value Premium and Time-Varying Unsystematic Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Brooks; Xiafei Li; Joelle Miffre

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has discussed the possible role of unsystematic risk in explaining equity returns. Simultaneously, but somehow independently, numerous other studies have documented the failure of the static and conditional capital asset pricing models to explain the differences in returns between value and growth stocks. This paper examines the post-1963 value premium by employing a model that captures the time-varying total risk of the value-minus-growth portfolios. In accordance with existi...

  6. Variations in health insurance coverage: benefits vs. premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilensky, G R; Farley, P J; Taylor, A K

    1984-01-01

    Renewed national interest in market forces to promote more efficient and cost-conscious behavior by patients and providers increasingly focuses on the structure of private health insurance benefits. Two features of procompetitive legislative proposals are considered: a ceiling on tax-free employer insurance premiums and offering greater choice of insurance plans. The interests of efficiency and equity invoke different kinds of risks and transfers; no single institutional approach is likely to yield the promised benefits.

  7. Global Variance Risk Premium and Forex Return Predictability

    OpenAIRE

    Aloosh, Arash

    2014-01-01

    In a long-run risk model with stochastic volatility and frictionless markets, I express expected forex returns as a function of consumption growth variances and stock variance risk premiums (VRPs)—the difference between the risk-neutral and statistical expectations of market return variation. This provides a motivation for using the forward-looking information available in stock market volatility indices to predict forex returns. Empirically, I find that stock VRPs predict forex returns at a ...

  8. Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, J.Y.; Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.

    1992-12-15

    The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyses the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step. 9 figs.

  9. Coal industry annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  10. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms. Final technical report, September 30, 1988--March 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  11. Coal industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  12. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  13. Microbial solubilization of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

    1988-01-21

    The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

  14. Sumpor u ugljenu (Sulphur in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović, A.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of sulphur in coal possesses important environmetal problems in its usage. The sulphur dioxide (S02 emissions produced during coal combustion account for a significant proportion of the total global output of anthropogenic SO2. The extent of sulphur separation depends on several variables such as the form of sulphur in coal, intimacy of contact between minerals and the products of devolatilization. The total sulphur in coal varies in the range of 0.2 - 11 wt %, although in most cases it is beetwen 1 and 3 wt %. Sulphur occurs in a variety of both inorganic and organic forms. Inorganic sulphur is found mainly as iron pyrite, marcasite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, galena, chalcopirite and as sulphates (rarely exceeds w = 0,1 %. Organic sulphur is found in aromatic rings and aliphatic functionalities usually as mercaptans, aliphatic and aryl sulfides, disulfides and thiophenes. Organic and pyritic sulphur quantities depend on coal rank. Higher rank coals tend to have a high proportion of labile sulphur. All the organic sulphur is bivalent and it is spread throughout the organic coal matrix. Sulphur occurs in all the macerals and most minerals. Vitrinite contains the major part of organic sulphur and metals. Elemental sulphur is produced during coal weathering. The depolymerization methods as pyrolysis and hydrogenation are very drastic methods wich change the structure of the coal and the sulphur groups. In the case of pyrolysis, high levels of desulphurization, in chars and additional production of liquid hydrocarbon can be achieved. Thiophenes and sulphides were the major sulphur components of tars from coal pyrolysis. Hyrdogen sulphide and the lower mercaptans and sulphides were found in the volatile matters. Hydrogen sulphide and thiophenes are practically the only sulphur products of coal hydrogenation. H2S is produced in char hydrodesulphurization. A number of options are available for reducing sulphur emissions including the

  15. Recent trend in coal utilization technology. Coal utilization workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chon Ho; Son, Ja Ek; Lee, In Chul; Jin, Kyung Tae; Kim, Seong Soo [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The 11th Korea-U.S.A. joint workshop on coal utilization technology was held in somerset, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. from october 2 to 3, 1995. In the opening ceremony, Dr.C. Low-el Miller, associate deputy assistant secretary of office of clean coal technology, U.S.DOE, gave congratulatory remarks and Dr. Young Mok Son, president of KIER, made a keynote address. In this workshop, 30 papers were presented in the fields of emission control technology, advanced power generation systems, and advanced coal cleaning and liquid fuels. Especially, from the Korean side, not only KIER but also other private research institutes and major engineering companies including KEPCO, Daewoo Institute of Construction Technology, Jindo Engineering and Construction Co. Daewoo Institute for Advanced Engineering and universities participated in this workshop, reflecting their great interests. Attendants actively discussed about various coal utilization technologies and exchanged scientific and technical information on the state-of-art clean coal technologies under development. (author)

  16. Analysis of photographic records of coal pyrolysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodoo, J.N.D.

    1991-10-01

    Bituminous coals upon heating undergo melting and pyrolytic decomposition with significant parts of the coal forming an unstable liquid that can escape from the coal by evaporation. The transient liquid within the pyrolyzing coal causes softening or plastic behavior that can influence the chemistry and physics of the process. Bubbles of volatiles can swell the softened coal mass in turn affecting the combustion behavior of the coal particles. The swelling behavior of individual coal particles has to be taken into account both as the layout as well as for the operation of pyrolysis, coking and performance of coal-fired boilers. Increased heating rates generally increase the amount of swelling although it is also known that in some cases, even highly swelling coals can be transformed into char with no swelling if they are heated slowly enough. The swelling characteristics of individual coal particles have been investigated by a number of workers employing various heating systems ranging from drop tube and shock tube furnaces, flow rate reactors and electrical heating coils. Different methods have also been employed to determine the swelling factors. The following sections summarize some of the published literature on the subject and outline the direction in which the method of analysis will be further extended in the study of the swelling characteristics of hvA bituminous coal particles that have been pyrolyzed with a laser beam.

  17. REGULATION OF COAL POLYMER DEGRADATION BY FUNGI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Bumpus

    1998-11-30

    A variety of lignin degrading fungi mediate solubilization and subsequent biodegradation of coal macromolecules (a.k.a. coal polymer) from highly oxidized low rank coals such as leonardites. It appears that oxalate or possibly other metal chelators (i.e., certain Krebs Cycle intermediates) mediate solubilization of low rank coals while extracellular oxidases have a role in subsequent oxidation of solubilized coal macromolecule. These processes are under nutritional control. For example, in the case of P. chrysosporium, solubilization of leonardite occurred when the fungi were cultured on most but not all nutrient agars tested and subsequent biodegradation occurred only in nutrient nitrogen limited cultures. Lignin peroxidases mediate oxidation of coal macromolecule in a reaction that is dependent on the presence of veratryl alcohol and hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic evidence suggests that veratryl alcohol is oxidized to the veratryl alcohol cation radical which then mediates oxidation of the coal macromolecule. Results by others suggest that Mn peroxidases mediate formation of reactive Mn{sup 3+} complexes which also mediate oxidation of coal macromolecule. A biomimetic approach was used to study solubilization of a North Dakota leonardite. It was found that a concentration {approximately}75 mM sodium oxalate was optimal for solubilization of this low rank coal. This is important because this is well above the concentration of oxalate produced by fungi in liquid culture. Higher local concentrations probably occur in solid agar cultures and thus may account for the observation that greater solubilization occurs in agar media relative to liquid media. The characteristics of biomimetically solubilized leonardite were similar to those of biologically solubilized leonardite. Perhaps our most interesting observation was that in addition to oxalate, other common Lewis bases (phosphate/hydrogen phosphate/dihydrogen phosphate and bicarbonate/carbonate ions) are able to mediate

  18. Rationale for continuing R&D in indirect coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G. [MITRE Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this analysis is to use the world energy demand/supply model developed at MITRE to examine future liquid fuels supply scenarios both for the world and for the United States. This analysis has determined the probable extent of future oil resource shortages and the likely time frame in which the shortages will occur. The role that coal liquefaction could play in helping to alleviate this liquid fuels shortfall is also examined. The importance of continuing R&D to improve process performance and reduce the costs of coal-derived transportation fuel is quantified in terms of reducing the time when coal liquids will become competitive with petroleum.

  19. Characterization of organic nitrogen in IBCSP coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruge, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the content and distribution of organic nitrogen in a series of IBCSP coals and their isolated macerals. The specific objectives were: to determine the bulk nitrogen contents for coals, isolated macerals, oxidation products and residues, solvent extracts and their liquid chromatographic fractions, and pyrolyzates; to determine the distribution of organic nitrogen in all coal derivatives enumerated in Objective 1 which are Gas Chromatography (GC)-amenable. This will be accomplished by GC-Thermionic Specific Detectors; to determine the molecular structure of the major nitrogen compounds detected in Objective 2, using mass spectrometry.

  20. Impact of terrorism and political instability on equity premium: Evidence from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MengYun, Wu; Imran, Muhammad; Zakaria, Muhammad; Linrong, Zhang; Farooq, Muhammad Umer; Muhammad, Shah Khalid

    2018-02-01

    The study quantifies the impact of terrorism and political instability on firm equity premium in Pakistan using panel data for 306 non-financial firms for the period 2001 to 2014. Other variables included are law & order, government regime change and financial crisis of 2007/08. The estimated results reveal that terrorism has statistically significant negative impact on firm equity premium in Pakistan. This result is robust with alternative equation specifications. The result also remains same when terrorism variable is replaced with external and internal conflict variables. Law & order variable has significant positive effect on firm equity premium, which implies that equity premium increases with the improvement in law & order situation in the country. Equity premium also increases with government stability and when there is democratic system in the country. The result also reveals that global financial crisis of 2007/08 negatively influenced the firm equity premium. The study suggests some policy implications.

  1. MODEL PERAMALAN KONSUMSI BAHAN BAKAR JENIS PREMIUM DI INDONESIA DENGAN REGRESI LINIER BERGANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farizal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption forecasting, especially premium, is an integral part of energy management. Premium is a type of energy that receives government subsidy. Unfortunately, premium forecastings being performed have considerable high error resulting difficulties on reaching planned subsidy target and exploding the amount. In this study forecasting was conducted using multilinear regression (MLR method with ten candidate predictor variables. The result shows that only four variables which are inflation, selling price disparity between pertamanx and premium, economic growth rate, and the number of car, dictate premium consumption. Analsys on the MLR model indicates that the model has a considerable low error with the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of 5.18%. The model has been used to predict 2013 primium consumption with 1.05% of error. The model predicted that 2013 premium consumption was 29.56 million kiloliter, while the reality was 29.26 million kiloliter.

  2. Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

    1991-10-01

    There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

  3. Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

    1991-10-01

    There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

  4. Coal industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  5. Premium Retail Brands in the Food Retail Industry : A Customer Based Study of ICA Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Husberg, Susanne; Ljung, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This study concerns retail brands in the food retail industry and focuses on premium products. The research is investigating how ICA can best use premium products to increase their profitability. The study is thus based on their brand ICA Selection and investigates three sub purposes concerning the customers’ perception of the products, their purchase behavior and their willingness to pay a price premium.   To investigate, theory concerning brand resources was utilized, involving both brand e...

  6. Microwave-induced co-processing of coal and biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jie-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis is an attractive alternative for the conversion of solid fuels to valuable chemicals and bio-fuels. In order to obtain more H2 and syngas from pyrolysis of coal and biomass, microwave has been adopted to enhance the co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass, which has been investigated systematically in this study. Firstly, conventional pyrolysis of coal and biomass was carried out using a vertical tube furnace. Characterizations of pyrolytic gas, liquid and solid products were conducted...

  7. Advanced Thermally Stable Coal-Based Jet Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Department of Energy, the Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Documentation of that... Propulsion Engineering Research Center. In addition to the contributions to combustion science gained by studying this unique coal-based fuel, a very...C.E.B. and H.H. Schobert. Production of Coal-based Fuels and Value-added Products: Coal to Liquids using Petroleum Refinery Streams. Energia ,, vol. 19

  8. A new South Africa: coal exports in transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botha, R.F. [Ministry of Mineral and Energy Affairs (South Africa)

    1995-11-01

    Discusses aspects of the coal industry in South Africa particularly in the light of the recent political changes i.e. the ending of apartheid and the election of the South African Government of National Unity. Areas covered include: increased foreign investment; the Government`s Reconstruction and Development Programme; improved health and safety; production of coal based liquid fuels; coal reserves; power generation; and exports and terminal facilities.

  9. Determination of high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high performance liquid chromatography fractions of coal tar standard reference material 1597a via solid-phase nanoextraction and laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Walter B; Alfarhani, Bassam; Moore, Anthony F T; Bisson, Cristina; Wise, Stephen A; Campiglia, Andres D

    2016-02-01

    This article presents an alternative approach for the analysis of high molecular weight - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) with molecular mass 302 Da in complex environmental samples. This is not a trivial task due to the large number of molecular mass 302 Da isomers with very similar chromatographic elution times and similar, possibly even virtually identical, mass fragmentation patterns. The method presented here is based on 4.2K laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy, a high resolution spectroscopic technique with the appropriate selectivity for the unambiguous determination of PAHs with the same molecular mass. The potential of this approach is demonstrated here with the analysis of a coal tar standard reference material (SRM) 1597a. Liquid chromatography fractions were submitted to the spectroscopic analysis of five targeted isomers, namely dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, dibenzo[a,e]pyrene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene. Prior to analyte determination, the liquid chromatographic fractions were pre-concentrated with gold nanoparticles. Complete analysis was possible with microliters of chromatographic fractions and organic solvents. The limits of detection varied from 0.05 (dibenzo[a,l]pyrene) to 0.24 µg L(-1) (dibenzo[a,e]pyrene). The excellent analytical figures of merit associated to its non-destructive nature, which provides ample opportunity for further analysis with other instrumental methods, makes this approach an attractive alternative for the determination of PAH isomers in complex environmental samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Formation and behaviour of coal free radicals in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant changes in radical concentration and in the chemical nature of the coals are observed as pyrolysis temperature is increased. The implications of free radicals in coal liquefaction are examined. A gradual reduction in the number of free radicals over the temperature range (370 – 4200C) was observed in the liquid ...

