WorldWideScience

Sample records for co2 plume behavior

  1. Understanding CO2 Plume Behavior and Basin-Scale Pressure Changes during Sequestration Projects through the use of Reservoir Fluid Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetaru, H.E.; Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Mehnert, E.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Jordan, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Large scale geologic sequestration tests are in the planning stages around the world. The liability and safety issues of the migration of CO2 away from the primary injection site and/or reservoir are of significant concerns for these sequestration tests. Reservoir models for simulating single or multi-phase fluid flow are used to understand the migration of CO2 in the subsurface. These models can also help evaluate concerns related to brine migration and basin-scale pressure increases that occur due to the injection of additional fluid volumes into the subsurface. The current paper presents different modeling examples addressing these issues, ranging from simple geometric models to more complex reservoir fluid models with single-site and basin-scale applications. Simple geometric models assuming a homogeneous geologic reservoir and piston-like displacement have been used for understanding pressure changes and fluid migration around each CO2 storage site. These geometric models are useful only as broad approximations because they do not account for the variation in porosity, permeability, asymmetry of the reservoir, and dip of the beds. In addition, these simple models are not capable of predicting the interference between different injection sites within the same reservoir. A more realistic model of CO2 plume behavior can be produced using reservoir fluid models. Reservoir simulation of natural gas storage reservoirs in the Illinois Basin Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone suggest that reservoir heterogeneity will be an important factor for evaluating storage capacity. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is a thick sandstone that underlies many significant coal fired power plants (emitting at least 1 million tonnes per year) in the midwestern United States including the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio. The initial commercial sequestration sites are expected to inject 1 to 2 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Depending on the geologic structure and

  2. Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A. E.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design A. Andrews, T. Ryerson, J. Peischl, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, P. Tans An extensive dataset of CO2 concentrations including enhancements in point and area source plumes is available from in situ measurements collected using the NOAA P-3 and NCAR Electra research aircraft during seven major field projects from 1999 through 2010. Research flights sampled emission plumes from coal-, oil-, and natural gas-fired electric utility power plants, industrial facilities, and urban areas. Plume sampling often included horizontal transects at several altitudes and multiple distances downwind. CO2 data from crosswind transects upwind and downwind, coupled with ancillary measurements of co-emitted nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, along with plume location, and wind speed and direction permit unambiguous attribution and quantification of atmospheric plumes from individual sources. Certain point sources were revisited on multiple flights over the course of 1-2 month long field projects and on successive field projects spanning several years. Sampling occurred primarily in the summertime, daytime continental boundary layer, with some plume studies performed after dark and in the spring, fall, and winter seasons. The data provide rigorously calibrated, measurement-based constraints on the expected range of atmospheric CO2 plume enhancements that can be used to assess satellite sensor concepts. Crosswind near-field (~5 km) transects in the summer daytime mixed-layer downwind of the strongest point sources were characterized by peak plume CO2 mixing ratio enhancements >100 ppm above background for the 100-m spatial averages reported from the moving aircraft. On many flights, the aircraft tracked such emissions plumes beyond 150 km downwind, or up to 10 hours of transport time, until plume enhancements were indistinguishable from background variability in CO2

  3. CO2 plume management in saline reservoir sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    A significant difference between injecting CO2 into saline aquifers for sequestration and injecting fluids into oil reservoirs or natural gas into aquifer storage reservoirs is the availability and use of other production and injection wells surrounding the primary injection well(s). Of major concern for CO2 sequestration using a single well is the distribution of pressure and CO2 saturation within the injection zone. Pressure is of concern with regards to caprock integrity and potential migration of brine or CO2 outside of the injection zone, while CO2 saturation is of interest for storage rights and displacement efficiency. For oil reservoirs, the presence of additional wells is intended to maximize oil recovery by injecting CO2 into the same hydraulic flow units from which the producing wells are withdrawing fluids. Completing injectors and producers in the same flow unit increases CO2 throughput, maximizes oil displacement efficiency, and controls pressure buildup. Additional injectors may surround the CO2 injection well and oil production wells in order to provide external pressure to these wells to prevent the injected CO2 from migrating from the pattern between two of the producing wells. Natural gas storage practices are similar in that to reduce the amount of "cushion" gas and increase the amount of cycled or working gas, edge wells may be used for withdrawal of gas and center wells used for gas injection. This reduces loss of gas to the formation via residual trapping far from the injection well. Moreover, this maximizes the natural gas storage efficiency between the injection and production wells and reduces the areal extent of the natural gas plume. Proposed U.S. EPA regulations include monitoring pressure and suggest the "plume" may be defined by pressure in addition to the CO2 saturated area. For pressure monitoring, it seems that this can only be accomplished by injection zone monitoring wells. For pressure, these wells would not need to be very

  4. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAUL, JOHN H

    2013-06-21

    Oceanic river plumes represent some of the most productive environments on Earth. As major conduits for freshwater and nutrients into the coastal ocean, their impact on water column ecosystems extend for up to a thousand km into oligotrophic oceans. Upon entry into the oceans rivers are tremendous sources of CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Yet owing to increased light transmissivity from sediment deposition coupled with the influx of nutrients, dramatic CO2 drawdown occurs, and plumes rapidly become sinks for CO2. Using state-of-the-art gene expression technology, we have examined the molecular biodiversity of CO2 fixation in the Mississippi River Plume (MRP; two research cruises) and the Orinoco River Plume (ORP; one cruise). When the MRP extends far into the Gulf because of entrainment with the Loop Current, MRP production (carbon fixation) can account for up to 41% of the surface production in the Gulf of Mexico. Nearer-shore plume stations (“high plume,” salinity< 32 ppt) had tremendous CO2 drawdown that was correlated to heterokont (principally diatom) carbon fixation gene expression. The principal form of nitrogen for this production based upon 15N studies was urea, believed to be from anthropogenic origin (fertilizer) from the MRP watershed. Intermediate plume environments (salinity 34 ppt) were characterized by high levels of Synechococcuus carbon fixation that was fueled by regenerated ammonium. Non-plume stations were characterized by high light Prochlorococcus carbon fixation gene expression that was positively correlated with dissolved CO2 concentrations. Although data from the ORP cruise is still being analyzed, some similarities and striking differences were found between the ORP and MRP. High levels of heterokont carbon fixation gene expression that correlated with CO2 drawdown were observed in the high plume, yet the magnitude of this phenomenon was far below that of the MRP, most likely due to the lower levels of anthropogenic

  5. Martian Atmospheric Plumes: Behavior, Detectability and Plume Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Mischna, M.; Sykes, R.; Dissly, R.

    2013-10-01

    We will present our recent work simulating neutrally buoyant plumes in the martian atmosphere. This work is primarily directed at understanding the behavior of discrete plumes of biogenic tracer gases, and thus increasing our understanding of their detectability (both from orbit and from in situ measurements), and finally how to use the plumes to identify their precise source locations. We have modeled the detailed behavior of martian atmospheric plumes using MarsWRF for the atmospheric dynamics and SCIPUFF (a terrestrial state of the art plume modeling code that we have modified to represent martian conditions) for the plume dynamics. This combination of tools allows us to accurately simulate plumes not only from a regional scale from which an orbital observing platform would witness the plume, but also from an in situ perspective, with the instantaneous concentration variations that a turbulent flow would present to a point sampler in situ instrument. Our initial work has focused on the detectability of discrete plumes from an orbital perspective and we will present those results for a variety of notional orbital trace gas detection instruments. We have also begun simulating the behavior of the plumes from the perspective of a sampler on a rover within the martian atmospheric boundary layer. The detectability of plumes within the boundary layer has a very strong dependence on the atmospheric stability, with plume concentrations increasing by a factor of 10-1000 during nighttime when compared to daytime. In the equatorial regions of the planet where we have simulated plumes, the diurnal tidal “clocking” of the winds is strongly evident in the plume trail, which similarly “clocks” around its source. This behavior, combined with the strong diurnal concentration variations suggests that a rover hunting a plume source would be well suited to approach it from a particular azimuth (downwind at night) to maximize detectability of the plume and the ability to

  6. Development of density plumes of dissolved CO2: Comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Karen; Vosper, Hayley; Rochelle, Chris; Noy, Dave; Chadwick, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The long-term trapping of CO2 within deep geological storage reservoirs will be dependent upon CO2-water-rock geochemical reactions. The first, and most important, steps in this process will be dissolution of CO2 into the reservoir porewater and the transport of this dissolved CO2 through the reservoir. As part of the CO2CARE project we have investigated these via laboratory tests using a water-filled porous medium. Key experimental parameters were measured to determine system permeability, so that a high-resolution numerical model could be built in an attempt to reproduce the observed system behaviour. The Hele-Shaw cell comprised two glass sheets 65 cm wide and 36 cm high, separated by a spacing of 1.1 mm, and filled with closely-packed glass beads 0.4-0.6 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass was treated to prevent the formation of a higher permeability zone along this interface. A pH-sensitive dye was added to the pore-filling water to show where it had been acidified due to the presence of CO2. CO2 gas was introduced to a space at the top of the cell, which created a thin, diffusion-controlled boundary layer of CO2-rich water below the CO2-water interface. CO2 dissolution increased water density, resulting in gravitational instabilities and the formation of many small, downward-migrating plumes. Time-lapse photography was used to track the formation and progress of these plumes. As the plumes grew they increased in length relative to their width, and decreased in number over time. They also became more complex with time, splitting and forming several lobes, whose outer edges became more diffuse as they mixed with the CO2-poor water. The onset time of plume development and the horizontal wavelength (spacing) of the descending plumes are diagnostic measures of the system properties, notably permeability. They were analysed from the time-lapse images and expressed as probability density functions based on histograms of the observations. The derived

  7. Modelling the electrical resistivity response to CO2 plumes generated in a laboratory, cylindrical sandbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, T.; Maineult, A. J.; Binley, A.; Vieira, C.; Zamora, M.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 capture and storage into deep geological formations is one of the main solutions proposed to reduce the concentration of anthropic CO2 in the atmosphere. The monitoring of injection sites is a crucial issue to assess for the long term viability of CO2 storage. With the intention of detecting potential leakages, we are investigating the possibility of using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) techniques to detect CO2 transfers in the shallow sub-surface. ERT measurements were performed during a CO2 injection in a cylindrical tank filled with Fontainebleau sand and saturated with water. Several measurements protocols were tested. The inversion of the resistances measured with the software R3T (Binley and Kemna (2005)) clearly showed that the CO2 injection induces significant changes in the resistivity distribution of the medium, and that ERT has a promising potential for the detection and survey of CO2 transfers through unconsolidated saturated media. We modeled this experiment using Matlab by building a 3D cellular automaton that describes the CO2 spreading, following the geometric and stochastic approach described by Selker et al. (2007). The CO2 circulation is described as independents, circular and continuous gas channels whose horizontal spread depends on a Gaussian probability law. From the channel distribution we define the corresponding gas concentration distribution and calculate the resistivity of the medium by applying Archie's law for unsaturated conditions. The forward modelling was performed with the software R3T to convert the resistivity distribution into resistances values, each corresponding to one of the electrode arrays used in the experimental measurements. Modelled and measured resistances show a good correlation, except for the electrode arrays located at the top or the bottom of the tank. We improved the precision of the model by considering the effects due to CO2 dissolution in the water which increases the conductivity of the

  8. Analytical solution for pressure buildup and plume evolution during injection of CO2 into saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, S. A.; Hardisty, P. E.; Trudell, M. R.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    If geo-sequestration of CO2 is to be employed as a key greenhouse gas reduction method in the global effort to mitigate climate change, simple yet robust methods must be available to help design and monitor injection into saline aquifers. There has been significant development of simple analytical and semi-analytical techniques to support screening analysis and performance assessment for potential carbon sequestration sites. These techniques have generally been used to estimate the size of CO2 plumes for the purpose of leakage rate estimation. A common assumption of previous has been that both the fluids and the geological formation are incompressible. Consequently, calculation of pressure distribution requires the specification of an arbitrary radius of influence. In the present work, we relax this restriction by incorporating fluid and formation compressibility into our governing equations. These equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation, and are then solved using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. By allowing for compressibility in the fluids and formation, the solutions improve on previous work by not requiring the specification of an arbitrary radius of influence. Our solution is also capable of accounting for non-Darcy inertial effects modeled by the Forchheimer equation. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with finite difference solutions. Our analysis leads to a simple yet highly accurate algebraic equation for estimating the evolution of a CO2 plume, and the associated pressure buildup, as a function of time.

  9. Airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN in boreal biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Sebastian J.; Bauguitte, Stephane; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Le Breton, Michael; Archibald, Alex; Gallagher, Martin W.; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl J.

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning plays an important role in the budgets of a variety of atmospheric trace gases and particles. For example, fires in boreal Russia have been linked with large growths in the global concentrations of trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and CO (Langenfelds et al., 2002; Simpson et al., 2006). High resolution airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN were made over Eastern Canada onboard the UK Atmospheric Research Aircraft FAAM BAe-146 from 12 July to 4 August 2011. These observations were made as part of the BORTAS project (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites). Flights were aimed at transecting and sampling the outflow from the commonly occurring North American boreal forest fires during the summer months and to investigate and identify the chemical composition and evolution of these plumes. CO2 and CH4 dry air mole fractions were determined using an adapted system based on a Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Model RMT-200) from Los Gatos Research Inc, which uses the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy technique. In-flight calibrations revealed a mean accuracy of 0.57 ppmv and 2.31 ppbv for 1 Hz observations of CO2 and CH4, respectively, during the BORTAS project. During these flights a number of fresh and photochemically-aged plumes were identified using simultaneous HCN measurements. HCN is a distinctive and useful marker for forest fire emissions and it was detected using chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS). In the freshest plumes, strong relationships were found between CH4, CO2 and other tracers for biomass burning. From this we were able to estimate that 8.5 ± 0.9 g of CH4 and 1512 ± 185 g of CO2 were released into the atmosphere per kg of dry matter burnt. These emission factors are in good agreement with estimates from previous studies and can be used to calculate budgets for the region. However for aged plumes the correlations between CH4 and other

  10. Estimation of seismically detectable portion of a gas plume: CO2CRC Otway project case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevzner, Roman; Caspari, Eva; Bona, Andrej; Galvin, Robert; Gurevich, Boris

    2013-04-01

    CO2CRC Otway project comprises of several experiments involving CO2/CH4 or pure CO2 gas injection into different geological formations at the Otway test site (Victoria, Australia). During the first stage of the project, which was finished in 2010, more than 64,000 t of gas were injected into the depleted gas reservoir at ~2 km depth. At the moment, preparations for the next stage of the project aiming to examine capabilities of seismic monitoring of small scale injection (up to 15,000 t) into saline formation are ongoing. Time-lapse seismic is one of the most typical methods for CO2 geosequestration monitoring. Significant experience was gained during the first stage of the project through acquisition and analysis of the 4D surface seismic and numerous time-lapse VSP surveys. In order to justify the second stage of the project and optimise parameters of the experiment, several modelling studies were conducted. In order to predict seismic signal we populate realistic geological model with elastic properties, model their changes using fluid substitution technique applied to the fluid flow simulation results and compute synthetic seismic baseline and monitor volumes. To assess detectability of the time-lapse signal caused by the injection, we assume that the time-lapse noise level will be equivalent to the level of difference between the last two Otway 3D surveys acquired in 2009 and 2010 using conventional surface technique (15,000 lbs vibroseis sources and single geophones as the receivers). In order to quantify the uncertainties in plume imaging/visualisation due to the time-lapse noise realisation we propose to use multiple noise realisations with the same F-Kx-Ky amplitude spectra as the field noise for each synthetic signal volume. Having signal detection criterion defined in the terms of signal/time- lapse noise level on a single trace we estimate visible portion of the plume as a function of this criterion. This approach also gives an opportunity to attempt to

  11. Water-air CO2 fluxes in the Tagus estuary plume (Portugal) during two distinct winter episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana P; Mateus, Marcos D; Cabeçadas, Graça; Neves, Ramiro

    2015-12-01

    Estuarine plumes are frequently under strong influence of land-derived inputs of organic matter. These plumes have characteristic physical and chemical conditions, and their morphology and extent in the coastal area depends strongly on physical conditions such as river discharge, tides and wind action. In this work we investigate the physical dynamics of the Tagus estuary plume and the CO2 system response during two contrasting hydrological winter periods. A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate the circulation regime of the study area, thus providing relevant information on hydrodynamic processes controlling the plume. Model simulations show that for the studied periods, the major cause of the plume variability (size and shape) was the interaction between Tagus River discharge and wind. The freshwater intrusion on Tagus shelf exerted considerable influence on biochemical dynamics, allowing identification of two regions: a high nutrient region enriched in CO2 inside the estuarine plume and another warmer region rich in phytoplankton in the outer plume. The Tagus estuarine plume behaved as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with estimated fluxes of 3.5 ± 3.7 and 27.0 ± 3.8 mmol C m(-2) d(-1) for February 2004 and March 2001, respectively.

  12. CO2 dissolution and its impact on reservoir pressure behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Egberts, P.J.P.; Loeve, D.; Hofstee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in large, saline aquifers needs to be monitored for safety purposes. In particular the observation of the pressure behavior of a storage site is relevant for the indication of CO2 leakage. However, interpretation of observed pressure is not straightforward in these systems,

  13. Influence of travel behavior on global CO2 emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girod, B.; Vuuren, D.P. van; Vries, B. de

    2013-01-01

    Travel demand is rising steeply and its contribution to global CO2 emissions is increasing. Different studies have shown possible mitigation through technological options, but so far few studies have evaluated the implications of changing travel behavior on global travel demand, energy use and CO2 e

  14. CO2 dissolution and its impact on reservoir pressure behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Egberts, P.J.P.; Loeve, D.; Hofstee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in large, saline aquifers needs to be monitored for safety purposes. In particular the observation of the pressure behavior of a storage site is relevant for the indication of CO2 leakage. However, interpretation of observed pressure is not straightforward in these systems,

  15. Inducing a CO2 leak into a shallow aquifer (CO2FieldLab EUROGIA+ project): Monitoring the CO2 plume in groundwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Gal, Frédérick; Proust, Eric; Humez, Pauline; Braibant, Gilles; Brach, Michel; Koch, Florian; Widory, David; Girard, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    International audience; An important part of the CO2 capture and storage projects concerns monitoring methods. Here we are focusing on the geochemical monitoring methods that may be deployed at depth to ensure early warning in case of unwanted CO2 leakages from a storage site. Independently from the nature of the reservoir (saline aquifer, depleted oil/gas reservoir), aquifers are ubiquitous in the overlying sedimentary pile. Before deploying water monitoring methods at depth, where long-term...

  16. Reservoir Architecture Control on the Geometry of a CO2 Plume Using 4D Seismic, Sleipner Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitrus, Roy; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2017-04-01

    Time lapse seismic from the Sleipner field, Norwegian North Sea represents a unique database to understand the geometry of a saline aquifer, the Utsira Sand Formation, and its role in containing sequestered CO2. The heterogeneous high permeability Utsira Sand formation bounded by an overlying seal is surrounded by impermeable to semi-permeable intra-reservoir thin shale units that influence the migration of injected CO2. It is important to understand and verify the dynamics of injected CO2 plume migration as this ensures close to accurate predictions of the evolving and stable state of CO2 in storage projects. Previous detailed interpretation results of the thin shale units and permeability flow path chimneys within the Utsira Formation have been used in this research. The Utsira Cap rock, IUTS1 and IUTS1 (Intra-Utsira Shale Units) are the top three units that affect the containment and upward migration path of injected CO2. They are combined with seismic geobodies of the CO2 plume across time lapse data. Here, these seismic geobodies are created using 2 methods to delineate the 3D shape and the cubic volume occupancy of the CO2 plume within the reservoir. Method 1 employs the use of an envelope attribute volume, where samples are extracted from voxels that contain seismic trace amplitude values of injected CO2 across the 3D data. These extracted samples are then tracked throughout the target area and then classed and quantified as a CO2 geobodies. Method 2 applies the same concept; the only difference is the samples extracted from voxels are classed based on the proximity and connectivity of pre-defined amplitude values. Both methods employ the use of a Bayesian classifier which defines the probability density function used to categorise the extracted threshold values. Our result of the 3D geobody shapes are compared against the internal geometry of the reservoir which shows the influence of the cap rock and intra-reservoir thin shales on the CO2 plume acting as

  17. Model Selection Coupled with a Particle Tracking Proxy Using Surface Deformation Data for Monitoring CO2 Plume Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B.; Nwachukwu, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study formulates a framework of a model selection that refines geological models for monitoring CO2 plume migration. Special emphasis is placed on CO2 injection, and the particular techniques that are used for this study including model selection, particle tracking proxies, and partial coupling of flow and geomechanics. The proposed process starts with generating a large initial ensemble of reservoir models that reflect a prior uncertainty in reservoir description, including all plausible geologic scenarios. These models are presumed to be conditioned to available static data. In the absence of production or injection data, all prior reservoir models are regarded as equiprobable. Thus, the model selection algorithm is applied to select a few representative reservoir models that are more consistent with observed dynamic responses. A quick assessment of the models must then be performed to evaluate their dynamic characteristics and flow connectivity. This approach develops a particle tracking proxy and a finite element method solver for solving the flow equation and the stress problem, respectively. The shape of CO2 plume is estimated using a particle-tracking proxy that serves as a fast approximation of finite-difference simulation models. Sequentially, a finite element method solver is coupled with the proxy for analyzing geomechanical effects resulting from CO2 injection. A method is then implemented to group the models into clusters based on similarities in the estimated responses. The posterior model set is chosen as the cluster that produces the minimum deviation from the observed field data. The efficacy of non-dominated sorting based on Pareto-optimality is also tested in the current model selection framework. The proposed scheme is demonstrated on a carbon sequestration project in Algeria. Coupling surface deformation data with well injection data enhances the efficiency of tracking the CO2 plume. Therefore, this algorithm provides a probabilistic

  18. Analysis of gaseous SO2, CO2 and halogen species in volcanic plumes using a multirotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, J.; de Moor, M. J.; Tirpitz, L.; Bobrowski, N.; Gutmann, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanoes are a large source for several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulfur and halogen containing species. The detailed understanding of volcanic plume chemistry is needed to draw information from gas measurements on subsurface processes. This knowledge is essential for using gas measurements as a monitoring tool for volcanic activity. The reactive bromine species bromine monoxide (BrO) is of particular interest, because BrO as well as SO2 are readily measurable from safe distance by spectroscopic remote sensing techniques. BrO is not directly emitted, but is formed in the plume by a multiphase reaction mechanism. The abundance of BrO changes as a function of the distance from the vent as well as the spatial position in the plume. The precursor substance for the formation of BrO is HBr with Br2 as an intermediate product. In this study we present the application of a UAV as a carrier for a remote-controlled sampling system for halogen species (Br2, HBr, BrCl, etc), based on the gas diffusion denuder technique, which allows speciation and enrichment by selective organic reactions. For the analysis of gaseous SO2 and CO2 an in-situ gas monitoring system was additionally mounted. This setup was deployed into the gas plumes of Stromboli Volcano (Italy) and Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua) in 2016, to investigate the halogen chemistry at distant locations in the plume further downwind to the emission source, which are in most cases not accessible by other approaches. The used quadrocopter (0.75 m in diameter) weighs 2.45 kg and lifts a payload of 1.3 kg. Flights into the plume were conducted with ascents of up to 900 m, starting at 500 to 800 m altitude. From telemetrically transmitted SO2 mixing ratios, areas of dense plume were localized to keep the UAV stationary for up to 10 minutes of sampling time. Herein we will present time and spatial resolved gas mixing ratio data for SO2, CO2 and halogen species for a downwind plume age of about 3 to 5 minutes.

  19. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-09-30

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO₂ in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO₂ in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO₂ plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO₂ plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO₂ Injection project in Algeria and CO₂ injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were

  20. Behavior of CO2/water flow in porous media for CO2 geological storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Yu, Minghao; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Ziqiu; Suekane, Tetsuya; Song, Yongchen

    2017-04-01

    A clear understanding of two-phase fluid flow properties in porous media is of importance to CO2 geological storage. The study visually measured the immiscible and miscible displacement of water by CO2 using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and investigated the factor influencing the displacement process in porous media which were filled with quartz glass beads. For immiscible displacement at slow flow rates, the MR signal intensity of images increased because of CO2 dissolution; before the dissolution phenomenon became inconspicuous at flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). For miscible displacement, the MR signal intensity decreased gradually independent of flow rates, because supercritical CO2 and water became miscible in the beginning of CO2 injection. CO2 channeling or fingering phenomena were more obviously observed with lower permeable porous media. Capillary force decreases with increasing particle size, which would increase permeability and allow CO2 and water to invade into small pore spaces more easily. The study also showed CO2 flow patterns were dominated by dimensionless capillary number, changing from capillary finger to stable flow. The relative permeability curve was calculated using Brooks-Corey model, while the results showed the relative permeability of CO2 slightly decreases with the increase of capillary number.

  1. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  2. Magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline ErCo(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sitikantha D; Mohapatra, Niharika; Iyer, Kartik K; Bapat, R D; Sampathkumaran, E V

    2009-07-22

    We have investigated the magnetic behavior of the nanocrystalline form of a well-known Laves phase compound, ErCo(2)-the bulk form of which has been known to undergo an interesting first-order ferrimagnetic ordering near 32 K-synthesized by high-energy ball-milling. It is found that, in these nanocrystallites, Co exhibits ferromagnetic order at room temperature, as inferred from the magnetization data. However, the magnetic transition temperature for the Er sub-lattice remains essentially unaffected suggesting the (Er)4f-Co(3d) coupling is weak on Er magnetism. The net magnetic moment as measured at high fields, for example at 120 kOe, is significantly reduced with respect to that for the bulk in the ferrimagnetically ordered state and possible reasons are outlined for this. We have also compared the magnetocaloric behavior for the bulk and for nanoparticles.

  3. Effects of CO2 Partial Pressure on CO2 Corrosion Behavior of N80 Tubular Steel%CO2分压对 N80油管钢 CO2腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高纯良; 刘明亮; 李大朋; 张雷; 马文海; 路民旭

    2014-01-01

    利用高温高压反应釜进行腐蚀模拟试验。采用失重法、SEM 和 XRD 等手段研究了 CO2分压对 N80油管钢在100℃下 CO2腐蚀行为的影响。结果表明,N80钢的腐蚀速率随 CO2分压升高而上升。不同 CO2分压下腐蚀类型与腐蚀产物膜宏观形貌的变化相对应,在低 CO2分压下腐蚀产物膜完整覆盖。随着 CO2分压的进一步升高,腐蚀产物膜由局部覆盖转而重新完整覆盖。相应地,N80钢在低 CO2分压下发生全面腐蚀,然后随 CO2分压的进一步升高,腐蚀类型由局部腐蚀向全面腐蚀过渡。%The effects of CO2 partial pressure on CO2 corrosion behavior of N80 steel at 100 ℃ were studied by autoclave test,together with weight loss method,SEM,and XRD.The results showed that the corrosion rate of N80 steel rose with the increase of CO2 pressure corresponding to the change of corrosion product film macro-morphology. At the low partial pressure of CO2 ,the corrosion product film was complete,then with the further increase of CO2 partial pressure,corrosion product film turned from incomplete to complete.Accordingly,at low CO2 partial pressure,the corrosion of N80 steel was general corrosion,and then with the further increase of CO2 partial pressure, corrosion characteristics were transformed from localized corrosion to general corrosion.

  4. Arc Behavior and Droplet Transfer of CWW CO2 Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-dong YANG; Chen-fu FANG; Yong CHEN; Guo-xiang XU; Qing-xian HU; Xiao-yan GU

    2016-01-01

    Cable-type welding wire (CWW)CO2 welding is an innovative process arc welding with high quality,high efficiency and energy saving,in which CWW is used as consumable electrode.The CWW is composed of seven wires with a diameter of 1.2 mm.One is in the center,while others uniformly distribute around it.The diameter of twisted wire is up to 3.6 mm,which can increase the deposition rate significantly.With continual wire-feeding and melting of CWW,the formed rotating arc improved welding quality obviously.The arc behavior and droplet transfer were ob-served by the electrical signal waveforms and corresponding synchronous images,based on the high speed digital camera and electrical signal system.The results showed that the shape of welding arc changed from bell arc to beam arc with the increase of welding parameter.The droplet transfer mode changed from repelled transfer,globular transfer to projected transfer in turn.Droplet transfer frequency increased from 18.17 Hz to 119.05 Hz,while the droplet diameter decreased from 1.5 times to 0.3 times of the CWW diameter.

  5. Remote sensing of volcanic CO2, HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, André; Solvejg Dinger, Anna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Kostinek, Julian; Fieber, Lukas; Fischerkeller, Constanze; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kuhn, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Tirpitz, Lukas; Tu, Qiansi

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing of the gaseous composition of non-eruptive, passively degassing volcanic plumes can be a tool to gain insight into volcano interior processes. Here, we report on a field study in September 2015 that demonstrates the feasibility of remotely measuring the volcanic enhancements of carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and bromine monoxide (BrO) in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna using portable and rugged spectroscopic instrumentation. To this end, we operated the Fourier transform spectrometer EM27/SUN for the shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectral range together with a co-mounted UV spectrometer on a mobile platform in direct-sun view at 5 to 10 km distance from the summit craters. The 3 days reported here cover several plume traverses and a sunrise measurement. For all days, intra-plume HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO vertical column densities (VCDs) were reliably measured exceeding 5 × 1016, 2 × 1017, 5 × 1017, and 1 × 1014 molec cm-2, with an estimated precision of 2.2 × 1015, 1.3 × 1016, 3.6 × 1016, and 1.3 × 1013 molec cm-2, respectively. Given that CO2, unlike the other measured gases, has a large and well-mixed atmospheric background, derivation of volcanic CO2 VCD enhancements (ΔCO2) required compensating for changes in altitude of the observing platform and for background concentration variability. The first challenge was met by simultaneously measuring the overhead oxygen (O2) columns and assuming covariation of O2 and CO2 with altitude. The atmospheric CO2 background was found by identifying background soundings via the co-emitted volcanic gases. The inferred ΔCO2 occasionally exceeded 2 × 1019 molec cm-2 with an estimated precision of 3.7 × 1018 molec cm-2 given typical atmospheric background VCDs of 7 to 8 × 1021 molec cm-2. While the correlations of ΔCO2 with the other measured volcanic gases confirm the detection of volcanic CO2 enhancements, correlations were found of variable

  6. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from aGeologic Storage Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-09

    The amounts of CO2 that would need to be injected intogeologic storage reservoirs to achieve a significant reduction ofatmospheric emissions are very large. A 1000 MWe coal-fired power plantemits approximately 30,000 tonnes of CO2 per day, 10 Mt per year(Hitchon, 1996). When injected underground over a typical lifetime of 30years of such a plant, the CO2 plume may occupy a large area of order 100km2 or more, and fluid pressure increase in excess of 1 bar(corresponding to 10 m water head) may extend over an area of more than2,500 km2 (Pruess, et al., 2003). The large areal extent expected for CO2plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered,such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape fromthe primary storage reservoir. Under most subsurface conditions oftemperature and pressure, CO2 is buoyant relative to groundwaters. If(sub-)vertical pathways are available, CO2 will tend to flow upward and,depending on geologic conditions, may eventually reach potablegroundwater aquifers or even the land surface. Leakage of CO2 could alsooccur along wellbores, including pre-existing and improperly abandonedwells, or wells drilled in connection with the CO2 storage operations.The pressure increases accompanying CO2 injection will give rise tochanges in effective stress that could cause movement along faults,increasing permeability and potential for leakage.Escape of CO2 from aprimary geologic storage reservoir and potential hazards associated withits discharge at the land surface raise a number of concerns, including(1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard whenleaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase inatmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy,eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In orderto gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address theseissues

  7. Differential behavioral sensitivity to carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Andrew; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Naik, Devanshi; Sah, Renu

    2017-03-27

    Inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO2) is frequently employed as a biological challenge to evoke intense fear and anxiety. In individuals with panic disorder, CO2 reliably evokes panic attacks. Sensitivity to CO2 is highly heterogeneous among individuals, and although a genetic component is implicated, underlying mechanisms are not clear. Preclinical models that can simulate differential responsivity to CO2 are therefore relevant. In the current study we investigated CO2-evoked behavioral responses in four different rat strains: Sprague-Dawley (SD), Wistar (W), Long Evans (LE) and Wistar-Kyoto, (WK) rats. We also assessed tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH-2)-positive serotonergic neurons in anxiety/panic regulatory subdivisions of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), as well as dopamine β hydroxylase (DβH)-positive noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus, implicated in central CO2-chemosensitivity. Behavioral responsivity to CO2 inhalation varied between strains. CO2-evoked immobility was significantly higher in LE and WK rats as compared with W and SD cohorts. Differences were also observed in CO2-evoked rearing and grooming behaviors. Exposure to CO2 did not produce conditioned behavioral responses upon re-exposure to CO2 context in any strain. Reduced TPH-2-positive cell counts were observed specifically in the panic-regulatory dorsal raphe ventrolateral (DRVL)-ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) subdivision in CO2-sensitive strains. Conversely, DβH-positive cell counts within the LC were significantly higher in CO2-sensitive strains. Collectively, our data provide evidence for strain dependent, differential CO2-sensitivity and potential differences in monoaminergic systems regulating panic and anxiety. Comparative studies between CO2-vulnerable and resistant strains may facilitate the mechanistic understanding of differential CO2-sensitivity in the development of panic and anxiety disorders.

  8. CO2 driven weathering vs plume driven weathering as inferred from the groundwater of a persistently degassing basaltic volcano: Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Marcello; D'Alessandro, Walter

    2016-04-01

    At Mt. Etna the presence of a persistent volcanic plume provides large amounts of volcanogenic elements to the bulk deposition along its flanks. The volcanic plume consists of solid particles, acidic droplets and gaseous species. After H2O and CO2, S, Cl and F represent the most abundant volatile elements emitted as gaseous species from the craters. During rain events acidic gases interact rapidly with droplets lowering the pH of rain. This process favors the dissolution and dissociation of the most acidic gases. Under these conditions, the chemical weathering of volcanic rocks and ashes is promoted by the acid rain during its infiltration. Subsequently during groundwater circulation, chemical weathering of volcanic rocks is also driven by the huge amount of deep magmatic carbon dioxide (CO2) coming up through the volcanic edifice and dissolving in the water. These two different weathering steps occur under very different conditions. The former occurs in a highly acidic environment (pH carbonic acid (H2CO3) after the hydration of CO2. The relative contributions of plume-derived elements/weathering and CO2-driven weathering has been computed for each element. In addition, the comparison between the chemical compositions of the bulk deposition and of groundwater provides a new understanding about the mobility of volatile elements. Other processes such as ion exchange, iddingsite formation, and carbonate precipitation can also play roles, but only to minor extents. The proposed approach has revealed that the persistent plume strongly affects the chemical composition of groundwater at Mt. Etna and probably also at other volcanoes characterized by huge open-conduit degassing activity.

  9. Compositional variation in aging volcanic plumes - Analysis of gaseous SO2, CO2 and halogen species in volcanic emissions using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Lukas, Tirpitz; Bobrowski, Nicole; Gutmann, Alexandra; Liotta, Marcello; de Moor, Maarten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes are a large source for several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulfur and halogen containing species. The detailed understanding of volcanic plume chemistry is needed to draw information from gas measurements on subsurface processes. This knowledge is essential for using gas measurements as a monitoring tool for volcanic activity. The reactive bromine species bromine monoxide (BrO) is of particular interest, because BrO as well as SO2 are readily measurable from safe distance by spectroscopic remote sensing techniques. BrO is not directly emitted, but is formed in the plume by a multiphase reaction mechanism. The abundance of BrO changes as a function of the distance from the vent as well as the spatial position in the plume. The precursor substance for the formation of BrO is HBr with Br2as an intermediate product. In this study we present the application of a UAV as a carrier for a remote-controlled sampling system for halogen species (Br2, HBr, BrCl, etc), based on the gas diffusion denuder technique, which allows speciation and enrichment by selective organic reactions. For the analysis of gaseous SO2 and CO2 an in-situ gas monitoring system was additionally mounted. This setup was deployed into the gas plumes of Stromboli Volcano (Italy), Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua) and Turrialba Volcano (Costa Rica) in 2016, to investigate the halogen chemistry at distant locations in the plume further downwind to the emission source, which are in most cases not accessible by other approaches. Flights into the plume were conducted with ascents of up to 1000 m. From telemetrically transmitted SO2 mixing ratios, areas of dense plume where localized to keep the UAV stationary for up to 10 minutes of sampling time. Additionally, ground based samples were taken at the crater rim (at Masaya and Turrialba) using alkaline traps, denuder and gas sensors for comparison with airborne-collected data. Herein we will present time and spatial resolved gas mixing ratio

  10. Preliminary Modelling of the Effect of Impurity in CO2 Streams on the Storage Capacity and the Plume Migration in Pohang Basin, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongchan; Choi, Byoungyoung; Shinn, Youngjae

    2015-04-01

    Captured CO2 streams contain various levels of impurities which vary depending on the combustion technology and CO2 sources such as a power plant and iron and steel production processes. Common impurities or contaminants are non-condensable gases like nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen, and are also air pollutants like sulphur and nitrogen oxides. Specifically for geological storage, the non-condensable gases in CO2 streams are not favourable because they can decrease density of the injected CO2 stream and can affect buoyancy of the plume. However, separation of these impurities to obtain the CO2 purity higher than 99% would greatly increase the cost of capture. In 2010, the Korean Government announced a national framework to develop CCS, with the aim of developing two large scale integrated CCS projects by 2020. In order to achieve this goal, a small scale injection project into Pohang basin near shoreline has begun which is seeking the connection with a capture project, especially at a steel company. Any onshore sites that are suitable for the geological storage are not identified by this time so we turned to the shallow offshore Pohang basin where is close to a large-scale CO2 source. Currently, detailed site surveys are being undertaken and the collected data were used to establish a geological model of the basin. In this study, we performed preliminary modelling study on the effect of impurities on the geological storage using the geological model. Using a potential compositions of impurities in CO2 streams from the steel company, we firstly calculated density and viscosity of CO2 streams as a function of various pressure and temperature conditions with CMG-WINPROP and then investigated the effect of the non-condensable gases on storage capacity, injectivity and plume migrations with CMG-GEM. Further simulations to evaluate the areal and vertical sweep efficiencies by impurities were perform in a 2D vertical cross section as well as in a 3D simulation grid. Also

  11. Influence of CO2 Concentration on Adsorption Behavior of 99Tc in Clay Under Hypoxic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Zhi-xin; BAO; Liang-jin; JIANG; Tao; CHEN; Xi

    2013-01-01

    Under hypoxic conditions,using the Beishan groundwater the influence of the CO2 concentration on the adsorption behavior of 99Tc in the Longdong clay was studied by batch method.Meanwhile,the buffering effect of clay rocks on the pH value of aqueous solution at different CO2 concentrations was discussed.The adsorption behavior of 99Tc on clay at different initial pH values was also researched.

  12. Effect of impurities on the corrosion behavior of CO2 transmission pipeline steel in supercritical CO2-water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Seok; Nesic, Srdjan; Young, David

    2010-12-01

    The corrosion property of carbon steel was evaluated using an autoclave under CO(2)-saturated water phase and water-saturated CO(2) phase with impurities (O(2) and SO(2)) at 80 bar CO(2) and 50 °C to simulate the condition of CO(2) transmission pipeline in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) applications. The results showed that the corrosion rate of carbon steel in CO(2)-saturated water was very high and it increased with adding O(2) in the system due to the inhibition effect of O(2) on the formation of protective FeCO(3). It is noteworthy that corrosion took place in the water-saturated CO(2) phase under supercritical condition when no free water is present. The addition of O(2) increased the corrosion rates of carbon steel in water-saturated CO(2) phase. The addition of 0.8 bar SO(2) (1%) in the gas phase dramatically increased the corrosion rate of carbon steel from 0.38 to 5.6 mm/y. This then increased to more than 7 mm/y with addition of both O(2) and SO(2). SO(2) can promote the formation of iron sulfite hydrate (FeSO(3)·3H(2)O) on the steel surface which is less protective than iron carbonate (FeCO(3)), and it is further oxidized to become FeSO(4) and FeOOH when O(2) is present with SO(2) in the CO(2)-rich phase. The corrosion rates of 13Cr steel were very low compared with carbon steel in CO(2)-saturated water environments with O(2), whereas it was as high as carbon steel in a water-saturated CO(2) phase with O(2) and SO(2).

  13. Effects of Co2+ doping on physicochemical behaviors of hierarchical NiO nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Caihua; Gao, WenChao; Zhao, Yongjie; Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping; Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo

    2016-12-01

    A series of Co2+ doped NiO materials (Ni1-xCoxO with x = 0, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5) were synthesized using a facile hydrothermal method followed by a calcination process. The effects of Co2+ doping on the structural, morphological, magnetic and catalytic properties of NiO were systematically investigated. The results indicated that Co2+ doping would bring about a series influence to the as-obtained NiO product. The XRD results indicated that within the region of 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.25 the doped products revealed a pure NiO phase. The elementary unit for the hierarchy NiO gradually transformed from nanosheets to nanoneedles with the increase of Co2+ doping content. As-obtained Co2+ doped NiO products showed ferromagnetism at room temperature and the magnetization value was increased with the increase of Co2+ doping content. The catalytic properties of NiO concerning the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were significantly improved via the introduction of Co2+. The Ni1-xCoxO products with x = 0.25 showed the best catalytic performance to AP, which could decrease the beginning and ending decomposition temperature of AP by 44 and 108 °C. The change of morphology, enhancement of electrical conductivity and the synergistic effect between Co2+ and NiO were the main factors responsible for the improvement of physicochemical behaviors.

  14. The influence of water and supercritical CO2 on the failure behavior of chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liteanu, E.; Spiers, C. J.; de Bresser, J. H. P.

    2013-06-01

    Reduction of compressive strength by injection of water into chalk is a well-known mechanism responsible for increased compaction in chalk reservoirs. This raises the question of whether such effects might be enhanced in the context of long-term storage of CO2 or of CO2 injection for enhanced oil and gas recovery (EOR/EGR) purposes. Therefore, data regarding the effect of supercritical CO2 on the mechanical behavior of chalk are needed. The effect of supercritical CO2 on the short-term failure behavior of wet chalk was accordingly investigated by means of conventional triaxial deformation experiments, performed on Maastrichtian chalk cores under dry conditions, in the presence of saturated chalk solution and using CO2-saturated solution at temperatures simulating reservoir conditions (20-80 °C) and effective confining pressures up to 7 MPa. Increasing temperature from 20 to 80 °C did not show any significant effects on the strength of the dry samples. Addition of aqueous solution to the samples led to drastic weakening of the chalk, the effect being more pronounced at high effective confining pressures (Peff > 3 MPa). Addition of 10 MPa supercritical CO2 to wet samples did not produce any significant additional effect in comparison with the wet samples. All samples showed a yield strength envelope characterized by shear failure at low effective mean stresses giving way to a compaction cap at high mean stresses. The weakening effect of aqueous solution was explained in terms of a reduction in frictional resistance of the material, due to water-enhanced grain-contact cracking, and perhaps pressure solution, with a possible contribution by disjoining pressure effects caused by water adsorption. While CO2 does not seem to reduce short-term failure strength of wet chalk, processes such as intergranular pressure solution have to be considered for assessing mechanical stability of chalk in the context of long-term CO2 storage or EOR/EGR operations.

  15. Thermal stability, swelling behavior and CO 2 absorption properties of Nanoscale Ionic Materials (NIMs)

    KAUST Repository

    Andrew Lin, Kun-Yi

    2014-11-11

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nanoscale Ionic Materials (NIMs) consist of a nanoscale core, a corona of charged brushes tethered on the surface of the core, and a canopy of the oppositely charged species linked to the corona. Unlike conventional polymeric nanocomposites, NIMs can display liquid-like behavior in the absence of solvents, have a negligible vapor pressure and exhibit unique solvation properties. These features enable NIMs to be a promising CO2 capture material. To optimize NIMs for CO2 capture, their structure-property relationships were examined by investigating the roles of the canopy and the core in their thermal stability, and thermally- and CO2-induced swelling behaviors. NIMs with different canopy sizes and core fractions were synthesized and their thermal stability as well as thermally- and CO2-induced swelling behaviors were determined using thermogravimetry, and ATR FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that the ionic bonds between the canopy and the corona, as well as covalent bonds between the corona and the core significantly improved the thermal stability compared to pure polymer and polymer/nanofiller mixtures. A smaller canopy size and a larger core fraction led to a greater enhancement in thermal stability. This thermal stability enhancement was responsible for the long-term thermal stability of NIMs over 100 temperature swing cycles. Owing to their ordered structure, NIMs swelled less when heated or when they adsorbed CO2 compared to their corresponding polymers. This journal is

  16. Limitations and high pressure behavior of MOF-5 for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joo Young; Karadas, Ferdi; Zulfiqar, Sonia; Deniz, Erhan; Aparicio, Santiago; Atilhan, Mert; Yavuz, Cafer T; Han, Seung Min

    2013-09-14

    Porous network structures (e.g. metal-organic frameworks, MOFs) show considerable potential in dethroning monoethanol amine (MEA) from being the dominant scrubber for CO2 at the fossil-fuel-burning power generators. In contrast to their promise, structural stability and high-pressure behavior of MOFs are not well documented. We herein report moisture stability, mechanical properties and high-pressure compression on a model MOF structure, MOF-5. Our results show that MOF-5 can endure all tested pressures (0-225 bar) without losing its structural integrity, however, its moist air stability points at a 3.5 hour safety window (at 21.6 °C and 49% humidity) for an efficient CO2 capture. Isosteric heats of CO2 adsorption at high pressures show moderate interaction energy between CO2 molecules and the MOF-5 sorbent, which combined with the large sorption ability of MOF-5 in the studied pressure-temperature ranges show the viability of this sorbent for CO2 capturing purposes. The combination of the physicochemical methods we used suggests a generalized analytical standard for measuring viability in CO2 capture operations.

  17. On the production behavior of enhanced geothermal systems with CO2as working fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.

    2007-05-31

    Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermal depletion. Wepresent the first-ever three-dimensional simulations of CO2injection-production systems. These show strong effects of gravity onmass flow and heat extraction, due to the large contrast of CO2 densitybetween cold injection and hot production conditions. The tendency forpreferential flow of cold, dense CO2 along the reservoir bottom can leadto premature thermal breakthrough. The problem can be avoided byproducing from only a limited depth interval at the top of thereservoir.

  18. Experimental Determination and Modeling of the Phase Behavior for the Selective Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol in Supercritical CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Beier, Matthias Josef; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2011-01-01

    In this study the phase behavior of mixtures relevant to the selective catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde by molecular oxygen in supercritical CO2 is investigated. Initially, the solubility of N2 in benzaldehyde as well as the dew points of CO2–benzyl alcohol–O2 and CO2...

  19. A Study of the Crystallization, Melting, and Foaming Behaviors of Polylactic Acid in Compressed CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul B. Park

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization and melting behaviors of linear polylactic acid (PLA treated by compressed CO2 was investigated. The isothermal crystallization test indicated that while PLA exhibited very low crystallization kinetics under atmospheric pressure, CO2 exposure significantly increased PLA’s crystallization rate; a high crystallinity of 16.5% was achieved after CO2 treatment for only 1 min at 100 °C and 6.89 MPa. One melting peak could be found in the DSC curve, and this exhibited a slight dependency on treatment times, temperatures, and pressures. PLA samples tended to foam during the gas release process, and a foaming window as a function of time and temperature was established. Based on the foaming window, crystallinity, and cell morphology, it was found that foaming clearly reduced the needed time for PLA’s crystallization equilibrium.

