WorldWideScience

Sample records for co2 concentration temperature

  1. Elevated temperature and CO2 concentration effects on xylem anatomy of Scots pine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpelainen, A.; Gerendiain, A.Z.; Luostarinen, K.; Peltola, H.; Kellomaki, S.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations and elevated temperatures on the xylem anatomy of 20-year old Scots pine trees were investigated. The experiment was conducted in 16 chambers containing 4 trees each with a factorial combination of both ambient and elevated CO 2 concentrations and 2 different temperature regimes. CO 2 concentrations were doubled with a corresponding increase of between 2 and 6 degrees C according to each season over a period of 6 years. The study showed that elevated CO 2 concentrations increased the ring width in 4 of the 6 analyzed treatment years. Earlywood width increased during the first 2 years of the experiment, while latewood width increased during the third year of the study. The study also showed that the tracheid walls in both the latewood and earlywood samples were thicker when either temperature levels or CO 2 levels were increased. It was noted that combined CO 2 and temperature elevations resulted in thinner tracheid walls. However, latewood tracheid lumen diameters were larger in all CO 2 and temperature treatments than trees grown in ambient conditions. It was concluded that xylem anatomy was impacted more by increases in temperature than by elevated CO 2 concentrations. 48 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  2. Elevated temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration effects on xylem anatomy of Scots pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpelainen, A.; Gerendiain, A.Z.; Luostarinen, K.; Peltola, H.; Kellomaki, S. [Joensuu Univ., Joensuu (Finland). Faculty of Forestry

    2007-09-15

    The effects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and elevated temperatures on the xylem anatomy of 20-year old Scots pine trees were investigated. The experiment was conducted in 16 chambers containing 4 trees each with a factorial combination of both ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations and 2 different temperature regimes. CO{sub 2} concentrations were doubled with a corresponding increase of between 2 and 6 degrees C according to each season over a period of 6 years. The study showed that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations increased the ring width in 4 of the 6 analyzed treatment years. Earlywood width increased during the first 2 years of the experiment, while latewood width increased during the third year of the study. The study also showed that the tracheid walls in both the latewood and earlywood samples were thicker when either temperature levels or CO{sub 2} levels were increased. It was noted that combined CO{sub 2} and temperature elevations resulted in thinner tracheid walls. However, latewood tracheid lumen diameters were larger in all CO{sub 2} and temperature treatments than trees grown in ambient conditions. It was concluded that xylem anatomy was impacted more by increases in temperature than by elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. 48 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  3. Diagnostic system for measuring temperature, pressure, CO.sub.2 concentration and H.sub.2O concentration in a fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jr., William P.; Jatana, Gurneesh Singh; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Parks, II, James E.

    2017-12-26

    A diagnostic system for measuring temperature, pressure, CO.sub.2 concentration and H.sub.2O concentration in a fluid stream is described. The system may include one or more probes that sample the fluid stream spatially, temporally and over ranges of pressure and temperature. Laser light sources are directed down pitch optical cables, through a lens and to a mirror, where the light sources are reflected back, through the lens to catch optical cables. The light travels through the catch optical cables to detectors, which provide electrical signals to a processer. The processer utilizes the signals to calculate CO.sub.2 concentration based on the temperatures derived from H.sub.2O vapor concentration. A probe for sampling CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2O vapor concentrations is also disclosed. Various mechanical features interact together to ensure the pitch and catch optical cables are properly aligned with the lens during assembly and use.

  4. Photosynthetic response to variation in CO2 concentrations and temperature of four broad-leaved trees in Beijing region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibo MA; Shengqing SHI; Qinyan MA; Yutao WANG; Xingliang LIU

    2008-01-01

    Responses of the photosynthetic characteris-tics to variation in CO2 concentration and temperature of Ginkgo biloba, Eucornmia ulmoides, Magnolia denudata and Tiliajaponica were measured during the peak growing season. The results show that the ambient CO2 concentra-tion could not meet the requirements for photosynthesis of these four species. The optimal temperatures for pho-tosynthesis were lower than the average daytime air tem-perature. Hence, the photosynthesis of these four species was restricted by the low CO2 concentration and high daytime air temperature at the time of measurement. Marked enhancements in the net photosynthetic rate were found in all four species when the CO2 concentration was doubled. When the dependency on CO2 and temperature were examined simultaneously, it was seen that for increased CO2 concentrations there was a shift in the optimum temperature for M. denudata and T. japonica towards higher temperatures. Due to their independence on CO2 concentrations, this trend could not be found in the G. biloba and E. ulmoides data sets. The stomatal con-ductance (Gs) was sensitive to a vapor pressure deficit (VPD) which in turn was sensitive to temperature. An increase in temperature would cause the VPD to increase and plants might be assumed to react by reducing their stomatal apertures. The effect on stomatal resistance would be most significant at high temperatures. The restriction to stomatal conductance for these four species would increase if CO2 concentrations were elevated at the same temperature.

  5. Productive and morphogenetic responses of buffel grass at different air temperatures and CO2 concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Machado Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present trial was to evaluate the productive and morphogenetic characteristics of buffel grass subjected to different air temperatures and CO2 concentrations. Three cultivars of buffel grass (Biloela, Aridus and West Australian were compared. Cultivars were grown in growth chambers at three temperatures (day/night: 26/20, 29/23, and 32/26 °C, combined with two concentrations of CO2: 370 and 550 µmol mol-1. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a 3 × 3 × 2 factorial arrangement with three replications. There were interactions between buffel grass cultivars and air temperatures on leaf elongation rate (LER, leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaf lifespan (LL and senescence rate (SR, whereas cultivars vs. carbon dioxide concentration affected forage mass (FM, root mass (RM, shoot/root ratio, LL and SR. Leaf elongation rate and SR were higher as the air temperature was raised. Increasing air temperature also promoted an increase in LAR, except for West Australian. High CO2 concentration provided greater SR of plants, except for Biloela. Cultivar West Australian had higher FM in relation to Biloela and Aridus when the CO2 concentration was increased to 550 µmol mol-1. West Australian was the only cultivar that responded with more forage mass when it was exposed to higher carbon dioxide concentrations, whereas Aridus had depression in forage mass. The increase in air temperatures affects morphogenetic responses of buffel grass, accelerating its vegetative development without increasing forage mass. Elevated carbon dioxide concentration changes productive responses of buffel grass.

  6. Productive and morphogenetic responses of buffel grass at different air temperatures and CO2 concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Roberta Machado; Voltolini, Tadeu Vinhas; Angelotti, Francislene; Aidar, Saulo de Tarso; Chaves, Agnaldo Rodrigues de Melo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present trial was to evaluate the productive and morphogenetic characteristics of buffel grass subjected to different air temperatures and CO2 concentrations. Three cultivars of buffel grass (Biloela, Aridus and West Australian) were compared. Cultivars were grown in growth chambers at three temperatures (day/night): 26/20, 29/23, and 32/26 °C, combined with two concentrations of CO2: 370 and 550 µmol mol-1. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a 3 × 3 × ...

  7. Water Resources Response to Changes in Temperature, Rainfall and CO2 Concentration: A First Approach in NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Arias

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the diverse responses of water resources to climate change and high concentrations of CO2 is crucial for the appropriate management of natural ecosystems. Despite numerous studies on the impact of climate change on different regions, it is still necessary to evaluate the impact of these changes at the local scale. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model was used to evaluate the potential impact of changes in temperature, rainfall and CO2 concentration on water resources in a rural catchment in NW Spain for the periods 2031–2060 and 2069–2098, using 1981–2010 as a reference period. For the simulations we used compiled regional climate models of the ENSEMBLES project for future climate input data and two CO2 concentration scenarios (550 and 660 ppm. The results showed that changes in the concentration of CO2 and climate had a significant effect on water resources. Overall, the results suggest a decrease in streamflow of 16% for the period 2031–2060 (intermediate future and 35% by the end of the 21st century as a consequence of decreasing rainfall (2031–2060: −6%; 2069–2098: −15% and increasing temperature (2031–2060: 1.1 °C; 2069–2098: 2.2 °C.

  8. Effect of the temperature and the CO2 concentration on the behaviour of the citric acid as a scale inhibitor of CaCO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, K.; Aponte, H.; Vera, E.

    2017-12-01

    For all Industrial sector is important to extend the useful life of the materials that they use in their process, the scales of CaCO3 are common in situation where fluids are handled with high concentration of ions and besides this temperatures and CO2 concentration dissolved, that scale generates large annual losses because there is a reduction in the process efficiency or corrosion damage under deposit, among other. In order to find new alternatives to this problem, the citric acid was evaluated as scale of calcium carbonate inhibition in critical condition of temperature and concentration of CO2 dissolved. Once the results are obtained it was carried out the statistical evaluation in order to generate an equation that allow to see that behaviour, giving as result, a good efficiency of inhibition to the conditions evaluated the scales of products obtained were characterized through scanning electron microscopy.

  9. [Effects of plastic film mulching on soil CO2 efflux and CO2 concentration in an oasis cotton field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong-xiang; Zhao, Cheng-yi; Jia, Hong-tao; Yu, Bo; Zhou, Tian-he; Yang, Yu-guang; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to compare soil CO2 efflux and CO2 concentration between mulched and non-mulched cotton fields by using closed chamber method and diffusion chamber technique. Soil CO2 efflux and CO2 concentration exhibited a similar seasonal pattern, decreasing from July to October. Mulched field had a lower soil CO2 efflux but a higher CO2 concentration, compared to those of non-mulched fields. Over the measurement period, cumulative CO2 efflux was 1871.95 kg C . hm-2 for mulched field and 2032.81 kg C . hm-2 for non-mulched field. Soil CO2 concentration was higher in mulched field (ranging from 5137 to 25945 µL . L-1) than in non- mulched field (ranging from 2165 to 23986 µL . L-1). The correlation coefficients between soil CO2 concentrations at different depths and soil CO2 effluxes were 0.60 to 0.73 and 0.57 to 0.75 for the mulched and non-mulched fields, indicating that soil CO2 concentration played a crucial role in soil CO2 emission. The Q10 values were 2.77 and 2.48 for the mulched and non-mulched fields, respectively, suggesting that CO2 efflux in mulched field was more sensitive to the temperature.

  10. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on the soil profile methane distribution and diffusion in rice-wheat rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Xuhui; Pan, Genxing; Zou, Jianwen; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the impacts of climate change on soil profile concentrations and diffusion effluxes of methane in a rice-wheat annual rotation ecosystem in Southeastern China. We initiated a field experiment with four treatments: ambient conditions (CKs), CO2 concentration elevated to ~500 μmol/mol (FACE), temperature elevated by ca. 2°C (T) and combined elevation of CO2 concentration and temperature (FACE+T). A multilevel sampling probe was designed to collect the soil gas at four different depths, namely, 7 cm, 15 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Methane concentrations were higher during the rice season and decreased with depth, while lower during the wheat season and increased with depth. Compared to CK, mean methane concentration was increased by 42%, 57% and 71% under the FACE, FACE+T and T treatments, respectively, at the 7 cm depth during the rice season (pCO2 concentration and temperature could significantly increase soil profile methane concentrations and their effluxes from a rice-wheat field annual rotation ecosystem (p<0.05). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Equilibrium solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol as function of concentration, temperature, and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolledo-Morales, Miguel Angel; Rebolledo-Libreros, Maria Esther [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Investigacion y Posgrado, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Area de Investigacion de Termofisica, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Trejo, Arturo, E-mail: atrejo@imp.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Investigacion y Posgrado, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Area de Investigacion de Termofisica, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: Gas solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol was measured. Solubility increases as pressure and concentration of 1-amino-2-propanol increase. The Kent-Eisenberg model was used to correlate all the experimental results. Aqueous solutions of MIPA are an excellent alternative to use in gas purification. - Abstract: Using a dynamic method with recirculation of the vapour phase, experimental values for the gas solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 1-amino-2-propanol (MIPA) were measured at T = (313.15 and 393.15) K, over the pressure range of (0.2 to 2436.4) kPa. The concentrations of the studied aqueous MIPA solutions were (0.20, 0.30, 0.40, and 0.50) mass fraction. The results of gas solubility are given as the partial pressure of CO{sub 2}, p{sub CO{sub 2}}, against its mole ratio, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}} (mol CO{sub 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -1} MIPA), and its mole fraction, x{sub CO{sub 2}}. It is observed that the solubility of CO{sub 2} increases as the concentration of MIPA in solution increases, at a given temperature throughout the pressure range considered; also the solubility values increase, under constant temperature, as the pressure increases in the studied concentration range of MIPA. The physicochemical model of Kent and Eisenberg was used to correlate simultaneously all the experimental results of the solubility of CO{sub 2} in the studied aqueous solutions of MIPA. The model correlates satisfactorily the experimental results. The deviation for pressure was 96.9 kPa using 62 experimental solubility points. The solubility results of carbon dioxide presented in this work are compared with those reported in the literature for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diisopropanolamine (DIPA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and it is possible to conclude that the aqueous solutions of MIPA are an excellent alternative to use in gas purification processes, since the

  12. The effect of temperature and concentration on the corrosion inhibition mechanism of an amphiphilic amido-amine in CO2 saturated solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desimone, M.P.; Gordillo, G.; Simison, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Behaviour of N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide (AAOA) as CO 2 corrosion inhibitor. → The adsorption of the AAOA corrosion inhibitor obeys a Frumkin adsorption isotherm. → The inhibition efficiency of the AAOA depends on temperature and concentration. → There is a change in the adsorption mode of the inhibitor with concentration. → AAOA is mainly physi- or chemisorbed for low or high concentrations, respectively. - Abstract: The corrosion inhibition mechanism of the N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide on mild steel surface in CO 2 -saturated 5% NaCl solution has been studied. The inhibition efficiency decreases with increasing temperature. Adsorption of the inhibitor studied is found to follow the Frumkin adsorption isotherm. EIS results show that the mechanism of its corrosion inhibition at concentrations higher than critical micelle concentration is by forming a protective porous bi-layer. The activation energy, thermodynamic parameters and electrochemical results reveal a change in the adsorption mode of the inhibitor studied: the inhibitor could primarily be physically adsorbed at low concentrations, while chemisorption is favoured as concentration increases.

  13. Absorption capacity and viscosity for CO_2 capture process using high concentrated PZ-DEAE aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Dong; Wang, LeMeng; Mi, ChenLu; Zhang, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Absorption of CO_2 in high concentrated DEAE-PZ aqueous solutions were measured. • Viscosities of CO_2-unloaded and CO_2-loaded DEAE-PZ aqueous solutions were measured. • Weiland equation was used to calculate the viscosities. • Effects of temperature, concentration and CO_2 loading on viscosity were demonstrated. - Abstract: The absorption capacity of CO_2 in piperazine (PZ) promoted 2-diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) aqueous solution was measured. The viscosities of both CO_2-unloaded and CO_2-loaded PZ-DEAE aqueous solutions were measured and then modelled. The temperatures ranged from 303.2 K to 323.2 K. The mass fraction of PZ and DEAE respectively ranged from 0 to 0.075 and 0.3 to 0.5. The temperature and concentration dependences of absorption capacity were determined. The effects of temperature, mass fraction and CO_2 loading on viscosities are demonstrated.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux and soil profile CO2 concentrations in arboretum of Moscow botanical garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Olga; Udovenko, Maria; Matyshak, Georgy

    2016-04-01

    To analyse and predict recent and future climate change on a global scale exchange processes of greenhouse gases - primarily carbon dioxide - over various ecosystems are of rising interest. In order to upscale land-use dependent sources and sinks of CO2, knowledge of the local variability of carbon fluxes is needed. Among terrestrial ecosystems, urban areas play an important role because most of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide originate from these areas. On the other hand, urban soils have the potential to store large amounts of soil organic carbon and, thus, contribute to mitigating increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Research objectives: 1) estimate the seasonal dynamics of carbon dioxide production (emission - closed chamber technique and profile concentration - soil air sampling tubes method) by soils of Moscow State University Botanical Garden Arboretum planted with Picea obovata and Pinus sylvestris, 1) identification the factors that control CO2 production. The study was conducted with 1-2 weeks intervals between October 2013 and November 2015 at two sites. Carbon dioxide soil surface efflux during the year ranged from 0 to 800 mgCO2/(m2hr). Efflux values above 0 mgCO2/(m2hr) was observed during the all cold period except for only 3 weeks. Soil CO2 concentration ranged from 1600-3000 ppm in upper 10-cm layer to 10000-40000 ppm at a depth of 60 cm. The maximum concentrations of CO2 were recorded in late winter and late summer. We associate it with high biological activity (both heterotrophic and autotrophic) during the summer, and with physical gas jamming in the winter. The high value of annual CO2 production of the studied soils is caused by high organic matter content, slightly alkaline reaction, good structure and texture of urban soils. Differences in soil CO2 production by spruce and pine urban forest soils (in the pine forest 1.5-2.0 times higher) are caused by urban soil profiles construction, but not temperature regimes. Seasonal

  15. High temperature H2/CO2 separation using cobalt oxide silica membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, S.; Diniz da Costa, J.C. [The University of Queensland, FIMLab - Films and Inorganic Membrane Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Vente, J.F. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    In this work high quality cobalt oxide silica membranes were synthesized on alumina supports using a sol-gel, dip coating method. The membranes were subsequently connected into a steel module using a graphite based proprietary sealing method. The sealed membranes were tested for single gas permeance of He, H2, N2 and CO2 at temperatures up to 600C and feed pressures up to 600 kPa. Pressure tests confirmed that the sealing system was effective as no gas leaks were observed during testing. A H2 permeance of 1.9 x 10{sup -7} mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} Pa-1 was measured in conjunction with a H2/CO2 permselectivity of more than 1500, suggesting that the membranes had a very narrow pore size distribution and an average pore diameter of approximately 3 Angstrom. The high temperature testing demonstrated that the incorporation of cobalt oxide into the silica matrix produced a structure with a higher thermal stability, able to resist thermally induced densification up to at least 600C. Furthermore, the membranes were tested for H2/CO2 binary feed mixtures between 400 and 600C. At these conditions, the reverse of the water gas shift reaction occurred, inadvertently generating CO and water which increased as a function of CO2 feed concentration. The purity of H2 in the permeate stream significantly decreased for CO2 feed concentrations in excess of 50 vol%. However, the gas mixtures (H2, CO2, CO and water) had a more profound effect on the H2 permeate flow rates which significantly decreased, almost exponentially as the CO2 feed concentration increased.

  16. Interactive effect of temperature and CO2 increase in Arctic phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eCoello-Camba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was performed in order to analyze the effects of the increase in water temperature and CO2 partial pressure expected for the end of this century in a present phytoplankton community inhabiting the Arctic Ocean. We analyzed both factors acting independently and together, to test possible interactions between them. The arctic planktonic community was incubated under 6 different treatments combining three experimental temperatures (1 ºC, 6 ºC and 10 ºC with two different CO2 levels of 380 ppm or 1000 ppm, at the UNIS installations in Longyearbyen (Svalbard, in summer 2010. Under warmer temperatures, a decrease in chlorophyll a concentration, biovolume and primary production was found, together with a shift in community structure towards a dominance of smaller cells (nano-sized. Effects of increased pCO2 were more modest, and although interactions were weak, our results suggest antagonistic interactive effects amongst increased temperature and CO2 levels, as elevated CO2 compensated partially the decrease in phytoplankton biomass induced by temperature in some groups. Interactions between the two stressors were generally weak, but elevated CO2 was observed to lead to a stepper decline in primary production with warming. Our results also suggest that future increases in water temperature and pCO2 would lead to a decrease in the community chl a concentration and biomass in the Arctic phytoplankton communities examined, leading to communities dominated by smaller nano-phytoplankton groups, with important consequences for the flow of carbon and food web dynamics.

  17. Interactive effects of preindustrial, current and future atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperature on soil fungi associated with two Eucalyptus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ian C; Drigo, Barbara; Keniry, Kerry; Ghannoum, Oula; Chambers, Susan M; Tissue, David T; Cairney, John W G

    2013-02-01

    Soil microbial processes have a central role in global fluxes of the key biogenic greenhouse gases and are likely to respond rapidly to climate change. Whether climate change effects on microbial processes lead to a positive or negative feedback for terrestrial ecosystem resilience is unclear. In this study, we investigated the interactive effects of [CO(2)] and temperature on soil fungi associated with faster-growing Eucalyptus saligna and slower-growing Eucalyptus sideroxylon, and fungi that colonised hyphal in-growth bags. Plants were grown in native soil under controlled soil moisture conditions, while subjecting the above-ground compartment to defined atmospheric conditions differing in CO(2) concentrations (290, 400, 650 μL L(-1)) and temperature (26 and 30 °C). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing methods were used to examine effects on the structure of the soil fungal communities. There was no significant effect of host plant or [CO(2)]/temperature treatment on fungal species richness (α diversity); however, there was a significant effect on soil fungal community composition (β diversity) which was strongly influenced by eucalypt species. Interestingly, β diversity of soil fungi associated with both eucalypt species was significantly influenced by the elevated [CO(2) ]/high temperature treatment, suggesting that the combination of future predicted levels of atmospheric [CO(2)] and projected increases in global temperature will significantly alter soil fungal community composition in eucalypt forest ecosystems, independent of eucalypt species composition. These changes may arise through direct effects of changes in [CO(2)] and temperature on soil fungi or through indirect effects, which is likely the case in this study given the plant-dependent nature of our observations. This study highlights the role of plant species in moderating below-ground responses to future predicted changes to [CO(2)] and temperature and the

  18. Effects of increased CO[sub 2] concentration and temperature on growth and yield of winter wheat at two levels of nitrogen application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.A.C.; Mitchell, V.J.; Driscoll, S.P.; Franklin, J.; Lawlor, D.W. (Institute of Arable Crops Research, Harpenden (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Physiology)

    1993-06-01

    Winter wheat was grown in chambers under light and temperature conditions similar to the UK field environment for the 1990/1991 growing season at two levels each of atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration (seasonal means: 361 nd 692 [mu]mol mol[sup -1]), temperature (tracking ambient and ambient +4[degree]C) and nitrogen application (equivalent to 87 and 489 kg ha[sub -1] total N applied). Total dry matter productivity through the season, the maximum number of shoots and final ear number were stimulated by CO[sub 2] enrichment at both levels of the temperature and N treatments. At high N, there was a CO[sub 2]-induced stimulation of grain yield (+15%) similar to that for total crop dry mass (+12%), and there was no significant interaction with temperature. Temperature had a direct, negative effect on yield at both levels of the N and CO[sub 2] treatments. This could be explained by the temperature-dependent shortening of the phenological stages, and therefore, the time available for accumulating resources for grain formation. At high N, there was also a reduction in grain set at ambient +4[degree]C temperature, but the overall negative effect of warmer temperature was greater on the number of grains (-37%) than on yield (-18%), due to a compensating increase in average grain mass. At low N, despite increasing total crop dry mass and the number of ears, elevated CO[sub 2] did not increase grain yield and caused a significant decrease under ambient temperature conditions. This can be explained in terms of a stimulation of early vegetative growth by CO[sub 2] enrichment leading to a reduction in the amount of N available later for the formation and filling of grain.

  19. CO2 leakage monitoring and analysis to understand the variation of CO2 concentration in vadose zone by natural effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joun, Won-Tak; Ha, Seung-Wook; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ju, YeoJin; Lee, Sung-Sun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2017-04-01

    Controlled ex-situ experiments and continuous CO2 monitoring in the field are significant implications for detecting and monitoring potential leakage from CO2 sequestration reservoir. However, it is difficult to understand the observed parameters because the natural disturbance will fluctuate the signal of detections in given local system. To identify the original source leaking from sequestration reservoir and to distinguish the camouflaged signal of CO2 concentration, the artificial leakage test was conducted in shallow groundwater environment and long-term monitoring have been performed. The monitoring system included several parameters such as pH, temperature, groundwater level, CO2 gas concentration, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, borehole pressure, and rainfall event etc. Especially in this study, focused on understanding a relationship among the CO2 concentration, wind speed, rainfall and pressure difference. The results represent that changes of CO2 concentration in vadose zone could be influenced by physical parameters and this reason is helpful in identifying the camouflaged signal of CO2 concentrations. The 1-D column laboratory experiment also was conducted to understand the sparking-peak as shown in observed data plot. The results showed a similar peak plot and could consider two assumptions why the sparking-peak was shown. First, the trapped CO2 gas was escaped when the water table was changed. Second, the pressure equivalence between CO2 gas and water was broken when the water table was changed. These field data analysis and laboratory experiment need to advance due to comprehensively quantify local long-term dynamics of the artificial CO2 leaking aquifer. Acknowledgement Financial support was provided by the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003)

  20. Effect of Promoter Concentration on CO2 Separation Using K2CO3 With Reactive Absorption Method in Reactor Packed Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monde Junety

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of carbon dioxide (CO2 in the gas is not expected because CO2 can reduce heating value and CO2 is the major emission contributor into the atmosphere. Various separation technologies can be used to reduce CO2 content and improve quality of gas. Chemical or reactive absorption is most widely used because it provides higher removal rate. This paper will study the effect of the addition di ethanolamine (DEA concentration into aqueous 30wt.% potassium carbonate(K2CO3 with reactive absorption method in a reactor packed column at temperature from 40°C to 80°C, DEA concentration range of (1% - 3% and absorbent flow rate (0.5, 0.75 and 1 L. min1. Contacting the gas and absorbent are countercurrent flow in packed column with 1.5 m high and 50 mm in diameter. The absorption column was randomly packed with a packing material raschig rings 5 mm in diameter. The CO2 loading in the liquid samples was determined by titration. It is found that the best result of CO2 loading is 0.065594 mole/mole K2CO3 and CO2 removal 28%. The result show that the loading capacity (mole CO2/mole K2CO3 and CO2 removal increased with the increase of DEA concentration.

  1. The effect of temperature and concentration on the corrosion inhibition mechanism of an amphiphilic amido-amine in CO2 saturated solution

    OpenAIRE

    Desimone, Paula Mariela; Gordillo, Gabriel Jorge; Simison, Silvia Noemi

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition mechanism of the N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide on mild steel surface in CO2-saturated 5% NaCl solution has been studied. The inhibition efficiency decreases with increasing temperature. Adsorption of the inhibitor studied is found to follow the Frumkin adsorption isotherm. EIS results show that the mechanism of its corrosion inhibition at concentrations higher than critical micelle concentration is by forming a protective porous bi-layer. The a...

  2. Dynamics of soil CO2 efflux under varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations reveal dominance of slow processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyoung; Oren, Ram; Clark, James S; Palmroth, Sari; Oishi, A Christopher; McCarthy, Heather R; Maier, Chris A; Johnsen, Kurt

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated the effect on soil CO 2 efflux (F CO 2 ) of sudden changes in photosynthetic rates by altering CO 2 concentration in plots subjected to +200 ppmv for 15 years. Five-day intervals of exposure to elevated CO 2 (eCO 2 ) ranging 1.0-1.8 times ambient did not affect F CO 2 . F CO 2 did not decrease until 4 months after termination of the long-term eCO 2 treatment, longer than the 10 days observed for decrease of F CO 2 after experimental blocking of C flow to belowground, but shorter than the ~13 months it took for increase of F CO 2 following the initiation of eCO 2 . The reduction of F CO 2 upon termination of enrichment (~35%) cannot be explained by the reduction of leaf area (~15%) and associated carbohydrate production and allocation, suggesting a disproportionate contraction of the belowground ecosystem components; this was consistent with the reductions in base respiration and F CO 2 -temperature sensitivity. These asymmetric responses pose a tractable challenge to process-based models attempting to isolate the effect of individual processes on F CO2 . © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on growth course of tree seed-lings in Changbai Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    One-year-old seedlings of Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sylvestriformis, Phellodendron amurense were grown in open-top chambers (OTCs) with 700 and 500 mmol/mol CO2 concentrations, control chamber and on open site (ambient CO2, about 350 mmol/mol CO2) respectively at the Open Research Station of Changbai Mountain Forest Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the growth course responses of three species to elevated CO2 and temperature during one growing season was studied from May to Oct. 1999. The results showed that increase in CO2 concentration enhanced the growth of seedlings and the effect of 700 mmol/mol CO2 was more remarkable than 500 mmol/mol CO2 on seedling growth. Under the condition of doubly elevated CO2 concentration, the biomass increased by 38% in average for coniferous seedlings and 60% for broad-leaved seedlings. With continuous treatment of high CO2 concentration, the monthly-accumulated biomass of shade-tolerant Pinus koraiensis seedlings was bigger in July than in August and September, while those of Pinus sylvestriformis and Phellodendron amurense seedlings showed an increase in July and August, or did not decrese until September. During the hot August, high CO2 concentration enhanced the growth of Pinus koraiensis seedlings by increasing temperature, but it did not show dominance in other two species.

  4. Tightened constraints on the time-lag between Antarctic temperature and CO2 during the last deglaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. van Ommen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic ice cores provide clear evidence of a close coupling between variations in Antarctic temperature and the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during the glacial/interglacial cycles of at least the past 800-thousand years. Precise information on the relative timing of the temperature and CO2 changes can assist in refining our understanding of the physical processes involved in this coupling. Here, we focus on the last deglaciation, 19 000 to 11 000 yr before present, during which CO2 concentrations increased by ~80 parts per million by volume and Antarctic temperature increased by ~10 °C. Utilising a recently developed proxy for regional Antarctic temperature, derived from five near-coastal ice cores and two ice core CO2 records with high dating precision, we show that the increase in CO2 likely lagged the increase in regional Antarctic temperature by less than 400 yr and that even a short lead of CO2 over temperature cannot be excluded. This result, consistent for both CO2 records, implies a faster coupling between temperature and CO2 than previous estimates, which had permitted up to millennial-scale lags.

  5. Room temperature CO and H2 sensing with carbon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daegyu; Pikhitsa, Peter V; Yang, Hongjoo; Choi, Mansoo

    2011-01-01

    We report on a shell-shaped carbon nanoparticle (SCNP)-based gas sensor that reversibly detects reducing gas molecules such as CO and H 2 at room temperature both in air and inert atmosphere. Crystalline SCNPs were synthesized by laser-assisted reactions in pure acetylene gas flow, chemically treated to obtain well-dispersed SCNPs and then patterned on a substrate by the ion-induced focusing method. Our chemically functionalized SCNP-based gas sensor works for low concentrations of CO and H 2 at room temperature even without Pd or Pt catalysts commonly used for splitting H 2 molecules into reactive H atoms, while metal oxide gas sensors and bare carbon-nanotube-based gas sensors for sensing CO and H 2 molecules can operate only at elevated temperatures. A pristine SCNP-based gas sensor was also examined to prove the role of functional groups formed on the surface of functionalized SCNPs. A pristine SCNP gas sensor showed no response to reducing gases at room temperature but a significant response at elevated temperature, indicating a different sensing mechanism from a chemically functionalized SCNP sensor.

  6. Physiological acclimation dampens initial effects of elevated temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration in mature boreal Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Shubhangi; Hall, Marianne; Räntfors, Mats; Chaudhary, Nitin; Linder, Sune; Way, Danielle; Uddling, Johan; Wallin, Göran

    2018-02-01

    Physiological processes of terrestrial plants regulate the land-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy, yet few studies have explored the acclimation responses of mature boreal conifer trees to climate change. Here we explored the acclimation responses of photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal conductance to elevated temperature and/or CO 2 concentration ([CO 2 ]) in a 3-year field experiment with mature boreal Norway spruce. We found that elevated [CO 2 ] decreased photosynthetic carboxylation capacity (-23% at 25 °C) and increased shoot respiration (+64% at 15 °C), while warming had no significant effects. Shoot respiration, but not photosynthetic capacity, exhibited seasonal acclimation. Stomatal conductance at light saturation and a vapour pressure deficit of 1 kPa was unaffected by elevated [CO 2 ] but significantly decreased (-27%) by warming, and the ratio of intercellular to ambient [CO 2 ] was enhanced (+17%) by elevated [CO 2 ] and decreased (-12%) by warming. Many of these responses differ from those typically observed in temperate tree species. Our results show that long-term physiological acclimation dampens the initial stimulation of plant net carbon assimilation to elevated [CO 2 ], and of plant water use to warming. Models that do not account for these responses may thus overestimate the impacts of climate change on future boreal vegetation-atmosphere interactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The effect of increased atmospheric temperature and CO2 concentration during crop growth on the chemical composition and in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics of wheat straw

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xiangyu; Wu, Yanping; Cai, Min; Mu, Chunlong; Luo, Weihong; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhu, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of increased atmospheric temperature and CO2 concentration during crop growth on the chemical composition and in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics of wheat straw. The field experiment was carried out from November 2012 to June 2013 at Changshu (31?32?93?N, 120?41?88?E) agro-ecological experimental station. A total of three treatments were set. The concentration of CO2 was increased to 500??mol/mol in the first treatment (CO2 grou...

  8. Arctic Ocean CO2 uptake: an improved multiyear estimate of the air-sea CO2 flux incorporating chlorophyll a concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaka, Sayaka; Siswanto, Eko; Olsen, Are; Hoppema, Mario; Watanabe, Eiji; Fransson, Agneta; Chierici, Melissa; Murata, Akihiko; Lauvset, Siv K.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Takahashi, Taro; Kosugi, Naohiro; Omar, Abdirahman M.; van Heuven, Steven; Mathis, Jeremy T.