  11. The anomalous forward premium of EUR/RSD exchange rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, exchange rate fluctuations should be positively related to interest-rate differential. This paper empirically examines whether such a relationship holds between EUR/RSD exchange rate and the corresponding interbank interest rates. Estimates on daily data between 2008 and 2015 obtained from a linear regression model indicate that this relationship is in fact negative, consistent with the forward premium anomaly. The result persists over different time horizons. The exchange-rate predictability builds over time. The uncovered interest-rate parity does not hold.

  12. Let's Do It Again: Bagging Equity Premium Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillebrand, Eric Tobias; Lee, Tae-Hwy; Medeiros, Marcelo C.

    of the regression coefficient and positivity of the forecast. Bagging constrained estimators can have smaller asymptotic mean-squared prediction errors than forecasts from a restricted model without bagging. Monte Carlo simulations show that forecast gains can be achieved in realistic sample sizes for the stock...... return problem. In an empirical application using the data set of Campbell, J., and S. Thompson (2008): “Predicting the Equity Premium Out of Sample: Can Anything Beat the Historical Average?”, Review of Financial Studies 21, 1511-1531, we show that we can improve the forecast performance further...

  13. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Exit Options in Corporate Finance: Liquidity versus Incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Aghion, Philippe; Bolton, Patrick; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a first study of the optimal design of active monitors' exit options in a problem involving a demand for liquidity and costly monitoring of the issuer. Optimal incentives to monitor the issuer may involve restricting the monitor's right to sell her claims on the firm's cash-flow early. But the monitor will then require a liquidity premium for holding such an illiquid claim. In general, therefore, there will be a trade off between incentives and liquidity. The paper highlig...

  15. An EPR spin probe method for characterizing changes in the accessible regions of coal upon oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sady, W.; Kispert, L.D.; Spears, D.R.

    1992-09-01

    Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) were weathered in air and the structural and chemical changes that upon swelling with toluene and pyridine were, examined by an EPR spin probe method developed in this laboratory. Under mild oxidation conditions and swelling with toluene large structural changes were observed for lignite (Beulah-Zap) which suggested the collapse of the coal structure. This did not occur for higher rank coal. Upon oxidation and swelling with toluene and pyridine an increase occurred in the amino substituted spin probe concentration for coals with the carbon percent above 80%. A maximum was found for the creation of 5 {Angstrom} diameter pores upon swelling with pyridine at 85% C.

  16. An EPR spin probe method for characterizing changes in the accessible regions of coal upon oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sady, W.; Kispert, L.D.; Spears, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) were weathered in air and the structural and chemical changes that upon swelling with toluene and pyridine were, examined by an EPR spin probe method developed in this laboratory. Under mild oxidation conditions and swelling with toluene large structural changes were observed for lignite (Beulah-Zap) which suggested the collapse of the coal structure. This did not occur for higher rank coal. Upon oxidation and swelling with toluene and pyridine an increase occurred in the amino substituted spin probe concentration for coals with the carbon percent above 80%. A maximum was found for the creation of 5 {Angstrom} diameter pores upon swelling with pyridine at 85% C.

  17. The NOXSO clean coal project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, J.B.; Woods, M.C.; Friedrich, J.J.; Browning, J.P. [NOXSO Corp., Bethel Park, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The NOXSO Clean Coal Project will consist of designing, constructing, and operating a commercial-scale flue-gas cleanup system utilizing the NOXSO Process. The process is a waste-free, dry, post-combustion flue-gas treatment technology which uses a regenerable sorbent to simultaneously adsorb sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from flue gas from coal-fired boilers. The NOXSO plant will be constructed at Alcoa Generating Corporation`s (AGC) Warrick Power Plant near Evansville, Indiana and will treat all the flue gas from the 150-MW Unit 2 boiler. The NOXSO plant is being designed to remove 98% of the SO{sub 2} and 75% of the NO{sub x} when the boiler is fired with 3.4 weight percent sulfur, southern-Indiana coal. The NOXSO plant by-product will be elemental sulfur. The elemental sulfur will be shipped to Olin Corporation`s Charleston, Tennessee facility for additional processing. As part of the project, a liquid SO{sub 2} plant has been constructed at this facility to convert the sulfur into liquid SO{sub 2}. The project utilizes a unique burn-in-oxygen process in which the elemental sulfur is oxidized to SO{sub 2} in a stream of compressed oxygen. The SO{sub 2} vapor will then be cooled and condensed. The burn-in-oxygen process is simpler and more environmentally friendly than conventional technologies. The liquid SO{sub 2} plant produces 99.99% pure SO{sub 2} for use at Olin`s facilities. The $82.8 million project is co-funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of the Clean Coal Technology program. The DOE manages the project through the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC).

  18. COAL Conference Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Taylor Alexander; McGibbney, Lewis John

    2017-01-01

    COAL Conference Poster This archive contains the COAL conference poster for the AGU Fall Meeting 2017 by Taylor Alexander Brown. The Inkscape SVG source is available at https://github.com/capstone-coal/coal-conference-poster/ under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

  19. 42 CFR 447.64 - Alternative premiums, enrollment fees, or similar fees: State plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sharing rules that could place families at risk of reaching the total aggregate limit for premiums and... methodology used to determine family income for purposes of the limitations on premiums related to family... beneficiaries have incurred family out-of-pocket expenses up to that limit and are no longer subject to further...

  20. 38 CFR 8.4 - Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. 8.4 Section 8.4 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. The insured under a National Service life...

  1. 38 CFR 8.5 - Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. 8.5 Section 8.5 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. Deductions from benefits...

  2. 26 CFR 1.803-6 - Amortization of premium and accrual of discount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of premium and accrual of discount... and accrual of discount. (a) Section 803(i) provides for certain adjustments on account of amortization of premium and accrual of discount on bonds, notes, debentures, or other evidences of indebtedness...

  3. 26 CFR 1.818-3 - Amortization of premium and accrual of discount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of premium and accrual of discount... and accrual of discount. (a) In general. Section 818(b) provides that the appropriate items of income... the appropriate amortization of premium and the appropriate accrual of discount on bonds, notes...

  4. Making sense of the labor market height premium: Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Anne; Paxson, Christina; Islam, Mahnaz

    2009-03-01

    We use data from the British Household Panel Survey to examine the labor market premium in height. Most of the premium is explained by higher average educational attainment and sorting into higher-status occupations and industries by those who are taller.

  5. 24 CFR 232.825 - Pro rata refund of insurance premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata refund of insurance... ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES Contract Rights and Obligations Premiums § 232.825 Pro rata refund of insurance... rata portion of the current annual loan insurance premium theretofore paid which is applicable to the...

  6. 24 CFR 241.825 - Pro rata refund of insurance premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata refund of insurance... Projects Without a HUD-Insured or HUD-Held Mortgage Premiums § 241.825 Pro rata refund of insurance premium... Commissioner shall refund to the lender for the account of the borrower an amount equal to the pro rata portion...

  7. 24 CFR 203.319 - Pro rata payment of premiums and charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata payment of premiums and... § 203.319 Pro rata payment of premiums and charges. No contract of insurance shall be terminated until the mortgagee has paid to the Commissioner the pro rata portion of the current annual MIP or open-end...

  8. 24 CFR 266.608 - Mortgage insurance premium: Pro rata refund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... rata refund. 266.608 Section 266.608 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and... premium: Pro rata refund. If the Contract of Insurance is terminated by payment in full or is terminated... account. In computing the pro rata portion of the annual mortgage insurance premium, the date of...

  9. DLA/FedEx Premium Service Effects on Defense Distribution Inventories and Shipments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Marichal L; Pitts, Bobby

    2006-01-01

    .... DLA and FedEx have formed a partnership called DLA Premium Service. Premium Service is the only DoD warehousing operation that is co-located with and managed by a commercial express transportation carrier at FedEx main transportation hub...

  10. 5 CFR 550.1409 - Inapplicability of premium pay and aggregate pay caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inapplicability of premium pay and aggregate pay caps. 550.1409 Section 550.1409 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Inapplicability of premium pay and aggregate pay caps. Accrued compensatory time off under this subpart is not...

  11. 12 CFR 741.4 - Insurance premium and one percent deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance premium and one percent deposit. 741... Insurance premium and one percent deposit. (a) Scope. This section implements the requirements of Section... a deposit by each insured credit union in an amount equaling one percent of its insured shares and...

  12. 47 CFR 69.113 - Non-premium charges for MTS-WATS equivalent services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-premium charges for MTS-WATS equivalent services. 69.113 Section 69.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.113 Non-premium charges for MTS...

  13. Steam coal forecaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This quarterly forecasting service provides a short-term analysis and predictions of the international steam coal trade. Sections are entitled: market review; world steam coal at a glance; economics/foreign exchange; demand (reviewing the main purchasing companies country-by-country); supply (country-by-country information on the main producers of steam coal); and freight. A subscription to Steam Coal Forecaster provides: a monthly PDF of McCloskey's Steam Coal Forecaster sent by email; access to database of stories in Steam Coal Forecaster via the search function; and online access to the latest issue of Steam Coal.

  14. Coal-derived promoters for the liquefaction of Illinois coal. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carty, R.H.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program is to investigate the use of liquids derived from coal either by mild gasification or supercritical extraction (SCE) to promote direct liquefaction of Illinois coal. Some organic sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds have been found to enhance liquefaction reactions. The use of Illinois coal to produce liquid fractions rich in these types of compounds could increase the rates of liquefaction reactions, thus improving the process economics. An integrated process combining direct liquefaction with mild gasification or SCE of coal is being developed by IGT. The approach taken in this two-year program is to use recently developed molecular probe techniques to assess the reactivity of three coal-derived liquids with respect to (A) hydrogen transfer rate, (B) carbon-carbon bond cleavage rate, (C) free radical flux, and (D) hydrocracking activity. Sample liquids from Illinois Basin Coal IBC-106 are prepared by three methods: mild gasification in an isothermal free-fall reactor (IFFR), steam treatment followed by mild gasification in a fixed-bed reactor (ST/FBR), and SCE using toluene in a batch autoclave. During the first year of the program, the IFFR and ST/FBR coal liquids were produced and characterized, and the IFFR liquid was assessed by the four molecular-probe methods. During the first quarter of the second year, reactivity testing and data analysis on the ST/FBR coal liquid was completed. For the ST/FBR liquid, hydrogen transfer rate showed a mean increase of 7%, C-C bond cleavage selectivity increased by 27%, free radical flux increased 101%, and data indicated a 227% increase in hydrocracking activity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. The Effect of Massachusetts' Health Reform on Employer-Sponsored Insurance Premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, John F; Hubbard, R Glenn; Kessler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we use publicly available data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey - Insurance Component (MEPS-IC) to investigate the effect of Massachusetts' health reform plan on employer-sponsored insurance premiums. We tabulate premium growth for private-sector employers in Massachusetts and the United States as a whole for 2004 - 2008. We estimate the effect of the plan as the difference in premium growth between Massachusetts and the United States between 2006 and 2008-that is, before versus after the plan-over and above the difference in premium growth for 2004 to 2006. We find that health reform in Massachusetts increased single-coverage employer-sponsored insurance premiums by about 6 percent, or $262. Although our research design has important limitations, it does suggest that policy makers should be concerned about the consequences of health reform for the cost of private insurance.

  16. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01

    future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  17. Coal desulfurization by low-temperature chlorinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G. C.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Ganguli, P. S.; Gavalas, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Among the three principal methods for precombustion desulfurization of coal, which include physical depyriting, chemical desulfurization, and coal conversion to low-sulfur liquid and gaseous fuels, the potential of chemical methods looks promising in terms of both total sulfur removal and processing cost. The principal chemical methods for coal desulfurization involve treatment with either oxidizing agents or basic media at elevated temperature and pressure. A description is given of some recent experimental results which show the feasibility of removing sulfur, particularly organic sulfur, from high-sulfur coals by a simple method of low-temperature chlorinolysis followed by hydrolysis and dechlorination. The chemical feasibility of sulfur removal by chlorinolysis rather than the detailed engineering process is emphasized.

  18. Literature survey of properties of synfuels derived from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T. W.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Clark, J. S.

    1980-02-01

    A literature survey of the properties of synfuels for ground-based gas turbine applications is presented. Four major concepts for converting coal into liquid fuels are described: solvent extraction, catalytic liquefaction, pyrolysis, and indirect liquefaction. Data on full range syncrudes, various distillate cuts, and upgraded products are presented for fuels derived from various processes, including H-coal, synthoil, solvent-refined coal, donor solvent, zinc chloride hydrocracking, co-steam, and flash pyrolysis. Some typical ranges of data for coal-derived low Btu gases are also presented.

  19. Coal data: A reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  20. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

    1985-06-19

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

  1. In-situ coal gasification as a progressive coal utilization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, E.V.; Saltykov, I.F.

    1988-02-01

    Describes the Podzemgaz coal gasification station at Angren that was put into operation in 1961. It exploits a 15 m thick and 120-250 m deep seam of brown coal. Technology of in-situ coal gasification is described and its results are compared in regard to cost and efficiency with the results of conventional surface mining. Air blowing is used for most in-situ coal gasification in USSR. Trials using air enriched in oxygen for this purpose were conducted in 1953 and 1957 but did not find wider application. A station using oxygen enrichment technology is planned for Angren at the Apartak section, as cheaper oxygen production methods have emerged. A new concept for in-situ coal gasification using membrane technology (molecular sieves) is set out. This technology assures total chemical and power utilization of coal, yielding not only coal gas but also liquid nitrogen, hydrogen, a mixture of both these gases for ammonia production, and carbonic acid. Prospective site selection for in-situ coal gasification stations is discussed and conditions required for the respective coalfields are outlined.