  20. Mechanisms for chemostatic behavior in catchments: implications for CO2 consumption by mineral weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Mast, M. Alisa

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of weathering products in streams often show relatively little variation compared to changes in discharge, both at event and annual scales. In this study, several hypothesized mechanisms for this “chemostatic behavior” were evaluated, and the potential for those mechanisms to influence relations between climate, weathering fluxes, and CO2 consumption via mineral weathering was assessed. Data from Loch Vale, an alpine catchment in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, indicates that cation exchange and seasonal precipitation and dissolution of amorphous or poorly crystalline aluminosilicates are important processes that help regulate solute concentrations in the stream; however, those processes have no direct effect on CO2 consumption in catchments. Hydrograph separation analyses indicate that old water stored in the subsurface over the winter accounts for about one-quarter of annual streamflow, and almost one-half of annual fluxes of Na and SiO2 in the stream; thus, flushing of old water by new water (snowmelt) is an important component of chemostatic behavior. Hydrologic flushing of subsurface materials further induces chemostatic behavior by reducing mineral saturation indices and increasing reactive mineral surface area, which stimulate mineral weathering rates. CO2 consumption by carbonic acid mediated mineral weathering was quantified using mass-balance calculations; results indicated that silicate mineral weathering was responsible for approximately two-thirds of annual CO2 consumption, and carbonate weathering was responsible for the remaining one-third. CO2 consumption was strongly dependent on annual precipitation and temperature; these relations were captured in a simple statistical model that accounted for 71% of the annual variation in CO2 consumption via mineral weathering in Loch Vale.

  1. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs, CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Boreal regions comprise about 17 % of the global land area, and they both affect and are influenced by climate change. To better understand boreal forest fire emissions and plume evolution, 947 whole air samples were collected aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft in summer 2008 as part of the ARCTAS-B field mission, and analyzed for 79 non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs using gas chromatography. Together with simultaneous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, CH2O, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN, these measurements represent the most comprehensive assessment of trace gas emissions from boreal forest fires to date. Based on 105 air samples collected in fresh Canadian smoke plumes, 57 of the 80 measured NMVOCs (including CH2O were emitted from the fires, including 45 species that were quantified from boreal forest fires for the first time. After CO2, CO and CH4, the largest emission factors (EFs for individual species were formaldehyde (2.1 ± 0.2 g kg−1, followed by methanol, NO2, HCN, ethene, α-pinene, β-pinene, ethane, benzene, propene, acetone and CH3CN. Globally, we estimate that boreal forest fires release 2.4 ± 0.6 Tg C yr−1 in the form of NMVOCs, with approximately 41 % of the carbon released as C1-C2 NMVOCs and 21 % as pinenes. These are the first reported field measurements of monoterpene emissions from boreal forest fires, and we speculate that the pinenes, which are relatively heavy molecules, were detected in the fire plumes as the result of distillation of stored terpenes as the vegetation is heated. Their inclusion in smoke chemistry models is expected to improve model predictions of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation. The fire-averaged EF of dichloromethane or CH2Cl2, (6.9 ± 8.6 × 10−4 g kg−1, was not significantly different from zero and supports recent findings that its global biomass burning source appears to have been overestimated. Similarly, we found no evidence for emissions of chloroform (CHCl3 or methyl

  2. Atmospheric CH4 and CO2 enhancements and biomass burning emission ratios derived from satellite observations of the 2015 Indonesian fire plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert J.; Boesch, Hartmut; Wooster, Martin J.; Moore, David P.; Webb, Alex J.; Gaveau, David; Murdiyarso, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The 2015-2016 strong El Niño event has had a dramatic impact on the amount of Indonesian biomass burning, with the El Niño-driven drought further desiccating the already-drier-than-normal landscapes that are the result of decades of peatland draining, widespread deforestation, anthropogenically driven forest degradation and previous large fire events. It is expected that the 2015-2016 Indonesian fires will have emitted globally significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere, as did previous El Niño-driven fires in the region. The form which the carbon released from the combustion of the vegetation and peat soils takes has a strong bearing on its atmospheric chemistry and climatological impacts. Typically, burning in tropical forests and especially in peatlands is expected to involve a much higher proportion of smouldering combustion than the more flaming-characterised fires that occur in fine-fuel-dominated environments such as grasslands, consequently producing significantly more CH4 (and CO) per unit of fuel burned. However, currently there have been no aircraft campaigns sampling Indonesian fire plumes, and very few ground-based field campaigns (none during El Niño), so our understanding of the large-scale chemical composition of these extremely significant fire plumes is surprisingly poor compared to, for example, those of southern Africa or the Amazon.Here, for the first time, we use satellite observations of CH4 and CO2 from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) made in large-scale plumes from the 2015 El Niño-driven Indonesian fires to probe aspects of their chemical composition. We demonstrate significant modifications in the concentration of these species in the regional atmosphere around Indonesia, due to the fire emissions.Using CO and fire radiative power (FRP) data from the Copernicus Atmosphere Service, we identify fire-affected GOSAT soundings and show that peaks in fire activity are followed by subsequent large

  3. Geomechanical behavior of the reservoir and caprock system at the In Salah CO2 storage project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joshua A; Chiaramonte, Laura; Ezzedine, Souheil; Foxall, William; Hao, Yue; Ramirez, Abelardo; McNab, Walt

    2014-06-17

    Almost 4 million metric tons of CO2 were injected at the In Salah CO2 storage site between 2004 and 2011. Storage integrity at the site is provided by a 950-m-thick caprock that sits above the injection interval. This caprock consists of a number of low-permeability units that work together to limit vertical fluid migration. These are grouped into main caprock units, providing the primary seal, and lower caprock units, providing an additional buffer and some secondary storage capacity. Monitoring observations at the site indirectly suggest that pressure, and probably CO2, have migrated upward into the lower portion of the caprock. Although there are no indications that the overall storage integrity has been compromised, these observations raise interesting questions about the geomechanical behavior of the system. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the measured pressure, seismic, and surface deformation behavior. These include fault leakage, flow through preexisting fractures, and the possibility that injection pressures induced hydraulic fractures. This work evaluates these hypotheses in light of the available data. We suggest that the simplest and most likely explanation for the observations is that a portion of the lower caprock was hydrofractured, although interaction with preexisting fractures may have played a significant role. There are no indications, however, that the overall storage complex has been compromised, and several independent data sets demonstrate that CO2 is contained in the confinement zone.

  4. Phase Behavior at High Pressure of the Ternary System: CO2, Ionic Liquid and Disperse Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Mazzer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High pressure phase behavior experimental data have been measured for the systems carbon dioxide (CO2 + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim] [PF6] and carbon dioxide (CO2 + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim] [PF6] + 1-amino-2-phenoxy-4-hydroxyanthraquinone (C.I. Disperse Red 60. Measurements were performed in the pressure up to 18 MPa and at the temperature (323 to 353 K. As reported in the literature, at higher concentrations of carbon dioxide the phase transition pressure increased very steeply. The experimental data for the binary and ternary systems were correlated with good agreement using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The amount of water in phase behavior of the systems was evaluated.

  5. Influence of bubble size, diffuser width, and flow rate on the integral behavior of bubble plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Bruño.; Stoesser, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    A large-eddy simulation based Eulerian-Lagrangian model is employed to quantify the impact of bubble size, diffuser diameter, and gas flow rate on integral properties of bubble plumes, such as the plume's width, centerline velocity, and mass flux. Calculated quantities are compared with experimental data and integral model predictions. Furthermore, the LES data were used to assess the behavior of the entrainment coefficient, the momentum amplification factor, and the bubble-to-momentum spread ratio. It is found that bubble plumes with constant bubble size and smaller diameter behave in accordance with integral plume models. Plumes comprising larger and non-uniform bubble sizes appear to deviate from past observations and model predictions. In multi-diameter bubble plumes, a bubble self-organisation takes place, i.e., small bubbles cluster in the center of the plume whilst large bubbles are found at the periphery of the plume. Multi-diameter bubble plumes also feature a greater entrainment rate than single-size bubble plumes, as well as a higher spread ratio and lower turbulent momentum rate. Once the plume is fully established, the size of the diffuser does not appear to affect integral properties of bubble plumes. However, plume development is affected by the diffuser width, as larger release areas lead to a delayed asymptotic behavior of the plume and consequently to a lower entrainment and higher spread ratio. Finally, the effect of the gas flow rate on the integral plume is studied and is deemed very relevant with regards to most integral plume properties and coefficients. This effect is already fairly well described by integral plume models.

  6. Carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption behavior of mixed matrix polymer composites containing a flexible coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Jeffrey T; Sui, Lang; Goodman, Angela; Luebke, David

    2013-03-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprised of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) dispersed in organic polymers are popular materials under study for potential applications in gas separations. However, research on MMMs containing structurally dynamic sorbents known as flexible MOFs has only very recently appeared in the literature. The thermodynamic requirements of the structure transition between the low porosity and high porosity phases of flexible MOFs may provide a mechanism for high adsorption selectivity in these materials. A fundamental question in MMMs containing flexible MOFs is how the constraint of the polymer matrix on the intrinsic expansion of the flexible MOF particles that occurs during gas adsorption might affect the thermodynamics of this structural phase transition and influence the gas adsorption properties of the embedded MOF. To investigate the fundamental nature of this flexible MOF-polymer interface, thin films of ~20 um thickness were prepared using the flexible linear chain coordination polymer catena-bis(dibenzoylmethanato)-(4,4'bipyridyl)nickel(II) "Ni(Bpy)(DBM)(2)" embedded as 35 wt% dispersions in Matrimid®, polystyrene, and polysulfone. The adsorption of CO(2) in the polymers and embedded particles was studied using in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and variable temperature volumetric CO(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms. Interestingly, no effect of the polymer matrix on the gas adsorption behavior of the embedded Ni(Bpy)(DBM)(2) particles was observed. The composite samples all showed the same threshold pressures for CO(2) absorption and desorption hysteresis associated with the structural phase change in the polymer embedded Ni(Bpy)(DBM)(2) particles as was observed in the pristine polycrystalline sample. The current results contrast those recently reported for a MMM containing the flexible MOF "NH(2)-MIL-53" where a significant increase in the threshold pressure for CO(2) adsorption associated with the structural phase change of the MOF was

  7. Phase behavior of supercritical CO2 microemulsion with food-grade surfactant AOT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yongsheng; AN Xueqin; SHEN Weiguo; ZHANG Yinghua

    2006-01-01

    Phase behavior of scCO2 microemulsion formed with food grade surfactant sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) was studied. Critical microemulsion concentration (cμc) was deduced from the dependence of pressure of cloud points on the concentration of surfactant AOT at constant temperature and water concentration. The results show that there are transition points on the cloud point curve in a very narrow range of concentration of surfactant AOT. The transition points were changed with the temperature and water concentration. These phenomena show that lower temperature is suitable to forming microemulsion droplet and the microemulsion with high water concentration is likely to absorb more surfactants to structure the interface.

  8. Effect of Ca2+ and Mg2+ on CO2 Corrosion Behavior of Tube Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guo-xian; LI Jian-ping; HAO Shi-ming; L(U) Xiang-hong; LI He-lin

    2005-01-01

    Effects of Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the CO2 corrosion behaviors of tube steel were studied in simulated oil-fieldenvironment. The influence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the corrosion rate and morphologies of corrosion product layerwas determined by scanning electron microscope and measuring mass loss. Potentiodynamic polarization and im-pedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the change of electrochemical characteristic parameters of corrosionproduct layer and corrosion dynamic process. The results show that with Ca2+ and Mg2+ in electrolyte, the mor-phologies and microstructures of corrosion product layer changed obviously, thus affecting the corrosion process.

  9. The behavior and concentration of CO2 in the suboceanic mantle: Inferences from undegassed ocean ridge and ocean island basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Peter J.; Graham, David W.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better determine the behavior of CO2 relative to incompatible elements, and improve the accuracy of mantle CO2 concentration and flux estimates, we determined CO2 glass and vesicle concentrations, plus trace element contents for fifty-one ultradepleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses from the global mid-ocean ridge system. Fifteen contained no vesicles and were volatile undersaturated for their depth of eruption. Thirty-six contained vesicles and/or were slightly oversaturated, and so may not have retained all of their CO2. If this latter group lost some bubbles during emplacement, then CO2/Ba calculated for the undersaturated group alone is the most reliable and uniform ratio at 98 ± 10, and CO2/Nb is 283 ± 32. If the oversaturated MORBs did not lose bubbles, then CO2/Nb is the most uniform ratio within the entire suite of ultradepleted MORBs at 291 ± 132, while CO2/Ba decreases with increasing incompatible element enrichment. Additional constraints on CO2/Ba and CO2/Nb ratios are provided by published estimates of CO2 contents in highly vesicular enriched basalts that may have retained their vesicles e.g., the Mid-Atlantic Ridge "popping rocks", and from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in normal MORBs. As incompatible element enrichment increases, CO2/Nb increases progressively from 283 ± 32 in ultradepleted MORBs to 603 ± 69 in depleted melt inclusions to 936 ± 132 in enriched, vesicular basalts. In contrast, CO2/Ba is nearly uniform in these sample suites at 98 ± 10, 106 ± 24 and 111 ± 11 respectively. This suggests that Ba is the best proxy for estimating CO2 contents of MORBs, with an overall average CO2/Ba = 105 ± 9. Atlantic, Pacific and Indian basalts have similar values. Gakkel Ridge has lower CO2/Ba because of anomalously high Ba, and is not included in our global averages. Using the CO2/Ba ratio and published compilations of trace elements in average MORBs, the CO2 concentration of a primary, average MORB is 2085+ 473/- 427

  10. In situ visualization study of CO 2 gas bubble behavior in DMFC anode flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Zhao, T. S.; Ye, Q.

    This paper reports on a visual study of the CO 2 bubble behavior in the anode flow field of an in-house fabricated transparent Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC), which consisted of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an active area of 4.0 × 4.0 cm 2, two bipolar plates with a single serpentine channel, and a transparent enclosure. The study reveals that at low current densities, small discrete bubbles appeared in the anode flow field. At moderate current densities, a number of gas slugs formed, in addition to small discrete bubbles. And at high current densities, the flow field was predominated by rather long gas slugs. The experiments also indicate that the cell orientation had a significant effect on the cell performance, especially at low methanol flow rates; for the present flow field design the best cell performance could be achieved when the cell was orientated vertically. It has been shown that higher methanol solution flow rates reduced the average length and the number of gas slugs in the flow field, but led to an increased methanol crossover. In particular, the effect of methanol solution flow rates on the cell performance became more pronounced at low temperatures. The effect of temperature on the bubble behavior and the cell performance was also examined. Furthermore, for the present flow field consisting of a single serpentine channel, the channel-blocking phenomenon caused by CO 2 gas slugs was never encountered under all the test conditions in this work.

  11. Corrosion Behaviors of PI 10 Steel and Chromium Coating in CO2-saturated Simulated Oilfield Brine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Naiming; XIE Faqin; ZHOU Jun; WU Xiangqing; TIAN Wei

    2011-01-01

    The protective chromium coating was prepared on P110 steel by employing pack cementation. The corrosion behaviors of P110 steel and the obtained coating in CO2-saturated simulated oilfield brine were studied by static complete immersion tests and electrochemical measurements.The corrosion attacks of the samples were determined by mass loss, corroded surface morphologies,corrosion products, and results of electrochemical measurements. The experimental results showed that the coating was uniform, continuous and compact. The chromium coating was slightly corroded,and the mass loss and corrosion rate of the coating were far lower than those of P110 steel. Chromium coating has higher self-corroding potential and lower corrosion current density than P110 steel in accordance with the electrochemical tests results. Taken as a whole, chromizing treatment has significantly improved the corrosion resistance of P110 steel.

  12. Prediction of Phase Behavior for Styrene/CO2/Polystyrene Mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴家龙; 潘勤敏; 等

    2002-01-01

    A lattice fluid model,Sanchez-Lacombe equation,is used to predict the phase behavior for a styrene/CO2/polystyrene ternary system.The binary parameters involved in the equation were optimized using experimental data.Phase diagrams and the distribution coefficients of styrene between polymer phase and fluid phase are obtained over a wide rang of pressure,temperature and composition.The analysis of ternary phase diagrams indicates that this system at relatively high pressure or low temperature may display two-phase equilibrium,and at low pressures or high temperatures three-phase equilibrium may appear.The distribution coefficients of styrene between the fluid phase and the polymer phase increase asymptotically to unity when the concentration of styrene increases.The results provide thermodynamic knowledge for further exploitation of supercritical carbon dioxide assisted devolatilization and impregnation.

  13. Impedance spectroscopy and scaling behaviors of Sr3Co2Fe24O41 hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rujun; Jiang, Chen; Jian, Jie; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The impedance spectroscopy of Z-type hexaferrite Sr3Co2Fe24O41 (SCFO) has been investigated as a function of temperature from 303 to 503 K. The frequency dependent impedance ( Z ″ ) and modulus ( M ″ ) spectra show that for the air annealed SCFO, the electrical responses of SCFO are thermal activated and there is a distribution of relaxation times. The scaling behaviors of Z ″ and M ″ spectra further suggest that the distribution of relaxation times is temperature independent. The Cole-Cole plots in impedance formalism show that the electrical response of SCFO originates from both the grain and the grain-boundaries. The activation energies for grain and grain boundary are 0.66 eV and 0.67 eV, respectively. The frequency dependent conductivity ( σ ' ) spectra follow the universal power law. The fitting results of σ ' spectra show that the small polaron hopping is the most probable conduction mechanism for SCFO. Moreover, the scaling behavior of σ ' spectra further confirms that the distribution of local electrical response times is temperature independent. The air plus O2 annealed SCFO shows thermally activated electrical responses and scaling behaviors as well. The above results show that although the electrical responses of SCFO are temperature dependent, the relaxation mechanism in SCFO is temperature independent.

  14. Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of EnhancedGeothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2007-04-13

    Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermaldepletion.

  15. Migration behavior of supercritical and liquid CO2 in a stratified system: Experiments and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Junho; Kim, Kue-Young; Han, Weon Shik; Park, Eungyu; Kim, Jeong-Chan

    2015-10-01

    Multiple scenarios of upward CO2 migration driven by both injection-induced pressure and buoyancy force were investigated in a horizontally and vertically stratified core utilizing a core-flooding system with a 2-D X-ray scanner. Two reservoir-type scenarios were considered: (1) the terrestrial reservoir scenario (10 MPa and 50°C), where CO2 exists in a supercritical state and (2) the deep-sea sediment reservoir scenario (28 MPa and 25°C), where CO2 is stored in the liquid phase. The core-flooding experiments showed a 36% increase in migration rate in the vertical core setting compared with the horizontal setting, indicating the significance of the buoyancy force under the terrestrial reservoir scenario. Under both reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 tended to find a preferential flow path (low capillary entry pressure and high-permeability (high-k) path) and bypass the unfavorable pathways, leaving low CO2 saturation in the low-permeability (low-k) layers. No distinctive fingering was observed as the CO2 moved upward, and the CO2 movement was primarily controlled by media heterogeneity. The CO2 saturation in the low-k layers exhibited a more sensitive response to injection rates, implying that the increase in CO2 injection rates could be more effective in terms of storage capacity in the low-k layers in a stratified reservoir. Under the deep-sea sediment condition, the storage potential of liquid CO2 was more than twice as high as that of supercritical CO2 under the terrestrial reservoir scenario. In the end, multiphase transport simulations were conducted to assess the effects of heterogeneity on the spatial variation of pressure buildup, CO2 saturation, and CO2 flux. Finally, we showed that a high gravity number (Ngr) tended to be more influenced by the heterogeneity of the porous media.

  16. Origin of metallic behavior in NiCo2O4 ferrimagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitla, Yugandhar; Chin, Yi-Ying; Lin, Jheng-Cyuan; van, Chien Nguyen; Liu, Ruirui; Zhu, Yuanmin; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zhan, Qian; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Chu, Ying-Hao; He, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Predicting and understanding the cation distribution in spinels has been one of the most interesting problems in materials science. The present work investigates the effect of cation redistribution on the structural, electrical, optical and magnetic properties of mixed-valent inverse spinel NiCo2O4(NCO) thin films. It is observed that the films grown at low temperatures (T  400 °C) are insulators with lower ferrimagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition temperature. So far, n-type Fe3O4 has been used as a conducting layer for the spinel thin films based devices and the search for a p-type counterpart still remains elusive. The inherent coexistence and coupling of ferrimagnetic order and the metallic nature in p-type NCO makes it a promising candidate for spintronic devices. Detailed X-ray Absorption and X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism studies revealed a strong correlation between the mixed-valent cation distribution and the resulting ferrimagnetic-metallic/insulating behavior. Our study clearly demonstrates that it is the concentration of Ni3+ions and the Ni3+-O2-Ni2+ double exchange interaction that is crucial in dictating the metallic behavior in NCO ferrimagnet. The metal-insulator and the associated magnetic order-disorder transitions can be tuned by the degree of cation site disorder via growth conditions.

  17. Comparison of melting and crystallization behaviors of polylactide under high-pressure CO2, N2, and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofar, M.; Tabatabaei, A.; Ameli, A.; Park, C. B.

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the melting and crystallization behaviors of polylactide (PLA) under high-pressure CO2, N2, and helium (He) using a high-pressure differential scanning calorimeter. The results showed that the PLA's melting temperature was depressed only in contact with pressurized CO2 where at high CO2 pressures the lubricating gas molecules induced more imperfect melt and cold crystals during the cooling and heating cycles, respectively. PLA's melt crystallization was analyzed during nonisothermal processes. Despite the effect of dissolved CO2 that expedited the PLA's crystallization rate, N2 showed almost a neutral impact on the PLA's crystallization kinetics. Because of the lower solubility, N2 gas content dissolved in the PLA had a diminutive plasticization effect, and thereby it could only counterbalance its negative hydraulic pressure effect. Moreover, as the helium pressure increased, the PLA's final crystallinity was reduced due to the dominant effect of helium's hydraulic pressure.

  18. The influence of water and supercritical CO2 on the failure behavior of chalk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liteanu, E.; Spiers, C.J.; de Bresser, J.H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of compressive strength by injection of water into chalk is a well-known mechanism responsible for increased compaction in chalk reservoirs. This raises the question of whether such effects might be enhanced in the context of long-term storage of CO2 or of CO2 injection for enhanced oil

  19. Protective behavior of an SO2/CO2 gas mixture for molten AZ91D alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Weizhong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The protective behavior for a molten AZ91D alloy in an open melting furnace was investigated under a protective gas mixture containing 3% SO2 and 97% CO2, and the protection mechanism was discussed. Experimental results show that the gas mixture provides effective protection for AZ91D melt in the temperature range from 680 ìC to 730 ìC. The microstructure, chemical composition and phase composition of the surface film formed on the molten AZ91D alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The SEM results demonstrate that the surface films with an average thickness between 0.5 レm and 2 レm are dense and coherent in the protected temperature range. The EDS results reveal that the surface film mainly contains elements S, C, O, Al and Mg. The XRD results show that the surface film consists of MgO, MgS and a small amount of C phase.

  20. Physico-Chemical Behavior of Nanoparticles at CO2-Water-Rock Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Y.; Shao, H.; Hu, Y.; Matos, R.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, to help mitigate global climate-change and energy problems, much effort has recently been devoted to developing methods for sequestering anthropogenic CO2 from coal-fired power plants. One of the most promising methods is geological CO2 sequestration (GS). Some prior studies of geological CO2 sequestration have mainly examined the physical processes that occur during the sequestration of CO2. However, most of the relevant studies are based on hydrological transport, using simulation models rather than studying actual interfacial chemical reactions in the ground. The mechanisms, kinetics, and environmental impact of interfacial reactions among CO2-H2O-mineral surfaces at the molecular scale have not been well understood. Changes in the porosity of the mineral phases at the geological formation sites, especially the dissolution of the mineral phase or precipitation of secondary minerals in the pores, will affect the fate and transport of CO2 and the integrity of seals and the matrix within the reservoirs. So far, little is known about the kinetics of the possible geochemical reactions of supercritical CO2 in brine and pre-existing mineral interfaces, or about the ultimate fate and transport of the injected CO2. We investigated the physico-chemical property changes of reference mineral samples (clay minerals) as well as field site samples (sandstone and caprock from the Illinois Basin) by chemical reactions at CO2-H2O-mineral interfaces. We investigated whether reactions between caprock and CO2 can change the integrity of caprock. Our experimental results with caprock samples (CONSOL coal mine sites, West Virginia) indicate that after 14 days in contact with 1 atm CO2 saturated saline water at 80°C, the concentrations of dissolved metals have increased from zero to as high as 47,000 ppm. In our experiments with caprocks and sandstones from GS sites of the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, we found that the most significant extent of dissolution

  1. Behavior of water in supercritical CO2: adsorption and capillary condensation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, J. E.; Bryan, C. R.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical potential of water in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) may play an important role in water adsorption, capillary condensation, and evaporation under partially saturated conditions at geologic CO2 storage sites, especially if initially anhydrous CO2 is injected. Such processes may affect residual water saturations, relative permeability, shrink/swell of clays, and colloidal transport. We have developed a thermodynamic model of water or brine film thickness as a function of water relative humidity in scCO2. The model is based on investigations of liquid water configuration in the vadose zone and uses the augmented Young-Laplace equation, which incorporates both adsorptive and capillary components. The adsorptive component is based on the concept of disjoining pressure, which reflects force per area normal to the solid and water/brine-scCO2 interfaces. The disjoining pressure includes van der Waals, electrostatic, and structural interactions. The van der Waals term includes the effects of mutual dissolution of CO2 and water in the two fluid phases on partial molar volumes, dielectric coefficients, and refractive indices. Our approach treats the two interfaces as asymmetric surfaces in terms of charge densities and electrostatic potentials. We use the disjoining pressure isotherm to evaluate the type of wetting (e.g., total or partial wetting) for common reservoir and caprock minerals and kerogen. The capillary component incorporates water activity and is applied to simple pore geometries with slits and corners. Finally, we compare results of the model to a companion study by the coauthors on measurement of water adsorption to mineral phases using a quartz-crystal microbalance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Effects of property of reservoir on heat extraction in CO2 plume geothermal system%二氧化碳羽流地热系统中储层物性参数对热提取率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封官宏; 李佳琦; 许天福; 石岩

    2013-01-01

    二氧化碳羽流地热是以超临界CO2作为地热系统的载热流体,利用天然孔隙介质,在进行CO2地质储存的同时实现深部地热资源的提取.CO2在注入地下储层后呈羽状扩散和分布,因此称这种地热开发系统为CO2羽流地热系统.在CO2羽流地热系统中,砂岩储层分布广泛,物性各异,对热提取率的影响较大.文章以松辽盆地中心凹陷区泉头组三、四段为地热储层,建立平面二维羽流地热模型,采用TOUGH2-MP软件进行数值模拟,定量评价储层物性对热提取率的影响.结果表明,温度对热提取率的影响最大,初始盐度的影响最小,故应按照“低压、低盐度、高温、高渗透、高比热”的标准选取储层,其中高温和高渗透率是应重点考虑的因素.%CO2 plume geothermal system (CPG),which utilizes supercritical CO2 as the underground heat-carrying fluid in natural porous medium,could achieve geologic sequestration as well as heat extraction of deep reservoir.The new geothermal system dubs CO2 plume geothermal system because CO2 is distributed as plume in the reservoir.In CPG,the broad distribution and various properties of the reservoir produce great effects on heat extraction.A 2D flow model is employed to analyze the effects,based on the geothermal reservoir of Klq3 and Klq4 of Quantou Formation in the central depression of Songliao basin.The effects of reservoir property on heat extraction are evaluated quantitatively by TOUGH2-MP software.The results indicate that the effect of temperature on heat extraction is the greatest,while salinity is the least.At last,the suggestion of reservoir selection is "low pressure,low salinity,high temperature,high permeability,high specific heat capacity".Among these standards,high temperature and permeability are the keys.

  3. Plant-aphid interactions under elevated CO2: some cues from aphid feeding behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the increasing concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 accelerates the accumulation of carbohydrates and increases the biomass and yield of C3 crop plants, it also reduces their nitrogen status. The consequent changes in primary and secondary metabolites affect the palatability of host plants and the feeding of herbivorous insects. Aphids are phloem feeders and are considered the only feeding guild that positively responds to elevated CO2. In this review, we consider how elevated CO2 modifies host defenses, nutrients, and water-use efficiency by altering concentrations of the phytohormones jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, ethylene, and abscisic acid. We will describe how these elevated CO2-induced changes in defenses, nutrients, and water status facilitate specific stages of aphid feeding, including penetration, phloem-feeding, and xylem absorption. We conclude that a better understanding of the effects of elevated CO2 on aphids and on aphid damage to crop plants will require research on the molecular aspects of the interaction between plant and aphid but also research on aphid interactions with their intra- and inter-specific competitors and with their natural enemies.

  4. Tracing Mantle Plumes: Quantifying their Morphology and Behavior from Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, K. A.; Eakin, C. M.; Jones, T. D.; Garcia, E.; Robson, A.; Mittal, T.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Jackson, M. G.; Lekic, V.; Rudolph, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Hotspot volcanism provides a direct link between the deep mantle and the surface, but the location, depth and source of the mantle plumes that feed hotspots are highly controversial. In order to address this issue it is important to understand the journey along which plumes have travelled through the mantle. The general behavior of plumes in the mantle also has the potential to tell us about the vigor of mantle convection, net rotation of the mantle, the role of thermal versus chemical anomalies, and important bulk physical properties of the mantle such as the viscosity profile. To address these questions we developed an algorithm to trace plume-like features in shear-wave (Vs) seismic tomographic models based on picking local minima in velocity and searching for continuous features with depth. We apply this method to several of the latest tomographic models and can recover 30 or more continuous plume conduits that are >750 km long. Around half of these can be associated with a known hotspot at the surface. We study the morphology of these plume chains and find that the largest lateral deflections occur near the base of the lower mantle and in the upper mantle. We analyze the preferred orientation of the plume deflections and their gradient to infer large scale mantle flow patterns and the depth of viscosity contrasts in the mantle respectively. We also retrieve Vs profiles for our traced plumes and compare with velocity profiles predicted for different mantle adiabat temperatures. We use this to constrain the thermal anomaly associated with these plumes. This thermal anomaly is then converted to a density anomaly and an upwelling velocity is derived. We compare this to buoyancy fluxes calculated at the surface and use this in conjunction with our measured plume tilts/deflections to estimate the strength of the "mantle wind".

  5. Electrochemical and Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of Tubing Steels in a H2S/CO2 Annular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, R. K.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.

    2014-04-01

    The electrochemical and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) behaviors of 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel were investigated in a simulated acidic annular environment with low-temperature and high-pressure H2S/CO2 using electrochemical methods, U-bend immersion tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In the solution containing high pressure CO2, 13Cr, and P110 steels exhibited general corrosion and severe pitting, respectively. Compared with sweet corrosion, additional H2S in the solution enhanced the corrosion of 13Cr steel but inhibited the corrosion of P110 steel. By contrast, in a solution containing 4 MPa CO2 and different (0-0.3 MPa), the susceptibility of both 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel toward SSCC was significantly promoted by increases in H2S partial pressure. The 13Cr stainless steel exhibited higher susceptibility toward SSCC than P110 steel under a H2S/CO2 environment but lower susceptibility under a pure CO2 environment.

  6. $CO_2$ sorption and transport behavior of ODPA-based polyetherimide polymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons-Fischbein, K.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Guilera Sala, Jordi; van der Werf, Hans; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Dingemans, Theo J.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Plasticization phenomena can significantly reduce the performance of polymeric membranes in high-pressure applications. Polyetherimides (PEIs) are a promising group of membrane materials that combine relatively high CO2/CH4 selectivities with high chemical and thermal stability. In this work sorptio

  7. Review on Corrosion Behaviors of Steels under Supercritical CO2 Condition%超临界CO2条件下钢的腐蚀行为研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉成; 屈少鹏; 庞晓露; 高克玮

    2011-01-01

    低压CO2腐蚀规律已经被人们广泛认识,而超临界CO2腐蚀方面的研究却非常有限。国内外的研究主要集中在钢在超临界CO2环境中的腐蚀速率、腐蚀产物膜的结构、形貌、组成及电化学行为等。然而,现有的研究均未涉及到超临界CO2腐蚀机理问题。本文综述了目前国内外超临界CO2条件下钢的腐蚀行为的研究成果,指出了现有研究中的不足,并对超临界CO2腐蚀的研究前景进行了展望,期望能对科研工作者全面了解超临界CO2腐蚀提供参考和借鉴,并能够为油气工业中管道的选材提供理论指导。%The CO2 corrosion under low partial pressure has been recognized widely, but the researches on supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) corrosion were very limited. By far, investigations on steel corrosion under SC CO2 conditions were mainly about the corrosion rate, structure, morphology and composition of corrosion scales, and the electrochemical behaviors. However, present studies were not related to the corrosion mechanism in SC CO2. This paper reviews the research results on corrosion behaviors of steel under supercritical COe conditions, points out the shortcomings in the present investigations and finally looks forward to the research prospects on supercritical CO2 corrosion. It is expected that this paper can not only provide reference for the workers in the field of supercritical CO2 corrosion, but also be served as a theoretical guidance for materials selection in oil and gas industry.

  8. Evaluation of CO2-philicity of poly(vinyl acetate) and poly(vinyl acetate-alt-maleate) copolymers through molecular modeling and dissolution behavior measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dongdong; Sun, Shaojun; Yuan, Peiqing; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Tao

    2015-02-19

    Multiscale molecular modeling and dissolution behavior measurement were both used to evaluate the factors conclusive on the CO2-philicity of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) homopolymer and poly(vinyl acetate-alt-maleate) copolymers. The ab initio calculated interaction energies of the candidate CO2-philic molecule models with CO2, including vinyl acetate dimer (VAc), dimethyl maleate (DMM), diethyl maleate (DEM), and dibutyl maleate (DBM), showed that VAc was the most CO2-philc segment. However, the cohesive energy density, solubility parameter, Flory-Huggins parameter, and radial distribution functions calculated by using the molecular dynamics simulations for the four polymer and polymer-CO2 systems indicated that poly(VAc-alt-DBM) had the most CO2-philicity. The corresponding polymers were synthesized by using free radical polymerization. The measurement of cloud point pressures of the four polymers in CO2 also demonstrated that poly(VAc-alt-DBM) had the most CO2-philicity. Although copolymerization of maleate, such as DEM or DBM, with PVAc reduced the polymer-CO2 interactions, the weakened polymer-polymer interaction increased the CO2-philicity of the copolymers. The polymer-polymer interaction had a significant influence on the CO2-philicity of the polymer. Reduction of the polymer-polymer interaction might be a promising strategy to prepare the high CO2-philic polymers on the premise that the strong polymer-CO2 interaction could be maintained.

  9. Exploration of CO2-Philicity of Poly(vinyl acetate-co-alkyl vinyl ether) through Molecular Modeling and Dissolution Behavior Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dongdong; Sun, Shaojun; Yuan, Pei-Qing; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Tao

    2015-09-24

    Hydrocarbon CO2-philes are of great interest for use in expanding CO2 applications as a green solvent. In this work, multiscale molecular modeling and dissolution behavior measurement were both applied to explore CO2-philicity of the poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc)-based copolymer. Introduction of a favorable comonomer, i.e., vinyl ethyl ether (VEE), could significantly reduce the polymer-polymer interaction on the premise that the polymer-CO2 interaction was not weakened but enhanced. The ab initio calculated interaction of the model molecules with CO2 demonstrated that the ether group in VEE or VBE was the suitable CO2-philic segment. From the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of polymer/CO2 systems, the interaction energy and Flory-Huggins parameter (χ12) of poly(VAc-alt-VEE)/CO2 supported that poly(VAc-alt-VEE) possessed better CO2-philicity than PVAc. The dissolution behaviors of the synthesized poly(VAc-co-alkyl vinyl ether) copolymers in CO2 showed the best CO2-phile had the VEE content of about 34 mol %. The MD simulations also indicated that the interaction of random poly(VAc-co-VEE) containing about 30 mol % VEE with CO2 was the strongest and the χ12 was the smallest in these polymer/CO2 systems. Not only could the VEE monomer reduce the polymer-polymer interaction, but it could also enhance the polymer-CO2 interaction with an optimized composition. Introducing a suitable comonomer with a certain composition might be a promising strategy to form the synergistic effect of polymer-polymer interaction and polymer-CO2 interaction for screening the hydrocarbon CO2-philes.

  10. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  11. Effects of Anode Flow Field Design on CO2 Bubble Behavior in μDMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Clogging of anode flow channels by CO2 bubbles is a vital problem for further performance improvements of the micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC. In this paper, a new type anode structure usingthe concept of the non-equipotent serpentine flow field (NESFF to solve this problem was designed, fabricated and tested. Experiments comparing the μDMFC with and without this type of anode flow field were implemented using a home-made test loop. Results show that the mean-value, amplitude and frequency of the inlet-to-outlet pressure drops in the NESFF is far lower than that in the traditional flow fields at high μDMFC output current. Furthermore, the sequential images of the CO2 bubbles as well as the μDMFC performance with different anode flow field pattern were also investigated, and the conclusions are in accordance with those derived from the pressure drop experiments. Results of this study indicate that the non-equipotent design of the µDMFC anode flow field can effectively mitigate the CO2 clogging in the flow channels, and hence lead to a significant promotion of the μDMFC performance.

  12. 二甲基亚砜中Co2+电化学行为的研究%Study on the Electrochemical Behaviors of Co2+in Dimethylsulfoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲丽; 王建朝; 李冰; 翟晋芳

    2009-01-01

    研究了二甲基亚砜中Co2+在Pt电极上的电化学行为.293 K时,在0.01 mol·L-1CoCl2-0.1mol·L-1LiClO4-DMSO体系中利用循环伏安法、计时电流法、计时电量法测定Co2+的扩散系数D0和传递系数a分别为1.66×10-6cm2·8-1和0.12;并通过塔菲尔曲线求出交换电流密度i0=3.36×10-8A/cm2.

  13. CO2 Corrosion and Grooving Corrosion Behavior of the ERW Joint of the Q125 Grade Tube Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-dong WANG; Feng-lei LIU; Qing-yun ZHAO; Hui-bin WU

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the CO2 corrosion behavior and the grooving corrosion susceptibility of electric resistance welded tubes of the Q125 grade, the high temperature and high pressure autoclave was employed to conduct CO2 corrosion experiments for the welded joint. The mechanisms of grooving corrosion and the factors inlfuencing grooving corrosion susceptibility were identiifed by electrochemical measurement, microstructure observation, residual stress examination, micro-region composition and orientation analysis. The CO2 corrosion results show that the corrosion resistance of the base material is the best, followed by heat-affected zone and the welded seam is the worst. The grooving corrosion occurred in the welded seam, and the grooving corrosion susceptibility of welded seam is relativity high. The dominated reason for the grooving corrosion of the electric resistance welded jointis the notable inclusions consisting of MnS as the main content in the welded seam.The proportion of high-angle grain bound-aries in the welding zone is higher than that of base metal and the heat affected zone, which plays an important role in the corrosion behavior of the welded seam.

  14. Effect of Small Amount H2S on CO2 Corrosion Behavior of Oil Tube Steel%微量H2S对油管钢CO2腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱进森; 燕铸; 刘建彬; 李小波

    2014-01-01

    H2S/CO2 corrosion environments in oil and gas field containing rich S were simulated in a high temperature and high pressure autoclave manufactured by USA Cortest Company, and tests were conducted in H2S/CO2 media with high salinity. The effect of small amount H2S on CO2 corrosion behavior of oil tube steel was discussed by the following technologies, such as SEM, XRD, dynamic potential scanning, AC impedance and electrochemical techniques, and the characteristics of corrosion conduct film and corrosion mechanism were studied. The results showed that the corrosion rate is the highest in pure CO2 corrosion, up to 2.4 mm/a. When the H2S/CO2 partial pressure ratio is 1/400, the corrosion rate decreases rapidly;with H2S/CO2 partial pressure ratio increases, the corrosion rate firstly increases then decreases, but are less than a single CO2 corrosion rate. H2S/CO2 partial pressure 1/400 is critical point of corrosion control. When H2S/CO2 partial pressure is more than 1/400, the corrosion process gradually transforms into H2S control.%利用美国Cortest公司高温高压反应釜模拟高含硫油气田H2S/CO2腐蚀环境,在流动高矿化度饱和H2S/CO2介质中进行试验,辅以SEM、 XRD、动电位扫描及交流阻抗等表面分析和电化学技术,探讨了微量H2S对油管钢CO2腐蚀行为的影响,并对腐蚀产物膜特征及腐蚀机制进行了研究。结果表明:单一CO2腐蚀速率最高,达2.4 mm/a;当H2S与CO2分压比为1/400时,腐蚀速率迅速减小,随着H2S与CO2分压比增大,腐蚀速率先增大后减小,但均小于单一CO2腐蚀速率; H2S与CO2分压比为1/400是腐蚀控制的临界点,当H2S与CO2分压比大于1/400时,腐蚀过程逐渐转变为H2S控制。

  15. Effect of silty sand with different sizes on corrosion behavior of 3Cr steel in CO2 aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Lu, Songle; Zhang, Peng; Dou, Juanjuan; Zhao, Qinghe

    2016-08-01

    Corrosion behavior of 3Cr steel in CO2 aqueous environment containing silty sand was investigated by immersion test. The results show that CO2 corrosion rate and morphology of 3Cr steel were obviously affected by the size of silty sand. 5000 mesh silty sand mixed with corrosion products, forming compact Cr-rich corrosion scale and resulting in low corrosion rate and uniform corrosion. 1000 mesh silty sand mixed with corrosion products, forming porous corrosion scale without Cr enrichment and resulting in high corrosion rate and pitting corrosion. 5000 mesh silty sand enhanced Cr enrichment in corrosion scale, leading to low anodic current. However, 1000 mesh silty sand deteriorated Cr enrichment in corrosion scale, leading to high anodic current. Cathodic current was reduced by silty sand, but was not affected by two sizes of silty sand. Cr enrichment in corrosion scale of 3Cr steel was obviously affected by separation effect of silty sand.

  16. Off-On-Off fluorescence behavior of an intramolecular charge transfer probe toward anions and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rashid; Razi, Syed S.; Shahid, Mohammad; Srivastava, Priyanka; Misra, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    The photophysical behavior of a newly developed fluorescent probe, tricyanoethylphenyl phenanthroimidazole (TCPPI) has been studied. Upon interaction of different class of anions TCPPI displayed naked-eye sensitive fluorescence "turn-on" response to detect selectively F- (0.98 μM, 18.62 ppb) and CN- (1.12 μM, 29.12 ppb) anions in acetonitrile (MeCN). Job's plot analysis revealed a 1:1 binding stoichiometry between probe and anions. The spectral data analysis and 1H NMR titration studies suggested about the affinity of F- and CN- anions with moderately acidic - NH fragment of imidazolyl unit of probe through deprotonation and H-bonding interaction. Moreover, the anion activated probe upon interaction with CO2 revived photophysical properties of probe, "On-Off-On" type fluorescence and enabled anion-induced CO2 sensing in the medium.

  17. Study on the Phase Behavior of Supercritical CO2/Dynol-604/Water System and Solubilization of Methyl Orange in the Microemulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It was found that Dynol-604, a non-fluorous and no silicon-containing nonionic surfactant, was soluble in supercritical (SC) CO2. The phase behavior of SC CO2/Dynol-604/water system was studied. The results showed that one-phase water-in-CO2 microemulsions could be formed. The solubilization of methyl orange in the microemulsions proved further the existence of water domain in the microemulsions.

  18. Study on the Phase Behavior of Supercritical CO2/Dynol—604/Water System and Solubilization of Methyl Orange in the Microemulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunChengLIU; JianLingZHANG; 等

    2002-01-01

    It was found that Dynol-604, a non-fluorous and no silicon-containing nonionic surfactant,was soluble in supercritical (SC) CO2. The phase behavior of SC CO2/Dynol-604/water system was studies. The results showed that one-phase water-in-CO2 microemulsions could be fromed. The solubilization of methyl orange in the microemulsions proved further the existence of water domain in the microemulsions.

  19. Charge transfer behavior of graphene-titania photoanode in CO2 photoelectrocatalysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Rakibul; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Basirun, Wan Jeffrey

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, a graphene-titania composite photoelectrode was synthesized, characterized and examined for the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) response. The charge transfer process on the semiconductor/electrolyte interface was investigated via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and voltammetry. In addition, the influence of pH toward the photoanode performance was also investigated and it was noticed that a high pH condition was favorable higher photocurrent response from the EIS measurements. The main reason could be attributed to the decrease of recombination process at the photoanode with fast quenching of the photogenerated holes with OH- ions at high pH. The experiment was also run for CO2 photoreduction and increased photocurrent was observed.

  20. Marine snow, organic solute plumes, and optimal chemosensory behavior of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jackson, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Leaking organic solutes form an elongated plume in the wake of a sinking aggregate. These solutes may both be assimilated by suspended bacteria and guide bacteria with chemokinetic swimming behavior toward the aggregate. We used modifications of previously published models of the flow...... and concentration fields around sinking aggregates and of chemokinetic behavior of bacteria to identify the behavior that optimizes aggregate colonization and plume utilization. The optimal solution is governed by physical constraints and is a trade off between a high sensitivity to chemical signals and a long...... signal integration time. For a run-and-tumble swimming behavior, the predicted tumbling frequency is between 1 and 10 s(-1), similar to that reported for marine bacteria. The predicted optimal sensitivity to chemical signals is similar to or greater than that known for Escherichia coli. The optimal...

  1. The influence of lumping on the behavior of reservoir with light oil and CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanavini, Helena Finardi Alvares [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNISIM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo. Pesquisa em Simulacao e Gerenciamento de Reservatorios; Schiozer, Denis Jose [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DEP/FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2012-07-01

    Compositional simulation demands a large number of equations and functions to be solved, once fluid properties depend on reservoir pressure and temperature and also on fluid composition. As a consequence, the number of components used influences considerably in the simulation run time and accuracy: more components yield more equations to be solved with expected higher run time. Giant petroleum fields discovered recently in Brazil (pre-salt reservoirs) demand compositional simulation due to the fluid characteristics (light oil with the presence of CO2). However, the computational time can be a limitation because of the number of grid blocks that are necessary to represent the reservoir. So, reducing the number of components is an important step for the simulation models. Under this context, this paper presents a study on the influence of different lumping clusters, used to reduce the number of components in a volatile oil, on reservoir simulation. Phase diagram, saturation pressure and simulation results were used for comparison purposes. The best results were obtained for the cases with 14, 9 and 7 pseudo components, which represented correctly the original fluid, reducing till three times the simulation run time, for the same production volumes of oil and gas. (author)

  2. Hydrogen Permeation Behaviors of X52 Pipeline Steel in NACE A Solution with Saturated H2S/CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi; LI Changjin; ZHANG Jiyin; ZENG Dezhi; ZHANG Liehui; SHI Taihe

    2012-01-01

    With the aid of hydrogen permeating devices,the hydrogen permeation behaviors of X52 pipeline steel in NACE A solution with saturated H2S/CO2 were studied under the conditions of different ambient temperatures and pH values,and the hydrogen permeation behaviors of X52 pipeline steel in weld seam zone were comparatively studied.The experimental results show that the hydrogen permeation coefficient value is directly proportional to the time required for reaching the saturation anode current and inversely proportional to the saturation anode current,and the hydrogen permeation coefficient is influenced by the corrosion scales;the temperature is directly proportional to the saturation anode current,and the hydrogen permeation coefficient is influenced by the temperature and corrosion scales,heat-affected zone and matrix zone in NACE A solution with saturated H2S/CO2 at normal temperature.The hydrogen permeation coefficient in weld seam zone is larger than that in heat-affected zone which is further larger than that in matrix zone.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Pipeline Steel Exposed to H2S/CO2-Saturated Saline Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu; Li, Jianping; Li, Ping; Bai, Xiaolei; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Immersion experiments were carried out to study H2S/CO2 corrosion behavior of low-alloy pipeline steel in terms of microstructure, corrosion kinetics, corrosion phases, microscopic surface morphology, cross-sectional morphology and elemental distribution. The experimental results indicated that the microstructure of designed steel was tempered martensite. The corrosion rate followed exponential behavior. H2S corrosion dominated the corrosion process, and the corrosion products were mackinawite, greigite and troilite. The corrosion products changed from mackinawite/greigite to mackinawite/troilite, and mackinawite dominated the corrosion phases. The corrosion products became more compact with immersion time, which led to decrease in corrosion rate. The chromium and molybdenum content in the corrosion product was higher than that in the steel substrate.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Pipeline Steel Exposed to H2S/CO2-Saturated Saline Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu; Li, Jianping; Li, Ping; Bai, Xiaolei; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-03-01

    Immersion experiments were carried out to study H2S/CO2 corrosion behavior of low-alloy pipeline steel in terms of microstructure, corrosion kinetics, corrosion phases, microscopic surface morphology, cross-sectional morphology and elemental distribution. The experimental results indicated that the microstructure of designed steel was tempered martensite. The corrosion rate followed exponential behavior. H2S corrosion dominated the corrosion process, and the corrosion products were mackinawite, greigite and troilite. The corrosion products changed from mackinawite/greigite to mackinawite/troilite, and mackinawite dominated the corrosion phases. The corrosion products became more compact with immersion time, which led to decrease in corrosion rate. The chromium and molybdenum content in the corrosion product was higher than that in the steel substrate.