    2018-03-01

    We estimated monthly air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas north of 60° N from 1997 to 2014. This was done by mapping partial pressure of CO2 in the surface water (pCO2w) using a self-organizing map (SOM) technique incorporating chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, sea ice concentration, atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio, and geographical position. We applied new algorithms for extracting Chl a from satellite remote sensing reflectance with close examination of uncertainty of the obtained Chl a values. The overall relationship between pCO2w and Chl a was negative, whereas the relationship varied among seasons and regions. The addition of Chl a as a parameter in the SOM process enabled us to improve the estimate of pCO2w, particularly via better representation of its decline in spring, which resulted from biologically mediated pCO2w reduction. As a result of the inclusion of Chl a, the uncertainty in the CO2 flux estimate was reduced, with a net annual Arctic Ocean CO2 uptake of 180 ± 130 Tg C yr-1. Seasonal to interannual variation in the CO2 influx was also calculated.

  9. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  10. Experimental and CFD modelling for thermal comfort and CO2 concentration in office building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabrein, H.; Hariri, A.; Leman, A. M.; Yusof, M. Z. M.; Afandi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamic CFD was used for simulating air flow, indoor air distribution and contamination concentration. Gases pollution and thermal discomfort affected occupational health and productivity of work place. The main objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of air change rate in CO2 concentration and to estimate the profile of CO2 concentration in the offices building. The thermal comfort and gases contamination are investigated by numerical analysis CFD which was validated by experiment. Thus the air temperature, air velocity and CO2 concentration were measured at several points in the chamber with four occupants. Comparing between experimental and numerical results showed good agreement. In addition, the CO2 concentration around human recorded high, compared to the other area. Moreover, the thermal comfort in this study is within the ASHRAE standard 55-2004.

  11. Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) and climate change: the effect of CO2 concentration, temperature, and water deficit on growth and reproduction of two biotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi; Bajwa, Ali Ahsan; Navie, Sheldon; O'Donnell, Chris; Adkins, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Climate change will have a considerable impact upon the processes that moderate weed invasion, in particular to that of parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.). This study evaluated the performance of two Australian biotypes of parthenium weed under a range of environmental conditions including soil moisture (100 and 50% of field capacity), atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentration (390 and 550 ppm), and temperature (35/20 and 30/15 °C/day/night). Measurements were taken upon growth, reproductive output, seed biology (fill, viability and dormancy) and soil seed longevity. Parthenium weed growth and seed output were significantly increased under the elevated CO 2 concentration (550 ppm) and in the cooler (30/15 °C) and wetter (field capacity) conditions. However, elevated CO 2 concentration could not promote growth or seed output when the plants were grown under the warmer (35/20 °C) and wetter conditions. Warm temperatures accelerated the growth of parthenium weed, producing plants with greater height biomass but with a shorter life span. Warm temperatures also affected the reproductive output by promoting both seed production and fill, and promoting seed longevity. Dryer soil conditions (50% of field capacity) also promoted the reproductive output, but did not retain high seed fill or promote seed longevity. Therefore, the rising temperatures, the increased atmospheric CO 2 concentration and the longer periods of drought predicted under climate change scenarios are likely to substantially enhance the growth and reproductive output of these two Australian parthenium weed biotypes. This may facilitate the further invasion of this noxious weed in tropical and sub-tropical natural and agro-ecosystems.

  12. Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Schoepf

    Full Text Available Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations threaten coral reefs globally by causing ocean acidification (OA and warming. Yet, the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and temperature on coral physiology and resilience remain poorly understood. While coral calcification and energy reserves are important health indicators, no studies to date have measured energy reserve pools (i.e., lipid, protein, and carbohydrate together with calcification under OA conditions under different temperature scenarios. Four coral species, Acropora millepora, Montipora monasteriata, Pocillopora damicornis, Turbinaria reniformis, were reared under a total of six conditions for 3.5 weeks, representing three pCO2 levels (382, 607, 741 µatm, and two temperature regimes (26.5, 29.0 °C within each pCO2 level. After one month under experimental conditions, only A. millepora decreased calcification (-53% in response to seawater pCO2 expected by the end of this century, whereas the other three species maintained calcification rates even when both pCO2 and temperature were elevated. Coral energy reserves showed mixed responses to elevated pCO2 and temperature, and were either unaffected or displayed nonlinear responses with both the lowest and highest concentrations often observed at the mid-pCO2 level of 607 µatm. Biweekly feeding may have helped corals maintain calcification rates and energy reserves under these conditions. Temperature often modulated the response of many aspects of coral physiology to OA, and both mitigated and worsened pCO2 effects. This demonstrates for the first time that coral energy reserves are generally not metabolized to sustain calcification under OA, which has important implications for coral health and bleaching resilience in a high-CO2 world. Overall, these findings suggest that some corals could be more resistant to simultaneously warming and acidifying oceans than previously expected.

  13. Kinetics of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from champagne glasses in tasting conditions: the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Cilindre, Clara; Jeandet, Philippe

    2009-03-11

    Measurements of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from a flute poured with a standard Champagne wine initially holding about 11 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2) were presented, in tasting conditions, all along the first 10 min following the pouring process. Experiments were performed at three sets of temperature, namely, 4 degrees C, 12 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively. It was demonstrated that the lower the champagne temperature, the lower CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute. Therefore, the lower the champagne temperature, the lower its progressive loss of dissolved CO(2) concentration with time, which constitutes the first analytical proof that low champagne temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps retains its effervescence. A correlation was also proposed between CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute poured with champagne and its continuously decreasing dissolved CO(2) concentration. Finally, the contribution of effervescence to the global kinetics of CO(2) release was discussed and modeled by the use of results developed over recent years. The temperature dependence of the champagne viscosity was found to play a major role in the kinetics of CO(2) outgassing from a flute. On the basis of this bubbling model, the theoretical influence of champagne temperature on CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from a flute was discussed and found to be in quite good accordance with our experimental results.

  14. Phytophthora quercina infections in elevated CO2 concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oszako Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, a new wave of oak decline has been observed in Poland. The most important pathogenic organisms involved in this phenomenon are probably soil-borne pathogens Phytophthoragenus, especially P. quercina. In this work, we sought to test the influence of elevated CO2 concentration on the susceptibility of oaks (Quercus robur L. to infection by P. quercina. In order to test the susceptibility of oak fine roots to infection, we applied phosphite-based fertiliser Actifos in 0.6% concentration. One-year-old oak seedlings were grown for one year in greenhouse with either an ambient atmosphere (400 ppm CO2 or an elevated (800 ppm concentration of CO2. Oaks grown at the elevated CO2 concentration developed longer shoots as proved by statistically significant differences. However, there was no difference in the development of root systems. The application of Actifos had a positive significant effect on the development of shoots and the surface area of fine roots under the elevated CO2 concentration.

  15. Temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration in a temperate deciduous forest in central Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Shohei; Saigusa, Nobuko; Yamamoto, Susumu; Kondo, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Yozo; Chan, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    In order to examine the temporal variation of the atmospheric CO 2 concentration in a temperate deciduous forest, and its relationship with meteorological conditions, continuous measurements of CO 2 and meteorological parameters have been made since 1993 on a tower at Takayama in the central part of Japan. In addition to an average secular increase in atmospheric CO 2 of 1.8 ppm/yr, diurnal variation with a maximum during the night-time to early morning and a minimum in the afternoon is observed from late spring to early fall; the diurnal cycle is not so clearly observed in the remaining seasons of the year. A concentration difference between above and below the canopy, and its diurnal variation, can also be seen clearly in summer. Daily mean concentration data show a prominent seasonal cycle. The maximum and the minimum of the seasonal cycle occur in April and from mid August to mid September, respectively. Day-to-day changes in the diurnal cycle of CO 2 are highly dependent on the day-to-day variations in meteorological conditions. However, CO 2 variations on longer time scales (>10 d) appear to be linearly related to changes in respiration. At Takayama, variations in the 10-d standard deviation of daily mean CO 2 data and 10-d averaged respiration show distinct relationships with soil temperature during spring and fall seasons. In spring, respiration has a stronger exponential dependence on soil temperature than in fall. Interestingly, in summer when soil temperature becomes greater than about 15 deg C, biological respiration becomes more variable and independent of the soil temperature. Thus, at the Takayama site, the Q10 relationship is seasonally dependent, and does not represent well the biological respiration process when the soil temperature rises above 15 deg C

  16. Leaf shape responds to temperature but not CO2 in Acer rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Dana L

    2012-01-01

    The degree of leaf dissection and the presence of leaf teeth, along with tooth size and abundance, inversely correlate with mean annual temperature (MAT) across many plant communities. These relationships form the core of several methods for reconstructing MAT from fossils, yet the direct selection of temperature on tooth morphology has not been demonstrated experimentally. It is also not known if atmospheric CO(2) concentration affects leaf shape, limiting confidence in ancient climate reconstructions because CO(2) has varied widely on geologic timescales. Here I report the results of growing Acer rubrum (red maple) in growth cabinets at contrasting temperature and CO(2) conditions. The CO(2) treatment imparted no significant differences in leaf size and shape, while plants grown at cooler temperatures tended to have more teeth and more highly dissected leaves. These results provide direct evidence for the selection of temperature on leaf shape in one species, and support a key link in many leaf-climate methods. More broadly, these results increase confidence for using leaf shape in fossils to reconstruct paleoclimate.

  17. Fluidized bed combustion of single coal char particles at high CO{sub 2} concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F.; Chirone, R. [CNR, Naples (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Combustion of single coal char particles was studied at 850{sup o}C in a lab-scale fluidized bed at high CO{sub 2} concentration, typical of oxyfiring conditions. The burning rate of the particles was followed as a function of time by continuously measuring the outlet CO and O{sub 2} concentrations. Some preliminary evaluations on the significance of homogeneous CO oxidation in the reactor and of carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} in the char were also carried out. Results showed that the carbon burning rate increases with oxygen concentration and char particle size. The particle temperature is approximately equal to that of the bed up to an oxygen concentration of 2%, but it is considerably higher for larger oxygen concentrations. Both CO{sub 2} gasification of char and homogeneous CO oxidation are not negligible. The gasification reaction rate is slow and it is likely to be controlled by intrinsic kinetics. During purely gasification conditions the extent of carbon loss due to particle attrition by abrasion (estimated from the carbon mass balance) appears to be much more important than under combustion conditions.

  18. Combined effects of elevated temperature and CO2 enhance threat from low temperature hazard to winter wheat growth in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kaiyan; Zhou, Guangsheng; Lv, Xiaomin; Guo, Jianping; Ren, Sanxue

    2018-03-12

    We examined the growth and yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) in response to the predicted elevated CO 2 concentration and temperature to determine the mechanism of the combined impacts in North China Plain. An elevated treatment (CO 2 : 600 μmol mol -1 , temperature: +2.5~3.0 °C, ECTI) and a control treatment (ambient CO 2 and temperature, CK) were conducted in open-top chambers from October 2013 to June 2016. Post-winter growth stages of winter wheat largely advanced and shifted to a cooler period of nature season under combined impact of elevated CO 2 and temperature during the entire growing season. The mean temperature and accumulated photosynthetic active radiations (PAR) over the post-winter growing period in ECTI decreased by 0.8-1.5 °C and 10-13%, respectively compared with that in CK, negatively impacted winter wheat growth. As a result, winter wheat in ECTI suffered from low temperature hazards during critical period of floret development and anthesis and grain number per ear was reduced by 10-31% in the three years. Although 1000-kernel weight in ECTI increased by 8-9% mainly due to elevated CO 2 , increasing CO 2 concentration from 400 to 600 μmol mol -1 throughout the growth stage was not able to offset the adverse effect of warming on winter wheat growth and yield.

  19. The High Accuracy Measurement of CO2 Mixing Ratio Profiles Using Ground Based 1.6 μm CO2-DIAL with Temperature Measurement Techniques in the Lower-Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a ground based direct detection three-wavelength 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to achieve measurements of vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in the atmosphere. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature and pressure in the atmosphere, it is important to measure them simultaneously so that the better accuracy of the DIAL measurement is realized. Conventionally, we have obtained the vertical profile of absorption cross sections using the atmospheric temperature profile by the objective analysis and the atmospheric pressure profile calculated by the pressure height equation. Comparison of atmospheric pressure profiles calculated from this equation and those obtained from radiosonde observations at Tateno, Japan is consistent within 0.2 % below 3 km altitude. But the temperature dependency of the CO2 density is 0.25 %/°C near the surface. Moreover, the CO2 concentration is often evaluated by the mixing ratio. Because the air density is related by the ideal gas law, the mixing ratio is also related by the atmospheric temperature. Therefore, the temperature affects not only accuracy of CO2 concentration but the CO2 mixing ratio. In this paper, some experimental results of the simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature profiles and CO2 mixing ratio profiles are reported from 0.4 to 2.5 km altitude using the three-wavelength 1.6 μm DIAL system. Temperature profiles of CO2 DIAL measurement were sometimes different from those of objective analysis below 1.5 km altitude. These differences are considered to be due to regionality at the lidar site. The temperature difference of 5.0 °C corresponds to a CO2 mixing ratio difference of 8.0 ppm at 500 m altitude. This cannot be ignored in estimates of regional sources and sinks of CO2. This three-wavelength CO2 DIAL technique can estimate accurately temporal behavior of CO2 mixing ratio profiles in the lower atmosphere

  20. ISLSCP II Globalview: Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GlobalView Carbon Dioxide (CO2) data product contains synchronized and smoothed time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected sites that were created...

  1. Carbon dioxide assimilation in Danish crops (wheat and maize) and its dependency on increasing temperature and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soegaard, H.; Boegh, E.

    2001-01-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of atmospheric CO 2 fluxes have been recorded over a number of crops throughout the growing season. These data have been used for validating a mechanistic photosynthesis model, which is used together with one of the most wide spread soil respiration equations. The combined model, is applied for analysing the temperature- and CO 2 -dependency of field crops. To get an idea of the potential range in the sensitivity of agricultural crops to atmospheric change, two crops with contrasting biochemical and physiological properties were selected for the present analysis: winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Hereward) and maize (Zea mayz cv. Loft). While wheat, which is a C 3 -species, is the most common Danish crop (covering 25% of the Danish agricultural area), maize is interesting because it is a C 4 -plant which uses another CO 2 pathway in the dry matter production. The photosynthetic process of C 4 -plants has a higher temperature optimum compared to C 3 -plants. This could give C 4 plants more favourable conditions in the future. The model applied in this paper is utilized to evaluate whether increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations have contributed to the general increase in grain yield observed in Denmark since the late sixties. (LN)

  2. CO{sub 2} exchange, environmental productivity indices, and productivity of Agaves and Cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Terminal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net CO{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  3. Temperature study of magnetic resonance spectra of co-modified (Co,N-TiO2 nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guskos Nikos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The (nCo,N-TiO2 (n = 1, 5 and 10 wt.% of Co nanocomposites were investigated by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 4 K to 290 K range. Analyses of ferromagnetic/electron paramagnetic resonance (FMR/EPR spectra in terms of four Callen lineshape components revealed the existence of two types of magnetic centers, one derived from metallic cobalt nanoparticles in superparamagnetic (SPM phase and the other from cobalt clusters in the TiO2 lattice. Additionally, at low temperature the EPR spectrum arising from Ti3+ ions was also registered. Both relaxations of the Landau-Lifshitz type and the Bloch-Bloembergen type played an important role at high temperature in determining the linewidths and the latter relaxation was prevailing at low temperature. Analysis of the integrated intensity showed that the SPM signal is due to small size FM cobalt nanoparticles while the paramagnetic signal from Co clusters originates from those nanoparticles in which the concentration of magnetic polarons is below the percolation threshold.

  4. Elevated CO2 concentration around alfalfa nodules increases N2 fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, Stephanie A.; Hristozkova, Marieta; Mainassara, Zaman-Allah; Schulze, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Nodule CO2 fixation via PEPC provides malate for bacteroids and oxaloacetate for N assimilation. The process is therefore of central importance for efficient nitrogen fixation. Nodule CO2 fixation is known to depend on external CO2 concentration. The hypothesis of the present paper was that nitrogen fixation in alfalfa plants is enhanced when the nodules are exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations. Therefore nodulated plants of alfalfa were grown in a hydroponic system that allowed separate ae...

  5. Projected near-future levels of temperature and pCO2 reduce coral fertilization success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Albright

    Full Text Available Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2 are projected to contribute to a 1.1-6.4°C rise in global average surface temperatures and a 0.14-0.35 reduction in the average pH of the global surface ocean by 2100. If realized, these changes are expected to have negative consequences for reef-building corals including increased frequency and severity of coral bleaching and reduced rates of calcification and reef accretion. Much less is known regarding the independent and combined effects of temperature and pCO2 on critical early life history processes such as fertilization. Here we show that increases in temperature (+3°C and pCO2 (+400 µatm projected for this century negatively impact fertilization success of a common Indo-Pacific coral species, Acropora tenuis. While maximum fertilization did not differ among treatments, the sperm concentration required to obtain 50% of maximum fertilization increased 6- to 8- fold with the addition of a single factor (temperature or CO2 and nearly 50- fold when both factors interact. Our results indicate that near-future changes in temperature and pCO2 narrow the range of sperm concentrations that are capable of yielding high fertilization success in A. tenuis. Increased sperm limitation, in conjunction with adult population decline, may have severe consequences for coral reproductive success. Impaired sexual reproduction will further challenge corals by inhibiting population recovery and adaptation potential.

  6. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Holding, J. M.

    2015-08-31

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate1 and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification2, 3. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs4, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production5. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145–2,099 μatm; however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  7. CO{sub 2} exchange environmental productivity indices, and productivity of agaves and cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net C0{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  8. Response of biomass and nitrogen yield of white clover to radiation and atmospheric CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manderscheid, R.; Bender, J.; Schenk, U.; Weigel, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to test (i) whether the effect of season-long CO 2 enrichment on plant dry matter production of white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Karina) depends on the temperature or can solely be explained by changes in radiation use efficiency, and (ii) whether the atmospheric CO 2 concentration affects the relationship between tissue %N and plant biomass. Plants were grown in pots with adequate nutrient and water supply and were exposed to ambient and above ambient CO 2 concentrations (approximately +80 ppm, +160 ppm, +280 ppm) in open-top chambers for two seasons. Nitrogen fertilizer was given only before the experiment started to promote N 2 fixation. Plants were clipped to a height of 5 cm, when the canopy had reached a height of about 20 cm and when the CO 2 effect had not been diminished due to self-shading of the leaves. Photon exposure (400–700 nm) measured above the canopy was linearly related to the above ground biomass, the leaf area index and the nitrogen yield (r 2 > 0.94). The slopes of the curves depended on the CO 2 concentration. Since most of the radiation (>90%) was absorbed by the foliage, the slopes were used to calculate the CO 2 effect on the radiation use efficiency of biomass production, which is shown to increase curvilinearly between 380 and 660 ppm CO 2 from 2.7 g MJ −1 to 3.9 g MJ −1 . CO 2 enrichment increased above ground biomass by increasing the leaf number, the individual leaf weight and the leaf area; specific leaf weight was not affected. The relative CO 2 response varied between harvests; there was a slight but not significant positive relationship with mean daytime temperature. At the beginning of the season, plant nitrogen concentration in the above ground biomass was decreased by CO 2 enrichment. However, at later growth stages, when the plants depended solely on N 2 fixation, nitrogen concentration was found to be increased when the nitrogen concentration value was adjusted for the decrease

  9. Defect equilibrium in PrBaCo2O5+δ at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntsov, A.Yu.; Leonidov, I.A.; Patrakeev, M.V.; Kozhevnikov, V.L.

    2013-01-01

    A defect equilibrium model for PrBaCo 2 O 5+δ is suggested based on oxygen non-stoichiometry data. The model includes reactions of oxygen exchange and charge disproportionation of Co 3+ cations. The respective equilibrium constants, enthalpies and entropies for the reactions entering the model are obtained from the fitting of the experimental data for oxygen non-stoichiometry. The enthalpies of oxidation Co 2+ →Co 3+ and Co 3+ →Co 4+ are found to be equal to 115±9 kJ mol –1 and 45±4 kJ mol –1 , respectively. The obtained equilibrium constants were used in order to calculate variations in concentration of cobalt species with non-stoichiometry, temperature and oxygen pressure. - Graphical abstract: Variations in concentration of cobalt species with oxygen content in PrBaCo n 2+ Co z 3+ Co p 4+ O 5+δ at 650 °S. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The defect equilibrium model based on oxygen non-stoichiometry data is suggested. • Disproportionation of Co 3+ cations gives significant contribution to defect equilibrium. • The hole concentration obtained from the model is in accord with electrical properties

  10. Effects of temperature at constant air dew point on leaf carboxylation efficiency and CO2 compensation point of different leaf types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J A; Tenhunen, J D; Lange, O L

    1985-09-01

    The effect of temperature on photosynthesis at constant water-vapor pressure in the air was investigated using two sclerophyll species, Arbutus unedo and Quercus suber, and one mesophytic species, Spinacia oleracea. Photosynthesis and transpiration were measured over a range of temperatures, 20-39° C. The external concentration of CO2 was varied from 340 μbar to near CO2 compensation. The initial slope (carboxylation efficiency, CE) of the photosynthetic response to intercellular CO2 concentration, the CO2 compensation point (Γ), and the extrapolated rate of CO2 released into CO2-free air (R i) were calculated. At an external CO2 concentration of 320-340 μbar CO2, photosynthesis decreased with temperature in all species. The effect of temperature on Γ was similar in all species. While CE in S. oleracea changed little with temperature, CE decreased by 50% in Q. suber as temperature increased from 25 to 34° C. Arbutus unedo also exhibited a decrease in CE at higher temperatures but not as marked as Q. suber. The absolut value of R i increased with temperature in S. oleracea, while changing little or decreasing in the sclerophylls. Variations in Γ and R i of the sclerophyll species are not consistent with greater increase of respiration with temperature in the light in these species compared with S. oleracea.

  11. The effects of CO2 and nutrient fertilisation on the growth and temperature response of the mangrove Avicennia germinans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reef, Ruth; Slot, Martijn; Motro, Uzi; Motro, Michal; Motro, Yoav; Adame, Maria F; Garcia, Milton; Aranda, Jorge; Lovelock, Catherine E; Winter, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    In order to understand plant responses to both the widespread phenomenon of increased nutrient inputs to coastal zones and the concurrent rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, CO2-nutrient interactions need to be considered. In addition to its potential stimulating effect on photosynthesis and growth, elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of photosynthesis. The scarcity of experiments testing how elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of tropical trees hinders our ability to model future primary productivity. In a glasshouse study, we examined the effects of elevated CO2 (800 ppm) and nutrient availability on seedlings of the widespread mangrove Avicennia germinans. We assessed photosynthetic performance, the temperature response of photosynthesis, seedling growth and biomass allocation. We found large synergistic gains in both growth (42 %) and photosynthesis (115 %) when seedlings grown under elevated CO2 were supplied with elevated nutrient concentrations relative to their ambient growing conditions. Growth was significantly enhanced under elevated CO2 only under high-nutrient conditions, mainly in above-ground tissues. Under low-nutrient conditions and elevated CO2, root volume was more than double that of seedlings grown under ambient CO2 levels. Elevated CO2 significantly increased the temperature optimum for photosynthesis by ca. 4 °C. Rising CO2 concentrations are likely to have a significant positive effect on the growth rate of A. germinans over the next century, especially in areas where nutrient availability is high.

  12. Effect of high temperature deposition on CoSi2 phase formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comrie, C. M.; Ahmed, H.; Smeets, D.; Demeulemeester, J.; Vantomme, A.; Turner, S.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Detavernier, C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the nucleation behaviour of the CoSi to CoSi 2 transformation from cobalt silicide thin films grown by deposition at elevated substrate temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 600 °C. A combination of channelling, real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, real-time x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the effect of the deposition temperature on the subsequent formation temperature of CoSi 2 , its growth behaviour, and the epitaxial quality of the CoSi 2 thus formed. The temperature at which deposition took place was observed to exert a significant and systematic influence on both the formation temperature of CoSi 2 and its growth mechanism. CoSi films grown at the lowest temperatures were found to increase the CoSi 2 nucleation temperature above that of CoSi 2 grown by conventional solid phase reaction, whereas the higher deposition temperatures reduced the nucleation temperature significantly. In addition, a systematic change in growth mechanism of the subsequent CoSi 2 growth occurs as a function of deposition temperature. First, the CoSi 2 growth rate from films grown at the lower reactive deposition temperatures is substantially lower than that grown at higher reactive deposition temperatures, even though the onset of growth occurs at a higher temperature, Second, for deposition temperatures below 450 °C, the growth appears columnar, indicating nucleation controlled growth. Elevated deposition temperatures, on the other hand, render the CoSi 2 formation process layer-by-layer which indicates enhanced nucleation of the CoSi 2 and diffusion controlled growth. Our results further indicate that this observed trend is most likely related to stress and changes in microstructure introduced during reactive deposition of the CoSi film. The deposition temperature therefore provides a handle to tune the CoSi 2 growth mechanism.

  13. The possible evolution and future of CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs), based either on active transport of inorganic carbon (biophysical CCMs) or on biochemistry involving supplementary carbon fixation into C4 acids (C4 and CAM), play a major role in global primary productivity. However, the ubiquitous CO2-fixing enzyme in autotrophs, Rubisco, evolved at a time when atmospheric CO2 levels were very much higher than today and O2 was very low and, as CO2 and O2 approached (by no means monotonically), today's levels, at some time subsequently many organisms evolved a CCM that increased the supply of CO2 and decreased Rubisco oxygenase activity. Given that CO2 levels and other environmental factors have altered considerably between when autotrophs evolved and the present day, and are predicted to continue to change into the future, we here examine the drivers for, and possible timing of, evolution of CCMs. CCMs probably evolved when CO2 fell to 2-16 times the present atmospheric level, depending on Rubisco kinetics. We also assess the effects of other key environmental factors such as temperature and nutrient levels on CCM activity and examine the evidence for evolutionary changes in CCM activity and related cellular processes as well as limitations on continuity of CCMs through environmental variations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Reversibility in an Earth System model in response to CO2 concentration changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, O; Halloran, P R; Burke, E J; Doutriaux-Boucher, M; Jones, C D; Lowe, J; Ringer, M A; Robertson, E; Wu, P

    2012-01-01

    We use the HadGEM2-ES Earth System model to examine the degree of reversibility of a wide range of components of the Earth System under idealized climate change scenarios where the atmospheric CO 2 concentration is gradually increased to four times the pre-industrial level and then reduced at a similar rate from several points along this trajectory. While some modelled quantities respond almost immediately to the atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, others exhibit a time lag relative to the change in CO 2 . Most quantities also exhibit a lag relative to the global-mean surface temperature change, which can be described as a hysteresis behaviour. The most surprising responses are from low-level clouds and ocean stratification in the Southern Ocean, which both exhibit hysteresis on timescales longer than expected. We see no evidence of critical thresholds in these simulations, although some of the hysteresis phenomena become more apparent above 2 × CO 2 or 3 × CO 2 . Our findings have implications for the parametrization of climate impacts in integrated assessment and simple climate models and for future climate studies of geoengineering scenarios. (letter)

  15. Low-temperature CO oxidation over Cu/Pt co-doped ZrO2 nanoparticles synthesized by solution combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhania, Amit; Gupta, Shipra Mital

    2017-01-01

    Zirconia (ZrO 2 ) nanoparticles co-doped with Cu and Pt were applied as catalysts for carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation. These materials were prepared through solution combustion in order to obtain highly active and stable catalytic nanomaterials. This method allows Pt 2+ and Cu 2+ ions to dissolve into the ZrO 2 lattice and thus creates oxygen vacancies due to lattice distortion and charge imbalance. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results showed Cu/Pt co-doped ZrO 2 nanoparticles with a size of ca. 10 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra confirmed cubic structure and larger oxygen vacancies. The nanoparticles showed excellent activity for CO oxidation. The temperature T 50 (the temperature at which 50% of CO are converted) was lowered by 175 °C in comparison to bare ZrO 2 . Further, they exhibited very high stability for CO reaction (time-on-stream ≈ 70 h). This is due to combined effect of smaller particle size, large oxygen vacancies, high specific surface area and better thermal stability of the Cu/Pt co-doped ZrO 2 nanoparticles. The apparent activation energy for CO oxidation is found to be 45.6 kJ·mol -1 . The CO conversion decreases with increase in gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) and initial CO concentration.

  16. [Dynamic observation, simulation and application of soil CO2 concentration: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Hao; Luo, Sha; Zhou, Ping; Li, Teng-Yi; Wang, Juan; Li, Jie

    2012-10-01

    Soil CO2 concentration is the consequences of biological activities in above- and below-ground, and its fluctuation may significantly affect the future atmospheric CO2 concentration and the projected climate change. This paper reviewed the methodologies for measuring the soil CO2 concentration in situ as well as their advantages and disadvantages, analyzed the variation patterns and controlling factors of soil CO2 concentration across the temporal (diurnal, several days, seasonal and inter-annual) and spatial (soil profile, site and landscape) scales, introduced the primary empirical and mechanical models for estimating and predicting soil CO2 concentration, and summarized the applications and constraints of soil CO2 concentration gradient in determining soil respiration. Four research priorities were proposed, i. e., to develop new techniques for collecting and determining the soil CO2 in severe soil conditions (e. g., flooding, lithoso and others), to approach the responses of soil CO2 concentration to weather change and related regulation mechanisms, to strengthen the researches on the spatial heterogeneity of soil CO2 concentration, and to expand the applications of soil CO2 concentration gradient in the measurement of tropical-subtropical soil respiration.

  17. Will increasing temperature and CO2 affect pumpkin early development in Brazilian semi-arid? | O aumento da temperatura e do CO2 afetará o desenvolvimento precoce da abóbora no semi-árido brasileiro?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara França Dantas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With rising levels of CO2 in atmosphere, understanding possible impacts on development and growth of plants becomes increasingly important. The aim of this study was to evaluate interaction between different temperatures and CO2 levels in germination and early development of seedlings of different species of pumpkin. Seeds of Cucurbita pepo cultivars ‘Caserta’ and ‘Redonda’, and Cucurbita maxima ‘Coroa’ were sown in trays of 36 cells and held in growth chambers with different combinations of levels of CO2 and day/night temperatures. The experimental design was completely randomized in a 2 X 3 factorial scheme with two levels of CO2 concentration (360 and 550ppm and three day/night temperatures (26/20, 29/26 and 32/26°C, with four replicates of 18 seedlings for each treatment. CO2 levels used caused different effects among cultivars for most variables, but a significant change in physiological behavior of seedlings with increasing CO2 concentration was not observed. Increase in temperature led to physiological changes in both seeds and seedlings. The predicted conditions of increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2 and temperature are damaging to production of pumpkin seedlings

  18. The Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index in Relation to Sunspot Number, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation Index, the Mauna Loa Atmospheric Concentration of CO2, and Anthropogenic Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Global warming/climate change has been a subject of scientific interest since the early 19th century. In particular, increases in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) have long been thought to account for Earth's increased warming, although the lack of a dependable set of observational data was apparent as late as the mid 1950s. However, beginning in the late 1950s, being associated with the International Geophysical Year, the opportunity arose to begin accurate continuous monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric concentration of CO2. Consequently, it is now well established that the atmospheric concentration of CO2, while varying seasonally within any particular year, has steadily increased over time. Associated with this rising trend in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 is a rising trend in the surface-air and sea-surface temperatures (SSTs). This Technical Publication (TP) examines the statistical relationships between 10-year moving averages (10-yma) of the Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index (GLOTI), sunspot number (SSN), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index, and the Mauna Loa CO2 (MLCO2) index for the common interval 1964-2006, where the 10-yma values are used to indicate trends in the data. Scatter plots using the 10-yma values between GLOTI and each of the other parameters are determined, both as single-variate and multivariate fits. Scatter plots are also determined for MLCO2 using single-variate and bivariate (BV) fits, based on the GLOTI alone and the GLOTI in combination with the AMO index. On the basis of the inferred preferential fits for MLCO2, estimates for MLCO2 are determined for the interval 1885-1964, thereby yielding an estimate of the preindustrial level of atmospheric concentration of CO2. Lastly, 10-yma values of MLCO2 are compared against 10-yma estimates of the total carbon emissions (TCE) to determine the likelihood that manmade sources of carbon emissions are indeed responsible for the recent warming now

  19. The potential effects of concurrent increases in temperature, CO2 and O3 on net photosynthesis, as mediated by rubisCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.; Essex Univ., Colchester

    1992-07-01

    At the leaf level, under light saturating and light limiting conditions, it is shown that elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration not only alters the scale of the response of carbon gain to rising temperature, but can alter the direction of response. These points bring into serious question the value of any predictions of plant production which ignore not only the direct effect Of C0 2 on carbon gain, but also the basic interactions of temperature, C0 2 and 0 3 . Whilst many factors may potentially diminish the enhancement of lightsaturated leaf photosynthetic rates with increase in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, no mechanism has so far been identified which could remove the parallel stimulation of light-limited photosynthesis

  20. Tightened constraints on the time-lag between Antarctic temperature and CO2 during the last deglaciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedro, Joel Benjamin; Rasmussen, Sune Olander; van Ommen, Tas D.