  2. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Technical progress report No. 17, 18 and 19, September 30, 1991--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio, R.W.; Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E. [and others

    1996-07-29

    The objective of this project is to retrofit a burner, capable of firing microfine coal, to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the last three quarters [seventeenth (October `95 through December `95), eighteenth (January `96 through March `96), and nineteenth (April `96 through June `96)] of the program.

  3. Theory of the liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.

    1944-01-31

    This report discussed the regularities in the behavior of the liquid phase and illustrated these with a few examples and also discussed a method of testing of hydrogenation behavior of coals. A table was given that contained examples of the behavior of different coals in the liquid phase for the purpose of production of oils of different composition. All tests had been run at 600 atm with iron catalysts, a normal gas throughput, and with about a 50% paste. The remaining independent variables were the temperature, the throughput, and the composition of the pasting oils. When these three requirements were fixed, the conversion of a given coal, yield, composition of the oils produced, gasification, and asphalt production would be definite for a fixed method of working up the residue. Results would vary from coal to coal. As a general rule, the Ruhr coal seemed better suited to gasoline and middle oil production than the Upper Silesian coal. The recycling of oils in a closed cycle was not necessarily the best means to determine the particular method best suited to a given coal because of the possibility of superimposed effects that could obscure the issue. The use of B-bombs with a standard pasting oil was basically more correct in spite of the disadvantages of using a non-continuous process. 2 tables.

  4. A comparison of mycotoxin contamination of premium and grocery brands of pelleted cat food in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil D. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Contamination with mycotoxins is of concern to pet owners and veterinary practitioners owing to their ability to cause disease and exacerbate the pathological changes associated with other diseases. Currently, there is a lack of information regarding the mycotoxin content of common premium brand (PB and grocery brand (GB cat feeds. Therefore, we undertook to determine the mycobiota content of feed samples, from both categories (n = 6 each, and measured the levels of aflatoxin (AF, fumonisin (FB, ochratoxin A (OTA and zearalenone (ZEA by high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. There were high concentrations of mycotoxins in both categories of feed, regardless of the notion that PBs are of a higher quality. The concentration of these toxins may contribute to the development of related pathologies in felines.

  5. A comparison of mycotoxin contamination of premium and grocery brands of pelleted cat food in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanil D; Baijnath, Sooraj; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2017-11-22

    Contamination with mycotoxins is of concern to pet owners and veterinary practitioners owing to their ability to cause disease and exacerbate the pathological changes associated with other diseases. Currently, there is a lack of information regarding the mycotoxin content of common premium brand (PB) and grocery brand (GB) cat feeds. Therefore, we undertook to determine the mycobiota content of feed samples, from both categories (n = 6 each), and measured the levels of aflatoxin (AF), fumonisin (FB), ochratoxin A (OTA) and zearalenone (ZEA) by high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. There were high concentrations of mycotoxins in both categories of feed, regardless of the notion that PBs are of a higher quality. The concentration of these toxins may contribute to the development of related pathologies in felines.

  6. Coal desulfurization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G. C.; Gavalas, G. R.; Ganguli, P. S.; Kalfayan, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for chlorinolysis of coal is an organic solvent at a moderate temperautre and atmospheric pressure has been proven to be effective in removing sulfur, particularly the organic sulfur, from coal. Chlorine gas is bubbled through a slurry of moist coal in chlorinated solvent. The chlorinated coal is separated, hydrolyzed and the dechlorinated. Preliminary results of treating a high sulfutr (4.77%S) bituminous coal show that up to 70% organic sulfur, 90% hyritic sulfur and 76% total sulfur can be removed. The treated coal is dechlorinated by heating at 500 C. The presence of moisture helps to remove organic sulfur.

  7. Behavioural characteristics of adulterated Premium Motor Spirit (PMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Onojake

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Distillation profiles and chemical characteristics of ten suspected adulterated Premium Motor Spirit samples randomly collected from different dispensing points were analysed to determine the chemical characteristics of these samples when compared to a reference sample that is not adulterated. Results of the analyses show, Research Octane Number values ranged from 60.10 to 93.30, specific gravity ranged from 0.75 to 0.79, Reid Vapour Pressure ranged from 0.28 kgf/cm2 to 0.60 kgf/cm2 while Atmospheric distillation ranged from 189 to 251 °C. The results of this research reveal that most of the products are highly adulterated and may pose problems when sent to the market for intended end users.

  8. A "LHC Premium" for Early Career Researchers? Perceptions from within

    CERN Document Server

    Camporesi, Tiziano; Florio, Massimo; Giffoni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    More than 36,000 students and post-docs will be involved in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) until 2025. Do they expect that their learning experience will have an impact on their professional future? By drawing from earlier salary expectations literature, this paper proposes a framework aiming at explaining the professional expectations of early career researchers (ECR) at the LHC. Results from different ordered logistic models suggest that experiential learning at LHC positively correlates with both current and former students' salary expectations. At least two not mutually exclusive explanations underlie such a relationship. First, the training at LHC gives early career researchers valuable expertise, which in turn affects salary expectations; secondly, respondents recognise that the LHC research experience per se may act as a signal in the labour market. Respondents put a price tag on their experience at LHC, a "salary premium" ranging from 5% to 12% in terms of future salaries compared with...

  9. Surgeons' Perspectives on Premium Implants in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasterlain, Amy S; Bello, Ricardo J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Long, William J

    2017-09-01

    Declining total joint arthroplasty reimbursement and rising implant prices have led many hospitals to restrict access to newer, more expensive total joint arthroplasty implants. The authors sought to understand arthroplasty surgeons' perspectives on implants regarding innovation, product launch, costs, and cost-containment strategies including surgeon gain-sharing and patient cost-sharing. Members of the International Congress for Joint Reconstruction were surveyed regarding attitudes about implant technology and costs. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. A total of 126 surgeons responded from all 5 regions of the United States. Although 76.9% believed new products advance technology in orthopedics, most (66.7%) supported informing patients that new implants lack long-term clinical data and restricting new implants to a small number of investigators prior to widespread market launch. The survey revealed that 66.7% would forgo gain-sharing incentives in exchange for more freedom to choose implants. Further, 76.9% believed that patients should be allowed to pay incremental costs for "premium" implants. Surgeons who believed that premium products advance orthopedic technology were more willing to forgo gain-sharing (P=.040). Surgeons with higher surgical volume (P=.007), those who believed implant companies should be allowed to charge more for new technology (Pinnovation advances the field but support discussing the "unproven" nature of new implants with patients. Many surgeons support alternative payment models permitting surgeons and patients to retain implant selection autonomy. Most respondents prioritized patient beneficence and surgeon autonomy above personal financial gain. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(5):e825-e830.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Survey of environmental-control technologies for industrial coal use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seward, W.H.; Hollis, J.R.; Opalanko, R.S.

    1978-12-01

    This report presents the results of a screening study done by Mittelhauser Corporation for Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of the study is to examine current and possible future constraints on the use of coal and coal-derived fuels in industry. Current environmental regulations pertaining to industrial fuel usage are listed and summarized. A Technology-Applications Matrix (TAM), which correlates generic types of industrial fuel-burning equipment with potential fuels, is a key element in this report. The study has led to several conclusions. Current environmental constraints may reduce significantly the attractiveness of coal-derived solid fuels. Coal-derived medium-Btu gases and methanol are unlikely to be economically competitive with natural gas, fuel oil, or other coal-derived synthetic fuels by 1985. It is unlikely that National Energy Act provisions, which force conversion of industrial facilities to coal-use, will be effective in changing the industrial fuel-use pattern in the United States in the near future. The most attractive application of coal technology in the industrial sector appears to be direct use of high-sulfur coal with post-combustion pollution control. It is recommended that this alternative be examined, along with the use of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, coal-oil mixtures, solvent-refined coal liquids, and high-Btu synthetic gas.

  11. Growth and variability in health plan premiums in the individual insurance market before the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Before we can evaluate the impact of the Affordable Care Act on health insurance premiums in the individual market, it is critical to understand the pricing trends of these premiums before the implementation of the law. Using rates of increase in the individual insurance market collected from state regulators, this issue brief documents trends in premium growth in the pre-ACA period. From 2008 to 2010, premiums grew by 10 percent or more per year. This growth was also highly variable across states, and even more variable across insurance plans within states. The study suggests that evaluating trends in premiums requires looking across a broad array of states and plans, and that policymakers must examine how present and future changes in premium rates compare with the more than 10 percent per year premium increases in the years preceding health reform.

  12. International perspectives on coal preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The report consists of the vugraphs from the presentations which covered the following topics: Summaries of the US Department of Energy`s coal preparation research programs; Preparation trends in Russia; South African coal preparation developments; Trends in hard coal preparation in Germany; Application of coal preparation technology to oil sands extraction; Developments in coal preparation in China; and Coal preparation in Australia.

  13. Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

    2008-06-20

    China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is

  14. Coal Production 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-29

    Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

  15. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000130.htm Coal worker's pneumoconiosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that ...

  16. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment: Task 6 Topical Report, Utah Clean Coal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.J.; Deo, M.; Edding, E.G.; Hradisky, M.; Kelly, K.E.; Krumm, R.; Sarofim, Adel; Wang, D.

    2014-08-15

    The long-term objective of this task is to develop a transformational energy production technology by in- situ thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas and/or liquid transportation fuels while leaving much of the coal’s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This task focused on three areas: Experimental. The Underground Coal Thermal Treatment (UCTT) team focused on experiments at two scales, bench-top and slightly larger, to develop data to understand the feasibility of a UCTT process as well as to develop validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ) data for the simulation team. Simulation. The investigators completed development of High Performance Computing (HPC) simulations of UCTT. This built on our simulation developments over the course of the task and included the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)- based tools to perform HPC simulations of a realistically sized domain representative of an actual coal field located in Utah. CO2 storage. In order to help determine the amount of CO2 that can be sequestered in a coal formation that has undergone UCTT, adsorption isotherms were performed on coals treated to 325, 450, and 600°C with slow heating rates. Raw material was sourced from the Sufco (Utah), Carlinville (Illinois), and North Antelope (Wyoming) mines. The study indicated that adsorptive capacity for the coals increased with treatment temperature and that coals treated to 325°C showed less or similar capacity to the untreated coals.

  17. Coal terminal project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    Malaysia is building the necessary infrastructure to cope with an increasing demand for electricity. Its restructured energy policy has led to construction of the 2,100 MW Manjung coal-fired power plant in the state of Perak, for which coal has to be imported via the new Lekiv Bulk Terminal (LBT) adjacent to the plant. Contracts for the LBC and the TNBJ coal stockyard were awarded to the Koch Consortium. The article describes equipment for handling and storing coal. 4 photos.

  18. Inorganic constituents in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Radenovic [University of Zagreb, Sisak (Croatia). Faculty of Metallurgy

    2006-07-01

    Coal contains not only organic matter but also small amounts of inorganic constituents. More than one hundred different minerals and virtually every element in the periodic table have been found in coal. Commonly found group minerals in coal are: major (quartz, pyrite, clays and carbonates), minor, and trace minerals. Coal includes a lot of elements of low mass fraction of the order of w=0.01 or 0.001 %. They are trace elements connected with organic matter or minerals comprised in coal. The fractions of trace elements usually decrease when the rank of coal increases. Fractions of the inorganic elements are different, depending on the coal bed and basin. A variety of analytical methods and techniques can be used to determine the mass fractions, mode of occurrence, and distribution of organic constituents in coal. There are many different instrumental methods for analysis of coal and coal products but atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) is the one most commonly used. Fraction and mode of occurrence are one of the main factors that have influence on transformation and separation of inorganic constituents during coal conversion. Coal, as an important world energy source and component for non-fuels usage, will be continuously and widely used in the future due to its relatively abundant reserves. However, there is a conflict between the requirements for increased use of coal on the one hand and less pollution on the other. It's known that the environmental impacts, due to either coal mining or coal usage, can be: air, water and land pollution. Although, minor components, inorganic constituents can exert a significant influence on the economic value, utilization, and environmental impact of the coal.

  19. Inorganic Constituents in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović A.

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal contains not only organic matter but also small amounts of inorganic constituents. More thanone hundred different minerals and virtually every element in the periodic table have been foundin coal. Commonly found group minerals in coal are: major (quartz, pyrite, clays and carbonates,minor, and trace minerals. Coal includes a lot of elements of low mass fraction of the orderof w=0.01 or 0.001 %. They are trace elements connected with organic matter or minerals comprisedin coal. The fractions of trace elements usually decrease when the rank of coal increases.Fractions of the inorganic elements are different, depending on the coal bed and basin. A varietyof analytical methods and techniques can be used to determine the mass fractions, mode ofoccurrence, and distribution of organic constituents in coal. There are many different instrumentalmethods for analysis of coal and coal products but atomic absorption spectroscopy – AAS is theone most commonly used. Fraction and mode of occurrence are one of the main factors that haveinfluence on transformation and separation of inorganic constituents during coal conversion.Coal, as an important world energy source and component for non-fuels usage, will be continuouslyand widely used in the future due to its relatively abundant reserves. However, there is aconflict between the requirements for increased use of coal on the one hand and less pollution onthe other. It’s known that the environmental impacts, due to either coal mining or coal usage, canbe: air, water and land pollution. Although, minor components, inorganic constituents can exert asignificant influence on the economic value, utilization, and environmental impact of the coal.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Winshel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1990-10-01

    Consol R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The first objective will utilize analytical techniques which have not been fully demonstrated; the second objective involves more previously proven methods. This quarter, two feed coals and 39 process oils from Wilsonville Run 258 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 258 was operated in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) mode with ash recycle. The subbituminous feed coals were from the Spring Creek Mine (Anderson and Dietz seams) and from the Black Thunder Mine (Wyodak and Anderson seams). Shell 324 catalyst was used in the second stage. Various coal samples related to Wilsonville Run 259 were analyzed for chemical and petrographic composition. These results will be given in a future report, which covers all of Run 259. 18 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Enthalpy measurement of coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1978. [SRC process distillate; 157 to 675/sup 0/C and 130 to 1000 psia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidnay, A.J.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1978-08-01

    Experimental measurements were completed on a middle distillate furnished by Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Company. A total of 52 enthalpy measurements were made covering the ranges 157 to 675/sup 0/F and 130 to 1000 psia.