  5. Sedation or Inhalant Anesthesia before Euthanasia with CO2 Does Not Reduce Behavioral or Physiologic Signs of Pain and Stress in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Helen; Williams, Wendy O; Maurer, Kirk J

    2012-01-01

    CO2 administration is a common euthanasia method for research mice, yet questions remain regarding whether CO2 euthanasia is associated with pain and stress. Here we assessed whether premedication with acepromazine, midazolam, or anesthetic induction with isoflurane altered behavioral and physiologic parameters that may reflect pain or stress during CO2 euthanasia. Mice were assigned to 1 of 6 euthanasia groups: CO2 only at a flow rate of 1.2 L/min which displaces 20% of the cage volume per minute (V/min; control group); premedication with acepromazine (5 mg/kg), midazolam (5 mg/kg), or saline followed by 20% V/min CO2; induction with 5% isoflurane followed by greater than 100% V/min CO2 (>6L/min); and 100% V/min CO2 only (6 L/min). Measures included ultrasonic sound recordings, behavioral analysis of video recordings, plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels immediately after euthanasia, and quantification of c-fos from brain tissue. Compared with 20% V/min CO2 alone, premedication with acepromazine or midazolam did not significantly alter behavior but did induce significantly higher c-fos expression in the brain. Furthermore, the use of isoflurane induction prior to CO2 euthanasia significantly increased both behavioral and neuromolecular signs of stress. The data indicate that compared with other modalities, 20% V/min CO2 alone resulted in the least evidence of stress in mice and therefore was the most humane euthanasia method identified in the current study. PMID:22330868

  6. Evaluation of Low versus High Volume per Minute Displacement CO2 Methods of Euthanasia in the Induction and Duration of Panic-Associated Behavior and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra L. Hickman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current recommendations for the use of CO 2 as a euthanasia agent for rats require the use of gradual fill protocols (such as 10% to 30% volume displacement per minute in order to render the animal insensible prior to exposure to levels of CO 2 that are associated with pain. However, exposing rats to CO 2 , concentrations as low as 7% CO 2 are reported to cause distress and 10%–20% CO 2 induces panic-associated behavior and physiology, but loss of consciousness does not occur until CO 2 concentrations are at least 40%. This suggests that the use of the currently recommended low flow volume per minute displacement rates create a situation where rats are exposed to concentrations of CO 2 that induce anxiety, panic, and distress for prolonged periods of time. This study first characterized the response of male rats exposed to normoxic 20% CO 2 for a prolonged period of time as compared to room air controls. It demonstrated that rats exposed to this experimental condition displayed clinical signs consistent with significantly increased panic-associated behavior and physiology during CO 2 exposure. When atmospheric air was then again delivered, there was a robust increase in respiration rate that coincided with rats moving to the air intake. The rats exposed to CO 2 also displayed behaviors consistent with increased anxiety in the behavioral testing that followed the exposure. Next, this study assessed the behavioral and physiologic responses of rats that were euthanized with 100% CO 2 infused at 10%, 30%, or 100% volume per minute displacement rates. Analysis of the concentrations of CO 2 and oxygen in the euthanasia chamber and the behavioral responses of the rats suggest that the use of the very low flow volume per minute displacement rate (10% may prolong the duration of panicogenic ranges of ambient CO 2 , while the use of the higher flow volume per minute displacement rate (100% increases agitation. Therefore, of the volume displacement per

  7. Effect of Saturated CO2 on Corrosion Behavior of 13Cr Pipe Steel in High Chloride Environment%高氯环境中饱和CO2对13Cr油管钢腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷冰; 马元泰; 李瑛; 王福会; 常泽亮; 谢俊峰; 宋文文; 周理志

    2013-01-01

    The effect of saturated CO2 on corrosion behavior of 13Cr pipe steel in high concentration chloride environment was studied by EIS, polarization test, EN test and SEM. The results indicated that the corrosion rate and corrosion probability of 13Cr pipe steel were accelerated in high chloride environment with the presence of saturated CO2. The 13Cr pipe steel suffered from pitting corrosion in high chloride concentration environment, whilst, from uniform corrosion by the synergistic effect of Cl and CO2. The stability of the passive film of 13Cr pipe steel decreased in high concentration chloride environment with saturated CO2, which can be explained by the dehydroxylation of the outer part of the passive film by carbonic acid and the increase of ionic conductivity of the passive film in aqueous electrolytes.%采用电化学阻抗(EIS)、极化曲线、电化学噪声(EN)和扫描电子显微镜(SEM)研究了高氯环境中饱和CO2对13Cr油管钢腐蚀行为的影响.结果表明:饱和CO2加速材料的腐蚀,增大了腐蚀的发生频率,使材料的腐蚀由点蚀转变为均匀腐蚀.碳酸对钝化膜的去羟基化作用和增大钝化膜的导通率,是材料腐蚀行为变化的原因.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of 110S Tube Steel in Environments of High H2S and CO2 Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI W en-fei; ZHOU Yan-jun; XUE Yan

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of the 110S tube steel in the environments of high H2 S and CO2 content was inves- tigated by using a high-temperature and high-pressure autoclave, and the corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X ray diffraction technique. The results showed that all of the corrosion products under the test conditions mainly consisted of different types of iron sulfides such as pyrrhotite of Fe0.95 S, mackinaw- ite of FeS0.9, Fe0. 985 S and FeS, and the absence of iron carbonate in the corrosion scales indicated that the corrosion process was controlled by H2S corrosion. The corrosion rate of the 110S steel decreased firstly and then increased with the rising of temperature. The minimum corrosion rate occurred at 110 ℃. When the H2 S partial pressure PH2s below 9 MPa, the corrosion rate declined with the increase of PH2s. While over 9 MPa, a higher PH2s resulted in a faster corrosion process. With the increasing of the CO2 partial pressure, the corrosion rate had an increasing trend. The morphologies of the corrosion scales had a good accordance with the corrosion rates.

  9. The condensation and vaporization behavior of ices containing SO2, H2S, and CO2: Implications for Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    In an extension of previously reported work on ices containing CO, CO2, H2O, CH3OH, NH3, and H2, measurements of the physical and infrared spectral properties of ices containing molecules relevant to Jupiter's moon Io are presented. These include studies on ice systems containing SO2, H2S, and CO2. The condensation and sublimation behaviors of each ice system and surface binding energies of their components are discussed. The surface binding energies can be used to calculate the residence times of the molecules on a surface as a function of temperature and thus represent important parameters for any calculation that attempts to model the transport of these molecules on Io's surface. The derived values indicate that SO2 frosts on Io are likely to anneal rapidly, resulting in less fluffy, 'glassy' ices and that H2S can be trapped in the SO2 ices of Io during night-time hours provided that SO2 deposition rates are on the order of 5 micrometers/hr or larger.

  10. Behavior of vapor/plasma within the keyhole and above the workpiece during CO2 laser penetration welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a high-speed camera and an optical emission monitor were used to study the behavior of vapor/plasma during CO2 laser welding of SUS304 stainless steel. Results of optical emission from vapor/plasma show that two characteristic frequency bands exist, 100-500 Hz and 1 500-3 500 Hz. At the same time, the changing images of vapor/plasma and bottom pool also confirm that there are two different fluctuation frequency bands. One of the frequency bands represents the characteristic of vapor/plasma within the keyhole, and it is within 167-500 Hz. Another frequency band is within 1 500-3 500 Hz, and it obviously derives from the shielding gas. Some factors may cause these frequency differences between the keyhole plasma and the shielding gas plasma. One of them is that the vapor/plasma pressure within the keyhole will increase slowly.

  11. Effect of Fe2+ ions on polarization behavior of X60 steel in CO2 saturated salty water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jincheng; Feng, Xiangzhu; Lin, Jiaxin; Shi, Weixin; Li, Wenqin

    1989-06-01

    The effects of ferrous ions on cathodic and anodic polarization behavior of the X60 steel in CO2 saturated salty water were studied by potentio-dynamic polarization method. The results show that the reducing current peak of cathodic polarization is affected significantly if FeCl2 is added to the salty solution of controlled pH, but not the anodic polarization. It is considered that the ferrous ions accelerate the formation of a protective ferrous carbonate film. Films formed by addition of ferrous ions and those formed by ferrous ions produced from steel corrosion have the same forming mechanism. The former can fully meet the formative condition of the film and can play the role of inhibitor.

  12. Analysis of Corrosion Behavior of Cr Steel in CO_2 Corrosive Environment%含Cr材质在CO_2腐蚀环境中的腐蚀分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志兵; 杨刚

    2012-01-01

    The media in Yakela Gas Field is characterized by high pressure,high throughput,high velocity,high CO2,low water and low H2S,and is very complex.Ever since the development of the gas field,the well tubes and gathering pipelines have corroded seriously.The tests of 13Cr steel in environments with different CO2 concentrations showed that the corrosion was little in low-CO2 environment.The corrosion became increasingly serious with increase of CO2 in service environment.The corrosion behavior of steel with different percentages of Cr was studied in the testes of simulated CO2 corrosive environments of gas well and gathering pipeline system on a HT and HP autoclave unit.The forms and compositions of corrosion products on sample surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscope(SEM,energy dispersion spectrum(EDS) and X-ray dispersion(XRD),etc.The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of 22Cr and 316L steels is superior over that of 3Cr and 13Cr steels.The corrosion control applicable for Yakela Gas Field is proposed.%雅克拉凝析气田具有高压力、高产量、高流速、CO2含量高、水和H2S含量低的"四高两低"特征,腐蚀介质非常复杂。气田开发以来,井下管柱和集输管道出现了严重的腐蚀。通过对13Cr材质在现场不同CO2腐蚀环境中的试验研究,验证了13Cr材质在CO2含量低的腐蚀环境中发生腐蚀较轻,随着CO2含量增加,13Cr材质腐蚀程度增加。模拟井下和集输管道两种CO2腐蚀环境,采用高温高压釜装置对不同Cr含量材质的腐蚀行为进行了试验研究,采用扫描电镜(SEM)、能谱分析(EDS)和X射线衍射(XRD)等方法对试样表面腐蚀产物的形貌及成分进行了分析。分析结果表明,22Cr和316L抗腐蚀性能优于3Cr和13Cr,并提出了适合雅克拉凝析气田井下和集输管道腐蚀治理的方向。

  13. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work, th...

  14. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work...

  15. Corrosion behavior of some commonly used pipeline steels in CO2 and H2S/CO2 environment%几种常用管线钢在CO2及H2S/CO2环境中的腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨新田; 周琦; 赵勇成

    2012-01-01

    对带状组织级别不同的管线钢在CO2及H2S/CO2饱和的NACE溶液中的腐蚀速率和腐蚀形貌进行了比较分析。结果表明,在CO2饱和的NACE溶液中,带状组织级别越低的材料,发生均匀腐蚀的特征越明显,通过生成保护性膜抵抗腐蚀的能力越强。而带状组织级别越高的材料,发生局部腐蚀,尤其是点蚀的特征越明显。在H2S/CO2饱和的NACE溶液中,带状组织级别越低的材料,越不易发生氢致开裂现象。为了提高管线钢抗CO2及H2S/CO2腐蚀的性能,应控制其带状组织。%In CO2 and H2S/CO2 saturated NACE solution, the corrosion rate and corrosion forms of the pipeline steel with different level banded structure were analyzed. The results show that in the CO2 saturated NACE solution, the lower the level of banded structure of the material is, the more obvious characteristics of uniform corrosion, and the stronger ability to corrosion resistance by generating protection-film. And the higher the level of banded structure of the material is, the more obvious characteristics of the local corrosion, especially spot corrosion. In H2S/CO2 saturated NACE solution, the lower the level of the banded structure of the materials, the more difficult the occurrence of HIC. In order to improve the corrosion resistance of pipeline steel artti-CO2 and H2S/CO2, its banded structure should be controlled.

  16. Effect of supercritical CO2 on the morphology and fluorescent behavior of fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative/graphene oxide nanohybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Shijun; Wang, Xiaobo; Yang, Hongxia; Loos, Katja; Xu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative, poly [(9-ylidene-{2-tetradecyloxy-5-tetrafluorophthalimide-phenyl}fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(1,4-phenyl)] (PFFB)/graphene oxide (GO) nanohybrids (SC-PFFB/GO) were successfully fabricated via a facile method with the assistance of supercritical CO2 (SC CO2).

  17. Effect of supercritical CO2 on the morphology and fluorescent behavior of fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative/graphene oxide nanohybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Shijun; Wang, Xiaobo; Yang, Hongxia; Loos, Katja; Xu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated polyylidenefluorenes derivative, poly [(9-ylidene-{2-tetradecyloxy-5-tetrafluorophthalimide-phenyl}fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(1,4-phenyl)] (PFFB)/graphene oxide (GO) nanohybrids (SC-PFFB/GO) were successfully fabricated via a facile method with the assistance of supercritical CO2 (SC CO2).

  18. Effect of experimental variables onto Co(2+) and Sr(2+) sorption behavior in red mud-water suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Aleksandra S; Smičiklas, Ivana D; Šljivić-Ivanović, Marija Z; Živković, Ljiljana S; Vukelić, Nikola S

    2016-07-02

    The prospects of rinsed red mud (alumina production residue) utilization for liquid radioactive waste treatment have been investigated, with Co(2+) and Sr(2+) as model cations of radioactive elements. To evaluate the sorption effectiveness and corresponding binding mechanisms, the process was analyzed in batch conditions, by varying experimental conditions (pH, Co(2+) and Sr(2+) concentrations in single solutions and binary mixtures, contact time, and the concentration of competing cations and ligands common in liquid radioactive waste). Comparison of the Co(2+) and Sr(2+) sorption pH edges with the red mud isoelectric point has revealed that Co(2+) removal took place at both positive and negative red mud surface, while Sr(2+) sorption abruptly increased when the surface became negatively charged. The increase of initial cation content and pH resulted in increased equilibrium times and sorption capacity and decreased rate constants. From single metal solutions and various binary mixtures, Co(2+) was sorbed more efficiently and selectively than Sr(2+). While Sr(2+) sorption was reduced by coexisting cations in the order Al(3+) ≥ Ca(2+) >Na(+) ≥Cs(+), removal of Co(2+) was affected by Al(3+) species and complexing agents (EDTA and citrate). Desorption of Co(2+) was negligible in Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) containing media and in solutions with initial pH 4-7. Sr(2+) desorption was generally more pronounced, especially at low pH and in the presence of Co(2+). Collected macroscopic data signify that Co(2+) sorption by red mud minerals occurred via strong chemical bonds, while Sr(2+) was retained mainly by weaker ion-exchange or electrostatic interactions. Results indicate that the rinsed red mud represent an efficient, low-cost sorbent for Co(2+) and Sr(2+) immobilization.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Super 13Cr Stainless Steel in Environment with High CO2 Level%高CO2分压环境超级13Cr的腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯桓榰; 邢希金; 谢仁军; 何松

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究超级13Cr 钢在高CO2分压条件下的腐蚀行为并评价其耐腐蚀能力,为存在类似工况的气田选材提供参考。方法模拟东方气田腐蚀环境(141℃,CO2分压27.9 MPa),通过高温高压腐蚀挂片实验和电化学实验对超级13Cr开展腐蚀行为研究。结果在东方气田高CO2分压腐蚀环境下,挂片腐蚀试验表明,超级13Cr的腐蚀形式为全面腐蚀,其均匀腐蚀速率为3×10-3 mm/a;电化学分析表明,13Cr不锈钢的自腐蚀电位(-0.785 V)和点蚀电位(-0.301 V)较超级13Cr不锈钢的(-0.580 V,-0.139 V)有明显负移,而自腐蚀电流密度和维钝电流密度明显更大。结论高CO2分压条件下,超级13Cr可满足气田油套管使用要求,超级13Cr不锈钢的耐蚀性能和抗点蚀敏感性均强于13Cr不锈钢。%ABSTRACT:Objective To analyze the corrosion behavior of super 13Cr and evaluate its anti-corrosion ability in high CO2 level condition. The result can support material selection work for similar gas fields.Methods High temperature/pressure corro-sion coupon test and electrochemical test were conducted in simulated Dong Fang gas field high CO2level environment (141℃, CO2 27.9 MPa).Results The corrosion coupon test result indicated that the corrosion type of super 13Cr was general corrosion with a corrosion rate of 3×10-3mm/a. The electrochemical test showed that the corrosion potential and pitting potential of 13Cr (-0.785 V,-0.301 V) had an obvious negative shift compared to super 13Cr (-0.580 V,-0.139 V). The corrosion current density and passivation current density of 13Cr were obviously higher than super 13Cr. Conclusion Super 13Cr could be applied to high CO2 level environment as tubing or casing. Super 13Cr was better than 13Cr in anti-corrosion and anti-pitting properties.

  20. Effect of CO2 partial pressure on SCC behavior of welded X80 pipeline in simulated soil solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming WU; Xu CHEN; Chuan HE; Jun XIAO

    2011-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of welded X80 pipeline steel in simulated Ku'erle soil solution was studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and slow strain rate tests (SSRT). The microstructure of the welded steel was observed by optical microscopy (OM). It is demonstrated that the microstructure of the weld metal consists of acicular ferrite and grain boundary ferrite,while that of heat affected zone (HAZ) is a mixture of acicular ferrite and bainitic ferrite microconstituents. The microstructure of the base steel is composed of ferrite and pearlite.The anodic dissolution of X80 pipeline steel in simulated Ku'erle soil solution could be enhanced and the SCC sensitivity increased with the increase of CO2 partial pressure. The SCC mechanism of X80 pipeline is a mixing mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement combined with anodic dissolution,and the hydrogen embrittlement plays a leading role. The higher SCC sensitivity of the weld metal was attributed to the metallurgical transformation,local hardening and residual stress.

  1. Temperature dependent CO2 behavior in microporous 1-D channels of a metal-organic framework with multiple interaction sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwook; Park, Jaehun; Kim, Yung Sam; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2017-01-01

    The MOF with the encapsulated CO2 molecule shows that the CO2 molecule is ligated to the unsaturated Cu(II) sites in the cage using its Lewis basic oxygen atom via an angular η1-(OA) coordination mode and also interacts with Lewis basic nitrogen atoms of the tetrazole ligands using its Lewis acidic carbon atom. Temperature dependent structure analyses indicate the simultaneous weakening of both interactions as temperature increases. Infrared spectroscopy of the MOF confirmed that the CO2 interaction with the framework is temperature dependent. The strength of the interaction is correlated to the separation of the two bending peaks of the bound CO2 rather than the frequency shift of the asymmetric stretching peak from that of free CO2. The encapsulated CO2 in the cage is weakly interacting with the framework at around ambient temperatures and can have proper orientation for wiggling out of the cage through the narrow portals so that the reversible uptake can take place. On the other hand, the CO2 in the cage is restrained at a specific orientation at 195 K since it interacts with the framework strong enough using the multiple interaction sites so that adsorption process is slightly restricted and desorption process is almost clogged.

  2. Large Scale Behavior and Droplet Size Distributions in Crude Oil Jets and Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Murphy, David; Morra, David

    2013-11-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout introduced several million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Injected initially as a turbulent jet containing crude oil and gas, the spill caused formation of a subsurface plume stretching for tens of miles. The behavior of such buoyant multiphase plumes depends on several factors, such as the oil droplet and bubble size distributions, current speed, and ambient stratification. While large droplets quickly rise to the surface, fine ones together with entrained seawater form intrusion layers. Many elements of the physics of droplet formation by an immiscible turbulent jet and their resulting size distribution have not been elucidated, but are known to be significantly influenced by the addition of dispersants, which vary the Weber Number by orders of magnitude. We present experimental high speed visualizations of turbulent jets of sweet petroleum crude oil (MC 252) premixed with Corexit 9500A dispersant at various dispersant to oil ratios. Observations were conducted in a 0.9 m × 0.9 m × 2.5 m towing tank, where large-scale behavior of the jet, both stationary and towed at various speeds to simulate cross-flow, have been recorded at high speed. Preliminary data on oil droplet size and spatial distributions were also measured using a videoscope and pulsed light sheet. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  3. 超级13Cr马氏体不锈钢在CO_2 及H_2 S/CO_2 环境中的腐蚀行为%Corrosion behaviors of super 13Cr martensitic stainless steel under CO_2 and H_2S/CO_2 environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕祥鸿; 赵国仙; 张建兵; 谢凯意

    2010-01-01

    在模拟油田腐蚀环境中,通过高温、高压、CO_2和H_2S/CO_2腐蚀实验及电化学测试,研究超级13Cr马氏体不锈钢的腐蚀行为. 结果表明:在CO_2腐蚀环境中,随着温度的升高,超级13Cr的均匀腐蚀速率呈稍微上升的趋势,点蚀轻微;在H_2S、CO_2共存条件下,超级13Cr的均匀腐蚀速率变化不大,点蚀严重,当Cl~-的质量浓度为160g·L~(-1)时,其最大点蚀深度可达28μm. 超级13Cr的点蚀电位明显高于普通13Cr的点蚀电位,温度升高、Cl~-的质量浓度增大和H_2S气体的存在降低了超级13Cr的点蚀电位,而CO_2对超级13Cr的点蚀电位影响不大;在N_2、CO_2环境中,超级13Cr的回复电位都在钝化区间,且回复电位较高,具有良好的再钝化能力. H_2S气体的存在同样使超级13Cr的回复电位和点蚀电位显著降低.

  4. The behavior of 14C and 13C in estuarine water: Effects of In situ CO2 production and atmospheric exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, Elliott C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of nonconservative sources (inputs) and sinks (outputs) of carbon are indicated by the behavior of Δ14C and δ13C of the total dissolved inorganic carbon (ΣCO2) in San Francisco Bay and Chesapeake Bay. Isotopic distributions and model calculations indicate that in North San Francisco Bay the net CO2 flux to the atmosphere and carbon utilization in the water column are balanced by benthic production. Municipal waste appears to be a dominant source in South San Francisco Bav. In Chesapeake Bay, atmospheric exchange has increased the Δ14C and δ13C in the surface water. Decomposition of organic matter in the water column is indicated to be the dominant source of excess ΣCO2 in the deep water.

  5. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF H2 AND CO2 ADSORPTION BEHAVIOR OF C-MOF-5 AND T-MOF-5: A COMPLEMENTARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arjmandi

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper the cubic and tetragonal structure of MOF-5 were successfully synthesized and characterized by TGA and SEM analysis. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms of C-MOF-5 and T-MOF-5 for H2 and CO2 were measured up to 25 bar at 298 K using a volumetric method. The C-MOF-5 adsorbent synthesized in this study had a 0.107 and 79.9 wt% adsorption capacities at 298 K and 25 bar for H2 and CO2, respectively. T-MOF-5 had a H2 adsorption capacity of 0.122 wt% and CO2 adsorption capacity of 67.6 wt% at 298 K and 25 bar. This behavior was attributed to more ZnO units in the T-MOF-5 structure. The difference between H2 and CO2 adsorption capacity for the cubic and tetragonal structure of MOF-5, suggests that C-MOF-5 and T-MOF-5 are potential adsorbents for the separation of CO2 and H2 from gas mixtures, respectively. Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models were used to correlate the adsorption isotherms. The results showed that, at 298 K, the fit of the Sips isotherm to the experimental datawas better than Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. According to TGA results, the thermal decomposition of C-MOF-5 requires a higher temperature than T-MOF-5.

  6. Application of computer vision in studying fire plume behavior of tilting flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminfar, Amirhessam; Cobian Iñiguez, Jeanette; Pham, Stephanie; Chong, Joey; Burke, Gloria; Weise, David; Princevac, Marko

    2016-11-01

    With the development in computer sciences especially in the field of computer vision, image processing has become an inevitable part of flow visualization. Computer vision can be used to visualize flow structure and to quantify its properties. We used a computer vision algorithm to study fire plume tilting when the fire is interacting with a solid wall. As the fire propagates to the wall the amount of air available for the fire to consume will decrease on the wall side. Therefore, the fire will start tilting towards the wall. Aspen wood was used for the fuel source and various configurations of the fuel were investigated. The plume behavior was captured using a digital camera. In the post processing, the flames were isolated from the image by using edge detection technics, making it possible to develop an algorithm to calculate flame height and flame orientation. Moreover, by using an optical flow algorithm we were able to calculate the speed associated with the edges of the flame which is related to the flame propagation speed and effective vertical velocity of the flame. The results demonstrated that as the size of the flame was increasing, the flames started tilting towards the wall. Leading to the conclusion that there should be a critical area of fire in which the flames start to tilt. Also, the algorithm made it possible to calculate a critical distance in which the flame will start orienting towards the wall

  7. 温度对管线钢H2S/CO2腐蚀行为的影响%Effect of Temperature on H2S/CO2 Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建炜; 章军; 曹建平; 陈晨; 张雷; 丁金慧; 路民旭

    2011-01-01

    Flowing solution environments containing H2S/CO2 were simulated in a high temperature and high pressure autoclave. Corrosion behavior of API-X60 pipeline steels was investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction methodology (XRD). Effects of temperature on corrosion rate and products were discussed. The results show that corrosion rate of X60 steel increases at the beginning and then decreases with temperature increasing, and localized corrosion turns into general corrosion obviously, but pitting is observed at high temperature. Mackinawite (FeS1-x) and FeS composite form as corrosion product in low-temperature condition, with temperature increasing the corrosion products were dominated by lamellar-type Mackinawite crystal and associated with a small amount of Pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) crystal. However, Pyrrhotite crystal becomes more dominated at higher temperature region. Poor adhesion of corrosion scale leads to a lower covering rate at low temperature. Cathodic effects of scale promote the localized corrosion and a faster anode reaction rate and rapid development of pitting will be achieved without blocked effect.%利用高温高压反应釜模拟高含硫气田H2S/CO2共存环境,在流动溶液介质中进行腐蚀实验,辅以SEM和XRD,探讨了温度对API-X60管线钢H2S/CO2腐蚀行为的影响.结果表明:随温度的升高X60钢的腐蚀速率先升高后降低,腐蚀形态由局部腐蚀趋于全面腐蚀,高温区有点蚀倾向.低温区形成的腐蚀产物以马基诺矿型晶体(FeS1-X)和FeS单硫化物为主,随温度升高腐蚀产物以层片状马基诺矿型晶体为主,并出现少量磁黄铁矿型(Fe1-XS)晶体;高温区则以磁黄铁矿型晶体为主.低温区腐蚀产物附着力差导致其覆盖率降低,膜层脱落处的阳极反应速率由于膜层覆盖处的阴极效应而加快,使点蚀迅速发展.

  8. 3种不同铬含量管线钢的CO2腐蚀行为%CO2 Corrosion Behavior of Three kinds of Pipeline Steels with Different Cr Contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 胡志兵; 杨刚; 吴成均

    2013-01-01

    采用失重、扫描电镜(SEM)、电子能谱(EDS)等方法研究了316L,13Cr以及3Cr3三种不同铬含量管线钢材质在模拟集输系统CO2腐蚀环境中腐蚀行为.结果表明,在模拟气、液相腐蚀环境中,316L发生轻度腐蚀,13Cr发生中度腐蚀,3Cr发生极严重腐蚀,13Cr发生了Cl-点蚀.3种材料耐蚀性依次为316L> 13Cr> 3Cr.推荐选用316L内衬复合管作为雅克拉气田集输管线抗腐蚀综合治理材料.%The corrosion behavior of three kinds of pipeline steels with different Cr contents,induding 316L,13Cr and 3Cr,in simulated CO2 gathering system was investiguated by weight loss method,scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) and so on.The results show that in the simulated corrosive environment,316L suffered mild corrosion,13Cr suffered moderate corrosion and 3Cr suffered very severe corrosion and 13Cr suffered Cl-pitting.The corrosion resistance of these three materals is in the following order:316L>13Cr>3Cr.The composite pipe lined with 316L is recommerded as the anti-corrosion material of Yakela gas field gathering and transportation pipelines.

  9. Behavior of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume at two sites on the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitashima, K.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal systems play an important role in the oceanic geochemical cycles of trace metals. High concentration of trace metals of the basalt origin is discharged into the deep sea via the hydrothermal plume. The hydrothermal plume is widely diffused to the ocean by mixing with ambient seawater. The processes of input and removal in the diffusing hydrothermal plume differ by individual hydrothermal systems. In this presentation, the behavior of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume of two sites on the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc is compared. This study was funded by the O`Archaean ParkO_L project of MEXT. The hydrothermal plume samples were taken from the Suiyo Seamount and the southern Mariana Trough (Pika Site). The mini CTDT-RMS mounted twelve 1.2L Niskin bottles was installed onto the manned submersible. And the hydrothermal plume samples were collected with monitoring the anomaly of temperature and turbidity. The samples were immediately filtered in an onboard clean bench. Unfiltered sample for analysis of total (particulate + dissolved) trace metal and filtered sample for analysis of dissolved trace metal were acidified. Trace metals (Al, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn) in the hydrothermal plume samples were analyzed by GFAAS. The ranges of concentration of Al, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn in the hydrothermal plume samples collected from two sites are _`15uM, _`5uM, _`5uM, _` 0.2uM and _`0.6uM, respectively. The particulate phase is predominant form in Al, Fe, Cu and Zn, and Mn shows the superiority of dissolved form. At the Suiyo Seamount, the hydrothermal active site is located in the bottom of caldera. On the other hand, the hydrothermal active site exists on the top of off-ridge seamount at the southern Mariana Trough. The diffusion process of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume to the ocean differed by the topographic factor in two sites. It suggests that trace metals discharged from the vents are hardly diffused to the ocean surmounting the Suiyo Seamount caldera

  10. Development of a Semiautomated Zero Length Column Technique for Carbon Capture Applications:Study of Diffusion Behavior of CO2 in MOFs

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiayi; Brandani, Stefano; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    A semiautomated zero length column (ZLC) technique has been applied to investigate diffusion behavior of CO2 in metal organic framework Co/DOBDC powder and in Ni/DOBDC pellets. For Co/DOBDC crystals, since the system was close to equilibrium control even at the highest flow rate achievable in the ZLC, a lower limit of the micropore diffusivity was estimated, which indicates that for this MOF topology in conditions that are characteristic of practical carbon capture applications the process wo...

  11. CO2 Sequestration short course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  12. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  13. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  14. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  15. Comparative study on CO2 corrosion behavior of N80,P110,X52 and 13Cr pipe lines in simulated stratum water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the carbon dioxide (CO2) corrosion behavior of carbon steel and its influence on petroleum development (including drilling,production and transportation) in the Daqing Oilfield,CO2 corrosion behaviors of N80,P110,X52 and 13Cr pipe lines in simulated solution at high temperature and high pressure condition are investigated by dynamic corrosion experiments,scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses.Results show that the corrosion rate of all pipe lines increases quickly when CO2 partial pressure increases from 0.5 to 1.5 MPa,but it slows down when CO2 partial pressure further increases from 1.5 to 4.5 MPa,during which localized corrosion is prevailing.When the experimental temperature ranges from 60 to 120°C,localized corrosion prevails.The corrosion rate of all pipe lines decreases sharply when the temperature changes from 60 to 100°C,and it becomes stable after the temperature is higher than 100°C.When the flow rate is in the range of 0–1.5 m/s,the corrosion rate of sample X52 remains unchanged,but localized corrosion gradually becomes very serious when the flow rate further increases.By analyzing the corrosion product scales of sample 13Cr,some remarkable phenomena are observed.At the temperature range of 60–100°C,the corrosion product scales are loose and thick,but become very compact when the temperature increases above 100°C.In the later case,localized corrosion is prevailing.The main components of the corrosion product scales are FeCO3 and Cr2O3.

  16. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part II: Impact of Geological CO2 Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Some key points still prevent the full development of geological carbon sequestration in underground formations, especially concerning the assessment of the integrity of such storage. Indeed, the consequences of gas injection on chemistry and petrophysical properties are still much discussed in the scientific community, and are still not well known at either laboratory or field scale. In this article, the results of an experimental study about the mobilization of Trace Elements (TE during CO2 injection in a reservoir are presented. The experimental conditions range from typical storage formation conditions (90 bar, supercritical CO2 to shallower conditions (60 and 30 bar, CO2 as gas phase, and consider the dissolution of the two carbonates, coupled with the sorption of an initial concentration of 10−5 M of Zn(II, and the consequent release in solution of Mn(II and Sr(II. The investigation goes beyond the sole behavior of TE in the storage conditions: it presents the specific behavior of each element with respect to the pressure and the natural carbonate considered, showing that different equilibrium concentrations are to be expected if a fluid with a given concentration of TE leaks to an upper formation. Even though sorption is evidenced, it does not balance the amount of TE released by the dissolution process. The increase in porosity is clearly evidenced as a linear function of the CO2 pressure imposed for the St-Emilion carbonate. For the Lavoux carbonate, this trend is not confirmed by the 90 bar experiment. A preferential dissolution of the bigger family of pores from the preexisting porosity is observed in one of the samples (Lavoux carbonate while the second one (St-Emilion carbonate presents a newly-formed family of pores. Both reacted samples evidence that the pore network evolves toward a tubular network type.

  17. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  18. Influence of methane in CO2 transport and storage for CCS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Sofía T; Rivas, Clara; Fernández, Javier; Artal, Manuela; Velasco, Inmaculada

    2012-12-04

    CO(2) Capture and Storage (CCS) is a good strategy to mitigate levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases. The type and quantity of impurities influence the properties and behavior of the anthropogenic CO(2), and so must be considered in the design and operation of CCS technology facilities. Their study is necessary for CO(2) transport and storage, and to develop theoretical models for specific engineering applications to CCS technology. In this work we determined the influence of CH(4), an important impurity of anthropogenic CO(2), within different steps of CCS technology: transport, injection, and geological storage. For this, we obtained new pressure-density-temperature (PρT) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) experimental data for six CO(2) + CH(4) mixtures at compositions which represent emissions from the main sources in the European Union and United States. The P and T ranges studied are within those estimated for CO(2) pipelines and geological storage sites. From these data we evaluated the minimal pressures for transport, regarding the density and pipeline's capacity requirements, and values for the solubility parameter of the mixtures, a factor which governs the solubility of substances present in the reservoir before injection. We concluded that the presence of CH(4) reduces the storage capacity and increases the buoyancy of the CO(2) plume, which diminishes the efficiency of solubility and residual trapping of CO(2), and reduces the injectivity into geological formations.

  19. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels.

  20. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  1. CO2 laser modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  2. The difficulty of measuring the absorption of scattered sunlight by H2O and CO2 in volcanic plumes: A comment on Pering et al. “A novel and inexpensive method for measuring volcanic plume water fluxes at high temporal resolution,” Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 146

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In their recent study, Pering et al. (2017) presented a novel method for measuring volcanic water vapor fluxes. Their method is based on imaging volcanic gas and aerosol plumes using a camera sensitive to the near-infrared (NIR) absorption of water vapor. The imaging data are empirically calibrated by comparison with in situ water measurements made within the plumes. Though the presented method may give reasonable results over short time scales, the authors fail to recognize the sensitivity of the technique to light scattering on aerosols within the plume. In fact, the signals measured by Pering et al. are not related to the absorption of NIR radiation by water vapor within the plume. Instead, the measured signals are most likely caused by a change in the effective light path of the detected radiation through the atmospheric background water vapor column. Therefore, their method is actually based on establishing an empirical relationship between in-plume scattering efficiency and plume water content. Since this relationship is sensitive to plume aerosol abundance and numerous environmental factors, the method will only yield accurate results if it is calibrated very frequently using other measurement techniques.

  3. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  4. Effects of Sodium Thiosulfate and Sodium Sulfide on the Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel in an MDEA-Based CO2 Capture Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emori, W.; Jiang, S. L.; Duan, D. L.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of carbon steel has been tested in the presence of sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfide in an MDEA-based CO2 capture system using electrochemical methods, weight loss measurements and surface analysis. The results of electrochemical measurements revealed that both thiosulfate and sulfide showed corrosion resistance properties to carbon steel corrosion. The corrosion resistance for the system with thiosulfate increased with concentration, while the system with sulfide yielded better corrosion resistance to carbon steel at lower concentrations as increase in sulfide concentration decreased the corrosion resistance. The corrosion inhibition behaviors for both systems at 0.05 M salt concentrations were confirmed by weight loss measurement, and the solution with sodium sulfide exhibited a better inhibition with time.

  5. Effects of Sodium Thiosulfate and Sodium Sulfide on the Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel in an MDEA-Based CO2 Capture Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emori, W.; Jiang, S. L.; Duan, D. L.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of carbon steel has been tested in the presence of sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfide in an MDEA-based CO2 capture system using electrochemical methods, weight loss measurements and surface analysis. The results of electrochemical measurements revealed that both thiosulfate and sulfide showed corrosion resistance properties to carbon steel corrosion. The corrosion resistance for the system with thiosulfate increased with concentration, while the system with sulfide yielded better corrosion resistance to carbon steel at lower concentrations as increase in sulfide concentration decreased the corrosion resistance. The corrosion inhibition behaviors for both systems at 0.05 M salt concentrations were confirmed by weight loss measurement, and the solution with sodium sulfide exhibited a better inhibition with time.

  6. Sorption Behavior of Compressed CO2 and CH4 on Ultrathin Hybrid Poly(POSS-imide) Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, Michiel; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wiese, M.; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of compressed gases into thin polymeric films is essential for applications including gas sensors and membrane based gas separation. For glassy polymers, the sorption behavior is dependent on the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. The uptake of molecules by a polymer is generally accompa

  7. Sorption Behavior of Compressed CO2 and CH4 on Ultrathin Hybrid Poly(POSS-imide) Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, M.J.T.; Ogieglo, W.; Wiese, M.; Wessling, M.; Nijmeijer, A.; Benes, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of compressed gases into thin polymeric films is essential for applications including gas sensors and membrane based gas separation. For glassy polymers, the sorption behavior is dependent on the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. The uptake of molecules by a polymer is generally accompa

  8. Treatment of tooth fracture by medium energy CO2 laser and DP-bioactive glass paste: thermal behavior and phase transformation of human tooth enamel and dentin after irradiation by CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C P; Lee, B S; Kok, S H; Lan, W H; Tseng, Y C; Lin, F H

    2000-06-01

    Acute trauma or trauma associated with occlusal disharmony can produce tooth crack or fracture. Although several methods are proposed to treat the defect, however, the prognosis is generally poor. If the fusion of a tooth fracture by laser is possible it will offer an alternative to extraction or at least serve as an adjunctive treatment in the reconstruction. The responses of soft tissues to lasers of different wavelengths are fairly well known, but the reactions of hard tissues are still to be understood. The purpose of this research was to study the feasibility of using a medium energy continuous-wave CO(2) laser and a low melting-point bioactive glass to fuse or bridge tooth fractures. The present report is focused on the first part of the research, the analysis of changes in laser-irradiated human tooth enamel/dentin by means of X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier-transforming infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric analysis (DTA/TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After CO(2) laser irradiation, there were no marked changes in the X-ray diffraction pattern of the enamel when compared to that before laser treatment. However, a small peak belonging to alpha-TCP appeared at the position of 2theta=30.78 degrees C. After being treated with CO(2) laser, the dentin showed much sharper peaks on the diffraction patterns because of grain growth and better crystallinity. alpha-TCP and beta-TCP were identified after laser treatment. In the FTIR analysis, an HPO(4)(-2) absorption band was noted before laser treatment disappeared after the irradiation. No significant change in the absorption band of HPO(4)(-2) was found on the FTIR curves of enamel after laser treatment. The results of DTA/TGA indicated that loss of water and organic materials occurred in both enamel and dentin after laser treatment. Under SEM, melting and resolidification occurred in both enamel and dentin by medium energy of CO(2) laser. This implies that

  9. 温度对超级13Cr马氏体不锈钢CO2腐蚀行为的影响%Effect of Temperature on CO2 Corrosion Behavior of Super 13Cr Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张双双; 赵国仙; 刘艳朝; 王立翀

    2013-01-01

    在模拟某油田腐蚀环境中,采用高温高压CO2腐蚀试验及SEM、EDS和XPS等测试手段,研究温度对超级13Cr马氏体不锈钢CO2腐蚀行为的影响.结果表明,在气、液两相环境下,随温度升高,超级13Cr马氏体不锈钢的均匀腐蚀速率增大,局部腐蚀速率呈现上升的趋势;随温度升高,点蚀敏感性增强;表面钝化膜主要成分是Cr2O3.

  10. Stable large-scale CO2 storage in defiance of an energy system based on renewable energy - Modelling the impact of varying CO2 injection rates on reservoir behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannach, Andreas; Hauer, Rene; Martin, Streibel; Stienstra, Gerard; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The IPCC Report 2014 strengthens the need for CO2 storage as part of CCS or BECCS to reach ambitious climate goals despite growing energy demand in the future. The further expansion of renewable energy sources is a second major pillar. As it is today in Germany the weather becomes the controlling factor for electricity production by fossil fuelled power plants which lead to significant fluctuations of CO2-emissions which can be traced in injection rates if the CO2 were captured and stored. To analyse the impact of such changing injection rates on a CO2 storage reservoir. two reservoir simulation models are applied: a. An (smaller) reservoir model approved by gas storage activities for decades, to investigate the dynamic effects in the early stage of storage filling (initial aquifer displacement). b. An anticline structure big enough to accommodate a total amount of ≥ 100 Mega tons CO2 to investigate the dynamic effects for the entire operational life time of the storage under particular consideration of very high filling levels (highest aquifer compression). Therefore a reservoir model was generated. The defined yearly injection rate schedule is based on a study performed on behalf of IZ Klima (DNV GL, 2014). According to this study the exclusive consideration of a pool of coal-fired power plants causes the most intensive dynamically changing CO2 emissions and hence accounts for variations of a system which includes industry driven CO2 production. Besides short-term changes (daily & weekly cycles) seasonal influences are also taken into account. Simulation runs cover a variation of injection points (well locations at the top vs. locations at the flank of the structure) and some other largely unknown reservoir parameters as aquifer size and aquifer mobility. Simulation of a 20 year storage operation is followed by a post-operational shut-in phase which covers approximately 500 years to assess possible effects of changing injection rates on the long-term reservoir

  11. 超临界CO_2介质染色的分散染料拼色性能%Combination dyeing behavior of disperse dyes in supercriticai CO_2 dyeing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左津梁; 黄钢; 邢彦军; 戴瑾瑾

    2010-01-01

    研究了分散染料三原色(C.I.分散橙30,C.I.分散蓝79和C.I.分散红167)在超临界CO_2流体介质中对涤纶染色的拼色性能.结果表明,三只染料在超临界CO_2染色中的上染速率与水浴染色基本一致,提升力与水浴染色相似,具有良好的配伍性.在超临界CO_2的拼色染色中,该三原色染料对纤维的上染量略小于各染料单独染色时的上染量,染料之间会相互影响,在Kubelka-Munk单常数理论方程中引入纠正因数,可以减小理论K/S值和实测K/S值的偏差.

  12. 高温高压CO2环境介质中X60钢的腐蚀%Corrosion Behavior of X60 Steel in CO2 Environment at High Temperature and High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琦; 贾建刚; 南雪丽; 赵红顺; 孟倩

    2008-01-01

    利用高温高压釜,通过失重法、SEM、XRD以及电子探针微观结构分析等方法,研究了X60钢在不同高温条件下及2MPa分压的饱和CO2的环境介质中的腐蚀行为.结果表明:在90℃、120℃、150℃温度下,X60钢发生了严重的CO2腐蚀,表现出高的腐蚀速率,且腐蚀速率随着温度的升高呈先上升再下降的趋势,120℃时最大,表面腐蚀产物膜的主要成分为Fe3C和FeCO3.腐蚀过程显示局部腐蚀特征,为不同程度的点蚀和条状腐蚀.研究发现,Clˉ为点蚀的"激发剂",促进了点蚀的发生和发展.CO2腐蚀受温度、腐蚀产物膜、钢的显微组织、Clˉ等影响,是各种因素相互作用的结果.

  13. Study On H_2S/CO_2 Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Steel in Wet Gas%管线钢在湿气介质中的H_2S/CO_2腐蚀行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建炜; 张雷; 丁睿明; 路民旭

    2008-01-01

    利用高温高压反应釜模拟高含硫气田H_2S/CO_2共存环境,在流动湿H_2S/CO_2介质中进行腐蚀实验,辅以SEM,EDS和XRD,探讨了湿气介质中高H_2S分压对API-X52和API-X60管线钢H_2S/CO_2腐蚀行为的影响.两种钢在湿气介质中的腐蚀速率均随H_2S分压的升高而增加,X60腐蚀速率略高于X52,随着H_2S分压由0.15MPa增至2.0MPa,腐蚀形态由全面腐蚀趋向局部腐蚀,腐蚀过程由H_2S控制,腐蚀产物以四方晶系的FeS_(1-x)(Mackinawite)为主.X60钢表面出现氢鼓泡,内部发生氢致开裂.

  14. CO2NNIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a system for calculating the personalized annual fuel consumption and CO2 emissions from transportation. The system, named CO2NNIE, estimates the fuel consumption on the fastest route between the frequent destinations of the user. The travel time and fuel consumption estimated are based......% of the actual fuel consumption (4.6% deviation on average). We conclude, that the system provides new detailed information on CO2 emissions and fuel consumption for any make and model....

  15. Wearable CO2 sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Radu, Tanja; Fay, Cormac; Lau, King-Tong; Waite, Rhys; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    High concentrations of CO2 may develop particularly in the closed spaces during fires and can endanger the health of emergency personnel by causing serious physiological effects. The proposed prototype provides real-time continuous monitoring of CO2 in a wearable configuration sensing platform. A commercially available electrochemical CO2 sensor was selected due to its selectivity, sensitivity and low power demand. This was integrated onto an electronics platform that performed signal capture...

  16. 3Cr钢和13Cr钢在高矿化度CO2环境中的腐蚀行为%Corrosion Behavior of 3Cr and 13Cr in High Salinity Brine and CO2 Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱培珂; 邓金根; 闫伟; 李明洋; 吴山; 彭程

    2014-01-01

    为了预测油井管钢在高矿化度、含CO2的储层环境中可能发生的腐蚀,为该储层推荐在开发周期内安全经济的材质,采用高温高压反应釜研究了3Cr钢和13Cr钢在模拟储层环境中的腐蚀行为,利用X射线衍射仪(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、能量色散X射线能谱(EDS)分析了3Cr钢和13Cr钢的腐蚀产物膜特征.从腐蚀速率、清理腐蚀产物后试样的表观特征、腐蚀产物的表面形貌、横截面腐蚀试样形貌和腐蚀产物化学成分方面探讨了3Cr钢和13Cr钢在CO2环境中的腐蚀特征随温度和含水率的变化规律及反应时间对其的影响.结果表明,3Cr钢在CO2分压为0.2 MPa,Cl-含量139 552mg/L的环境中会发生极严重腐蚀,且试样表面产物膜在微观上分布不均匀,存在局部不完整;13Cr钢发生轻度腐蚀,在所测试样中未观测到点蚀,即3Cr钢不适用于该高矿化度CO2环境而13Cr钢能够满足要求.

  17. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  18. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  19. Aerosol size distribution in a coagulating plume: Analytical behavior and modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Richard P.; Yu, Fangqun

    In a previous paper (Turco and Yu, 1997), a series of analytical solutions were derived for the problem of aerosol coagulation in an expanding plume, as from a jet engine. Those solutions were shown to depend on a single dimensionless time-dependent number, NT, which is related to the particle coagulation kernel and the plume volume. Here, we derive a new analytical expression that describes the particle size distribution in an expanding plume in terms of NT. We show how this solution can be extended to include the effects of soot particles on the evolving volatile sulfuric acid aerosols in an aircraft wake. Our solutions apply primarily to cases where changes in the size distribution—beyond an initial period encompassing emission and prompt nucleation/condensation—is controlled mainly by coagulation. The analytical size distributions allow most of the important properties of an evolving aerosol population—mean size, number greater than a minimum size, surface area density, size dependent reactivities, and optical properties—to be estimated objectively. We have applied our analytical solution to evaluate errors associated with numerical diffusion in a detailed microphysical code, and demonstrate that, if care is not exercised in solving the coagulation equation, substantial errors can result in the predictions at large particle sizes. This effect is particularly important when comparisons between models and field observations are carried out. The analytical expressions derived here can also be employed to initialize models that do not resolve individual aircraft plumes, by providing a simple means for parameterizing the initial aerosol properties after an appropriate mixing time.