    2012-01-01

    changes can assist in refining our understanding of the physical processes involved in this coupling. Here, we focus on the last deglaciation, 19 000 to 11 000 yr before present, during which CO2 concentrations increased by 80 parts per million by volume and Antarctic temperature increased by 10°C...... lead of CO2 over temperature cannot be excluded. This result, consistent for both CO2 records, implies a faster coupling between temperature and CO2 than previous estimates, which had permitted up to millennial-scale lags....

  1. Effects of CO2 and temperature on growth and resource use of co-occurring C3 and C4 annuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.S.; Bazzaz, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors examined how CO 2 concentrations and temperature interacted to affect growth, resource acquisition, and resource allocation of two annual plants that were supplied with a single pulse of nutrients. Physiological and growth measurements were made on individuals of Abutilon throphrasti (C 3 ) and Amaranthus retroflexus (C 4 ) grown in environments with atmospheric CO 2 levels of 400 or 700 μL/L and with light/dark temperatures of 28 degree/22 degree or 38 degree/31 degree C. Elevated CO 2 and temperature treatments had significant independent and interactive effects on plant growth, resource allocation, and resource acquisition, and the strength and direction of these effects were often dependent on plant species. For example, final biomass of Amaranthus was enhanced by elevated CO 2 at 28 degree but was depressed at 38 degree. For Abutilon, elevated CO 2 increased initial plant relative growth rates at 28 degree but not at 38 degree, and had no significant effects on final biomass at either temperature. These results are interpreted in light of the interactive effects of CO 2 and temperature on the rates of net leaf area production and loss, and on net whole-plant nitrogen retention. At 28 degree C, elevated CO 2 stimulated the initial production of leaf area in both species, which led to an initial stimulation of biomass accumulation at the higher CO 2 level. However, in elevated CO 2 at 28 degree, the rate of net leaf area loss for Abutilon increased while that of Amaranthus decreased. Furthermore, high CO 2 apparently enhanced the ability of Amaranthus to retain nitrogen at this temperature, which may have helped to enhance photosynthesis, whereas nitrogen retention was unaffected in Abutilon

  2. Effects of soil water content and elevated CO2 concentration on the monoterpene emission rate of Cryptomeria japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Amagai, Takashi; Tani, Akira

    2018-04-11

    Monoterpenes emitted from plants contribute to the formation of secondary pollution and affect the climate system. Monoterpene emission rates may be affected by environmental changes such as increasing CO 2 concentration caused by fossil fuel burning and drought stress induced by climate change. We measured monoterpene emissions from Cryptomeria japonica clone saplings grown under different CO 2 concentrations (control: ambient CO 2 level, elevated CO 2 : 1000μmolmol -1 ). The saplings were planted in the ground and we did not artificially control the SWC. The relationship between the monoterpene emissions and naturally varying SWC was investigated. The dominant monoterpene was α-pinene, followed by sabinene. The monoterpene emission rates were exponentially correlated with temperature for all measurements and normalized (35°C) for each measurement day. The daily normalized monoterpene emission rates (E s0.10 ) were positively and linearly correlated with SWC under both control and elevated CO 2 conditions (control: r 2 =0.55, elevated CO 2 : r 2 =0.89). The slope of the regression line of E s0.10 against SWC was significantly higher under elevated CO 2 than under control conditions (ANCOVA: P<0.01), indicating that the effect of CO 2 concentration on monoterpene emission rates differed by soil water status. The monoterpene emission rates estimated by considering temperature and SWC (Improved G93 algorithm) better agreed with the measured monoterpene emission rates, when compared with the emission rates estimated by considering temperature alone (G93 algorithm). Our results demonstrated that the combined effects of SWC and CO 2 concentration are important for controlling the monoterpene emissions from C. japonica clone saplings. If these relationships can be applied to the other coniferous tree species, our results may be useful to improve accuracy of monoterpene emission estimates from the coniferous forests as affected by climate change in the present and

  3. Synthesis of Novel Temperature- and pH-Sensitive ABA Triblock Copolymers P(DEAEMA-co-MEO2MA-co-OEGMA-b-PEG-b-P(DEAEMA-co-MEO2MA-co-OEGMA: Micellization, Sol–Gel Transitions, and Sustained BSA Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Han

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel temperature- and pH-responsive ABA-type triblock copolymers, P(DEAEMA-co-MEO2MA-co-OEGMA-b-PEG-b-P(DEAEMA-co-MEO2MA-co-OEGMA, composed of a poly(ethylene glycol (PEG middle block and temperature- and pH-sensitive outer blocks, were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. The composition and structure of the copolymer were characterized by 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The temperature- and pH-sensitivity, micellization, and the sol–gel transitions of the triblock copolymers in aqueous solutions were studied using transmittance measurements, surface tension, viscosity, fluorescence probe technique, dynamic light scattering (DLS, zeta-potential measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST of the triblock copolymer, which contains a small amount of a weak base group, (N,N-diethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA, can be tuned precisely and reversibly by changing the solution pH. When the copolymer concentration was sufficiently high, increasing temperature resulted in the free-flowing solution transformation into a micellar gel. The sol-to-gel transition temperature (Tsol–gel in aqueous solution will continue to decrease as solution concentration increases.

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co and Nb co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachisu, M.; Mori, K.; Hyodo, K.; Morimoto, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Co- and Nb-doped TiO 2 nanoparticles encapsulated with amorphous SiO 2 were synthesized by our novel preparation method. An anatase TiO 2 single-phase structure was confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The particle size could be controlled to be about 5 nm. The composition of these nanoparticles was investigated by X-ray fluorescence analysis. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra showed that the Ti 4+ and Co 2+ states were dominant in our prepared samples. A reduction in the coordination number was also confirmed. The dependence of the electrical conductivity on the frequency was measured by an LCR meter, and the carrier concentration was determined. The magnetization curves for the nanoparticles indicated ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. We concluded that the ferromagnetism originated in oxygen vacancies around the transition metal ions

  5. CO2 and temperature effects on leaf area production in two annual plant species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, D.D.; Coleman, J.S.; Morse, S.R.; Bazzaz, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors studied leaf area production in two annual plant species, Abutilon theophrasti and Amaranthus retroflexus, under three day/night temperature regimes and two concentrations of carbon dioxide. The production of whole-plant leaf area during the first 30 d of growth was analyzed in terms of the leaf initiation rate, leaf expansion, individual leaf area, and, in Amaranthus, production of branch leaves. Temperature and CO 2 influenced leaf area production through effects on the rate of development, determined by the production of nodes on the main stem, and through shifts in the relationship between whole-plant leaf area and the number of main stem nodes. In Abutilon, leaf initiation rate was highest at 38 degree, but area of individual leaves was greatest at 28 degree. Total leaf area was greatly reduced at 18 degree due to slow leaf initiation rates. Elevated CO 2 concentration increased leaf initiation rate at 28 degree, resulting in an increase in whole-part leaf area. In Amaranthus, leaf initiation rate increased with temperature, and was increased by elevated CO 2 at 28 degree. Individual leaf area was greatest at 28 degree, and was increased by elevated CO 2 at 28 degree but decreased at 38 degree. Branch leaf area displayed a similar response to CO 2 , butt was greater at 38 degree. Overall, wholeplant leaf area was slightly increased at 38 degree relative to 28 degree, and elevated CO 2 levels resulted in increased leaf area at 28 degree but decreased leaf area at 38 degree

  6. Effect of oxygen vacancy and dopant concentration on the magnetic properties of high spin Co2+ doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, B.; Choudhury, A.; Maidul Islam, A.K.M.; Alagarsamy, P.; Mukherjee, M.

    2011-01-01

    Co doped TiO 2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a simple sol-gel route taking 7.5, 9.5 and 10.5 mol% of cobalt concentration. Formation of nanoparticles is confirmed by XRD and TEM. Increase in d-spacing occurs for (0 0 4) and (2 0 0) peak with increase in impurity content. Valence states of Co and its presence in the doped material is confirmed by XPS and EDX. The entire vacuum annealed samples show weak ferromagnetism. Increased magnetization is found for 9.5 mol% but this value again decreases for 10.5 mol% due to antiferromagnetic interactions. A blocking temperature of 37.9 K is obtained, which shows shifting to high temperature as the dopant concentration is increased. The air annealed sample shows only paramagnetic behavior. Temperature dependent magnetic measurements for the air annealed sample shows antiferromagnetic behavior with a Curie-Weiss temperature of -16 K. Here we report that oxygen vacancy and cobalt aggregates are a key factor for inducing ferromagnetism-superparamagnetism in the vacuum annealed sample. Appearance of negative Curie-Weiss temperature reveals the presence of antiferromagnetic Co 3 O 4 , which is the oxidation result of metallic Co or cobalt clusters present on the host TiO 2 . - Research highlights: → Oxygen vacancy induces ferromagnetism in cobalt doped anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. → On air annealing the sample loses ferromagnetism giving rise to paramagnetism. → Saturation magnetization decreases at higher doping concentration. → Blocking of magnetic moment occurs due to the presence of cobalt clusters.

  7. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Liger-Belair

    Full Text Available In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2 and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2 and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC, all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2 was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2 visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2 found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2 escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  8. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  9. Interactive effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on coral physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, A. G.; Cai, W.; Warner, M.; Melman, T.; Schoepf, V.; Baumann, J.; Matsui, Y.; Pettay, D. T.; Hoadley, K.; Xu, H.; Wang, Y.; Li, Q.; Hu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Increases in ocean acidification and temperature threaten coral reefs globally. However, the interactive effect of both lower pH and higher temperature on coral physiology and growth are poorly understood. Here, we present preliminary findings from a replicated controlled experiment where four species of corals (Acorpora millepora, Pocillopora damicornis, Montipora monasteriata, Turbinaria reniformis) were reared under the following six treatments for three weeks: 1) 400ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 2) 400ppm CO2 and elevated temperature, 3) 650ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 4) 650ppm CO2 and elevated temperature, 5) 800ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 6) 800ppm CO2 and elevated temperature. Initial findings of photophysiological health (Fv/Fm), calcification rates (as measured by both buoyant weight and the total alkalinity methods), and energy reserves will be presented.

  10. Experimental study of the aqueous CO2-NH3 rate of reaction for temperatures from 15 °C to 35 °C, NH3 concentrations from 5% to 15% and CO2 loadings from 0.2 to 0.6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillia, Stefano; Bonalumi, Davide; Fosbøl, Philip L.

    2018-01-01

    , and lastly CO2 loadings from 0.2 to 0.6. The resulting overall mass transfer coefficient of absorption measured follows the trends described by the modelling of the reactor and the equations used to describe the rate of the absorption reactions. Moreover, the overall mass transfer coefficient of absorption...... loading conditions. The kinetic model intercept the values found in literature in every range of concentration. Consequently, the model is valid in every conditions and the rate of the reaction between NH3 and CO2 in liquid phase is described with an Arrhenius constant with a pre-exponential factor of 1......The absorption reaction between aqueous NH3 and CO2 was studied using the Wetted Wall Column. A total of 27 different cases are investigated in the region defined by temperatures from 15 °C to 35 °C, NH3 concentrations from 5% to 15%, which are the typical solvent conditions in absorption columns...

  11. GWAS of Barley Phenotypes Established Under Future Climate Conditions of Elevated Temperature, CO2, O3 and Elevated Temperature and CO2 Combined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvordsen, Cathrine Heinz; Backes, G.; Lyngkjær, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is likely to decrease crop yields worldwide. Developing climate resilient cultivars is one way to combat this production scarcity, however, little is known of crop response to future climate conditions and in particular the variability within crops.In Scandinavia, barley is widely...... cultivated, but yields have stagnated since the start of this century. In this study we cultivated 138 spring barley accessions in a climate phytotron under four treatments mimicking forecasted levels of temperature, carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and ozone ([O3]) at the end of the 21st century1...... yield, grain protein concentration, grain protein harvested, number of grains, number of ears, aboveground vegetative biomass and harvest index. In addition, stability of the production was calculated over the applied treatments for the assessed parameters.In the climate scenario of elevated temperature...

  12. Enhanced electrocatalytic CO2 reduction via field-induced reagent concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Pang, Yuanjie; Zhang, Bo; de Luna, Phil; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Xu, Jixian; Zheng, Xueli; Dinh, Cao Thang; Fan, Fengjia; Cao, Changhong; de Arquer, F. Pelayo García; Safaei, Tina Saberi; Mepham, Adam; Klinkova, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Filleter, Tobin; Sinton, David; Kelley, Shana O.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO) is the first step in the synthesis of more complex carbon-based fuels and feedstocks using renewable electricity. Unfortunately, the reaction suffers from slow kinetics owing to the low local concentration of CO2 surrounding typical CO2 reduction reaction catalysts. Alkali metal cations are known to overcome this limitation through non-covalent interactions with adsorbed reagent species, but the effect is restricted by the solubility of relevant salts. Large applied electrode potentials can also enhance CO2 adsorption, but this comes at the cost of increased hydrogen (H2) evolution. Here we report that nanostructured electrodes produce, at low applied overpotentials, local high electric fields that concentrate electrolyte cations, which in turn leads to a high local concentration of CO2 close to the active CO2 reduction reaction surface. Simulations reveal tenfold higher electric fields associated with metallic nanometre-sized tips compared to quasi-planar electrode regions, and measurements using gold nanoneedles confirm a field-induced reagent concentration that enables the CO2 reduction reaction to proceed with a geometric current density for CO of 22 milliamperes per square centimetre at -0.35 volts (overpotential of 0.24 volts). This performance surpasses by an order of magnitude the performance of the best gold nanorods, nanoparticles and oxide-derived noble metal catalysts. Similarly designed palladium nanoneedle electrocatalysts produce formate with a Faradaic efficiency of more than 90 per cent and an unprecedented geometric current density for formate of 10 milliamperes per square centimetre at -0.2 volts, demonstrating the wider applicability of the field-induced reagent concentration concept.

  13. Hydrogen purification by selective methanation of CO in CO/CO2/H2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Mette; Johannessen, Tue; Livbjerg, Hans

    down through the reactor and inside the catalyst pellets/particles. The small particles, which have a rather high effectiveness factor with respect to methanation of CO, have a high CO selectivity, whereas the larger pellets have very low selectivity even at high CO inlet concentrations. Negative...... of reaction kinetics and pore diffusion is crucial for interpreting the experimental data. We have found that the selectivity decreases by increasing the reactor temperature or catalyst particle size and when the CO inlet concentration is reduced. As a result, the selectivity drops significantly...... in an integral reactor operating at high CO-conversion. The lower limit of CO concentration in the outlet is determined by the quasi-equilibrium between CO removal and CO production from CO2....

  14. 1.6 μm DIAL Measurement and Back Trajectory Analysis of CO2 Concentration Profiles in the Lower-Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the primary greenhouse gas emitted through human activities. In addition to the ground level CO2 network, vertical CO2 concentration profiles also play an important role for the estimation of the carbon budget and global warming in the inversion method. Especially, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, vertical CO2 concentration profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution in the lower atmosphere have been conducted by a differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We have observed several vertical profiles of CO2 concentrations for nighttime and daytime from 0.25 to 2.5 km altitude with range resolution of 300 m and integration time of 1 hour. In order to extract information on the origin of the CO2 masses, one day back trajectories were calculated by using a three dimensional (3-D) atmospheric transport model. In many cases, CO2 low concentration layers of over 1.5km altitude were flown by westerly winds from the forest. In another case, high concentration layers of CO2 were flown from the urban areas. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature in the atmosphere, laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption spectrum are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature profiles. Moreover, a few processing algorithms of CO2-DIAL are also performed for improvement of measurement accuracy. For computation of trajectories and drawing their figures, the JRA-25 data provided by the cooperative research project for the JRA-25 long-term reanalysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the NIPR trajectory model (Tomikawa and Sato, 2005; http://firp-nitram.nipr.ac.jp) were used. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and

  15. Effects of CO, O2, NO, H2O, and irradiation temperature on the radiation-induced oxidation of SO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Okihiro; Nishimura, Koichi; Suzuki, Nobutake; Washino, Masamitsu

    1977-01-01

    When a SO 2 -H 2 O-O 2 -N 2 gaseous mixture was irradiated by electron beams of 1.5 MeV, SO 2 was easily oxidized to H 2 SO 4 . Effects of CO, O 2 , NO, H 2 O, and irradiation temperature on the radiation-induced oxidation of SO 2 were studied by measuring the SO 2 concentration gas chromatographically. The G(-SO 2 ) increased greatly at the addition of a small amount of O 2 , and then decreased gradually with an increase in the O 2 concentration, i.e., the G(-SO 2 ) values were 0.9, 8.0, and 5.3 for the 0, 0.1, and 20% O 2 concentrations at 100 0 C, respectively (Fig.4). The G(-SO 2 ) was independent of the H 2 O concentration in the range of 0.84 to 8.4% (Fig.5). The G(-SO 2 ) decreased with a rise in the irradiation temperature (Fig.6) and an apparent activation energy of the oxidation reaction of SO 2 obtained was -4.2 kcal.mol -1 . The effects of CO, NO, and O 2 on the G(-SO 2 ) showed that SO 2 was mainly oxidized by OH and O and that the contribution of OH to the oxidation of SO 2 increased with an increase in the O 2 concentration (Table 1). The rate constants for the reactions of SO 2 with OH and O, obtained from competitive reactions of SO 2 with CO and O 2 , were 5.4 x 10 11 cm 3 .mol -1 .sec -1 and 5.0 x 10 11 cm 3 .mol -1 .sec -1 , respectively. (auth.)

  16. Light availability and temperature, not increased CO2, will structure future meadows of Posidonia oceanica

    KAUST Repository

    Hendriks, Iris E.; Olsen, Ylva S.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the photosynthetic performance of Posidonia oceanica during short-term laboratory exposures to ambient and elevated temperatures (24–25°C and 29–30°C) warming and pCO2 (380, 750 and 1000ppm pCO2) under normal and low light conditions (200 and 40μmol photons m−2s−1 respectively). Plant growth was measured at the low light regime and showed a negative response to warming. Light was a critical factor for photosynthetic performance, although we found no evidence of compensation of photosynthetic quantum efficiency in high light. Relative Electron Rate Transport (rETRmax) was higher in plants incubated in high light, but not affected by pCO2 or temperature. The saturation irradiance (Ik) was negatively affected by temperature. We conclude that elevated CO2 does not enhance photosynthetic activity and growth, in the short term for P. oceanica, while temperature has a direct negative effect on growth. Low light availability also negatively affected photosynthetic performance during the short experimental period examined here. Therefore increasing concentrations of CO2 may not compensate for predicted future conditions of warmer water and higher turbidity for seagrass meadows.

  17. Light availability and temperature, not increased CO2, will structure future meadows of Posidonia oceanica

    KAUST Repository

    Hendriks, Iris E.

    2017-02-15

    We evaluated the photosynthetic performance of Posidonia oceanica during short-term laboratory exposures to ambient and elevated temperatures (24–25°C and 29–30°C) warming and pCO2 (380, 750 and 1000ppm pCO2) under normal and low light conditions (200 and 40μmol photons m−2s−1 respectively). Plant growth was measured at the low light regime and showed a negative response to warming. Light was a critical factor for photosynthetic performance, although we found no evidence of compensation of photosynthetic quantum efficiency in high light. Relative Electron Rate Transport (rETRmax) was higher in plants incubated in high light, but not affected by pCO2 or temperature. The saturation irradiance (Ik) was negatively affected by temperature. We conclude that elevated CO2 does not enhance photosynthetic activity and growth, in the short term for P. oceanica, while temperature has a direct negative effect on growth. Low light availability also negatively affected photosynthetic performance during the short experimental period examined here. Therefore increasing concentrations of CO2 may not compensate for predicted future conditions of warmer water and higher turbidity for seagrass meadows.

  18. Seasonal and diel variation in xylem CO2 concentration and sap pH in sub-Mediterranean oak stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomón, Roberto; Valbuena-Carabaña, María; Teskey, Robert; McGuire, Mary Anne; Aubrey, Doug; González-Doncel, Inés; Gil, Luis; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Since a substantial portion of respired CO2 remains within the stem, diel and seasonal trends in stem CO2 concentration ([CO2]) are of major interest in plant respiration and carbon budget research. However, continuous long-term stem [CO2] studies are scarce, and generally absent in Mediterranean climates. In this study, stem [CO2] was monitored every 15min together with stem and air temperature, sap flow, and soil water storage during a growing season in 16 stems of Quercus pyrenaica to elucidate the main drivers of stem [CO2] at different temporal scales. Fluctuations in sap pH were also assessed during two growing seasons to evaluate potential errors in estimates of the concentration of CO2 dissolved in xylem sap ([CO2*]) calculated using Henry's law. Stem temperature was the best predictor of stem [CO2] and explained more than 90% and 50% of the variability in stem [CO2] at diel and seasonal scales, respectively. Under dry conditions, soil water storage was the main driver of stem [CO2]. Likewise, the first rains after summer drought caused intense stem [CO2] pulses, suggesting enhanced stem and root respiration and increased resistance to radial CO2 diffusion. Sap flow played a secondary role in controlling stem [CO2] variations. We observed night-time sap pH acidification and progressive seasonal alkalinization. Thus, if the annual mean value of sap pH (measured at midday) was assumed to be constant, night-time sap [CO2*] was substantially overestimated (40%), and spring and autumn sap [CO2*] were misestimated by 25%. This work highlights that diel and seasonal variations in temperature, tree water availability, and sap pH substantially affect xylem [CO2] and sap [CO2*]. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Evidence for divergence of response in Indica, Japonica, and wild rice to high CO2 x temperature interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies suggest that the intraspecific variability of rice yield response to rising carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], could serve as a basis of selection to improve genotypes for future high CO2 conditions. However, assessment of responses to elevated [CO2] must consider air temperature,...

  20. Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration on the Biomasses and Nitrogen Concentrations in the Organs of Sainfoin(Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zheng-chao; SHANGGUAN Zhou-ping

    2009-01-01

    In forage grasses,the nitrogen concentration is directly related to the nutritional value.The studies examined the hypothesis that global elevation of CO2 concentration probably affects the biomass,nitrogen(N)concentration,and allocation and distribution patterns in the organs of forage grasses.While sainfoin(Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop.)seedlings grew on a low nutrient soil in closed chambers for 90 days,they were exposed to two CO2 concentrations(ambient or ambient+350μmol mol-1 CO2)without adding nutrients to them.After 90 days exposure to CO2,the biomasses of leaves,stems,and roots,and N concentrations and contents of different parts were measured.Compared with the ambient CO2 concentration,the elevated CO2 concentration increased the total dry matter by 25.07%,mainly due to the root and leaf having positive response to the elevated CO2 concentration.However,the elevated CO2 concentration did not change the proportions of the dry matters in different parts and the total plants compared with the ambient CO2 concentration.The elevated CO2 concentration lowered the N concentrations of the plant parts.Because the dry matter was higher,the elevated CO2 concentration had no effect on the N content in the plants compared to the ambient CO2 concentration.The elevated CO2 concentration promoted N allocations of the different parts significantly and increased N allocation of the underground part.The results have confirmed the previous suggestions that the elevated CO2 concentration stimulates plant biomass production and decreases the N concentrations of the plant parts.

  1. Dynamics of soil CO 2 efflux under varying atmospheric CO 2 concentrations reveal dominance of slow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohyoung Kim; Ram Oren; James S. Clark; Sari Palmroth; A. Christopher Oishi; Heather R. McCarthy; Chris A. Maier; Kurt Johnsen

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effect on soil CO2 efflux (FCO2) of sudden changes in photosynthetic rates by altering CO2 concentration in plots subjected to +200 ppmv for 15 years. Five-day intervals of exposure to elevated CO2 (eCO2) ranging 1.0–1.8 times ambient did not affect FCO2. FCO2 did not decrease until 4 months after termination of the long-term eCO2 treatment, longer...

  2. Effect of thermal treatments and Co concentration on the structural and luminescent properties of sputtered TiO{sub 2}:Co films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona-Rodriguez, J. [Instituto Tecnologico Superior de Poza Rica, Luis Donaldo Colosio, S/N Col. Arroyo del Maiz, 93230 Poza Rica, Veracruz (Mexico); Rodriguez-Melgarejo, F.; Hernandez-Landaverde, M.A.; Urbina-Alvarez, J.E.; Marquez-Marin, J.; Zuniga-Romero, C.; Jimenez-Sandoval, S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, A.P. 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Vargas, S.; Estevez, M. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, UNAM, Campus Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Rodriguez, R. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, UNAM, Campus Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Division de Ciencias de la Salud, UVM, Campus Queretaro, Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2012-11-15

    Thin films of Co-doped titania were grown at room temperature by rf reactive co-sputtering. A post-growth annealing procedure was carried out at 300, 450, and 750 C in an inert argon atmosphere. The samples were studied using X-ray diffraction, micro Raman, UV-Vis, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. The properties of the films were analyzed as a function of the Co concentration and the annealing temperature. The as-grown films were amorphous; however, after a thermal annealing procedure the samples presented a Co-concentration-dependent transition to the anatase phase. In particular, the samples annealed at 300 C showed a strong and broad PL signal that was quenched after exposure to an Ar{sup +} laser beam ({lambda} = 488.0 nm) focused through a microscope objective. The emission properties of the films have been ascribed to defects arising during the amorphous-anatase structural phase transition. It was also shown that the intensity and quenching rate of the PL depended upon the Co concentration and the annealing temperature. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  4. Interactions of CO{sub 2} with temperature and other climate variables: response of vegetation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipling, E.B.

    1995-02-28

    The overall objectives of this project were: (1) to examine experimentally, for major crop species, the interacting effects of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and water availability on plant growth and development, (2) to model these interactions, and (3) to continue developing physiologically-based mechanistic models for predicting crop response to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and future global climate change. To meet these objectives, controlled-environment studies were conducted on cotton, lemon, rice, and soybean and a long-term open-top chamber study was continued on orange. Much progress was made on development of plant growth models for cotton, wheat, rice, and soybean. In addition, there were two special modeling efforts which have the potential for contributing to all of the crop models. These efforts are concerned with modeling root growth and physical and chemical processes in soil and with modeling the effect of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates as a function of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and vapor pressure deficit. The root growth and soil process modeling is important because it enables us to estimate the water available to the plant. The modeling of effects of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates enables them to estimate dry weight gain and water use by the plant. These are both important components of the interaction of CO{sub 2} concentration with temperature and water availability. The work on stomatal aperture, photosynthesis, and transpiration has the added benefit of allowing us to improve predictions of energy partitioning by the terrestrial biosphere. The lack of realistic energy partitioning is a serious deficiency of the present general circulation models which are used to predict how climate will change. An additional important aspect of the rice experiments is a study of methane emissions of paddy-grown (i.e., flooded) rice grown under two levels of CO{sub 2} and three

  5. Gas exchange, growth, and defense responses of invasive Alliaria petiolata (Brassicaceae) and native Geum vernum (Rosaceae) to elevated atmospheric CO2 and warm spring temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laurel J; Cipollini, Don

    2013-08-01

    Global increases in atmospheric CO2 and temperature may interact in complex ways to influence plant physiology and growth, particularly for species that grow in cool, early spring conditions in temperate forests. Plant species may also vary in their responses to environmental changes; fast-growing invasives may be more responsive to rising CO2 than natives and may increase production of allelopathic compounds under these conditions, altering species' competitive interactions. We examined growth and physiological responses of Alliaria petiolata, an allelopathic, invasive herb, and Geum vernum, a co-occurring native herb, to ambient and elevated spring temperatures and atmospheric CO2 conditions in a factorial growth chamber experiment. At 5 wk, leaves were larger at high temperature, and shoot biomass increased under elevated CO2 only at high temperature in both species. As temperatures gradually warmed to simulate seasonal progression, G. vernum became responsive to CO2 at both temperatures, whereas A. petiolata continued to respond to elevated CO2 only at high temperature. Elevated CO2 increased thickness and decreased nitrogen concentrations in leaves of both species. Alliaria petiolata showed photosynthetic downregulation at elevated CO2, whereas G. vernum photosynthesis increased at elevated temperature. Flavonoid and cyanide concentrations decreased significantly in A. petiolata leaves in the elevated CO2 and temperature treatment. Total glucosinolate concentrations and trypsin inhibitor activities did not vary among treatments. Future elevated spring temperatures and CO2 will interact to stimulate growth for A. petiolata and G. vernum, but there may be reduced allelochemical effects in A. petiolata.

  6. CO2 Fluxes and Concentrations in a Residential Area in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissert, L. F.; Salmond, J. A.; Turnbull, J. C.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2014-12-01

    While cities are generally major sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, recent research has shown that parts of urban areas may also act as CO2 sinks due to CO2 uptake by vegetation. However, currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods and the limited number of studies available from urban areas, particularly from the southern hemisphere. In this study, we explore the potential of eddy covariance and tracer measurements (13C and 14C isotopes of CO2) to quantify and partition CO2 fluxes and concentrations in a residential urban area in Auckland, New Zealand. Based on preliminary results from autumn and winter (March to July 2014) the residential area is a small source of CO2 (0.11 mol CO2 m-2 day-1). CO2 fluxes and concentrations follow a distinct diurnal cycle with a morning peak between 7:00 and 9:00 (max: 0.25 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/412 ppm) and midday low with negative CO2 fluxes (min: -0.17 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/392 ppm) between 10:00 and 15:00 local time, likely due to photosynthetic CO2 uptake by local vegetation. Soil CO2 efflux may explain that CO2 concentrations increase and remain high (401 ppm) throughout the night. Mean diurnal winter δ13C values are in anti-phase with CO2 concentrations and vary between -9.0 - -9.7‰. The depletion of δ13C compared to clean atmospheric air (-8.2‰) is likely a result of local CO2 sources dominated by gasoline combustion (appr. 60%) during daytime. A sector analysis (based on prevailing wind) of CO2 fluxes and concentrations indicates lower CO2 fluxes and concentrations from the vegetation-dominated sector, further demonstrating the influence of vegetation on local CO2 concentrations. These results provide an insight into the temporal and spatial variability CO2 fluxes/concentrations and potential CO2 sinks and sources from a city in the southern hemisphere and add valuable information to the global database of urban CO2 fluxes.

  7. Effect of CO2 Concentration on Growth and Biochemical Composition of Newly Isolated Indigenous Microalga Scenedesmus bajacalifornicus BBKLP-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Lakkanagouda; Kaliwal, Basappa

    2017-05-01

    Photosynthetic mitigation of CO 2 through microalgae is gaining great importance due to its higher photosynthetic ability compared to plants, and the biomass can be commercially exploited for various applications. CO 2 fixation capability of the newly isolated freshwater microalgae Scenedesmus bajacalifornicus BBKLP-07 was investigated using a 1-l photobioreactor. The cultivation was carried at varying concentration of CO 2 ranging from 5 to 25%, and the temperature and light intensities were kept constant. A maximum CO 2 fixation rate was observed at 15% CO 2 concentration. Characteristic growth parameters such as biomass productivity, specific growth rate, and maximum biomass yield, and biochemical parameters such as carbohydrate, protein, lipid, chlorophyll, and carotenoid were determined and discussed. It was observed that the effect of CO 2 concentration on growth and biochemical composition was quite significant. The maximum biomass productivity was 0.061 ± 0.0007 g/l/day, and the rate of CO 2 fixation was 0.12 ± 0.002 g/l/day at 15% CO 2 concentration. The carbohydrate and lipid content were maximum at 25% CO 2 with 26.19 and 25.81% dry cell weight whereas protein, chlorophyll, and carotenoid contents were 32.89% dry cell weight, 25.07 μg/ml and 6.15 μg/ml respectively at 15% CO 2 concentration.

  8. The ignition delay, laminar flame speed and adiabatic temperature characteristics of n-pentane, n-hexane and n-heptane under O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ran [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion; Wuhan Textile Univ. (China). School of Environment and Urban Construction; Liu, Hao; Zhong, Xiaojiao; Wang, Zijian; Jin, Ziqin; Qiu, Jianrong [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion; Chen, Yingming [Wuhan Textile Univ. (China). School of Environment and Urban Construction

    2013-07-01

    Oxy-fuel (O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) combustion is one of the several promising new technologies which can realize the integrated control of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X} and other pollutants. However, when fuels are burned in the high CO{sub 2} concentration environment, the combustion characteristics can be very different from conventional air-fired combustion. Such changes imply that the high CO{sub 2} concentration atmosphere has impacts on the combustion processes. In this paper, the ignition time, laminar flame speed and adiabatic temperature property of C{sub 5} {proportional_to} C{sub 7} n-alkane fuels were studied under both ordinary air atmosphere and O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmospheres over a wide range of CO{sub 2} concentration in the combustion systems. A new unified detailed chemical kinetic model was validated and used to simulate the three liquid hydrocarbon fuel's flame characteristics. Based on the verified model, the influences of various parameters (atmosphere, excess oxygen ratio, O{sub 2} concentration, CO{sub 2} concentration, and alkane type) on the C{sub 5} {proportional_to} C{sub 7} n-alkane's flame characteristics were systematically investigated. It can be concluded that high CO{sub 2} concentration atmosphere has negative effect on n-pentane, n-hexane and n-heptane flame's ignition, laminar flame speed and adiabatic temperature. Besides, this work confirms that high CO{sub 2} concentration atmosphere's chemical effects play a pronounced role on the flame characteristics, especially for the ignition time property.