  2. Coal production 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

  3. Characteristics of Pyrolytic Topping in Fluidized Bed for Different Volatile Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, R.; Dong, L.; Xu, G. W.

    Coal is generally combusted or gasified directly to destroy completely the chemical structures, such as aromatic rings containing in volatile coals including bituminite and lignite. Coal topping refers to a process that extracts chemicals with aromatic rings from such volatile coals in advance of combustion or gasification and thereby takes advantage of the value of coal as a kind of chemical structure resource. CFB boiler is the coal utilization facility that can be easily retrofitted to implement coal topping. A critical issue for performing coal topping is the choice of the pyrolytic reactor that can be different types. The present study concerns fluidized bed reactor that has rarely been tested for use in coal topping. Two different types of coals, one being Xiaolongtan (XLT) lignite and the other Shanxi (SX) bituminous, were tested to clarify the yield and composition of pyrolysis liquid and gas under conditions simulating actual operations. The results showed that XLT lignite coals had the maximum tar yield in 823-873K and SX bituminite realized its highest tar yield in 873-923K. Overall, lignite produced lower tar yield than bituminous coal. The pyrolysis gas from lignite coals contained more CO and CO2 and less CH4, H2 and C2+C3 (C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8) components comparing to that from bituminous coal. TG-FTIR analysis of tars demonstrated that for different coals there are different amounts of typical chemical species. Using coal ash of CFB boiler, instead of quartz sand, as the fluidized particles decreased the yields of both tar and gas for all the tested coals. Besides, pyrolysis in a reaction atmosphere simulating the pyrolysis gas (instead of N2) resulted also in higher production of pyrolysis liquid.

  4. Carbonization and liquid crystal (mesophase) development. 14. Co-carbonization of coals with A 240 Ashland petroleum pitch: effects of conditions of carbonization upon optical textures of resultant cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, H.; Gerus-Piasecka, I.; Grint, A.

    1980-05-01

    This study examines the effect of pitch concentration, rate of heating, soak temperature and time of soak upon the optical texture of cokes prepared from the co-carbonizations of a coal (Oxcroft-Clowne, NCB Rank 802) and three vitrains of NCB Rank 204, 801, 902 with Ashland A240 petroleum pitch. Using the coal (Rank 802) with 10 wt % and 25 wt % additions of pitch caused progressive penetration of the pitch into the coal with a resultant development of a mosaic anisotropy in the coke to replace partially the original coke isotropy. With 50 wt % addition of pitch almost all of the coal particles, 600 to 1100 atm in size, were modified during carbonization. Some pitch coke was formed. For the coal and three vitrains with increasing rates of co-carbonization from 0.5-10 K minat-at1 to 1200 K, using 25 wt % of A240 pitch, resultant cokes showed progressively increased extents of modification. For the two vitrains (Rank 801, 902) soaking at temperatures of 650-690 K caused a decrease in the extent of modification of isotropic coke when compared with the coke of HTT 1200 K. Evidently fast heating rates create the conditions of fluidity necessary for the pitch to modify the coal leading to growth of mesophase and anisotropic coke. (15 refs.)

  5. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, September 1, 1995--February 28, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  6. Health benefits in 2014: stability in premiums and coverage for employer-sponsored plans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Claxton, Gary; Rae, Matthew; Panchal, Nirmita; Whitmore, Heidi; Damico, Anthony; Kenward, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    .... On average, in 2014 covered workers paid nearly $5,000 per year for family health insurance premiums, and 18 percent of covered workers were in a plan with an annual single coverage deductible of $2,000 or more...

  7. Noise and Vibration Monitoring for Premium Efficiency IE 3 Three-Phase Induction Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NISTOR, C. G; SCUTARU, G; CAMPEANU, R; CERNAT, M

    2015-01-01

    .... For proving the practical utility of the proposed platform, two induction motors of 7.5 kW and 11 kW, respectively, in single-layer winding, at 1000 rpm, with IE3 premium efficiency were analyzed...

  8. Utilization of low rank coal and agricultural by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, E.; Yardim, M.F.; Petrova, B.; Budinova, T.; Petrov, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The present investigation deals with alternative utilization processes to convert low rank coal and agricultural by products into solid, liquid and gaseous products for a more efficient exploitation of these materials. Low rank coals and different agricultural by-products were subjected to different thermochemical treatments. The composition and physico-chemical properties of liquid products obtained from agricultural by-products were investigated. The identified compounds are predominantly oxygen derivatives of phenol, dihydroxybenzenes, guaiacol, syringol, vanilin, veratrol, furan and acids. Liquids from low rank coals contain higher quality of aromatic compounds predominantly mono- and bicyclic. The amount of oxygen containing structures is high as well. By thermo-chemical treatment of liquid products from agricultural by-products, low rank coals and their mixtures with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} carbon adsorbents with very low ash and sulfur content are obtained. Using different activation reagents large scale carbon adsorbents are prepared from agricultural by-products and coals. The results of the investigations open-up possibilities for utilization of low rank coals and agricultural by-products. 18 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Mutual Fund Flight-to-Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    of their portfolio towards more liquid assets in order to meet potential redemptions. This causal chain is consistent with Vayanos (2004), who argues that fund managers are investors with time-varying liquidity preferences due to threat of withdrawal. Aggregated over funds, the effect is substantial: a one standard......This paper examines the liquidity choices of mutual funds during times of market uncertainty. I find that when markets are uncertain, mutual funds actively increase the liquidity of their portfolio { often referred to as a `flight-to-liquidity.' In aggregate, mutual fund behaviour has implications...... for the market; the market driven flight-toliquidity places upward pressure on the liquidity premium. I examine the underlying mechanisms driving fund behaviour. I show that market volatility is associated with lower fund performance and withdrawals, which causes funds to adjust the composition...

  10. Current experiences in applied underground coal gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Justyn

    2010-05-01

    The world is experiencing greater stress on its ability to mine and exploit energy resources such as coal, through traditional mining methods. The resources available by extraction from traditional mining methods will have a finite time and quantity. In addition, the high quality coals available are becoming more difficult to find substantially increasing exploration costs. Subsequently, new methods of extraction are being considered to improve the ability to unlock the energy from deep coals and improve the efficiency of the exploitation of the resources while also considering the mitigation of global warming. Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a leading commercial technology that is able to maximize the exploitation of the deep coal through extraction of the coal as a syngas (CO and H2) in situ. The syngas is then brought to the surface and efficiently utilized in any of combined cycle power generation, liquid hydrocarbon transport fuel production, fertilizer production or polymer production. Commercial UCG has been successfully operating for more than 50 years at the Yerostigaz facility in Angren, Uzbekistan. Yerostigaz is the only remaining UCG site in the former Soviet Union. Linc Energy currently owns 91.6% of this facility. UCG produces a high quality synthetic gas (syngas), containing carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. UCG produced syngas can be economically used for a variety of purposes, including: the production of liquid fuels when combined with Gas to Liquids (GTL) technology power generation in gas turbine combined cycle power stations a feedstock for different petrochemical processes, for example producing chemicals or other gases such as hydrogen, methane, ammonia, methanol and dimethyl ether Linc Energy has proven the combined use of UCG to Gas to Liquids (GTL) technologies. UCG to GTL technologies have the ability to provide energy alternatives to address increasing global demand for energy products. With these technologies, Linc Energy is

  11. 29 CFR 778.204 - “Clock pattern” premium pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âClock patternâ premium pay. 778.204 Section 778.204 Labor... Excluded From the âRegular Rateâ Extra Compensation Paid for Overtime § 778.204 “Clock pattern” premium pay... pursuance of an applicable employment contract or collective bargaining agreement,” and the rates of pay and...

  12. What drives insurer participation and premiums in the Federally-Facilitated Marketplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean Marie; Drake, Coleman; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Simon, Kosali

    2017-12-01

    We investigate determinants of market entry and premiums within the context of the Affordable Care Act's Marketplaces for individual insurance. Using Bresnahan and Reiss (1991) as the conceptual framework, we study how competition and firm heterogeneity relate to premiums in 36 states using Federally Facilitated or Supported Marketplaces in 2016. Our primary data source is the Qualified Health Plan Landscape File, augmented with market characteristics from the American Community Survey and Area Health Resource File as well as insurer-level information from federal Medical Loss Ratio annual reports. We first estimate a model of insurer entry and then investigate the relationship between a market's predicted number of entrants and insurer-level premiums. Our entry model results suggest that competition is increasing with the number of insurers, most notably as the market size increases from 3 to 4 entrants. Results from the premium regression suggest that each additional entrant is associated with approximately 4% lower premiums, controlling for other factors. An alternative explanation for the relationship between entrants and premiums is that more efficient insurers (who can price lower) are the ones that enter markets with many entrants, and this is reflected in lower premiums. An exploratory analysis of insurers' non-claims costs (a proxy for insurer efficiency) reveals that average costs among entrants are rising slightly with the number of insurers in the market. This pattern does not support the hypothesis that premiums decrease with more entrants because those entrants are more efficient, suggesting instead that the results are being driven mostly by price competition.

  13. Solving Cracking Phenomenon in Premium Transparent Toilet Soap Production Using Stretched LLDPE Film Wrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Sharif, Zainon Binti; Taib, Norhasnina Binti Mohd; Yusof, Mohd Sallehuddin Bin; Rahim, Mohammad Zulafif Bin; Tobi, Abdul Latif Bin Mohd; Othman, Mohd Syafiq Bin

    2017-05-01

    Cracking phenomenon in soap production is an imminent problem. It renders the soap aesthetically unpleasing. This study attempts to find best solution to solve cracking phenomenon in premium soap production. The adopted approach is a stamping method with stretched LLDPE wrap film. The result shows that stretched LLDPE wrap film able to solve the cracking problem. The appearance of the premium transparent was improved. This paper presents the results and the SOP for stretched LLDPE film wrap for soap making industries to adopt.

  14. Method for desulfurization of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelland, D.R.

    1987-07-07

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for desulfurizing coal which removes sulfur in the inorganic and organic form by preferentially heating the inorganic iron sulfides in coal in a flowing gas to convert some of the inorganic iron sulfides from a pyrite form FeS[sub 2] to a troilite FeS form or a pyrrhotite form Fe[sub 1[minus]x]S and release some of the sulfur as a gaseous compound. The troilite and pyrrhotite forms are convenient catalyst for removing the organic sulfur in the next step, which is to react the coal with chemical agents such as alcohol, thus removing the organic sulfur as a liquid or a gas such as H[sub 2]S. The remaining inorganic sulfur is left in the predominantly higher magnetic form of pyrrhotite and is then removed by magnetic separation techniques. Optionally, an organic flocculant may be added after the organic sulfur has been removed and before magnetic separation. The flocculant attaches non-pyrite minerals with the pyrrhotite for removal by magnetic separation to reduce the ash-forming contents. 2 figs.

  15. Solvent tailoring in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October 1983-December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrer, A.R.; Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Williams, D.C.

    1983-07-01

    The contribution of transferable hydrogen in coal-derived solvents to coal conversion was investigated in a two-step process. Initially, the amount of transferable hydrogen in the coal-derived solvents was analyzed by spectroscopic methods and by catalytic dehydrogenation. The spectroscopic methods included carbon magnetic resonance, proton magnetic resonance as well as a combination of these two methods. Three of the methods gave nearly equivalent quantities for the amount of transferable hydrogen present in the complex coal liquids. Coal conversion determined in each of the coal-derived solvents was correlated to the amount of transferable hydrogen present. The contribution of transferable hydrogen is a significant factor in coal dissolution and the presence of saturates and hexane insolubles compounds in these solvents may have a detrimental effect on coal dissolution. 20 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Coal; Le charbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teissie, J.; Bourgogne, D. de; Bautin, F. [TotalFinaElf, La Defense, 92 - Courbevoie (France)

    2001-12-15

    Coal world production represents 3.5 billions of tons, plus 900 millions of tons of lignite. 50% of coal is used for power generation, 16% by steel making industry, 5% by cement plants, and 29% for space heating and by other industries like carbo-chemistry. Coal reserves are enormous, about 1000 billions of tons (i.e. 250 years of consumption with the present day rate) but their exploitation will be in competition with less costly and less polluting energy sources. This documents treats of all aspects of coal: origin, composition, calorific value, classification, resources, reserves, production, international trade, sectoral consumption, cost, retail price, safety aspects of coal mining, environmental impacts (solid and gaseous effluents), different technologies of coal-fired power plants and their relative efficiency, alternative solutions for the recovery of coal energy (fuel cells, liquefaction). (J.S.)