  20. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  1. 管线钢在含H2S/CO2的NaCl环境中的腐蚀行为%Corrosion Behaviors of Pipeline Steel in NaCI Solutions Containing H2S and CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 吴明; 陈旭; 谢飞; 马成; 孙海宁

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of an oil pipeline steel in NaCI solutions coutaining carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were studied by electrochemical experiments and slow strain rate test(SSRT). The results of electrochemical experiments of 15 #steel showed a state of active dissolution without active-passive transition, and the corrosion rate increased as the following order: in NaC1 solution〈 in NaC1-CO2 solution〈 in NaC1-CO2-H2S solution 〈in NaCl- H2 S solution, SSRT showed that the reduction in area decreased as the following order: in NaC1 2〉 in NaC1-CO2 〉 in NaC1-CO2-H2S 2〉 in NaC1-H2S solution. But the brittleness and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity increased gradually under the same conditions.%采用动电位极化方法和慢应变速率拉伸试验(SSRT)研究了15#钢在含H2S/CO2的NaCl环境中的腐蚀行为。结果表明,15#钢在NaCl溶液、NaCl-CO2溶液、NaCl-CO2-H2S溶液和NaCl-H2S溶液中的电化学行为均表现出活化溶解状态,而没有出现活化-钝化转变区,腐蚀速率依次逐渐增大;15#钢在以上四种溶液中的断面收缩率依次减小,脆性系数依次增大,应力腐蚀开裂敏感性依次增加。

  2. Negative chemical pressure effects induced by Y substitution for Ca on the `exotic' magnetic behavior of the spin-chain compound, Ca3Co2O6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rayaprol; E V Sampathkumaran

    2005-09-01

    The magnetic behavior of a solid solution, Ca3-YCo2O6, based on the `exotic' spin-chain compound, Ca3Co2O6, crystallizing in K4CdCl6-derived rhombohedral structure is investigated. Among the compositions investigated ( = 0.0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0), single-phase formation persists up to = 0.75, with the elongation of the -axis. The present investigations reveal that the temperature at which the `so-called' `partially disordered antiferromagnetic structure' sets in (which occurs at 24 K for the parent compound, = 0.0) undergoes gradual reduction with the substitution of Y for Ca, attaining the value of about 2.2 K for the nominal = 1.0. The trend observed in this characteristic temperature is opposite to that reported under external pressure, thereby establishing that Y substitution exerts negative chemical pressure. Anomalous steps observed in the isothermal magnetization at very low temperatures (around 2 K) for = 0.0, which have been proposed to arise from `quantum tunneling effects' are found to vanish by a small substitution ( = 0.3) of Y for Ca. Systematics in AC and DC magnetic susceptibility behavior with Y substitution for Ca have also been probed. We believe that the present results involving the expansion of chain length without disrupting the magnetic chain may be useful to the overall understanding of the novel magnetism of the parent compound.

  3. Density-driven enhanced dissolution of injected CO2 during long-term CO2 geological storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations is increasingly seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, possible leakage of injected CO2 from the storage formation through vertical pathways such as fractures, faults and abandoned wells is a huge challenge for CO2 geological storage projects. Thus, the density-driven fluid flow as a process that can accelerate the phase change of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase is receiving more and more attention. In this paper, we performed higher-resolution reactive transport simulations to investigate the possible density-driven fluid flow process under the ‘real’ condition of CO2 injection and storage. Simulation results indicated that during CO2 injection and geological storage in deep saline formations, the higher-density CO2-saturated aqueous phase within the lower CO2 gas plume migrates downward and moves horizontally along the bottom of the formation, and the higher-density fingers within the upper gas plume propagate downward. These density-driven fluid flow processes can significantly enhance the phase transition of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase, consequently enhancing the effective storage capacity and long-term storage security of injected CO2 in saline formations.

  4. CO2-Water-Rock Wettability: Variability, Influencing Factors, and Implications for CO2 Geostorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-05-16

    Carbon geosequestration (CGS) has been identified as a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and thus significantly mitigate climate change. In CGS, CO2 is captured from large point-source emitters (e.g., coal fired power stations), purified, and injected deep underground into geological formations for disposal. However, the CO2 has a lower density than the resident formation brine and thus migrates upward due to buoyancy forces. To prevent the CO2 from leaking back to the surface, four trapping mechanisms are used: (1) structural trapping (where a tight caprock acts as a seal barrier through which the CO2 cannot percolate), (2) residual trapping (where the CO2 plume is split into many micrometer-sized bubbles, which are immobilized by capillary forces in the pore network of the rock), (3) dissolution trapping (where CO2 dissolves in the formation brine and sinks deep into the reservoir due to a slight increase in brine density), and (4) mineral trapping (where the CO2 introduced into the subsurface chemically reacts with the formation brine or reservoir rock or both to form solid precipitates). The efficiency of these trapping mechanisms and the movement of CO2 through the rock are strongly influenced by the CO2-brine-rock wettability (mainly due to the small capillary-like pores in the rock which form a complex network), and it is thus of key importance to rigorously understand CO2-wettability. In this context, a substantial number of experiments have been conducted from which several conclusions can be drawn: of prime importance is the rock surface chemistry, and hydrophilic surfaces are water-wet while hydrophobic surfaces are CO2-wet. Note that CO2-wet surfaces dramatically reduce CO2 storage capacities. Furthermore, increasing pressure, salinity, or dissolved ion valency increases CO2-wettability, while the effect of temperature is not well understood. Indeed theoretical understanding of CO2-wettability and the ability to

  5. Dilution-triggered SMM behavior under zero field in a luminescent Zn2Dy2 tetranuclear complex incorporating carbonato-bridging ligands derived from atmospheric CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titos-Padilla, Silvia; Ruiz, José; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Brechin, Euan K; Wersndorfer, Wolfgang; Lloret, Francesc; Colacio, Enrique

    2013-08-19

    The synthesis, structure, magnetic, and luminescence properties of the Zn2Dy2 tetranuclear complex of formula {(μ3-CO3)2[Zn(μ-L)Dy(NO3)]2}·4CH3OH (1), where H2L is the compartmental ligand N,N',N″-trimethyl-N,N″-bis(2-hydroxy-3-methoxy-5-methylbenzyl)diethylenetriamine, are reported. The carbonate anions that bridge two Zn(μ-L)Dy units come from the atmospheric CO2 fixation in a basic medium. Fast quantum tunneling relaxation of the magnetization (QTM) is very effective in this compound, so that single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior is only observed in the presence of an applied dc field of 1000 Oe, which is able to partly suppress the QTM relaxation process. At variance, a 1:10 Dy:Y magnetic diluted sample, namely, 1', exhibits SMM behavior at zero applied direct-current (dc) field with about 3 times higher thermal energy barrier than that in 1 (U(eff) = 68 K), thus demonstrating the important role of intermolecular dipolar interactions in favoring the fast QTM relaxation process. When a dc field of 1000 Oe is applied to 1', the QTM is almost fully suppressed, the reversal of the magnetization slightly slows, and U(eff) increases to 78 K. The dilution results combined with micro-SQUID magnetization measurements clearly indicate that the SMM behavior comes from single-ion relaxation of the Dy(3+) ions. Analysis of the relaxation data points out that a Raman relaxation process could significantly affect the Orbach relaxation process, reducing the thermal energy barrier U(eff) for slow relaxation of the magnetization.

  6. Frictional and sealing behavior of simulated anhydrite fault gouge : Effects of CO2 and implications for fault stability and caprock integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluymakers, A.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    To limit climate change, humanity needs to limit atmospheric CO2 concentrations, hence reduce CO2 emissions. An attractive option to do this involves capture at industrial sources followed by storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs. In such reservoir systems, faults cutting the topseal are consid

  7. 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring of injected CO2 in a shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph A. J.A.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5...... inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface and glacial sands below 5 m depth. Time-lapse inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can follow the CO2 plume as it spreads and moves with the groundwater...

  8. CO2-strategier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    I 2007 henvendte Lyngby-Taarbæk kommunens Agenda 21 koordinator sig til Videnskabsbutikken og spurgte om der var interesse for at samarbejde om CO2-strategier. Da Videnskabsbutikken DTU er en åben dør til DTU for borgerne og deres organisationer, foreslog Videnskabsbutikken DTU at Danmarks...... Naturfredningsforening’s lokalkomité for Lyngby blev en del af samarbejdet for at få borgerne i kommunen involveret i arbejdet med at udvikle strategier for reduktion af CO2. Siden sommeren 2007 har Videnskabsbutikken DTU, Lyngby-Taarbæk kommune og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening i Lyngby-Taarbæk samarbejdet om analyse...... og innovation i forhold til CO2-strategier....

  9. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF H2 AND CO2 ADSORPTION BEHAVIOR OF C-MOF-5 AND T-MOF-5: A COMPLEMENTARY STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Arjmandi,M.; Pakizeh,M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this paper the cubic and tetragonal structure of MOF-5 were successfully synthesized and characterized by TGA and SEM analysis. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms of C-MOF-5 and T-MOF-5 for H2 and CO2 were measured up to 25 bar at 298 K using a volumetric method. The C-MOF-5 adsorbent synthesized in this study had a 0.107 and 79.9 wt% adsorption capacities at 298 K and 25 bar for H2 and CO2, respectively. T-MOF-5 had a H2 adsorption capacity of 0.122 wt% and CO2 adsorption capacity ...

  10. 温度对13Cr不锈钢在高 CO2 分压环境中腐蚀行为的影响%Effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of 13Cr stainless steel under a high CO2 partial pressure environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大朋; 张雷; 石凤仙; 王竹; 李辉; 路民旭

    2015-01-01

    通过高温高压电化学测试,获得不同实验温度下13Cr不锈钢的循环伏安曲线、交流阻抗谱和Mott-Schottky曲线,结合ZSIMPWIN软件和扫描电子显微镜分析,研究高温高CO2 分压环境下,温度对13Cr不锈钢腐蚀电化学行为的影响. 在高温高CO2 分压环境下,随温度升高,13Cr不锈钢发生腐蚀的倾向增加,表面钝化膜稳定性下降,点蚀敏感度增加.%This article is focused on the effect of temperature on the corrosion electrochemical behavior of 13Cr martensitic stain-less steel under a high temperature and high CO2 partial pressure environment. Cyclic polarization ( CP) measurements, electrochemi-cal impedance spectroscopy ( EIS ) , Mott- Schottky plot measurements, ZSIMPWIN software, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used in this study. The results show that the stability of passive films formed on the 13Cr stainless steel surface decreases with increasing temperature under a high temperature and high CO2 partial pressure environment. This leads to increases in the corro-sion rate and pitting susceptibility.

  11. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  12. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  13. 油管钢在高温高压H2S/CO2环境中的二次腐蚀行为研究%Research on Second Corrosion Behavior of Oil Tube Steel in High Temperature and High Pressure Environments Containing H2S/CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕铸; 钱进森; 李振东; 刘建彬; 李小波

    2014-01-01

    利用美国CORTEST公司高温高压反应釜模拟高含S油气田H2S/CO2腐蚀环境,在流动高矿化度饱和H2S/CO2介质中进行试验,辅以SEM、 XRD、动电位扫描及交流阻抗等表面分析和电化学技术,探讨了油管钢在高温高压H2S/CO2环境中的二次腐蚀行为。结果表明,普通N80油管钢单一CO2腐蚀速率较高,为1.89 mm/a;先CO2腐蚀后H2S腐蚀,腐蚀速率减小为1.38 mm/a,材料的腐蚀类型表现出严重的局部腐蚀,先生成的FeCO3膜转变为FeS膜,转变过程中腐蚀产物膜的晶格发生畸变,导致腐蚀产物膜分层、疏松且容易脱落;先H2S腐蚀后再CO2腐蚀,腐蚀速率明显减小至0.27 mm/a,腐蚀产物膜未发生转变,通过腐蚀产物膜电化学测试分析, FeCO3膜对基体的保护性差,而FeS膜对基体的保护性相对较好。%H2S/CO2 corrosion environments in oil and gas field containing rich S were simulated in a high temperature and high pressure autoclave manufactured by USA Cortest Company,and tests were conducted in flowing medium with high salinity. Second corrosion behavior of oil tube steel in high temperature and high pressure H2S/CO2 corrosion environments was analyzed and discussed by the following technologies,such as SEM,XRD,dynamic potential scanning,AC impedance and electrochemical techniques. The results showed that corrosion rate of N80 oil tube steel was very high,up to 1.89 mm/a. when solution immersion environment contain only CO2. If H2S corrosion was conducted after CO2 corrosion, the corrosion rate reduced to 1.38 mm/a. The corrosion type showed distinct characteristic of local corrosion. FeCO3 corrosion film formed firstly would be transformed to FeS film,in this process,aberration of crystal lattice happened,which would result in delamination and loosen of film. If CO2 corrosion was conducted after H2S corrosion, the corrosion rate decreased a lot,up to 0.27 mm/a, FeS film formed firstly would not

  14. Stochastic Modeling of CO2 Migrations and Chemical Reactions in Deep Saline Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, C.; Lee, I.; Lin, C.

    2013-12-01

    correlation lengths in a Gaussian covariance model are varied in the MCS and the uncertainty of the CO2 and other chemical concentrations are evaluated based on 144 random realizations. In this study a constant injection rate of100Mt/year supercritical CO2 is applied in the bottom of CF. The continuous injection time is 20 years and the uncertainty results are evaluated at 100 years. By comparing with the case without small-scale variability simulation results show that the CO2 plume sizes in the horizontal direction increase from tens of meters to hundreds of meters when the variances of small-scale variability are varied from 1.0 to 4.0. The changes of correlation lengths (i.e., from 100m, 200m, to 400m) show small contribution on the size increases of CO2 plumes. Other uncertainties of chemical concentrations show behaviors similar to the CO2 plume patterns.

  15. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ammoura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical

  16. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH) at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical transport, or in

  17. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    through emission plumes, providing momentary cross sections. While GOSAT measured approximately circular ~10.5km diameter single-shot footprints, OCO-2 can provide hundreds more soundings per area at single kilometer scale footprint resolution. In this contribution, we summarize the approach and progress made over the past 5 years of CO2 satellite observations, and their application toward detecting volcanic CO2 eruption precursors. © California Institute of Technology

  18. 二氧化碳羽流地热系统水岩气相互作用:以松辽盆地泉头组为例%Water-Rock-Gas Interaction of CO2-Plume Geothermal System in Quantou Formation of Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石岩; 冯波; 许天福; 王福刚; 封官宏; 田海龙; 雷宏武

    2014-01-01

    二氧化碳羽流地热系统(CPGS)是利用 CO2地质储存场地进行地热能开发的一种工程技术,也是整合 CO2减排与开发深部地热资源的理想方式。但伴随着对深部地热的提取,注入储层的超临界 CO2使深部咸水的 pH 值降低,导致周围岩体产生溶解和沉淀,从而引起孔隙度、渗透率等地层物性的变化,最终改变系统的生产能力和净热提取效率。以松辽盆地泉头组为目标储层,采用室内实验、数值模拟等技术手段,通过实验和数值计算结果的对比,揭示系统水岩气相互作用对热储矿物组分的改变。研究结果显示:实验过程中矿物溶解对温度和盐度变化较为敏感,而受压力影响较小;在实验和模拟时间内发生溶解的矿物主要是长石类矿物,方解石在反应后全部溶解;石英、伊利石和高岭石的矿物组分体积分数有所增加,并有少量菱铁矿生成。%CO2 plume geothermal systems (CPGS )is an engineering technology for integrating carbon geological storage with geothermal energy development.When the supercritical CO2 is injected into a deep reservoir,the pH of reservoir water will be decreased.The surrounding rock will be dissolved or precipitated,so the porosity and permeability of the formation will also be changed.Based on a potential geothermal reservoir of Quantou Formation of Songliao basin,experiment and numerical simulation are used to investigate water-rock-gas chemical interaction.The research results show that the experimental process is more sensitive to temperature change,and less affected by pressure.This study will provide a theoretical basis and technical support to future CPGS project in China.

  19. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  20. CO2 Interaction with Geomaterials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, V.; Howard, B. H.; Lynn, R. J.; Warzinski, R. P.; Hur, T.; Myshakin, E. M.; Lopano, C. L.; Voora, V. K.; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Jordan, K. D.; Cygan, R. T.; Guthrie, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

  1. 胺法脱碳系统动态特性及控制策略研究%Investigation of the Dynamic Behavior and Control Strategies for a CO2 Capture System Using Amine Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小飞; 王淑娟; 陈昌和

    2014-01-01

    The amine-based CO2 capture system is an inherently dynamic system that is affected by the load variations in the up-stream power plant due to fluctuations in electricity demand. However, most of researches in this field are based on the steady state operation model, little dynamic data and analysis of the dynamic behavior of a CO2 capture system are available in open literatures. A dynamic model of amine-based CO2 capture system was developed with Aspen Dynamics software based on a typical coal fired power plant. Dynamic responses of the amine-based CO2 capture system with basic control structure were studied when step change in reboiler heat duty, flue gas flowrate and CO2 composition. The results show that the CO2 removal efficiency is influenced by the flue gas disturbances. The CO2 removal target is guaranteed by two proportional control strategies, and operating parameters can be adjusted according to the changes of the flowrate and CO2 composition in flue gas. Dynamic simulations show that the CO2 capture system can achieve removal targets with the proposed control strategies.%由于电力需求的波动,受上游碳捕集电厂负荷变化的影响,胺法脱碳系统本质上是一个动态系统。但绝大多数关于胺法脱碳系统的研究是基于稳态运行方式展开的,对碳捕集系统动态研究还处于起步阶段。文中基于一个典型的燃煤电厂胺法脱碳装置,应用Aspen Dynamics软件建立胺法脱碳系统动态模型。研究了带基本控制结构胺法脱碳系统在再沸器热功率、烟气流量及烟气组分阶跃变化时,吸收和再生过程的动态响应特性。结果表明,在阶跃扰动下,CO2脱除率发生阶跃变化。为了实现固定的 CO2脱除率,提出2种比例控制策略,根据烟气处理量及组分浓度变化,分别通过调节贫液流量及贫液CO2担载量来保持固定的CO2脱除率。动态分析表明,在烟气流量及组分阶跃变化时,2

  2. Effects of Capillary Pressure on Multiphase Flow during CO2 Injection in Saline Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau J.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on supercritical CO2 injection into saline aquifer, in particular its capillarity’s effects on the plume migration, reservoir pressure alteration and CO2 flux density. The numerical method used to solve the incompressible two-phase flow equations is based on the mimetic method, which conserves the mass and fluxes simultaneously. The investigation showed that exclusion of capillarity can greatly underestimate the CO2 plume migration and resulted in distinctive reservoir pressure distribution. It is found that capillarity showed no significant effect on the flux intensity of CO2.

  3. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh;

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, western Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for detection of small electrical conductivity (EC) changes during the first 2...... the migration of a CO2 plume consist of buoyancy of gaseous CO2, local heterogeneity, groundwater flow and external pressure exerted by the injector. The CO2 plume at the Vrøgum site migrated mostly upward due to buoyancy and it also skewed toward northeastern region by overcoming local groundwater flow...

  4. The effect of O2 and CO2 on the dive behavior and heart rate of lesser scaup ducks (Aythya affinis): quantification of the critical PaO2 that initiates a diving bradycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Kim A; Milsom, William K; Jones, David R

    2004-12-15

    Lesser scaup ducks were trained to dive for short and long durations following exposure to various gas concentrations to determine the influence of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) on diving behavior and heart rate. Compared with normoxia, hyperoxia (50% O2) significantly increased the duration of long dives, whereas severe hypoxia (9% O2) significantly decreased the duration of both short and long dives. Hypercapnia (5% CO2) had no effect on dive duration. Surface intervals were not significantly altered by the oxygen treatments, but significantly increased following CO2 exposure. Heart rate during diving was unaffected by hyperoxia and hypercapnia, but gradually declined in long dives after severe hypoxia. Thus, our results suggest that during the majority of dives, O2 and CO2 levels in lesser scaup ducks are managed through changes in diving behavior without any major cardiovascular adjustments, but below a threshold PaO2, a bradycardia is evoked to conserve the remaining oxygen for hypoxia sensitive tissues. A model of oxygen store utilization during voluntary diving was developed to estimate the critical PaO2 below which bradycardia is initiated (approximately 26 mmHg) and predicted that this critical PaO2 would be reached 19s into a dive after exposure to severe hypoxia, which corresponded exactly with the time of initiation of bradycardia in the severe hypoxia trials.

  5. Investigation of Multiphase Modeling Approaches for Behavior of Super Critical CO2 in Deep Formations Using Analog Fluids in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Agartan, E.; Mori, H.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Investigation of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) injection and migration in the laboratory is challenging due to difficulties in recreating the high pressures that exist in deep formations, influencing physicochemical properties of the fluid phases. Experimental simulation of scCO2 injection into deep saline formations can be performed under ambient pressure conditions in the laboratory scale by using combinations of analog fluids that mimic the flow dynamics of the phases involved in the actual scCO2 injection and migration in saline aquifers. In this study, dimensional analysis is used to describe the interplay of relevant forces acting on the fluid system during experiments conducted in a synthetic aquifer. The two-dimensional component of the experiment enables a qualitative estimation of the sweep efficiency, while a glycerol-water mixture and an isoparaffin solvent represent the displaced and invading phases, respectively. Viscosity and density ratios of this analog fluid combination are maintained consistent with brine and scCO2 in deep geologic formations. We present an experimental study of scCO2 injection and migration using a 3 ft x 2 ft synthetic quasi-2D aquifer aimed to quantify capillary entrapment factoring in hysteresis effects. Compared to one-dimensional core-flooding tests, the range of initial and residual non-wetting phase saturations at the end of the primary drainage and main imbibition stages in our experiments allows determination of the trapping curve through only one experiment. Finally, a numerical model with TOUGH2-T2VOC is used to simulate the experiments with analog fluids. Afterwards, a self-similar numerical model with TOUGH2-ECO2N simulating reservoir fluids is compared to the model with analog fluids in order to establish a link between the experimental scale and the field scale.

  6. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  7. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2 and implications for the global CO2 budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Francofonte, V.; Bergsson, B.; Ilyinskaya, E.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in hydrothermal/volcanic environments has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potential of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted between April 2013 and March 2014 at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece), Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland) and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t d-1; Krýsuvík) to moderate (524 ± 108 t d-1; La Fossa crater, Vulcano). Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in the hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at the global scale.

  8. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2, and implications for the global CO2 budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Francofonte, V.; Bergsson, B.; Ilyinskaya, E.

    2014-08-01

    Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in volcanic-hydrothermal environment has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potentiality of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted (between April 2013 and March 2014) at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece), Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland) and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross-sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The so-calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t day-1; Krýsuvík) to moderate (524 ± 108 t day-1; "La Fossa" crater, Vulcano). Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at global scale.

  9. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2, and implications for the global CO2 budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pedone

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in volcanic-hydrothermal environment has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potentiality of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted (between April 2013 and March 2014 at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece, Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy. At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross-sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The so-calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t day−1; Krýsuvík to moderate (524 ± 108 t day−1; "La Fossa" crater, Vulcano. Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at global scale.

  10. A new method for GPS-based wind speed determinations during airborne volcanic plume measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Begun nearly thirty years ago, the measurement of gases in volcanic plumes is today an accepted technique in volcano research. Volcanic plume measurements, whether baseline gas emissions from quiescent volcanoes or more substantial emissions from volcanoes undergoing unrest, provide important information on the amount of gaseous output of a volcano to the atmosphere. Measuring changes in gas emission rates also allows insight into eruptive behavior. Some of the earliest volcanic plume measurements of sulfur dioxide were made using a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC). The COSPEC, developed originally for industrial pollution studies, is an upward-looking optical spectrometer tuned to the ultraviolet absorption wavelength of sulfur dioxide (Millán and Hoff, 1978). In airborne mode, the COSPEC is mounted in a fixed-wing aircraft and flown back and forth just underneath a volcanic plume, perpendicular to the direction of plume travel (Casadevall and others, 1981; Stoiber and others, 1983). Similarly, for plumes close to the ground, the COSPEC can be mounted in an automobile and driven underneath a plume if a suitable road system is available (Elias and others, 1998). The COSPEC can also be mounted on a tripod and used to scan a volcanic plume from a fixed location on the ground, although the effectiveness of this configuration declines with distance from the plume (Kyle and others, 1990). In the 1990’s, newer airborne techniques involving direct sampling of volcanic plumes with infrared spectrometers and electrochemical sensors were developed in order to measure additional gases such as CO2 and H2S (Gerlach and others, 1997; Gerlach and others, 1999; McGee and others, 2001). These methods involve constructing a plume cross-section from several measurement traverses through the plume in a vertical plane. Newer instruments such as open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are now being used to measure the gases in volcanic plumes mostly from fixed

  11. CO2 laser preionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  12. Comportamento de larvas de Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae em resposta ao CO2 e a plântulas de espécies cultivadas Behavioral responses of Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae larvae to CO2 and seedlings of host plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Pereira

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available As respostas de larvas de Diabrotica speciosa (Germar (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae ao CO2 e o comportamento destas larvas quando expostas a plantas hospedeiras e não hospedeiras foram estudadas em laboratório. Larvas de primeiro ínstar de D. speciosa foram utilizadas. Num primeiro bioensaio, as larvas preferiram o tratamento com CO2, que foi gerado a partir da reação de bicarbonato de potássio com ácido acético em oposição a água destilada. Quando se observou o comportamento das larvas em relação a plantas hospedeiras, verificou-se que ocorreu um número significativamente maior de "mudanças de direção" em milho e milho pipoca do que em feijão, soja, trigo e sorgo. Este parâmetro foi inferior no sorgo em relação a todos os outros tratamentos. Valores similares foram verificados em milho pipoca e milho (26,2 e 24,2, respectivamente. Em relação a distância percorrida, foram verificadas maiores distâncias na aveia em comparação com milho pipoca, milho, feijão e sorgo. Após o contato das larvas com sorgo, elas não apresentaram comportamento de busca, pois a larva caía da plântula ou não se movia .Responses of Diabrotica speciosa (Germar (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae larvae to CO2 and their behavior when exposed to host and non host plants were studied in the laboratory. First instar larvae of D. speciosa were used. In a first bioassay, larvae preferred the treatment with CO2, from the reaction of the potassium bicarbonate and acetic acid, in opposition to distillated water. When the behavior of the larvae was observed in response to host plants, a significant higher number of turns was found in corn and popcorn than in common beans, soybean, wheat and sorghum. Sorghum differed from all other treatments with a lower number of turns. Similar values were found in popcorn and corn. The greater distances ranged were found on oats in comparison to pop corn, corn, common beans and sorghum. After contact with sorghum seedlings

  13. The influence of power and frequency on the filamentary behavior of a flowing DBD-application to the splitting of CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Ozkan, Alp; Silva, Tiago; Britun, Nikolay; Snyders, Rony; Bogaerts, Annemie; Reniers, François

    2016-01-01

    In this experimental study, a flowing dielectric barrier discharge operating at atmospheric pressure is used for the splitting of CO2 into O2 and CO. The influence of the applied frequency and plasma power on the microdischarge properties is investigated to understand their role on the CO2 conversion. Electrical measurements are carried out to explain the conversion trends and to characterize the microdischarges through their number, their lifetime, their intensity and the induced electrical charge. Their influence on the gas and electrode temperatures is also evidenced through optical emission spectroscopy and infrared imaging. It is shown that, in our configuration, the conversion depends mostly on the charge delivered in the plasma and not on the effective plasma voltage when the applied power is modified. Similarly, at constant total current, a better conversion is observed at low frequencies, where a less filamentary discharge regime with a higher effective plasma voltage than that at a higher frequency ...

  14. Effect of H2S concentration on the corrosion behavior of pipeline steel under the coexistence of H2S and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-peng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jian-wei; Lu, Min-xu; Ding, Jin-hui; Liu, Ming-liang

    2014-04-01

    The effect of H2S concentration on H2S/CO2 corrosion of API-X60 steel was studied by scanning electron microscopy, a weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. It is found that the corrosion process of the steel in an environment where H2S and CO2 coexist at different H2S concentrations is related to the morphological structure and stability of the corrosion product film. With the addition of a small amount of H2S, the size of the anode reaction region is decreased due to constant adsorption and separation of more FeS sediment or more FeHS+ ions on the surface of the steel. Meanwhile, the double-layer capacitance is diminished with increasing anion adsorption capacity. Therefore, the corrosion process is inhibited. The general corrosion rate of the steel rapidly decreases after the addition of a small amount of H2S under the coexistence of H2S and CO2. With a further increase in H2S concentration, certain parts of the corrosion product film become loose and even fall off. Thus, the protection provided by the corrosion product film worsens, and the corrosion rate tends to increase.

  15. A sol-gel process for fabrication of NiO/NiCo2O4/Co3O4 composite with improved electrochemical behavior for electrochemical capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mao-Cheng; Kong, Ling-Bin; Lu, Chao; Li, Xiao-Ming; Luo, Yong-Chun; Kang, Long

    2012-09-26

    Transition metal oxides possess multiple oxidation states that enable rich redox reactions for pseudo capacitanc. They have been investigated as promising electrode materials to achieve high energy density. In this study, NiO/NiCo(2)O(4)/Co(3)O(4) composite with high specific surface and mesoporous structure is fabricated by a sol-gel process then calcined at 250 °C. Benefits from the improved electron conductivity and effective mesoporous structure, the fabricated composite exhibits high specific capacitance (1717 F g(-1)), enhanced rate capability, and excellent electrochemical stability (94.9% retention after 1000 cycles). Interestingly, the specific capacitance of the composite is higher than that of NiO, NiCo(2)O(4), and Co(3)O(4), which indicates a synergistic effect of the composite on improvement of electrochemical performance. The findings demonstrate the importance and great potential of NiO/NiCo(2)O(4)/Co(3)O(4) composite in development of high-performance energy-storage systems.

  16. Effect of H2S concentration on the corrosion behavior of pipeline steel under the coexistence of H2S and CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-peng Li; Lei Zhang; Jian-wei Yang; Min-xu Lu; Jin-hui Ding; Ming-liang Liu

    2014-01-01

    The effect of H2S concentration on H2S/CO2 corrosion of API-X60 steel was studied by scanning electron microscopy, a weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. It is found that the cor-rosion process of the steel in an environment where H2S and CO2 coexist at different H2S concentrations is related to the morphological structure and stability of the corrosion product film. With the addition of a small amount of H2S, the size of the anode reaction region is de-creased due to constant adsorption and separation of more FeS sediment or more FeHS+ions on the surface of the steel. Meanwhile, the dou-ble-layer capacitance is diminished with increasing anion adsorption capacity. Therefore, the corrosion process is inhibited. The general cor-rosion rate of the steel rapidly decreases after the addition of a small amount of H2S under the coexistence of H2S and CO2. With a further in-crease in H2S concentration, certain parts of the corrosion product film become loose and even fall off. Thus, the protection provided by the corrosion product film worsens, and the corrosion rate tends to increase.

  17. Measuring Nitrous Oxide Mass Transfer into Non-Aqueous CO2BOL CO2 Capture Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zwoster, Andy; Heldebrant, David J.

    2016-03-28

    This paper investigates CO2 absorption behavior in CO2BOL solvents by decoupling the physical and chemical effects using N2O as a non-reactive mimic. Absorption measurements were performed using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed using a “first generation” CO2 binding organic liquid (CO2BOL), comprised of an independent base and alcohol. Measurements were made with N2O at a lean (0.06 mol CO2/mol BOL) and rich (0.26 mol CO2/mol BOL) loading, each at three temperatures (35, 45 and 55 °C). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (kg') were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance – determined from a correlation from literature – from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting kg' values for N2O in CO2BOLs were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous MEA under comparable conditions, which is supported by published measurements of Henry’s coefficients for N2O in various solvents. These results suggest that the physical solubility contribution for CO2 absorption in CO2BOLs is greater than that of aqueous amines, an effect that may pertain to other non-aqueous solvents.

  18. Highly dissipative Hénon map behavior in the four-level model of the CO 2 laser with modulated losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando L., C. L.; Acosta, G. A. Luna; Meucci, R.; Ciofini, M.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the four-level model for the CO 2 laser with modulated losses behaves in a qualitatively similar way as the highly dissipative Hénon map. The ubiquity of elements of the universal sequence, their related symbolic dynamics, and the presence of reverse bifurcations of chaotic bands in the model are reminiscent of the logistic map which is the limit of the Hénon map when the Jacobian equals zero. The coexistence of attractors, its dynamics related to contraction of volumes in phase space and the associated return maps can be correlated with those of the highly dissipative Hénon map.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure and catalytic behavior of homo- and heteronuclear coordination polymers [M(tdc)(bpy)] (M2+ = Fe2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Cd2+; tdc2- = 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, Florian; Worch, Christian; Moellmer, Jens; Gläser, Roger; Staudt, Reiner; Krautscheid, Harald

    2013-08-05

    A series of isostructural 3D coordination polymers (3)∞[M(tdc)(bpy)] (M(2+) = Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+); tdc(2-) = 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylate; bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine) was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and gas adsorption measurements. The materials show high thermal stability up to approximately 400 °C and a solvent induced phase transition. Single crystal X-ray structure determination was successfully performed for all compounds after the phase transition. In the zinc-based coordination polymer, various amounts of a second type of metal ions such as Co(2+) or Fe(2+) could be incorporated. Furthermore, the catalytic behavior of the homo- and heteronuclear 3D coordination polymers in an oxidation model reaction was investigated.

  20. 高压下CO_2稀释的CO/H_2/Air火焰贫可燃极限处的辐射重吸收效应的数值研究%Numerical Investigation of Radiation Re-Absorption Influences on Flame Behaviors of CO/H_2/Air Mixtures With CO_2 Diluted Near Lean Flammability Limits at High Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶志强; 艾育华; 孔文俊

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional laminar premixed flames for CO/H_2/air mixtures were investigated numerically for a wide range of pressures with different CO_2 diluted ratios.Re-absorption-included radiation model called statistical narrow-band correlated-k(SNBCK)model and re-absorption-excluded radiation model called optically thin(OPT)model were used respectively in order to assess the impacts of re-absorption on flame behaviors near lean flammability limits.Results revealed that re-absorption extended lean flammability limits and these effects increased with increasing CO2 addition or ratios of CO/H_2.Effect of re-absorption strengthened as pressures increased.The maximum flames temperature at lean flammability limits increased first and then decreased with a peak value at near 10atm as pressures increased.%本文分别采用考虑辐射重吸收的谱带辐射(SNBCK)模型及未考虑辐射重吸收的光学薄辐射(OPT)模型,对0.1~4 MPa,CO_2稀释比为0%和20%的一维预混层流合成气/空气火焰进行数值分析,研究辐射重吸收效应对可燃极限及极限处的火焰传播速度和温度的影响。结果表明,辐射重吸收效应能有效拓宽贫可燃极限,提高燃料中CO_2比例或提高CO/H_2比例都会加剧上述效果。辐射重吸收效应随压力增大而逐渐增强,并造成可燃极限处最大火焰温度随压力先增加后减小,在1 MPa左右达到峰值。

  1. Influence of Cl- on Corrosion Behavior of 2Crl3 Steel in H2S/CO2 Saturated Solutions%饱和H2S/CO2溶液中Cl-对2Crl3钢腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕修良

    2011-01-01

    采用失重法和电化学方法研究了饱和H2S/CO2溶液中Cl对2Crl3钢腐蚀行为的作用,并用SEM、EDS和XRD对钢上的腐蚀产物的形貌、组成与成分进行了分析。结果表明,随着Cl-含量的增加,2Crl3钢在饱和H2S/CO2溶液中的腐蚀失重速率也增加,且在Cl-含量为20g/L时达到最大值。在2Crl3钢上所形成的腐蚀产物以四方硫铁矿型FeS为主,并有少量的Fe1-xS。2Crl3钢活性溶解的腐蚀电化学过程主要受阴极扩散过程控制,而Cl-的存在不改变2Crl3钢腐蚀的活性溶解状态以及电化学反应历程与机制,仅影响了其腐蚀倾向和速率大小。%The influence of Cl- on corrosion behavior of 2Crl3 steel in H2 S/CO2 saturated solutions was investigated by weight loss method and electrochemical measurement technology. Morphology, elements and composition of corrosion products on the surface of 2Crl3 steel specimens were analyzed by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. The results showed that the increase of CI- content aggravated the corrosion rate of 2Crl3 steel in H2S/COz saturated solutions, which would reach the maximum value at concentration of Cl- 20 g/L. Corrosion products of 2Crl3 steel specimens consisted mainly of quartet pyrite FeS and a small amount of Fel xS. The electrochemical process of 2Crl3 steel active dissolution corrosion was controlled by cathode diffusion process. The existence of Cl- in H2 S/CO2 saturated solutions did not change the active dissolution situation of 2Crl3 steel corrosion and the electrochemical reaction mechanism, only could have an impact on the corrosion tendency and the value of corrosion rate.

  2. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agustí-Panareda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate – Interim Implementation (MACC-II service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they

  3. Plumes Do Not Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. B.; Anderson, D. L.; Foulger, G. R.; Winterer, E. L.

    Hypothetical plumes from the deep mantle are widely assumed to provide an abso- lute hotspot reference frame, inaugurate rifting, drive plates, and profoundly influence magmatic and tectonic evolution of oceans and continents. Many papers on local to global tectonics, magmatism, and geochemistry invoke plumes, and assign to the man- tle whatever properties, dynamics, and composition are needed to enable them. The fixed-plume concept arose from the Emperor-Hawaii seamount-and-island province, the 45 Ma inflection in which was assumed to record a 60-degree change in direction by the Pacific plate. Paleomagnetic latitudes and smooth Pacific spreading patterns show that such a change did not occur. Other Pacific chains once assumed to be syn- chronous with, and Euler-parallel to, Hawaii have proved to be neither. Thermal and physical properties of Hawaiian lithosphere falsify plume predictions. Rationales for fixed hotspots elsewhere also have become untenable as databases enlarged. Astheno- sphere is everywhere near solidus temperature, so buoyant melt does not require a local heat source but, rather, needs a thin roof or crack or tensional setting for egress. MORB and ocean-island basalt (OIB) broadly intergrade in composition, but MORB typically is richer in refractory elements and their radiogenic daughters, whereas OIB commonly is richer in fusible elements and their daughters. MORB and OIB contrasts are required by melt behavior and do not indicate unlike source reservoirs. MORB melts rise, with minimal reaction, through hot asthenosphere, whereas OIB melts re- act, and thereby lose substance, by crystallizing refractories and retaining and assim- ilating subordinate fusibles, with thick, cool lithosphere and crust. There is no need for hypotheses involving chaotic plume behavior or thousands of km of lateral flow of plume material, nor for postulates of SprimitiveT lower mantle contrary to cos- & cedil;mological and thermodynamic considerations. Plume

  4. India Co2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    created a balance in between the “developed” and developing countries. If India was producing the same amounts of emissions per capita as the it would have a total of 20 billion metric tons of CO2 emissions annually.

  5. Coupling of Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics in Fractured Porous Media: Application to CO2 Leakages from Natural and Stimulated Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Leakage to the atmosphere of a significant fraction of injected CO2 would constitute a failure of a geological CO2 storage project from a greenhouse gas mitigation perspective. We present a numerical model that simulates flow and transport of CO2 into heterogeneous subsurface systems. The model, StoTran, is a flexible numerical environment that uses state-of-the-art finite element and finite volume methods and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement scheme implemented using MPI and OpenMP protocols. Multiphase flow equations and the geomechanical equations are implicitly solved and either fully or sequentially coupled. StoTran can address inverse and forward problems under deterministic or stochastic conditions. For the current study, StoTran has been used to simulate several scenarios spanning from a homogeneous single layered reservoir to heterogeneous multi-layered systems, which including cap-rock with embedded fractures, have been simulated under different operations of CO2 injection and CO2 leakages conditions. Results show the impact of the injection and leakage rates on the time evolution of the spread of the CO2 plume, its interception of the fractured cap-rock and the risk associated with the contamination of the overlaying aquifer. Spatial and temporal moments have been calculated for different, deterministic of stochastic, subsurface physical and chemical properties. Spatial moments enable assessing the extent of the region of investigation under conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, several leakage scenarios show the intermittence behavior and development of the CO2 plume in the subsurface; its first interception with the fractures located further far from the injection well then, at a second stage, its interception with the fracture within the immediate vicinity of the injection well. We will present a remedy to CO2 leakages from the reservoir in order to enhance a long term containment of the injected CO2. This work performed under the auspices of

  6. Vertically averaged approaches for CO 2 migration with solubility trapping

    KAUST Repository

    Gasda, S. E.

    2011-05-20

    The long-term storage security of injected carbon dioxide (CO2) is an essential component of geological carbon sequestration operations. In the postinjection phase, the mobile CO2 plume migrates in large part because of buoyancy forces, following the natural topography of the geological formation. The primary trapping mechanisms are capillary and solubility trapping, which evolve over hundreds to thousands of years and can immobilize a significant portion of the mobile CO2 plume. However, both the migration and trapping processes are inherently complex, spanning multiple spatial and temporal scales. Using an appropriate model that can capture both large- and small-scale effects is essential for understanding the role of these processes on the long-term storage security of CO2 sequestration operations. Traditional numerical models quickly become prohibitively expensive for the type of large-scale, long-term modeling that is necessary for characterizing the migration and immobilization of CO2 during the postinjection period. We present an alternative modeling option that combines vertically integrated governing equations with an upscaled representation of the dissolution-convection process. With this approach, we demonstrate the effect of different modeling choices for typical large-scale geological systems and show that practical calculations can be performed at the temporal and spatial scales of interest. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. CO2 as a refrigerant

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    A first edition, the IIR guide “CO2 as a Refrigerant” highlights the application of carbon dioxide in supermarkets, industrial freezers, refrigerated transport, and cold stores as well as ice rinks, chillers, air conditioning systems, data centers and heat pumps. This guide is for design and development engineers needing instruction and inspiration as well as non-technical experts seeking background information on a specific topic. Written by Dr A.B. Pearson, a well-known expert in the field who has considerable experience in the use of CO2 as a refrigerant. Main topics: Thermophysical properties of CO2 – Exposure to CO2, safety precautions – CO2 Plant Design – CO2 applications – Future prospects – Standards and regulations – Bibliography.

  8. PREDICTING DIVING PLUME BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has responded to a number of multi media environmental issues surrounding the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and other fuel oxygenates. In Region 5, MTBE from various sources - but mainly from leaking underground stora...

  9. Selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol in dense CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Tsivintzelis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic reactions in pressurized CO2 are often strongly affected by the phase behavior. Knowledge on phase behavior is therefore desirable for optimizing the reaction conditions but often requires considerable experimental effort. Here, a previously established thermodynamic model for complex...

  10. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...... monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated...

  11. Biogeochemistry of landfill leachate plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2001-01-01

    is on dissolved organic matter, xenobiotic organic compounds, inorganic macrocomponents as anions and cations, and heavy metals. Laboratory as well as field investigations are included. This review is an up-date of an earlier comprehensive review. The review shows that most leachate contamination plumes...... the behavior of the contaminants in the plume as the leachate migrates away from the landfill. Diverse microbial communities have been identified in leachate plumes and are believed to be responsible for the redox processes. Dissolved organic C in the leachate, although it appears to be only slowly degradable...

  12. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim......The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  13. The Source Of CO2 Ice On Enceladus' Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, D.; Davies, A.; Johnson, T. V.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Lunine, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    Brown et al. (2006) identified CO2 ice on the surface of Enceladus within the South Polar Terrain using Cassini VIMS data. Considering the volatility of CO2, they suggested that the CO2 ice deposits resulted from an active replenishment process. Until now the nature of this process has been a mystery. Although there is a relatively small amount of CO2 in the water vapor erupted by the plumes, water-frost will dominate the spectra of the resulting deposits and the CO2 signature will be masked. We point out that CO2 frost deposits are a possible product of the water circulation model proposed by Matson et al. (2012). In this model, buoyant CO2-bubble-rich water rises up from the ocean and into fissures in the icy crust. When a neutral buoyancy level is reached, the water flows horizontally along the fissures under a relatively thin ice cap. Heat lost from the water beneath the ice supplies heat for the thermal anomalies identified on the surface. Even as the water is flowing horizontally, it continues to lose CO2 because bubbles continue to rise. Recesses and other irregularities on the bottom of the surface ice allow the bubble-gas to collect in pockets. When these are fissured by recurring tidal stresses (Hurford et al., 2007), the CO2 gas can escape and condense nearby on surfaces that are cold enough. The pure CO2 ice deposits discussed here are not to be confused with other deposits seen by VIMS in which the CO2 may be trapped in water-ice matrices. These have different spectral signatures and may be in the icy dust-sized grains ejected by the eruptive plumes. References: Brown et al. (2006) Science, 311, 5766; Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, in press, doi 0.1016/j.icarus.2012.05.031; Hurford et al. (2007) Nature 447, 292. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA.

  14. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River, Estuary, and Plume in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Skalski, John R.; Deters, Katherine A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Richard L.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.; Kim, Jin A.; Trott, Donna M.

    2011-09-01

    Uncertainty regarding the migratory behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids passing through the lower Columbia River and estuary after negotiating dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) prompted the development and application of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS). The JSATS has been used to investigate the survival of juvenile salmonid smolts between Bonneville Dam (river kilometer (rkm) 236) and the mouth of the Columbia River annually since 2004. In 2010, a total of 12,214 juvenile salmonids were implanted with both a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and a JSATS acoustic transmitter. Using detection information from JSATS receiver arrays deployed on dams and in the river, estuary, and plume, the survival probability of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tagged at John Day Dam was estimated form multiple reaches between rkm 153 and 8.3 during the spring. During summer, the survival probability of subyearling Chinook salmon was estimated for the same reaches. In addition, the influence of routes of passage (e.g., surface spill, deep spill, turbine, juvenile bypass system) through the lower three dams on the Columbia River (John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville) on juvenile salmonid smolt survival probability from the dams to rkm 153 and then between rkm 153 and 8.3 was examined to increase understanding of the immediate and latent effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival. Similar to previous findings, survival probability was relatively high (>0.95) for most groups of juvenile salmonids from the Bonneville Dam tailrace to about rkm 50. Downstream of rkm 50 the survival probability of all species and run types we examined decreased markedly. Steelhead smolts suffered the highest mortality in this lower portion of the Columbia River estuary, with only an estimated 60% of the tagged fish surviving to the mouth of the river. In contrast, yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts survived to the mouth

  15. Corrosion studies on casing steel in CO2 storage environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Benedictus, T.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of casing steel N80 in brine plus CO2 was studied in autoclave to simulate the CO2 storage environment. The brine solution used in the study contained 130 g/l NaCl, 22.2 g/l CaCl2 and 4 g/l MgCl2. The CO2 was charged in the autoclave at different pressures (60, 80 and 100 bar)

  16. Corrosion studies on casing steel in CO2 storage environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Benedictus, T.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of casing steel N80 in brine plus CO2 was studied in autoclave to simulate the CO2 storage environment. The brine solution used in the study contained 130 g/l NaCl, 22.2 g/l CaCl2 and 4 g/l MgCl2. The CO2 was charged in the autoclave at different pressures (60, 80 and 100 bar)

  17. An extremely high altitude plume seen at Mars morning terminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Gomez-Forrellad, Josep M.; Pellier, Christophe; Delcroix, Marc; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Jaeschke, Wayne; Parker, Donald C.; Phillips, James H.; Peach, Damian

    2014-11-01

    We report the occurrence in March and April 2012 of two bright very high altitude plumes at the Martian terminator at 250 km or more above the surface, thus well into the ionosphere and bordering on the exosphere. They were located at about 195 deg West longitude and -45 deg latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and lasted for about 10 days. The features showed day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb, which indicates rapid evolution in less than 10 hours and a cyclic behavior. Photometric measurements are used to explore two possible scenarios to explain their nature. If the phenomenon is due to suspended particles (dust, CO2 or H2O ice clouds) reflecting solar radiation, the mean size is about 0.1 microns with a nadir optical depth > 0.06. Alternatively, the plume could be auroral emission above a region with a strong magnetic anomaly and where aurora has previously been detected. Importantly, both explanations defy our current understanding of the Mars upper atmosphere.AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Spanish MINECO projects AYA2012-36666 with FEDER support, CONSOLIDER program ASTROMOL CSD2009-00038 and AYA2011-30613-CO2-1. Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT765-13 and UPV/EHU UFI11/55.