  9. Specific radioactivity of glycolate and photorespiration during 14CO2 assimilation at four different CO2 concentrations by sunflower and bean leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fock, H.; Klug, K.; Krampitz, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Using an open gas-exchange system, the rates of apparent CO 2 uptake (APS), true CO 2 uptake (TIPS), CO 2 evolution in light (PR), and the relative specific radioactivity of photorespiration (RSA) by sunflower and bean leaves were measured at four different CO 2 concentrations. At the end of the 14 CO 2 assimilation period the leaves were killed and extract for the analysis of glycolic acid. The rate of PR was CO 2 independent at low and normal CO 2 concentrations but inreased at CO 2 concentrations above normal. The ratio of PR/TPS which declined with an increase in CO 2 was compatible with the ratio of vo/2vo of the RuBP-Carboxylase/Oxygenase reaction. At low and normal concentrations of CO 2 the concentration as well as the specific radioactivity of glycolic acid increased with an increase in CO 2 and the relative specific activity (RSA) of glycolic acid resembled the RSA of photorespiration. It was concluded that these results support the concept of RuBP-carboxylase/oxygenase regulating the fluxes of carbon via the photosynthetic carbon reduction and the glycolate pathway. (orig.) [de

  10. Ecological imperatives for aquatic CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2017-06-01

    In aquatic environments, the concentration of inorganic carbon is spatially and temporally variable and CO2 can be substantially oversaturated or depleted. Depletion of CO2 plus low rates of diffusion cause inorganic carbon to be more limiting in aquatic than terrestrial environments, and the frequency of species with a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and their contribution to productivity, is correspondingly greater. Aquatic photoautotrophs may have biochemical or biophysical CCMs and exploit CO2 from the sediment or the atmosphere. Though partly constrained by phylogeny, CCM activity is related to environmental conditions. CCMs are absent or down-regulated when their increased energy costs, lower CO2 affinity, or altered mineral requirements outweigh their benefits. Aquatic CCMs are most widespread in environments with low CO2, high HCO3-, high pH, and high light. Freshwater species are generally less effective at inorganic carbon removal than marine species, but have a greater range of ability to remove carbon, matching the environmental variability in carbon availability. The diversity of CCMs in seagrasses and marine phytoplankton, and detailed mechanistic studies on larger aquatic photoautotrophs are understudied. Strengthening the links between ecology and CCMs will increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ecological success and will place mechanistic studies in a clearer ecological context. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Changes in concentration and (delta) 13C value of dissolved CH4, CO2 and organic carbon in rice paddies under ambient and elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiguo Cheng; Yagi, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hua Xu; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Changes in concentration and (delta) 13 C value of dissolved CH 4 , CO 2 and organic carbon (DOC) in floodwater and soil solution from a Japanese rice paddy were studied under ambient and elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 in controlled environment chambers. The concentrations of dissolved CH 4 in floodwater increased with rice growth (with some fluctuation), while the concentrations of CO 2 remained between 2.9 to 4.4 and 4.2 to 5.8 μg C mL -1 under conditions of ambient and elevated CO 2 concentration, respectively. The amount of CH 4 dissolved in soil solution under elevated CO 2 levels was significantly lower than under ambient CO 2 in the tillering stage, implying that the elevated CO 2 treatment accelerated CH 4 oxidation during the early stage of growth. However, during later stages of growth, production of CH 4 increased and the amount of CH 4 dissolved in soil solution under elevated CO 2 levels was, on average, greater than that under ambient CO 2 conditions. Significant correlation existed among the (delta) 13 C values of dissolved CH 4 , CO 2 , and DOC in floodwater (except for the samples taken immediately after pulse feeding with 13 C enriched CO 2 ), indicating that the origins and cycling of CH 4 , CO 2 and DOC were related. There were also significant correlations among the (delta) 13 C values of CH 4 , CO 2 and DOC in the soil solution. The turnover rate of CO 2 in soil solution was most rapid in the panicle formation stage of rice growth and that of CH 4 fastest in the grain filling stage. (Author)

  12. Response of Sphagnum mosses to increased CO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhiainen, J.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to study the effects of different CO 2 concentration and N deposition rates on Sphagna adapted to grow along a nutrient availability gradient (i.e. ombrotrophy-mesotrophy-eutrophy). The study investigated: (i) the effects of various longterm CO 2 concentrations on the rate of net photosynthesis in Sphagna, (ii) the effects of the CO 2 and N treatments on the moss density, shoot dry masses, length increment and dry mass production in Sphagna, (iii) the concentrations of the major nutrients in Sphagna after prolonged exposure to the CO 2 and N treatments, and (iv) species dependent differences in potential NH 4 + and NO 3 - uptake rates. The internal nutrient concentration of the capitulum and the production of biomass were effected less by the elevated CO 2 concentrations because the availability of N was a controlling factor. In addition responses to the N treatments were related to ecological differences between the Sphagna species. Species with a high tolerance of N availability were able to acclimatise to the increased N deposition rates. The data suggests a high nutrient status is less significant than the adaptation of the Sphagna to their ecological niche (e.g. low tolerance of meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii to high N deposition rate). At the highest N deposition rate the ombrotrophic S. fuscum had the highest increase in tissue N concentration among the Sphagna studied. S. fuscum almost died at the highest N deposition rate because of the damaging effects of N to the plant's metabolism. Ombrotrophic hummock species such as S. fuscum, were also found to have the highest potential N uptake rate (on density of dry mass basis) compared to lawn species. The rate of net photosynthesis was initially increased with elevated CO 2 concentrations, but photosynthesis was down regulated with prolonged exposure to CO 2 . The water use efficiency in Sphagna appeared not to be coupled with exposure to the long-term CO 2 concentration. The

  13. The optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration for the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming

    2015-07-20

    This study examined the optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration of the CO2 fertilization effect on the growth of winter wheat with growth chambers where the CO2 concentration was controlled at 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 ppm respectively. I found that initial increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration dramatically enhanced winter wheat growth through the CO2 fertilization effect. However, this CO2 fertilization effect was substantially compromised with further increase in CO2 concentration, demonstrating an optimal CO2 concentration of 889.6, 909.4, and 894.2 ppm for aboveground, belowground, and total biomass, respectively, and 967.8 ppm for leaf photosynthesis. Also, high CO2 concentrations exceeding the optima not only reduced leaf stomatal density, length and conductance, but also changed the spatial distribution pattern of stomata on leaves. In addition, high CO2 concentration also decreased the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc(max)) and the maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) of leaf photosynthesis. However, the high CO2 concentration had little effect on leaf length and plant height. The optimal CO2 fertilization effect found in this study can be used as an indicator in selecting and breeding new wheat strains in adapting to future high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Dual Phase Membrane for High Temperature CO2 Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Lin

    2007-06-30

    This project aimed at synthesis of a new inorganic dual-phase carbonate membrane for high temperature CO{sub 2} separation. Metal-carbonate dual-phase membranes were prepared by the direct infiltration method and the synthesis conditions were optimized. Permeation tests for CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from 450-750 C showed very low permeances of those two gases through the dual-phase membrane, which was expected due to the lack of ionization of those two particular gases. Permeance of the CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} mixture was much higher, indicating that the gases do form an ionic species, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, enhancing transport through the membrane. However, at temperatures in excess of 650 C, the permeance of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} decreased rapidly, while predictions showed that permeance should have continued to increase with temperature. XRD data obtained from used membrane indicated that lithium iron oxides formed on the support surface. This lithium iron oxide layer has a very low conductivity, which drastically reduces the flow of electrons to the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture; thus limiting the formation of the ionic species required for transport through the membrane. These results indicated that the use of stainless steel supports in a high temperature oxidative environment can lead to decreased performance of the membranes. This revelation created the need for an oxidation resistant support, which could be gained by the use of a ceramic-type membrane. Work was extended to synthesize a new inorganic dual-phase carbonate membrane for high temperature CO{sub 2} separation. Helium permeance of the support before and after infiltration of molten carbonate are on the order of 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -10} moles/m{sup 2} {center_dot} Pa {center_dot} s respectively, indicating that the molten carbonate is able to sufficiently infiltrate the membrane. It was found that La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) was a suitable candidate for the support

  15. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  16. Arrangement of experiments for simulating the effects of elevated temperatures and elevated CO2 levels on field-sown crops in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaija Hakala

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental plants: spring wheat, winterwheat, spring barley, meadow fescue, potato, strawberry and black currant were sown or planted directly in the field, part of which was covered by an automatically controlled greenhouse to elevate the temperature by 3°C. The temperature of the other part of the field (open field was not elevated, but the field was covered with the same plastic film as the greenhouse to achieve radiation and rainfall conditions comparable to those in the greenhouse. To elevate the CO2 concentrations, four open top chambers (OTC were built for the greenhouse, and four for the open field. Two of these, both in the greenhouse and in the open field, were supplied with pure CO2 to elevate their CO2 level to 700 ppm. The temperatures inside the greenhouse followed accurately the desired level. The relative humidity was somewhat higher in the greenhouse and in the OTC:s than in the open field, especially after the modifications in the ventilation of the greenhouse and in the OTC:s in 1994. Because the OTC:s were large (3 m in diameter, the temperatures inside them differed very little from the surrounding air temperature. The short-term variation in the CO2 concentrations in the OTC:s with elevated CO2 was, however, quite high. The control of the CO2 concentrations improved each year from 1992 to 1994, as the CO2 supplying system was modified. The effects of the experimental conditions on plant growth and phenology are discussed.

  17. Arrangement of experiments for simulating the effects of elevated temperatures and elevated CO2 levels on field-sown crops in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. HAKALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The experimental plants: spring wheat, winter wheat, spring barley, meadow fescue, potato, strawberry and black currant were sown or planted directly in the field, part of which was covered by an automatically controlled greenhouse to elevate the temperature by 3°C. The temperature of the other part of the field (open field was not elevated, but the field was covered with the same plastic film as the greenhouse to achieve radiation and rainfall conditions comparable to those in the greenhouse. To elevate the CO2 concentrations, four open top chambers (OTC were built for the greenhouse, and four for the open field. Two of these, both in the greenhouse and in the open field, were supplied with pure CO2 to elevate their CO2 level to 700 ppm. The temperatures inside the greenhouse followed accurately the desired level. The relative humidity was somewhat higher in the greenhouse and in the OTC:s than in the open field, especially after the modifications in the ventilation of the greenhouse and in the OTC:s in 1994. Because the OTC:s were large (3 m in diameter, the temperatures inside them differed very little from the surrounding air temperature. The short-term variation in the CO2 concentrations in the OTC:s with elevated CO2 was, however, quite high. The control of the CO2 concentrations improved each year from 1992 to 1994, as the CO2 supplying system was modified. The effects of the experimental conditions on plant growth and phenology are discussed.;

  18. Simulation of spring wheat responses to elevated CO2 and temperature by using CERES-wheat crop model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. LAURILA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The CERES-wheat crop simulation model was used to estimate the changes in phenological development and yield production of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Polkka under different temperature and CO2 growing conditions. The effects of elevated temperature (3-4°C and CO2 concentration (700 ppm as expected for Finland in 2100 were simulated. The model was calibrated for long-day growing conditions in Finland. The CERES-wheat genetic coefficients for cv. Polkka were calibrated by using the MTT Agrifood Research Finland (MTT official variety trial data (1985-1990. Crop phenological development and yield measurements from open-top chamber experiments with ambient and elevated temperature and CO2 treatments were used to validate the model. Simulated mean grain yield under ambient temperature and CO2 conditions was 6.16 t ha-1 for potential growth (4.49 t ha-1 non-potential and 5.47 t ha-1 for the observed average yield (1992-1994 in ambient open-top chamber conditions. The simulated potential grain yield increased under elevated CO2 (700 ppm to 142% (167% non-potential from the simulated reference yield (100%, ambient temperature and CO2 350 ppm. Simulations for current sowing date and elevated temperature (3°C indicate accelerated anthesis and full maturity. According to the model estimations, potential yield decreased on average to 80.4% (76.8% non-potential due to temperature increase from the simulated reference. When modelling the concurrent elevated temperature and CO2 interaction, the increase in grain yield due to elevated CO2 was reduced by the elevated temperature. The combined CO2 and temperature effect increased the grain yield to 106% for potential growth (122% non-potential compared to the reference. Simulating the effects of earlier sowing, the potential grain yield increased under elevated temperature and CO2 conditions to 178% (15 days earlier sowing from 15 May, 700 ppm CO2, 3°C from the reference. Simulation results suggest

  19. 大气CO2浓度和温度升高对岷江冷杉(Abies faxoniana)幼苗针叶化学特性的影响%Effects of Elevated CO2 and Temperature on Needle Chemistry of Abies faxoniana Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李守剑; 宋贺; 王进闯; 张远彬

    2012-01-01

    The subalpine coniferous forests in eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau provide a natural laboratory for studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about the effects of elevated CO; and temperature on leaf chemistry of tree seedlings. 6-year-old Abies faxoniana seedlings were grown under control (CON, ambient CO2 concentration and temperature), elevated CO2 concentration (EC, ambient CO2 concentration + 347 μmol mol-1, ambient temperature), elevated temperature (ET, ambient temperature + 2.2 ℃, ambient CO2 concentration) and the interaction with elevated CO2 concentration and temperature (ECT, ambient CO2 concentration + 345 umol mol-1, ambient temperature + 2.1 ℃) in environment-controlled chambers. After 2 growing seasons, seedlings were harvested and measured for needle chlorophyll, C, N, P and soluble sugar, starch and cellulose in current-year and one-year-old needles. Compared with CON, EC did not affect chlorophyll in current-year and one-year-old needles, but led to a decline of needle N and P, as well as lower cellulose in needles at two layers. EC induced an increase in the concentrations of soluble sugar and starch in needles. Elevated temperature tended to reduce Chl b concentration in one-year-old needle. Needle N, P and cellulose concentrations in current-year and one-year-old needles were lower under elevated temperature than ambient temperature. Soluble sugar and starch concentrations in needles tended to increase with elevated temperature. Significant combination effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on needle chlorophyll, N, P and carbohydrates were found, Both elevated CO, and temperature may alter leaf chemistry, indicating climate change may influence not only biochemical processes of leaves but also fundamental ecosystem processes, such as litter decomposition.%以6年生岷江冷杉(Abies faxoniana)幼苗为研究对象,利用控制环境生长室进行了2个生长季的大气CO2

  20. Carbon Balance at Landscape Level inferred fromTower CO2 Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, B.; Higuchi, K.; Chan, D.; Shashkov, A.; Lin, H.; Liu, J.

    2003-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon sinks are considerable in the global carbon budget, but the accumulation of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is very small (~0.2% per year) relative to the total carbon stocks in forests. Currently, eddy-covariance instruments mounted on towers are the only reliable means to measure carbon balance of a land surface, albeit limited to small areas and not free of caveats. In our quest of understanding the collective performance of ecosystems under the changing climate, it is highly desirable to have the ability to acquire carbon cycle information for large areas (landscape) consisting of patches of different ecosystems. For this purpose we explored methodologies of inferring carbon cycle information from tower CO2 concentration measurements affected by large areas (100-10000 km2). An ecosystem model named Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) is coupled with a carbon-specific Vertical Diffusion Scheme (VDS) in order to decipher temporal variations in CO2 for landscape-level photosynthesis and respiration information. The coupled BEPS-VDS is applied to a unique 9-year (1990-2000 with 1997-8 missing data) 5-minute CO2 record measured on a 40-m tower over boreal forests near Fraserdale, Ontario, Canada. Over the period, the mean diurnal amplitude of the measured CO2 at 40 m increased by 5.58 ppmv, or 28% in the growing season. The increase in nighttime ecosystem respiration, causing the increase in the daily maximum CO2 concentration, was responsible for 65% of the increase in the diurnal amplitude, i.e., 3.61 ppmv, corresponding to an increase in the mean daily air temperature by about 2.77 degC and precipitation by 5% over the same period. The rest (35%) is explained by the increase in ecosystem daytime photosynthesis, causing the decrease in the daily minimum CO2 concentration. As the nighttime stable boundary layer (SBL) (270-560 m) was much shallower than the daytime convective boundary layer (CBL) (1000-1600 m), the increase in

  1. Effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature on photosynthesis and leaf traits of an understory dwarf bamboo in subalpine forest zone, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongping Li; Yuanbin Zhang; Xiaolu Zhang; Chunyang Li [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Korpelainenc, H. [Univ. of Helsinki. Dept. of Agricultural Sciences, Helsinki (Finland); Berningerd, F. [Univ. of Helsinki. Dept. of Forest Sciences, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-06-01

    The dwarf bamboo (Fargesia rufa Yi), growing understory in subalpine dark coniferous forest, is one of the main foods for giant panda, and it influences the regeneration of subalpine coniferous forests in southwestern China. To investigate the effects of elevated CO{sub 2}, temperature and their combination, the dwarf bamboo plantlets were exposed to two CO{sub 2} regimes (ambient and double ambient CO{sub 2} concentration) and two temperatures (ambient and +2.2 deg. C) in growth chambers. Gas exchange, leaf traits and carbohydrates concentration were measured after the 150-day experiment. Elevated CO{sub 2} significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (A{sub net}), intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUE{sub i}) and carbon isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) and decreased stomatal conductance (g{sub s}) and total chlorophyll concentration based on mass (Chl{sub m}) and area (Chl{sub a}). On the other hand, elevated CO{sub 2} decreased specific leaf area (SLA), which was increased by elevated temperature. Elevated CO{sub 2} also increased foliar carbon concentration based on mass (C{sub m}) and area (C{sub a}), nitrogen concentration based on area (N{sub a}), carbohydrates concentration (i.e. sucrose, sugar, starch and non-structural carbohydrates) and the slope of the A{sub net}-N{sub a} relationship. However, elevated temperature decreased C{sub m}, C{sub a} and N{sub a}. The combination of elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature hardly affected SLA, C{sub m}, C{sub a}, N{sub m}, N{sub a}, Chl{sub m} and Chl{sub a}. Variables A{sub net} and N{sub a} had positive linear relationships in all treatments. Our results showed that photosynthetic acclimation did not occur in dwarf bamboo at elevated CO{sub 2} and it could adjust physiology and morphology to enable the capture of more light, to increase WUE and improve nutritional conditions. (Author)

  2. The effect of elevated CO{sub 2} concentration on photosynthesis of Sphagnum fuscum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J; Silvola, J [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of the research were to measure photosynthesis of Sphagnum fuscum in long term exposure to four CO{sub 2} levels at semi-natural conditions, to find out if there is an acclimation of net photosynthesis into prevailing CO{sub 2} concentrations and to measure the moisture dependent net photosynthesis at various CO{sub 2} concentrations of samples grown at different CO{sub 2} concentrations

  3. The effect of elevated CO{sub 2} concentration on photosynthesis of Sphagnum fuscum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J.; Silvola, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    The objectives of the research were to measure photosynthesis of Sphagnum fuscum in long term exposure to four CO{sub 2} levels at semi-natural conditions, to find out if there is an acclimation of net photosynthesis into prevailing CO{sub 2} concentrations and to measure the moisture dependent net photosynthesis at various CO{sub 2} concentrations of samples grown at different CO{sub 2} concentrations

  4. Nutrient concentrations in a Littorella uniflora community at higher CO2 concentrations and reduced light intensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Andersen, F. Ø.

    2005-01-01

    laboratory experiments with isoetid vegetation (Littorella uniflora) where water column CO2 and light could be manipulated in order to test whether (i) light and CO2 availability affect nutrient concentrations in isoetid vegetation, and (ii) if changes in light and CO2 climate affect fluxes of inorganic...... nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from sediment to water column, which potentially could result in increased growth of epiphytic algae. 3. The results showed that the standing stocks of phosphorus and nitrogen in the L. uniflora vegetation were significantly influenced by CO2 concentration and light...... intensity. Both standing stocks of P and N were significantly higher in the mesocosm treatments with high CO2 concentration than in those at low CO2 concentration. Similarly, standing stocks of P and N enhanced with increasing light intensity. 4. Measurements of nutrient fluxes both in the field...

  5. Tree and forest water use under elevated CO2 and temperature in Scandinavian boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg Hasper, Thomas; Wallin, Göran; Lamba, Shubhangi; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Medhurst, Jane L.; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Uddling, Johan

    2014-05-01

    According to experimental studies and models, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have the potential to affect stomatal conductance and, consequently, tree and forest transpiration. This effect has in turn the capacity to influence the terrestrial energy and water balance, including affecting of the magnitude of river runoff. Furthermore, forest productivity is currently water-limited in southern Scandinavia and in a near future, under the projected climatic change, this limitation may become a reality in the central and northern parts of Scandinavia. In this study we examine the water-use responses in 12 40-year old native boreal Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees exposed to a factorial combination of two levels of [CO2] (ambient and doubled) and temperature (ambient and +2.8 °C in summer / +5.6 °C in winter), as well as of entire boreal forests to temporal variation in [CO2], temperature and precipitation over the past 50 years in central and northern Sweden. The controlled factorial CO2 and temperature whole-tree chamber experiment at Flakaliden study site demonstrated that Norway spruce trees lacked elevated [CO2]-induced water savings at guard cell, shoot, and tree levels in the years of measurements. Experimentally, elevated temperature did not result in increased shoot or tree water use as stomatal closure fully cancelled the effect of higher vapour pressure deficit in warmed air environment. Consistent with these results, large scale river runoff data and evapotranspiration estimates from large forested watersheds in central Sweden supported lack of elevated CO2-mediated water savings, and rather suggested that the increasing evapotranspiration trend found in this study was primarily linked to increasing precipitation, rising temperature and more efficient forest management. The results from the whole-tree chamber experiment and boreal forested watersheds have important implications for more accurate

  6. Temperature versus plant effects on diel dynamics of soil CO2 production and efflux: a controlled environment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinthaler, David; Roy, Jacques; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clement; Resco de Dios, Victor; Bahn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is the biggest source of CO2 emitted from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Therefore the understanding of its drivers is of major importance for models of carbon cycling. Next to temperature as a major abiotic factor, photosynthesis has been suggested as an important driver influencing diel patterns in Rs. Under natural conditions it is difficult to disentangle abiotic and biotic effects on soil CO2 production, as fluctuating light intensity affects both photosynthetic activity and soil temperature. To analyse individual and combined effects of soil temperature and light on the dynamics of soil CO2 production and efflux, we performed a controlled environment study at the ECOTRON facility in Montpellier. The study manipulated temperature and photosynthetically active radiation independently and was carried out in large macrocosms, hosting canopies of either a woody (cotton) or a herbaceous (bean) crop. In each macrocosm membrane tubes had been installed across the soil profile for continuous measurement of soil CO2 concentrations. In addition, an automated soil respiration system was installed in each macrocosm, whose data were also used for validating a model of soil CO2 production and transport based on the concentration profiles. Both for cotton and for bean canopies, under conditions of naturally fluctuating temperature and light conditions, soil CO2 production and efflux followed a clear diel pattern. Under constantly dark conditions (excluding immediate effects of photosynthesis) and constant temperature, no significant diel changes in Rs could be observed. Furthermore, soil CO2 production and efflux did not increase significantly upon exposure of previously darkened macrocosms to light. Under constant temperature and fluctuating light conditions, we observed a dampened diel pattern of Rs, which did not match diurnal solar cycles. A detailed residual analysis accounting for temporal trends in soil moisture suggested a significant

  7. Effects of increasing temperature and, CO2 on quality of litter, shredders, and microorganisms in Amazonian aquatic systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Tavares Martins

    Full Text Available Climate change may affect the chemical composition of riparian leaf litter and, aquatic organisms and, consequently, leaf breakdown. We evaluated the effects of different scenarios combining increased temperature and carbon dioxide (CO2 on leaf detritus of Hevea spruceana (Benth Müll. and decomposers (insect shredders and microorganisms. We hypothesized that simulated climate change (warming and elevated CO2 would: i decrease leaf-litter quality, ii decrease survival and leaf breakdown by shredders, and iii increase microbial leaf breakdown and fungal biomass. We performed the experiment in four microcosm chambers that simulated air temperature and CO2 changes in relation to a real-time control tracking current conditions in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. The experiment lasted seven days. During the experiment mean air temperature and CO2 concentration ranged from 26.96 ± 0.98ºC and 537.86 ± 18.36 ppmv in the control to 31.75 ± 0.50ºC and 1636.96 ± 17.99 ppmv in the extreme chamber, respectively. However, phosphorus concentration in the leaf litter decreased with warming and elevated CO2. Leaf quality (percentage of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, cellulose and lignin was not influenced by soil flooding. Fungal biomass and microbial leaf breakdown were positively influenced by temperature and CO2 increase and reached their highest values in the intermediate condition. Both total and shredder leaf breakdown, and shredder survival rate were similar among all climatic conditions. Thus, low leaf-litter quality due to climate change and higher leaf breakdown under intermediate conditions may indicate an increase of riparian metabolism due to temperature and CO2 increase, highlighting the risk (e.g., decreased productivity of global warming for tropical streams.

  8. Enhanced Intermediate-Temperature CO2 Splitting Using Nonstoichiometric Ceria and Ceria-Zirconia

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2017-08-24

    CO2 splitting via thermo-chemical or reactive redox has emerged as a novel and promising carbon-neutral energy solution. Its performance depends critically on the properties of the oxygen carriers (OC). Ceria is recognized as one of the most promising OC candidates, because of its fast chemistry, high ionic diffusivity, and large oxygen storage capacity. The fundamental surface ion-incorporation pathways, along with the role of surface defects and the adsorbates remains largely unknown. This study presents a detailed kinetics study of CO2 splitting using CeO2 and Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 (CZO) in the temperature range 600-900℃. Given our interest in fuel-assisted reduction, we limit our study to relatively lower temperatures to avoid excessive sintering and the need for high temperature heat. Compared to what has been reported previously, we observe higher splitting kinetics, resulting from the utilization of fine particles and well-controlled experiments which ensure a surface-limited-process. The peak rates with CZO are 85.9 μmole g–1s–1 at 900℃ and 61.2 μmole g–1s–1 at 700℃, and those of CeO2 are 70.6 μmole g–1s–1 and 28.9 μmole g–1s–1. Kinetics models are developed to describe the ion incorporation dynamics, with consideration of CO2 activation and the charge transfer reactions. CO2 activation energy is found to be – 120 kJ mole-1 for CZO, half of that for CeO2, while CO desorption energetics is analogous among the two samples with the value of ~160 kJ mole-1. The charge-transfer process is found to be the rate-limiting step for CO2 splitting. The evolution of CO32- with surface Ce3+ is examined based on the modeled kinetics. We show that the concentration of CO32- varies with Ce3+ in a linear-flattened-decay pattern, resulting from a mismatch between the kinetics of the two reactions. Our study provides new insights into the significant role of the surface defects and adsorbates in determining the splitting kinetics.

  9. A laboratory study of ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) precipitation as a function of pH, salinity, temperature and phosphate concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Dieckmann, Gerhard S.; Völker, Christoph; Nehrke, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) has only recently been discovered in sea ice, in a study that also provided first direct evidence of CaCO3 precipitation in sea ice. However, little is as yet known about the impact of physico-chemical processes on ikaite precipitation in sea ice. Our study focused on how the changes in pH, salinity, temperature and phosphate (PO4) concentration affect the precipitation of ikaite. Experiments were set up at pH from 8.5 to 10.0, salinities from 0 to 105 (in both artificial ...

  10. Estimates of CO2 traffic emissions from mobile concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, H. L.; Thurlow, M. E.; McDonald, B. C.; Harley, R. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present data from a new mobile system intended to aid in the design of upcoming urban CO2-monitoring networks. Our collected data include GPS probe data, video-derived traffic density, and accurate CO2 concentration measurements. The method described here is economical, scalable, and self-contained, allowing for potential future deployment in locations without existing traffic infrastructure or vehicle fleet information. Using a test data set collected on California Highway 24 over a 2 week period, we observe that on-road CO2 concentrations are elevated by a factor of 2 in congestion compared to free-flow conditions. This result is found to be consistent with a model including vehicle-induced turbulence and standard engine physics. In contrast to surface concentrations, surface emissions are found to be relatively insensitive to congestion. We next use our model for CO2 concentration together with our data to independently derive vehicle emission rate parameters. Parameters scaling the leading four emission rate terms are found to be within 25% of those expected for a typical passenger car fleet, enabling us to derive instantaneous emission rates directly from our data that compare generally favorably to predictive models presented in the literature. The present results highlight the importance of high spatial and temporal resolution traffic data for interpreting on- and near-road concentration measurements. Future work will focus on transport and the integration of mobile platforms into existing stationary network designs.

  11. Interactive effect of elevated pCO2 and temperature on the larval development of an inter-tidal organism, Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Baragi, L.V.; Anil, A.C.

    selected based on present day pCO2 (~400 µatm) and predicted concentration for the year 2100 (~750 µatm) (Stocker et al., 2013). Four treatments were used in this study: (1) Control treatment - ambient temperature (~30 °C) and ambient pCO2 (~400 µatm); (2...) Elevated pCO2 treatment - ambient temperature (~30 °C) and elevated pCO2 (~750 µatm); (3) Elevated temperature treatment - elevated temperature (~34 °C) and ambient pCO2 (~400 µatm); and (4) Synergistic treatment - elevated temperature (~34 °C...

  12. The impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on grain quality of rice grown under open-air field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Liquan; Wang, Juan; Shen, Shibo; Wang, Yunxia; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Yulong; Yang, Lianxin

    2016-08-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is accompanied by global warming. However, interactive effects of elevated CO2 and temperature have not been well studied on grain quality of rice. A japonica cultivar was grown in the field using a free-air CO2 enrichment facility in combination with a canopy air temperature increase system in 2014. The gas fumigation (200 µmol mol(-1) above ambient CO2 ) and temperature increase (1 °C above ambient air temperature) were performed from tillering until maturity. Compared with the control (ambient CO2 and air temperature), elevated CO2 increased grain length and width as well as grain chalkiness but decreased protein concentrations. In contrast, the increase in canopy air temperature had less effect on these parameters except for grain chalkiness. The starch pasting properties of rice flour and taste analysis of cooked rice indicated that the palatability of rice was improved by CO2 and/or temperature elevation, with the combination of the two treatments showing the most significant changes compared with ambient rice. It is concluded that projected CO2 in 2050 may have larger effects on rice grain quality than the projected temperature increase. Although deterioration in milling suitability, grain appearance and nutritional quality can be expected, the taste of cooked rice might be better in the future environment. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Deep Sea Memory of High Atmospheric CO2 Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesius, Sabine; Hofmann, Matthias; Caldeira, Ken; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed as a powerful measure to mitigate global warming and ocean acidification. Planetary-scale interventions of that kind are often portrayed as "last-resort strategies", which need to weigh in if humankind keeps on enhancing the climate-system stock of CO2. Yet even if CDR could restore atmospheric CO2 to substantially lower concentrations, would it really qualify to undo the critical impacts of past emissions? In the study presented here, we employed an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) to investigate how CDR might erase the emissions legacy in the marine environment, focusing on pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen. Against a background of a world following the RCP8.5 emissions path ("business-as-usual") for centuries, we simulated the effects of two massive CDR interventions with CO2 extraction rates of 5 GtC yr-1 and 25 GtC yr-1, respectively, starting in 2250. We found that the 5 GtC yr-1 scheme would have only minor ameliorative influence on the oceans, even after several centuries of application. By way of contrast, the extreme 25 GtC yr-1 scheme eventually leads to tangible improvements. However, even with such an aggressive measure, past CO2 emissions leave a substantial legacy in the marine environment within the simulated period (i.e., until 2700). In summary, our study demonstrates that anthropogenic alterations of the oceans, caused by continued business-as-usual emissions, may not be reversed on a multi-centennial time scale by the most aspirational geoengineering measures. We also found that a transition from the RCP8.5 state to the state of a strong mitigation scenario (RCP2.6) is not possible, even under the assumption of extreme extraction rates (25 GtC yr-1). This is explicitly demonstrated by simulating additional scenarios, starting CDR already in 2150 and operating until the atmospheric CO2 concentration reaches 280 ppm and 180 ppm, respectively. The simulated

  14. Mg/Ca- Δ CO3porewater2- -temperature calibration for Globobulimina spp.: A sensitive paleothermometer for deep-sea temperature reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeab, Syee; Arce, Adam; Kasten, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Existing benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations are surrounded by substantial uncertainties mainly due to low temperature sensitivity of Mg/Ca in most benthic foraminifers and the effect of carbonate ion concentration on benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca. Here we present Mg/Ca analysis of Rose Bengal stained and exceptionally well-preserved tests of the infaunal benthic foraminifer Globobulimina spp. from 39 eastern equatorial Atlantic core top samples. Mg/Ca in Globobulimina spp. varies between 2.5 mmol/mol and 9.1 mmol/mol corresponding to bottom water temperatures (BWT) between 1.8 °C and 19.1 °C and Δ CO3pore water2- between 33.7 ± 4 and - 34.3 ± 4 μmol /kg in sediment depths between 1 and 10 cm. Mg/Ca and BWT are linearly correlated with a best fit of Mg/Ca [mmol/mol] = (0.36 ± 0.02) * BWT [°C] + 2.22 ± 0.19 (r2 = 0.92, p-value: 11 *10-20, and n = 39). Using total alkalinity and pH data of pore water samples from 64 Atlantic multi-corer sites, we obtained Δ CO3pore water2- data from the depth habitat range of Globobulimina spp. (≥1 cm ≤ 10 cm below sediment surface). We show that Δ CO3pore waterSUP>2- is significantly lower than and linearly co-varies with the ΔCO2-3 of the overlying bottom water: Δ CO3pore water2- = (0.67 ± 0.05) * Δ CO3bottom water2- - (39.84 ± 1.98); r2 = 0.75, p-value: 6 *10-20, n = 64. We found a Mg/Ca sensitivity of 0.009 ± 0.0044 mmol /mol per μmol/kg Δ CO3pore water2- and Mg/Ca temperature sensitivity of 0.32 ± 0.06 mmol /mol / °C after a correction for the Δ CO3pore water2- effect. This study provides a robust Mg/Ca-temperature calibration, highlights that Δ CO3pore water2- is spatially and most likely temporally variable, and contradicts the notion that infaunal foraminiferal Mg/Ca is relatively immune from ΔCO2-3 changes in the overlying bottom water. Furthermore, comparison of down core Mg/Ca data of Cibicides pachyderma and Globobulimina spp. demonstrates that the high temperature sensitivity of

  15. Solubility of NaNd(CO3)2.6H2O(c) in concentrated Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, L.; Rai, D.; Felmy, A.R.; Fulton, R.W.; Novak, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) was identified to be the final equilibrium solid phase in suspensions containing concentrated sodium carbonate (0.1 to 2.0 M) and sodium bicarbonate (0.1 to 1.0 M), with either NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) or Nd 2 (CO 3 ) 3 x xH 2 O(s) as initial solids. A thermodynamic model, based on Pitzer's specific into-interaction approach, was developed to interpret the solubility of NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) as functions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate concentrations. In this model, the solubility data of NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c) were explained by assuming the formation of NdCO 3 + , Nd(CO 3 ) 2 - and Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- species and invoking the specific ion interactions between Na + and Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- . Ion interaction parameters for Na + -Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- were developed to fit the solubility data. Based on the model calculations, Nd(CO 3 ) 3 3- was the predominant aqueous neodymium species in 0.1 to 2 M sodium carbonate and 0.1 to 1 M sodium bicarbonate solutions. The logarithm of the NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O solubility product (NaNd(CO 3 ) 2 x 6 H 2 O(c)=Na + +Nd 3+ +2 CO 3 2- +6 H 2 O) was calculated to be -21.39. This model also provided satisfactory interpretation of the solubility data of the analogous Am(III) system in less concentrated carbonate and bicarbonate solutions. (orig.)