  17. Coal to gas substitution using coal?!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Schlüter, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    Substitution of carbon-intensive coal with less carbon-intensive natural gas for energy production is discussed as one main pillar targeting reduction of antrophogenic greenhouse gas emissions by means of climate change mitigation. Other pillars are energy efficiency, renewable energies, carbon capture and storage as well as further development of nuclear energy. Taking into account innovative clean coal technologies such as UCG-CCS (underground coal gasification with carbon capture and storage), in which coal deposits are developed using directional drilling technologies and subsequently converted into a synthesis gas of high calorific value, the coupled conceptual approach can provide a synergetic technology for coal utilization and mitigation of carbon emissions. This study aims at the evaluation of UCǴ s carbon mitigation potentials and the review of the economical boundary conditions. The analytical models applied within this study are based on data available from world-wide UCG projects and extensive laboratory studies. In summary, scenarios considering costs and carbon storage potentials are economically feasible and thus competitive with less carbon-intensive energy generation technologies such as natural gas. Thus, coal to gas substitution can be one of the coal based options.

  18. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  19. The Dual Role of Oxygen Functions in Coal Pretreatment and Liquefaction: Crosslinking and Cleavage Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Serio; Erik Kroo; Sylvie Charpenay; Peter Solomon

    1993-09-30

    The overall objective of this project was to elucidate and model the dual role of oxygen functions in thermal pretreatment and liquefaction of low rank coals through the application of analytical techniques and theoretical models. The project was an integrated study of model polymers representative of coal structures, raw coals of primarily low rank, and selectively modified coals in order to provide specific information relevant to the reactions of real coals. The investigations included liquefaction experiments in microautoclave reactors, along with extensive analysis of intermediate solid, liquid and gaseous products. Attempts were made to incorporate the results of experiments on the different systems into a liquefaction model.

  20. Petrographic and Vitrinite Reflectance Analyses of a Suite of High Volatile Bituminous Coal Samples from the United States and Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kolak, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents vitrinite reflectance and detailed organic composition data for nine high volatile bituminous coal samples. These samples were selected to provide a single, internally consistent set of reflectance and composition analyses to facilitate the study of linkages among coal composition, bitumen generation during thermal maturation, and geochemical characteristics of generated hydrocarbons. Understanding these linkages is important for addressing several issues, including: the role of coal as a source rock within a petroleum system, the potential for conversion of coal resources to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and the interactions between coal and carbon dioxide during enhanced coalbed methane recovery and(or) carbon dioxide sequestration in coal beds.

  1. Premium performance heating oil - Part 2, Field trial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetter, S.M.; Hoskin, D.; McClintock, W.R. [Mobil Oil Corp., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Limited field trial results of a heating oil additive package developed to minimize unscheduled maintenance indicate that it achieves its goal of keeping heating oil systems cleaner. The multifunctional additive package was developed to provide improved fuel oxidation stability, improved corrosion protection, and dispersency. This combination of performance benefits was chosen because we believed it would retard the formation of sludge, as well as allow sludge already present to be carried through the system without fouling the fuel system components (dispersency should keep sludge particles small so they pass through the filtering system). Since many unscheduled maintenance calls are linked to fouling of the fuel filtering system, the overall goal of this technology is to reduce these maintenance calls. Photographic evidence shows that the additive package not only reduces the amount of sludge formed, but even removes existing sludge from filters and pump strainers. This {open_quotes}clean-up{close_quotes} performance is provided trouble free: we found no indication that nozzle/burner performance was impaired by dispersing sludge from filters and pump strainers. Qualitative assessments from specific accounts that used the premium heating oil also show marked reductions in unscheduled maintenance.

  2. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report concerns our research on base-catalyzed coal solubilization and a new approach for hydrogen addition. The work on base-catalyzed, chemical solubilization is continuing. this report is focused on the hydrogenation research. Specifically it deals with the use of arene chromium carbonyl complexes as reagents for the addition of dideuterium to coal molecules. In one phase of the work, he has established that the aromatic hydrocarbons in a representative coal liquid can be converted in very good yield to arene chromium carbonyl compounds. In a second phase of the work directly related to our objective of improved methods for catalytic hydrogenation, he has established that the aromatic constituents of the same coal liquid add dideuterium in the presence of added napththalene chromium carbonyl.

  3. Process for recovering deashing solvent from insoluble coal products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, T.A.

    1982-02-02

    A process for effecting deashing solvent recovery from insoluble coal products and preparing a slurry of the insoluble products. An elevated temperature and pressure stream comprising insoluble coal products and deashing solvent is admixed with a makeup liquid to dilute the stream. The diluted stream is reduced in pressure and introduced into a first treatment vessel containing sufficient slurry to provide a hydrostatic pressure to prevent boiling of the diluted stream upon entry therein. The solvent then is permitted to flash and cool the remainder of the slurry. A portion of the cooled slurry is recycled to provide the makeup liquid and a second portion is introduced into a second treatment vessel to permit diffusion of solvent infused into the insoluble coal products in the slurry. The slurry of insoluble coal products in the second vessel then is introduced into a thickener to concentrate the slurry and provide a feed suitable for a gasifier.

  4. Case studies on direct liquefaction of low rank Wyoming coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, P.; Kramer, S.J.; Poddar, S.K. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Previous Studies have developed process designs, costs, and economics for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 and Wyoming Black Thunder coals at mine-mouth plants. This investigation concerns two case studies related to the liquefaction of Wyoming Black Thunder coal. The first study showed that reducing the coal liquefaction reactor design pressure from 3300 to 1000 psig could reduce the crude oil equivalent price by 2.1 $/bbl provided equivalent performing catalysts can be developed. The second one showed that incentives may exist for locating a facility that liquifies Wyoming coal on the Gulf Coast because of lower construction costs and higher labor productivity. These incentives are dependent upon the relative values of the cost of shipping the coal to the Gulf Coast and the increased product revenues that may be obtained by distributing the liquid products among several nearby refineries.

  5. Direct liquefaction of low-rank coals under mild conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, N.; Rinaldi, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Due to decreasing of petroleum reserves, direct coal liquefaction is attracting renewed interest as an alternative process to produce liquid fuels. The combination of hydrogen peroxide and coal is not a new one. In the early 1980, Vasilakos and Clinton described a procedure for desulfurization by leaching coal with solutions of sulphuric acid/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. But so far, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has never been ascribed a major role in coal liquefaction. Herein, we describe a novel approach for liquefying low-rank coals using a solution of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in presence of a soluble non-transition metal catalyst. (orig.)

  6. Coal sector profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-05

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  7. Zero VOC, Coal Tar Free Splash Zone Coating (SZC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    volatile organic compounds (VOC) content, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and may also include hazardous pigment content. The coal tar epoxy also...VOCs, HAPs of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and xylene, and the pigment chromium oxide. Each coat of SSPC PS 11.01 contains 30% by weight coal tar...marketed a millable gum polysulfide known as the first synthetic rubber commercially made in the United States. Today, there are several liquid

  8. Problems with the quantitative spectroscopic analysis of oxygen rich Czech coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlikova, H.; Machovic, V.; Cerny, J. [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Sebestova, E. [Inst. of Rock Structure and Mechanics, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Solid state NMR and FTIR spectroscopies are two main methods used for the structural analysis of coals and their various products. Obtaining quantitative parameters from coals, such as arornaticity (f{sub a}) by the above mentioned methods can be a rather difficult task. Coal samples of various rank were chosen for the quantitative NMR, FTIR and EPR analyses. The aromaticity was obtained by the FTIR, {sup 13}C CP/MAS and SP/MAS NMR experiments. The content of radicals and saturation characteristics of coals were measured by EPR spectroscopy. The following problems have been discussed: 1. The relationship between the amount of free radicals (N{sub g}) and f{sub a} by NMR. 2. The f{sub a} obtained by solid state NMR and FTIR spectroscopies. 3. The differences between the f{sub a} measured by CP and SP/NMR experiments. 4. The relationship between the content of oxygen groups and the saturation responses of coals. The reliability of our results was checked by measuring the structural parameters of Argonne premium coals.

  9. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  10. Coal, culture and community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    16 papers are presented with the following titles: the miners; municipalisation and the millenium - Bolton-upon-Dearne Urban District Council 1899-1914; the traditional working class community revisited; the cultural capital of coal mining communities; activities, strike-breakers and coal communities; the limits of protest - media coverage of the Orgreave picket during the miners` strike; in defence of home and hearth? Families, friendships and feminism in mining communities; young people`s attitudes to the police in mining communities; the determinants of productivity growth in the British coal mining industry, 1976-1989; strategic responses to flexibility - a case study in coal; no coal turned in Yorkshire?; the North-South divide in the Central Coalfields; the psychological effects of redundancy and worklessness - a case study from the coalfields; the Dearne Valley initiative; the future under labour: and coal, culture and the community.

  11. Coal tar in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Van Der Valk, P.G.M.; Van Houtum, J.L.M.; Van De Kerkhof, P.C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Dermatology

    2007-07-01

    Coal tar is one of the oldest treatments for psoriasis and eczema. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antipruritic and antimitotic effects. The short-term side effects are folliculitis, irritation and contact allergy. Coal tar contains carcinogens. The carcinogenicity of coal tar has been shown in animal studies and studies in occupational settings. There is no clear evidence of an increased risk of skin tumors or internal tumors. Until now, most studies have been fairly small and they did not investigate the risk of coal tar alone, but the risk of coal tar combined with other therapies. New, well-designed, epidemiological studies are necessary to assess the risk of skin tumors and other malignancies after dermatological use of coal tar.

  12. Coal-water mixture fuel burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

    1985-04-29

    The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

  13. Two-stage liquefaction of a Spanish subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.T.; Fernandez, I.; Benito, A.M.; Cebolla, V.; Miranda, J.L.; Oelert, H.H. (Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1993-05-01

    A Spanish subbituminous coal has been processed in two-stage liquefaction in a non-integrated process. The first-stage coal liquefaction has been carried out in a continuous pilot plant in Germany at Clausthal Technical University at 400[degree]C, 20 MPa hydrogen pressure and anthracene oil as solvent. The second-stage coal liquefaction has been performed in continuous operation in a hydroprocessing unit at the Instituto de Carboquimica at 450[degree]C and 10 MPa hydrogen pressure, with two commercial catalysts: Harshaw HT-400E (Co-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and HT-500E (Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]). The total conversion for the first-stage coal liquefaction was 75.41 wt% (coal d.a.f.), being 3.79 wt% gases, 2.58 wt% primary condensate and 69.04 wt% heavy liquids. The heteroatoms removal for the second-stage liquefaction was 97-99 wt% of S, 85-87 wt% of N and 93-100 wt% of O. The hydroprocessed liquids have about 70% of compounds with boiling point below 350[degree]C, and meet the sulphur and nitrogen specifications for refinery feedstocks. Liquids from two-stage coal liquefaction have been distilled, and the naphtha, kerosene and diesel fractions obtained have been characterized. 39 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. U.S. DOE indirect coal liquefaction program: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.; Schmetz, E.; Winslow, J.; Tischer, R. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    Coal is the most abundant domestic energy resource in the United States. The Fossil Energy Organization within the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been supporting a coal liquefaction program to develop improved technologies to convert coal to clean and cost-effective liquid fuels to complement the dwindling supply of domestic petroleum crude. The goal of this program is to produce coal liquids that are competitive with crude at $20 to $25 per barrel. Indirect and direct liquefaction routes are the two technologies being pursued under the DOE coal liquefaction program. This paper will give an overview of the DOE indirect liquefaction program. More detailed discussions will be given to the F-T diesel and DME fuels which have shown great promises as clean burning alternative diesel fuels. The authors also will briefly discuss the economics of indirect liquefaction and the hurdles and opportunities for the early commercial deployment of these technologies. Discussions will be preceded by two brief reviews on the liquid versus gas phase reactors and the natural gas versus coal based indirect liquefaction.

  15. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. DOE, together with the Electric Power Research Institue, has contracted with fourteen projects are described brieflly: funding, description, status, history, and progress in the current quarter. (LTN)

  16. Microbial desulfurization of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several sulfur-oxidizing bacteria strains have been very efficient in desulfurizing coal. Process occurs at room temperature and does not require large capital investments of high energy inputs. Process may expand use of abundant reserves of high-sulfur bituminous coal, which is currently restricted due to environmental pollution. On practical scale, process may be integrated with modern coal-slurry transportation lines.

  17. Altruism in social networks: evidence for a 'kinship premium'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Oliver; Roberts, Sam G B; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2013-05-01

    Why and under what conditions are individuals altruistic to family and friends in their social networks? Evolutionary psychology suggests that such behaviour is primarily the product of adaptations for kin- and reciprocal altruism, dependent on the degree of genetic relatedness and exchange of benefits, respectively. For this reason, individuals are expected to be more altruistic to family members than to friends: whereas family members can be the recipients of kin and reciprocal altruism, friends can be the recipients of reciprocal altruism only. However, there is a question about how the effect of kinship is implemented at the proximate psychological level. One possibility is that kinship contributes to some general measure of relationship quality (such as 'emotional closeness'), which in turn explains altruism. Another possibility is that the effect of kinship is independent of relationship quality. The present study tests between these two possibilities. Participants (N= 111) completed a self-report questionnaire about their willingness to be altruistic, and their emotional closeness, to 12 family members and friends at different positions in their extended social networks. As expected, altruism was greater for family than friends, and greater for more central layers of the network. Crucially, the results showed that kinship made a significant unique contribution to altruism, even when controlling for the effects of emotional closeness. Thus, participants were more altruistic towards kin than would be expected if altruism was dependent on emotional closeness alone - a phenomenon we label a 'kinship premium'. These results have implications for the ongoing debate about the extent to which kin relations and friendships are distinct kinds of social relationships, and how to measure the 'strength of ties' in social networks. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Fluidized bed coal desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindram, M.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted on two high volatile bituminous coals in a bench scale batch fluidized bed reactor. Chemical pretreatment and posttreatment of coals were tried as a means of enhancing desulfurization. Sequential chlorination and dechlorination cum hydrodesulfurization under modest conditions relative to the water slurry process were found to result in substantial sulfur reductions of about 80%. Sulfur forms as well as proximate and ultimate analyses of the processed coals are included. These studies indicate that a fluidized bed reactor process has considerable potential for being developed into a simple and economic process for coal desulfurization.