  18. Effect of canopy structures and their steric interactions on CO2 sorption behavior of liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Youngjune

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-like NOHMs with different grafting densities of polymeric canopy were synthesized to evaluate their solvating properties as CO2 solvents. The in situ ATR FT-IR study of NOHMs with linear and branched canopies revealed distinct CO2 capture and corresponding swelling behaviors. These observations suggested that the entropic contribution for CO2 sorption in NOHMs can be tuned via the canopy design. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Connecting CO2. Feasibility study CO2 network Southwest Netherlands; Connecting CO2. Haalbaarheidsstudie CO2-netwerk Zuidwest-Nederland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, M.

    2009-06-10

    An overview is given of supply and demand of CO2 in the region Southwest Netherlands and the regions Antwerp and Gent in Belgium. Also attention is paid to possible connections between these regions [Dutch] Een inventarisatie wordt gegeven van vraag en aanbod van CO2 in de regio Zuidwest- Nederland en de regios Antwerpen en Gent in Belgie. Ook worden mogelijke koppelingen tussen de regios besproken.

  20. Uncertainty quantification for CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia, Wei; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Ampomah, William; Grigg, Reid

    2014-01-01

    This study develops a statistical method to perform uncertainty quantification for understanding CO2 storage potential within an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) environment at the Farnsworth Unit of the Anadarko Basin in northern Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil-water flow and reactive transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major uncertainty metrics: net CO2 injection, cumulative oil production, cumulative gas (CH4) production, and net water injection. A global sensitivity and response surface analysis indicates that reservoir permeability, porosity, and thickness are the major intrinsic reservoir parameters that control net CO2 injection/storage and oil/gas recovery rates. The well spacing and the initial water saturation also have large impact on the oil/gas recovery rates. Further, this study has revealed key insights into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s...

  1. 苯乙烯/二氧化碳/聚苯乙烯三元混合物的相平衡预测%Prediction of Phase Behavior for Styrene/CO2/Polystyrene Mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A lattice fluid model, Sanchez-Lacombe equation, is used to predict the phase behavior for a styrene/CO2/polystyrene ternary system. The binary parameters involved in the equation were optimized using experimental data. Phase diagrams and the distribution coefficients of styrene between polymer phase and fluid phase are obtained over a wide range of pressure, temperature and composition. The analysis of ternary phase diagrams indicates that this system at relatively high pressure or low temperature may display two-phase equilibrium, and at low pressures or high temperatures three-phase equilibrium may appear. The distribution coefficients of styrene between the fluid phase and the polymer phase increase asymptotically to unity when the concentration of styrene increases. The results provide thermodynamic knowledge for further exploitation of supercritical carbon dioxide assisted devolatilization and impregnation.

  2. Influence of chromium on the initial corrosion behavior of low alloy steels in the CO2-O2-H2S-SO2 wet-dry corrosion environment of cargo oil tankers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-he Zhao; Wei Liu; Jie Zhao; Dong Zhang; Peng-cheng Liu; Min-xu Lu

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Cr on the initial corrosion behavior of low-alloy steels exposed to a CO2–O2–H2S–SO2wet–dry corrosion envi-ronment was investigated using weight-loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the corrosion rate increases with increasing Cr content in samples subjected to corrosion for 21 d. However, the rust grain size decreases, its specific surface area increases, and it becomes more compact and denser with increasing Cr content, which indicates the enhanced protectivity of the rust. The results of charge transfer resistance (Rct) calculations indicate that higher Cr contents can accelerate the corrosion during the first 7 d and promote the formation of the enhanced protective inner rust after 14 d; the formed protective inner rust is responsible for the greater corrosion resistance during long-term exposure.

  3. CO$_2$ dissolution controlled by buoyancy driven shear dispersion in a background hydrological flow

    CERN Document Server

    Unwin, H Juliette T; Woods, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the long-time flow which controls the dissolution of a plume of CO$_2$ following injection into an anticline structure in a deep saline aquifer of finite vertical extent. Over times of tens to thousands of years, some of the CO$_2$ will dissolve into the underlying groundwater to produce a region of relatively dense, CO$_2$ saturated water directly below the plume of CO$_2$. Continued dissolution then requires the supply of CO$_2$ unsaturated aquifer water. This may be provided by a background hydrological flow or buoyancy driven flow caused by the density contrast between the CO$_2$ saturated and unsaturated water in the aquifer. At long times, the interaction of the cross-layer diffusive mixing with the buoyancy, leads to buoyancy driven shear dispersion of the CO$_2$. With a background hydrological flow, the upstream transport of dissolved CO$_2$ by this dispersion becomes balanced by the oncoming hydrological flow so that CO$_2$ rich water can only spread a ...

  4. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  5. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  6. Corrosion Behavior and Sulfide Stress Cracking Sensitivity of Sulfide-resistant Casing Steel P110SS in Hyperbaric H2S/CO2 Environment%抗硫套管钢P110SS在高含H2S/CO2环境中的腐蚀行为和硫化物应力开裂敏感性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王树涛; 郑新艳; 李明志; 黄雪松; 关建庆; 郑树启; 陈长风; 陈月民

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behavior and sulfide induced stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of a sulfide-resistant casing steel P110SS in hyperbaric H2S/CO2 environment were studied by high temperature/pressure reactor which simulated the operating environment of Puguang gas field. The corrosion rate of P110SS in hyperbaric H2S/CO2 environment decreased first and then rose with the increase of temperature and partial pressure of H2S/CO2. Corrosion product peeled off in an environment corresponding to the middle area of the well where the corrosion rate was minimal. The sulfide induced stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of P110SS steel in hyperbaric H2S/CO2 environment was very low revealed by four point bending test for the steel with a load of 90% yield strength, which could be attributed to the uniform tempered microstructure of sorbite with fine grain, high dislocation density and uniform dispersion of carbides of the steel.%利用高温高压反应釜模拟普光气田的工况环境,研究抗硫套管钢P110SS在高含H2S/CO2环境中的腐蚀行为和硫化物应力开裂(SSC)敏感性.结果表明,随着温度和H2S/CO2分压的升高,P110SS的腐蚀速率先降低后升高,而在相当于井中部工况的环境中,钢的腐蚀速率最低,腐蚀产物膜明显脱落.在高含H2S/CO2环境中,采用四点弯曲法加载达到P110SS屈服强度的90%时,试样表面未发现裂纹,表明SSC敏感性比较低.

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of CO2 mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Martin Gamel

    performed satisfactorily and predicted the general behavior of the systems, but qCPA used fewer adjustable parameters to achieve similar predictions. It has been demonstrated that qCPA is a promising model which, compared to CPA, systematically improves the predictions of the experimentally determined phase......, accurate predictions of the thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of mixtures containing CO2 are challenging with classical models such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state (EoS). This is believed to be due to the fact, that CO2 has a large quadrupole moment which the classical models...... do not explicitly account for. In this thesis, in an attempt to obtain a physically more consistent model, the cubicplus association (CPA) EoS is extended to include quadrupolar interactions. The new quadrupolar CPA (qCPA) can be used with the experimental value of the quadrupolemoment...

  8. The CO2nnect activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  9. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  10. Plume dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Jerome A.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2008-11-01

    Buoyancy driven flows in layered porous media are present in many geological settings and play an important role in the mixing of fluids, from the dispersal of pollutants in underground aquifers to enhanced oil recovery techniques and, of more recent importance, the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Seismic images of the rise of a buoyant CO2 plume at Sleipner in the North Sea indicate that these plumes are greatly influenced by a vertical array of thin lenses of relatively low permeability material. We model propagation of CO2 at each layer as a gravity current in a porous medium which propagates along, and drains through, a thin, low permeability seal. Drainage, driven both by hydrostatic pressure and the body force on the draining fluid, leads to an initial rapid advance followed by a gradual retreat of the current to a steady-state. By incorporating a vertical array of these single layer models we are able to capture the rise of the buoyant plume in layered reservoirs. We find that the plume is characterized by a broad head with a tail given by the steady state extent.

  11. High Materials Performance in Supercritical CO2 in Comparison with Atmospheric Pressure CO2 and Supercritical Steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Tylczak, Joseph [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Carney, Casey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Dogan, Omer N. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2017-02-26

    This presentation covers environments (including advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) steam boiler/turbine and sCO2 indirect power cycle), effects of pressure, exposure tests, oxidation results, and mechanical behavior after exposure.

  12. Estimates of CO2 since the mid-Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather

    2016-04-01

    For past warm climates, direct CO2 determinations are unavailable. Our inferences of Antarctic ice sheet thresholds and climate sensitivity to CO2 are therefore strongly conditioned by the reliability of CO2 proxy reconstructions. For the Miocene, these rely heavily on proxies using the carbon isotopic fractionation of marine phytoplankton during photosynthesis (ep). While recent records are beginning to reveal more clearly the long term CO2 trends since the middle Miocene , the absolute CO2 concentrations are subject to higher uncertainty. This in turn influences the ability of models to simulate dynamic Antarctic ice sheet behavior in the context of expected ice sheet hysteresis. In this contribution, I discuss a new approach for estimating CO2 from published and new measurements of phytoplankton carbon isotopic fractionation using the ACTI-CO cell model. This approach accounts for the physiological adaptations made by phytoplankton cells to avoid falling below optimal photosynthetic rates as CO2 declines, the carbon concentrating mechanism. The model yields CO2 estimates which can be significantly (up to 2-fold) higher than those estimated from classic equations. Given the large degree of cooling since the late Miocene in extratropical sea surface temperature records, such CO2 estimates are consistent with a more conservative estimate of climate sensitivity over the last 12 Ma.

  13. CO2 injection along a pipeline with transient approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezos, Víctor; Carrera, Jesús; Slooten, Luit Jan; Silva, Orlando; Bear, Jacob; Kitro-Belinkov, Myra

    2013-04-01

    CO2 geological sequestration involves several processes. One of the more relevant of these processes is the CO2 injection along a pipeline, because it links the capture and transport of CO2 with its deep geological storage. The knowledge of the CO2 behavior within injection and monitoring wells is essential for designing efficient CO2 storage strategies. In particular, a thorough modeling and simulation of CO2 flow through the injection pipe is required to define operational protocols and to design the surface CO2 conditioning facilities. Much work has been performed on modeling the steady state multiphase flow in wellbores during CO2 injection. However, relevant problems, including the displacement of the initial brine in the injection well, or the upwards flow of CO2 during a push-pull test, require the modeling of transient conditions, which is the goal of the present work. Here, we present the governing equations and preliminary results for the modeling of dynamic non isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well, including displacement of the initial brine. The model considers continuity, momentum and energy equations, together with equations of state and some thermodynamic relations. These equations are solved using the simulation framework "Proost", which implements the finite element method. The code is verified by comparison with a steady-state solver for a range of surface injection conditions. The results obtained show pressure, velocity and temperature evolution, which allows quantifying the phase changes that gradually experiment the CO2 through the injection pipe. We find the surface pressure required initially is much higher than steady-state because heat exchange with the formation reduces significantly the density of CO2 at the borehole.

  14. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  15. Monitoring subsurface CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthaegen, P.; Arts, R.; Schroot, B.M.

    2005-01-01

    An overview is given of various currently applied monitoring techniques for CO2 storage. Techniques are subdivided in correspondence to their applicability for monitoring three distinct realms. These are: - the atmosphere and the near-surface; - the overburden (including faults and wells); - the

  16. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten type capillary pressure curves

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Dominic, David F; Mehnert, Edward; Okwen, Roland T

    2015-01-01

    Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Previously we showed how the dynamics of a CO2 plume is influenced by the multi-scale stratal architecture in deep saline reservoirs. The results strongly suggest that representing small-scale features is critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. Here we present the result of simulation of CO2 trapping using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, for the capillary pressure curves. We showed that capillary trapping and dissolution rates are very different for the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches when heterogeneity and hysteresis are both represented.

  17. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  18. Simulation of muon radiography for monitoring CO$_2$ stored in a geological reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, J; Coleman, M; Gluyas, J G; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lincoln, D L; Pal, S; Paling, S M; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Thompson, L F; Woodward, D

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of monitoring subsurface CO$_2$, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and require highly skilled personnel to acquire the data. Simulations based on simplified models have previously shown that muon radiography could be automated to continuously monitor CO$_2$ injection and migration, in addition to reducing the overall cost of monitoring. In this paper, we present a simulation of the monitoring of CO$_2$ plume evolution in a geological reservoir using muon radiography. The stratigraphy in the vicinity of a nominal test facility is modelled using geological data, and a numerical fluid flow model is used to describe the time evolution of the CO$_2$ plume. A planar detection region with a surface area of 1000 m$^2$ is considered, at a vertical depth of 776 m below the seabed. We find that one year of constant CO$_2$ injection leads to changes in the column density of $\\lesssim 1\\%$, and that the CO$_2$ plume is already resolvable with an exposure time of less than 50 days.

  19. Electrochemical Study on Corrosion Behavior of Oil Pipeline Steels in Carbon and Hydrogen Sulfide Solution%石油管线钢在H2S/CO2环境中腐蚀行为的电化学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 吴明; 陈旭; 谢飞; 李睿; 徐鹏惠

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 15# steels in carbon and hydrogen sulfide solution was studied by the polarization curves and EIS. The result shows that the corrosion rate of 15# steel in NaCI solution has accelerated, when joined H2S and CO2 , moreover, from the NaCI solution, NaCI - CO2 solution to the NaCI - CO2 - H2S solution, then to NaCI - H2S solution , the electrochemical reaction process of resistance is getting smaller, the corrosion current density is bigger and the corrosive rate is faster.%采用极化曲线法和交流阻抗法研究了15#钢在H2S/CO2环境下的电化学行为.试验结果表明,H2S和CO2的存在加速了15#钢在NaCl溶液中的腐蚀速率,管线钢在NaCl溶液、NaCl-CO2溶液、NaCl-CO2-H2S溶液以及NaCl-H2S溶液中电化学反应过程所受的阻力愈来愈小,腐蚀电流密度越来越大,腐蚀速率越来越快.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Super 13Cr Stainless Steel in Cl-/CO2 Medium at Different Temperatures%不同温度下超级13Cr在Cl-/CO2环境中的腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩燕; 赵雪会; 白真权; 尹成先

    2011-01-01

    模拟油田现场Cl-/CO2腐蚀环境,对超级13Cr不锈钢在不同温度下的耐均匀腐蚀及点蚀的性能进行了研究。利用金相、扫描电镜(SEM)、能谱分析(EDS)及X射线衍射(XRD)等方法对试样进行了分析。结果表明,温度升高,超级13Cr均匀腐蚀速率增大,温度升高到150℃时,均匀腐蚀由轻微腐蚀转变成中度腐蚀。在Cl-/CO2腐蚀环境中,超级13Cr不锈钢极易发生点蚀,且温度升高,点蚀程度先加重后减弱,在120℃时,点蚀坑数量最多,尺寸最大,点蚀最严重。XRD结果显示,所有温度条件下材料均无CO2腐蚀产物FeCO3产生,超级13Cr不锈钢依靠表面形成的钝化膜抵抗CO2腐蚀。%The resistant to uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion of super 13Cr stainless steel at different temperatures was studied in simulated oil field corrosion environment with Cl~ and CO2. The surfaces of specimens were analyzed by metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy(EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the uniform corrosion rate increased with the increase of temperature, and slight uniform corrosion turned moderate at 150 ℃. In C1-/CO2 corrosive environment, pitting corrosion of super 13Cr stainless steel occurred very easily, pitting corrosion rate increased firstly and then decreased when temperature raised, pitting corrosion was the most serious when temperature was 120 ℃. X-ray diffraction showed that there was no CO2 corrosion product at all the tested temperatures, indicating that the CO2 corrosion resistance of super 13Cr stainless depends on the passive film formed on the material surface.

  1. Preparation of Ordered Mesoporous CarbonlNiCo2O4 Electrode and Its Electrochemical Capacitive Behavior%有序介孔碳负载NiCo2O4电极的制备及其超电容性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车倩; 张方; 张校刚; 卢向军; 丁兵; 朱佳佳

    2012-01-01

    OMC/NiCo2O4 composite was prepared by co-precipitation with ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) as a support. The crystalline structure and morphology of the composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM images showed that NiCo2O4 was uniformly coated on the OMC. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge were used to investigate the electrochemical performance of the OMC/ NiCo2O4 composite. The specific capacitances of the OMC/NiCo2O4 composite with a mass fraction of 40% NiCo2O4 were 577.0 F G"1 at a current density of 1 A G~' and 470.8 F G~1 at 8 A G-1. The specific capacitance remains at 508.4 F G~1 after 2000 cycles at a current density of 2 A-g~\\ with a capacitance retention of 92.7%.%以有序介孔碳(OMC)为载体,采用共沉淀法制备了OMC/NiCo2O4复合物.用X射线衍射(XRD)、傅里叶变换红外(FT-IR)光谱和透射电镜(TEM)研究其结构与形貌,发现NiCo2O4纳米颗粒均匀地负载在有序介孔碳上.循环伏安和恒流充放电测试表明,NiCo2O4质量分数为40%时,在1 A·g-1的电流密度下,复合物电极的比电容可以达到577.0 F·g-1,电流密度为8A·g-1时,比电容可以达到470.8 F·g-1,并具有良好的循环稳定性.在2A·g-1的电流密度下,经过2000次循环后,比电容还可达到508.4 F·g-1,电容保持率为92.7%.

  2. Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Plumes from Combined Ground-Airborne Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jamey; Mitchell, Taylor; Honeycutt, Wes; Materer, Nicholas; Ley, Tyler; Clark, Peter

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid ground-airborne sensing network for real-time plume monitoring of CO2 and CH4 for carbon sequestration is investigated. Conventional soil gas monitoring has difficulty in distinguishing gas flux signals from leakage with those associated with meteorologically driven changes. A low-cost, lightweight sensor system has been developed and implemented onboard a small unmanned aircraft and is combined with a large-scale ground network that measures gas concentration. These are combined with other atmospheric diagnostics, including thermodynamic data and velocity from ultrasonic anemometers and multi-hole probes. To characterize the system behavior and verify its effectiveness, field tests have been conducted with simulated discharges of CO2 and CH4 from compressed gas tanks to mimic leaks and generate gaseous plumes, as well as field tests over the Farnsworth CO2-EOR site in the Anadarko Basin. Since the sensor response time is a function of vehicle airspeed, dynamic calibration models are required to determine accurate location of gas concentration in space and time. Comparisons are made between the two tests and results compared with historical models combining both flight and atmospheric dynamics. Supported by Department of Energy Award DE-FE0012173.

  3. Fang CO2 med Aminosyrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    2010-01-01

    Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer.......Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer....

  4. Crystal structures and dynamical properties of dense CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xue; Liu, Hanyu; Wu, Min; Yao, Yansun; Tse, John S; Dias, Ranga; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-10-04

    Structural polymorphism in dense carbon dioxide (CO2) has attracted significant attention in high-pressure physics and chemistry for the past two decades. Here, we have performed high-pressure experiments and first-principles theoretical calculations to investigate the stability, structure, and dynamical properties of dense CO2 We found evidence that CO2-V with the 4-coordinated extended structure can be quenched to ambient pressure below 200 K-the melting temperature of CO2-I. CO2-V is a fully coordinated structure formed from a molecular solid at high pressure and recovered at ambient pressure. Apart from confirming the metastability of CO2-V (I-42d) at ambient pressure at low temperature, results of ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics (MD) simulations provided insights into the transformation processes and structural relationship from the molecular to the extended phases. In addition, the simulation also predicted a phase V'(Pna21) in the stability region of CO2-V with a diffraction pattern similar to that previously assigned to the CO2-V (P212121) structure. Both CO2-V and -V' are predicted to be recoverable and hard with a Vicker hardness of ∼20 GPa. Significantly, MD simulations found that the CO2 in phase IV exhibits large-amplitude bending motions at finite temperatures and high pressures. This finding helps to explain the discrepancy between earlier predicted static structures and experiments. MD simulations clearly indicate temperature effects are critical to understanding the high-pressure behaviors of dense CO2 structures-highlighting the significance of chemical kinetics associated with the transformations.

  5. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  6. Evaluation of CO2 migration and formation storage capacity in the Dalders formations, Baltic Sea - Preliminary analysis by means of models of increasing complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Auli; Yang, Zhibing; Tian, Liang; Jung, Byeongju; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Joodaki, Saba; Pasquali, Riccardo; O'Neill, Nick; Vernon, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present preliminary data analysis and modeling of CO2 injection into selected parts of the Dalders Monocline and Dalders Structure, formations situated under the Baltic Sea and of potential interest for CO2 geological storage. The approach taken is to use models of increasing complexity successively, thereby increasing the confidence and reliability of the predictions. The objective is to get order-of-magnitude estimates of the behavior of the formations during potential industrial scale CO2 injection and subsequent storage periods. The focus has been in regions with best cap-rock characteristics, according to the present knowledge. Data has been compiled from various sources available, such as boreholes within the region. As the first approximation we use analytical solutions, in order to get an initial estimate the CO2 injection rates that can be used without causing unacceptable pressure increases. These preliminary values are then used as basis for more detailed numerical analyses with TOUGH2/TOUGH2-MP (e.g. Zhang et al, 2008) simulator and vertical equilibrium based (e.g. Gasda et al, 2009) models. With the numerical models the variations in material properties, formation thickness etc., as well as more processes such as CO2 dissolution can also be taken into account. The presentation discusses results from these preliminary analyses in terms of estimated storage capacity, CO2 and pressure plume extent caused by various injection scenarios, as well as CO2 travel time after the end of the injection. The effect of factors such as number of injection wells and the positioning of these, the effect of formation properties and the boundary conditions are discussed as are the benefits and disadvantages of the various modeling approaches used. References: Gasda S.E. et al, 2009. Computational Geosciences 13, 469-481. Zhang et al, 2008. Report LBNL-315E, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  7. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion.

  8. Trace amounts of water-induced distinct growth behaviors of NiO nanostructures on graphene in CO2-expanded ethanol and their applications in lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Linhai; Wu, Yingqiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Lingyan; Yu, Yancun; Zhang, Xinbo; Zhao, Fengyu

    2013-08-14

    In this work, we have developed a new method to grow NiO nanomaterials on the surface of graphene nanosheets (GNSs). The morphologies of NiO nanomaterials grown on GNSs could be tailored by trace amounts of water introduced into the mixed solvents of CO2-expanded ethanol (CE). Small and uniform Ni-salt nanoparticles (Ni-salt-NPs) were grown on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) through the decomposition of nickel nitrate directly in CE. However, when trace amounts of water were introduced into the mixed solvents, Ni-salt nanoflakes arrays (Ni-salt-NFAs) were grown on the surface of GO with almost perpendicular direction. After thermal treatment in N2 atmosphere, these Ni-salt @GO composites were converted to NiO@GNSs composites. The forming mechanisms of the NiO-NPs@GNSs and NiO-NFAs@GNSs were discussed by series comparative experiments. The presence of the trace amounts of water affected the chemical composition and structure of the precursors formed in CE and the growth behaviors on the surface of GNSs. When used as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the NiO-NPs@GNSs composite exhibited better cycle and rate performance compared with the NiO-NFAs@GNSs.

  9. Volcanic CO2 flux measurement at Campi Flegrei by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Valenza, M.

    2014-04-01

    Near-infrared room temperature tunable diode lasers (TDL) have recently found increased usage in atmospheric chemistry and air monitoring research, but applications in volcanology are still limited to a few examples. Here, we explored the potential of a commercial infrared laser unit (GasFinder 2.0 from Boreal Laser Ltd) for measurement of volcanic CO2 mixing ratios, and ultimately for estimating the volcanic CO2 flux. Our field tests were conducted at Campi Flegrei near Pozzuoli, Southern Italy, where the GasFinder was used during three campaigns in October 2012, January 2013 and May 2013 to repeatedly measure the path-integrated mixing ratios of CO2 along cross sections of the atmospheric plumes of two major fumarolic fields (Solfatara and Pisciarelli). By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we resolved, for each of the two fields, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the atmosphere, from the integration of which (and after multiplication by the plumes' transport speeds) the CO2 fluxes were finally obtained. We evaluate a total CO2 output from the Campi Flegrei fumaroles of ˜490 Mg/day, in line with independent estimates based on in situ (Multi-GAS) observations. We conclude that TDL technique may enable CO2 flux quantification at other volcanoes worldwide.

  10. RODZAJE METOD SEKWESTRACJI CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia LUBAŃSKA

    Full Text Available Z pojęciem ochrony środowiska wiąże się bardzo szeroko w ostatnim czasie omawiane zagadnienie dotyczące ograniczenia emisji CO2. Konsekwencją globalnych zmian klimatu wywołanego przez ludzi jest wzrost stężenia atmosferycznego gazów cieplarnianych, które powodują nasilający się efekt cieplarniany. Wzrasta na świecie liczba ludności, a co za tym idzie wzrasta konsumpcja na jednego mieszkańca, szczególnie w krajach szeroko rozwiniętych gospodarczo. Protokół z Kioto ściśle określa działania jakie należy podjąć w celu zmniejszenia stężenia dwutlenku węgla w atmosferze. Pomimo maksymalnej optymalizacji procesu spalania paliw kopalnianych wykorzystywanych do produkcji energii, zastosowania odnawialnych źródeł energii zmiana klimatu jest nieunikniona i konsekwentnie będzie postępować przez kolejne dekady. Prognozuje się, że duże znaczenie odegra nowoczesna technologia, która ma za zadanie wychwycenie CO2 a następnie składowanie go w odpowiednio wybranych formacjach geologicznych (CCS- Carbon Capture and Storage. Eksperci są zgodni, że ta technologia w niedalekiej przyszłości stanie się rozwiązaniem pozwalającym ograniczyć ogromną ilość emisji CO2 pochodzącą z procesów wytwarzania energii z paliw kopalnych. Z analiz Raportu IPCC wynika, iż technologia CSS może się przyczynić do ok. 20% redukcji emisji dwutlenku węgla przewidzianej do 2050 roku [3]. Zastosowanie jej napotyka na wiele barier, nie tylko technologicznych i ekonomicznych, ale także społecznych. Inną metodą dającą ujemne źródło emisji CO2 jest możliwość wykorzystania obszarów leśnych o odpowiedniej strukturze drzewostanu. Środkiem do tego celu, oprócz ograniczenia zużycia emisjogennych paliw kopalnych (przy zachowaniu zasad zrównoważonego rozwoju może być intensyfikacja zalesień. Zwiększanie lesistości i prawidłowa gospodarka leśna należy do najbardziej efektywnych sposobów kompensowania

  11. Behavior of Mercury Emissions from a Commercial Coal-Fired Utility Boiler: TheRelationship Between Stack Speciation and Near-Field Plume Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reduction of divalent gaseous mercury (HgII) to elemental gaseous mercury (Hg0) in a commercial coal-fired power plant (CFPP)exhaust plume was investigated by simultaneous measurement in-stack and in-plume as part of a collaborative study among the U.S....

  12. Influence of small scale heterogeneity on CO2 trapping processes in deep saline aquifers

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of CO2 trapping in porous media by capillary trapping (pore scale) incorporates a number of related processes, i.e. residual trapping, trapping due to hysteresis of the relative permeability, and trapping due to hysteresis of the capillary pressure. Additionally CO2 may be trapped in heterogeneous media due to difference in capillary pressure entry points for different materials (facies scale). The amount of CO2 trapped by these processes depends upon a complex system of non-linear and hysteretic relationships including how relative permeability and capillary pressure vary with brine and CO2 saturation, and upon the spatial variation in these relationships as caused by geologic heterogeneity. Geological heterogeneities affect the dynamics of CO2 plumes in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs. We ...

  13. Modelling oil plumes from subsurface spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardner, Robin; Zodiatis, George

    2017-07-11

    An oil plume model to simulate the behavior of oil from spills located at any given depth below the sea surface is presented, following major modifications to a plume model developed earlier by Malačič (2001) and drawing on ideas in a paper by Yapa and Zheng (1997). The paper presents improvements in those models and numerical testing of the various parameters in the plume model. The plume model described in this paper is one of the numerous modules of the well-established MEDSLIK oil spill model. The deep blowout scenario of the MEDEXPOL 2013 oil spill modelling exercise, organized by REMPEC, has been applied using the improved oil plume module of the MEDSLIK model and inter-comparison with results having the oil spill source at the sea surface are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CO2/H2S Corrosion Behavior of Tubular Steel N80 at Different H2S Partial Pressures%不同H2S分压下N80油管钢的CO2/H2S腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张清; 李全安; 文九巴; 张兴渊

    2008-01-01

    采用高温高压釜试验,辅以失重法计算和扫描电镜分析,对不同H2S分压(O.0015 MPa,0.015 MPa,0.02MPa,0.06 MPa,0.12 MPa)下N80油管钢的CO2/H2S腐蚀行为进行了研究.结果表明,在试验H2S分压范围内,N80油管钢发生了极严重的CO2/H2S腐蚀;随着Hzs分压的升高,腐蚀速率先增加后降低,且在H2s分压为0.02 MPa时腐蚀速率取得最大值.

  15. Study on Phase Equilibrium Properties for CO2+Cosolvent Binary Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the constant volume, visual method is used to measure thc critical point of CO2toluene, CO2+cyclohexane, CO2+n-butyraldehyde, CO2+i-butyraldchyde, CO2+methanol and CO2+alcohol binary systems. The relationship between critical point and the concentration of the entrainer for different substances has been discussed, and the comparison of the phase behavior of single component system and that of binary systems have been carried out.

  16. Plume head - trench interaction: impact on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, P. G.; Moresi, L. N.; Mason, W. G.; Willis, D.

    2013-12-01

    The geologic record provides numerous examples where plumes and their associated buoyancy swell have disrupted convergent plate margins. These interactions have produced a variety of responses in the overriding plate including transient episodes of arc amagmatism, transient episodes of crustal shortening followed by plume-related magmatism in the overriding plate. The latter observation implies the plume must have transitioned from the subducting plate to the overriding plate. We present several 3D Underworld numerical models of plume heads of variable dimension and buoyancy interacting with a subduction trench. The models indicate that plume heads impact enormously on trench geometry. Arcuate trenches are created as the trench retreats around the edges of the plume head, whereas trench advance occurs in front of the plume resulting in transient crustal shortening in the overriding plate. Stalling of subduction when the plume head impacts the trench causes slab windowing. The size of the slab window is dependent on the size and buoyancy of the plume. The creation of the slab window provides a potential conduit for plume migration to the overriding plate. Alternatively, the plume head may be transferred to the overriding plate as subduction is re-established behind the plume. Models with "strong" slabs, characterized by high yield strengths, display different behavior. Plume-heads are entrained in the slab and are subducted without the development of a slab window.

  17. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Mineral Reactivity in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: I. Phase Behavior of Carbon Dioxide - Water - Chloride Salt Systems Across the H2O-Rich to the CO2-Rich Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Ronald D.; Wang, Zheming; Anderko, Andre; Wang, Peiming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-09-05

    Phase equilibria in mixtures containing carbon dioxide, water, and chloride salts have been investigated using a combination of solubility measurements and thermodynamic modeling. The solubility of water in the CO2-rich phase of ternary mixtures of CO2, H2O and NaCl or CaCl2 was determined, using near infrared spectroscopy, at 90 atm and 40 to 100 °C. These measurements fill a gap in the experimental database for CO2 water salt systems, for which phase composition data have been available only for the H2O-rich phases. A thermodynamic model for CO2 water salt systems has been constructed on the basis of the previously developed Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) framework, which is capable of modeling aqueous solutions over broad ranges of temperature and pressure, is valid to high electrolyte concentrations, treats mixed-phase systems (with both scCO2 and water present) and can predict the thermodynamic properties of dry and partially water-saturated supercritical CO2 over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. Within the MSE framework the standard-state properties are calculated from the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state whereas the excess Gibbs energy includes a long-range electrostatic interaction term expressed by a Pitzer-Debye-Hückel equation, a virial coefficient-type term for interactions between ions and a short-range term for interactions involving neutral molecules. The parameters of the MSE model have been evaluated using literature data for both the H2O-rich and CO2-rich phases in the CO2 - H2O binary and for the H2O-rich phase in the CO2 - H2O - NaCl / KCl / CaCl2 / MgCl2 ternary and multicompontent systems. The model accurately represents the properties of these systems at temperatures from 0°C to 300 °C and pressures up to ~4000 atm. Further, the solubilities of H2O in CO2-rich phases that are predicted by the model are in agreement with the new measurements for the CO2 - H2O - NaCl and CO2 - H2O - CaCl2 systems. Thus, the model can be

  18. Variability and Composition of Io's Pele Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, K. L.; Spencer, J.; Yelle, R.

    2004-11-01

    The Pele plume is one of the largest and most dynamic of the plumes on Io. While sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas was always assumed to be a constituent of this plume, spectral observations obtained in 1999 were the first to positively identify elemental sulfur (S2) (Spencer et al. 2000) within the Pele plume. The S2/SO2 ratio derived from this observation provided a critical component necessary for the constraint of the magma chemistry and vent conditions of the Pele plume (Zolotov and Fegley 1998). But, because the Pele plume has long been known to be variable in its eruptive behavior, it is not likely that the vent conditions are invariant. Consequently, additional observations were needed to constrain the extent of the variability of the plume's composition and gas abundances. To this end, in February 2003, March 2003 and January 2004 we obtained spectra of Pele with Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in transit of Jupiter, using the 0.1 arcsec slit, for the wavelength region extending from 2100-3100 Å. Contemporaneous with the spectral data we also obtained UV and visible-wavelength images of the plume in reflected sunlight with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) prior to Jupiter transit, in order to constrain plume dust abundance. The newly acquired STIS data show both the S2 and SO2 absorption signatures, and provide concrete evidence of temporal variability in the abundance of these gases. Likewise, the degree of dust scattering recorded in the ACS data varied as a function of the date of observation. We will present preliminary constraints on the composition and variability of the gas abundances of the Pele plume as recorded within the STIS data. We will also give a brief overview of the variability of the plume dust signatures relative to the gas signatures as a function of time.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of 3Cr and P110 Steel in Simulated Environment Containing CO2/H2S%模拟油田CO2/H2S环境下3Cr和P110钢的腐蚀行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何兴利; 赵国仙; 刘会

    2009-01-01

    通过模拟塔里木油田现场环境,利用高温高压试验设备,采用扫描电镜(SEM)、能谱仪(EDS)和X射线衍射仪(XRD)技术,辅以失重法,研究了油套管3Cr(API 5CT LS0钢级)和P110钢在H2S分压为0.5 MPa时不同CO2分压下的腐蚀速率和腐蚀形态,并对试样表面腐蚀产物的成分进行了分析.试验结果表明,随着CO2分压的增大,3Cr钢平均腐蚀速率也随之变大,而P110钢呈现先增大后减小的趋势,且3Cr钢的腐蚀产物膜中出现了Cr的富集现象.探讨了在CO2/H2S环境下Cl-及Cr元素对P110和3Cr钢腐蚀的影响.

  20. CO2 activation on bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalie Austin; Brandon Butina; Giannis Mpourmpakis⁎

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic, and CO2 adsorption properties of 55-atom bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles (NPs) in core-shell and decorated architectures, as well as of their monometallic counterparts. Our results revealed that with respect to the monometallic Cu55 and Ni55 parents, the formation of decorated Cu12Ni43 and core-shell Cu42Ni13 are energetically favorable. We found that CO2 chemisorbs on monometallic Ni55, core-shell Cu13Ni42, and decorated Cu12Ni43 and Cu43Ni12, whereas, it physisorbs on monometallic Cu55 and core-shell Cu42Ni13. The presence of surface Ni on the NPs is key in strongly adsorbing and activating the CO2 molecule (linear to bent transition and elongation of C˭O bonds). This activation occurs through a charge transfer from the NPs to the CO2 molecule, where the local metal d-orbital density localization on surface Ni plays a pivotal role. This work identifies insightful structure-property relationships for CO2 activation and highlights the importance of keeping a balance between NP stability and CO2 adsorption behavior in designing catalytic bimetallic NPs that activate CO2.

  1. CO2 activation on bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Austin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic, and CO2 adsorption properties of 55-atom bimetallic CuNi nanoparticles (NPs in core-shell and decorated architectures, as well as of their monometallic counterparts. Our results revealed that with respect to the monometallic Cu55 and Ni55 parents, the formation of decorated Cu12Ni43 and core-shell Cu42Ni13 are energetically favorable. We found that CO2 chemisorbs on monometallic Ni55, core-shell Cu13Ni42, and decorated Cu12Ni43 and Cu43Ni12, whereas, it physisorbs on monometallic Cu55 and core-shell Cu42Ni13. The presence of surface Ni on the NPs is key in strongly adsorbing and activating the CO2 molecule (linear to bent transition and elongation of C˭O bonds. This activation occurs through a charge transfer from the NPs to the CO2 molecule, where the local metal d-orbital density localization on surface Ni plays a pivotal role. This work identifies insightful structure-property relationships for CO2 activation and highlights the importance of keeping a balance between NP stability and CO2 adsorption behavior in designing catalytic bimetallic NPs that activate CO2.

  2. Simplified Predictive Models for CO2 Sequestration Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta; RaviGanesh, Priya; Schuetter, Jared; Mooney, Douglas; He, Jincong; Durlofsky, Louis

    2014-05-01

    We present results from an ongoing research project that seeks to develop and validate a portfolio of simplified modeling approaches that will enable rapid feasibility and risk assessment for CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The overall research goal is to provide tools for predicting: (a) injection well and formation pressure buildup, and (b) lateral and vertical CO2 plume migration. Simplified modeling approaches that are being developed in this research fall under three categories: (1) Simplified physics-based modeling (SPM), where only the most relevant physical processes are modeled, (2) Statistical-learning based modeling (SLM), where the simulator is replaced with a "response surface", and (3) Reduced-order method based modeling (RMM), where mathematical approximations reduce the computational burden. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. In the first category (SPM), we use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. In the second category (SLM), we develop statistical "proxy models" using the simulation domain described previously with two different approaches: (a) classical Box-Behnken experimental design with a quadratic response surface fit, and (b) maximin Latin Hypercube sampling (LHS) based design with a Kriging metamodel fit using a quadratic trend and Gaussian correlation structure. For roughly the same number of

  3. CyclicCO2R: production of cyclic carbonates from CO2 using renewable feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Håkonsen, S.F.; Heyn, R.; Offermans, W.; Leitner, W.; Ostapowicz, T.; Müller, T. E.; Mul, G.; North, M.; Ngomsik-Fanselow, A.F.; Sarron, E.; Sigurbjörnsson, O.; Schäffner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The consortium behind CyclicCO2R wants to kick-start the implementation of CO2 utilization technologies by converting CO2 into a high value-added product, thus providing a showcase that inspires industry to further develop technologies utilizing CO2 as a sustainable raw material and valorizing CO2

  4. CyclicCO2R: production of cyclic carbonates from CO2 using renewable feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Håkonsen, S.F.; Heyn, R.; Offermans, W.; Leitner, W.; Ostapowicz, T.; Müller, T. E.; Mul, G.; North, M.; Ngomsik-Fanselow, A.F.; Sarron, E.; Sigurbjörnsson, O.; Schäffner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The consortium behind CyclicCO2R wants to kick-start the implementation of CO2 utilization technologies by converting CO2 into a high value-added product, thus providing a showcase that inspires industry to further develop technologies utilizing CO2 as a sustainable raw material and valorizing CO2 i

  5. REDUCING UNCERTAINTIES IN MODEL PREDICTIONS VIA HISTORY MATCHING OF CO2 MIGRATION AND REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING OF CO2 FATE AT THE SLEIPNER PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chen

    2015-03-31

    An important question for the Carbon Capture, Storage, and Utility program is “can we adequately predict the CO2 plume migration?” For tracking CO2 plume development, the Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea provides more time-lapse seismic monitoring data than any other sites, but significant uncertainties still exist for some of the reservoir parameters. In Part I, we assessed model uncertainties by applying two multi-phase compositional simulators to the Sleipner Benchmark model for the uppermost layer (Layer 9) of the Utsira Sand and calibrated our model against the time-lapsed seismic monitoring data for the site from 1999 to 2010. Approximate match with the observed plume was achieved by introducing lateral permeability anisotropy, adding CH4 into the CO2 stream, and adjusting the reservoir temperatures. Model-predicted gas saturation, CO2 accumulation thickness, and CO2 solubility in brine—none were used as calibration metrics—were all comparable with the interpretations of the seismic data in the literature. In Part II & III, we evaluated the uncertainties of predicted long-term CO2 fate up to 10,000 years, due to uncertain reaction kinetics. Under four scenarios of the kinetic rate laws, the temporal and spatial evolution of CO2 partitioning into the four trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic/structural, solubility, residual/capillary, and mineral) was simulated with ToughReact, taking into account the CO2-brine-rock reactions and the multi-phase reactive flow and mass transport. Modeling results show that different rate laws for mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions resulted in different predicted amounts of trapped CO2 by carbonate minerals, with scenarios of the conventional linear rate law for feldspar dissolution having twice as much mineral trapping (21% of the injected CO2) as scenarios with a Burch-type or Alekseyev et al.–type rate law for feldspar dissolution (11%). So far, most reactive transport modeling (RTM) studies for

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Nanoparticle Transport in Multiphase Flows in Porous Media: CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-09-03

    Geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in deep saline aquifers has recently received tremendous attention in the scientific literature. Injected CO2 plume buoyantly accumulates at the top part of the deep aquifer under a sealing cap rock, and some concern that the high-pressure CO2 could breach the seal rock. However, CO2 will diffuse into the brine underneath and generate a slightly denser fluid that may induce instability and convective mixing. Onset times of instability and convective mixing performance depend on the physical properties of the rock and fluids, such as permeability and density contrast. The novel idea is to adding nanoparticles to the injected CO2 to increase density contrast between the CO2-rich brine and the underlying resident brine and, consequently, decrease onset time of instability and increase convective mixing. As far as it goes, only few works address the issues related to mathematical and numerical modeling aspects of the nanoparticles transport phenomena in CO2 storages. In the current work, we will present mathematical models to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by injected CO2 in porous media. Buoyancy and capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion are important to be considered in the model. IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation-Concentration (IMPESC) scheme is used and a numerical simulator is developed to simulate the nanoparticles transport in CO2 storages.

  7. Standoff midwave infrared hyperspectral imaging of ship plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Lagueux, Philippe; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of ship plumes is very challenging due to the great variety of ships, fuel, and fuel grades, as well as the extent of a gas plume. In this work, imaging of ship plumes from an operating ferry boat was carried out using standoff midwave (3-5 μm) infrared hyperspectral imaging. Quantitative chemical imaging of combustion gases was achieved by fitting a radiative transfer model. Combustion efficiency maps and mass flow rates are presented for carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The results illustrate how valuable information about the combustion process of a ship engine can be successfully obtained using passive hyperspectral remote sensing imaging.

  8. CO2 Utilization and Storage in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaef, T.; Glezakou, V.; Owen, T.; Miller, Q.; Loring, J.; Davidson, C.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Surging natural gas production from fractured shale reservoirs and the emerging concept of utilizing anthropogenic CO2 for secondary recovery and permanent storage is driving the need for understanding fundamental mechanisms controlling gas adsorption and desorption processes, mineral volume changes, and impacts to transmissivity properties. Early estimates indicate that between 10 and 30 gigatons of CO2 storage capacity may exist in the 24 shale gas plays included in current USGS assessments. However, the adsorption of gases (CO2, CH4, and SO2) is not well understood and appears unique for individual clay minerals. Using specialized experimental techniques developed at PNNL, pure clay minerals were examined at relevant pressures and temperatures during exposure to CH4, CO2, and mixtures of CO2-SO2. Adsorbed concentrations of methane displayed a linear behavior as a function of pressure as determined by a precision quartz crystal microbalance. Acid gases produced differently shaped adsorption isotherms, depending on temperature and pressure. In the instance of kaolinite, gaseous CO2 adsorbed linearly, but in the presence of supercritical CO2, surface condensation increased significantly to a peak value before desorbing with further increases in pressure. Similarly shaped CO2 adsorption isotherms derived from natural shale samples and coal samples have been reported in the literature. Adsorption steps, determined by density functional theory calculations, showed they were energetically favorable until the first CO2 layer formed, corresponding to a density of ~0.35 g/cm3. Interlayer cation content (Ca, Mg, or Na) of montmorillonites influenced adsorbed gas concentrations. Measurements by in situ x-ray diffraction demonstrate limited CO2 diffusion into the Na-montmorillonite interlayer spacing, with structural changes related to increased hydration. Volume changes were observed when Ca or Mg saturated montmorillonites in the 1W hydration state were exposed to

  9. Transient modeling of electrochemically assisted CO2 capture and release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shobhana; Stechel, Ellen B.; Buttry, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims to develop a model of a new electrochemical CO2 separation and release technology. We present a one-dimensional transient model of an electrochemical cell for point source CO2 capture and release, which mainly focuses on the simultaneous mass transport and complex chemical...... reactions associated with the separation process. For concreteness, we use an ionic liquid (IL) with 2 M thiolate anion (RS−) in 1 M disulfide (RSSR) as an electrolyte in the electrochemical cell to capture, transport and release CO2 under standard operating conditions. We computationally solved the model...... to analyze the time-dependent behavior of CO2 capture and electro-migration transport across the cell length. Given high nonlinearity of the system, we used a finite element method (FEM) to numerically solve the coupled mass transport equations. The model describes the concentration profiles by taking...

  10. CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CO2 Virtual Data Environment is a comprehensive effort at bringing together the models, data, and tools necessary to perform research on atmospheric CO2.This...

  11. Why capture CO2 from the atmosphere?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, David W

    2009-01-01

    Air capture is an industrial process for capturing CO2 from ambient air; it is one of an emerging set of technologies for CO2 removal that includes geological storage of biotic carbon and the acceleration of geochemical weathering...

  12. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-10-01

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires are compared to thermal plumes from cooling towers and proposed energy centers to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rates of mass fires are generally larger than for single or small groups of cooling towers but are comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, significant physical differences exist between cooling tower plumes and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are generally dominated by ambient wind, stability and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on burning rates and other factors, can transform into convective columns which may cause the fire behavior to become more violent. This transformation can cause strong inflow winds and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Intense convective columns may interact with ambient winds to create significant downwind effects such as wakes and Karman vortex streets. These characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date. The differences in physical characteristics between cooling tower and fire plumes makes the fire analog concept very questionable even though the approximate energy requirements appear to be satisfied in case of large energy centers. Additional research is suggested in studying the upper-level plume characteristics of small experimental fires so this information can be correlated with similar data from cooling towers. Numerical simulation of fires and proposed multiple cooling tower systems could also provide comparative data.

  13. Multicomponent CO2-Brine Simulations of Fluid and Heat Transfer in Sedimentary-Basin Geothermal Systems: Expanding Geothermal Energy Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, M. O.; Randolph, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    In a carbon dioxide plume geothermal (CPG) system, carbon dioxide (CO2) is pumped into existing high-permeability geologic formations that are overlain by a low-permeability caprock. The resulting CO2 plume largely displaces native formation fluid and is heated by the natural in-situ heat and background geothermal heat flux. A portion of the heated CO2 is piped to the surface to produce power and/or to provide heat for direct use before being returned to the geologic reservoir. Non-recoverable CO2 in the subsurface is geologically sequestered, serving as a CO2 sink. As such, this approach results in a geothermal power plant with a negative carbon footprint. We present results of calculations concerning geothermal power plant efficiencies and energy production rates in both traditional reservoir-based systems and engineered geothermal systems (EGS) when CO2, rather than water, is used as the subsurface working fluid. While our previous studies have examined geologic systems with established CO2 plumes, we focus here on multicomponent (CO2 + brine) systems. Numerical simulations (e.g., Randolph and Saar, Geophysical Research Letters, 2011) indicate that CPG systems provide several times the heat energy recovery of similar water-based systems. Furthermore, the CPG method results in higher geothermal heat extraction efficiencies than both water- and CO2-based EGS. Therefore, CPG should further extend the applicability of geothermal energy utilization to regions with subsurface temperatures and heat flow rates that are even lower than those that may be added due to switching from water- to CO2-based EGS. Finally, simulations at present suggest that multicomponent effects - e.g., buoyant flow as CO2 rises over denser brine - may enhance heat extraction in CPG systems compared to traditional water-based geothermal approaches.