  16. Modeling Silicate Weathering for Elevated CO2 and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    A reactive transport model (RTM) is used to assess CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering over a wide range of temperature, pCO2, and infiltration rates for basalts and granites. Although RTM's have been used extensively to model weathering of basalts and granites for present-day conditions, we extend such modeling to higher CO2 that could have existed during the Archean and Proterozoic. We also consider a wide range of surface temperatures and infiltration rates. We consider several model basalt and granite compositions. We normally impose CO2 in equilibrium with the various atmospheric ranges modeled and CO2 is delivered to the weathering zone by aqueous transport. We also consider models with fixed CO2 (aq) throughout the weathering zone as could occur in soils with partial water saturation or with plant respiration, which can strongly influence pH and mineral dissolution rates. For the modeling, we use Kinflow: a model developed at Yale that includes mineral dissolution and precipitation under kinetic control, aqueous speciation, surface erosion, dynamic porosity, permeability, and mineral surface areas via sub-grid-scale grain models, and exchange of volatiles at the surface. Most of the modeling is done in 1D, but some comparisons to 2D domains with heterogeneous permeability are made. We find that when CO2 is fixed only at the surface, the pH tends toward higher values for basalts than granites, in large part due to the presence of more divalent than monovalent cations in the primary minerals, tending to decrease rates of mineral dissolution. Weathering rates increase (as expected) with increasing CO2 and temperature. This modeling is done with the support of the Virtual Planetary Laboratory.

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ATMOSPHERIC CO_2 AND CH_4 CONCENTRATIONS AT SYOWA STATION, ANTARCTICA

    OpenAIRE

    アオキ, シュウジ; ナカザワ, タカキヨ; ムラヤマ, ショウヘイ; シミズ, アキラ; ハヤシ, マサヒコ; イワイ, クニモト; Shuhji, AOKI; Takakiyo, NAKAZAWA; Shohei, MURAYAMA; Akira, SHIMIZU; Masahiko, HAYASHI; Kunimoto, IWAI

    1994-01-01

    Precise measurements of the atmospheric CO_2 and CH_4 concentrations have been continued at Syowa Station since 1984 and 1987,respectively. Measured concentrations show secular increase, together with seasonal cycle and irregular variations. Negative correlation is clearly seen between the secular trends of the CO_2 and CH_4 concentrations. The increase rates of CO_2 and CH_4 show oscillations with periods of 2.3 to 2.8 years. The phases of the average seasonal cycles of CO_2 and CH_4 coincid...

  18. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were 6 km.

  19. Effects of CO/sub 2/ enrichment and temperature on growth in two C/sub 4/ weeds, Echinochloa crus-galli and Eleusine indica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potvin, C.; Strain, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical growth analyses were carried out on two C/sub 4/ grasses, Echinochloa crus-galli and Eleusine indica, to test the influence of CO/sub 2/ enrichment and temperature on growth. Echinochloa populations from Quebec, North Carolina, and Mississippi and a single population of Eleusine from Mississippi were grown for 48 days at two CO/sub 2/ concentrations (350 and 675 ..mu..L/center dot/L/sup /minus/1/) and three temperature regimes (28:22, 24:18, and 21: 15/degree/C). CO/sub 2/ enrichment generated an increased root dry weight and induced an earlier development of inflorescences. Net assimilation rate, the only other parameter to respond to CO/sub 2/ enrichment, was higher for plants grown at high CO/sub 2/ concentration during the first harvest interval. Biomass partitioning was affected by temperature. Root dry weight was greater in plants grown at 21:15/degree/C while more leaf area was produced in warmer temperature regimes. Only plants from Quebec maintained normal growth rates under the 21:15/degree/C regime, suggesting that northern C/sub 4/ plants are better suited for growth at low temperatures than southern ones. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Field Effect Devices Sensitive to CO at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo ARAG?N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available [5,10,15-Tris(2,6-dichlorophenylcorrolate] cobalt(III was used to chemisorb CO selectively, on the gap-gate of MOS capacitors and the state of charge monitored by voltage shifts of the photocurrent induced by pulsed illumination under constant D. C. bias, proportionally to CO concentration in air. Negative chemically induced charges at room temperature induce positive responses above and negative shifts below the threshold voltage, conforming to acceptor behavior, and the dynamic range (125 ppm is limited by the silicon doping concentration. The linear proportionality between CO concentration and surface charge (6.46[ppm.m2.µC-1] corresponds to the low concentration limit of the Langmuir isotherm. Sluggish CO desorption can be compensated by photo stimulation at 395 nm.

  1. Effects of temperature and anion species on CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 separation coefficient through ionic liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jindaratsamee, Pinyarat; Shimoyama, Yusuke; Morizaki, Hironobu; Ito, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) through imidazolium-based ionic liquid membranes was measured by a sweep gas method. Six species of ionic liquids were studied in this work as follows: [emim][BF 4 ], [bmim][BF 4 ], [bmim][PF 6 ], [bmim][Tf 2 N], [bmim][OTf], and [bmim][dca]. The ionic liquids were supported with a polyvinylidene fluoride porous membrane. The measurements were performed at T = (303.15 to 343.15) K. The partial pressure difference between feed and permeate sides was 0.121 MPa. The permeability of the CO 2 increases with temperature for the all ionic liquid species. Base on solution diffusion theory, it can be explained that the diffusion coefficient of CO 2 in an ionic liquid affects the temperature dependence more strongly than the solubility coefficient. The greatest permeability was obtained with the [bmim][Tf 2 N] membrane. The membrane of [bmim][PF 6 ] presents the lowest permeability. The separation coefficient between CO 2 and N 2 through the ionic liquid membranes was also investigated at the volume fraction of CO 2 at feed side 0.10. The separation coefficient decreases with the increase of temperature for the all ionic liquid species. The membrane of [emim][BF 4 ] and [bmim][BF 4 ] gives the highest separation coefficient at constant temperature. The lowest separation coefficient was obtained from [bmim][Tf 2 N] membrane which presents the highest permeability of CO 2 .

  2. DOES SOIL CO2 EFFLUX ACCLIMATIZETO ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND CO2 DURING LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF DOUGLAS-FIR SEEDLINGS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effects of elevated soil temperature and atmospheric CO2 efflux (SCE) during the third an fourth years of study. We hypothesized that elevated temperature would stimulate SCE, and elevated CO2 would also stimulate SCE with the stimulation being greater at hig...

  3. Carbon dioxide exchange of buds and developing shoots of boreal Norway spruce exposed to elevated or ambient CO2 concentration and temperature in whole-tree chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Marianne; Räntfors, Mats; Slaney, Michelle; Linder, Sune; Wallin, Göran

    2009-04-01

    Effects of ambient and elevated temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on CO2 assimilation rate and the structural and phenological development of shoots during their first growing season were studied in 45-year-old Norway spruce trees (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) enclosed in whole-tree chambers. Continuous measurements of net assimilation rate (NAR) in individual buds and shoots were made from early bud development to late August in two consecutive years. The largest effect of elevated temperature (TE) was manifest early in the season as an earlier start and completion of shoot length development, and a 1-3-week earlier shift from negative to positive NAR compared with the ambient temperature (TA) treatments. The largest effect of elevated [CO2] (CE) was found later in the season, with a 30% increase in maximum NAR compared with trees in the ambient [CO2] treatments (CA), and shoots assimilating their own mass in terms of carbon earlier in the CE treatments than in the CA treatments. Once the net carbon assimilation compensation point (NACP) had been reached, TE had little or no effect on the development of NAR performance, whereas CE had little effect before the NACP. No interactive effects of TE and CE on NAR were found. We conclude that in a climate predicted for northern Sweden in 2100, current-year shoots of P. abies will assimilate their own mass in terms of carbon 20-30 days earlier compared with the current climate, and thereby significantly contribute to canopy assimilation during their first year.

  4. The effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on nutrient uptake by plants grown in basaltic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor Iribe, E.; Dontsova, K.; Juarez, S.; Le Galliard, J. F.; Chollet, S.; Llavata, M.; Massol, F.; Barré, P.; Gelabert, A.; Daval, D.; Troch, P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Ferrière, R.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral weathering is an important process in soil formation. The interactions between the hydrologic, geologic and atmospheric cycles often determine the rate at which weathering occurs. Elements and nutrients weathered from the soil by water can be removed from soils in the runoff and seepage, but they can also remain in situ as newly precipitated secondary minerals or in biomass as a result of plant uptake. Here we present data from an experiment that was conducted at the controlled environment facility, Ecotron Ile-de-France (Saint-Pierre-les-Nemours, France) that studied mineral weathering and plant growth in granular basaltic material with high glass content that is being used to simulate soil in large scale Biosphere 2 Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) project. The experiment used 3 plant types: velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina), green spangletop (Leptochloa dubia), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), which were grown under varying temperature and CO2 conditions. We hypothesized that plants grown under warmer, higher CO2 conditions would have larger nutrient concentrations as more mineral weathering would occur. Results of plant digestions and analysis showed that plant concentrations of lithogenic elements were significantly influenced by the plant type and were different between above- and below-ground parts of the plant. Temperature and CO2 treatment effects were less pronounced, but we observed significant temperature effect on plant uptake. A number of major and trace elements showed increase in concentration with increase in temperature at elevated atmospheric CO2. Effect was observed both in the shoots and in the roots, but more significant differences were observed in the shoots. Results presented here indicate that climate change would have strong effect on plant uptake and mobility of weathered elements during soil formation and give further evidence of interactions between abiotic and biological processes in terrestrial ecosystems.

  5. Effects of increased temperature and CO{sub 2} on soil quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogner, G.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. The Norwegian Forest Research Institute has studied the effects of increased CO{sub 2} and temperature on forest soil, soil leachate and plants in an open top chamber experiment. The purpose was to analyze the changes in soil parameters and the leaching of elements. Nitrate and aluminium received special attention. The growth of Norway spruce and birch was followed, and its impact on the soil parameters. Preliminary results indicate that the temperature increase of the soil and consequently an increased turnover of soil organic matter had the major effect on the quality of soil leachates. CO{sub 2} was less important. Leaching of NO{sub 3}{sup -} was high from control lysimeters with moss cover. Lysimeters with birch hardly leached NO{sub 3}{sup -} at all. Spruce is in an intermediate position. Increased leaching of Al{sup n+} is found for moss lysimeters. Leachates from birch lysimeters have high concentrations of Al{sup n+} only at the end of the growth seasons. Plant growth is to some extent increased by the CO{sub 2} treatment. Birch grew well in all lysimeters and all treatments, spruce developed clear symptoms of stress. This result does not fit with the increased availability of nutrients in soil solution

  6. Response of Sphagnum mosses to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J.

    1998-12-31

    The main objective of this work was to study the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentration and N deposition rates on Sphagna adapted to grow along a nutrient availability gradient (i.e. ombrotrophy-mesotrophy-eutrophy). The study investigated: (i) the effects of various longterm CO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of net photosynthesis in Sphagna, (ii) the effects of the CO{sub 2} and N treatments on the moss density, shoot dry masses, length increment and dry mass production in Sphagna, (iii) the concentrations of the major nutrients in Sphagna after prolonged exposure to the CO{sub 2} and N treatments, and (iv) species dependent differences in potential NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake rates. The internal nutrient concentration of the capitulum and the production of biomass were effected less by the elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations because the availability of N was a controlling factor. In addition responses to the N treatments were related to ecological differences between the Sphagna species. Species with a high tolerance of N availability were able to acclimatise to the increased N deposition rates. The data suggests a high nutrient status is less significant than the adaptation of the Sphagna to their ecological niche (e.g. low tolerance of meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii to high N deposition rate). At the highest N deposition rate the ombrotrophic S. fuscum had the highest increase in tissue N concentration among the Sphagna studied. S. fuscum almost died at the highest N deposition rate because of the damaging effects of N to the plant`s metabolism. Ombrotrophic hummock species such as S. fuscum, were also found to have the highest potential N uptake rate (on density of dry mass basis) compared to lawn species. The rate of net photosynthesis was initially increased with elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, but photosynthesis was down regulated with prolonged exposure to CO{sub 2}. The water use efficiency in Sphagna appeared not to be coupled

  7. Stomatal response of Pinus sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations during the four years of exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu-mei; HAN Shi-jie; LIU Ying; JIA Xia

    2005-01-01

    Four-year-old Pinus sylvestriformis were exposed for four growing seasons in open top chambers to ambient CO2 concentration (approx. 350 μmol·mol-1) and high CO2 concentrations (500 and 700 μmol·mol-1) at Research Station of Changbai Mountain Forest Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences at Antu Town, Jilin Province, China (42oN, 128oE). Stomatal response to elevated CO2 concentrations was examined by stomatal conductance (gs), ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration (ci/ca) and stomatal number. Reciprocal transfer experiments of stomatal conductance showed that stomatal conductance in high-[CO2]-grown plants increased in comparison with ambient-[CO2]-grown plants when measured at their respective growth CO2 concentration and at the same measurement CO2 concentration (except a reduction in 700 μmol·mol-1 CO2 grown plants compared with plants on unchambered field when measured at growth CO2 concentration and 350 μmol·mol-1CO2). High-[CO2]-grown plants exhibited lower ci/ca ratios than ambient-[CO2]-grown plants when measured at their respective growth CO2 concentration. However, ci/ca ratios increased for plants grown in high CO2 concentrations compared with control plants when measured at the same CO2 concentration. There was no significant difference in stomatal number per unit long needle between elevated and ambient CO2. However, elevated CO2 concentrations reduced the total stomatal number of whole needle by the decline of stomatal line and changed the allocation pattern of stomata between upper and lower surface of needle.

  8. Effects of solar ultraviolet-B radiation, temperature and CO2 on growth and physiology of sunflower and maize seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, U.; Tevini, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of solar UV-B radiation, in combination with elevated temperature (4 °C) and CO 2 (680 μL L -1 ) concentration, on sunflower and maize seedlings were studied from May to August in 1991 at the research station Quinta de São Pedro in Portugal (38.7°N). The ambient solar radiation of Portugal was reduced to levels of Central European latitudes by using the ozone filter technique. This radiation served as control, while the ambient solar radiation of Portugal was to simulate intense UV-B treatment (+30%). All plants were grown up to 18 days in 4 climate controlled growth chambers simulating a daily course of temperature with T max = 28 °C or 32 °C, resp., and ambient CO 2 concentrations (340 μL L -1 ); in one chamber the CO 2 concentration was twice as high (680 μL L-1). Under intense UV-B and at 28 °C (T max ) all growth parameters (height, leaf area, fresh and dry weight, stem elongation rate, relative growth rate) of sunflower and maize seedlings were reduced down to 35% as compared to controls. An increase in growing temperature by 4 °C, alone or in combination with doubled CO 2 , compensated or even overcompensated the UV-B effect so that the treated plants were comparable to controls. Chlorophyll content, on a leaf area basis, increased under intense UV-B radiation. This increase was compensated by lower leaf areas, resulting in comparable chlorophyll contents. Similar to growth, also the net photosynthetic rates of sunflower and maize seedlings were reduced down to 29% by intense UV-B calculated on a chlorophyll basis. This reduction was compensated by an increased temperature. Doubling of CO 2 concentration had effects only on sunflower seedlings in which the photosynthetic rates were higher than in the controls. Dark respiration rates of the seedlings were not influenced by any experimental condition. Transpiration and water use efficiency (wue) were not influenced by intense UV-B. Higher temperatures led to higher transpiration rates and

  9. Uncertainty of Wheat Water Use: Simulated Patterns and Sensitivity to Temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarano, Davide; Roetter, Reimund P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Wallach, Daniel; Martre, Pierre; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Ruane, Alex C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Projected global warming and population growth will reduce future water availability for agriculture. Thus, it is essential to increase the efficiency in using water to ensure crop productivity. Quantifying crop water use (WU; i.e. actual evapotranspiration) is a critical step towards this goal. Here, sixteen wheat simulation models were used to quantify sources of model uncertainty and to estimate the relative changes and variability between models for simulated WU, water use efficiency (WUE, WU per unit of grain dry mass produced), transpiration efficiency (Teff, transpiration per kg of unit of grain yield dry mass produced), grain yield, crop transpiration and soil evaporation at increased temperatures and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). The greatest uncertainty in simulating water use, potential evapotranspiration, crop transpiration and soil evaporation was due to differences in how crop transpiration was modelled and accounted for 50 of the total variability among models. The simulation results for the sensitivity to temperature indicated that crop WU will decline with increasing temperature due to reduced growing seasons. The uncertainties in simulated crop WU, and in particularly due to uncertainties in simulating crop transpiration, were greater under conditions of increased temperatures and with high temperatures in combination with elevated atmospheric [CO2] concentrations. Hence the simulation of crop WU, and in particularly crop transpiration under higher temperature, needs to be improved and evaluated with field measurements before models can be used to simulate climate change impacts on future crop water demand.

  10. Relationship between carbon-14 concentrations in tree-ring cellulose and atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshimune; Yasuike, Kaeko; Komura, Kazuhisa

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of organically-bound 14 C in the tree-ring cellulose of a Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) grown in a rural region of Kanazawa, Ishikawa prefecture, Japan (36.5degN, 136.7degE), were measured for the ring-years from 1989 to 1998 to study relationship between 14 C concentrations in tree-ring cellulose and atmospheric CO 2 in a narrow region. An interesting result in comparing our data of tree-ring cellulose with those of atmospheric CO 2 is that the 14 C concentration in tree-ring cellulose was close to the corresponding average from mid-June to early September of 14 C concentrations in atmospheric CO 2 . Furthermore, the 14 C concentrations in tree-ring cellulose were found to be merely influenced by the drastic decrease of 14 C concentrations in atmospheric CO 2 in winter, which might be caused by air pollution from the Asian continent and additional local fossil fuel contribution. These results suggest that the 14 C concentration in tree-ring cellulose for a given growing year reflects the 14 C concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 during the warm summer months. (author)

  11. A statistical analysis of three ensembles of crop model responses totemperature and CO2concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowski, D; Asseng, S; Ewert, F.

    2015-01-01

    Ensembles of process-based crop models are increasingly used to simulate crop growth for scenarios of temperature and/or precipitation changes corresponding to different projections of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This approach generates large datasets with thousands of simulated crop yield data...

  12. High Resilience in Heathland Plants to Changes in Temperature, Drought, and CO2 in Combination: Results from the CLIMAITE Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, J.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    of in situexposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration,increased temperature and prolonged droughtperiods on the plant biomass in a dry heathland(Brandbjerg, Denmark). Results after 3 yearsshowed that drought reduced the growth of thetwo dominant species Deschampsia flexuosa and Callunavulgaris. However, both...... the standingbiomass for either D. flexuosa or the ecosystem asmore litter was produced. Treatment combinationsshowed little interactions on the measuredparameters and in particular elevated CO2 did notcounterbalance the drought effect on plant growth,as we had anticipated. The plant community didnot show any......Climate change scenarios predict simultaneouslyincrease in temperature, altered precipitation patternsand elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration,which will affect key ecosystem processes and plantgrowth and species interactions. In a large-scaleexperiment, we investigated the effects...

  13. Growth performance and survival of larval Atlantic herring, under the combined effects of elevated temperatures and CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sswat

    Full Text Available In the coming decades, environmental change like warming and acidification will affect life in the ocean. While data on single stressor effects on fish are accumulating rapidly, we still know relatively little about interactive effects of multiple drivers. Of particular concern in this context are the early life stages of fish, for which direct effects of increased CO2 on growth and development have been observed. Whether these effects are further modified by elevated temperature was investigated here for the larvae of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus, a commercially important fish species. Over a period of 32 days, larval survival, growth in size and weight, and instantaneous growth rate were assessed in a crossed experimental design of two temperatures (10°C and 12°C with two CO2 levels (400 μatm and 900 μatm CO2 at food levels mimicking natural levels using natural prey. Elevated temperature alone led to increased swimming activity, as well as decreased survival and instantaneous growth rate (Gi. The comparatively high sensitivity to elevated temperature in this study may have been influenced by low food levels offered to the larvae. Larval size, Gi and swimming activity were not affected by CO2, indicating tolerance of this species to projected "end of the century" CO2 levels. A synergistic effect of elevated temperature and CO2 was found for larval weight, where no effect of elevated CO2 concentrations was detected in the 12°C treatment, but a negative CO2 effect was found in the 10°C treatment. Contrasting CO2 effects were found for survival between the two temperatures. Under ambient CO2 conditions survival was increased at 12°C compared to 10°C. In general, CO2 effects were minor and considered negligible compared to the effect of temperature under these mimicked natural food conditions. These findings emphasize the need to include biotic factors such as energy supply via prey availability in future studies on interactive

  14. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-09-29

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions.

  15. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on seed quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampton, John G; Boelt, Birte; Rolston, M P

    2013-01-01

    production on three seed quality components: seed mass, germination and seed vigour. In response to elevated CO2, seed mass has been reported to both increase and decrease in C3 plants, but not change in C4 plants. Increases are greater in legumes than non-legumes, and there is considerable variation among...... species. Seed mass increases may result in a decrease of seed nitrogen (N) concentration in non-legumes. Increasing temperature may decrease seed mass because of an accelerated growth rate and reduced seed filling duration, but lower seed mass does not necessarily reduce seed germination or vigour. Like...

  16. Carbonate mineral solubility at low temperatures in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO 4-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-H 2O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Giles M.

    2001-06-01

    Carbonate minerals have played an important role in the geochemical evolution of Earth, and may have also played an important role in the geochemical evolution of Mars and Europa. Several models have been published in recent years that describe chloride and sulfate mineral solubilities in concentrated brines using the Pitzer equations. Few of these models are parameterized for subzero temperatures, and those that are do not include carbonate chemistry. The objectives of this work are to estimate Pitzer-equation bicarbonate-carbonate parameters and carbonate mineral solubility products and to incorporate them into the FREZCHEM model to predict carbonate mineral solubilities in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO 4-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-H 2O system at low temperatures (≤25°C) with a special focus on subzero temperatures. Most of the Pitzer-equation parameters and equilibrium constants are taken from the literature and extrapolated into the subzero temperature range. Solubility products for 14 sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium bicarbonate and carbonate minerals are included in the model. Most of the experimental data are at temperatures ≥ -8°C; only for the NaHCO 3-NaCl-H 2O and Na 2CO 3-NaCl-H 2O systems are there bicarbonate and carbonate data to temperatures as low as -21.6°C. In general, the fit of the model to the experimental data is good. For example, calculated eutectic temperatures and compositions for NaHCO 3, Na 2CO 3, and their mixtures with NaCl and Na 2SO 4 salts are in good agreement with experimental data to temperatures as low as -21.6°C. Application of the model to eight saline, alkaline carbonate waters give predicted pHs ranging from 9.2 to 10.2, in comparison with measured pHs that range from 8.7 to 10.2. The model suggests that the CaCO 3 mineral that precipitates during seawater freezing is probably calcite and not ikaite. The model demonstrates that a proposed salt assemblage for the icy surface of Europa consisting of highly hydrated MgSO 4

  17. An econometric time-series analysis of global CO2 concentrations and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.C.; Labys, W.C.; Eliste, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper extends previous work on the econometric modelling of CO 2 concentrations and emissions. The importance of such work rests in the fact that models of the Cohen-Labys variety represent the only alternative to scientific or physical models of CO 2 accumulations whose parameters are inferred rather than estimated. The stimulation for this study derives from the recent discovery of oscillations and cycles in the net biospheric flux of CO 2 . A variety of time series tests is thus used to search for the presence of normality, stationarity, cyclicality and stochastic processes in global CO 2 emissions and concentrations series. Given the evidence for cyclicality of a short-run nature in the spectra of these series, both structural time series and error correction model are applied to confirm the frequency and amplitude of these cycles. Our results suggest new possibilities for determining equilibrium levels of CO 2 concentrations and subsequently revising stabilization policies. (Author)

  18. Carbon dioxide as working fluid for medium and high-temperature concentrated solar thermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Duong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the benefits and drawbacks of using carbon dioxide in solar thermal systems at medium and high operating temperatures. For medium temperatures, application of CO2 in non-imaging-optics based compound parabolic concentrators (CPC combined with evacuated-tube collectors is studied. These collectors have been shown to obtain efficiencies higher than 40% operating at around 200℃ without the need of tracking. Validated numerical models of external compound parabolic concentrators (XCPCs are used to simulate their performance using CO2 as working fluid. For higher temperatures, a mathematical model is implemented to analyze the operating performance of a parabolic trough solar collector (PTC using CO2 at temperatures between 100℃ and 600℃.

  19. Effects of elevated root zone CO2 and air temperature on photosynthetic gas exchange, nitrate uptake, and total reduced nitrogen content in aeroponically grown lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Austin, Paul T; Lee, Sing Kong

    2010-09-01

    Effects of elevated root zone (RZ) CO(2) and air temperature on photosynthesis, productivity, nitrate (NO(3)(-)), and total reduced nitrogen (N) content in aeroponically grown lettuce plants were studied. Three weeks after transplanting, four different RZ [CO(2)] concentrations [ambient (360 ppm) and elevated concentrations of 2000, 10,000, and 50,000 ppm] were imposed on plants grown at two air temperature regimes of 28 degrees C/22 degrees C (day/night) and 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. Photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) increased with increasing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). When grown at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C, all plants accumulated more biomass than at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. When measured under a PAR >or=600 micromol m(-2) s(-1), elevated RZ [CO(2)] resulted in significantly higher A, lower g(s), and higher midday leaf relative water content in all plants. Under elevated RZ [CO(2)], the increase of biomass was greater in roots than in shoots, causing a lower shoot/root ratio. The percentage increase in growth under elevated RZ [CO(2)] was greater at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C although the total biomass was higher at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C. NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentrations of shoot and root were significantly higher in all plants under elevated RZ [CO(2)] than under ambient RZ [CO(2)] of 360 ppm at both temperature regimes. At each RZ [CO(2)], NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentration of shoots were greater at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C than at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. At all RZ [CO(2)], roots of plants at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C had significantly higher NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentrations than at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C. Since increased RZ [CO(2)] caused partial stomatal closure, maximal A and maximal g(s) were negatively correlated, with a unique relationship for each air temperature. However, across all RZ [CO(2)] and temperature treatments, there was a close correlation between

  20. Marine phytoplankton stoichiometry mediates nonlinear interactions between nutrient supply, temperature, and atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Allison R.; Hagstrom, George I.; Primeau, Francois W.; Levin, Simon A.; Martiny, Adam C.

    2018-05-01

    Marine phytoplankton stoichiometry links nutrient supply to marine carbon export. Deviations of phytoplankton stoichiometry from Redfield proportions (106C : 1P) could therefore have a significant impact on carbon cycling, and understanding which environmental factors drive these deviations may reveal new mechanisms regulating the carbon cycle. To explore the links between environmental conditions, stoichiometry, and carbon cycling, we compared four different models of phytoplankton C : P: a fixed Redfield model, a model with C : P given as a function of surface phosphorus concentration (P), a model with C P given as a function of temperature, and a new multi-environmental model that predicts C : P as a function of light, temperature, and P. These stoichiometric models were embedded into a five-box ocean circulation model, which resolves the three major ocean biomes (high-latitude, subtropical gyres, and tropical upwelling regions). Contrary to the expectation of a monotonic relationship between surface nutrient drawdown and carbon export, we found that lateral nutrient transport from lower C : P tropical waters to high C : P subtropical waters could cause carbon export to decrease with increased tropical nutrient utilization. It has been hypothesized that a positive feedback between temperature and pCO2, atm will play an important role in anthropogenic climate change, with changes in the biological pump playing at most a secondary role. Here we show that environmentally driven shifts in stoichiometry make the biological pump more influential, and may reverse the expected positive relationship between temperature and pCO2, atm. In the temperature-only model, changes in tropical temperature have more impact on the Δ pCO2, atm (˜ 41 ppm) compared to subtropical temperature changes (˜ 4.5 ppm). Our multi-environmental model predicted a decline in pCO2, atm of ˜ 46 ppm when temperature spanned a change of 10 °C. Thus, we find that variation in marine phytoplankton

  1. Photosynthesis and Rubisco kinetics in spring wheat and meadow fescue under conditions of simulated climate change with elevated CO2 and increased temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. HAKALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.cv.Polkkaand meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Hudson cv. Kalevicwere grown in ambient and elevated (700 µl l -1 carbon dioxide concentration both at present ambient temperatures and at temperatures 3°C higher than at present simulating a future climate.The CO2 concentrations were elevated in large (3 m in diameteropen top chambers and the temperatures in a greenhouse built over the experimental field.The photosynthetic rate of both wheat and meadow fescue was 31 –37%higher in elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2 than in ambient CO 2 (aCO2 throughout the growing season.The enhancement in wheat photosynthesis in eCO2 declined 10 –13 days before yellow ripeness,at which point the rate of photosynthesis in both CO 2 treatments declined.The stomatal conductance of wheat and meadow fescue was 23–36% lower in eCO2 than in aCO2 .The amount and activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco in wheat were lower under conditions of eCO2 ,except at elevated temperatures in 1993 when there was a clear yield increase.There was no clear change in the amount and activity of Rubisco in meadow fescue under eCO2 at either elevated or ambient temperature.This suggests that adaptation to elevated CO2 at biochemical level occurs only when there is insufficient sink for photosynthetic products.While the sink size of wheat can be increased only by introducing new,more productive genotypes,the sink size of meadow fescue can be regulated by fitting the cutting schedule to growth.;

  2. Dynamic ikaite production and dissolution in sea ice - control by temperature, salinity and pCO2 conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysgaard, S.; Wang, F.; Galley, R. J.; Grimm, R.; Lemes, M.; Geilfus, N.-X.; Chaulk, A.; Hare, A. A.; Crabeck, O.; Else, B. G. T.; Campbell, K.; Papakyriakou, T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Sievers, J.; Notz, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ikaite is a hydrous calcium carbonate mineral (CaCO3 · 6H2O). It is only found in a metastable state, and decomposes rapidly once removed from near-freezing water. Recently, ikaite crystals have been found in sea ice and it has been suggested that their precipitation may play an important role in air-sea CO2 exchange in ice-covered seas. Little is known, however, of the spatial and temporal dynamics of ikaite in sea ice. Here we present evidence for highly dynamic ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice grown at an out-door pool of the Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility (SERF). During the experiment, ikaite precipitated in sea ice with temperatures below -3 °C, creating three distinct zones of ikaite concentrations: (1) a mm to cm thin surface layer containing frost flowers and brine skim with bulk concentrations of > 2000 μmol kg-1, (2) an internal layer with concentrations of 200-400 μmol kg-1 and (3) a~bottom layer with concentrations of ikaite crystals under acidic conditions. Manual removal of the snow cover allowed the sea ice to cool and brine salinities to increase, resulting in rapid ikaite precipitation. The modeled (FREZCHEM) ikaite concentrations were in the same order of magnitude as observations and suggest that ikaite concentration in sea ice increase with decreasing temperatures. Thus, varying snow conditions may play a key role in ikaite precipitation and dissolution in sea ice. This will have implications for CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and ocean.