  19. Pyrolysis of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović, A.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of relevant literature on coal pyrolysis.Pyrolysis, as a process technology, has received considerable attention from many researchers because it is an important intermediate stage in coal conversion.Reactions parameters as the temperature, pressure, coal particle size, heating rate, soak time, type of reactor, etc. determine the total carbon conversion and the transport of volatiles and therebythe product distribution. Part of the possible environmental pollutants could be removed by optimising the pyrolysis conditions. Therefore, this process will be subsequently interesting for coal utilization in the future

  20. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  1. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  2. How do health insurer market concentration and bargaining power with hospitals affect health insurance premiums?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin E; Herring, Bradley J

    2015-07-01

    The US health insurance industry is highly concentrated, and health insurance premiums are high and rising rapidly. Policymakers have focused on the possible link between the two, leading to ACA provisions to increase insurer competition. However, while market power may enable insurers to include higher profit margins in their premiums, it may also result in stronger bargaining leverage with hospitals to negotiate lower payment rates to partially offset these higher premiums. We empirically examine the relationship between employer-sponsored fully-insured health insurance premiums and the level of concentration in local insurer and hospital markets using the nationally-representative 2006-2011 KFF/HRET Employer Health Benefits Survey. We exploit a unique feature of employer-sponsored insurance, in which self-insured employers purchase only administrative services from managed care organizations, to disentangle these different effects on insurer concentration by constructing one concentration measure representing fully-insured plans' transactions with employers and the other concentration measure representing insurers' bargaining with hospitals. As expected, we find that premiums are indeed higher for plans sold in markets with higher levels of concentration relevant to insurer transactions with employers, lower for plans in markets with higher levels of insurer concentration relevant to insurer bargaining with hospitals, and higher for plans in markets with higher levels of hospital market concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Several Factors Responsible For The Recent Slowdown In Premium Growth In Employer-Sponsored Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistnes, Jessica; Selden, Thomas M; Zawacki, Alice

    2015-12-01

    Containing growth in health care spending is important to the long-term fiscal health of the United States. Researchers have been seeking to identify which factors behind the recent spending slowdown might continue to have an impact after the economy has fully recovered from the Great Recession (2007-09). We extended this inquiry by decomposing trends in the growth of private-sector employer-sponsored insurance premiums. Using data for 2001-13 from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component and a combination of cell- and regression-based decomposition methods, we found that the slowdown in premium growth that preceded the recession reflected declining growth rates in per policyholder premiums. For 2009-11, however, the dominant contributors to the slowdown were factors underlying declining employee enrollment: a sharp downturn in employment in 2009, followed by eroding offer and eligibility rates. Growth in per policyholder premiums slowed in 2012 and 2013 compared to the preceding few years. Like other researchers, we found that a substantial portion of premium growth remained unexplained. However, it is likely driven, in part, by growth in the underlying cost of medical care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. Purification processes for coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, D.K.; Primack, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    It is apparent from the discussion that many routes can be taken to achieve acid-gas removal and sulfur recovery from coal gas. The selection of the optimum purification system is a major task. The type of coal, type of gasifier and the upstream processing all strongly influence the selection. Several generalizations can be made: (1) The cost of the purification sections of a high-Btu gas plant is significant--perhaps 10 to 30% of the capital cost of the coal conversion facility. (2) The cost of purifying gas produced from high-sulfur coal feed is more expensive than the cost for purifying gas produced from low-sulfur coal. (3) The choice of an acid-gas removal system will often be a function of system pressure. The economical choice will usually be: (a) amine-based systems at atmospheric pressure; (b) hot-carbonate systems at moderate pressure or (c) physical-solvent systems at higher pressure. (4) For a high-Btu, high-sulfur case: (a) A selective acid-gas removal system with a Claus plant is probably more economical than a non-selective acid-gas system with liquid oxidation of the H/sub 2/S in the regenerator off-gas. (b) Even moderately selective systems can produce an H/sub 2/S-rich gas suitable for a Claus plant. The CO/sub 2/-rich gas may or may not require further sulfur removal, depending on the selectivity. (5) For a high-Btu, low-sulfur case: (a) The hot carbonate and tertiary amine systems may not be sufficiently selective to produce a gas suitable for feed to a Claus process while a physical solvent system may be. Therefore, the physical solvent system may be expected to be more economical. (b) The regenerated gas from the bulk CO/sub 2/ removal system following a selective physical solvent system may require further sulfur removal, depending upon the sulfur level in the initial feedstock and the selectivity of the system selected.

  5. Phase equilibria in coal conversion processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K.C.

    1986-10-01

    Fluid-phase equilibrium data have been determined in simulation of coal liquefaction process conditions. Gas-liquid equilibrium and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-containing mixtures have been the central interest while some water-free mixtures were also investigated. Experimental gas-liquid equilibrum studies were made for: hydrogen + water + m-cresol; hydrogen + water + quinoline; hydrogen + water + n-decane; methane + water + n-hexadecane; carbon dioxide + water + diethylamine; carbon dioxide + 1-hexadecene; carbon dioxide + n-propylcyclohexane; carbon dioxide + n-octadecane; carbon dioxide + phenyloctane; and propane + n-butyraldehyde. Mutual liquid-liquid solubilities have been determined for: water + m-cresol; water + quinoline; water + indoline; water + 1,2,3,4 - tetrahydroquinoline; water + thianaphthene; and water + 9,10 - dihydrophenanthrene. The Cubic Chain-of-Rotators (CCOR) equation of state was modified to extend to strongly polar substances. The modified equation was used to correlate the new fluid phase equilibrium data of water-containing mixtures. The original CCOR equation was used to correlate the vaporization equilibrium data of an Illinois coal liquid and a Wyoming coal liquid described in our previous report AP-3450. 107 refs., 32 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Coal data base - thesaurus 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The thesaurus contains the vocabulary used to index the Coal Data Base maintained by IEA Coal Research Technical Information Service. The Data Base contains indexed and abstracted references to publicly-available literature covering all aspects of the coal industry. The subject areas covered include: economics and management, reserves and exploration, mining, preparation, transport and handling, coal properties and constitution, processing and conversion, combustion, waste management, environ mental aspects, coal products, and health and safety. The indexing terms are used in the preparation of the annual subject index to Coal Abstracts and should be useful in searching other data bases for material relevant to the coal industry. (Available from IEA Coal Research)

  7. Preliminary assessment of coal-based industrial energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study, performed by Mittelhauser Corp. and Resource Engineering, Inc. to identify the potential economic, environmental, and energy impacts of possible New Source Performance Standards for industrial steam generators on the use of coal and coal-derived fuels. A systems-level approach was used to take mine-mouth coal and produce a given quantity of heat input to a new boiler at an existing Chicago industrial-plant site. The technologies studied included post-combustion clean-up, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, solvent-refined coal liquids, substitute natural gas, and low-Btu gas. Capital and operating costs were prepared on a mid-1985 basis from a consistent set of economic guidelines. The cases studied were evaluated using three levels of air emission controls, two coals, two boiler sizes, and two operating factors. Only those combinations considered likely to make a significant impact on the 1985 boiler population were considered. The conclusions drawn in the report are that the most attractive applications of coal technology are atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion and post-combustion clean-up. Solvent-refined coal and probably substitute natural gas become competitive for the smaller boiler applications. Coal-derived low-Btu gas was found not to be a competitive boiler fuel at the sizes studied. It is recommended that more cases be studied to broaden the applicability of these results.

  8. Review of coal-water fuel pulverization technology and atomization quality registration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenkov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of coal-water fuel application in industrial power engineering are considered and described. Two main problems and disadvantages of this fuel type are suggested. The paper presents information about liquid fuel atomization technologies and provides data on nozzle type for coal-water fuel pulverization. This article also mentions some of the existing technologies for coal-water slurry spraying quality determination.

  9. Experimental Studies of Coal and Biomass Fuel Synthesis and Flame Characterization for Aircraft Engines (Year Two)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    formation during fast- pyrolysis and fast-hydropyrolysis. To study coal gasification in the presence of excess hydrogen, an optically accessible, high...counter-flow flames using axi-symmetric 2-D flame codes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Biomass fast hydropyrolysis, hydrodeoxygenation, and coal steam pyrolysis ...utilization of biomass and coal to produce appropriate aviation liquid fuels. Several prototype, fast- pyrolysis reactors were built and tested to

  10. Experimental Studies of Coal and Biomass Fuel Synthesis and Flame Characterization for Aircraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-31

    of biomass and coal to produce appropriate aviation liquid fuels. Fundamentals of fast- pyrolysis and fast-hydropyrolysis were systematically studied...optimization accounting for changes in the heating value of the input coal . In another study by Lackner et al. [2.18, 2.19] , the pyrolysis ...Final Performance Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-09-2008 to 31-03-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Studies of Coal and Biomass Fuel

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  12. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  13. Coals of Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landis, E.R.; Rohrbacher, T.J.; Gluskoter, H.; Fodor, B.; Gombar, G.; Sebestyen, I.

    1999-07-01

    As part of the activities conducted under the U.S. Hungarian Science and Technology Fund, a total of 39 samples from five coal mines in Hungary were selected for standard coal analyses and major, minor and trace elements analysis. The mine areas sampled were selected to provide a spectrum of coal quality information for comparison with other coal areas in central Europe and worldwide. All of the areas are of major importance in the energy budget of Hungary. The five sample sites contain coal in rocks of Jurassic, Cretaceous, Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene age. The coals, from four underground and one surface mine, range in rank from high volatile bituminous to lignite B. Most of the coal produced from the mines sampled is used to generate electricity. Some of the power plants that utilize the coals also provide heat for domestic and process usage. The standard coal analysis program is based on tests performed in accordance with standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Proximate and ultimate analyses were supplemented by determinations of the heating value, equilibrium moisture, forms of sulfur, free-swelling index, ash fusion temperatures (both reducing and oxidizing), apparent specific gravity and Hardgrove Grindability index. The major, minor and trace element analyses were performed in accordance with standardized procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey. The analytical results will be available in the International Coal Quality Data Base of the USGS. The results of the program provide data for comparison with test data from Europe and information of value to potential investors or cooperators in the coal industry of Hungary and Central Europe.

  14. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [FWDC (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The primary coal of this program, Black Thunder subbituminous coal, can be effectively beneficiated to about 3.5 wt % ash using aqueous sulfurous acid pretreatment. This treated coal can be further beneficiated to about 2 wt % ash using commercially available procedures. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated subbituminous coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent. The study of bottoms processing consists of combining the ASCOT process which consists of coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking to maximize the production of coal-derived liquids while rejecting solids within the coke drum. The asphalt production phase has been completed; representative product has been evaluated. The solvent system for the deasphalting process has been established. Two ASCOT tests produced overall liquid yields (63.3 wt % and 61.5 wt %) that exceeded the combined liquid yields from the vacuum tower and ROSE process.

  15. Environmental impacts of coal mine and thermal power plant to the surroundings of Barapukuria, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Nazir; Paul, Shitangsu Kumar; Hasan, Md Muyeed

    2015-04-01

    The study was carried out to analyse the environmental impacts of coal mine and coal-based thermal power plant to the surrounding environment of Barapukuria, Dinajpur. The analyses of coal, water, soil and fly ash were carried out using standard sample testing methods. This study found that coal mining industry and coal-based thermal power plant have brought some environmental and socio-economic challenges to the adjacent areas such as soil, water and air pollution, subsidence of agricultural land and livelihood insecurity of inhabitants. The pH values, heavy metal, organic carbon and exchangeable cations of coal water treated in the farmland soil suggest that coal mining deteriorated the surrounding water and soil quality. The SO4(2-) concentration in water samples was beyond the range of World Health Organisation standard. Some physico-chemical properties such as pH, conductivity, moisture content, bulk density, unburned carbon content, specific gravity, water holding capacity, liquid and plastic limit were investigated on coal fly ash of Barapukuria thermal power plant. Air quality data provided by the Barapukuria Coal Mining Company Limited were contradictory with the result of interview with the miners and local inhabitants. However, coal potentially contributes to the development of economy of Bangladesh but coal mining deteriorates the environment by polluting air, water and soil. In general, this study includes comprehensive baseline data for decision makers to evaluate the feasibility of coal power industry at Barapukuria and the coalmine itself.

  16. Effects of main parameters on rheological properties of oil-coal slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yong-gang; Hao Li-fang; Xiong Chu-an; Sun Xiu-ying [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China). School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2006-09-15

    Oil-coal slurry prepared in coal direct liquefaction is a dispersed solid-liquid suspension system. In this paper, some factors such as solvent properties, solid concentrations and temperatures, which affect viscosity change of oil-coal slurry, were studied. The viscosity of coal slurry was measured using rotary viscometer, and the rheological properties have been investigated. The viscosity and rheological curves were plotted and regressed, respectively. The results show that the coal slurry behaves a pseudoplastic and thixotropic property. The rheological type of coal slurry was ascertained and its rheological equations were educed. The oil-coal slurry changes to non-Newtonian fluid from Newtonian fluid with the increasing of solid concentration. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The Comparative Analysis of the Efficiency of Coal Liquefaction Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudyka Viktor I.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organization of production of synthetic liquid fuels (SLF in Ukraine becomes an especially topical and at the same time complex scientific and applied task, taking into consideration criteria of the techno-ecological and economic rationality. The article presents a methodical approach to the comparative analysis of efficiency of the main methods and technologies for the synthetic liquid fuels production and a carried out testing, the results of which allowed to conclude that the most rational is the technology of indirect coal liquefaction based on coal thermal plasma gasification.