  14. Calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, B. van der; Egberts, P.

    2008-01-01

    Often we need to know how much CO2 we can store in a certain underground space, or how much such space we need to store a given amount of CO2. In a recent attempt (Bradshaw et al., 2006) to list various regional and global estimates of CO2 storage capacity (Figure 1), the estimates reported are ofte

  15. Calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, B. van der; Egberts, P.

    2008-01-01

    Often we need to know how much CO2 we can store in a certain underground space, or how much such space we need to store a given amount of CO2. In a recent attempt (Bradshaw et al., 2006) to list various regional and global estimates of CO2 storage capacity (Figure 1), the estimates reported are

  16. Stress Path Evolution Associated With CO2 Storage Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarrasa, V.; Gheibi, S.; Holt, R. M.; Lavrov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Safe storage of CO2 in geological formations is an essential part of CO2 sequestration projects. Pressure changes inside the formation cause effective and total stress changes inside and outside of those formations. These changes can bring the reservoir or its surroundings to failure conditions. The existence of faults and weak zones increases the likelihood of failure in rock masses depending on the amount of the injection-induced changes and the formation properties. This paper discusses the stress changes in different reservoir and injection conditions. Numerical analysis indicates that the pressure buildup can significantly change the total and effective stress and these changes are more severe when faults are present in the formation. Also, the reservoir and caprock experience a greater decrease in the mean effective stress and increase in the deviatoric stress in the footwall and hanging wall of a fault in reverse and normal faulting stress regimes, respectively. The stress path depends on the size of the CO2 plume, the pressure distribution inside the reservoir, and fault and reservoir properties.

  17. Porous-medium convection: new problems from CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, John

    2013-11-01

    Large scale injection and storage of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep saline aquifers is proposed to offset anthropogenic emissions and mitigate climate change. Many aspects of the resultant porous flows provoke fundamental fluid-mechanical problems. The rise and spread of the buoyant CO2 plume beneath an overlying impermeable stratum is a classic gravity current, but with the undesirable extra possibility of upward leakage through fractures. Fortunately, long-term trapping mechanisms exist. One such, dissolution of CO2 into the underlying brine, produces a denser solution which thus convects reassuringly downwards. Consideration of the convective flux prompts re-examination of high-Ra convection in a porous medium, which is found to have a strikingly different asymptotic form from that in a pure fluid. The high-Ra regime of Rayleigh-Darcy convection has an ordered interior with a linear mean temperature gradient and a superposed vertical columnar heat-exchanger flow whose wavelength is consistent with the Ra - 5 / 14 scaling predicted by an asymptotic stability analysis. Quantification of the convective dissolution flux allows evolution towards saturation in confined aquifers, or the erosion of a gravity current in open aquifers, to be calculated.

  18. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; William Smith; Carl Palmer

    2013-02-01

    EGS using CO2 as a working fluid will likely involve hydro-shearing low-permeability hot rock reservoirs with a water solution. After that process, the fractures will be flushed with CO2 that is maintained under supercritical conditions (> 70 bars). Much of the injected water in the main fracture will be flushed out with the initial CO2 injection; however side fractures, micro fractures, and the lower portion of the fracture will contain connate water that will interact with the rock and the injected CO2. Dissolution/precipitation reactions in the resulting scCO2/brine/rock systems have the potential to significantly alter reservoir permeability, so it is important to understand where these precipitates form and how are they related to the evolving ‘free’ connate water in the system. To examine dissolution / precipitation behavior in such systems over time, we have conducted non-stirred batch experiments in the laboratory with pure minerals, sandstone, and basalt coupons with brine solution spiked with MnCl2 and scCO2. The coupons are exposed to liquid water saturated with scCO2 and extend above the water surface allowing the upper portion of the coupons to be exposed to scCO2 saturated with water. The coupons were subsequently analyzed using SEM to determine the location of reactions in both in and out of the liquid water. Results of these will be summarized with regard to significance for EGS with CO2 as a working fluid.

  19. Zero-Offset VSP Monitoring of CO2 Storage: Impedance Inversion and Wedge Modelling at the Ketzin Pilot Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Götz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At the CO2 storage pilot site near the town of Ketzin (35 km west of Berlin, Germany the sandstone reservoir at 630 m–650 m depth is thin and heterogeneous. The time-lapse analysis of zero-offset VSP measurements shows that CO2-induced amplitude changes can be observed on near-well corridor stacks. Further, we investigate whether CO2-induced amplitude changes in the monitoring data can be used to derive geometrical and petrophysical parameters governing the migration of CO2 within a brine saturated sandstone aquifer. 2D seismic-elastic modelling is done to test the processing workflow and to perform a wedge modelling study for estimation of the vertical expansion of the CO2 plume. When using the NRMS error as a measure for the similarity between the modelled and recorded repeat traces, the best match is achieved for a plume thickness of 6-7 m within the reservoir sandstone of 8 m thickness. With band limited impedance inversion a velocity reduction at the top of the reservoir of 30%, influenced by casing reverberations as well as CO2 injection, is found. The relation of seismic amplitude to CO2 saturated layer thickness and CO2-induced changes in P-wave velocities are important parameters for the quantification of the injected CO2 volume.

  20. Potential for the Use of Wireless Sensor Networks for Monitoring of CO2 Leakage Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, R.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Han, Q.; Jayasumana, A.

    2015-12-01

    Storage of supercritical CO2 in deep saline geologic formation is under study as a means to mitigate potential global climate change from green house gas loading to the atmosphere. Leakage of CO2 from these formations poses risk to the storage permanence goal of 99% of injected CO2 remaining sequestered from the atmosphere,. Leaked CO2 that migrates into overlying groundwater aquifers may cause changes in groundwater quality that pose risks to environmental and human health. For these reasons, technologies for monitoring, measuring and accounting of injected CO2 are necessary for permitting of CO2 sequestration projects under EPA's class VI CO2 injection well regulations. While the probability of leakage related to CO2 injection is thought to be small at characterized and permitted sites, it is still very important to protect the groundwater resources and develop methods that can efficiently and accurately detect CO2 leakage. Methods that have been proposed for leakage detection include remote sensing, soil gas monitoring, geophysical techniques, pressure monitoring, vegetation stress and eddy covariance measurements. We have demonstrated the use of wireless sensor networks (WSN) for monitoring of subsurface contaminant plumes. The adaptability of this technology for leakage monitoring of CO2 through geochemical changes in the shallow subsurface is explored. For this technology to be viable, it is necessary to identify geochemical indicators such as pH or electrical conductivity that have high potential for significant change in groundwater in the event of CO2 leakage. This talk presents a conceptual approach to use WSNs for CO2 leakage monitoring. Based on our past work on the use of WSN for subsurface monitoring, some of the challenges that need to be over come for this technology to be viable for leakage detection will be discussed.

  1. Two-phase flow effects on the CO2 injection pressure evolution and implications for the caprock geomechanical stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilarrasa Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geologic carbon storage is considered to be one of the main solutions to significantly reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere to mitigate climate change. CO2 injection in deep geological formations entails a two-phase flow, being CO2 the non-wetting phase. One of the main concerns of geologic carbon storage is whether the overpressure induced by CO2 injection may compromise the caprock integrity and faults stability. We numerically investigate the two-phase flow effects that govern the overpressure evolution generated by CO2 injection and how this overpressure affects the caprock geomechanical stability. We find that fluid pressure increases sharply at the beginning of injection because CO2 has to displace the brine that fills the pores around the injection well, which reduces the relative permeability. However, overpressure decreases subsequently because once CO2 fills the pores around the injection well, CO2 can flow easily due to its low viscosity and because the relative permeability to CO2 increases. Furthermore, the pressure drop that occurs in the capillary fringe due to two-phase flow interference decreases as the CO2 plume becomes larger. This overpressure evolution induced by CO2 injection, which remains practically constant with time after the initial peak, is very beneficial for maintaining caprock stability. Thus, the sealing capacity of the caprock will be maintained, preventing CO2 leakage to occur across the caprock.

  2. Valence Fluctuations in CeCo2 and Ti-Doped CeCo2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner, Yıldırhan

    2016-12-01

    We report on the magnetic measurements of polycrystalline samples of CeCo2 and CeCo(2-x)Ti x (x = 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, and 0.05) which have been synthesized by an arc melting technique. All these compounds crystallize into the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure with the Fd bar{3} m space group. The lattice parameter decreases linearly with increasing Ti content from 7.15808(5) Å for x = 0 (CeCo2) to 7.15231(7) Å for x = 0.05. The magnetic behavior of these compounds has been investigated in the temperature range 5-400 K. The zero field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled magnetization (FC) curves show irreversibility below T = 400 K. This result indicates that an inhomogeneous, dynamic magnetic state exists over a wide temperature range. The magnetic susceptibility for both ZFC and FC cases initially decreases with Ti content and then increases with further Ti addition. This behavior is interpreted in terms of band magnetism in the presence of magnetic clusters. This result indicates that the magnetic inhomogeneity of these alloys becomes dominant over a wide temperature range. The observed temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility leads us to suggest that these compounds are in a mixed-valence state of the magnetic Ce3+ ions and non-magnetic Ce4+ ions. This fact allows us to successfully interpret the ZFC magnetic susceptibility data with the two-level ionic inter-configuration fluctuations model. We also observe that the magnetic susceptibility increases by the addition of Ti, as evidenced by the enhancement of the formation of magnetic Co clusters due to local disorder. Finally, the magnetic state below the Curie temperatures are discussed based on Griffiths-like behavior.

  3. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Production of cement is an energy intensive process and is the source of considerable CO2emissions. Itis estimated that the cement industry contributes around 8% of total global CO2emissions. CO2is oneof the major greenhouse gases. In the atmosphere, the CO2concentration has increased from 310 ppmvin 1960 to 390 ppmv in 2012, probably due to human activity. A lot of research is being carried out forreducing CO2emissions from large stationary sources. Ofwhich, the carbonate looping process is ...

  4. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  5. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  6. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases.

  7. Amine scrubbing for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Gary T

    2009-09-25

    Amine scrubbing has been used to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from natural gas and hydrogen since 1930. It is a robust technology and is ready to be tested and used on a larger scale for CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. The minimum work requirement to separate CO2 from coal-fired flue gas and compress CO2 to 150 bar is 0.11 megawatt-hours per metric ton of CO2. Process and solvent improvements should reduce the energy consumption to 0.2 megawatt-hour per ton of CO2. Other advanced technologies will not provide energy-efficient or timely solutions to CO2 emission from conventional coal-fired power plants.

  8. On the Formation of CO2 and Other Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, Robin T

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of interstellar dust-grain ices under dark-cloud conditions, with a particular emphasis on CO2. We use a three-phase model (gas/surface/mantle) to simulate the coupled gas--grain chemistry, allowing the distinction of the chemically-active surface from the ice layers preserved in the mantle beneath. The model includes a treatment of the competition between barrier-mediated surface reactions and thermal-hopping processes. The results show excellent agreement with the observed behavior of CO2, CO and water ice in the interstellar medium. The reaction of the OH radical with CO is found to be efficient enough to account for CO2 ice production in dark clouds. At low visual extinctions, with dust temperatures ~12 K, CO2 is formed by direct diffusion and reaction of CO with OH; we associate the resultant CO2-rich ice with the observational polar CO2 signature. CH4 ice is well correlated with this component. At higher extinctions, with lower dust temperatures, CO is relative...

  9. Nucleation Pathways of CO2 Condensation under Mesoporous Templated Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Byran, Matthew S.; Warren, Garfield T.; Sokol, Paul E.; Indiana University Team; NIST Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) are important elements in reducing greenhouse gas emission and combating global warming. The adsorption behavior of CO2 under mesoporous confinement at room temperature is particularly relevant. , Small Angle Scattering of X-ray (SAXS) and Neutron (SANS) were used to probe the adsorption process of CO2 under such mesoporous confinement MCM-41 and details of nucleation pathways were mapped out by fitting the scattering intensities with adsorption models. From both experiments, the nucleation of CO2 on the inner pore surface of MCM-41 is found to be a two-step process; high density liquid phase CO2 first forms uniform layers following the long range translational symmetry of the porous matrix, above one CO2 filling, determined by the pore size and temperature, capillary condensation initiates. The nucleation sites formed during capillary condensation start to separate the long range symmetry from the one at uniform layers. Finally, SAXS and SANS techniques are compared and they both showed their unique properties of probing the filling-dependent structures of adsorbed CO2 under such mesoporous system.

  10. Harnessing Geothermal Energy from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, M. O.; Randolph, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Recent geotechnical research shows that geothermal heat can be efficiently mined by circulating CO2 through naturally permeable, porous rock formations. This method, called CO2 Plume Geothermal (CPG), targets the same geologic reservoirs that are suitable for deep saline aquifer CO2 sequestration or enhanced oil recovery (EOR). While previous investigations have focused on CO2-based heat mining from saline aquifers, here we present new research that is primarily concerned with EOR reservoirs, specifically those using a CO2 flood. EOR operations provide excellent opportunities for economically-favorable geothermal energy recovery, assuming subsurface temperatures are sufficient, because the majority of costly infrastructure (i.e., wells) is in place. Moreover, the subsurface characteristics that make a site suitable for hydrocarbon recovery -- at least moderate reservoir permeability and porosity, and a low-permeability capping feature -- help ensure that fluid can be circulated for heat extraction and that CO2 will be contained. However, heat extraction from the CO2 + water/brine + hydrocarbon EOR production stream is challenging, requiring fluid separation and multiple binary and/or direct power systems (depending on site-specific fluid composition and conditions). We discuss several scenarios, encompassing multiple power system configurations, for harnessing geothermal energy from CO2 EOR operations. In addition, we present preliminary numerical modeling results for net power production from such EOR operations -- accounting for wide variation in produced fluid temperature, pressure, and composition -- and consider the economic implications of power sales for EOR sites.

  11. Effect of H2S Partial Pressure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of 13Cr Stainless Steel in Annulus Environment Around CO2 Injection Well%H2S分压对13Cr不锈钢在CO2注气井环空环境中应力腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰; 韦春艳; 黄天杰; 崔中雨; 李晓刚

    2014-01-01

    利用高压下的电化学实验及U型弯浸泡实验结合微观分析手段,研究了13Cr不锈钢在不同H2S分压下CO2注气井环空环境模拟液中的电化学特征及应力腐蚀规律.结果表明:油套管钢的刺漏现象以及环境中硫酸盐还原菌的存在使得环空环境成为复杂的高压H2S-CO2-Cl-环境,13Cr不锈钢在该种环境下具有明显的应力腐蚀敏感性.随着H2S分压的升高,13Cr不锈钢击破电位下降,应力腐蚀敏感性增强,这主要因为H2S分压的增大对不锈钢表面膜(钝化膜及腐蚀产物膜)的破坏作用加强.当H2S分压达到0.20 MPa时,13Cr不锈钢发生明显的应力腐蚀,断口表现为由沿晶应力腐蚀裂纹(IGSCC)和穿晶应力腐蚀裂纹(TGSCC)组成的混合断口,应力腐蚀受阳极溶解和氢致开裂共同控制.

  12. Effects of Temperature on H2S/CO2 Corrosion Behavior of API- X60 Steel%温度对API-X60管线钢H2S/CO2腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建炜; 章军; 陈晨; 曹建平; 许静

    2010-01-01

    利用高温高压反应釜模拟高含硫气田H2S/CO2共存环境,在流动溶液介质中进行腐蚀试验,辅以扫描电子显微镜和X射线衍射仪等研究手段,探讨了温度对API-X60管线钢H2S/CO2腐蚀行为的影响.结果表明,随着温度的升高,API-X60管线钢的腐蚀速率先升高后降低,腐蚀形态由局部腐蚀趋于全面腐蚀,高温区有点蚀倾向.低温时形成的腐蚀产物以马基诺矿型晶体和铁的单硫化物为主,随着温度的升高,腐蚀产物以层片状马基诺矿型晶体为主,并出现少量磁黄铁矿型晶体,高温区则以磁黄铁矿型晶体为主.低温区点蚀的发生是由于腐蚀产物附着力差导致其覆盖率降低,膜层覆盖处的阴极效应促进了局部腐蚀.

  13. Spatial distribution of Δ14CO2 across Eurasia: measurements from the TROICA-8 expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Mondeel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Because fossil fuel derived CO2 is the only source of atmospheric CO2 that is devoid of 14C, atmospheric measurements of Δ14CO2 can be used to constrain fossil fuel emissions at local and regional scales. However, at the continental scale, atmospheric transport and other sources of variability in Δ14CO2 may influence the fossil fuel detection capability. We present a set of Δ14CO2 observations from the train-based TROICA-8 expedition across Eurasia in March–April 2004. Local perturbations in Δ14CO2 are caused by easily identifiable sources from nuclear reactors and localized pollution events. The remaining data show an increase in Δ14CO2 from Western Russia (40° E to Eastern Siberia (120° E, consistent with depletion in 14CO2 caused by fossil fuel CO2 emissions in heavily populated Europe, and gradual dispersion of the fossil fuel plume across Northern Asia. Other tracer gas species which may be correlated with fossil fuel CO2 emissions, including carbon monoxide, sulphur hexafluoride, and perchloroethylene, were also measured and the results compared with the Δ14CO2 measurements. The sulphur hexafluoride longitudinal gradient is not significant relative to the measurement uncertainty. Carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene show large-scale trends of enriched values in Western Russia and decreasing values in Eastern Siberia, consistent with fossil fuel emissions, but exhibit significant spatial variability, especially near their primary sources in Western Russia. The clean air Δ14CO2 observations are compared with simulated spatial gradients from the TM5 atmospheric transport model. We show that the change in Δ14CO2 across the TROICA transect is due almost entirely to emissions of fossil fuel CO2, but that the magnitude of this Δ14CO2 gradient is relatively insensitive to modest uncertainties in the fossil fuel flux. In contrast, the Δ14CO2 gradient is strongly sensitive to the modeled representation of vertical mixing, suggesting

  14. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh;

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, western Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for detection of small electrical conductivity (EC) changes during the first 2....... The combined HBB and VBB data sets were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for cancellation of coherent noises and enhanced resolution of small changes. ERT detected the small bulk EC changes (resistive gaseous CO2. The primary factors that control...... bulk EC changes may be caused by limited and variable ERT resolution, low ERT sensitivity to resistive anomalies and uncalibrated CO2 gas saturation. ERT data show a broader CO2 plume while water sample EC had higher fine-scale variability. Our ERT electrode configuration can be optimized for more...

  15. Plume Migration of Different Carbon Dioxide Phases During Geological Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hao Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the plume migration of mobile supercritical phase (flowing, aqueous phase (dissolved, and ionic phase CO2 (bicarbonate, and evaluates the spatial distribution of immobile supercritical phase (residual and mineral phase CO2 (carbonates when CO2 was sequestered. This utilized a simulation, in an anticline structure of a deep saline aquifer in the Tiechenshan (TCS field, Taiwan. All of the trapping mechanisms and different CO2 phases were studied using the fully coupled geochemical equation-of-state GEM compositional simulator. The mobile supercritical phase CO2 moved upward and then accumulated in the up-dip of the structure because of buoyancy. A large amount of immobile supercritical phase CO2 was formed at the rear of the moving plume where the imbibition process prevailed. Both the aqueous and ionic phase CO2 finally accumulated in the down-dip of the structure because of convection. The plume volume of aqueous phase CO2 was larger than that of the supercritical phase CO2, because the convection process increased vertical sweep efficiency. The up-dip of the structure was not the major location for mineralization, which is different from mobile supercritical phase CO2 accumulation.

  16. Extraction of stevia glycosides with CO2 + water, CO2 + ethanol, and CO2 + water + ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pasquel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Stevia leaves are an important source of natural sugar substitute. There are some restrictions on the use of stevia extract because of its distinctive aftertaste. Some authors attribute this to soluble material other than the stevia glycosides, even though it is well known that stevia glycosides have to some extent a bitter taste. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to develop a process to obtain stevia extract of a better quality. The proposed process includes two steps: i Pretreatment of the leaves by SCFE; ii Extraction of the stevia glycosides by SCFE using CO2 as solvent and water and/or ethanol as cosolvent. The mean total yield for SCFE pretreatment was 3.0%. The yields for SCFE with cosolvent of stevia glycosides were below 0.50%, except at 120 bar, 16°C, and 9.5% (molar of water. Under this condition, total yield was 3.4%. The quality of the glycosidic fraction with respect to its capacity as sweetener was better for the SCFE extract as compared to extract obtained by the conventional process. The overall extraction curves were well described by the Lack extended model.

  17. Helium and CO2 in xenoliths and lavas from Harrat Hutaymah, Saudi Arabia: insight to magma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, K.; Graham, D. W.; Thornber, C. R.; Duncan, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Harrat Hutaymah is a young (chromium-diopside and aluminous augite lithologies (including spinel lherzolite, amphibole clinopyroxenite, olivine websterite, clinopyroxenite and garnet websterite). The samples are from eight different volcanic centers over an area of ~2500 km2. The one notable exception is anhydrous spinel lherzolite, which has lower He and CO2 concentrations, and a weighted mean 3He/4He of 7.07× 0.2 RA (2σ, n = 3). Helium and CO2 concentrations are highly correlated in the xenolith suite, with some clinopyroxene separates ranging up to 0.65 ucc STP/g and 32 mcc STP/g, respectively. Olivine-phyric lavas from the region are more variable in composition, but have a similar weighted mean 3He/4He of 7.33 × 1.5 RA (2σ, n = 4) and extend to significantly lower gas concentrations. The 3He/4He results indicate a non-plume origin for volcanism in this area of central Arabia, and trace element data suggest a melting origin within the Proterozoic lithospheric mantle. Despite the uniformity in 3He/4He, Hutaymah xenoliths exhibit a large range of ɛNd, from -0.1 to 12.3 (Thornber 1992). The xenolith isotope variations in lithophile elements are apparently decoupled from those of volatile elements such as helium, as observed in previous studies from other localities (Dunai and Porcelli 2002). This decoupling, combined with the upper mantle He isotope signature, may be indicative of open system behavior in the lithospheric mantle and implies fluid exchange with the shallow asthenosphere. Further work is required to establish if there are spatial or temporal variations of 3He/4He indicating involvement of the high 3He/4He Afar plume.

  18. Influence of Sulfate-reducing Bacteria on the Carbon Dioxide Corrosion Behavior of X60 Steel%硫酸盐还原菌对X60钢CO2腐蚀行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范梅梅; 赵勇; 闫化云; 刘宏芳

    2010-01-01

    采用API-RP38培养基,从油田含油污水中分离出硫酸盐还原茵(SRB),研究了该菌种的生长特性.用腐蚀失重实验和电化学手段系统地研究了CO2饱和的油田污水中SRB对X60钢CO:腐蚀行为的影响.结果表明,SRB最佳生长温度为30℃,最佳生长pH值为7.5;30℃时SRB的存在减缓了CO2腐蚀,此温度下SRB细胞、胞外聚合物和腐蚀产物能够形成致密膜层,腐蚀产物主要是FeS和FeCO3;随温度升高,SRB的存在会加速CO2腐蚀,且SRB与CO2之间产生协同作用,促进基体材料的腐蚀破坏.

  19. Measurements of capillary pressure and electric permittivity of gas-water systems in porous media at elevated pressures: application to geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and wetting behavior in coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plug, W.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in aquifers and coal layers is a promising technique to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Considering the reservoir properties, e.g. wettability, heterogeneity and the caprocks sealing capacity, the capillary pressure is an important measure to evaluate the efficiency, the

  20. Dynamic Behaviour CO2 Capture and Compression: An Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.; Khakharia, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; De Kler, R.

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  1. Dynamic behaviour CO2 capture and compression: an assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.H.L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Kler, R.F.C. de

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  2. Dynamic behaviour CO2 capture and compression: an assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.H.L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Kler, R.F.C. de

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  3. Dynamic Behaviour CO2 Capture and Compression: An Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.; Khakharia, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; De Kler, R.

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  4. Covalent Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongfei; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-20

    As an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are excellent candidates for various applications. In particular, they can serve as ideal platforms for capturing CO2 to mitigate the dilemma caused by the greenhouse effect. Recent research achievements using COFs for CO2 capture are highlighted. A background overview is provided, consisting of a brief statement on the current CO2 issue, a summary of representative materials utilized for CO2 capture, and an introduction to COFs. Research progresses on: i) experimental CO2 capture using different COFs synthesized based on different covalent bond formations, and ii) computational simulation results of such porous materials on CO2 capture are summarized. Based on these experimental and theoretical studies, careful analyses and discussions in terms of the COF stability, low- and high-pressure CO2 uptake, CO2 selectivity, breakthrough performance, and CO2 capture conditions are provided. Finally, a perspective and conclusion section of COFs for CO2 capture is presented. Recent advancements in the field are highlighted and the strategies and principals involved are discussed.

  5. Porous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Baiyang

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has long been regarded as the major greenhouse gas, which leads to numerous negative effects on global environment. The capture and separation of CO2 by selective adsorption using porous materials proves to be an effective way to reduce the emission of CO2 to atmosphere. Porous organic polymers (POPs) are promising candidates for this application due to their readily tunable textual properties and surface functionalities. The objective of this thesis work is to develop new POPs with high CO2 adsorption capacities and CO2/N2 selectivities for post-combustion effluent (e.g. flue gas) treatment. We will also exploit the correlation between the CO2 capture performance of POPs and their textual properties/functionalities. Chapters Two focuses on the study of a group of porous phenolic-aldehyde polymers (PPAPs) synthesized by a catalyst-free method, the CO2 capture capacities of these PPAPs exceed 2.0 mmol/g at 298 K and 1 bar, while keeping CO2/N2 selectivity of more than 30 at the same time. Chapter Three reports the gas adsorption results of different hyper-cross-linked polymers (HCPs), which indicate that heterocyclo aromatic monomers can greatly enhance polymers’ CO2/N2 selectivities, and the N-H bond is proved to the active CO2 adsorption center in the N-contained (e.g. pyrrole) HCPs, which possess the highest selectivities of more than 40 at 273 K when compared with other HCPs. Chapter Four emphasizes on the chemical modification of a new designed polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM) with high CO2/N2 selectivity (50 at 273 K), whose experimental repeatability and chemical stability prove excellent. In Chapter Five, we demonstrate an improvement of both CO2 capture capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity by doping alkali metal ions into azo-polymers, which leads a promising method to the design of new porous organic polymers.

  6. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  7. Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 sorbent for highly selective CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuwu; Zhai, Xinru; Liu, Dongyang; Sun, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 materials are used as CO2 sorbent to improve the selectivity of CH4/CO2 separation. The SBA-15 sorbents modified by physical CO2 absorbents are very limited to increasing CO2 adsorption and present poor selectivity. However, the SBA-15 sorbents modified by chemical CO2 absorbents increase CO2 adsorption capacity obviously. The separation coefficients of CO2/CH4 increase in this case. The adsorption and regeneration properties of the SBA-15 sorbents modified by TEA, MDEA and DIPA have been compared. The SBA-15 modified by triethanolamine (TEA) presents better CO2/CH4 separation performance than the materials modified by other CO2 absorbents.

  8. Plume meander and dispersion in a stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, April L.; Miller, David R.; Nappo, Carmen J.

    2010-11-01

    Continuous lidar measurements of elevated plume dispersion and corresponding micrometeorology data are analyzed to establish the relationship between plume behavior and nocturnal boundary layer dynamics. Contrasting nights of data from the JORNADA field campaign in the New Mexico desert are analyzed. The aerosol lidar measurements were used to separate the plume diffusion (plume spread) from plume meander (displacement). Mutiresolution decomposition was used to separate the turbulence scale (90 s). Durations of turbulent kinetic energy stationarity and the wind steadiness were used to characterize the local scale and submesoscale turbulence. Plume meander, driven by submesoscale wind motions, was responsible for most of the total horizontal plume dispersion in weak and variable winds and strong stability. This proportion was reduced in high winds (i.e., >4 m s-1), weakly stable conditions but remained the dominant dispersion mechanism. The remainder of the plume dispersion in all cases was accounted for by internal spread of the plume, which is a small eddy diffusion process driven by turbulence. Turbulence stationarity and the wind steadiness are demonstrated to be closely related to plume diffusion and plume meander, respectively.

  9. Advanced technology development reducing CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sup

    2010-09-15

    Responding to Korean government policies on green growth and global energy/ environmental challenges, SK energy has been developing new technologies to reduce CO2 emissions by 1) CO2 capture and utilization, 2) efficiency improvement, and 3) Li-ion batteries. The paper introduces three advanced technologies developed by SK energy; GreenPol, ACO, and Li-ion battery. Contributing to company vision, a more energy and less CO2, the three technologies are characterized as follows. GreenPol utilizes CO2 as a feedstock for making polymer. Advanced Catalytic Olefin (ACO) reduces CO2 emission by 20% and increase olefin production by 17%. Li-ion Batteries for automotive industries improves CO2 emission.

  10. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  11. CO2 Allowance and Electricity Price Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    With the introduction of CO2 emission constraints on power generators in the European Union, climate policy is starting to have notable effects on energy markets. This paper sheds light on the links between CO2 prices, electricity prices, and electricity costs to industry. It is based on a series of interviews with industrial and electricity stakeholders, as well as a rich literature seeking to estimate the exact effect of CO2 prices on electricity prices.

  12. [A new colorimetric CO2 indicator Colibri].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, T; Hanaoka, K

    1996-06-01

    A new colorimetric carbon dioxide (CO2) indicator Colibri is a disposable, compact and light weighted device. Colibri does not need to be calibrated and is easily usable in an emergency. It indicates blue with CO2 below 4 mmHg and becomes yellow with CO2 above 40 mmHg. In comparison with EASY CAP, Colibri functions for a longer period and it has a humidifier and a bacterial filter. Colibri is useful for emergency situations and anesthetic care.

  13. CO2 uptake capacity of coal fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzella, Alessandro; Errico, Massimiliano; Spiga, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    -solid carbonation treatment on coal fly ash in order to assess the potential of the process in terms of sequestration of CO2 as well as its influence on the leaching behavior of metals and soluble salts. Laboratory tests, performed under different pressure and temperature conditions, showed that in the pressure......% corresponding to a maximum carbonation efficiency of 74%, estimated on the basis of the initial CaO content. The high degree of ash carbonation achieved in the present research, which was conducted under mild conditions, without add of water and without stirring, showed the potential use of coal fly ash in CO2...

  14. X60管线钢在湿气和溶液介质中的H2S/CO2腐蚀行为%H2S/CO2 CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF X60 PIPELINE STEEL IN WET GAS AND SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建炜; 张雷; 丁睿明; 孙建波; 路民旭

    2008-01-01

    利用高温高压反应釜模拟高含硫气田H2S/CO2共存环境,分别在流动湿气和溶液介质中进行API-X60腐蚀实验,探讨了高H2S分压对腐蚀行为的影响.X60管线钢的腐蚀速率在湿气介质中随H2S分压升高而增加,在溶液介质中则先升高后降低,腐蚀形态均由全面腐蚀趋于局部腐蚀,腐蚀产物以硫铁化合物(FexSy)为主.H2S分压为2.0 MPa条件下,溶液介质中形成的腐蚀产物中富S相比例明显增加,HS-和Cl-穿过膜层缺陷引发点蚀,多孔且不连续的富S膜层进一步促进点蚀发展.

  15. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.

    2007-05-31

    Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

  16. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  17. Synthetic biology for CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals is a potential approach to reduce CO2 emission and fossil-fuel consumption. Autotrophic microbes can utilize energy from light, hydrogen, or sulfur to assimilate atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds at ambient temperature and pressure. This provides a feasible way for biological production of fuels and chemicals from CO2 under normal conditions. Recently great progress has been made in this research area, and dozens of CO2-derived fuels and chemicals have been reported to be synthesized by autotrophic microbes. This is accompanied by investigations into natural CO2-fixation pathways and the rapid development of new technologies in synthetic biology. This review first summarizes the six natural CO2-fixation pathways reported to date, followed by an overview of recent progress in the design and engineering of CO2-fixation pathways as well as energy supply patterns using the concept and tools of synthetic biology. Finally, we will discuss future prospects in biological fixation of CO2.

  18. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    performed recently has focused on CO2capture from fossil fuel-based power plants. Inherently,this process is especially suitablefor cement plants, as CaO used for CO2capture is also a majoringredient for clinker production. Thus, a detailed investigation was carried outto study the applicationof......% of the inlet CO2 was captured by highly deactivated limestone, which had a maximum CO2 capture capacity of 11.5%, with an inlet Ca/C ratio of 13. So, the performance of the carbonator can be defined by the inlet Ca/C ratio, which can be estimated if the maximum capture capacity of limestone is known...

  19. Epoxy based oxygen enriched porous carbons for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Deepak; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.

    2017-08-01

    Oxygen enriched carbon adsorbents were successfully synthesized for the first time from template zeolite and epoxy resin as precursor using a nanocasting technique. Carbonization and CO2 activation were performed at various temperatures (500-800 °C) to prepare different carbon structure adsorbents. Several characterization techniques were used to characterize the textural structure, oxygen content and surface functional groups of the adsorbents. The carbon adsorbents show high oxygen content (47.51%), highest surface area (SBET = 686.37 m2 g-1) and pore volume (0.60 cm3 g-1), respectively. The materials were evaluated thermogravimetrically at different adsorption temperatures (30-100 °C) and CO2 concentrations (6-100%). Adsorbent prepared at 700 °C exhibited highest CO2 uptake of 0.91 mmol g-1 due to high surface basicity. Further, regeneration studies of adsorbent exhibited easy regenerability and stability over four multiple adsorptions-desorption cycles. Kinetic models for CO2 adsorption at various CO2 concentrations and temperatures were studied and it was found that the fractional order provided best fitting for the adsorption behavior with an error of less than 3%. The experimental data for CO2 adsorption were analyzed using different isothermal models and found that the Freundlich isothermal model presented perfect fit among all isotherm models depicting heterogeneous adsorbent surface. The isosteric heat of adsorption was estimated to be 11.75 kJ mol-1, indicating physiosorption process. Overall, the above results suggested that the synthesized adsorbent using nanocasting technique provides a feasible way for CO2 capture from point source due to their environmentally benign nature, low cost and stable adsorption capacity.

  20. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  1. Communication: Enhanced dissociative chemisorption of CO2 via vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-01

    A fully coupled global nine-dimensional potential energy surface for the dissociative chemisorption of CO2 on Ni(100) is constructed from ˜18 000 density functional points. It reveals a complex reaction pathway dominated by two near iso-energetic transition states. The dissociation probabilities obtained by quasi-classical trajectories on the potential energy surface reproduced experimental trends, and indicate that vibrational excitations of CO2 significantly promote the dissociation. Using the sudden vector projection model, the behavior of the reactivity is rationalized by couplings with the reaction coordinate at each transition state. These results offer plausible rationalization for the observed enhancement of CO2 dissociation in non-thermal plasmas by metal surfaces.

  2. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard J. Herzog; E. Eric Adams

    2002-09-01

    The primary focus of this reporting period was to prepare for conducting the ocean carbon sequestration field experiment during the summer of 2002. We discuss four key aspects of this preparation: (1) Design criteria for a CO{sub 2} flow system mounted on a ship; (2) Inter-model comparison of plume models; (3) Application of a double plume model to compute near field mixing; and (4) Evaluation of tracers.

  3. Framework for the assessment of interaction between CO2 geological storage and other sedimentary basin resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, K; Whittaker, S; Varma, S; Bekele, E; Langhi, L; Hodgkinson, J; Harris, B

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentary basins around the world considered suitable for carbon storage usually contain other natural resources such as petroleum, coal, geothermal energy and groundwater. Storing carbon dioxide in geological formations in the basins adds to the competition for access to the subsurface and the use of pore space where other resource-based industries also operate. Managing potential impacts that industrial-scale injection of carbon dioxide may have on other resource development must be focused to prevent potential conflicts and enhance synergies where possible. Such a sustainable coexistence of various resource developments can be accomplished by implementing a Framework for Basin Resource Management strategy (FBRM). The FBRM strategy utilizes the concept of an Area of Review (AOR) for guiding development and regulation of CO2 geological storage projects and for assessing their potential impact on other resources. The AOR is determined by the expected physical distribution of the CO2 plume in the subsurface and the modelled extent of reservoir pressure increase resulting from the injection of the CO2. This information is used to define the region to be characterised and monitored for a CO2 injection project. The geological characterisation and risk- and performance-based monitoring will be most comprehensive within the region of the reservoir containing the carbon dioxide plume and should consider geological features and wells continuously above the plume through to its surface projection; this region defines where increases in reservoir pressure will be greatest and where potential for unplanned migration of carbon dioxide is highest. Beyond the expanse of the carbon dioxide plume, geological characterisation and monitoring should focus only on identified features that could be a potential migration conduit for either formation water or carbon dioxide.

  4. Application of simplified models to CO2 migration and immobilization in large-scale geological systems

    KAUST Repository

    Gasda, Sarah E.

    2012-07-01

    Long-term stabilization of injected carbon dioxide (CO 2) is an essential component of risk management for geological carbon sequestration operations. However, migration and trapping phenomena are inherently complex, involving processes that act over multiple spatial and temporal scales. One example involves centimeter-scale density instabilities in the dissolved CO 2 region leading to large-scale convective mixing that can be a significant driver for CO 2 dissolution. Another example is the potentially important effect of capillary forces, in addition to buoyancy and viscous forces, on the evolution of mobile CO 2. Local capillary effects lead to a capillary transition zone, or capillary fringe, where both fluids are present in the mobile state. This small-scale effect may have a significant impact on large-scale plume migration as well as long-term residual and dissolution trapping. Computational models that can capture both large and small-scale effects are essential to predict the role of these processes on the long-term storage security of CO 2 sequestration operations. Conventional modeling tools are unable to resolve sufficiently all of these relevant processes when modeling CO 2 migration in large-scale geological systems. Herein, we present a vertically-integrated approach to CO 2 modeling that employs upscaled representations of these subgrid processes. We apply the model to the Johansen formation, a prospective site for sequestration of Norwegian CO 2 emissions, and explore the sensitivity of CO 2 migration and trapping to subscale physics. Model results show the relative importance of different physical processes in large-scale simulations. The ability of models such as this to capture the relevant physical processes at large spatial and temporal scales is important for prediction and analysis of CO 2 storage sites. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A Single Gene Target of an ETS-Family Transcription Factor Determines Neuronal CO2-Chemosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Julia P.; Martinez-Velazquez, Luis A.; Petersen, Jakob Gramstrup; Pocock, Roger; Ringstad, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO2), which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO2 is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO2. The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO2-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO2-detection and transforms neurons into CO2-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO2-sensing neurons in other phyla. PMID:22479504

  6. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia P Brandt

    Full Text Available Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO(2, which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO(2 is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2. The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO(2-detection and transforms neurons into CO(2-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO(2-sensing neurons in other phyla.

  7. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  8. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...

  9. Monitoring Options for CO2 Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, R.; Winthaegen, P.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of various monitoring techniques for CO2 storage that is structured into three categories-instrumentation in a well (monitoring well); instrumentation at the (near) surface (surface geophysical methods); and sampling at the (near) surface measuring CO2 concentration

  10. CO2 capture research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerman, J.C.; Kuramochi, T.; Egmond, S. van

    2008-01-01

    The global climate is changing due to human activities. This human‑induced climate change is mainly caused by global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Most scientists agree that in order to mitigate climate change, by 2050, global CO2 emissions must be reduced by at least 50% co

  11. Photocatalytic CO2 Activation by Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Chieh-Chao

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic activation of CO2 and water has potential for producing fuels by conversion of photon energy. However, the low productivity still limits practical application. In this study, the goal was to gain more fundamental insight in CO2 activation, and to provide guidelines for rational design

  12. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  13. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team members expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  14. CO2 Rekentool voor Tuinbouw: Handleiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiller, S.R.C.H.; Danse, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Dit document is een handleiding bij de online CO2 Rekentool voor Tuinbouw Ketens. De CO2 tool is mogelijk gemaakt door de financiële bijdrage van Productschap Tuinbouw en het Ministerie van Landbouw, Natuur en Voedselkwaliteit (LNV). De tool is ontwikkeld door het onderzoeksconsortium WUR, BMA en AI

  15. CO2 capture, transport, storage and utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing CO2 emissions requires an integrated CO2 management approach. The dependency between the different industry sectors is higher than commonly acknowledged and covers all areas; capture, transport, storage and utilisation. TNO is one of Europe’s largest independent research organisations and p

  16. Magnetic properties of PrCo 2 and its ternary hydride PrCo 2H 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, L. J.; Bartolomé, J.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Stipdonk, H. L.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1981-12-01

    Magnetization and susceptibility data on PrCo 2 and PrCo 2H 4 are presented. The ac susceptibility of PrCo 2 measured in zero dc field displays a sharp and high peak at Tc = (39.9 ± 0.2) K. The magnetization versus temperature curves show ferromagnetic behaviour for B >1 T, but display a maximum at lower values of the applied field. These results, together with the behaviour of the hysteresis loops at different temperatures below Tc, indicate that PrCo 2 orders ferromagnetically, the magnetic hardness increasing strongly for T → 0. The saturation moment at 4.2 K equals 3.9 μ B per formula unit, as found from the magnetization curve measured in a pulsed-field magnet up to B = 30 T. Similar experiments on PrCo 2H 4 provide evidence that the introduction of hydrogen in PrCo 2 not only destroys the long-range atomic order, but also considerably reduces the ferromagnetic interactions. Such an effect of the hydrogen is commonly observed in cobalt intermetallics. Part of the PrCo 2H 4 is found to have decomposed into PrH 2 and free Co. The clusters of free Co atoms give rise to a maximum in the zero-field ac susceptibility versus temperature curves, similar as observed in spin glasses or magnetic glasses. By increasing the ac frequency, the maximum shifts to higher temperatures. The behavior can be explained in terms of the Néel model for superparamagnetic particles with randomly oriented local anisotropy axes.

  17. Improved Criteria for Increasing CO2 Storage Potential with CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, J.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been found that deployment of CO2 capture and storage technology at large scales will be difficult without significant incentives. One of the technologies that has been a focus in recent years is CO2 enhanced oil/gas recovery, where additional hydrocarbon recovery provides an economic incentive for deployment. The way CO2 EOR is currently deployed, maximization of additional oil production does not necessarily lead to maximization of stored CO2, though significant amounts of CO2 are stored regardless of the objective. To determine the potential of large-scale CO2 storage through CO2 EOR, it is necessary to determine the feasibility of deploying this technology over a wide range of oil/gas field characteristics. In addition it is also necessary to accurately estimate the ultimate CO2 storage potential and develop approaches that optimize oil recovery along with long-term CO2 storage. This study uses compositional reservoir simulations to further develop technical screening criteria that not only improve oil recovery, but maximize CO2 storage during enhanced oil recovery operations. Minimum miscibility pressure, maximum oil/ CO2 contact without the need of significant waterflooding, and CO2 breakthrough prevention are a few key parameters specific to the technical aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery that maximize CO2 storage. We have developed reduced order models based on simulation results to determine the ultimate oil recovery and CO2 storage potential in these formations. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that can be used to determine feasibility and long-term CO2 storage potential of CO2 EOR technology.

  18. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  19. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  20. Ground-based remote sensing of volcanic CO2 and correlated SO2, HF, HCl, and BrO, in safe-distance from the crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Andre; Solvejg Dinger, Anna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Kostinek, Julian; Fieber, Lukas; Fischerkeller, Constanze; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kuhn, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Tirpitz, Lukas; Tu, Qiansi

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing of CO2 enhancements in volcanic plumes can be a tool to estimate volcanic CO2 emissions and thereby, to gain insight into the geological carbon cycle and into volcano interior processes. However, remote sensing of the volcanic CO2 is challenged by the large atmospheric background concentrations masking the minute volcanic signal. Here, we report on a demonstrator study conducted in September 2015 at Mt. Etna on Sicily, where we deployed an EM27/SUN Fourier Transform Spectrometer together with a UV spectrometer on a mobile remote sensing platform. The spectrometers were operated in direct-sun viewing geometry collecting cross-sectional scans of solar absorption spectra through the volcanic plume by operating the platform in stop-and-go patterns in 5 to 10 kilometers distance from the crater region. We successfully detected correlated intra-plume enhancements of CO2 and volcanic SO2, HF, HCl, and BrO. The path-integrated volcanic CO2 enhancements amounted to about 0.5 ppm (on top of the ˜400 ppm background). Key to successful detection of volcanic CO2 was A) the simultaneous observation of the O2 total column which allowed for correcting changes in the CO2 column caused by changes in observer altitude and B) the simultaneous measurement of volcanic species co-emitted with CO2 which allowed for discriminating intra-plume and extra-plume observations. The latter were used for subtracting the atmospheric CO2 background. The field study suggests that our remote sensing observatory is a candidate technique for volcano monitoring in safe distance from the crater region.

  1. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  2. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years remains a mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O and ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene variations near 100 000 years is a linear (''Milankovitch'' response to summer insolation forcing. Both result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of this non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase both at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and within the ~100 000-year eccentricity band. This timing argues against greenhouse-gas forcing of a slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. Because the effect of CO2 on temperature is logarithmic, the temperature/CO2 feedback on ice volume is also logarithmic. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets were forced by insolation changes at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago and responded in a linear way, but CO2 feedback amplified (roughly doubled the ice response at 41 000 years. After 0.9 million years ago, as polar climates continued to cool, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth at 41 000-year intervals, but weaker ablation permitted ice to survive subsequent insolation maxima of low intensity. These longer-lived ice sheets persisted until peaks in northern summer insolation paced abrupt deglaciations every 100 000±15 000 years. Most ice melting during deglaciations was achieved by the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets, but now acting in the opposite direction. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to have been the mechanisms by which ice sheets

  3. Behavior of highly diluted electrolytes in strong electric fields-prevention of alumina deposition on grading electrodes in HVDC transmission modules by CO2-induced pH-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Immo; Mallick, Bert; Schild, Matthias; Kareth, Sabine; Puchta, Ralph; van Eldik, Rudi

    2014-09-15

    Alumina deposition on platinum grading electrodes in high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission modules is an unsolved problem that has been around for more than three decades. This is due to the unavoidable corrosion of aluminum heat sinks that causes severe damage to electrical power plants and losses in the range of a million Euro range per day in power outage. Simple experiments in a representative HV test setup showed that aluminates at concentrations even below 10(-8) mol L(-1) can deposit on anodes through neutralization by protons produced in de-ionized water (κ≤0.15 μS cm(-1)) at 20-35 kV (8 mA) per electrode. In this otherwise electrolyte-poor aqueous environment, the depositions are formed three orders of magnitude below the critical precipitation concentration at pH 7! In the presence of an inert electrolyte such as TMAT (tetramethylammonium-p-toluenesulfonate), at a concentration level just above that of the total dissolved aluminum, no deposition was observed. Deposition can be also prevented by doping with CO2 gas at a concentration level that is magnitudes lower than that of the dissolved aluminum. From an overview of aqueous aluminum chemistry, the mystery of the alumina deposition process and its inhibition by CO2 is experimentally resolved and fully explained by field accumulation and repulsion models in synergism with acid-base equilibria. The extraordinary size of the alumina depositions is accounted for in terms of proton tunneling through "hydrated" alumina, which is supported by quantum chemical calculations. As a consequence, pulse-purging with pure CO2 gas is presented as a technical solution to prevent the deposition of alumina.

  4. CO2 deserts: implications of existing CO2 supply limitations for carbon management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Richard S; Clarens, Andres F; Liu, Xiaowei; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change will require deep reductions in anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the scale of gigatonnes per year. CO2 capture and utilization and/or storage technologies are a class of approaches that can substantially reduce CO2 emissions. Even though examples of this approach, such as CO2-enhanced oil recovery, are already being practiced on a scale >0.05 Gt/year, little attention has been focused on the supply of CO2 for these projects. Here, facility-scale data newly collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was processed to produce the first comprehensive map of CO2 sources from industrial sectors currently supplying CO2 in the United States. Collectively these sources produce 0.16 Gt/year, but the data reveal the presence of large areas without access to CO2 at an industrially relevant scale (>25 kt/year). Even though some facilities with the capability to capture CO2 are not doing so and in some regions pipeline networks are being built to link CO2 sources and sinks, much of the country exists in "CO2 deserts". A life cycle analysis of the sources reveals that the predominant source of CO2, dedicated wells, has the largest carbon footprint further confounding prospects for rational carbon management strategies.