  3. Research of CO2 concentration in naturally ventilated lecture room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Marta; Dudkiewicz, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    Naturally ventilated buildings especially dedicated for educational purposes need to be design to achieve required level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality. It is crucial in terms of both: health and productivity of the room users. Higher requirements of indoor environment are important due to the level of students concentration, their ability to acquire new knowledge and willingness to interact with the lecturer. The article presents the results of experimental study and surveys undertaken in naturally ventilated lecture room. The data is analysed in terms of CO2 concentration and its possible influence on users. Furthermore the outcome of the research is compared with the CO2 concentration models available in the literature.

  4. Stability of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid polymer microgels under various conditions of temperature, pH and salt concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahoor H. Farooqi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research article describes the colloidal stability of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid [P(NIPAM-co-AAc] polymer microgels with different acrylic acid contents in aqueous medium under various conditions of temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentrations. Three samples of multi-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AAc polymer microgels were synthesized using different amounts of acrylic acid by free radical emulsion polymerization. Dynamic laser light scattering was used to investigate the responsive behavior and stability of the prepared microgels under various conditions of pH, temperature and ionic strength. The microgels were found to be stable at all pH values above the pKa value of acrylic acid moiety in the temperature range from 15 to 60 °C in the presence and absence of sodium chloride. Increase in temperature, salt concentration and decrease in pH causes aggregation and decreases the stability of microgels due to the decrease in hydrophilicity.

  5. Study on the conversion of H2 and CO from the helium carrier gas of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Cuiping; Zheng Zhenhong; Shi Fuen

    1995-01-01

    The conversions of hydrogen and carbon monoxide into water vapor and carbon dioxide on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst are studied. The effects of different temperature, system atmospheric pressure, impurity gas concentration, flow and dew point on properties of cupric oxide bed are investigated. The conversion characteristics curves of H 2 and CO are given. Experimental data of conversion capacity, action period and conversion efficiency of CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 are obtained and the optimal parameters are determined. The results show that the concentration of H 2 and CO of the effluent gas after purification can reach below 2 x 10 -6 , respectively. So it can meet the demands of high temperature gas-cooled reactor and also provide optimal design parameters and reliable data for conversion of H 2 and CO on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst

  6. The response of three dominant Arctic copepod species to elevated CO2 concentrations and water temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrandt, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and ocean warming are threatening marine life. Within the framework of the research project BIOACID, this thesis aims to provide a comprehensive overview on the sensitivity of the dominant Arctic calanoid copepod species Calanus finmarchicus, C. glacialis and C. hyperboreus to elevated pCO2 and temperatures. Controlled laboratory experiments have shown that subadult and adult Calanus life stages are rather robust to the direct effects of OA during both active and rest...

  7. Influx of CO2 from Soil Incubated Organic Residues at Constant Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukat Ali Abro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature induced CO2 from genotypic residue substances is still less understood. Two types of organic residues (wheat- maize were incubated at a constant temperature (25°C to determine the rate and cumulative influx of CO2 in laboratory experiment for 40 days. Further, the effect of surface and incorporated crop residues with and without phosphorus addition was also studied. Results revealed that mixing of crop residues increased CO2-C evolution significantly & emission rare was 37% higher than that of control. At constant temperature, soil mixed residues, had higher emission rates CO2-C than the residues superimposed. There was linear correlation of CO2-C influxed for phosphorus levels and residue application ways with entire incubation at constant temperature. The mixing of organic residues to soil enhanced SOC levels and biomass of microbially bound N; however to little degree ammonium (NH4-N and nitrate NO3-N nitrogen were decreased.

  8. Effects of CO2 and temperature on tritrophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Dyer

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in studies of how global change parameters affect interacting species or entire communities, yet the combined or interactive effects of increased atmospheric CO2 and associated increases in global mean temperatures on chemically mediated trophic interactions are mostly unknown. Thus, predictions of climate-induced changes on plant-insect interactions are still based primarily on studies of individual species, individual global change parameters, pairwise interactions, or parameters that summarize communities. A clear understanding of community response to global change will only emerge from studies that examine effects of multiple variables on biotic interactions. We examined the effects of increased CO2 and temperature on simple laboratory communities of interacting alfalfa, chemical defense, armyworm caterpillars, and parasitoid wasps. Higher temperatures and CO2 caused decreased plant quality, decreased caterpillar development times, developmental asynchrony between caterpillars and wasps, and complete wasp mortality. The effects measured here, along with other effects of global change on natural enemies suggest that biological control and other top-down effects of insect predators will decline over the coming decades.

  9. Linearity between temperature peak and bio-energy CO2 emission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan M.; Stromman, Anders H.; Gasser, Thomas; Ciais, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Many future energy and emission scenarios envisage an increase of bio-energy in the global primary energy mix. In most climate impact assessment models and policies, bio-energy systems are assumed to be carbon neutral, thus ignoring the time lag between CO 2 emissions from biomass combustion and CO 2 uptake by vegetation. Here, we show that the temperature peak caused by CO 2 emissions from bio-energy is proportional to the maximum rate at which emissions occur and is almost insensitive to cumulative emissions. Whereas the carbon-climate response (CCR) to fossil fuel emissions is approximately constant, the CCR to bio-energy emissions depends on time, biomass turnover times, and emission scenarios. The linearity between temperature peak and bio-energy CO 2 emission rates resembles the characteristic of the temperature response to short-lived climate forcers. As for the latter, the timing of CO 2 emissions from bio-energy matters. Under the international agreement to limit global warming to 2 C by 2100, early emissions from bio-energy thus have smaller contributions on the targeted temperature than emissions postponed later into the future, especially when bio-energy is sourced from biomass with medium (50-60 years) or long turnover times (100 years). (authors)

  10. Solar processing of CO2 and H2O, routes for solar fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flammant, G.; Abanades, St.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Concentrated solar energy provides heat in the temperature range 200 C - 3000 C for concentration ratio variation from 10 to 10 000 (three orders of magnitude). Consequently, solar-driven thermochemical processes may be proposed to produce hydrogen from water decomposition and to reduce carbon dioxide. This lecture gives an overview of such processes. High temperature thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production by water splitting are currently studied at PROMES lab, particularly 2-step and 3-step cycles based on the following reaction scheme, MOox → MOred + 1/2 O 2 (high temperature solar step), MOred + H 2 O → MOox + H 2 (low temperature non solar step). Volatile and non-volatile oxide cycles are developed from the chemical and the engineering points of view. A similar reaction scheme may be proposed to reduce carbon dioxide with concentrated solar energy (Fig. 1), it comes, MOox → MOred + 1/2 O 2 (high temperature solar step), MOred + CO 2 → MOox + CO (low temperature non solar step). As a result gas mixtures such as CO 2 /H 2 and CO/H 2 may be produced by solar energy. Such mixtures are the reactants for liquid fuels production (solar fuels)

  11. Towards CO2 sequestration and applications of CO2 hydrates: the effects of tetrahydrofuran on the phase equilibria of CO2 hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalik, M.S.; Peters, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing quantity of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere has caused widespread global concerns. Capturing CO 2 from its sources and stored it in the form of gas hydrates and application of CO 2 hydrates are among the proposed methods to overcome this problem. In order to make hydrate-based process more attractive, the use of cyclic ethers as promoters is suggested to reduce the required hydrate formation pressure and enhancing the corresponding kinetic rate. In the present work, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen as a hydrate promoter, participating in forming hydrates and produces mixed hydrate together with CO 2 . The pressure and temperature ranges of hydrate stability region are carefully determined through phase equilibrium measurement of the ternary CO 2 , tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water systems. From the experimental results, it is confirmed that the presence of THF in CO 2 + water systems will extend the hydrate formation region to higher temperature at a constant pressure. The extension of the hydrate stability region is depended on the overall concentration of the ternary system. Moreover, four-phase equilibrium of H-Lw-Lv-V is observed in the system, which may be due to a liquid phase split. In the region where the four-phase equilibrium exists, the ternary system loses its concentration dependency of the hydrate equilibrium conditions. (Author)

  12. Modeling the response of forest isoprene emissions to future increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration and changes in climate (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, R. K.; Heald, C. L.; Guenther, A. B.; Wilkinson, M.

    2009-12-01

    Isoprene emissions from plants to the atmosphere are sensitive to changes in temperature, light and atmospheric CO2 concentration in both the short- (seconds-to-minutes) and long-term (hours-to-months). We now understand that the different time constants for these responses are due to controls by different sets of biochemical and physiological processes n leaves. Progress has been made in the past few years toward converting this process-level understanding into quantitative models. In this talk, we consider this progress with special emphasis on the short- and long-term responses to atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. A new biochemically-based model is presented for describing the CO2 responses, and the model is deployed in a global context to predict interactions between the influences of temperature and CO2 on the global isoprene emission rate. The model is based on the theory of enzyme-substrate kinetics, particularly with regard to those reactions that produce puruvate or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, the two chloroplastic substrates for isoprene biosynthesis. In the global model, when we accounted for CO2 inhibition of isoprene emission in the long-term response, we observed little impact on present-day global isoprene emission (increase from 508 to 523 Tg C yr-1). However, the large increases in future isoprene emissions predicted from past models which are due to a projected warmer climate, were entirely offset by including the CO2 effects. The isoprene emission response to CO2 was dominated by the long-term growth environment effect, with modulations of 10% or less from the short-term effect. We use this analysis as a framework for grounding future global models of isoprene emission in biochemical and physiological observations.

  13. A novel rate of the reaction between NaOH with CO2 at low temperature in spray dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Tavan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 is an influential greenhouse gas that has a significant impact on global warming partly. Nowadays, many techniques are available to control and remove CO2 in different chemical processes. Since the spray dryer has high removal efficiency rate, a laboratory-scale spray dryer is used to absorb carbon dioxide from air in aqueous solution of NaOH. In the present study, the impact of NaOH concentration, operating temperature and nozzle diameter on removal efficiency of CO2 is explored through experimental study. Moreover, the reaction kinetic of NaOH with CO2 is studied over the temperature range of 50–100 °C in a laboratory-scale spray dryer absorber. In the present contribution, a simple reaction rate equation is proposed that shows the lowest deviation from the experimental data with error less than 2%.

  14. High temperature stability of surfactant capped CoFe2O4 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyappan, S.; Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Philip, John

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Self-assembled molecular layers of surfactant on nanoparticles are often used to modify surface properties. → We demonstrate that a surfactant nanolayer on CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles can act as a strong reducing agent under high temperature vacuum annealing. → We propose a possible reduction mechanism of CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles under air and vacuum annealing. → Our results are important in the understanding of the stability of nanoparticles at high temperatures. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of adsorbed surfactant on the structural stability of CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles during vacuum thermal annealing. In-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction studies show a reduction of oleic acid coated CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles into α-Fe and CoO under annealing at 800 deg. C. On the contrary, the uncoated CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles remains stable, with its cubic phase intact, even at 1000 deg. C. Thermo-gravimetric analysis coupled mass spectra reveals that the evolved carbon from the surfactant aids the removal of oxygen atom from CoFe 2 O 4 lattice thereby reducing it to α-Fe and CoO phases. These results are important in tailoring stable CoFe 2 O 4 nanostructures for various applications.

  15. Elevated CO2-mitigation of high temperature stress associated with maintenance of positive carbon balance and carbohydrate accumulation in Kentucky bluegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yali; Yu, Jingjin; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentration may promote plant growth while high temperature is inhibitory for C3 plant species. The interactive effects of elevated CO2 and high temperatures on C3 perennial grass growth and carbon metabolism are not well documented. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) plants were exposed to two CO2 levels (400 and 800 μmol mol-1) and five temperatures (15/12, 20/17, 25/22, 30/27, 35/32°C, day/night) in growth chambers. Increasing temperatures to 25°C and above inhibited leaf photosynthetic rate (Pn) and shoot and root growth, but increased leaf respiration rate (R), leading to a negative carbon balance and a decline in soluble sugar content under ambient CO2. Elevated CO2 did not cause shift of optimal temperatures in Kentucky bluegrass, but promoted Pn, shoot and root growth under all levels of temperature (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C) and mitigated the adverse effects of severe high temperatures (30 and 35°C). Elevated CO2-mitigation of adverse effects of high temperatures on Kentucky bluegrass growth could be associated with the maintenance of a positive carbon balance and the accumulation of soluble sugars and total nonstructural carbohydrates through stimulation of Pn and suppression of R and respiratory organic acid metabolism.

  16. Supercritical CO2 extraction of oil and omega-3 concentrate from Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L. from Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Triana-Maldonado

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L. seeds were employed for oil extraction with supercritical CO2 at laboratory scale. The supercritical extraction was carried out at a temperature of 60 °C, pressure range of 400–500 bars and CO2 flow of 40–80 g/min. The maximum recovery was 58% in 180 min, favored by increasing the residence time of CO2 in the extraction tank. Subsequently, the process was evaluated at pilot scale reaching a maximum recovery of 60% in 105 min, with a temperature of 60 °C, pressure of 450 bars and CO2 flow of 1270 g/min. The fatty acid composition of the oil was not affected for an extraction period of 30–120 min. The Sacha inchi oil was fractionated with supercritical CO2 to obtain an omega-3 concentrate oil without finding a considerable increase in the proportion of this compound, due to the narrow range in the carbon number of fatty acids present in the oil (16–18 carbons, making it difficult for selective separation.

  17. Supercritical CO2 extraction of oil and omega-3 concentrate from Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) from Antioquia, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torijano-Gutiérrez, S.A.; Triana-Maldonadoa, D.M.; Giraldo-Estradaa, C.

    2017-01-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) seeds were employed for oil extraction with supercritical CO2 at laboratory scale. The supercritical extraction was carried out at a temperature of 60 °C, pressure range of 400–500 bars and CO2 flow of 40–80 g/min. The maximum recovery was 58% in 180 min, favored by increasing the residence time of CO2 in the extraction tank. Subsequently, the process was evaluated at pilot scale reaching a maximum recovery of 60% in 105 min, with a temperature of 60 °C, pressure of 450 bars and CO2 flow of 1270 g/min. The fatty acid composition of the oil was not affected for an extraction period of 30–120 min. The Sacha inchi oil was fractionated with supercritical CO2 to obtain an omega-3 concentrate oil without finding a considerable increase in the proportion of this compound, due to the narrow range in the carbon number of fatty acids present in the oil (16–18 carbons), making it difficult for selective separation. [es

  18. Two-dimensional temperature and carbon dioxide concentration profiles in atmospheric laminar diffusion flames measured by mid-infrared direct absorption spectroscopy at 4.2 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunchen; Zhang, Guoyong; Huang, Yan; Wang, Yizun; Qi, Fei

    2018-04-01

    We present a multi-line flame thermometry technique based on mid-infrared direct absorption spectroscopy of carbon dioxide at its v_3 fundamental around 4.2 μm that is particularly suitable for sooting flames. Temperature and concentration profiles of gas phase molecules in a flame are important characteristics to understand its flame structure and combustion chemistry. One of the standard laboratory flames to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot formation is laminar non-premixed co-flow flame, but PAH and soot introduce artifact to most non-contact optical measurements. Here we report an accurate diagnostic method of the temperature and concentration profiles of CO2 in ethylene diffusion flames by measuring its v_3 vibrational fundamental. An interband cascade laser was used to probe the R-branch bandhead at 4.2 μm, which is highly sensitive to temperature change, free from soot interference and ambient background. Calibration measurement was carried out both in a low-pressure Herriott cell and an atmospheric pressure tube furnace up to 1550 K to obtain spectroscopic parameters for high-temperature spectra. In our co-flow flame measurement, two-dimensional line-of-sight optical depth of an ethylene/N2 laminar sooting flame was recorded by dual-beam absorption scheme. The axially symmetrical attenuation coefficient profile of CO2 in the co-flow flame was reconstructed from the optical depth by Abel inversion. Spatially resolved flame temperature and in situ CO2 volume fraction profiles were derived from the calibrated CO2 spectroscopic parameters and compared with temperature profiles measured by two-line atomic fluorescence.

  19. Attribution of atmospheric CO2 and temperature increases to regions: importance of preindustrial land use change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, Julia; Caldeira, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The historical contribution of each country to today’s observed atmospheric CO 2 excess and higher temperatures has become a basis for discussions around burden-sharing of greenhouse gas reduction commitments in political negotiations. However, the accounting methods have considered greenhouse gas emissions only during the industrial era, neglecting the fact that land use changes (LUC) have caused emissions long before the Industrial Revolution. Here, we hypothesize that considering preindustrial LUC affects the attribution because the geographic pattern of preindustrial LUC emissions differs significantly from that of industrial-era emissions and because preindustrial emissions have legacy effects on today’s atmospheric CO 2 concentrations and temperatures. We test this hypothesis by estimating CO 2 and temperature increases based on carbon cycle simulations of the last millennium. We find that accounting for preindustrial LUC emissions results in a shift of attribution of global temperature increase from the industrialized countries to less industrialized countries, in particular South Asia and China, by up to 2–3%, a level that may be relevant for political discussions. While further studies are needed to span the range of plausible quantifications, our study demonstrates the importance of including preindustrial emissions for the most scientifically defensible attribution. (letter)

  20. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ming-Hung; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm) and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses). Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel. PMID:25923722

  1. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ming-Hung; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm) and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses). Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel.

  2. Contribution of Co2+ in increasing chlorophyll a concentration of Nannochloropsis salina in controlled Conwy medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, Y.; Taba, P.; Suryati, E.; Kasih, P.; Firman, N. F.

    2018-03-01

    A research in determining the contribution of Co2+ on the increase of chlorophyll a concentration of Nannochloropsis salina has been caried out. The cultivation of N. salina was conducted in the Conwy medium with a salinity of 5%o and 25%o and various Co2+ concentration (2, 4, and 8 ppm). In this research, Co2+ was exposed early in the cultivation of N. salina. The growth of N. salina was observed daily by counting the number of populations using a haemocytometer while the chlorophyll a concentration was determined by a Uv-Vis spectrophotometer. The results showed that the growth of N. salina in the control was higher than that in the medium containing Co2+. The optimum growth time was achieved on 15th days (5%) and 8th days (25%). In the cultivation medium with a salinity of 5%, Co2+ with a concentration of 2 ppm increased the chlorophyll a level while Co2+ with concentrations of 4 and 8 ppm decreased it. In the medium of cultivation with a salinity of 25%, the increase in chlorophyll a level was observed at Co2+ concentrations of 2 and 4 ppm whereas the decrease in chlorophyl a level was given at a concentration of 8 ppm. It can be concluded that at low concentrations, Co2+ increased the concentration of chlorophyll a in N. salina.

  3. An investigation on the tribological properties of Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite as potential lubricating additive at various temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhai; Lu, Bing; Zhang, Lixiu; Li, Ting; Yan, Tingting; Li, Mengxu

    2018-02-01

    The Co(ReO4)2 powder was fabricated via the aqueous solution method, and mixed with MoS2 powder using ball milling technique. A certain concentration of Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive was dispersed into the poly alpha olefin base oil with the assistance of surface active agents. The load-carrying property and lubricating behavior of base oil containing a certain content of Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive at various temperatures were evaluated by four-ball test and ball-on-disc sliding friction test. The physical properties and friction-reducing mechanism of synthesized composite were ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetry. The four-ball test results suggested the Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive could effectively promote the load-carrying capacity of base oil, and decrease the friction coefficient as well as wear scar diameter. Ball-on-disc sliding friction test results showed that the base oil with Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive possessed lower friction coefficients than that of base oil in the whole temperature range, particularly at high temperatures. The protective layer consisted of composite additive and native oxides from superalloy substrate formed on the worn surface to prevent the direct contact between friction pair. The Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite played a dominant role in friction-reducing function in the protective layer at elevated temperatures, and the reason for this was that MoS2 possessed layered structure and superior adsorption capacity, and Co(ReO4)2 had experienced thermal softening with elevated temperatures and maintained shear-susceptible hexagonal structure.

  4. Monolithic Au/CeO2 nanorod framework catalyst prepared by dealloying for low-temperature CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Duan, Dong; Li, Guijing; Feng, Wenjie; Yang, Sen; Sun, Zhanbo

    2018-03-01

    Monolithic Au/CeO2 nanorod frameworks (NFs) with porous structure were prepared by dealloying melt-spun Al89.7Ce10Au0.3 ribbons. After calcination in O2, a 3D Au/CeO2 NF catalyst with large surface area was obtained and used for low-temperature CO oxidation. The small Au clusters/nanoparticles (NPs) were in situ supported and highly dispersed on the nanorod surface, creating many nanoscale contact interfaces. XPS results demonstrated that high-concentration oxygen vacancy and Au δ+/Au0 co-existed in the calcined sample. The Au/CeO2 nanorod catalyst calcined at 400 °C exhibited much higher catalytic activity for CO oxidation compared with the dealloyed sample and bare CeO2 nanorods. Moreover, its complete reaction temperature was as low as 91 °C. The designed Au/CeO2 NF catalyst not only possessed extreme sintering resistance but also exhibited high performance owing to the enhanced interaction between the Au clusters/NPs and CeO2 nanorod during calcination.

  5. Diurnal changes in photosynthetic parameters of Populus tremuloides, modulated by elevated concentrations of CO2 and/or O3 and daily climatic variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kets, Katre; Darbah, Joseph N.T.; Sober, Anu; Riikonen, Johanna; Sober, Jaak; Karnosky, David F.

    2010-01-01

    The diurnal changes in light-saturated photosynthesis (Pn) under elevated CO 2 and/or O 3 in relation to stomatal conductance (g s ), water potential, intercellular [CO 2 ], leaf temperature and vapour-pressure difference between leaf and air (VPD L ) were studied at the Aspen FACE site. Two aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones differing in their sensitivity to ozone were measured. The depression in Pn was found after 10:00 h. The midday decline in Pn corresponded with both decreased g s and decreased Rubisco carboxylation efficiency, Vc max . As a result of increasing VPD L , g s decreased. Elevated [CO 2 ] resulted in more pronounced midday decline in Pn compared to ambient concentrations. Moreover, this decline was more pronounced under combined treatment compared to elevated CO 2 treatment. The positive impact of CO 2 on Pn was relatively more pronounced in days with environmental stress but relatively less pronounced during midday depression. The negative impact of ozone tended to decrease in both cases. - Diurnal and seasonal patterns of environmental stress (drought, high air temperature) affects a relative impact of elevated concentrations of CO 2 and O 3 on trees.

  6. The counteracting effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and drought episodes: Studies of enchytraeid communities in a dry heathland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Kristine; Krogh, Paul Henning; Linden, Leon

    2010-01-01

    The potential impacts of interactions of multiple climate change factors in soil ecosystems have received little attention. Most studies have addressed effects of single factors such as increased temperature or atmospheric CO2 but little is known about how such environmental factors will interact...... impact of drought on the enchytraeids, compared to the year with a wet summer and autumn (2007). Our study emphasises the importance of multi-factorial experimental design as a means to investigate effects of climatic changes.......The potential impacts of interactions of multiple climate change factors in soil ecosystems have received little attention. Most studies have addressed effects of single factors such as increased temperature or atmospheric CO2 but little is known about how such environmental factors will interact....... In the present study we investigate the effects of in situ exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperatures and prolonged drought episodes on field communities of Enchytraeidae (Oligochaeta) in a dry heathland (Brandbjerg, Denmark). Increased CO2 had a positive effect on enchytraeid...

  7. Nitrous oxide flux under changing temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are investigating nitrous oxide flux seasonal trends and response to temperature and CO2 increases in a boreal peatland. Peatlands located in boreal regions make up a third of global wetland area and are expected to have the highest temperature increases in response to climat...

  8. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Joseph C V; Allen, Leon H

    2009-07-15

    Two cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum cv. CP73-1547 and CP88-1508) were grown for 3 months in paired-companion, temperature-gradient, sunlit greenhouses under daytime [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720 (double ambient) micromol mol(-1) and at temperatures of 1.5 degrees C (near ambient) and 6.0 degrees C higher than outside ambient temperature. Leaf area and biomass, stem biomass and juice and CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of fully developed leaves were measured at harvest. On a main stem basis, leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume were increased by growth at doubled [CO2] or high temperature. Such increases were even greater under combination of doubled [CO2]/high temperature. Plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination averaged 50%, 26%, 84% and 124% greater in leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume, respectively, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. In addition, plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination were 2-3-fold higher in stem soluble solids than those at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. Although midday CER of fully developed leaves was not affected by doubled [CO2] or high temperature, plants grown at doubled [CO2] were 41-43% less in leaf stomatal conductance and 69-79% greater in leaf water-use efficiency, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Activity of PEPC was down-regulated 23-32% at doubled [CO2], while high temperature did not have a significant impact on this enzyme. Activity of Rubisco was not affected by growth at doubled [CO2], but was reduced 15-28% at high temperature. The increases in stem juice production and stem juice soluble solids concentration for sugarcane grown at doubled [CO2] or high temperature, or at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination, were partially

  9. Photosynthetic pigments and gas exchange in castor bean under conditions of above the optimal temperature and high CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola França Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The castor bean plant, a Euphorbiaceae oil seed C3-metabolism rustic and drought-resistant plant, is cultivated in a wide range of environments due to its good adaptive capacity. However, given the current environmental changes, many biochemical and physiological impacts may affect the productivity of important crops, such as castor bean. This work aimed to evaluate the impacts of the castor bean gas exchange in response to high temperature and increased CO2concentration.Our experiment was conducted in a phytotron located at Embrapa Algodão in 2010. We adopted a completely randomized design, with four treatments in a factorial combination of two temperatures (30/20 and 37/30°C and two CO2 levels (400 and 800 mmol L-1; four replications were performed, obtained in five surveys over the growth cycle, for a total of 80 sample units. An infrared gas analyzer (IRGA - Infra Red Gas Analyzer was used for the quantification of the photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration. An increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature negatively affected the physiology of the castor bean plants, decreasing the net rate of photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance.

  10. Growth under elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration accelerates leaf senescence in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mata, Lourdes; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación; Agüera, Eloísa

    2012-09-15

    Some morphogenetic and metabolic processes were sensitive to a high atmospheric CO(2) concentration during sunflower primary leaf ontogeny. Young leaves of sunflower plants growing under elevated CO(2) concentration exhibited increased growth, as reflected by the high specific leaf mass referred to as dry weight in young leaves (16 days). The content of photosynthetic pigments decreased with leaf development, especially in plants grown under elevated CO(2) concentrations, suggesting that high CO(2) accelerates chlorophyll degradation, and also possibly leaf senescence. Elevated CO(2) concentration increased the oxidative stress in sunflower plants by increasing H(2)O(2) levels and decreasing activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and ascorbate peroxidase. The loss of plant defenses probably increases the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the chloroplast, decreasing the photosynthetic pigment content as a result. Elevated CO(2) concentration was found to boost photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, especially in young leaves. High CO(2) also increased the starch and soluble sugar contents (glucose and fructose) and the C/N ratio during sunflower primary leaf development. At the beginning of senescence, we observed a strong increase in the hexoses to sucrose ratio that was especially marked at high CO(2) concentration. These results indicate that elevated CO(2) concentration could promote leaf senescence in sunflower plants by affecting the soluble sugar levels, the C/N ratio and the oxidative status during leaf ontogeny. It is likely that systemic signals produced in plants grown with elevated CO(2), lead to early senescence and a higher oxidation state of the cells of these plant leaves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. PENGARUH TEMPERATUR TERHADAP TINGKAT SERAPAN AIR DALAM BAHAN POLY (2-VINYL PYRIDINE -CO-STYRENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr Wiendartun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophilic properties of organic polymer such as Poly (2-Vinylpyridine- Co-Styrene have been found to have a correlation with other physical properties especially the electric resistivity. In this work, we have studied one of the physical properties of a polymer material, Poly (2-Vinylpyridine- Co-Styrene, that is the electric resistivity. It was studied on the basis of its relation with the concentration, temperature, humidity and the distance between their electrodes. The sample fabricated consists of two types of consentration: 0.03 gr/ml and 0.05 gr/ml with the distance between the two electrodes are 0.40 mm and 0.80 mm respectively. Towards these samples, we investigated the resistance coefficient for every 2% change in humidity for both drying and watering processes. From the experiment we obtain the following results: 1 There is hysteresis during the watering and drying processes indicating the continuity of resistance of this material, 2 Sample with smaller distance of electrodes performs better than that of the longer ones, 3 Sample fabricated from solution with higher concentration performs better than that of the lower ones, 4 Room temperature plays a significant role on the performance of the polymer material between the associated electrodes. These results could be used as a stepping-stone toward the more advance research leading the determination of film stability, resistancy upon temperature variation etc, so that this polymer material could be further developed into the humidity sensor device material. Key words: Hydrophilic, electric resistance, humidity sensor and polymer.

  12. Low-temperature upgrading of low-calorific biogas for CO2 mitigation using DBD-catalyst hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Tsukijihara, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Wataru; Okazaki, Ken

    2006-10-01

    Although huge amounts of biogas, which consists of 20-60% of CH4 in CO2/N2, can be obtained from landfills, coal mines, and agricultural residues, most of them are simply flared and wasted: because global warming potential of biogas is 5-15 times as potent as CO2. Poor combustibility of such biogas makes it difficult to utilize in conventional energy system. The purpose of this project is to promote the profitable recovery of methane from poor biogas via non-thermal plasma technology. We propose low-temperature steam reforming of biogas using DBD generated in catalyst beds. Methane is partially converted into hydrogen, and then fed into internal combustion engines for improved ignition stability as well as efficient operation. Low-temperature steam reforming is beneficial because exhaust gas from an engine can be used to activate catalyst beds. Space velocity (3600-15000 hr-1), reaction temperature (300-650^oC), and energy cost (30-150 kJ per mol CH4) have been investigated with simulated biogas (20-60% CH4 in mixtures of CO2/N2). The DBD enhances reaction rate of CH4 by a factor of ten at given catalyst temperatures, which is a rate-determining step of methane steam reforming, while species concentration of upgraded biogas was governed by thermodynamic equilibrium in the presence of catalyst.

  13. Can rising CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere mitigate the impact of drought years on tree growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Alexis; Plumpton, Heather; Auty, David; Ogee, Jerome; MacCarthy, Heather; Bert, Didier; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Oren, Ram; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations and nitrogen deposition rates have increased substantially over the last century and are expected to continue unabated. As a result, terrestrial ecosystems will experience warmer temperatures and some may even experience droughts of a more intense and frequent nature that could lead to widespread forest mortality. Thus there is mounting pressure to understand and predict how forest growth will be affected by such environmental interactions in the future. In this study we used annual tree growth data from the Duke Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment to determine the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (+200 ppm) and Nitrogen fertilisation (11.2 g of N m-2 yr-1) on the stem biomass increments of mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees from 1996 to 2010. A non-linear mixed-effects model was developed to provide estimates of annual ring specific gravity in all trees using cambial age and annual ring width as explanatory variables. Elevated CO2 did not have a significant effect on annual ring specific gravity, but N fertilisation caused a slight decrease of approximately 2% compared to the non-fertilised in both the ambient and CO2-elevated plots. When basal area increments were multiplied by wood specific gravity predictions to provide estimates of stem biomass, there was a 40% increase in the CO2-elevated plots compared to those in ambient conditions. This difference remained relatively stable until the application of the fertilisation treatment, which caused a further increase in biomass increments that peaked after three years. Unexpectedly the magnitude of this second response was similar in the CO2-elevated and ambient plots (about 25% in each after 3 years), suggesting that there was no interaction between the concentration of CO2 and the availability of soil N on biomass increments. Importantly, during drier years when annual precipitation was less than 1000 mm we observed a significant decrease in annual

  14. Evidence for a temperature-induced spin-state transition of Co3+ in La2-xSrxCoO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, N.; Haverkort, M. W.; Benomar, M.; Cwik, M.; Braden, M.; Lorenz, T.

    2011-05-01

    We study the magnetic susceptibility of mixed-valent La2-xSrxCoO4 single crystals in the doping range of 0.5⩽x⩽0.8 for temperatures up to 1000 K. The magnetism below room temperature is described by paramagnetic Co2+ in the high-spin state and by Co3+ in the nonmagnetic low-spin state. At high temperatures, an increase in susceptibility is seen, which we attribute to a temperature-induced spin-state transition of Co3+. The susceptibility is analyzed by comparison to full-multiplet calculations for the thermal population of the high- and intermediate-spin states of Co3+.