  18. The individual insurance market before reform: low premiums and low benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Heidi; Gabel, Jon R; Pickreign, Jeremy; McDevitt, Roland

    2011-10-01

    Based on analyses of individual market health plans sold through ehealthinsurance and enrollment information collected from individual market carriers, this article profiles the individual health insurance market in 2007, before health reform. The article examines premiums, plan enrollment, cost sharing, and covered benefits and compares individual and group markets. Premiums for the young are lower than in the group market but higher for older people. Cost sharing is substantial in the individual insurance market. Seventy-eight percent of people were enrolled in plans with deductibles for single coverage, which averaged $2,117. Annual out-of-pocket maximums averaged $5,271. Many plans do not cover important benefits. Twelve percent of individually insured persons had no coverage for office visits and only 43% have maternity benefits in their basic coverage. With the advent of health exchanges and new market rules in 2014, covered benefits may become richer, cost sharing will decline, but premiums for the young will rise.

  19. Premium inflation in the Irish private health insurance market: drivers and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, B

    2013-12-01

    Nearly half of the Irish population is covered by private health insurance. In recent years, premium inflation has been significantly ahead of overall inflation and has been accelerating. This has contributing to a drop in the numbers insured since the peak in 2008. The fall in the numbers with private health insurance also has implications for the public health system. Factors behind this premium inflation include rising charges for beds in public hospitals, increasing volume of treatments and increasing quality of service and cover. While some progress has been made by insurers on reducing fees paid to consultants and private hospitals, unless the quantity or quality of care are addressed then premium inflation is unlikely to abate.

  20. Analysis of Relativity Premium in Bonus-Malus System Based on Optimal Linear Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A bonus-malus system plays a very important role in actuarial mathematics through determining its relativity premium, which is extensively used in automobile insurance. There are many ways including Bayesian estimator and ordinary linear estimator to calculate the relativity premium. There is no doubt that Bayesian estimator is the most accurate estimator; however, it is undesirable for commercial purposes for its rather irregular pattern. This paper aims to introduce an optimal linear estimator for relativity premium, which has a simple pattern and is obtained under the quadratic loss function such that the result is close to Bayesian method. The Loimaranta efficiency of such an optimal linear estimator has been studied and compared with the two methods mentioned above.

  1. THE STUDY OF INSURANCE PREMIUM RATE GIS MAPPING CONSIDERING THE STORM AND FLOOD HAZARD RISKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the number of natural disaster occurrence is increasing because of abnormal changes of weather in Korea. In Korea the storm and flood insurance system is in effect to prevent these natural disasters. The national storm and flood insurance Premium rate is very low and the risk of adverse selection resides because of choosing by who lives in high risk area. To solve these problems, the storm and flood insurance rate map are required. In this study, the prototype of storm and flood insurance premium rate map of the Ulsan, Korea was made and the method of GIS analysis for the insurance premium rate calculating and the procedure of the Ulsan storm and flood insurance rate map were researched.

  2. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be

  3. COAL USE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The world's coal reserves have been estimated to be about one exagram accessible with current extraction technology. The energy content has been valued at 290 zettajourles. Using a value of 15 terawatt as the current global energy consumption, the coal supply could global needs f...

  4. Improving coal handling effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S.

    2003-10-01

    Appropriate coal handling systems are essential for successful coal utilisation. The paper looks at some of the options available, including crushers and hammer mills, wear-resistant liners for chutes and wagons, and dewatering systems. These are individual components within larger systems such as stockyard stacking and reclaiming installations. 5 photos.

  5. Management of coal stockpiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, A.M. [IEA Coal Research, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-10-01

    Stockpile management is an important part of the coal handling process from mine to customer. Virtually all coal producers and consumers make use of stockpiles at their facilities, either to serve as a buffer between material delivery and processing or to enable coal blending to meet quality requirements. This report begins by examining why stockpiles are employed. The stacking and reclaiming of piles, and the reduction of noise arising from the handling equipment is then discussed, along with stockpile automation and management. Good sampling and analysis procedures are essential for coal quality management. Sampling systems, representative samples and on-line analysis are described. Stock auditing to reconcile the amount of coal in the stockpiles is also covered. Coals are susceptible to weathering and atmospheric oxidation during storage in open-air piles. Properties and processes affected by coal oxidation and weathering, including heating value losses, handleability, cleaning, combustion and coking are examined. Spontaneous combustion poses safety, environmental, economic and handling problems if it becomes established in stockpiles. Factors affecting spontaneous combustion are discussed with the emphasis on prevention, detection and control. Stockyard operators are under constant social and political pressures to improve the environmental acceptability of their operations. Thus the control, prevention, and monitoring of fugitive dust emissions, and the composition, collection and treatment of stockpile runoff are addressed. The prevention and control of flowslides is also covered. Experience has shown that with good stockpile design and management, most coals can be safely stored in an environmentally acceptable way. 187 refs., 41 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Biostimulators from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, L.V.

    1984-04-01

    A report is presented on a meeting of the Bureau of the Scientific Council of the Ministry of Coal Industry of the USSR on chemistry of fossil fuels held on 21-22 November 1983 in Moscow. Papers delivered during the meeting are evaluated. Chemistry of black and brown coal from the USSR was analyzed. Chemical coal properties which are of particular significance for coal use as an agricultural fertilizer (biostimulator of plant growth) were investigated. Brown and black coal with the highest oxidation level used as a fuel by power plants could be used for production of fertilizers with a high content of humic acids. Tests carried out in the USSR in various climatic zones (in the North and in Central Asia) showed that biostimulators from coal improved plant growth, reduced ripening period, increased crops, improved physical properties of soils (prevented moisture losses). Utilizing selected wastes from coal processing for production of biostimulators was also discussed. Methods for coal preparation for biostimulant production (crushing, screening, chemical processing) were evaluated. Prospects of biostimulator use in land reclamation were discussed.

  7. Coal for the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-01-15

    With reserves of 7 billion t of coal, Colombia is the world's fourth-largest exporter of bituminous coal and has the potential to grow further. The paper discusses current production and the future potential of the La Guajira reserves with Carbones del Cerrejon Ltd., Colombia. 1 ref.

  8. Biodesulphurisation of coal

    OpenAIRE

    Prayuenyong, P.

    2001-01-01

    The emission of sulphur oxides during the combustion of coal is one of the causes of an environmental problem known as acid rain. Biodesulphurisation technology applied as a method to remove sulphur before coal combustion was investigated in this work. The desulphurisation abilities of three specific bacterial strains including Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8, R. erythropolis X309 and Shewanella putrefaciens strain NCIMB 8...

  9. Development of coal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    It is an important issue to expand stable coal supply areas for Japan, especially to assure stable supply of overseas coals. The investigations on geological structures in foreign countries perform surveys on geological structures in overseas coal producing countries and basic feasibility studies. The investigations select areas with greater business risks in coal producing countries and among private business entities. The geological structure investigations were carried out on China, Indonesia and Malaysia and the basic feasibility studies on Indonesia during fiscal 1994. The basic coal resource development investigations refer to the results of previous physical explorations and drilling tests to develop practical exploration technologies for coal resources in foreign countries. The development feasibility studies on overseas coals conduct technological consultation, surface surveys, physical explorations, and trial drilling operations, and provide fund assistance to activities related thereto. Fiscal 1994 has provided fund assistance to two projects in Indonesia and America. Fund loans are provided on investigations for development and import of overseas coals and other related activities. Liability guarantee for development fund is also described.

  10. Electrolysis of coal slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, K.E.; Tran, T.; Swinkels, D.

    1984-01-01

    The major aims of the project were: to verify early reports of the American workers and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept of electrolysis of coal slurries; investigate reaction mechanisms and the stoichiometry; measure the reducing power and oxidation kinetics of selected Australian coals; investigate some process variables, and demonstrate an electrolysis cell with practical electrode geometry.

  11. Assessment of the candidate markets for liquid boiler fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    Liquid fuels can be produced from coal in a number of indirect and direct liquefaction processes. While indirect coal liquefaction has been proved commercially outside the United States, most attention in this country has focused on the direct liquefaction processes, which include the processes under examination in this report; namely, the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), the H-Coal, and the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) II processes. The objectives of the study were to: compare the boiler fuels of direct coal liquefaction with residual fuel oil (No. 6 fuel oil) including physical characteristics and environmental hazards, such as carcinogenic characteristics and toxic hazard characteristics; determine whether a boiler fuel market would exist for the coal liquefaction products given their physical characteristics and potential environmental hazards; determine the advantages of utilizing methanol as a boiler fuel on a continuous basis in commercial boilers utilizing existing technology; identify the potential regional candidate markets for direct coal liquefaction products as liquid boiler fuels; determine the distributing and handling costs associated with marketing coal liquefaction products as liquid boiler fuels; determine the current regulatory issues associated with the marketing of coal liquefaction products as boiler fuels; and determine and evaluate other institutional issues associated with the marketing of direct coal liquefaction products as boiler fuels.

  12. The leachability of carbon-14-labelled 3,4-benzopyrene from coal ash into aqueous systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, A.C.; Kanij, J.

    1984-01-01

    The leachability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal ash into aqueous systems was studied. Carbon-14-labeled 3,4-Benzopyrene (BaP) was deposited on coal fly ash by adsorption from the liquid phase in quantities of about 10 ??g/g ash. After a thermal treatment in air at 120??C for 2 hours

  13. Coal Formation and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, W. H.; Finkelman, R. B.

    2003-12-01

    Coal is one of the most complex and challenging natural materials to analyze and to understand. Unlike most rocks, which consist predominantly of crystalline mineral grains, coal is largely an assemblage of amorphous, degraded plant remains metamorphosed to various degrees and intermixed with a generous sprinkling of minute syngenetic, diagenetic, epigenetic, and detrital mineral grains, and containing within its structure various amounts of water, oils, and gases. Each coal is unique, having been derived from different plant sources over geologic time, having experienty -45ced different thermal histories, and having been exposed to varying geologic processes. This diversity presents a challenge to constructing a coherent picture of coal geochemistry and the processes that influence the chemical composition of coal.Despite the challenge coal presents to geochemists, a thorough understanding of the chemistry and geology of this complex natural substance is essential because of its importance to our society. Coal is, and will remain for sometime, a crucial source of energy for the US and for many other countries (Figure 1). In the USA, more than half of the electricity is generated by coal-fired power plants, and almost 90% of the coal mined in the USA is sold for electricity generation (Pierce et al., 1996). It is also an important source of coke for steel production, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and even perfumes ( Schobert, 1987). It may also, in some cases, be an economic source of various mineral commodities. The utilization of coal through mining, transport, storage, combustion, and the disposal of the combustion by-products, also presents a challenge to geochemists because of the wide range of environmental and human health problems arising from these activities. The sound and effective use of coal as a natural resource requires a better understanding of the geochemistry of coal, i.e., the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the coal that control its

  14. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1991-05-16

    The overall objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of an enzymatic desulfurization process specifically intended for organic sulfur removal from coal. Toward that end, a series of specific objectives were defined: (1) establish the feasibility of (bio)oxidative pretreatment followed by biochemical sulfate cleavage for representative sulfur-containing model compounds and coals using commercially-available enzymes; (2) investigate the potential for the isolation and selective use of enzyme preparations from coal-utilizing microbial systems for desulfurization of sulfur-containing model compounds and coals; and (3) develop a conceptual design and economic analysis of a process for enzymatic removal of organic sulfur from coal. Within the scope of this program, it was proposed to carry out a portion of each of these efforts concurrently. (VC)

  15. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Sarofim, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gueishen, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hradisky, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Mandalaparty, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhang, H. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-01-11

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coal's carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO2 sequestration.

  16. Assessing Alternative Modifications to the Affordable Care Act: Impact on Individual Market Premiums and Insurance Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibner, Christine; Saltzman, Evan

    2015-03-20

    The goals of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are to enable all legal U.S. residents to have access to affordable health insurance and to prevent sicker individuals (such as those with preexisting conditions) from being priced out of the market. The ACA also instituted several policies to stabilize premiums and to encourage enrollment among healthy individuals of all ages. The law's tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies offer a "carrot" that may encourage enrollment among some young and healthy individuals who would otherwise remain uninsured, while the individual mandate acts as a "stick" by imposing penalties on individuals who choose not to enroll. In this article, the authors use the COMPARE microsimulation model, an analytic tool that uses economic theory and data to predict the effects of health policy reforms, to estimate how eliminating the ACA's individual mandate, eliminating the law's tax credits, and combined scenarios that change these and other provisions of the act might affect 2015 individual market premiums and overall insurance coverage. Underlying these estimates is a COMPARE-based analysis of how premiums and insurance coverage outcomes depend on young adults' propensity to enroll in insurance coverage. The authors find that eliminating the ACA's tax credits and eliminating the individual mandate both increase premiums and reduce enrollment on the individual market. They also find that these key features of the ACA help to protect against adverse selection and stabilize the market by encouraging healthy people to enroll and, in the case of the tax credit, shielding subsidized enrollees from premium increases. Further, they find that individual market premiums are only modestly sensitive to young adults' propensity to enroll in insurance coverage, and ensuring market stability does not require that young adults make up a particular share of enrollees.

  17. Investigation on characterization and liquefaction of coals from Tavan tolgoi deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Purevsuren

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of proximate, ultimate, petrographic and IR analysis results have been confirmed that the Tavan tolgoi coal is a high-rank G mark stone coal. The results of X-ray fluorescence analysis of coal ash show that the Tavan tolgoi coal is a subbituminous coal. The ash of Tavan tolgoi coal has an acidic character. The results of pyrolysis of Tavan tolgoi coal at different heating temperatures show that a maximum yield - 5.0% of liquid product can be obtained at 700°C. The results of thermal dissolution of Tavan tolgoi coal in tetralin with constant mass ratio between coal and tetralin (1:1.8 at 450°C show that 50.0% of liquid product can be obtained after thermal decomposition of the COM (coal organic matter. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v14i0.191 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 14 (40, 2013, p12-19

  18. 5 CFR 550.107 - Premium payments capped on a biweekly basis when an annual limitation otherwise applies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... basis when an annual limitation otherwise applies. 550.107 Section 550.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Maximum Earnings Limitations § 550.107 Premium payments capped on a biweekly basis when an annual limitation...