  5. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs.

  6. Effects of CO2 leakage on soil bacterial communities from simulated CO2-EOR areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Yang, Yongjun; Ma, Yanjun; Hou, Huping; Zhang, Shaoliang; Ma, Jing

    2016-05-18

    CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) has been proposed as a viable option for flooding oil and reducing anthropogenic CO2 contribution to the atmospheric pool. However, the potential risk of CO2 leakage from the process poses a threat to the ecological system. High-throughput sequencing was used to investigate the effects of CO2 emission on the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities. The diversity of bacterial communities notably decreased with increasing CO2 flux. The composition of bacterial communities varied along the CO2 flux, with increasing CO2 flux accompanied by increases in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla, but decreases in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi phyla. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the genus Lactobacillus increased sharply when the CO2 flux was at its highest point. Alpha and beta diversity analysis revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by CO2 flux. The redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by soil pH values which related to CO2 flux. These results could be useful for evaluating the risk of potential CO2 leakages on the ecosystems associated with CO2-EOR processes.

  7. Self-Potential Monitoring for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Y.; Tosha, T.; Ishido, T.

    2009-12-01

    To appraise the utility of geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 injected into aquifers, we carried out numerical simulations of an aquifer system underlying a portion of Tokyo Bay and calculated the temporal changes in geophysical observables caused by changing underground conditions as computed by the reservoir simulation. We used the STAR general-purpose reservoir simulator with the CO2SQS equation-of-state package (Pritchett, 2005) which treats three fluid phases (liquid- and gaseous-phase CO2 and an aqueous liquid phase) to calculate the evolution of reservoir conditions, and then used various “geophysical postprocessors” to calculate the resulting temporal changes in the earth-surface distributions of microgravity, apparent resistivity (from either DC or MT surveys), seismic observables and electrical self-potential (SP). The applicability of any particular method is likely to be highly site-specific, but these calculations indicate that none of these techniques should be ruled out altogether. In case of SP, CO2 injection does not create large electric signals through electrokinetic coupling within the saline aquifer owing to small coupling coefficients under the high salinity conditions. However, if a substantial pressure disturbance is induced to shallower levels where the interface between shallower fresh- and deeper saline-waters (which works as the boundary between regions of differing streaming potential coefficient) is present, obvious SP changes can appear on the ground surface. Continuous and/or repeat SP measurements are thought to be a promising geophysical technique to monitor pressure changes in shallower levels than the saline aquifer where CO2 is injected. In addition to SP measurements in a relatively wide area like covering the horizontal extent of CO2 plume, SP monitoring in a local area around a deep well is thought to be worthwhile from a different angle. SP anomalies of negative polarity are frequently observed near deep wells

  8. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  9. Elevated CO2 and Soil Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K.; Schlesinger, W.

    2002-12-01

    Although forests can be large terrestrial carbon sinks, soil fertility can limit carbon sequestration in response to increased atmospheric CO2. During five years of CO2 fertilization (ambient + 200ppm) at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, net primary production increased significantly by an average of 25% in treatment plots. Total nitrogen in the foliar canopy increased by 16%, requiring an additional 1.3 g N m-2yr-1 to be taken up from soils under elevated CO2. Mechanisms supporting increased nitrogen acquisition have not been identified. Here we report on biological N-fixation rates, using the acetylene reduction assay, in litter and mineral soil during three years of the CO2 enrichment experiment. Lack of a significant CO2 treatment effect on acetylene reduction indicates that carbon is not directly limiting biological N fixation. Nutrient addition experiments using a complete block design with glucose, Fe, Mo and P indicate biological N fixation is co-limited by molybdenum and carbon. These results suggest even if elevated atmospheric CO2 enhances below-ground carbon availability via root exudation, biological nitrogen fixation may not be stimulated due to micronutrient limitations. Assessment of future carbon sequestration by forest stands must consider limitations imposed by site fertility, including micronutrients.

  10. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    of aeolian and glacial sands near the surface and marine sands below 10m depth. 3-D time-lapse ERT inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can image the geochemical changes induced by the dissolved CO2 until the end of the acquisition, 120days after......Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose......, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5 and 10m and monitored its migration using 320 electrodes on a 126m×25m surface grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis using geostatistical...

  11. Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of CO2 Column Mixing Ratios: Source and Sink Detection in the Atmospheric Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menzies Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The four most recent flight campaigns were on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, in support of the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission formulation studies. This instrument operates in the 2.05-μm spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the CO2LAS signal processing, data analysis, and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from flights in various U.S. locations during the past three years include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest, also cases of point-source and regional plume detection that enable the calculation of emission rates.

  12. Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of CO2 Column Mixing Ratios: Source and Sink Detection in the Atmospheric Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Spiers, Gary D.; Jacob, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The four most recent flight campaigns were on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, in support of the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission formulation studies. This instrument operates in the 2.05-μm spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the CO2LAS signal processing, data analysis, and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from flights in various U.S. locations during the past three years include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest, also cases of point-source and regional plume detection that enable the calculation of emission rates.

  13. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  14. High Resolution X-ray CMT Imaging of Supercritical CO2 in Porous Media: Experimental Challenges, Solutions, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, A. L.; Andersson, L.; Newell, D. L.; Carey, J. W.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy to limit emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from large fossil-fuel burning CO2 point sources; however, there are concerns associated with the long-term stability of a mobile subsurface CO2 plume. Capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2), wherein the CO2 is held within the pore structure of the geologic matrix by capillary forces, is a more secure form of subsurface storage than structural trapping, which relies on an impermeable caprock to contain the buoyant CO2 plume. To understand the multiphase physics of CO2 transport, and to subsequently produce quantitative estimates of potential CO2 capillary trapping, it is necessary to study field, core, and pore-scale processes. X-ray computed microtomography (x-ray CMT) allows for three-dimensional (3D) in-situ visualization of fluid phases within and the physical structure of a porous medium at the pore-scale. We have designed and built a mobile experimental set-up capable of running at pressures up to 2000 PSI and temperatures up to 50°C, made with materials that are compatible with corrosive fluids. Our experimental procedure includes pressurizing, mixing, and separating fluids; and subsequently running immiscible drainage and imbibition flow experiments with brine and supercritical CO2. With this set-up and procedure, we successfully conducted a brine-scCO2 drainage experiment in Bentheimer sandstone at 1200 PSI and 36°C, and confirmed and quantified CO2 flow in the sandstone core via synchrotron-based x-ray CMT with a resolution of 4.65 μm at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We have proven that we can observe, on a pore-scale basis, the movement of supercritical CO2 within a porous media. The properties of supercritical CO2 (e.g. viscosity, density, interfacial tension and solubility in brine) vary significantly with changes in pressure and temperature; consequently, precise

  15. CO2 laser in vitreoretinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlin, D.B.; Patel, C.K.; Wood, O.R.; Llovera, I.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation from a CO2 laser has the dual effect of phototransection and photocoagulation. Incisions have been made in scleral-chorioretinal tissue, lens tissue, and the vitreous body (with and without membrane formation). Results indicate that the CO2 laser may be useful in intravitreal surgery. Its simultaneous cutting and coagulating properties may make the experimental transvitreal chorioretinal biopsy and the full-thickness ocular wall resection for small melanosarcomas of the choroid clinical possibilities in the not too distant future. Finally, the effects of CO2 laser radiation on the normal human lens suggests the possibility of the dissolution of cataracts by laser irradiation.

  16. Spin polarization effect for Co2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Bao Wen-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT)(b3p86) of Gaussian 03 has been used to optimize the structure of the Co2molecule, a transition metal element molecule. The result shows that the ground state for the Co2 molecule is a 7-multiple state, indicating a spin polarization effect in the Co2 molecule. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state is not mingled with wavefunctions of higher-energy states. So for the ground state of Co2 molecule to be a 7-multiple state is the indicative of spin polarization effect of the Co2molecule, that is, there exist 6 parallel spin electrons in a Co2 molecule. The number of non-conjugated electrons is the greatest. These electrons occupy different spacial orbitals so that the energy of the Co2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Co2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule,which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and the other states of the Co2 molecule are derived. The dissociation energy De for the ground state of Co2 molecule is 4.0489eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2061 nm, and vibration frequency 11.2222 aJ.nm-4respectively(1 a.J=10-18 J). The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Co2 molecule ωexe,Be, and αe are 0.7202 cm-1, 0.1347 cm-1, and 2.9120× 10-1 cm-1 respectively. And ωexe is the non-syntonic part of frequency, Be is the rotational constant, αe is revised constant of rotational constant for non-rigid part of Co2 molecule.

  17. Structurally simple complexes of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Luke J.; Robertson, Katherine N.; Richard A. Kemp; TUONONEN, Heikki; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added p...

  18. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective...... control which can solve future global environmental problems. The economic gains from 'hot air' distributions of permits and CO2 trade make the system politically attractive to potential participants. For example, vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe are to be expected. It will probably...

  19. Intermittent heat instabilities in an air plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Perrier, Frederic; Morat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of heating experiments carried out in an abandoned limestone quarry close to Paris, in an isolated room of a volume of about 400 m3. A heat source made of a metallic resistor of power 100 W was installed on the floor of the room, at distance from the walls. High-quality temperature sensors, with a response time of 20 s, were fixed on a 2 m long bar. In a series of 24 h heating experiments the bar had been set up horizontally at different heights or vertically along the axis of the plume to record changes in temperature distribution with a sampling time varying from 20 to 120 s. When taken in averages over 24 h, the temperatures present the classical shape of steady-state plumes, as described by classical models. On the contrary, the temperature time series show a rich dynamic plume flow with intermittent trains of oscillations, spatially coherent, of large amplitude and a period around 400 s, separated by intervals of relative quiescence whose duration can reach several hours. To our knowledge, no specific theory is available to explain this behavior, which appears to be a chaotic interaction between a turbulent plume and a stratified environment. The observed behavior, with first-order factorization of a smooth spatial function with a global temporal intermittent function, could be a universal feature of some turbulent plumes in geophysical environments.

  20. Vertically integrated approaches to large scale CO2 storage: Evaluating long-term storage security of CO2 injection in saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasda, S. E.; Nordbotten, J.; Celia, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Storage security of injected carbon dioxide (CO2) is an essential component of risk management for geological carbon sequestration operations. During the injection and early post-injection periods, CO2 leakage may occur along faults and leaky wells, but this risk may be partly managed by proper site selection and sensible deployment of monitoring and remediation technologies. On the other hand, long-term storage security is an entirely different risk management problem—one that is dominated by a mobile CO2 plume that may travel over very large spatial and temporal scales before it is trapped by different physical and chemical processes. The primary trapping mechanisms are capillary and solubility trapping, which evolve over thousands to tens of thousands of years and can immobilize a significant portion of the mobile, free-phase CO2 plume. However, these processes are complex, involving a combination of small and large spatial scales over varying time scales. Solubility trapping is a prime example of this complexity, where small-scale density instabilities in the dissolved CO2 region leads to convective mixing that has that has a significant effect on the large-scale dissolution process over very long time scales. Using appropriate models that can capture both large and small-scale effects is essential for understanding the role of dissolution and convective mixing on the long-term storage security of CO2 sequestration operations. There are several approaches to modeling long-term CO2 trapping mechanisms. One modeling option is the use of traditional numerical methods, which are often highly sophisticated models that can handle multiple complex phenomena with high levels of accuracy. However, these complex models quickly become prohibitively expensive for the type of large-scale, long-term modeling that is necessary for risk assessment applications such as the late post-injection period. We present an alternative modeling option, the VESA model, that combines

  1. Applied Pressure on Altering the Nano-Crystallization Behavior of Al86Ni6Y4.5Co2La1.5 Metallic Glass Powder during Spark Plasma Sintering and Its Effect on Powder Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. P. Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic glass powder of the composition Al86Ni6Y4.5Co2La1.5 was consolidated into 10 mm diameter samples by spark plasma sintering (SPS at different temperatures under an applied pressure of 200 MPa or 600 MPa. The heating rate and isothermal holding time were fixed at 40°C/min and 2 min, respectively. Fully dense bulk metallic glasses (BMGs free of particle-particle interface oxides and nano-crystallization were fabricated under 600 MPa. In contrast, residual oxides were detected at particle-particle interfaces (enriched in both Al and O when fabricated under a pressure of 200 MPa, indicating the incomplete removal of the oxide surface layers during SPS at a low pressure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed noticeable nano-crystallization of face-centered cubic (fcc Al close to such interfaces. Applying a high pressure played a key role in facilitating the removal of the oxide surface layers and therefore full densification of the Al86Ni6Y4.5Co2La1.5 metallic glass powder without nano-crystallization. It is proposed that applied high pressure, as an external force, assisted in the breakdown of surface oxide layers that enveloped the powder particles in the early stage of sintering. This, together with the electrical discharge during SPS, may have benefitted the viscous flow of metallic glasses during sintering.

  2. Vertical and horizontal soil CO2 transport and its exchanges with the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortíz, Penélope; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Domingo, Francisco; Oyonarte, Cecilio

    2015-04-01

    registered net CO2 emissions to the atmosphere mainly during windy days in the dry period. During these windy days, large wind speeds induced decreases in the soil CO2 molar fraction both near-plant and bare soil, but also increments in the under-plant soil CO2 molar fraction. During windy days the under-plant CO2 can easily double its previously typical values, breaking the clear daily pattern found on previous days. These data demonstrate the need for continuous monitoring to understand correctly the behavior of soil CO2 effluxes.

  3. The mid-Cretaceous super plume, carbon dioxide, and global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-dioxide releases associated with a mid-Cretaceous super plume and the emplacement of the Ontong-Java Plateau have been suggested as a principal cause of the mid-Cretaceous global warming. A carbonate-silicate cycle model is developed to quantify the possible climatic effects of these CO2 releases, utilizing four different formulations for the rate of silicate-rock weathering as a function of atmospheric CO2. CO2 emissions resulting from super-plume tectonics could have produced atmospheric CO2 levels from 3.7 to 14.7 times the modern preindustrial value of 285 ppm. Based on the temperature sensitivity to CO2 increases used in the weathering-rate formulations, this would cause a global warming of from 2.8 to 7.7 C over today's glogal mean temperature. Altered continental positions and higher sea level may have been contributed about 4.8 C to mid-Cretaceous warming. Thus, the combined effects of paleogeographic changes and super-plume related CO2 emissions could be in the range of 7.6 to 12.5 C, within the 6 to 14 C range previously estimated for mid-Cretaceous warming. CO2 releases from oceanic plateaus alone are unlikely to have been directly responsible for more than 20 percent of the mid-Cretaceous increase in atmospheric CO2.

  4. Geophysical monitoring of near surface CO2 injection at Svelvik - Learnings from the CO2FieldLab experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querendez, Etor; Romdhane, Anouar; Jordan, Michael; Eliasson, Peder; Grimstad, Alv-Arne

    2014-05-01

    A CO2 migration field laboratory for testing monitoring methods and tools has been established in the glaciofluvial-glaciomarine Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, near Oslo (Norway). At the site, feasibility, sensitivity, acquisition geometry and usefulness of various surface and subsurface monitoring tools are investigated during controlled CO2 injection experiments. In a first stage, a shallow CO2 injection experiment was conducted in September 2011. Approximately 1700 kg of CO2 was injected at 18 m depth below surface in an unconsolidated sand formation. The objectives of this experiment were to (i) detect and, where possible, quantify migrated CO2 concentrations at the surface and very shallow subsurface, (ii) evaluate the sensitivity of the monitoring tools and (iii) study the impact of the vadose zone on observed measurements. Results showed that all deployed monitoring tools (for surface and near-surface gas monitoring, subsurface water monitoring and subsurface geophysical monitoring) where able to detect the presence of CO2 even though the CO2 plume did not migrate vertically as expected in what was thought to be an homogeneous unconsolidated sand structure. The upper part of the site revealed to be more heterogeneous than expected, mainly due to the highly variable lamination and channelling of the morainic sediments and to the presence of pebble and cobble beds sporadically showing throughout the deposits. Building on the learnings from the 18m depth injection experiment, a second experiment is being planned for a deeper injection, at a depth of 65m. Re-processing of the appraisal 2D multi-channel seismic with state-of-the-art processing techniques, like Linear Radon coherent and random noise attenuation and Full Waveform Inversion followed by pre-stack depth migration, corroborate the presence of heterogeneities at the near surface. Based on the re-interpreted seismic sections, a more realistic 3D geomodel, where the complex topography of the site

  5. Understanding the basic concepts of CO2 angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoli, Romano; Bianchini, David; Rossi, Pier Luca; Caridi, James G.; Corazza, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The diagnostic quality of carbon dioxide angiography depends both on optimal setting of radiological aspects (X-ray emission and image post-processing) and on the mechanical behavior of the injected gas bubbles. The gas behavior differs in large cavities (d > 12 mm), medium sized vessels (d > 6 mm), and small diameter vessels (d cultural and practical intervention of a medical physicist is fundamental. Obtaining a good quality CO2 angiogram is not only a matter of medical operator experience or radiological system performance, but involves matching a wide knowledge of medical physics to particular pathophysiological conditions and to unusual measurement tests. Most medical physicists are used to dealing mainly with radiological problems, and other physical aspects are considered beyond their interest. In CO2 angiography, non-radiological aspects strongly interfere with radiological issues and an optimal result can only be obtained by tackling the two simultaneously.

  6. Conditional Methods in Modeling CO2 Capture from Coal Syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry N. Saulov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gasification of coal or biomass with in-situ CO2 capture is an emerging technology aiming to address the problem of climate change. Development of a CO2 sorbent with desirable properties and understanding the behavior of such a material in carbonation/calcination reactions is an important part of developing the technology. In this paper, we report experimental results describing the carbonation behavior of three synthetic CaO-based sorbents. We also present a physically-based model of the reactive transport processes in sorbent particles, which have complicated pore structures. This modeling is based on the conditional approach (i.e., conditional moment closure (CMC, which has proven to be successful in modeling reactive transport phenomena in porous media. The model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. CO2 emissions in the steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kundak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Global CO2 emissions caused by the burning of fossil fuels over the past century are presented. Taking into consideration the total world production of more than 1,3 billion tons of steel, the steel industry produces over two billion tons of CO2. Reductions in CO2 emissions as a result of technological improvements and structural changes in steel production in industrialized countries during the past 40 years are described. Substantial further reductions in those emissions will not be possible using conventional technologies. Instead, a radical cutback may be achieved if, instead of carbon, hydrogen is used for direct iron ore reduction. The cost and the ensuing CO2 generation in the production of hydrogen as a reducing agent from various sources are analysed.

  8. Hoeveel CO2 kostte deze paprika?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.X.

    2011-01-01

    Ondernemers in de tuinbouwsector kunnen dankzij een nieuw protocol de CO2-voetafdruk van hun product van zaaigoed tot supermarktschap berekenen. Daarbij zit een tool die de telers, handelaren en transporteurs kan laten zien waar de uitstoot plaatsvindt.

  9. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  10. Translucent CO2 ice on Mars ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frederic; Andrieu, Francois; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate is driven by the condensation/sublimation of CO2 representing 95% of the atmosphere. Many active surface features (such dark spot, dark flows), have been potentially linked to CO2 exchange. Understanding the surface/atmosphere interactions is a major issue, for both atmospheric but also surface science. This study aims at estimating the physical properties of the seasonal CO2 ice deposits. Are these deposits granular or compact? What is the thickness of the ice? How much impurities are included within the ice? These questions have been highly debated in the literature, in particular the presence of a translucent slab ice, the link with the H2O cycle. In particular the cold jet geyser model requires translucent CO2 ice. We use radiative transfer models to simulate spectroscopic data from the CRISM instrument and perform an inversion to estimate model's parameters though time. We then discuss the consistency of the results with other datasets.

  11. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  12. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Atlas Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  13. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  14. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 control for during ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on mars is challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable...

  15. CO2 phytotron established in Ailaoshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Understanding the Uinteractions between ecological systems and the environment is a priority for the studies of global change, evolutionary biology, and functional genomics.Controlled environment facilities,like CO2 phytotrons, are necessary for acquiring such an understanding.

  16. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A practical CO2 control system for ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on Mars have not yet been developed. TDA Research, Inc. proposes to develop a durable,...

  17. Combustion of hythane diluted with CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hraiech Ibtissem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing concern about energy shortage and environmental protection, improving engine fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions have become major research topics in combustion and engine development. Hythane (a blend of hydrogen H2 and natural gas NG has generated a significant interest as an alternative fuel for the future. This paper describes an experimental study of the effects of CO2 addition on the stability of a turbulent jet diffusion NG-H2 flame. The mole fraction of hydrogen (% H2 in NG-H2 mixture was varied from 0% to 50%. The equivalence ratio of the hythane/CO2/air mixture was kept at stoichiometry. The results show that the lift-off height increases with the addition of CO2 at various % H2 content in hythane. However, we observe that with 20% H2, we can obtain a stable flame diluted with 40% CO2, while for 0% H2, the flame is blown out above 20% CO2. This means that the limits of flame blowing out are pushed with the additions of H2. Moreover, the results show that for %H2 content in NG-H2 fuel up to 10%, the addition of CO2 could produce lifted flame if the % CO2 is low. At higher % CO2 dilution, flame would remain attached until blow-out. This is mainly due to the fact that the dilution leads to ejection velocities very high but reactivity of the mixture does not change so the flame tends to stretch.

  18. Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan

    Denne rapport indeholder en beskrivelse af arbejdet udført i og resultaterne af forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ” Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur” og udgør slutrapportering for dette projekt.......Denne rapport indeholder en beskrivelse af arbejdet udført i og resultaterne af forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ” Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur” og udgør slutrapportering for dette projekt....

  19. The Twelve Principles of CO2 CHEMISTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emilia S

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  20. The twelve principles of CO2 Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emelia S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  1. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-07

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  2. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    GÜVENÇ, A.; MEHMETOĞLU, Ü.; ÇALIMLI, A.

    1999-01-01

    Extraction of ethanol was studied from both synthetic ethanol solution and fermentation broth using supercritical CO2 in an extraction apparatus in ranges of 313 to 333 K and 80 to 160 atmospheres, for varying extraction times. The experimental system consists mainly of four parts: a CO2 storage system, a high-pressure liquid pump, an extractor and a product collection unit. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Effects of temperature, pressure, extraction time, initial ethan...

  3. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Julia P; Aziz-Zaman, Sonya; Juozaityte, Vaida

    2012-01-01

    Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO(2) is poorly understoo...

  4. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  5. Reducing CO2 emission from bitumen upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of sand oil can result in significant CO2 emission. Ceramatec Inc. has developed a technology to reduce the emission of CO2 during the upgrading of feedstocks bearing heteroatoms. This technology can be applied to kerogen derived oil (shale oil) and heavy oil as well as to bitumen from oil sands. Metallic sodium is used as the reducing and heteroatom scavenging agent. Hydrogen, methane or other hydrocarbons may be used to cap radicals formed in the process. But using methane can lead to lower material and capital costs, greater product yield, and lower CO2 emission. During the upgrading process, the aromatic constituents remain in the product, after treatment with sodium and removal of sulphur, nitrogen and metals. Aromatic saturation is not required with sodium, so less hydrogen is needed which leads to reduced CO2 emission. The reason is that CO2 is emitted in the steam methane reforming (SMR) process where hydrogen is produced. An example is introduced to demonstrate the reduction of CO2 emission from hydrogen production. Another advantage of the sodium/methane upgrading process is the incorporation of methane into the fuel. In addition, the total acid number, TAN, becomes negligible in the sodium upgrading processes. Ceramatec has also developed a process for the recovery of sodium from the sodium salts generated in the sodium/methane upgrading process.

  6. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  7. On the Vertical Gradient in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, A. R.; Fung, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Attempts to constrain surface fluxes of carbon from atmospheric measurements of carbon dioxide have primarily focused on surface boundary layer measurements, because information about surface fluxes is least diluted close to the locations where the fluxes occur. However, errors in model ventilation of air in the vertical can be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes. Satellites which measure column integrated CO2 are expected to represent a major advance in part because they observe the entire atmospheric column. Recent work has highlighted the fact that vertical gradients in carbon concentrations can give us information about where vertical mixing errors are likely to be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes, but passive tracer evidence suggests that models that capture vertical profiles on the ocean do poorly on the land (and vice versa), suggesting that the problem of correctly treating vertical mixing in inverse studies is more fundamental than picking the "best" model. We consider observations of the vertical gradient in CO2 from aircrafts and from a comparison of satellites that observe in the near infrared (which observe the column integrated CO2 field) and the thermal infrared (which observe the upper troposphere). We evaluate the feasibility of using these satellites for determining the vertical gradient in CO2. We examine how observations of the vertical gradient of CO2 allow us to differentiate the imprint of vertical mixing and the imprint in surface fluxes on the observed field of atmospheric CO2.

  8. CO2 efflux from cleared mangrove peat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Lovelock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CO(2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2 efflux. CO(2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10,600 tonnes km(-2 year(-1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km(2 year(-1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO(2 efflux (27 umol m(-2 s(-1, but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO(2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks.

  9. CO2 Emission Factors for Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Orlović-Leko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors are used in greenhouse gas inventories to estimate emissions from coal combustion. In the absence of direct measures, emissions factors are frequently used as a quick, low cost way to estimate emissions values. Coal combustion has been a major contributor to the CO2 flux into the atmosphere. Nearly all of the fuel carbon (99 % in coal is converted to CO2 during the combustion process. The carbon content is the most important coal parameter which is the measure of the degree of coalification (coal rank. Coalification is the alteration of vegetation to form peat, succeeded by the transformation of peat through lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous to anthracite coal. During the geochemical or metamorphic stage, the progressive changes that occur within the coal are an increase in the carbon content and a decrease in the hydrogen and oxygen content resulting in a loss of volatiles. Heterogeneous composition of coal causes variation in CO2 emission from different coals. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has produced guidelines on how to produce emission inventories which includes emission factors. Although 2006 IPCC Guidelines provided the default values specified according to the rank of the coal, the application of country-specific emission factors was recommended when estimating the national greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses the differences between country-specific emission factors and default IPCC CO2 emission factors, EF(CO2, for coals. Also, this study estimated EF(CO2 for two different types of coals and peat from B&H, on the basis fuel analyses. Carbon emission factors for coal mainly depend on the carbon content of the fuel and vary with both rank and geographic origin, which supports the idea of provincial variation of carbon emission factors. Also, various other factors, such as content of sulphur, minerals and macerals play an important role and influence EF(CO2 from coal. Carbonate minerals

  10. Pore-scale Evolution of Supercritical CO2 within Bentheimer Sandstone during Multiple Drainage-Imbibition Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, A. L.; Andersson, L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy to limit emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from large fossil-fuel burning CO2 point sources; however, there are concerns associated with the long-term stability of a mobile subsurface CO2 plume. The large-scale movement of subsurface supercritical CO2 (scCO2) can be prevented via capillary trapping, wherein scCO2 is immobilized in the subsurface by capillary interactions between the solid surface, resident brine, and scCO2. Capillary trapping occurs in two steps: first, the porous medium undergoes drainage as scCO2 is injected into the system; then, wetting fluid re-enters the medium in an imbibition process, isolating small bubbles of scCO2 in the pore bodies of the medium. There are many empirical models which predict capillary trapping for a single drainage-imbibition cycle; however, in an engineered CO2 sequestration project, it is possible to implement cyclic scCO2-water injections in a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme in which the system may undergo multiple CO2 injections to potentially increase the trapping efficiency of scCO2. We present experimental results of multiple drainage-imbibition cycles of scCO2 and 1:6 by mass potassium iodide (KI) brine within Bentheimer sandstone. Capillary (differential) pressure and absolute pressures for each phase were continuously measured throughout each flow process, which is a unique feature of our experimental system. Experiments were conducted at a working pressure of 8.3 MPa (1200 PSI) and 40oC, and synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (x-ray CMT) images were collected of the drainage and imbibition process endpoints at a resolution of 3.19 μm at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The evolution of the connectivity, topology, morphology, and capillary trapping of scCO2 phase is analyzed as a function of capillary pressure, scCO2 saturation, and sample history. Preliminary results suggest

  11. Collisions of CO$_2$ Ice Grains in Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Musiolik, Grzegorz; Jankowski, Tim; Wurm, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In protoplanetary disks, CO$_2$ is solid ice beyond its snow line at $\\sim 10 \\rm AU$. Due to its high abundance, it contributes heavily to the collisional evolution in this region of the disk. For the first time, we carried out laboratory collision experiments with CO$_2$ ice particles and a CO$_2$-covered wall at a temperature of 80 K. Collision velocities varied between 0 - 2.5 m/s. Particle sizes were on the order of $\\sim$ 100 $\\mu$m. We find a threshold velocity between the sticking and the bouncing regime at 0.04 m/s. Particles with greater velocities but below 1 m/s bounce off the wall. For yet greater velocities, fragmentation occurs. We give analytical models for the coefficients of restitution and fragmentation strength consistent with the experimental data. Set in context, our data show that CO$_2$ ice and silicate dust resemble each other in the collisional behavior. Compared to water ice the sticking velocity is an order of magnitude smaller. One immediate consequence as example is that water ic...

  12. Highly efficient CO2 sorbents: development of synthetic, calcium-rich dolomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filitz, Rainer; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka M; Broda, Marcin; Müller, Christoph R

    2012-01-03

    The reaction of CaO with CO(2) is a promising approach for separating CO(2) from hot flue gases. The main issue associated with the use of naturally occurring CaCO(3), that is, limestone, is the rapid decay of its CO(2) capture capacity over repeated cycles of carbonation and calcination. Interestingly, dolomite, a naturally occurring equimolar mixture of CaCO(3) and MgCO(3), possesses a CO(2) uptake that remains almost constant with cycle number. However, owing to the large quantity of MgCO(3) in dolomite, the total CO(2) uptake is comparatively small. Here, we report the development of a synthetic Ca-rich dolomite using a coprecipitation technique, which shows both a very high and a stable CO(2) uptake over repeated cycles of calcination and carbonation. To obtain such an excellent CO(2) uptake characteristic it was found to be crucial to mix the Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) on a molecular level, that is, within the crystalline lattice. For sorbents which were composed of mixtures of microscopic crystals of CaCO(3) and MgCO(3), a decay behavior similar to natural limestone was observed. After 15 cycles, the CO(2) uptake of the best sorbent was 0.51 g CO(2)/g sorbent exceeding the CO(2) uptake of limestone by almost 100%.

  13. Efficient CO2 capture on low-cost silica gel modified by polyethyleneimine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Wang; Hongyan Shang; Lin Li; Xinlong Yan; Zifeng Yan; Chenguang Liu; Qingfang Zha

    2012-01-01

    In this work,a series of polyethyleneimine (PEI) functionalized commercial silica gel were prepared by wet impregnation method and used as CO2 sorbent.The as-prepared sorbents were characterized by N2 adsorption,FT-IR and SEM techniques.CO2 capture was tested in a fixed bed reactor using a simulated flue gas containing 15.1% CO2 in a temperature range of 25-100 ℃.The effects of sorption temperature and amine content on CO2 uptake of the adsorbents were investigated.The silica gel with a 30 wt% PEI loading manifested the largest CO2 uptake of 93.4 mgCO2/gadsorbent (equal to 311.3 mgCO2/gPEI) among the tested sorbents under the conditions of 15.1% (v/v) CO2 in N2 at 75 ℃ and atmospheric pressure.Moreover,it was rather low-cost.In addition,the PEI-impregnated silica gel exhibited stable adsorption-desorption behavior during 5 consecutive test cycles.These results suggest that the PEI-impregnated silica gel is a promising and cost-effective sorbent for CO2 capture from flue gas and other stationary sources with low CO2 concentration.

  14. Application of CO2 in BOF%转炉应用CO2技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万雪峰; 曹东; 刘祥; 朱晓雷; 廖相巍

    2015-01-01

    By the thermodynamic analysis of top blowing CO2 in the converter,combined with laboratory simulation re-sult of top blowing O2+CO2 mixture gas in converter,some key parameters of CO2 used in converter were established. It is concluded that although pure CO2 injected in the converter could achieve decarburize,the drop of temperature was rath-er large. When the CO2 supplying intensity was 3.0 m3/(t·min),the reduction of temperature was 15.1℃/min;By blow-ing O2+CO2 mixture gas,temperature balance could be realized,but the largest theoretical proportion of CO2 in mixture gas was 79.1%;with the increase of CO2 proportion,the carbon and oxygen product of molten steel at the blowing end was reduced,under the condition of φ(CO2)∶φ(O2)=1∶1,the carbon and oxygen product could be controlled in the range of (25~32)×10-8.%通过对转炉顶吹CO2的热力学分析,结合实验室模拟转炉顶吹O2+CO2混合气体试验结果,确立了CO2在转炉中应用的关键参数。得出在转炉中顶吹纯CO2虽可脱碳,但温降较大,顶吹CO2供气强度为3.0 m3/(t·min)时,钢液温降速率为15.1℃/min;通过喷吹O2+CO2混合气体可实现温度平衡,但CO2配比的最大理论比例为79.1%;随着混合气体中CO2比例增大,吹炼终点钢液碳氧积降低,当φ(CO2)∶φ(O2)=1∶1时可控碳氧积为(25~32)×10-8。

  15. Sorption of methane and CO2 for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon dioxide seauestration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basanta Kumar Prusty

    2008-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in deep and unmineable coal seams is one of the attractive alternatives to reduce its atmospheric concentration. Injection of CO2 in coal seams may help in enhancing the recovery of coalbed methane. An experimental study has been carried out using coal samples from three different coal seams, to evaluate the enhanced gas recovery and sequestration potential of these coals. The coals were first saturated with methane and then by depressurization some of the adsorbed methane was desorbed. After partial desorption, CO2 was injected into the coals and subsequently they were depressurized again. Desorption of methane after the injections was studied, to investigate the ability of CO2 to displace and enhance the recovery of methane from the coals. The coals exhibited varying behavior of adsorption of CO2 and release of methane. For one coal, the release of methane was enhanced by injection of CO2, suggesting preferential adsorption of CO2 and desorption of methane. For the other two coals, CO2 injection did not produce incremental methane initially, as there was initial resistance to methane release. However with continued CO2 injection, most of the remaining methane was produced. The study suggested that preferential sorption behavior of coal and enhanced gas recovery pattern could not be generalized for all coals.

  16. Electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture: first principle computational exploration of carbon nanotubes with pyridinic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Smith, Sean C; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes with specific nitrogen doping are proposed for controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO2 capture. Using density functional theory incorporating long-range dispersion corrections, we investigated the adsorption behavior of CO2 on (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with several nitrogen doping configurations and varying charge states. Pyridinic-nitrogen incorporation in CNTs is found to induce an increasing CO2 adsorption strength with electron injecting, leading to a highly selective CO2 adsorption in comparison with N2 . This functionality could induce intrinsically reversible CO2 adsorption as capture/release can be controlled by switching the charge carrying state of the system on/off. This phenomenon is verified for a number of different models and theoretical methods, with clear ramifications for the possibility of implementation with a broader class of graphene-based materials. A scheme for the implementation of this remarkable reversible electrocatalytic CO2 -capture phenomenon is considered.

  17. Enhancement of CO2 Affinity in a Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity by Amine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Christopher R; Maynard-Atem, Louise; Heard, Kane W J; Satilmis, Bekir; Budd, Peter M; Friess, Karel; Lanc̆, Marek; Bernardo, Paola; Clarizia, Gabriele; Jansen, Johannes C

    2014-02-11

    Nitrile groups in the polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1 were reduced to primary amines using borane complexes. In adsorption experiments, the novel amine-PIM-1 showed higher CO2 uptake and higher CO2/N2 sorption selectivity than the parent polymer, with very evident dual-mode sorption behavior. In gas permeation with six light gases, the individual contributions of solubility and diffusion to the overall permeability was determined via time-lag analysis. The high CO2 affinity drastically restricts diffusion at low pressures and lowers CO2 permeability compared to the parent PIM-1. Furthermore, the size-sieving properties of the polymer are increased, which can be attributed to a higher stiffness of the system arising from hydrogen bonding of the amine groups. Thus, for the H2/CO2 gas pair, whereas PIM-1 favors CO2, amine-PIM-1 shows permselectivity toward H2, breaking the Robeson 2008 upper bound.

  18. Effect of the transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 on the drought response of winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yafei; Li, Xiangnan; Yu, Jingjie;

    2017-01-01

    effect of e[CO2] in combination of drought on stomatal behavior, plant water consumption and water use efficiency (WUE) have not been investigated. Seeds harvested from plants after two generations (2014–2015) continuously grown in ambient CO2 (a[CO2], 400 μmol L−1) and e[CO2] (800 μmol L−1) were sown......-watered and served as controls. The results showed that transgenerational exposure of the winter wheat plants to e[CO2] could attenuate the negative impact of drought stress on dry biomass (DM) and WUE. The modulations of multi-generational e[CO2] on leaf abscisic acid concentration, stomatal conductance, and leaf...

  19. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket".

  20. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags using CO2 diluted sources: CO2 uptakes and energy requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato eBaciocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of carbonation experiments performed on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF steel slag samples employing gas mixtures containing 40 and 10% CO2 vol. simulating the gaseous effluents of gasification and combustion processes respectively, as well as 100% CO2 for comparison purposes. Two routes were tested, the slurry phase (L/S=5 l/kg, T=100 °C and Ptot=10 bar and the thin film (L/S =0.3-0.4 l/kg, T=50 °C and Ptot=7-10 bar routes. For each one, the CO2 uptake achieved as a function of the reaction time was analyzed and on this basis the energy requirements associated to each carbonation route and gas mixture composition were estimated considering to store the CO2 emissions of a medium size natural gas fired power plant (20 MW. For the slurry phase route, maximum CO2 uptakes ranged from around 8% at 10% CO2, to 21.1% (BOF-a and 29.2% (BOF-b at 40% CO2 and 32.5% (BOF-a and 40.3% (BOF-b at 100% CO2. For the thin film route, maximum uptakes of 13% (BOF-c and 19.5% (BOF-d at 40% CO2, and 17.8% (BOF-c and 20.2% (BOF-d at 100% were attained. The energy requirements of the two analyzed process routes appeared to depend chiefly on the CO2 uptake of the slag. For both process route, the minimum overall energy requirements were found for the tests with 40% CO2 flows (i.e. 1400-1600 MJ/t CO2 for the slurry phase and 2220-2550 MJ/t CO2 for the thin film route.

  1. Volcanic CO2 mapping and flux measurements at Campi Flegrei by Tunable Diode Laser absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedone, Maria; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Giudice, Gaetano; Grassa, Fausto; Chiodini, Giovanni; Valenza, Mariano

    2014-05-01

    Near-infrared room-temperature Tunable Diode Lasers (TDL) have recently found increased usage in atmospheric chemistry and air monitoring research, but applications in Volcanology are still limited to a few examples. Here, we explored the potentiality of a commercial infrared laser unit (GasFinder 2.0 from Boreal Laser Ltd) to measurement of volcanic CO2 flux emissions. Our field tests were conducted at Campi Flegrei (near Pozzuoli, Southern Italy), where the GasFinder was used (during three campaigns in October 2012, January 2013 and May 2013) to repeatedly measure the path-integrated concentrations of CO2 along cross-sections of the atmospheric plumes of the two main fumarolic fields in the area (Solfatara and Pisciarelli). By using ad-hoc designed field-set-up and a tomographic post-processing routine, we resolved, for each of the 2 manifestations, the contour maps of CO2 concentrations in their atmospheric plumes, from the integration of which (and after multiplication by the plumes' transport speeds) the CO2 fluxes were finally obtained [1]. The so-calculated fluxes average of 490 tons/day, which agrees well with independent evaluations of Aiuppa et al. (2013) [2] (460 tons/day on average), and support a significant contribution of fumaroles to the total CO2 budget. The cumulative (fumarole [this study] +soil [2]) CO2 output from Campi Flegrei is finally evaluated at 1600 tons/day. The application of lasers to volcanic gas studies is still an emerging (though intriguing) research field, and requires more testing and validation experiments. We conclude that TDL technique may valuably assist CO2 flux quantification at a number of volcanic targets worldwide. [1] Pedone M. et al. (2013) Gold2013:abs:5563, Goldschmidt Conference, session 11a. [2] Aiuppa A. et al. (2013) Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. doi: 10.1002/ggge.20261. [3] Chiodini G. et al. (2010) Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 115, B03205. doi:10.1029/2008JB006258.

  2. Preliminary Seismic Time-lapse Results of the First Post-injection Monitoring at the Ketzin Pilot Site for CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Monika, Ivandic; Julin, Christopher; Lüth, Stefan; Bergmann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse surface seismic monitoring methods have proven to be notably successful in imaging the development of the CO2 plume injected into the 630-650 meters deep saline aquifer at the Ketzin pilot site. A 3D baseline survey was acquired in the autumn of 2005 prior to CO2 injection, followed by two 3D repeat surveys conducted in the same season of 2009 and 2012 after injection of about 22 and 61 kt of CO2, respectively. These repeat surveys showed that the CO2 plume was concentrated around the injection well with a preferred WNW propagating trend due to reservoir heterogeneity. The CO2 induced amplitude anomaly continued to grow with more CO2 injected into the reservoir. The CO2 injection ended on August 29, 2013 after a total of about 67 kt injected CO2. In the autumn of 2015, a third 3D repeat survey with a nominal fold of 25 was acquired during the post-injection phase. The acquisition was implemented with an identical template scheme and acquisition parameters as in the previous surveys. About 5500 source points were acquired during the 57 days of active acquisition. The same processing steps as used before were carried out from pre-stack to post-stack. In order to minimize changes unrelated to the site operations, cross-calibration was applied to the data. Preliminary results of the time-lapse analysis show that the obtained amplitude anomaly at the reservoir level is smaller in size than the one observed at the time of the second repeat survey. This may indicate that CO2 dissolution is active, especially east of the injection site, where permeability and flow rate appear to be lower. In comparison to the previous surveys, the maximum amplitude anomaly has moved towards the west, which is consistent with the previously observed propagating tendency of the CO2 plume within the reservoir. No CO2 leakage is observed within the overburden.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Clusters: (CO_2)_6 to (CO_2)13

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2011-06-01

    We recenty reported assignments of specific infrared bands in the CO_2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn) to (CO_2)_6, (CO_2)_7, (CO_2)_9, (CO_2)10, (CO_2)11, (CO_2)12, and (CO_2)13. Spectra are obtained by direct absorption using a rapid-scan tuneable diode laser spectrometer to probe a pulsed supersonic slit-jet expansion and assignments are facilitated by recent calculations of Takeuchi based on the Murthy potential. (CO_2)_6 is a symmetric top with S_6 point group symmetry which can be thought of as a stack of two planar cyclic trimers. (CO_2)13 is also an S_6 symmetric top, and consists of a single CO_2 monomer surrounded by an slightly distorted icosahedral cage. The remaining clusters are asymmetric tops without symmetry. Here we report additional CO_2 cluster results. Calculations based on the SAPT-s potential indicate that the structure of (CO_2)10 may be slightly different from that given by Takeuchi/Murthy. An additional band is observed for each of (CO_2)13 and (CO_2)10. A feature observed at 2378.2 wn is assigned as a (CO_2)_6 parallel combination band involving the sum of a fundamental and a low-lying intermolecular vibration. Most significantly, two bands are assigned to a second isomer of (CO_2)_6. This is also a symmetric top, but now with S_4 symmetry. The two symmetric hexamer isomers observed spectroscopically correspond well with the lowest energy structures given by both the SAPT-s and Murthy intermolecular potentials. [1] J. Norooz Oliaee, M. Dehgany, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A.R.W. McKellar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 1297 (2011). [2] H. Takeuchi, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 5703 (2008); C.S. Murthy, S.F. O'Shea, and I.R. McDonald, Mol. Phys. 50, 531 (1983). [3] R. Bukowski, J. Sadlej, B. Jeziorski, P. Jankowski, K. Szalewicz, S.A. Kucharski, H.L. Williams, and B.M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)

  4. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  5. GOSAT/TANSO-FTS Measurement of Volcanic and Geothermal CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    2010-05-01

    Approximately one tenth of the Earth's human population lives in direct reach of volcanic hazards. Being able to provide sufficiently early and scientifically sound warning is a key to volcanic hazard mitigation. Quantitative time-series monitoring of volcanic CO2 emissions will likely play a key role in such early warning activities in the future. Impending volcanic eruptions or any potentially disastrous activity that involves movement of magma in the subsurface, is often preceded by an early increase of CO2 emissions. Conventionally, volcanic CO2 monitoring is done either in campaigns of soil emission measurements (grid of one-time measuring points) that are labor intensive and slow, or by ground-based remote FTIR measurements in emission plumes. These methods are not easily available at all sites of potential activity and prohibitively costly to employ on a large number of volcanoes. In addition, both of these ground-based approaches pose a significant risk to the workers conducting these measurements. Some aircraft-based measurements have been conducted as well in the past, however these are limited by the usually meager funding situation of individual observatories, the hazard such flights pose to equipment and crew, and by the inaccessibility of parts of the plume due to ash hazards. The core motivation for this study is therefore to develop a method for volcanic CO2 monitoring from space that will provide sufficient coverage, resolution, and data quality for an application to quantitative time series monitoring and correlation with other available datasets, from a safe distance and with potentially global reach. In summary, the purpose of the proposed research is to quantify volcanic CO2 emissions using satellite-borne observations. Quantitative estimates will be useful for warning of impending volcanic eruptions, and assessing the contribution of volcanic CO2 to global GHG. Our approach encompasses method development and testing for the detection of

  6. Modeling atmospheric transport of CO2 at High Resolution to estimate the potentialities of spaceborne observation to monitor anthropogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciais, P.; Chimot, J.; Klonecki, A.; Prunet, P.; Vinuessa, J.; Nussli, C.; Breon, F.

    2010-12-01

    There is a crucial and urgent need to quantify and monitor anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of CO2. Spaceborne measurements, such as those from GOSAT or the forthcoming OCO-2, or other space missions in preparation, could provide the necessary information, in particular over regions with few in-situ measurements of atmospheric concentration are too scarce. Contrarily to biogenic flux, anthropogenic emissions are highly heterogeneous in space with typical values that vary by several orders of magnitudes. A proper analysis of the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the atmospheric concentration of CO2 therefore requires a high spatial resolution, typically of a few km. Simulations of the transport of fossil CO2 plumes were performed with a resolution of 1 km over the main industrialized regions of France, and using other models of lower resolution to account for the influence of distant sources advected into the area of interest. The results clearly show the plumes from intense yet localized sources, such as urban areas or power plants, and how their structures vary with the meteorology (wind speed and direction). They also show that the plume from distant sources, such as the large emission from Northern Europe, may sometime mask the local plume, even from large cities like Paris or Lyon. These atmospheric transport simulations are then sampled according to cloud cover, spaceborne instrument sampling and typical errors, to analyze the information content of the remote sensing data and how they can improve the current knowledge on anthropogenic emissions.

  7. The contribution of aquatic metabolism to CO2 emissions from New Hampshire streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, L.; Snyder, L. E.; McDowell, W. H.; Hunt, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Fluvial networks represent a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Recent evidence has highlighted the ubiquity of CO2 supersaturation in streams, rivers, and lakes worldwide, yet our understanding of how the source of this CO2 flux (e.g. in situ aquatic production versus soil and groundwater sources within the catchment) varies in time and across different aquatic systems remains limited. In this study we used continuous, high-frequency measurements of dissolved oxygen (DO) and CO2 to model stream metabolism and CO2 emissions for five stream sites across New Hampshire that vary in size, nutrient loading, and landscape context, with the goal of quantitatively partitioning the aquatic CO2 flux into catchment and aquatic sources, respectively. Spectral analysis of the DO and CO2 time series indicates that these gases often deviated from the pure inverse behavior that would be expected if CO2 flux originated solely from in-stream biological activity. Across all streams, the estimated contribution of aquatic net ecosystem production (NEP) to stream CO2 flux varied from approximately 0% to 50%. For each site, the proportion of CO2 flux supported by aquatic NEP was lower at higher discharge, perhaps due to increased CO2 transport from soils to streams during wetter periods, and/or due to effects of scouring flows and carbon removal on stream metabolism. Our data provides evidence that catchment sources represent substantial contributions to aquatic CO2 flux across temperate streams, but that the proportion of CO2 flux originating from net in situ production and carbon transformation is variable throughout the growing season.