  15. Estimating respiration of roots in soil: interactions with soil CO2, soil temperature and soil water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Lynch, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Little information is available on the variability of the dynamics of the actual and observed root respiration rate in relation to abiotic factors. In this study, we describe I) interactions between soil CO2 concentration, temperature, soil water content and root respiration, and II) the effect of

  16. Dynamics of dimethylsulphoniopropionate and dimethylsulphide under different CO2 concentrations during a mesocosm experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. LeQuéré

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of seawater acidification on the concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, and the activity of the enzyme DMSP-lyase was investigated during a pelagic ecosystem CO2 enrichment experiment (PeECE III in spring 2005. Natural phytoplankton blooms were studied for 24 days under present, double and triple partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2; pH=8.3, 8.0, 7.8 in triplicate 25 m3 enclosures. The results indicate similar DMSP concentrations and DMSP-lyase activity (DLA patterns for all treatments. Hence, DMSP and DLA do not seem to have been affected by the CO2 treatment. In contrast, DMS concentrations showed small but statistically significant differences in the temporal development of the low versus the high CO2 treatments. The low pCO2 enclosures had higher DMS concentrations during the first 10 days, after which the levels decreased earlier and more rapidly than in the other treatments. Integrated over the whole study period, DMS concentrations were not significantly different from those of the double and triple pCO2 treatments. Pigment and flow-cytometric data indicate that phytoplanktonic populations were generally similar between the treatments, suggesting a certain resilience of the marine ecosystem under study to the induced pH changes, which is reflected in DMSP and DLA. However, there were significant differences in bacterial community structure and the abundance of one group of viruses infecting nanoeukaryotic algae. The amount of DMS accumulated per total DMSP or chlorophyll-a differed significantly between the present and future scenarios, suggesting that the pathways for DMS production or bacterial DMS consumption were affected by seawater pH. A comparison with previous work (PeECE II suggests that DMS concentrations do not respond consistently to pelagic ecosystem CO2 enrichment experiments.

  17. Temperature dependence of differential conductance in Co-based Heusler alloy Co2TiSn and superconductor Pb junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooka, Ryutaro; Shigeta, Iduru; Umetsu, Rie Y.; Nomura, Akiko; Yubuta, Kunio; Yamauchi, Touru; Kanomata, Takeshi; Hiroi, Masahiko

    2018-05-01

    We investigated temperature dependence of differential conductance G (V) in planar junctions consisting of Co-based Heusler alloy Co2TiSn and superconductor Pb. Ferromagnetic Co2TiSn was predicted to be half-metal by first-principles band calculations. The spin polarization P of Co2TiSn was deduced to be 60.0% at 1.4 K by the Andreev reflection spectroscopy. The G (V) spectral shape was smeared gradually with increasing temperature and its structure was disappeared above the superconducting transition temperature Tc. Theoretical model analysis revealed that the superconducting energy gap Δ was 1.06 meV at 1.4 K and the Tc was 6.8 K , indicating that both values were suppressed from bulk values. However, the temperature dependent Δ (T) behavior was in good agreement with that of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. The experimental results exhibit that the superconductivity of Pb attached to half-metallic Co2TiSn was kept the conventional BCS mechanism characterized strong-coupling superconductors while its superconductivity was slightly suppressed by the superconducting proximity effect at the Co2TiSn/Pb interface.

  18. Potential impact of increased temperature and CO2 on particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate in the Southeastern Bering Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of elevated sea surface temperature (SST and pCO2 on algal community structure and particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPp concentrations in the southeastern Bering Sea was examined using a shipboard “Ecostat” continuous culture system. The ecostat system was used to mimic the conditions projected to exist in the world's oceans by the end of this century (i.e. elevated pCO2 (750 ppm and elevated SST (ambient + 4°C. Two experiments were conducted using natural phytoplankton assemblages from the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC central basin and from the middle domain of the southeastern continental shelf. At the HNLC site, the relative abundances of haptophytes and pelagophytes were higher and the relative abundance of diatoms lower under “greenhouse” conditions (i.e. combined 750 ppm CO2 and elevated temperature than control conditions (380 ppm CO2 and ambient temperature. This shift in algal community structure was accompanied by increases in DMSPp (2–3 fold, DMSPp:Chl a (2–3 fold and DMSP:PON (2 fold. At the continental shelf site, the changes in the relative abundances of haptophytes, pelagophytes and diatoms under “greenhouse” conditions were similar to those observed at the HNLC site, with 2.5 fold increases in DMSPp, 50–100% increases in DMSPp:Chl a and 1.8 fold increases in DMSP:PON. At both locations, changes in community structure and the DMSPp parameters were largely driven by increasing temperature. The observed changes were also consistent with the phytoplankton-DMS-albedo climate feedback mechanism proposed in the Charlson-Lovelock-Andreae-Warren (CLAW hypothesis.

  19. Elevated tropospheric CO2 and O3 concentrations impair organic pollutant removal from grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Fuxun; Eisenhauer, Nico; Jousset, Alexandre; Butenschoen, Olaf; Ji, Rong; Guo, Hongyan

    2018-04-03

    The concentrations of tropospheric CO 2 and O 3 have been rising due to human activities. These rising concentrations may have strong impacts on soil functions as changes in plant physiology may lead to altered plant-soil interactions. Here, the effects of eCO 2 and eO 3 on the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollutants in grassland soil were studied. Both elevated CO 2 and O 3 concentrations decreased PAH removal with lowest removal rates at elevated CO 2 and elevated O 3 concentrations. This effect was linked to a shift in soil microbial community structure by structural equation modeling. Elevated CO 2 and O 3 concentrations reduced the abundance of gram-positive bacteria, which were tightly linked to soil enzyme production and PAH degradation. Although plant diversity did not buffer CO 2 and O 3 effects, certain soil microbial communities and functions were affected by plant communities, indicating the potential for longer-term phytoremediation approaches. Results of this study show that elevated CO 2 and O 3 concentrations may compromise the ability of soils to degrade organic pollutants. On the other hand, the present study also indicates that the targeted assembly of plant communities may be a promising tool to shape soil microbial communities for the degradation of organic pollutants in a changing world.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  1. CO2 recovery system using solar energy; Taiyo energy wo riyoshita CO2 bunri kaishu system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosho, F; Naito, H; Yugami, H; Arashi, H [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    As a part of studies on chemical absorption process with MEA (monoethanolamine) for CO2 recovery from boiler waste gas in thermal power plants, use of solar heat as MEA regenerating energy was studied. An integrated stationary evacuated concentrator (ISEC) effective as collector in a medium temperature range was used to realize a regenerating temperature range of 100-120degC. ISEC is featured by vacuum insulation, use of selective absorbing membranes for an absorber, a CPC (compound parabolic concentrator)-shaped reflection mirror, and high-efficiency. An MEA regenerator is composed of an ISEC and PG(propylene glycol)-MEA heat exchanger, and circulates PG as heat medium. Heat collection experiment was also made using water instead of MEA. Both batch and continuous systems could supply a heat quantity necessary for MEA regeneration. CO2 concentration in the top of the regenerator rapidly decreased with PG circulation regenerating MEA. As mol ratios of CO2/MEA were compared between before and after regeneration, a recovery rate was estimated to be 59.4% for the batch system. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Emission of OH* and CO2* during the high-temperature oxidation of acetone in reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereza, A. M.; Smirnov, V. N.; Vlasov, P. A.; Shumova, V. V.; Garmash, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental and kinetic modeling study of the ignition of a stoichiometric mixture of acetone with oxygen diluted by argon was carried out behind reflected shock waves within the temperature range of 1350-1810 K for the total mixture concentration [M 50] ~ 10-5 mol/cm3. Emission signals were recorded simultaneously for three different wavelengths: OH* (λ = 308 nm) and {{{CO}}}2* (λ1 = 365 nm; λ2 = 451 nm). It was revealed that the time it takes to reach the maximum of emission of OH* and {{{CO}}}2* is practically the same over the whole temperature range. At the same time, the emission profiles of {{{CO}}}2* after the maximum was attained, recorded at λ2 = 451 nm, differ noticeably from the profiles recorded at λ1 = 365 nm. For numerical modeling of the emission profiles of OH* and {{{CO}}}2* , the corresponding sets of excitation and quenching reactions available in the literature were used. In the course of our numerical simulations we succeeded in good agreement of our own experimental and simulation results on acetone ignition and the results available in the literature for conditions under consideration.

  3. Trace and low concentration co2 removal methods and apparatus utilizing metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-10

    In general, this disclosure describes techniques for removing trace and low concentration CO2 from fluids using SIFSIX-n-M MOFs, wherein n is at least two and M is a metal. In some embodiments, the metal is zinc or copper. Embodiments include devices comprising SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids. In particular, embodiments relate to devices and methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids, wherein CO2 concentration is trace. Methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids can occur in confined spaces. SIFSIX-n-M MOFs can comprise bidentate organic ligands. In a specific embodiment, SIFSIX-n-M MOFs comprise pyrazine or dipryidilacetylene ligands.

  4. Investigational study of the CO2 balance in high temperature CO2 separation technology; Nisanka tanso koon bunri gijutsu ni okeru CO2 balance ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted to clarify the adaptable environment and effectivity of technologies of high temperature separation/recovery/reutilization of CO2. In the study, data collection, arrangement and comparison were made of various separation technologies such as the membrane method, absorption method, adsorption method, and cryogenic separation method. With the LNG-fired power generation as an example, the adaptable environment and effectivity were made clear by making models by a process simulator, ASPEN PLUS. Moreover, using this simulator, effects of replacing the conventional steam reforming of hydrocarbon with the CO2 reforming were made clear with the methanol synthesis as an example. As to the rock fixation treatment of high temperature CO2, collection/arrangement were made of the data on the fixation treatment of the CO2 separated at high temperature into basic rocks such as peridotite and serpentinite in order to clarify the adaptable environment and effectivity of the treatment. Besides, a potentiality of the fixation to concrete waste was made clear. 57 refs., 57 figs., 93 tabs.

  5. Concentration of Co2+, Fe3+ and Zn2+ ions with microbiological collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisel, S.; Dulman, V.; Cecal, A.

    1975-01-01

    By means of the Spicaria Biolacea Abbott fungus a satisfactory microbiological concentration of 60 Co 2+ , sup(55+59)Fe 3+ and 65 Zn 2+ can be obtained under optimum experimental conditions. By repeating the cultures on the media obtained after filtration, multistage processes, and by adding the necessary nutritive substances, practically quantitative concentration of these three elements can be produced. The experimental results plead in favour of a concentration mechanism of the isotopes inside the cell with no surface adsorption. The influence of the experimental conditions i.e. pH, time and concentration have been investigated. (T.G.)

  6. Combination treatment of elevated UVB radiation, CO2 and temperature has little effect on silver birch (Betula pendula) growth and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavola, Anu; Nybakken, Line; Rousi, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Petrelius, Mari; Kellomäki, Seppo; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2013-12-01

    Elevations of carbon dioxide, temperature and ultraviolet-B (UBV) radiation in the growth environment may have a high impact on the accumulation of carbon in plants, and the different factors may work in opposite directions or induce additive effects. To detect the changes in the growth and phytochemistry of silver birch (Betula pendula) seedlings, six genotypes were exposed to combinations of ambient or elevated levels of CO2 , temperature and UVB radiation in top-closed chambers for 7 weeks. The genotypes were relatively similar in their responses, and no significant interactive effects of three-level climate factors on the measured parameters were observed. Elevated UVB had no effect on growth, nor did it alter plant responses to CO2 and/or temperature in combined treatments. Growth in all plant parts increased under elevated CO2 , and height and stem biomass increased under elevated temperature. Increased carbon distribution to biomass did not reduce its allocation to phytochemicals: condensed tannins, most flavonols and phenolic acids accumulated under elevated CO2 and elevated UVB, but this effect disappeared under elevated temperature. Leaf nitrogen content decreased under elevated CO2 . We conclude that, as a result of high genetic variability in phytochemicals, B. pendula seedlings have potential to adapt to the tested environmental changes. The induction in protective flavonoids under UVB radiation together with the positive impact of elevated CO2 and temperature mitigates possible UVB stress effects, and thus atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature are the climate change factors that will dictate the establishment and success of birch at higher altitudes in the future. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. A joint global carbon inversion system using both CO2 and 13CO2 atmospheric concentration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing M.; Mo, Gang; Deng, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Observations of 13CO2 at 73 sites compiled in the GLOBALVIEW database are used for an additional constraint in a global atmospheric inversion of the surface CO2 flux using CO2 observations at 210 sites (62 collocated with 13CO2 sites) for the 2002-2004 period for 39 land regions and 11 ocean regions. This constraint is implemented using prior CO2 fluxes estimated with a terrestrial ecosystem model and an ocean model. These models simulate 13CO2 discrimination rates of terrestrial photosynthesis and ocean-atmosphere diffusion processes. In both models, the 13CO2 disequilibrium between fluxes to and from the atmosphere is considered due to the historical change in atmospheric 13CO2 concentration. This joint inversion system using both13CO2 and CO2 observations is effectively a double deconvolution system with consideration of the spatial variations of isotopic discrimination and disequilibrium. Compared to the CO2-only inversion, this 13CO2 constraint on the inversion considerably reduces the total land carbon sink from 3.40 ± 0.84 to 2.53 ± 0.93 Pg C year-1 but increases the total oceanic carbon sink from 1.48 ± 0.40 to 2.36 ± 0.49 Pg C year-1. This constraint also changes the spatial distribution of the carbon sink. The largest sink increase occurs in the Amazon, while the largest source increases are in southern Africa, and Asia, where CO2 data are sparse. Through a case study, in which the spatial distribution of the annual 13CO2 discrimination rate over land is ignored by treating it as a constant at the global average of -14. 1 ‰, the spatial distribution of the inverted CO2 flux over land was found to be significantly modified (up to 15 % for some regions). The uncertainties in our disequilibrium flux estimation are 8.0 and 12.7 Pg C year-1 ‰ for land and ocean, respectively. These uncertainties induced the unpredictability of 0.47 and 0.54 Pg C year-1 in the inverted CO2 fluxes for land and ocean, respectively. Our joint inversion system is therefore

  8. Dielectric and magnetic properties of (Zn, Co) co-doped SnO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajwali, Khan; Fang Ming-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of (Zn, Co) co-doped SnO 2 nanoparticles were prepared using a co-precipitation method. The influence of (Zn, Co) co-doping on electrical, dielectric, and magnetic properties was studied. All of the (Zn, Co) co-doped SnO 2 powder samples have the same tetragonal structure of SnO 2 . A decrease in the dielectric constant was observed with the increase of Co doping concentration. It was found that the dielectric constant and dielectric loss values decrease, while AC electrical conductivity increases with doping concentration and frequency. Magnetization measurements revealed that the Co doping SnO 2 samples exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism. Our results illustrate that (Zn, Co) co-doped SnO 2 nanoparticles have an excellent dielectric, magnetic properties, and high electrical conductivity than those reported previously, indicating that these (Zn, Co) co-doped SnO 2 materials can be used in the field of the ultrahigh dielectric material, high frequency device, and spintronics. (paper)

  9. On the losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Villaume, Sandra; Jeandet, Philippe; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume

    2010-08-11

    Pouring champagne into a glass is far from being consequenceless with regard to its dissolved CO(2) concentration. Measurements of losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving were done from a bottled Champagne wine initially holding 11.4 +/- 0.1 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2). Measurements were done at three champagne temperatures (i.e., 4, 12, and 18 degrees C) and for two different ways of serving (i.e., a champagne-like and a beer-like way of serving). The beer-like way of serving champagne was found to impact its concentration of dissolved CO(2) significantly less. Moreover, the higher the champagne temperature is, the higher its loss of dissolved CO(2) during the pouring process, which finally constitutes the first analytical proof that low temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps it to retain its effervescence during the pouring process. The diffusion coefficient of CO(2) molecules in champagne and champagne viscosity (both strongly temperature-dependent) are suspected to be the two main parameters responsible for such differences. Besides, a recently developed dynamic-tracking technique using IR thermography was also used in order to visualize the cloud of gaseous CO(2) which flows down from champagne during the pouring process, thus visually confirming the strong influence of champagne temperature on its loss of dissolved CO(2).

  10. The interactive effects of elevated CO2, temperature and N supply on rice yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baysa, Marieta C.; Tremmel, David C.; Reynolds, James F.; Rivero, Gilda C.; Tabbada, Reynaldo A.

    2001-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR 72)was grown in growth chambers under combinations of two CO 2 (375 and 750 μL L -1 ), temperature(29/21 and 34/26 degrees centigrade day/night) and N (40 and 80 mg L -1 ) regimes from sowing until grain maturity. Panicle production was significantly enhanced by elevated CO 2 with more pronounced effects at high temperature and N. CO 2 -enriched plants grown at high temperatures had lower harvest indices due to reductions in the number of grains per panicle and grain mass. Any potential benefit of increased atmospheric CO 2 on rice grain yield and grain N content under optimal N supply may therefore be dampened by higher temperatures associated with possible future global warming conditions. (Author)

  11. Influence of O{sub 2} on the dielectric properties of CO{sub 2} at the elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Mingzhe; Sun, Hao; Yang, Fei, E-mail: yfei2007@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Yi, E-mail: wuyic51@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhexin; Wang, Xiaohua; Wu, Mingliang [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-11-15

    SF{sub 6} gas is widely used in the high voltage circuit breakers but considering its high global warming potential other substitutes are being sought. Among them CO{sub 2} was investigated and even has been used in some practical products. However, at room temperature, the dielectric properties of CO{sub 2} are relatively lower than SF{sub 6} and air. The goal of this work is to investigate a CO{sub 2}-based gas to improve the performance of the pure CO{sub 2}. In this paper, the dielectric properties of hot CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures related to the dielectric recovery phase of the circuit breaker were investigated in the temperature range from 300 K to 4000 K and in the pressure range from 0.01 MPa to 1.0 MPa. The species compositions of hot CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} were obtained based on Gibbs free energy minimization under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium and local chemical equilibrium. The reduced critical electric field strength of CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} was determined by balancing electron generation and loss. These were calculated using the electron energy distribution function by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. The validity of the calculation method and the cross sections data was confirmed by comparing the measurements and calculations of the electron swarm data in previous work. The results indicate that in pure CO{sub 2} the critical electric field strength is higher only in higher temperature range. By adding the O{sub 2} into the CO{sub 2}, the critical electric field strength at lower temperature is effectively enhanced. CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures have a much better dielectric strength than both the pure CO{sub 2} and air and thus have the potential to improve the CO{sub 2}-based gas circuit breakers. Similar conclusions can also be found in others’ work, which further confirm the validity of these results.

  12. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Wanamaker, Alan D., Jr.; Downing, John A.

    2017-06-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3-) across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto) in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass-balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3- during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3- uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  13. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Morales-Williams

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3− across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass–balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3− during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3− uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  14. Acute physiological impacts of CO2 ocean sequestration on marine animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimatsu, A.; Hayashi, M.; Lee, K.S.; Murata, K.; Kumagai, E.

    2005-01-01

    The biological impacts of ocean carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration must be carefully considered before it is implemented as a mitigation strategy. This paper presented details of a study investigating the effects of high CO 2 concentrations on marine fish, lobster, and octopus. The influence of water temperature on the physiological effects of CO 2 was also discussed. In the first part of the study, eggs and larvae of red seabream were exposed to both CO 2 and HCI-acidified seawater at identical pH levels. Seabream in the CO 2 group showed a much higher mortality rate than fish in the HCI group. Other tests showed that Japanese Flounder died after complete recovery of pH in seawater equilibrated with 5 per cent CO 2 . Cardiac output was rapidly depressed in Yellowtail fish without significant changes in blood oxygen concentrations. Lower temperatures resulted in higher mortality and delayed pH recovery during hypercapnia in all fish. Western rock lobsters were the most tolerant to CO 2 among all species tested. The recovery of hemolymph pH was complete at exposure to CO 2 concentrations of 1 per cent. Changes in hemolymph bicarbonate concentrations indicated that acid-based regulatory mechanisms differed between fish and lobsters. Mortality rates for octopus were significant at CO 2 concentrations of 1 per cent. The results of all tests showed that aquatic animals are more susceptible to increases in ambient CO 2 levels than terrestrial animals. It was concluded that even slight elevations in CO 2 concentration levels adversely affected physiological functioning in the tested species. It was concluded that CO 2 sequestration in deeper, colder waters will have a more pronounced effect on aquatic animals due to the interactions between CO 2 and lower temperatures, as well as the fact that most deep-sea fish are less tolerant to environmental perturbations. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  15. A MIXED MODEL ANALYSIS OF SOIL CO2 EFFLUX AND NIGHT-TIME RESPIRATION RESPONSES TO ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: We investigated the effects of elevated soil temperature and atmospheric CO2 on soil CO2 efflux and system respiration responses. The study was conducted in sun-lit controlled-environment chambers using two-year-old Douglas-fir seedlings grown in reconstructed litter-so...

  16. The sensitivity of stand-scale photosynthesis and transpiration to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijt, B.; Barton, C.; Rey, A.; Jarvis, P. G.

    The 3-dimensional forest model MAESTRO was used to simulate daily and annual photosynthesis and transpiration fluxes of forest stands and the sensitivity of these fluxes to potential changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]), temperature, water stress and phenology. The effects of possible feed-backs from increased leaf area and limitations to leaf nutrition were simulated by imposing changes in leaf area and nitrogen content. Two different tree species were considered: Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr., a conifer with long needle longevity and large leaf area, and Betula pendula Roth., a broad-leaved deciduous species with an open canopy and small leaf area. Canopy photosynthetic production in trees was predicted to increase with atmospheric [CO2] and length of the growing season and to decrease with increased water stress. Associated increases in leaf area increased production further only in the B. pendula canopy, where the original leaf area was relatively small. Assumed limitations in N uptake affected B. pendula more than P. sitchensis. The effect of increased temperature was shown to depend on leaf area and nitrogen content. The different sensitivities of the two species were related to their very different canopy structure. Increased [CO2] reduced transpiration, but larger leaf area, early leaf growth, and higher temperature all led to increased water use. These effects were limited by feedbacks from soil water stress. The simulations suggest that, with the projected climate change, there is some increase in stand annual `water use efficiency', but the actual water losses to the atmosphere may not always decrease.

  17. High temperature infrared absorption cross sections of methane near 3.4 μm in Ar and CO2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Neupane, Sneha; Pryor, Owen; Peale, Robert E.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2018-02-01

    The absorption cross-sections of CH4 at two wavelengths in the mid-IR region: λpeak = 3403.4 nm and λvalley = 3403.7 nm were measured. Data were taken using three different compositions of non-reactive gas mixtures comprising CH4/Ar/CO2 between 700 laser. Also, broadband room temperature methane cross section measurements were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and the cascade laser to gain a better insight into the changes of the line shapes in various bath gasses (Ar, CO2, and N2). An application of the high-temperature cross-section data was demonstrated to determine the concentration of methane during oxy-methane combustion in a mixture of CO2, O2, and Ar. Current measurements will be valuable addition to the spectroscopy database for methane- an important fuel used for power generation and heating around the world.

  18. Low concentration CO2 capture using physical adsorbents: Are Metal-Organic Frameworks becoming the new benchmark materials?

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef; Guillerm, Vincent; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The capture and separation of traces and concentrated CO2 from important commodities such as CH4, H2, O2 and N2, is becoming important in many areas related to energy security and environmental sustainability. While trace CO2 concentration removal applications have been modestly studied for decades, the spike in interest in the capture of concentrated CO2 was motivated by the need for new energy vectors to replace highly concentrated carbon fuels and the necessity to reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. CO2 capture from various gas streams, at different concentrations, using physical adsorbents, such as activated carbon, zeolites, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), is attractive. However, the adsorbents must be designed with consideration of many parameters including CO2 affinity, kinetics, energetics, stability, capture mechanism, in addition to cost. Here, we perform a systematic analysis regarding the key technical parameters that are required for the best CO2 capture performance using physical adsorbents. We also experimentally demonstrate a suitable material model of Metal Organic Framework as advanced adsorbents with unprecedented properties for CO2 capture in a wide range of CO2 concentration. These recently developed class of MOF adsorbents represent a breakthrough finding in the removal of traces CO2 using physical adsorption. This platform shows colossal tuning potential for more efficient separation agents.

  19. Low concentration CO2 capture using physical adsorbents: Are Metal-Organic Frameworks becoming the new benchmark materials?

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2016-03-30

    The capture and separation of traces and concentrated CO2 from important commodities such as CH4, H2, O2 and N2, is becoming important in many areas related to energy security and environmental sustainability. While trace CO2 concentration removal applications have been modestly studied for decades, the spike in interest in the capture of concentrated CO2 was motivated by the need for new energy vectors to replace highly concentrated carbon fuels and the necessity to reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. CO2 capture from various gas streams, at different concentrations, using physical adsorbents, such as activated carbon, zeolites, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), is attractive. However, the adsorbents must be designed with consideration of many parameters including CO2 affinity, kinetics, energetics, stability, capture mechanism, in addition to cost. Here, we perform a systematic analysis regarding the key technical parameters that are required for the best CO2 capture performance using physical adsorbents. We also experimentally demonstrate a suitable material model of Metal Organic Framework as advanced adsorbents with unprecedented properties for CO2 capture in a wide range of CO2 concentration. These recently developed class of MOF adsorbents represent a breakthrough finding in the removal of traces CO2 using physical adsorption. This platform shows colossal tuning potential for more efficient separation agents.

  20. Decontamination of solid matrices using supercritical CO2: study of contaminant-additives-CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galy, J.

    2006-11-01

    This work deals with the decontamination of solid matrices by supercritical CO 2 and more particularly with the study of the interactions between the surfactants and the CO 2 in one part, and with the interactions between the contaminant and the surfactants in another part. The first part of this study has revealed the different interactions between the Pluronics molecules and the supercritical CO 2 . The diagrams graphs have shown that the pluronics (PE 6100, PE 8100 and PE 10100) present a solubility in the supercritical CO 2 low but sufficient (0.1% m/m at 25 MPa and 313 K) for the studied application: the treatment of weak quantities of cerium oxide (or plutonium). An empirical approach based on the evolutions of the slops value and of the origin ordinates of the PT diagrams has been carried out to simulate the phase diagrams PT of the Pluronics. A modeling based on the state equations 'SAFT' (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory) has been studied in order to confirm the experimental results of the disorder points and to understand the role of the different blocks 'PEO' and 'PPO' in the behaviour of Pluronics; this modeling confirms the evolution of the slopes value with the 'CO 2 -phily' of the system. The measure of the surface tension in terms of the Pluronics concentration (PE 6100, 81000 and 10100) has shown different behaviours. For the PE 6100, the surface tension decreases when the surfactant concentration increases (at constant pressure and temperature); on the other hand, for the PE 8100 a slop rupture appears and corresponds to the saturation of the interface water/CO 2 and allows then to determine the Interface Saturation Concentration (ISC). The ISC value (at constant pressure and temperature) increases with an increase of the 'CO 2 -phily'). The model hydrophilous medium being an approximation, it has been replaced by a solid polar phase of CeO 2 . A parallel has been established between the evolution of the surface tension between the water and

  1. A possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism in plant stomata SLAC1 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO(2 and HCO(3(- concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO(2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. METHODOLOGY: The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1 provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pK(a values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO(2 and anion HCO(3(- are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. CONCLUSIONS: The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO(2 concentration is enhanced around 10(4 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO(2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO(2 pool. The pH driven CO(2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl(- and NO(3(- from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO(2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells.

  2. A high precision mass spectrometry method for measuring O2/N2 ratios and CO2 concentrations in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marca, A.D.; Dennis, P.F.; Etchells, A.

    2002-01-01

    A full, detailed understanding of the global carbon budget is needed for robust modelling of global climate and environmental change. Since the industrial revolution the carbon cycle has been shifted from a steady state in which removal of CO 2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis is balanced by its addition through respiration. Currently increased respiration due to deforestation, modern agricultural practises and the burning of fossil fuels dominates photosynthesis resulting in modern atmospheric CO 2 concentrations some 32% higher than the year 1800 levels. However, the CO 2 concentration rises are lower than expected from known fossil fuel combustion inventories. A significant proportion of the excess CO 2 is taken up by the oceans, however a missing carbon sink must still be invoked to account for the difference between measured and expected CO 2 rises. A global greening as a result of increased photosynthesis is required to close the circle

  3. Which are the most important parameters for modelling carbon assimilation in boreal Norway spruce under elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Marianne; Medlyn, Belinda E; Abramowitz, Gab; Franklin, Oskar; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Wallin, Göran

    2013-11-01

    Photosynthesis is highly responsive to environmental and physiological variables, including phenology, foliage nitrogen (N) content, atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]), irradiation (Q), air temperature (T) and vapour pressure deficit (D). Each of these responses is likely to be modified by long-term changes in climatic conditions such as rising air temperature and [CO2]. When modelling photosynthesis under climatic changes, which parameters are then most important to calibrate for future conditions? To assess this, we used measurements of shoot carbon assimilation rates and microclimate conditions collected at Flakaliden, northern Sweden. Twelve 40-year-old Norway spruce trees were enclosed in whole-tree chambers and exposed to elevated [CO2] and elevated air temperature, separately and in combination. The treatments imposed were elevated temperature, +2.8 °C in July/August and +5.6 °C in December above ambient, and [CO2] (ambient CO2 ∼370 μ mol mol(-1), elevated CO2 ∼700 μ mol mol(-1)). The relative importance of parameterization of Q, T and D responses for effects on the photosynthetic rate, expressed on a projected needle area, and the annual shoot carbon uptake was quantified using an empirical shoot photosynthesis model, which was developed and fitted to the measurements. The functional form of the response curves was established using an artificial neural network. The [CO2] treatment increased annual shoot carbon (C) uptake by 50%. Most important was effects on the light response curve, with a 67% increase in light-saturated photosynthetic rate, and a 52% increase in the initial slope of the light response curve. An interactive effect of light saturated photosynthetic rate was found with foliage N status, but no interactive effect for high temperature and high CO2. The air temperature treatment increased the annual shoot C uptake by 44%. The most important parameter was the seasonality, with an elongation of the growing season by almost 4

  4. Soil and Root Respiration Under Elevated CO2 Concentrations During Seedling Growth of Pinus sylvestris var. sylvestriformis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of higher CO2 concentrations (500 and 700 μmol mol-1) in atmosphere on total soil respiration and the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration during seedling growth of Pinus sylvestris var. sylvestriformis. During the four growing seasons (May-October) from 1999 to 2003, the seedlings were exposed to elevated concentrations of CO2 in open-top chambers. The total soil respiration and contribution of root respiration were measured using an LI-6400-09 soil CO2 flux chamber on June 15 and October 8, 2003. To separate root respiration from total soil respiration, three PVC cylinders were inserted approximately 30 cm deep into the soil in each chamber. There were marked diurnal changes in air and soil temperatures on June 15. Both the total soil respiration and the soil respiration without roots showed a strong diurnal pattern, increasing from before sunrise to about 14:00in the afternoon and then decreasing before the next sunrise. No increase in the mean total soil respiration and mean soil respiration with roots severed was observed under the elevated CO2 treatments on June 15, 2003, as compared to the open field and control chamber with ambient CO2. However, on October 8, 2003, the total soil respiration and soil respiration with roots severed in the open field were lower than those in the control and elevated CO2 chambers. The mean contribution of root respiration measured on June 15, 2003, ranged from 8.3% to 30.5% and on October 8, 2003,from 20.6% to 48.6%.

  5. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2, prolonged summer drought and temperature increase on N2O and CH4 fluxes in a temperate heathland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Mette Sustmann; Ambus, Per; Albert, Kristian Rost

    2011-01-01

    In temperate regions, climate change is predicted to increase annual mean temperature and intensify the duration and frequency of summer droughts, which together with elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, may affect the exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) between...... terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. We report results from the CLIMAITE experiment, where the effects of these three climate change parameters were investigated solely and in all combinations in a temperate heathland. Field measurements of N2O and CH4 fluxes took place 1–2 years after the climate...... change manipulations were initiated. The soil was generally a net sink for atmospheric CH4. Elevated temperature (T) increased the CH4 uptake by on average 10 μg C m−2 h−1, corresponding to a rise in the uptake rate of about 20%. However, during winter elevated CO2 (CO2) reduced the CH4 uptake, which...

  6. Evolutionary History of Atmospheric CO2 during the Late Cenozoic from Fossilized Metasequoia Needles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Wang

    Full Text Available The change in ancient atmospheric CO2 concentrations provides important clues for understanding the relationship between the atmospheric CO2 concentration and global temperature. However, the lack of CO2 evolution curves estimated from a single terrestrial proxy prevents the understanding of climatic and environmental impacts due to variations in data. Thus, based on the stomatal index of fossilized Metasequoia needles, we reconstructed a history of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from middle Miocene to late Early Pleistocene when the climate changed dramatically. According to this research, atmospheric CO2 concentration was stabile around 330-350 ppmv in the middle and late Miocene, then it decreased to 278-284 ppmv during the Late Pliocene and to 277-279 ppmv during the Early Pleistocene, which was almost the same range as in preindustrial time. According to former research, this is a time when global temperature decreased sharply. Our results also indicated that from middle Miocene to Pleistocene, global CO2 level decreased by more than 50 ppmv, which may suggest that CO2 decrease and temperature decrease are coupled.