  19. Asymmetric impacts of global risk appetite on the risk premium for an emerging market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlı, İbrahim Burak

    2008-05-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of global risk appetite on the risk premium utilizing high-frequency data. Taking the Turkish economy as our laboratory, we find that the risk premium volatility responds only to a worsening in the risk appetite for the Turkish economy, which is a result that we do not observe for the other emerging markets. Then, we investigate the role of current account dynamics on this asymmetric effect, by focusing also on an economy with similar current account performance. The empirical results find supporting evidence for the role of current account dynamics on the estimated asymmetry.

  20. Determinants of premiums in aerospace mergers and acquisitions: A preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, John K.

    There is a large body of literature on different aspects of premiums as they relate to mergers and acquisitions. However, there is very little literature that specifically discusses the determinants of premiums in aerospace. Few industries have experienced the prolonged consolidation that the aerospace industry has seen. Today, the industry is dominated by a few large firms, but there is still merger activity continuing especially with second-tier firms attempting to secure their future through growth. This paper examines several determinants as applied to 18 aerospace mergers of publicly held companies and divisions from 1991 through April of 2002.

  1. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    It is the objective of this project to isolate the asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions from coal liquids from a number of liquefaction processes. These processes consist of in general: catalytic hydrogenation, staged pyrolysis and solvent refining. The asphaltene fractions may be further separated by both gradient elution through column chromatography, and molecular size distribution through gel permeation chromatography. These coal-derived asphaltene and preashpaltene fractions will then be investigated by various chemical and physical methods for characterization of their structures. After the parameters are obtained, these parameters will be correlated with the refining and conversion variables which control a given type of liquefaction process. The effects of asphaltene in catalysis, ash or metal removal, desulfurization and denitrification will also be correlated. It is anticipated that understanding the role of asphaltenes in liquefaction processes will enable engineers to both improve existing processes, and to make recommendations for operational changes in planned liquefaction units. The objective of Phase 1 was to complete the isolation and separation of coal liquid fractions and to initiate their characterization. The objective of Phase 2 is to continue the characterization of coal asphaltenes and other coal liquid fractions by use of physical and instrumental methods. The structural parameters obtained will be used to postulate hypothetical average structures for coal liquid fractions.The objective of Phase 3 is to concentrate on the characterization of the preasphaltene (benzene insoluble fraction) of coal liquid fraction by the available physical and chemical methods to obtain a number of structural parameters.

  2. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    It is the objective of this project to isolate the asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions from coal liquids from a number of liquefaction processes. These processes consist of in general: catalytic hydrogenation, staged pyrolysis and solvent refining. These asphaltene fractions may be further separated by both gradient elution through column chromatography, and molecular size distribution through gel permeation chromatography. Those coal-derived asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions will be investigated by various chemical and physical methods for characterization of their structures. After the parameters are obtained, these parameters will be correlated with the refining and conversion variables which control a given type of liquefaction process. The effects of asphaltene in catalysis, ash or metal removal, desulfurization and denitrification will also be correlated. It is anticipated that understanding the role of asphaltenes in liquefaction processes will enable engineers to both improve existing processes, and to make recommendations for operational changes in planned liquefaction units in the United States. The objective of Phase 1 was to complete the isolation and separation of coal liquid fractions and to initiate their characterization. The objective of Phase 2 is to continue the characterization of coal asphaltenes and other coal liquid fractions by use of physical and instrumental methods. The structural parameters obtained will be used to postulate hypothetical average structures for coal liquid fractions. The objective of Phase 3 is to concentrate on the characterization of the preasphaltene (benzene insoluble fraction) of coal liquid fraction by the available physical and chemical methods to obtain a number of structural parameters.

  3. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  4. Environmentally conscious coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to evaluate the environmental impacts of home-scale coal combustion on the Navajo Reservation and develop strategies to reduce adverse health effects associated with home-scale coal combustion. Principal accomplishments of this project were: (1) determination of the metal and gaseous emissions of a representative stove on the Navajo Reservation; (2) recognition of cyclic gaseous emissions in combustion in home-scale combustors; (3) `back of the envelope` calculation that home-scale coal combustion may impact Navajo health; and (4) identification that improved coal stoves require the ability to burn diverse feedstocks (coal, wood, biomass). Ultimately the results of Navajo home-scale coal combustion studies will be extended to the Developing World, particularly China, where a significant number (> 150 million) of households continue to heat their homes with low-grade coal.

  5. High Temperature High Pressure Thermodynamic Measurements for Coal Model Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John C. Chen; Vinayak N. Kabadi

    1998-11-12

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a better thermodynamic model for predicting properties of high-boiling coal derived liquids, especially the phase equilibria of different fractions at elevated temperatures and pressures. The development of such a model requires data on vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), enthalpy, and heat capacity which would be experimentally determined for binary systems of coal model compounds and compiled into a database. The data will be used to refine existing models such as UNIQUAC and UNIFAC. The flow VLE apparatus designed and built for a previous project was upgraded and recalibrated for data measurements for thk project. The modifications include better and more accurate sampling technique and addition of a digital recorder to monitor temperature, pressure and liquid level inside the VLE cell. VLE data measurements for system benzene-ethylbenzene have been completed. The vapor and liquid samples were analysed using the Perkin-Elmer Autosystem gas chromatography.

  6. Coal desulfurization by aqueous chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Vasilakos, N.; Corcoran, W. H.; Grohmann, K.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of desulfurizing coal is described in which chlorine gas is bubbled through an aqueous slurry of coal at low temperature below 130 degrees C., and at ambient pressure. Chlorinolysis converts both inorganic and organic sulfur components of coal into water soluble compounds which enter the aqueous suspending media. The media is separated after chlorinolysis and the coal dechlorinated at a temperature of from 300 C to 500 C to form a non-caking, low-sulfur coal product.

  7. Coal. A human history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freese, B.

    2002-07-01

    Prized as 'the best stone in Britain' by Roman invaders who carved jewellery out of it, coal has transformed societies, powered navies, fueled economies, and expanded frontiers. Yet the mundane mineral that built our global economy and even today powers our electrical plants, has also caused death, disease, and environmental destruction. As early as 1306, King Edward I tried to ban coal (unsuccessfully) because its smoke became so obnoxious. Its recent identification as a primary cause of global warming has made it a cause celebre of a new kind. This book describes the history of coal, that began three hundred million years ago and spans the globe.

  8. Coal-fired generation

    CERN Document Server

    Breeze, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Coal-Fired Generation is a concise, up-to-date and readable guide providing an introduction to this traditional power generation technology. It includes detailed descriptions of coal fired generation systems, demystifies the coal fired technology functions in practice as well as exploring the economic and environmental risk factors. Engineers, managers, policymakers and those involved in planning and delivering energy resources will find this reference a valuable guide, to help establish a reliable power supply address social and economic objectives. Focuses on the evolution of the traditio

  9. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL's contract.

  10. Evaluation of pitches and cokes from solvent-extracted coal materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, E.R.

    1996-12-01

    Three initial coal-extracted (C-E) samples were received from the West Virginia University (WVU) Chemical Engineering Department. Two samples had been hydrogenated to obtain pitches that satisfy Theological requirements. One of the hydrogenated (HC-E) samples had been extracted by toluene to remove ash and higher molecular weight aromatic compounds. We were unable to measure the softening point and viscosity of the non-hydro treated solid extract sample, Positive characteristics in the HC-E materials were softening points of 113-119{degrees}C, low sulfur and ash. The oxygen and nitrogen content of the HC-E samples may limit future usage in premium carbon and graphite products. Coking values were similar to petroleum pitches. Laboratory anode testing indicates that in combination with standard coal-tar pitch, the HC-E material can be used as a binder pitch.

  11. AQUEOUS BIPHASE EXTRACTION FOR PROCESSING OF FINE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Osseo-Asare; X. Zeng

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop an aqueous biphase extraction process for the treatment of fine coals. Aqueous biphase extraction is an advanced separation technology that relies on the ability of an aqueous system consisting of a water-soluble polymer and another component, e.g., another polymer, an inorganic salt, or a nonionic surfactant, to separate into two immiscible aqueous phases. The principle behind the partition of solid particles in aqueous biphase systems is the physicochemical interaction between the solid surface and the surrounding liquid solution. In order to remove sulfur and mineral matter from fine coal with aqueous biphasic extraction, it is necessary to know the partitioning behavior of coal, as well as the inorganic mineral components. Therefore, in this research emphasis was placed on the partitioning behavior of fine coal particles as well as model fine inorganic particles in aqueous biphase systems.

  12. Transport fuels from two-stage coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, A.; Cebolla, V.; Fernandez, I.; Martinez, M.T.; Miranda, J.L.; Oelert, H.; Prado, J.G. (Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1994-03-01

    Four Spanish lignites and their vitrinite concentrates were evaluated for coal liquefaction. Correlationships between the content of vitrinite and conversion in direct liquefaction were observed for the lignites but not for the vitrinite concentrates. The most reactive of the four coals was processed in two-stage liquefaction at a higher scale. First-stage coal liquefaction was carried out in a continuous unit at Clausthal University at a temperature of 400[degree]C at 20 MPa hydrogen pressure and with anthracene oil as a solvent. The coal conversion obtained was 75.41% being 3.79% gases, 2.58% primary condensate and 69.04% heavy liquids. A hydroprocessing unit was built at the Instituto de Carboquimica for the second-stage coal liquefaction. Whole and deasphalted liquids from the first-stage liquefaction were processed at 450[degree]C and 10 MPa hydrogen pressure, with two commercial catalysts: Harshaw HT-400E (Co-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and HT-500E (Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]). The effects of liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV), temperature, gas/liquid ratio and catalyst on the heteroatom liquids, and levels of 5 ppm of nitrogen and 52 ppm of sulphur were reached at 450[degree]C, 10 MPa hydrogen pressure, 0.08 kg H[sub 2]/kg feedstock and with Harshaw HT-500E catalyst. The liquids obtained were hydroprocessed again at 420[degree]C, 10 MPa hydrogen pressure and 0.06 kg H[sub 2]/kg feedstock to hydrogenate the aromatic structures. In these conditions, the aromaticity was reduced considerably, and 39% of naphthas and 35% of kerosene fractions were obtained. 18 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

  14. 77 FR 27099 - Submission of Information Collection for OMB Review; Comment Request; Payment of Premiums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... revoking a prior election to use the Alternative Premium Funding Target (APFT) to determine unfunded vested benefits (UVBs). (Under PBGC regulations, an election to use the APFT is irrevocable for 5 years; 2008 was the first year that plans were permitted to elect the APFT, so 2013 is the first year for which it is...

  15. 77 FR 4839 - Proposed Submission of Information Collection for OMB Review; Comment Request; Payment of Premiums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... revoking a prior election to use the Alternative Premium Funding Target (APFT) to determine unfunded vested benefits (UVBs). (Under PBGC regulations, an election to use the APFT is irrevocable for 5 years; 2008 was the first year that plans were permitted to elect the APFT, so 2013 is the first year for which it is...

  16. 77 FR 55879 - Submission of Information Collection for OMB Review; Comment Request; Payment of Premiums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Alternative Premium Funding Target (APFT) to determine unfunded vested benefits (UVBs). (Under PBGC regulations, an election to use the APFT is irrevocable for 5 years; 2008 was the first year that plans were permitted to elect the APFT, so 2013 is the first year for which it is necessary to collect this information...

  17. Spending the Primary Physical Education and Sport Premium: A West Midlands Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    In March 2013 the government announced that it was to provide funding to improve provision of Physical Education and sport in primary schools in England. Entitled The Primary Physical Education and Sport Premium, this ring-fenced annual funding has been allocated to schools that are free to choose how the money is spent but are accountable for its…

  18. 78 FR 79619 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Pub. L. 111-148) and the Health Care and Education... to undertake certain recordkeeping and self-auditing activities to ensure compliance with Federal requirements, such as those governing eligibility determinations for advance payments of the premium tax [[Page...

  19. The value premium within and across GICS industry sectors in a pre-financial collapse sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth E. Scislaw

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A portfolio manager employing a top-down/bottom-up method who seeks to capture the value premium long promised in academic literature would want to first determine whether the premium exists across industries and not just observed in firm-specific book-to-market (BE/ME relationships. Next, the investor would want to know if BE/ME characteristics are stable across these defined homogeneous groups or whether there is considerable variation. Results show that certain industries appear to have a natural or structural tendency to reflect either a high or low BE/ME characteristic. Results also shows that growth-oriented industry BE/ME characteristics appear to be more stable than value-oriented industries over time. Moreover, stocks from growth-oriented industries tend to cluster at high rates in the lowest BE/ME quintile, while stocks from value-oriented industries appear more evenly distributed across middle BE/ME quintiles over time. Value stocks found in growth sectors outperform value stocks in value sectors, contrary to prior published results. The January premium exists both within and across Global Industry Classification Standard industry sectors, but the value premium is not subsumed by the January effect in either analysis.

  20. 24 CFR 220.806 - Pro rata refund of insurance premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata refund of insurance... AREAS Contract Rights and Obligations-Projects Insured Project Improvement Loans § 220.806 Pro rata... equal to the pro rata portion of the current annual loan insurance premium theretofore paid which is...