  8. Summit CO2 emission rates by the CO2/SO2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, during a period of sustained inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, S.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Wallace, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June–July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO2emission rates with synchronous CO2/SO2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995–1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO2/SO2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  9. Atomistic simulations of CO2 and N2 within cage-type silica zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Lindsey; Heitzer, Henry; Russell, Colin; Kohen, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of CO(2) and N(2), both as single components and as binary mixtures, in two cage-type silica zeolites was studied using atomistic simulations. The zeolites considered, ITQ-3 and paradigm cage-type zeolite ZK4 (the all-silica analog of LTA), were chosen so that the principles illustrated can be generalized to other adsorbent/adsorbate systems with similar topology and types of interactions. N(2) was chosen both because of the potential uses of N(2)/CO(2) separations and because it differs from CO(2) most significantly in the magnitude of its Coulombic interactions with zeolites. Despite similarities between N(2) and CO(2) diffusion in other materials, we show here that the diffusion of CO(2) within cage-type zeolites is dominated by an energy barrier to diffusion located at the entrance to the narrow channels connecting larger cages. This barrier originates in Coulombic interactions between zeolites and CO(2)'s quadrupole and results in well-defined orientations for the diffusing molecules. Furthermore, CO(2)'s favorable electrostatic interactions with the zeolite framework result in preferential binding in the windows between cages. N(2)'s behavior, in contrast, is more consistent with that of molecules previously studied. Our analysis suggests that CO(2)'s behavior might be common for adsorbates with quadrupoles that interact strongly with a material that has narrow windows between cages.

  10. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  11. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...... profitable trade. Also, a periodical renewal of permits makes it possible to tighten target levels in the future.......The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost......-effective control which can solve future global environmental problems. The gains from CO2 trade may give vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe, for example, and it will probably not pay to cheat if quotas are renewed periodically by the UN. Cheating countries are then to be excluded from further...

  12. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...... not pay to cheat if quotas are renewed periodically by the UN. Cheating countries are then to be excluded from further profitable trade. Also, a periodical renewal of permits makes it possible to tighten target levels in the future.......The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost......-effective control which can solve future global environmental problems. The economic gains from 'hot air' distributions of permits and CO2 trade make the system politically attractive to potential participants. For example, vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe are to be expected. It will probably...

  13. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    by the Ministry of Transport, with the Technical University of Denmark as one of the main contributors. The CO2-strategy was to be based on the principle of cost-effectiveness. A model was set up to assist in the assessment. The model consists of a projection of CO2-emissions from road and rail modes from 2020...... are evaluated according to CO2 reduction potential and according to the ‘shadow price’ on a reduction of one ton CO2. The shadow price reflects the costs (and benefits) of the different measures. Comparing the measures it is possible to identify cost effective measures, but these measures are not necessarily......, a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...

  14. Where Plumes Live

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  15. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of CO2-HX complexes using the CO2 asymmetric stretch chromophore: CO2HF(DF) and CO2HCl(DCl) linear and CO2HBr bent equilibrium geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, S. W.; Zeng, Y. P.; Wittig, C.; Beaudet, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra associated with the CO2 asymmetric stretch vibration have been recorded for weakly bonded gas-phase complexes of CO2 with HF, DF, HCl, DCl, and HBr, using tunable diode laser spectroscopy and a pulsed slit expansion (0.15×38 mm2) that provides >20 MHz overall resolution. Results obtained with CO2-HF are in agreement with earlier studies, in which the HF-stretch region near 3900 cm-1 was examined. In both cases, broad linewidths suggest subnanosecond predissociation. With CO2-DF, the natural linewidths are markedly narrower than with CO2-HF (e.g., 28 vs 182 MHz), and this difference is attributed to slower predissociation, possibly implicating resonances in the case of CO2-HF. Both CO2-HF and CO2-DF exhibited overlapping features: simple P and R branches associated with a linear rotor, and P and R branches containing doublets. As in earlier studies, the second feature can be assigned to either a slightly asymmetric rotor with Ka=1, or a hot band involving a low-frequency intermolecular bend mode. Results obtained with CO2-HCl are in excellent agreement with earlier microwave measurements on the ground vibrational state, and the vibrationally excited state is almost identical to the lower state. Like CO2-DF, linewidths of CO2-HCl and CO2-DCl are much sharper than those of CO2-HF, and in addition, CO2-HCl and CO2-DCl exhibited weak hot bands, as were also evident with CO2-HF and CO2-DF. Upon forming complexes with either HF or HCl, the asymmetric stretch mode of CO2 underwent a blue shift relative to uncomplexed CO2. This can be understood in terms of the nature of the hydrogen bonds, and ab initio calculations are surprisingly good at predicting these shifts. Deuteration of both HF and HCl resulted in further blue shifts of the band origins. These additional shifts are attributed to stronger intermolecular interactions, i.e., deuteration lowers the zero-point energy, and in a highly anharmonic field this results in a more compact average

  16. Feasibility Study for The Setting Up of a Safety System for Monitoring CO2 Storage at Prinos Field, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Lymperopoulos, Panagiotis; Tasianas, Alexandros; Shariatipour, Seyed

    2016-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in subsurface geological structures can mitigate global warming. A comprehensive safety and monitoring system for CO2 storage has been undertaken for the Prinos hydrocarbon field, offshore northern Greece; a system which can prevent any possible leakage of CO2. This paper presents various monitoring strategies of CO2 subsurface movement in the Prinos reservoir, the results of a simulation of a CO2 leak through a well, an environmental risk assessment study related to the potential leakage of CO2 from the seafloor and an overall economic insight of the system. The results of the simulation of the CO2 leak have shown that CO2 reaches the seabed in the form of gas approximately 13.7 years, from the beginning of injection. From that point onwards the amount of CO2 reaching the seabed increases until it reaches a peak at around 32.9 years. During the injection period, the CO2 plume develops only within the reservoir. During the post-injection period, the CO2 reaches the seabed and develops side branches. These correspond to preferential lateral flow pathways of the CO2 and are more extensive for the dissolved CO2 than for the saturated CO2 gas. For the environmental risk assessment, we set up a model, using ArcGIS software, based on the use of data regarding the speeds of the winds and currents encountered in the region. We also made assumptions related to the flow rate of CO2. Results show that after a period of 10 days from the start of CO2 leakage the CO2 has reached halfway to the continental shores where the “Natura” protected areas are located. CO2 leakage modelling results show CO2 to be initially flowing along a preferential flow direction, which is towards the NE. However, 5 days after the start of leakage of CO2, the CO2 is also flowing towards the ENE. The consequences of a potential CO2 leak are considered spatially limited and the ecosystem is itself capable of recovering. We have tried to determine the costs necessary for the

  17. Dilution in Transition Zone between Rising Plumes and Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    The papers presents some physical experiments with the dilution of sea outfall plumes with emphasize on the transition zone where the relative fast flowing vertical plume turns to a horizontal surface plume following the slow sea surface currents. The experiments show that a considerable dilution...

  18. Investigation into optimal CO2 concentration for CO2 capture from aluminium production

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Anette; Sørensen, Henriette; Melaaen, Morten Christian; Müller, Gunn-Iren

    2013-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from aluminum production has been simulated using Aspen Plus and Aspen Hysys. The technology used for aluminum production is the Hall-Héroult and the current cell design necessitates that large amounts of false air is supplied to the cells. This results in a CO2 concentration in the process gas at around 1 vol%, which is considered uneconomical for CO2 capture. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to evaluate the CO2 capture from aluminum production when the process g...

  19. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: a Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, A.; Sasselov, D.; Podolak, M.

    2017-03-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction large enough to form an external mantle composed of high-pressure water-ice polymorphs and also lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone, so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global, deep, liquid ocean. For these ocean planets, we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2, the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that, in a steady state, the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is established. The exact value depends on the subpolar surface temperature. Our results suggest the possibility of a negative feedback mechanism, unique to water planets, where a reduction in the subpolar temperature drives more CO2 into the atmosphere to increase the greenhouse effect.

  20. Metal-CO2 Batteries on the Road: CO2 from Contamination Gas to Energy Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhang; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-01-20

    Rechargeable nonaqueous metal-air batteries attract much attention for their high theoretical energy density, especially in the last decade. However, most reported metal-air batteries are actually operated in a pure O2 atmosphere, while CO2 and moisture in ambient air can significantly impact the electrochemical performance of metal-O2 batteries. In the study of CO2 contamination on metal-O2 batteries, it has been gradually found that CO2 can be utilized as the reactant gas alone; namely, metal-CO2 batteries can work. On the other hand, investigations on CO2 fixation are in focus due to the potential threat of CO2 on global climate change, especially for its steadily increasing concentration in the atmosphere. The exploitation of CO2 in energy storage systems represents an alternative approach towards clean recycling and utilization of CO2 . Here, the aim is to provide a timely summary of recent achievements in metal-CO2 batteries, and inspire new ideas for new energy storage systems. Moreover, critical issues associated with reaction mechanisms and potential directions for future studies are discussed.

  1. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years is a long-standing mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O/ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene oscillations near 100 000 years is a linear ('Milankovitch' response to summer insolation forcing. Both responses must result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of the required non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and nearly in phase within the ~100 000-year band. This timing rules out greenhouse-gas forcing of a very slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets responded linearly to insolation forcing at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago, but CO2 feedback amplified the ice response at the 41 000-year period by a factor of approximately two. After 0.9 million years ago, with slow polar cooling, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth every 41 000 years, but weaker ablation permitted some ice to survive insolation maxima of low intensity. Step-wise growth of these longer-lived ice sheets continued until peaks in northern summer insolation produced abrupt deglaciations every ~85 000 to ~115 000 years. Most of the deglacial ice melting resulted from the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to be candidate mechanisms for ice-sheet control of CO2 and their own feedback.

  2. Corrosion behavior of steel X60 at different temperatures%X60钢在不同温度下的CO2腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琦; 杨新田; 徐鸿麟

    2005-01-01

    为了研究腐蚀因素与腐蚀速率的关系,通过在NACE溶液(5%NaCl +0.5%CH3COOH)中进行饱和CO2浸泡腐蚀实验,利用失重法、电子显微镜(SEM)和数码相机等方法研究了X60管线钢在30、60和90 ℃温度条件下的腐蚀行为.研究结果表明,X60钢在90 ℃条件下的腐蚀速率比在30和60 ℃条件下高一个数量级,为12.885 8 mm/a.在30 ℃时,试样表面无明显点蚀特征,在60 ℃条件下试样表面仅仅出现点蚀,其余部分平整,而在90 ℃条件下试样表面不仅出现严重的台地腐蚀而且出现线蚀槽,腐蚀严重.在60 ℃条件下,点蚀周围富集Cl-,说明Cl-在坑内富集,是引起点蚀成核的主要原因.

  3. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  4. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity.

  5. Membraneless water filtration using CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Shardt, Orest; Warren, Patrick; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Water purification technologies such as ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis utilize porous membranes to remove suspended particles and solutes. These membranes, however, cause many drawbacks such as a high pumping cost and a need for periodic replacement due to fouling. Here we show an alternative membraneless method for separating suspended particles by exposing the colloidal suspension to CO2. Dissolution of CO2 into the suspension creates solute gradients that drive phoretic motion of particles, or so-called diffusiophoresis. Due to the large diffusion potential built up by the dissociation of carbonic acid, colloidal particles move either away from or towards the gas-liquid interface depending on their surface charge. Our findings suggest a means to separate particles without membranes or filters, thus reducing operating and maintenance costs. Using the directed motion of particles induced by exposure to CO2, we demonstrate a scalable, continuous flow, membraneless particle filtration process that exhibits very low pressure drop and is essentially free from fouling.

  6. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlaat, B.; Ostrega, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Bortolin, C.; Vogt, S.; Godlewski, J.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Van Overbeek, M.; Blaszcyk, T.

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra pixel layer in the space obtained by a smaller radius beam pipe. This new pixel layer called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) was installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the expected high radiation dose received at an integrated luminosity of 550 fb1. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  7. Upscaling of enzyme enhanced CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne Berthold

    the mass transfer of CO2 with slow-capturing but energetically favorable solvents can open up a variety of new process options for this technology. The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which enhances the mass transfer of CO2 in the lungs by catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2, is one very...... promising mass transfer rate promoter for CCS. This process has been previously been tested successfully in lab scale and in some rare cases in pilot scale, but no validated process model for this technology has been published yet. This PhD thesis presents an investigation of the feasibility of enzyme...... enzyme kinetic model and validating it against in-house pilot plant experiments. The work consisted of identifying a suitable enzyme-solvent system and the ideal process conditions by comparing mass transfer rates of different solvents and enzyme enhanced solvents in a lab scale wetted wall column...

  8. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  9. CO2-water-mineral reactions during CO2 leakage into glauconitic sands: geochemical and isotopic monitoring of batch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, P.; Lions, J.; Lagneau, V.; Negrel, Ph.

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of environmental impacts of carbon dioxide geological storage requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakages into fresh groundwater reserves. The Albian aquifer of the Paris Basin was chosen as a case of study because i) the Paris Basin contains deep saline Jurassic and Triassic aquifers identified as targets by the French national program of CO2 geological storage and ii) the Albian aquifer is a deep freshwater resource of strategic national importance, above the Jurassic and Triassic formations. An experimental and a geochemical modelling approach were carried out in order to better understand the rock-water-CO2 interactions with two main objectives: to assess the evolution of the chemistry of the formation water and of the mineralogy of the solid phase during the interaction and to design a monitoring program for freshwater resources. The main focus is to select and develop suitable indirect indicators of the presence of CO2 in the aquifer. We present here the experimental results, which combines both major and trace elements and isotopic tools, some of them new in the CCS field. Batch reactors with a liquid/solid ratio of 10 made of appropriate materials (PTFE, stainless steel) were equipped with simultaneous controls on several parameters (pH measurement, gas phase composition, pressure, tightness…) after CO2 injection (PCO2= 2 bar; room temperature). Ten reactors were run simultaneously, over pre-determined durations of CO2-water-rock interaction (1, 7, 15 and 30 days). During the batch experiment, we observed major changes in several chemical parameters due to the CO2 injection. A sharp drop in pH from 6.6 to 4.9 was noticeable, immediately after the injection, due to CO2 dissolution in the water phase. Alkalinity varies from 1.3 mmol.L-1 in the initial water to 2.0 mmol.L-1 at the end of the 1-month experiment. Four types of ion behaviors are observed: (1) calcium, silicon and magnesium concentrations increase during the 1-month

  10. Local CO2-induced swelling of shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2017-04-01

    In heterogeneous shale rocks, CO2 adsorbs more strongly to organic matter than to the other components. CO2-induced swelling of organic matter has been shown in coal, which is pure carbon. The heterogeneity of the shale matrix makes an interesting case study. Can local swelling through adsorption of CO2 to organic matter induce strain in the surrounding shale matrix? Can fractures close due to CO2-induced swelling of clays and organic matter? We have developed a new generation of microfluidic high pressure cells (up to 100 bar), which can be used to study flow and adsorption phenomena at the microscale in natural geo-materials. The devices contain one transparent side and a shale sample on the other side. The shale used is the Pomeranian shale, extracted from 4 km depth in Poland. This formation is a potential target of a combined CO2-storage and gas extraction project. To answer the first question, we place the pressure cell under a Veeco NT1100 Interferometer, operated in Vertical Scanning Interferometry mode and equipped with a Through Transmissive Media objective. This allows for observation of local swelling or organic matter with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution. We expose the sample to CO2 atmospheres at different pressures. Comparison of the interferometry data and using SEM-EDS maps plus optical microscopy delivers local swelling maps where we can distinguish swelling of different mineralogies. Preliminary results indicate minor local swelling of organic matter, where the total amount is both time- and pressure-dependent.

  11. Optimisation of dispersion parameters of Gaussian plume model for CO₂ dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiong; Godbole, Ajit; Lu, Cheng; Michal, Guillaume; Venton, Philip

    2015-11-01

    The carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects entail the possibility of accidental release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. To quantify the spread of CO2 following such release, the 'Gaussian' dispersion model is often used to estimate the resulting CO2 concentration levels in the surroundings. The Gaussian model enables quick estimates of the concentration levels. However, the traditionally recommended values of the 'dispersion parameters' in the Gaussian model may not be directly applicable to CO2 dispersion. This paper presents an optimisation technique to obtain the dispersion parameters in order to achieve a quick estimation of CO2 concentration levels in the atmosphere following CO2 blowouts. The optimised dispersion parameters enable the Gaussian model to produce quick estimates of CO2 concentration levels, precluding the necessity to set up and run much more complicated models. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were employed to produce reference CO2 dispersion profiles in various atmospheric stability classes (ASC), different 'source strengths' and degrees of ground roughness. The performance of the CFD models was validated against the 'Kit Fox' field measurements, involving dispersion over a flat horizontal terrain, both with low and high roughness regions. An optimisation model employing a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the best dispersion parameters in the Gaussian plume model was set up. Optimum values of the dispersion parameters for different ASCs that can be used in the Gaussian plume model for predicting CO2 dispersion were obtained.

  12. An analytical and experimental investigation of resistojet plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zana, Lynnette M.; Hoffman, David J.; Breyley, Loranell R.; Serafini, John S.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the electrothermal propulsion plume research program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, efforts have been initiated to analytically and experimentally investigate the plumes of resistojet thrusters. The method of Simons for the prediction of rocket exhaust plumes is developed for the resistojet. Modifications are made to the source flow equations to account for the increased effects of the relatively large nozzle boundary layer. Additionally, preliminary mass flux measurements of a laboratory resistojet using CO2 propellant at 298 K have been obtained with a cryogenically cooled quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). There is qualitative agreement between analysis and experiment, at least in terms of the overall number density shape functions in the forward flux region.

  13. Do Tree Stems Recapture Respired CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilman, B.; Angert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Tree stem respiration is an important, yet not well understood, component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Predicting how trees as whole organisms respond to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 requires understanding of the variability in the fraction of assimilated carbon allocated to respiration, versus the allocation to growth, damage repair, and to rhizosphere symbionts. Here we used the ratio of CO2 efflux/O2 influx (Apparent Respiratory Quotient, ARQ) to study stem respiration. The ARQ in trees stems is predicted to be 1.0, as a result of carbohydrates metabolism. Lower than 1.0 ARQ values may indicate a local assimilation of respired CO2, or dissolution and transport of CO2 in the xylem stream. We measured stems ARQ in 16 tree species at tropical, Mediterranean and temperate ecosystems using stem chambers and in-vitro incubations. The CO2 and O2 were measured by a system we developed, which is based on an IRGA and a Fuel-cell O2 analyzer (Hilman and Angert 2016). We found typical values of ARQ in the range of 0.4-0.8. Since incubations of detach stem tissues yielded similar ARQ values, and since the influence of natural variations in the transpiration stream on ARQ was found to be small, we conclude that the removal of the respired CO2 is not via dissolution in the xylem stream. Using 13C labeling, dark fixation of stem tissues was detected, which is most probably phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) mediated. Hence, we suggest that in-stem dark fixation of respired CO2 to organic acids (e.g. malate) affects the outgoing efflux. Further research should determine if these organic acids are transported to the canopy, stored in the stem, or transported to the roots to serve as exudates. Hilman B, Angert A (2016) Measuring the ratio of CO2 efflux to O2 influx in tree stem respiration. Tree Physiol 2016, doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpw057

  14. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...... concerns of the potential measures within those intervention areas: • Reductions in the need to travel • Improved efficiency of the transport system • Improved fuel efficiency of transport activities • Reduced CO2 intensity of the fuels Within each area a number of measures were analysed. The measures...

  15. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late

  16. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...... perspectives for decreasing the heat requirement. However, a scientific understanding of the processes is required. The thermodynamic properties of the NH3–CO2–H2O system were described using the extended UNIQUAC electrolyte model developed by Thomsen and Rasmussen in a temperature range from 0 to 110°C...

  17. Leak Path Development in CO2 Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsater, M.; Todorovic, J.; Opedal, N.; Lavrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wells have in numerous scientific works been denoted the "weak link" of safe and cost-efficient CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Whether they are active or abandoned, all wells are man-made intrusions into the storage reservoir with sealing abilities depending on degradable materials like steel and cement. If dense CO2 is allowed to expand (e.g. due to leakage) it will cool down its surroundings and cause strong thermal and mechanical loading on the wellbore. In addition, CO2 reacts chemically with rock, cement and steel. To ensure long-term underground containment, it is therefore necessary to study how, why, where and when leakage occurs along CO2wells. If cement bonding to rock or casing is poor, leak paths can form already during drilling and completion of the well. In the present work, we have mapped the bonding quality of cement-rock and cement-steel interfaces - and measured their resistance towards CO2 flow. This involved a large experimental matrix including different rocks, steels, cement types and well fluids. The bonding qualities were measured on composite cores using micro computed tomography (µ-CT), and CO2 was flooded through the samples to determine leakage rates. These were further compared to numerical simulations of leakage through the digitalized µ-CT core data, and CO2chemical interactions with the materials were mapped using electron microscopy. We also present a new laboratory set-up for measuring how well integrity is affected by downhole temperature variations - and we showcase some initial results. Our work concludes that leak path development in CO2 wells depends critically on the drilling fluids and presflushes/spacers chosen already during drilling and completion of a well. Fluid films residing on rock and casing surfaces strongly degrade the quality of cement bonding. The operation of the well is also important, as even slight thermal cycling (between 10°C and 95°C on casing) leads to significant de-bonding of the annular cement.

  18. Toxic emissions and devaluated CO2-neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    with a climate policy whose goals of CO2-reduction were made operational by green-wash. Arguments are given for the devaluation of CO2- neutrality in case of burning wood. Alternative practices as storing C in high quality wood products and/or leaving wood in the forest are recommended. A counter......-productive effect of dioxin formation in the cooling phase of wood burning appliances has been registered akin to de-novo-synthesis in municipal solid waste incinerators. Researchers, regulators and the public are, however, still preoccupied by notions of oven design and operation parameters, assuming that dioxin...

  19. Carbon monoxide : A quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamnitzer, Ulrike; Karstens, Ute; Kromer, Bernd; Neubert, Rolf E. M.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Schroeder, Hartwig; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and radiocarbon ((CO2)-C-14) measurements have been made in Heidelberg from 2001 to 2004 in order to determine the regional fossil fuel CO2 component and to investigate the application of CO as a quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2 (CO2(foss)). The obs

  20. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  1. On predicting mantle mushroom plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kheng Tan

    2011-04-01

    Top cooling may produce plunging plumes of diameter of 585 km and at least 195 Myr old. The number of cold plumes is estimated to be 569, which has not been observed by seismic tomography or as cold spots. The cold plunging plumes may overwhelm and entrap some of the hot rising plumes from CMB, so that together they may settle in the transition zone.

  2. Geophysical Monitoring at the Aquistore CO2 Storage Site, Saskatchewan, Canada (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Aquistore Project, located near Estevan, Saskatchewan, is designed to demonstrate CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer. CO2 captured from the nearby Boundary Dam coal-fired power plant will be injected into a brine-filled sandstone formation at ~3300 m depth, starting in November, 2013. A key element of the Aquistore research program is the further development of geophysical methods to monitor the security and subsurface distribution of the injected CO2. Toward this end, a spectrum of geophysical techniques are being tested at the Aquistore site. Various time-lapse seismic methods, including 3D surface and vertical seismic profiles (VSP) as well as crosswell seismic tomography, are designed to provide monitoring of the CO2 plume. Novel components of the seismic monitoring include use of a sparse permanent array and borehole recording using a fiber optic distributed acoustic sensor (DAS) system. Gravity and electromagnetic methods are providing complementary monitoring. Pre-injection baseline surveys have been acquired for each of these methods. In addition, continuous pre-injection monitoring has been ongoing since the summer of 2012 to establish background surface deformation patterns and local seismicity prior to the start of CO2 injection. A network of GPS stations, surface tiltmeters and InSAR reflectors has been deployed to monitor injection-related surface deformation. Passive seismic monitoring is being conducted using two orthogonal linear arrays of surface geophones.

  3. Modeling vertical stratification of CO 2 injected into a deep layered aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed; Mouche, Emmanuel; Mügler, Claude

    2009-03-01

    The vertical stratification of carbon dioxide (CO 2) injected into a deep layered aquifer made up of high-permeability and low-permeability layers, such as Utsira aquifer at Sleipner site in Norway, is investigated with a Buckley-Leverett equation including gravity effects. In a first step, we study both by theory and simulation the application of this equation to the vertical migration of a light phase (CO 2), in a denser phase (water), in 1D vertical columns filled with different types of porous media: homogeneous, piecewise homogeneous, layered periodic and finally heterogeneous. For each case, we solve the associated Riemann problems and propose semi-analytical solutions describing the spatial and temporal evolution of the light phase saturation. These solutions agree well with simulation results. We show that the flux continuity condition at interfaces between high-permeability and low-permeability layers leads to CO 2 saturation discontinuities at these interfaces and, in particular, to a saturation increase beneath low-permeability layers. In a second step, we analyze the vertical migration of a CO 2 plume injected into a 2D layered aquifer. We show that the CO 2 vertical stratification under each low-permeability layer is induced, as in 1D columns, by the flux continuity condition at interfaces. As the injection takes place at the bottom of the aquifer the velocity and the flux function decrease with elevation and this phenomenon is proposed to explain the stratification under each mudstone layer as observed at Sleipner site.

  4. Multi-technique monitoring of CO2 leakage from an engineered CO2 leakage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Apple, M. E.; Dobeck, L.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring of canopy and soil geophysical and geochemical properties in vadose zone by multiple techniques were carried out from 1999 to 2012 using an engineered CO2 release to simulate the CO2 leakage from CO2 storage at an agricultural plot at Bozeman, MT. The CO2 release was based on a horizontally-drilled well of 100 m at a depth of about 2.0-2.3m (Fig.1). Techniques utilized include hyperspectral and infrared radiation of various vegetations, electric conductivity in soil, magnetic field at the ground surface, and soil gas composition and dynamics using various gas sensors and soil moisture sensors. Measurements were made at several sites along a transect perpendicular to the releasing well, along which the soil CO2 concentration attenuated from high to normal condition at control site. The response of the canopy hyperspectral reflectance, infrared radiation, soil geophysical properties such as soil electric conductivity, top soil magnetic susceptibility and magnetic field, soil gas composition such as CO2 and O2 concentration to CO2 release at different rates were quantified and will be shown at this presentation. Fig.2 shows some examples of the results. The different responses at the impact and control sites are used to assess the effectiveness for CO2 surface and near-surface detection when a possible CO2 leakage occurs.ig.1. A schematic showing the injection and release of CO2 at an agricultral plot in Bozeman, MT. ig.2. Some examples of results showing the response of vegetation, hyperspectral reflectance, soil electric conductivity, soil O2 concentration to the release of CO2.

  5. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (≤ 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and

  6. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  7. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... to be the only possible approach to obtain the volume flow in: thermal plumes in ventilated rooms....

  8. Air–sea exchanges of CO2 in the world's coastal seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-T. A. Chen

    2013-10-01

    atmosphere in all seasons. Shelves between 0 and 23.5° S are on average a weak source and have a small flux per unit area of CO2 to the atmosphere. Water temperature, the spreading of river plumes, upwelling, and biological production seem to be the main factors in determining pCO2 in the shelves. Wind speed, again, is critical because at high latitudes, the winds tend to be strong. Since the surface water pCO2 values are low, the air-to-sea fluxes are high in regions above 50° N and below 50° S. At low latitudes, the winds tend to be weak, so the sea-to-air CO2 flux is small. Overall, the world's continental shelves absorb 0.4 Pg C yr−1 from the atmosphere.

  9. Chemical transformation of CO2 during its capture by waste biomass derived biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Kan, Yue; Zhao, Ling; Cao, Xinde

    2016-06-01

    Biochar is a porous carbonaceous material with high alkalinity and rich minerals, making it possible for CO2 capture. In this study, biochars derived from pig manure, sewage sludge, and wheat straw were evaluated for their CO2 sorption behavior. All three biochars showed high sorption abilities for CO2, with the maximum capacities reaching 18.2-34.4 mg g(-1) at 25 °C. Elevating sorption temperature and moisture content promoted the transition of CO2 uptake from physical to chemical process. Mineral components such as Mg, Ca, Fe, K, etc. in biochar induced the chemical sorption of CO2 via the mineralogical reactions which occupied 17.7%-50.9% of the total sorption. FeOOH in sewage sludge biochar was transformed by sorbed CO2 into Fe(OH)2CO3, while the sorbed CO2 in pig manure biochar was precipitated as K2Ca(CO3)2 and CaMg(CO3)2, which resulted in a dominant increase of insoluble inorganic carbon in both biochars. For wheat straw biochar, sorbed CO2 induced CaCO3 transformed into soluble Ca(HCO3)2, which led to a dominant increase of soluble inorganic carbons. The results obtained from this study demonstrated that biochar as a unique carbonaceous material could distinctly be a promising sorbent for CO2 capture in which chemical sorption induced by mineralogical reactions played an important role.

  10. Numerical Studies on Fire-induced Thermal Plumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junmei LI; Yanfeng LI; Wan Ki CHOW; Huairong HUANG

    2005-01-01

    Most of the expressions describing fire plumes reported in the literature are known to be based on experiments.Due to different experimental methods, the geometry of the fire sources, fuel types and surrounding conditions, it is difficult to derive a comprehensive picture of a plume with its temperature and velocity fields on the basis of existing theoretical work. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), which is regarded as a practical engineering tool in fire engineering by the experts, is sure to be able to give more details of the plume behavior under various situations. Aerodynamics for thermally-induced plumes will be studied numerically with CFD. Four typical axisymmetric plume equations will be assessed in this paper, and investigations will be useful for fire engineers in designing smoke management systems in an affordable fashion. This is a critical point in implementing engineering performance-based fire code.

  11. Infrared absorption of t-HOCO+, H+(CO2)2, and HCO2- produced in electron bombardment of CO2 in solid para-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasanta; Tsuge, Masashi; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2016-07-01

    We have employed electron bombardment during matrix deposition of CO2 (or 13CO2, C18O2) and para-hydrogen (p-H2) at 3.2 K and recorded infrared (IR) spectra of t-HOCO+, H+(CO2)2, HCO2-, CO2-, t-HOCO, and other species isolated in solid p-H2. After the matrix was maintained in darkness for 13 h, intensities of absorption features of t-HOCO+ at 2403.5 (ν1), 2369.9 (ν2), 1018.1 (ν4), and 606.5 (ν6) cm-1 and those of H+(CO2)2 at 1341.1, 883.6, and 591.5 cm-1 decreased. Corresponding lines of isotopologues were observed when 13CO2 or C18O2 replaced CO2. In contrast, lines of HCO2- at 2522.4 (ν1), 1616.1 (ν5), 1327.9 (ν2), and 745.6 (ν3) cm-1 increased in intensity; corresponding lines of H13CO2- or HC18O2- were also observed. Lines of t-DOCO+ and DCO2- were observed in an electron bombarded CO2 /normal-deuterium (n-D2) matrix. Data of ν6 of t-HOCO+ and all observed modes of H18OC18O+ and HC18O2- are new. The assignments were made according to expected chemical behavior, observed isotopic shifts, and comparisons with vibrational wavenumbers and relative intensities of previous reports and calculations with the B3PW91/aug-cc-pVQZ method. The ν1 line of t-HOCO+ in solid p-H2 (2403.5 cm-1), similar to the line at 2673 cm-1 of t-HOCO+ tagged with an Ar atom, is significantly red-shifted from that reported for gaseous t-HOCO+ (3375.37 cm-1) due to partial proton sharing between CO2 and H2 or Ar. The ν1 line of HCO2- in solid p-H2 (2522.4 cm-1) is blue shifted from that reported for HCO2- in solid Ne (2455.7 cm-1) and that of HCO2- tagged with Ar (2449 cm-1); this can be explained by the varied solvation effects by Ne, Ar, or H2 on the mixing of H+ + CO2 and H + CO2- surfaces. Possible formation mechanisms of t-HOCO+, H+(CO2)2, HCO2-, CO2-, t-HOCO, H2O, and t-HCOOH are discussed.

  12. Your View or Mine: Spatially Quantifying CO2 Storage Risk from Various Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, J. M.; Pollak, M.; Wilson, E.; Elliot, T. R.; Guo, B.; Nogues, J. P.; Peters, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 capture and storage involves injecting captured CO2 into geologic formations, such as deep saline aquifers. This injected CO2 is to be "stored" within the rock matrix for hundreds to thousands of years, but injected CO2, or the brine it displaces, may leak from the target reservoir. Such leakage could interfere with other subsurface activities-water production, energy production, energy storage, and waste disposal-or migrate to the surface. Each of these interferences will incur multiple costs to a variety of stakeholders. Even if injected or displaced fluids do not interfere with other subsurface activities or make their way to the surface, costs will be incurred to find and fix the leak. Consequently, the suitability of a site for CO2 storage must therefore include an assessment of the risk of leakage and interference with various other activities within a three-dimensional proximity of where CO2 is being injected. We present a spatial analysis of leakage and interference risk associated with injecting CO2 into a portion of the Mount Simon sandstone in the Michigan Basin. Risk is the probability of an outcome multiplied by the impact of that outcome (Ro=po*Io). An outcome is the result of the leakage (e.g., interference with oil production), and the impact is the cost associated with the outcome. Each outcome has costs that will vary by stakeholder. Our analysis presents CO2 storage risk for multiple outcomes in a spatially explicit manner that varies by stakeholder. We use the ELSA semi-analytical model for estimating CO2 and brine leakage from aquifers to determine plume and pressure front radii, and CO2 and brine leakage probabilities for the Mount Simon sandstone and multiple units above it. Results of ELSA simulations are incorporated into RISCS: the Risk Interference Subsurface CO2 Storage model. RISCS uses three-dimensional data on subsurface geology and the locations of wells and boreholes to spatially estimate risks associated with CO2 leakage from

  13. DSMC simulation of Europa water vapor plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    A computational investigation of the physics of water vapor plumes on Europa was performed with a focus on characteristics relevant to observation and spacecraft mission operations. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to model the plume expansion assuming a supersonic vent source. The structure of the plume was determined, including the number density, temperature, and velocity fields. The possibility of ice grain growth above the vent was considered and deemed probable for large (diameter > ∼20 m) vents at certain Mach numbers. Additionally, preexisting grains of three diameters (0.1, 1, 50 μm) were included and their trajectories examined. A preliminary study of photodissociation of H2O into OH and H was performed to demonstrate the behavior of daughter species. A set of vent parameters was evaluated including Mach number (Mach 2, 3, 5), reduced temperature as a proxy for flow energy loss to the region surrounding the vent, and mass flow rate. Plume behavior was relatively insensitive to these factors, with the notable exception of mass flow rate. With an assumed mass flow rate of ∼1000 kg/s, a canopy shock occurred and a maximum integrated line of sight column density of ∼1020 H2O molecules/m2 was calculated, comparing favorably with observation (Roth et al., 2014a).

  14. Simulation of CO2 Injection in Porous Media with Structural Deformation Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2011-06-18

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is one of the most attractive methods to reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere by injecting it into the geological formations. Furthermore, it is also an effective mechanism for enhanced oil recovery. Simulation of CO2 injection based on a suitable modeling is very important for explaining the fluid flow behavior of CO2 in a reservoir. Increasing of CO2 injection may cause a structural deformation of the medium. The structural deformation modeling in carbon sequestration is useful to evaluate the medium stability to avoid CO2 leakage to the atmosphere. Therefore, it is important to include such effect into the model. The purpose of this study is to simulate the CO2 injection in a reservoir. The numerical simulations of two-phase flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media are presented. Also, the effects of gravity and capillary pressure are considered. IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation (IMPES) and IMplicit Pressure-Displacements and an Explicit Saturation (IMPDES) schemes are used to solve the problems under consideration. Various numerical examples were simulated and divided into two parts of the study. The numerical results demonstrate the effects of buoyancy and capillary pressure as well as the permeability value and its distribution in the domain. Some conclusions that could be derived from the numerical results are the buoyancy of CO2 is driven by the density difference, the CO2 saturation profile (rate and distribution) are affected by the permeability distribution and its value, and the displacements of the porous medium go to constant values at least six to eight months (on average) after injection. Furthermore, the simulation of CO2 injection provides intuitive knowledge and a better understanding of the fluid flow behavior of CO2 in the subsurface with the deformation effect of the porous medium.

  15. Development of in situ CO2 and pH sensor for AUVs and ROVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Kimoto, Hideshi; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has been developing two-type autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs): a cruising AUV and a working AUV, since October 2010. These vehicles will perform carbon dioxide (CO2) and pH observations to explore hydrothermal plume on seabed mineral resources and to monitor a leak of CO2 in carbon capture and storage (CCS) up to depth of 3,000 meters. We here have been developing the compact in situ CO2 and pH sensor (Hybrid CO2-pH sensor: HCS) for the AUVs to obtain vertical and horizontal distributions of CO2 and pH. The HCS consists of an aluminum pressure housing (diameter 84 mm, length 570 mm, weight 4 kg) and an acrylic silicon-oil filled, pressure-compensated vessel (diameter 90 mm, length 355 mm, weight 2 kg) containing valves and pump unit. The HCS is also useful for the observation by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The measured data were transmitted to the AUVs or ROVs by serial communications. We can monitor the data of in situ pCO2, pH and so on in real time on board. The measurement principle for the CO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. On the other hand, we adopt potentiometric analysis using original glass and reference electrodes as a pH sensor because of the most commonly used technique for sea water pH measurements and high-speed response (within 20 seconds). From simultaneously measured data of in situ pCO2 and pH, we can also calculate dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) as other carbonate species in the ocean. The resolutions of HCS are 1 μatm for pCO2 and 0.001 pH. In the laboratory experiment, the HCS obtained precisions within 3 μatm and within 0.01 pH, respectively. Our first in situ observational test of the HSC with cruising AUV was made in the coast of the Japan Sea last August. And also first in situ test

  16. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production.

  17. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the inferr

  18. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the inferr

  19. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: A Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Amit; Podolak, Morris

    2016-01-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction that is large enough to form an external mantle composed of high pressure water ice polymorphs and that lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global deep liquid ocean. For these ocean planets we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2; the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that in steady state the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When the wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is esta...

  20. Projecting human development and CO2 emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2012-01-01

    We estimate cumulative CO2 emissions during the period 2000 to 2050 from developed and developing countries based on the empirical relationship between CO2 per capita emissions (due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production) and corresponding HDI. In order to project per capita emissions of individual countries we make three assumptions which are detailed below. First, we use logistic regressions to fit and extrapolate the HDI on a country level as a function of time. This is mainly motivated by the fact that the HDI is bounded between 0 and 1 and that it decelerates as it approaches 1. Second, we employ for individual countries the correlations between CO2 per capita emissions and HDI in order to extrapolate their emissions. This is an ergodic assumption. Third, we let countries with incomplete data records evolve similarly as their close neighbors (in the emissions-HDI plane, see Fig. 1 in the main text) with complete time series of CO2 per capita emissions and HDI. Country-based emissions estimates a...

  1. The mechanical impact of CO2 injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Schroot, B.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical impact of CO2 injection into a depleted hydrocarbon field or aquifer is caused by changes in the stress field, resulting from changes in the pore pressure and volume of the rock. Mechanical processes can lead to the loss of reservoir and caprock integrity, and the reactivation of exis

  2. 50 years of CO2 experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyree, L. Jr [Liquid Carbonic Corp., PRAXAIR Inc., Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An overview is given of the experiences with the use of CO2 as a refrigerant at the Liquid Carbonic Corporation, now owned by PRAXAIR Inc. The overview is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets, presented in Session 2 on Applications

  3. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  4. Kosten en baten CO2-emissiereductie maatregelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, B.; Tieben, B.; Weda, J.; Hekkenberg, M.; Smekens, K.; Vethman, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment has requested the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) and SEO Economic Research (SEO) to investigate the costs and benefits of a broad range of technical measures to realise CO2 emission reductions. The research aims to identify th

  5. Harvesting Energy from CO2 Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Paz-García, J.M.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    When two fluids with different compositions are mixed, mixing energy is released. This holds true for both liquids and gases, though in the case of gases, no technology is yet available to harvest this energy source. Mixing the CO2 in combustion gases with air represents a source of energy with a to

  6. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  7. Warming the early Earth - CO2 reconsidered

    CERN Document Server

    Von Paris, P; Grenfell, L; Patzer, B; Hedelt, P; Stracke, B; Trautmann, T; Schreier, F

    2008-01-01

    Despite a fainter Sun, the surface of the early Earth was mostly ice-free. Proposed solutions to this so-called "faint young Sun problem" have usually involved higher amounts of greenhouse gases than present in the modern-day atmosphere. However, geological evidence seemed to indicate that the atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Archaean and Proterozoic were far too low to keep the surface from freezing. With a radiative-convective model including new, updated thermal absorption coefficients, we found that the amount of CO2 necessary to obtain 273 K at the surface is reduced up to an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. For the late Archaean and early Proterozoic period of the Earth, we calculate that CO2 partial pressures of only about 2.9 mb are required to keep its surface from freezing which is compatible with the amount inferred from sediment studies. This conclusion was not significantly changed when we varied model parameters such as relative humidity or surface albedo, obtaining CO2 ...

  8. Agriculture waste and rising CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there are many uncertainties concerning agriculture’s role in global environmental change including the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. A viable and stable world food supply depends on productive agricultural systems, but environmental concerns within agriculture have to...

  9. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  10. Sustainable Process Networks for CO2 Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Kongpanna, P.; Pavarajam, V.

    carbonate and ethylene carbonate are just some of the possible products that can be formed. Each of these involves CO2 and a co-reactant, such as hydrogen, which may also be captured from process purge streams. The process network evolves as some of the reactions involve products from other reactions...

  11. Economic optimization of CO2 pipeline configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M.M.J.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an economic optimization tool is developed taking into account different steel grades, inlet pressure, diameter and booster stations for point-to-point pipelines as well as for simple networks. Preliminary results show that gaseous CO2 transport is cost effective for relatively smal

  12. Cutting weeds with a CO2 laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    treatment. The relationship between dry weight and laser energy was analysed using a non-linear dose-response regression model. The regression parameters differed significantly between the weed species. At all growth stages and heights S. arvensis was more difficult to cut with a CO2 laser than C. album...

  13. Rhizosphere Responses to Elevated CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drigo, B.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; de Bruijn, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to have major consequences on C cycling and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Experimentation during the last two to three decades using a large variety of approaches have provided sufficient information to conclude that the enrichment of atmosphe

  14. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2

  15. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  16. Effects of dissolved CO2 on Shallow Freshwater Microbial Communities simulating a CO2 Leakage Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, D. M.; Lowry, G. V.; Gregory, K.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration is likely to be part of a comprehensive strategy to minimize the atmospheric release of greenhouse gasses, establishing a concern of sequestered CO2 leakage into overlying potable aquifers. Leaking CO2 may affect existing biogeochemical processes and therefore water quality. There is a critical need to understand the evolution of CO2 exposed microbial communities that influence the biogeochemistry in these freshwater aquifers. The evolution of microbial ecology for different CO2 exposure concentrations was investigated using fluid-slurry samples obtained from a shallow freshwater aquifer (55 m depth, 0.5 MPa, 22 °C, Escatawpa, MS). The microbial community of well samples upstream and downstream of CO2 injection was characterized. In addition, batch vessel experiments were conducted with the upstream aquifer samples exposed to varying pCO2 from 0% to 100% under reservoir temperature and pressure for up to 56 days. The microbial community of the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment were analyzed with 16S rRNA clone libraries and qPCR. In both the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment, DNA concentration did not correlate with CO2 exposure. Both the in situ experiment and the batch reactors displayed a changing microbial community with increased CO2 exposure. The well water isolate, Curvibacter, appeared to be the most tolerant genus to high CO2 concentrations in the in situ experiments and to mid-CO2 concentrations in the batch reactors. In batch reactors with pCO2 concentrations higher than experienced in situ (pCO2 = 0.5 MPa), Pseudomonas appeared to be the most tolerant genus. Findings provide insight into a dynamic biogeochemical system that will alter with CO2 exposure. Adapted microbial populations will eventually give rise to the community that will impact the metal mobility and water quality. Knowledge of the surviving microbial populations will enable improved models for predicting the fate of CO2

  17. Ocean-Atmosphere coupling and CO2 exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, R.; Pezzi, L. P.; Carmargo, R.; Acevedo, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    The establishment of the INTERCONF Program (Air-Sea Interactions at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone) in 2004 and subsequent developing of projects such as the SIMTECO (Integrated System for Monitoring the Weather, the Climate and the Ocean in the South of Brazil) and ACEx (Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment) from 2010 in Brazil brought to light the importance of understanding the impact of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean's mesoscale variability on the modulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the synoptic scale. Recent results of all these projects showed that the ABL modulation, as well as the ocean-atmosphere turbulent (heat, momentum and CO2) fluxes are dependent on the behavior of the ocean's surface thermal gradients, especially those found in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and at the southern coast off Brazil during the winter. As expected, when atmospheric large scale systems are not present over the study area, stronger heat fluxes are found over regions of higher sea surface temperature (SST) including over warm core eddies shed towards the subantarctic (cold) environment. In the coastal region off southern Brazil, the wintertime propagation of the Brazilian Costal Current (La Plata Plume) acts rising the chlorophyll concentration over the continental shelf as well as diminishing considerably the SST - hence producing prominent across-shore SST gradients towards the offshore region dominated by the Brazil Current waters. Owing to that, heat fluxes are directed towards the ocean in coastal waters that are also responsible for the carbon sinking off Brazil in wintertime. All this description is dependent on the synoptic atmospheric cycle and strongly perturbed when transient systems (cold fronts, subtropical cyclones) are present in the area. However, remote sensing data used here suggest that the average condition of the atmosphere directly responding to the ocean's mesoscale variability appears to imprint a signal that extends from the

  18. The Li–CO2 battery: a novel method for CO2 capture and utilization

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Shaomao

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel primary Li-CO2 battery that consumes pure CO2 gas as its cathode. The battery exhibits a high discharge capacity of around 2500 mA h g-1 at moderate temperatures. At 100 °C the discharge capacity is close to 1000% higher than that at 40 °C, and the temperature dependence is significantly weaker for higher surface area carbon cathodes. Ex-situ FTIR and XRD analyses convincingly show that lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) is the main component of the discharge product. The feasibility of similar primary metal-CO2 batteries based on earth abundant metal anodes, such as Al and Mg, is demonstrated. The metal-CO2 battery platform provides a novel approach for simultaneous capturing of CO2 emissions and producing electrical energy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  20. Extraction of lipids from microalgae using CO2-expanded methanol and liquid CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Ashok; Jessop, Michael J; Stubbins, Spencer H; Champagne, Pascale; Jessop, Philip G

    2015-05-01

    The use of CO2-expanded methanol (cxMeOH) and liquid carbon dioxide (lCO2) is proposed to extract lipids from Botryococcus braunii. When compressed CO2 dissolves in methanol, the solvent expands in volume, decreases in polarity and so increases in its selectivity for biodiesel desirable lipids. Solid phase extraction of the algal extract showed that the cxMeOH extracted 21 mg of biodiesel desirable lipids per mL of organic solvent compared to 3mg/mL using either neat methanol or chloroform/methanol mixture. The non-polar lCO2 showed a high affinity for non-polar lipids. Using lCO2, it is possible to extract up to 10% neutral lipids relative to the mass of dry algae. Unlike extractions using conventional solvents, these new methods require little to no volatile, flammable, or chlorinated organic solvents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A cross-association model for CO2-methanol and CO2-ethanol mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-association model was proposed for CO2-alcohol mixtures based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT).CO2 was treated as a pseudo-associating molecule and both the self-association between alcohol hydroxyls and the cross-association between CO2 and alcohol hydroxyls were considered.The equilibrium properties from low temperature-pressure to high temperature-pressure were investigated using this model.The calculated p-x and p-p diagrams of CO2-methanol and CO2-ethanol mixtures agreed with the experimental data.The results showed that when the cross-association was taken into account for Helmholtz free energy,the calculated equilibrium properties could be significantly improved,and the error prediction of the three phase equilibria and triple points in low temperature regions could be avoided.

  2. Quantification of mechanical effect on the migration of injected CO2 in brine aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.; Ni, C.; Lee, I.; Lu, C.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) offers a favorable scheme of the solution to the problem of global climate change. In hydrodynamic of geology, permeability (k) and porosity (φ ) play important roles, which control the migration of CO2 plume gas saturation for structural and stratigraphic trapping. During the periods of CO2 injected into objective storage formations, the effective stress of geologic formations can be changed wi