  7. Evolutionary History of Atmospheric CO2 during the Late Cenozoic from Fossilized Metasequoia Needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqing; Momohara, Arata; Wang, Li; Lebreton-Anberrée, Julie; Zhou, Zhekun

    2015-01-01

    The change in ancient atmospheric CO2 concentrations provides important clues for understanding the relationship between the atmospheric CO2 concentration and global temperature. However, the lack of CO2 evolution curves estimated from a single terrestrial proxy prevents the understanding of climatic and environmental impacts due to variations in data. Thus, based on the stomatal index of fossilized Metasequoia needles, we reconstructed a history of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from middle Miocene to late Early Pleistocene when the climate changed dramatically. According to this research, atmospheric CO2 concentration was stabile around 330-350 ppmv in the middle and late Miocene, then it decreased to 278-284 ppmv during the Late Pliocene and to 277-279 ppmv during the Early Pleistocene, which was almost the same range as in preindustrial time. According to former research, this is a time when global temperature decreased sharply. Our results also indicated that from middle Miocene to Pleistocene, global CO2 level decreased by more than 50 ppmv, which may suggest that CO2 decrease and temperature decrease are coupled.

  8. Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may imply higher risk of Fusarium mycotoxin contamination of wheat grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, Szilvia; Puskás, Katalin; Vida, Gyula; Karsai, Ildikó; Balla, Krisztina; Komáromi, Judit; Veisz, Ottó

    2017-08-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentration not only has a direct impact on plants but also affects plant-pathogen interactions. Due to economic and health-related problems, special concern was given thus in the present work to the effect of elevated CO 2 (750 μmol mol -1 ) level on the Fusarium culmorum infection and mycotoxin contamination of wheat. Despite the fact that disease severity was found to be not or little affected by elevated CO 2 in most varieties, as the spread of Fusarium increased only in one variety, spike grain number and/or grain weight decreased significantly at elevated CO 2 in all the varieties, indicating that Fusarium infection generally had a more dramatic impact on the grain yield at elevated CO 2 than at the ambient level. Likewise, grain deoxynivalenol (DON) content was usually considerably higher at elevated CO 2 than at the ambient level in the single-floret inoculation treatment, suggesting that the toxin content is not in direct relation to the level of Fusarium infection. In the whole-spike inoculation, DON production did not change, decreased or increased depending on the variety × experiment interaction. Cooler (18 °C) conditions delayed rachis penetration while 20 °C maximum temperature caused striking increases in the mycotoxin contents, resulting in extremely high DON values and also in a dramatic triggering of the grain zearalenone contamination at elevated CO 2 . The results indicate that future environmental conditions, such as rising CO 2 levels, may increase the threat of grain mycotoxin contamination.

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetism in nano-crystalline Co:ThO2 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhide, M.K.; Kadam, R.M.; Godbole, S.V.; Tyagi, A.K.; Salunke, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    The major interest in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS's) had been directed towards the synthesis of room temperature ferromagnetic (RTF) materials for their potential applications in spintronic devices. Room temperature (RT) ferromagnetism was initially reported in Co doped TiO 2 , ZnO 2 and SnO 2 thin films and in the recent past in transition metal doped wide band gap materials. In the present paper we report the synthesis of Co doped ThO 2 nano powders by urea combustion method. The XRD characterization of 300℃ annealed samples confirmed formation of ThO 2 in the cubic phase and the average crystallite size obtained using Scherrer's formula was around 6 nm

  10. Elevated Temperature and CO2 Stimulate Late-Season Photosynthesis But Impair Cold Hardening in Pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christine Y; Fréchette, Emmanuelle; Unda, Faride; Mansfield, Shawn D; Ensminger, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Rising global temperature and CO 2 levels may sustain late-season net photosynthesis of evergreen conifers but could also impair the development of cold hardiness. Our study investigated how elevated temperature, and the combination of elevated temperature with elevated CO 2 , affected photosynthetic rates, leaf carbohydrates, freezing tolerance, and proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold hardening in Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). We designed an experiment where control seedlings were acclimated to long photoperiod (day/night 14/10 h), warm temperature (22°C/15°C), and either ambient (400 μL L -1 ) or elevated (800 μmol mol -1 ) CO 2 , and then shifted seedlings to growth conditions with short photoperiod (8/16 h) and low temperature/ambient CO 2 (LTAC), elevated temperature/ambient CO 2 (ETAC), or elevated temperature/elevated CO 2 (ETEC). Exposure to LTAC induced down-regulation of photosynthesis, development of sustained nonphotochemical quenching, accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, expression of a 16-kD dehydrin absent under long photoperiod, and increased freezing tolerance. In ETAC seedlings, photosynthesis was not down-regulated, while accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, dehydrin expression, and freezing tolerance were impaired. ETEC seedlings revealed increased photosynthesis and improved water use efficiency but impaired dehydrin expression and freezing tolerance similar to ETAC seedlings. Sixteen-kilodalton dehydrin expression strongly correlated with increases in freezing tolerance, suggesting its involvement in the development of cold hardiness in P. strobus Our findings suggest that exposure to elevated temperature and CO 2 during autumn can delay down-regulation of photosynthesis and stimulate late-season net photosynthesis in P. strobus seedlings. However, this comes at the cost of impaired freezing tolerance. Elevated temperature and CO 2 also impaired freezing tolerance. However, unless the frequency and timing of extreme low-temperature

  11. Reactions between olivine and CO2-rich seawater at 300 °C: Implications for H2 generation and CO2 sequestration on the early Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisahiro Ueda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand the influence of fluid CO2 on ultramafic rock-hosted seafloor hydrothermal systems on the early Earth, we monitored the reaction between San Carlos olivine and a CO2-rich NaCl fluid at 300 °C and 500 bars. During the experiments, the total carbonic acid concentrationCO2 in the fluid decreased from approximately 65 to 9 mmol/kg. Carbonate minerals, magnesite, and subordinate amount of dolomite were formed via the water-rock interaction. The H2 concentration in the fluid reached approximately 39 mmol/kg within 2736 h, which is relatively lower than the concentration generated by the reaction between olivine and a CO2-free NaCl solution at the same temperature. As seen in previous hydrothermal experiments using komatiite, ferrous iron incorporation into Mg-bearing carbonate minerals likely limited iron oxidation in the fluids and the resulting H2 generation during the olivine alteration. Considering carbonate mineralogy over the temperature range of natural hydrothermal fields, H2 generation is likely suppressed at temperatures below approximately 300 °C due to the formation of the Mg-bearing carbonates. Nevertheless, H2 concentration in fluid at 300 °C could be still high due to the temperature dependency of magnetite stability in ultramafic systems. Moreover, the Mg-bearing carbonates may play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere system on the early Earth. Recent studies suggest that the subduction of carbonated ultramafic rocks may transport surface CO2 species into the deep mantle. This process may have reduced the huge initial amount of CO2 on the surface of the early Earth. Our approximate calculations demonstrate that the subduction of the Mg-bearing carbonates formed in komatiite likely played a crucial role as one of the CO2 carriers from the surface to the deep mantle, even in hot subduction zones.

  12. Photosynthesis of amphibious and obligately submerged plants in CO2-rich lowland streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Frost-Christensen, Henning

    1998-11-01

    Small unshaded streams in lowland regions receive drainage water with high concentrations of free␣CO 2 , and they support an abundant growth of amphibious and obligately submerged plants. Our first objective was to measure the CO 2 regime during summer in a wide range of small alkaline Danish streams subject to wide variation in temperature, O 2 and CO 2 during the day. The second objective was to determine the effect of these variations on daily changes in light-saturated photosynthesis in water of a homophyllous and a heterophyllous amphibious species that only used CO 2 , and an obligately submerged species capable of using both HCO - 3 and CO 2 . We found that the median CO 2 concentrations of the streams were 11 and 6 times above air saturation in the morning and the afternoon, respectively, but stream sites with dense plant growth had CO 2 concentrations approaching air saturation in the afternoon. In contrast, outlets from lakes had low CO 2 concentrations close to, or below, air saturation. The amphibious species showed a reduction of photosynthesis in water from morning to afternoon along with the decline in CO 2 concentrations, while increasing temperature and O 2 had little effect on photosynthesis. Photosynthesis of the obligately submerged species varied little with the change of CO 2 because of HCO 3 - - use, and variations were mostly due to changes in O 2 concentration. Independent measurements showed that changes in temperature, O 2 and CO 2 could account for the daily variability of photosynthesis of all three species in water. The results imply that CO 2 supersaturation in small lowland streams is important for the rich representation of amphibious species and their contribution to system photosynthesis.

  13. Performance Estimation of Supercritical CO2 Cycle for the PG-SFR application with Heat Sink Temperature Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2015-01-01

    The heat sink temperature conditions are referred from the annual database of sea water temperature in East sea. When the heat sink temperature increases, the compressor inlet temperature can be influenced and the sudden power decrease can happen due to the large water pumping power. When designing the water pump, the pumping margin should be considered as well. As a part of Prototype Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PG-SFR) development, the Supercritical CO 2 cycle (S-CO 2 ) is considered as one of the promising candidate that can potentially replace the steam Rankine cycle. S-CO 2 cycle can achieve distinctively high efficiency compared to other Brayton cycles and even competitive performance to the steam Rankine cycle under the mild turbine inlet temperature region. Previous studies explored the optimum size of the S-CO 2 cycle considering component designs including turbomachinery, heat exchangers and pipes. Based on the preliminary design, the thermal efficiency is 31.5% when CO 2 is sufficiently cooled to the design temperature. However, the S-CO 2 compressor performance is highly influenced by the inlet temperature and the compressor inlet temperature can be changed when the heat sink temperature, in this case sea water temperature varies. To estimate the S-CO 2 cycle performance of PG-SFR in the various regions, a Quasi-static system analysis code for S-CO 2 cycle is developed by the KAIST research team. A S-CO 2 cycle for PG-SFR is designed and assessed for off-design performance with the heat sink temperature variation

  14. Amelioration of boron toxicity in sweet pepper as affected by calcium management under an elevated CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2017-04-01

    We investigated B tolerance in sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuun L.) under an elevated CO 2 concentration, combined with the application of calcium as a nutrient management amelioration technique. The data show that high B affected the roots more than the aerial parts, since there was an increase in the shoot/root ratio, when plants were grown with high B levels; however, the impact was lessened when the plants were grown at elevated CO 2 , since the root FW reduction caused by excess B was less marked at the high CO 2 concentration (30.9% less). Additionally, the high B concentration affected the membrane permeability of roots, which increased from 39 to 54% at ambient CO 2 concentration, and from 38 to 51% at elevated CO 2 concentration, producing a cation imbalance in plants, which was differentially affected by the CO 2 supply. The Ca surplus in the nutrient solution reduced the nutritional imbalance in sweet pepper plants produced by the high B concentration, at both CO 2 concentrations. The medium B concentration treatment (toxic according to the literature) did not result in any toxic effect. Hence, there is a need to review the literature on critical and toxic B levels taking into account increases in atmospheric CO 2 .

  15. Economic efficiency of CO2 reduction programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahvonen, O.; Storch, H. von; Storch, J. von

    1993-01-01

    A highly simplified time-dependent low-dimensional system has been designed to describe conceptually the interaction of climate and economy. Enhanced emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is understood as the agent that not only favors instantaneous consumption but also causes unfavorable climate changes at a later time. The problem of balancing these two counterproductive effects of CO 2 emissions on a finite time horizon is considered. The climate system is represented by just two parameters, namely a globally averaged near-surface air-temperature and a globally averaged troposheric CO 2 concentration. The costs of abating CO 2 emissions are monitored by a function which depends quadratically on the percentage reduction of emission compared to an 'uncontrolled emission' scenario. Parameters are fitted to historical climate data and to estimates from studies of CO 2 abatement costs. Two optimization approaches, which differ from earlier attempts to describe the interaction of economy and climate, are discussed. In the 'cost oriented' strategy an optimal emission path is identified which balances the abatement costs and explicitly formulated damage costs. These damage costs, whose estimates are very uncertain, are hypothesized to be a linear function of the time-derivative of temperature. In the 'target oriented' strategy an emission path is chosen so that the abatement costs are minimal while certain restrictions on the terminal temperature and concentration change are met. (orig.)

  16. Exploring the Phase Diagram SiO2-CO2 at High Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavner, A.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is an important volatile system relevant for planetary sciences and fundamental chemistry. Molecular CO2 has doubly bonded O=C=O units but high pressure-high temperature (HP-HT) studies have recently shown its transformation into a three-dimensional network of corner-linked [CO4] units analogous to the silica mineral polymorphs, through intermediate non-molecular phases. Here, we report P-V-T data on CO2-IV ice from time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments, which allow determining the compressibility and thermal expansivity of this intermediate molecular-to-non-molecular phase.1 Aditionally, we have explored the SiO2-CO2 phase diagram and the potential formation of silicon carbonate compounds. New data obtained by laser-heating diamond-anvil experiments in CO2-filled microporous silica polymorphs will be shown. In particular, these HP-HT experiments explore the existence of potential CO2/SiO2 compounds with tetrahedrally-coordinated C/Si atoms by oxygens, which are predicted to be stable (or metastable) by state-of-the-art ab initio simulations.2,3 These theoretical predictions were supported by a recent study that reports the formation of a cristobalite-type Si0.4C0.6O2 solid solution at high-pressures and temperatures, which can be retained as a metastable solid down to ambient conditions.4 Entirely new families of structures could exist based on [CO4]4- units in various degrees of polymerisation, giving rise to a range of chain, sheet and framework solids like those found in silicate chemistry. References[1] S. Palaich et al., Am. Mineral. Submitted (2015) [2] A. Morales-Garcia et al., Theor. Chem. Acc. 132, 1308 (2013) [3] R. Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. X, 4, 011030 (2014) [4] M. Santoro et al. Nature Commun. 5, 3761 (2014)

  17. CO2 absorption/emission and aerodynamic effects of trees on the concentrations in a street canyon in Guangzhou, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Zhan, Jie-Min; Li, Y.S.; Wai, Onyx W.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of trees on CO 2 concentrations in a street canyon in Guangzhou, China are examined by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the concentration distribution, taking into account both the CO 2 absorption/emission and aerodynamic effects of trees. Simulation results show that, under a 2 m/s southerly prevailing wind condition, CO 2 absorption by trees will reduce the CO 2 concentration by around 2.5% in the daytime and at the same time the trees' resistance will increase the difference of CO 2 concentrations in the street and at the inflow by 43%. As the traffic density increases to 50 vehicles/min, the effect of trees on the ambient CO 2 concentration will change from positive to negative. At night, trees have a negative effect on the concentration in the street canyon mainly because of their resistance to airflow. When environmental wind changes, the effect of trees will be different. -- Highlights: ► The trees affect CO 2 concentrations in a street canyon. ► Both the CO 2 absorption and flow resistance of trees are significant factors by day. ► As the emissions of CO 2 increase, the effect of trees will become negative. ► At night, trees have a negative effect on CO 2 concentration due to the resistance. -- The effects of trees on CO 2 concentrations in a street canyon are examined by CFD simulations, taking into account both the CO 2 absorption/emission and aerodynamic effects of trees

  18. Analysis of a New Liquefaction Combined with Desublimation System for CO2 Separation Based on N2/CO2 Phase Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic CO2 capture is considered as a promising CO2 capture method due to its energy saving and environmental friendliness. The phase equilibrium analysis of CO2-mixtures at low temperature is crucial for the design and operation of a cryogenic system because it plays an important role in analysis of recovery and purity of the captured CO2. After removal of water and toxic gas, the main components in typical boiler gases are N2/CO2. Therefore, this paper evaluates the reliabilities of different cubic equations of state (EOS and mixing rules for N2/CO2. The results show that Peng-Robinson (PR and Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK fit the experimental data well, PR combined with the van der Waals (vdW mixing rule is more accurate than the other models. With temperature decrease, the accuracy of the model improves and the deviation of the N2 vapor fraction is 0.43% at 220 K. Based on the selected calculation model, the thermodynamic properties of N2/CO2 at low temperature are analyzed. According to the results, a new liquefaction combined with a desublimation system is proposed. The total recovery and purity of CO2 production of the new system are satisfactory enough for engineering applications. Additionally, the total energy required by the new system to capture the CO2 is about 3.108 MJ·kg−1 CO2, which appears to be at least 9% lower than desublimation separation when the initial concentration of CO2 is 40%.

  19. Acute physiological impacts of CO{sub 2} ocean sequestration on marine animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimatsu, A.; Hayashi, M.; Lee, K.S.; Murata, K.; Kumagai, E. [Nagasaki Univ., Nagasaki (Japan). Marine Research Inst.; Kikkawa, T. [Marine Ecology Research Inst., Chiba (Japan). Central Laboratory; Kita, J. [Research Inst. of Innovative Technology for the Earth, Kyoto (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The biological impacts of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration must be carefully considered before it is implemented as a mitigation strategy. This paper presented details of a study investigating the effects of high CO{sub 2} concentrations on marine fish, lobster, and octopus. The influence of water temperature on the physiological effects of CO{sub 2} was also discussed. In the first part of the study, eggs and larvae of red seabream were exposed to both CO{sub 2} and HCI-acidified seawater at identical pH levels. Seabream in the CO{sub 2} group showed a much higher mortality rate than fish in the HCI group. Other tests showed that Japanese Flounder died after complete recovery of pH in seawater equilibrated with 5 per cent CO{sub 2}. Cardiac output was rapidly depressed in Yellowtail fish without significant changes in blood oxygen concentrations. Lower temperatures resulted in higher mortality and delayed pH recovery during hypercapnia in all fish. Western rock lobsters were the most tolerant to CO{sub 2} among all species tested. The recovery of hemolymph pH was complete at exposure to CO{sub 2} concentrations of 1 per cent. Changes in hemolymph bicarbonate concentrations indicated that acid-based regulatory mechanisms differed between fish and lobsters. Mortality rates for octopus were significant at CO{sub 2} concentrations of 1 per cent. The results of all tests showed that aquatic animals are more susceptible to increases in ambient CO{sub 2} levels than terrestrial animals. It was concluded that even slight elevations in CO{sub 2} concentration levels adversely affected physiological functioning in the tested species. It was concluded that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deeper, colder waters will have a more pronounced effect on aquatic animals due to the interactions between CO{sub 2} and lower temperatures, as well as the fact that most deep-sea fish are less tolerant to environmental perturbations. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  20. An inverse radiation model for optical determination of temperature and species concentration: Development and validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Tao; Modest, Michael F.; Fateev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    2010 (Rothman et al. (2010) [1]), which contains line-by-line (LBL) information for several combustion gas species, such as CO2 and H2O, was used to predict gas spectral transmissivities. The model was validated by retrieving temperatures and species concentrations from experimental CO2 and H2O...

  1. Cycling-induced degradation of LiCoO2 thin-film cathodes at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sluytman, J.S.; West, W.C.; Whitacre, J.F.; Alamgir, F.M.; Greenbaum, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    The cycle life of LiCoO 2 -based all solid-state thin-film cells has been studied at room temperature, and at elevated temperatures of 50, 100, and 150 deg. C. X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman analysis, has been used to complement the electrochemical data in examining structural and chemical changes. XRD and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that elevated temperature soaks of the thin-film batteries in the quiescent state causes no discernable changes in the LiCoO 2 cathode layer. However, when the thin-film batteries are cycled at elevated temperatures, decreases in average grain size of the LiCoO 2 film occur with dramatic concomitant charge and discharge capacity loss

  2. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Larry W.; Way, J. Douglas; Vlasse, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The objective of CAM is to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications that will operate in extraterrestrial environments and support future unmanned and human space missions. A primary application is the Sabatier Electrolysis process that uses Mars atmosphere CO2 as raw material for producing water, oxygen, and methane for rocket fuel and habitat support. Other applications include use as an inlet filter to collect and concentrate Mars atmospheric argon and nitrogen gases for habitat pressurization, and to remove CO2 from breathing gases in Closed Environment Life Support Systems (CELSS). CAM membrane materials include crystalline faujasite (FAU) zeolite and rubbery polymers such as silicone rubber (PDMS) that have been shown in the literature and via molecular simulation to favor adsorption and permeation of CO2 over nitrogen and argon. Pure gas permeation tests using commercial PDMS membranes have shown that both CO2 permeance and the separation factor relative to other gases increase as the temperature decreases, and low (Delta)P(Sub CO2) favors higher separation factors. The ideal CO2/N2 separation factor increases from 7.5 to 17.5 as temperature decreases from 22 C to -30 C. For gas mixtures containing CO2, N2, and Ar, plasticization decreased the separation factors from 4.5 to 6 over the same temperature range. We currently synthesize and test our own Na(+) FAU zeolite membranes using standard formulations and secondary growth methods on porous alumina. Preliminary tests with a Na(+) FAU membrane at 22 C show a He/SF6 ideal separation factor of 62, exceeding the Knudsen diffusion selectivity by an order of magnitude. This shows that the membrane is relatively free from large defects and associated non-selective (viscous flow) transport

  3. Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements with Clouds from an Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Numata, K.; Chen, J. R.; Sun, X.; DiGangi, J. P.; Choi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Globally distributed atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements with high precision, low bias and full seasonal sampling are crucial to advance carbon cycle sciences. However, two thirds of the Earth's surface is typically covered by clouds, and passive remote sensing approaches from space are limited to cloud-free scenes. NASA Goddard is developing a pulsed, integrated-path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric column CO2 concentrations, XCO2, from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere also allow this technique to estimate XCO2 and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground with precise knowledge of the photon path-length. We demonstrate this measurement capability using airborne lidar measurements from summer 2017 ASCENDS airborne science campaign in Alaska. We show retrievals of XCO2 to ground and to a variety of cloud tops. We will also demonstrate how the partial column XCO2 to cloud tops and cloud slicing approach help resolving vertical and horizontal gradient of CO2 in cloudy conditions. The XCO2 retrievals from the lidar are validated against in situ measurements and compared to the Goddard Parameterized Chemistry Transport Model (PCTM) simulations. Adding this measurement capability to the future lidar mission for XCO2 will provide full global and seasonal data coverage and some information about vertical structure of CO2. This unique facility is expected to benefit atmospheric transport process studies, carbon data assimilation in models, and global and regional carbon flux estimation.

  4. CO2 as an Oxidant for High Temperature Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibudjing eKawi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the developments in catalyst technology for the reactions utilizing CO2 for high temperature applications. These include dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins, the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and finally CO2 reforming of hydrocarbon feedstock (i.e. methane and alcohols. Aspects on the various reaction pathways are also highlighted. The literature on the role of promoters and catalyst development is critically evaluated. Most of the reactions discussed in this review are exploited in industries and related to on-going processes, thus providing extensive data from literature. However some reactions, such as CO2 reforming of ethanol and glycerol which have not reached industrial scale are also reviewed owing to their great potential in terms of sustainability which are essential as energy for the future. This review further illustrates the building-up of knowledge which shows the role of support and catalysts for each reaction and the underlying linkage between certain catalysts which can be adapted for the multiple CO2-related reactions.

  5. Plant growth and leaf-spot severity on eucalypt at different CO2 concentrations in the air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of increased air-CO2 concentration on plant growth and on leaf-spot caused by Cylindrocladium candelabrum in Eucalyptus urophylla. Seedlings were cultivated for 30 days at 451, 645, 904, and 1,147 µmol mol-1 CO2 ; then, they were inoculated with the pathogen and kept under the same conditions for seven days. Increased CO2 concentration increased plant height and shoot dry matter mass, and decreased disease incidence and severity. Stem diameter was not affected by the treatments. Increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 favorably affect eucalypt growth and reduce leaf-spot severity.

  6. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venot Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm. Within the studied range of temperature, the CO2 cross section can vary by more than two orders of magnitude. This, in particular, makes the absorption of CO2 significant up to wavelengths as high as 230 nm, while it is negligible above 200 nm at 300 K. To investigate the influence of these new data on the photochemistry of exoplanets, we implemented the measured cross section into a 1D photochemical model. The model predicts that accounting for this temperature dependency of CO2 cross section can affect the computed abundances of NH3, CO2, and CO by one order of magnitude in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter and hot Neptune.

  7. Elevated Temperature and CO2 Stimulate Late-Season Photosynthesis But Impair Cold Hardening in Pine[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperature and CO2 levels may sustain late-season net photosynthesis of evergreen conifers but could also impair the development of cold hardiness. Our study investigated how elevated temperature, and the combination of elevated temperature with elevated CO2, affected photosynthetic rates, leaf carbohydrates, freezing tolerance, and proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold hardening in Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). We designed an experiment where control seedlings were acclimated to long photoperiod (day/night 14/10 h), warm temperature (22°C/15°C), and either ambient (400 μL L−1) or elevated (800 μmol mol−1) CO2, and then shifted seedlings to growth conditions with short photoperiod (8/16 h) and low temperature/ambient CO2 (LTAC), elevated temperature/ambient CO2 (ETAC), or elevated temperature/elevated CO2 (ETEC). Exposure to LTAC induced down-regulation of photosynthesis, development of sustained nonphotochemical quenching, accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, expression of a 16-kD dehydrin absent under long photoperiod, and increased freezing tolerance. In ETAC seedlings, photosynthesis was not down-regulated, while accumulation of soluble carbohydrates, dehydrin expression, and freezing tolerance were impaired. ETEC seedlings revealed increased photosynthesis and improved water use efficiency but impaired dehydrin expression and freezing tolerance similar to ETAC seedlings. Sixteen-kilodalton dehydrin expression strongly correlated with increases in freezing tolerance, suggesting its involvement in the development of cold hardiness in P. strobus. Our findings suggest that exposure to elevated temperature and CO2 during autumn can delay down-regulation of photosynthesis and stimulate late-season net photosynthesis in P. strobus seedlings. However, this comes at the cost of impaired freezing tolerance. Elevated temperature and CO2 also impaired freezing tolerance. However, unless the frequency and timing of extreme low-temperature

  8. The effect of CO2 activation temperature on the physical and electrochemical properties of activated carbon monolith from banana stem waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Susanti, Y.; Awitdrus, Sugianto, Taslim, R.; Setiadi, R. N.; Bahri, S.; Agustino, Dewi, P.; Kurniasih, B.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of CO2 activation on the synthesis of activated carbon monolith from banana stem waste has been studied. Physical characteristics such as density, degree of crystallinity, surface morphology and elemental content has been analyzed, supporting the finding of an excellent electrochemical properties for the supercapacitor. The synthesis of activated carbon electrode began with pre-carbonization process at temperature of 250°C for 2.5 h. Then the process was continued by chemical activation using KOH as activating agent with a concentration of 0.4 M. The pellets were formed with 8 ton hydrolic pressure. All the samples were carbonized at a temperature of 600°C, followed by physical activation using CO2 gas at a various temperatures ranging from 800°C, 850°C, 900°C and 950°C for 2 h. The carbon content was increased with increasing temperature and the optimum temperature was 900°C. The specific capacitance depends on the activation temperature with the highest specific capacitance of 104.2 F/g at the activation temperature of 900°C.

  9. Armazenamento refrigerado de morango submetido a altas concentrações de CO2 Cold storage of strawberries under high CO2 concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C Cunha Junior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperatura de 0ºC associada a atmosferas com 12 a 20% de CO2 têm sido recomendadas como condição ideal para o armazenamento de morango. Entretanto, as redes de distribuição e comercialização de produtos hortícolas no Brasil geralmente não possuem cadeia de frio, ou a possuem em temperatura entre 10 e 15ºC. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a qualidade e conservação do morango 'Oso Grande' sob temperatura de 10ºC associada com altas concentrações de dióxido de carbono. Os morangos foram selecionados, resfriados e armazenados a 10ºC em mini-câmaras herméticas, onde foram aplicadas as distintas concentrações de CO2 (0,03, 10, 20, 40 e 80% combinadas com 20% de O2. Os morangos foram avaliados a cada 2 dias até se tornarem impróprios para o consumo. As concentrações de 20 e 40% de CO2 permitiram a conservação dos morangos por até 8 dias; já aqueles com 0,03% de CO2 duraram apenas 2 dias. Os morangos a 80% de CO2 mantiveram ótima aparência por 6 dias, porém foram considerados inadequados para o consumo por apresentarem elevados teores de acetaldeído (40,92 µg g-1 e de etanol (1.053 µg g-1, provenientes do processo fermentativo. A perda de massa fresca dos morangos foi inferior a 2%, demonstrando a eficiência da técnica utilizada para o controle da umidade relativa no armazenamento. Os frutos acondicionados com 0,03 e 80% de CO2 apresentaram a maior perda de firmeza, sendo que ao final do armazenamento esta foi de 40% em relação à firmeza inicial. Já os morangos armazenados com 20 e 40% de CO2 perderam apenas 28% da firmeza inicial. Apesar da diferença estatística na coloração externa do morango, essa foi visualmente imperceptível. Os morangos 'Oso Grande' armazenados a 10ºC sob atmosfera controlada com 40% de CO2 associado com 20% de O2 mantiveram suas características comerciais por 8 dias.Temperature of 0ºC associated to 12-20% CO2 has been recommended as the ideal conditions to store

  10. In-operando elucidation of bimetallic CoNi nanoparticles during high-temperature CH 4 /CO 2 reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Sabban, Bedour

    2017-05-02

    Dry reforming of methane (DRM) proceeds via CH4 decomposition to leave surface carbon species, followed by their removal with CO2-derived species. Reactivity tuning for stoichiometric CH4/CO2 reactants was attempted by alloying the non-noble metals Co and Ni, which have high affinity with CO2 and high activity for CH4 decomposition, respectively. This study was focused on providing evidence of the capturing surface coverage of the reactive intermediates and the associated structural changes of the metals during DRM at high temperature using in-operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). On the Co catalysts, the first-order effects with respect to CH4 pressure and negative-order effects with respect to CO2 pressure on the DRM rate are consistent with the competitive adsorption of the surface oxygen species on the same sites as the CH4 decomposition reaction. The Ni surface provides comparatively higher rates of CH4 decomposition and the resultant DRM than the Co catalyst but leaves some deposited carbon on the catalyst surface. In contrast, the bimetallic CoNi catalyst exhibits reactivity towards the DRM but with kinetic orders resembling Co catalyst, producing negligible carbon deposition by balancing CH4 and CO2 activation. The in-operando X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements confirmed that the Co catalyst was progressively oxidized from the surface to the bulk with reaction time, whereas CoNi and Ni remained relatively reduced during DRM. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation considering the high reaction temperature for DRM confirmed the unselective site arrangement between Co and Ni atoms in both the surface and bulk of the alloy nanoparticle (NP). The calculated heat of oxygen chemisorption became more exothermic in the order of Ni, CoNi, Co, consistent with the catalytic behavior. The comprehensive experimental and theoretical evidence provided herein clearly suggests

  11. Monoterpene and herbivore-induced emissions from cabbage plants grown at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Terhi; Reddy, G. V. P.; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The warming of the lower atmosphere due to elevating CO 2 concentration may increase volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from plants. Also, direct effects of elevated CO 2 on plant secondary metabolism are expected to lead to increased VOC emissions due to allocation of excess carbon on secondary metabolites, of which many are volatile. We investigated how growing at doubled ambient CO 2 concentration affects emissions from cabbage plants ( Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata) damaged by either the leaf-chewing larvae of crucifer specialist diamondback moth ( Plutella xylostella L.) or generalist Egyptian cotton leafworm ( Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval)). The emission from cabbage cv. Lennox grown in both CO 2 concentrations, consisted mainly of monoterpenes (sabinene, limonene, α-thujene, 1,8-cineole, β-pinene, myrcene, α-pinene and γ-terpinene). ( Z)-3-Hexenyl acetate, sesquiterpene ( E, E)- α-farnesene and homoterpene ( E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) were emitted mainly from herbivore-damaged plants. Plants grown at 720 μmol mol -1 of CO 2 had significantly lower total monoterpene emissions per shoot dry weight than plants grown at 360 μmol mol -1 of CO 2, while damage by both herbivores significantly increased the total monoterpene emissions compared to intact plants. ( Z)-3-Hexenyl acetate, ( E, E)- α-farnesene and DMNT emissions per shoot dry weight were not affected by the growth at elevated CO 2. The emission of DMNT was significantly enhanced from plants damaged by the specialist P. xylostella compared to the plants damaged by the generalist S. littoralis. The relative proportions of total monoterpenes and total herbivore-induced compounds of total VOCs did not change due to the growth at elevated CO 2, while insect damage increased significantly the proportion of induced compounds. The results suggest that VOC emissions that are induced by the leaf-chewing herbivores will not be influenced by elevated CO 2 concentration.

  12. Effect of Co doping concentration on structural properties and optical parameters of Co-doped ZnO thin films by sol-gel dip-coating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Giwoong; Yoon, Hyunsik; Kim, Byunggu; Lee, Dong-Yul; Kim, Jong Su; Leem, Jae-Young

    2014-11-01

    The structural and optical properties of Co-doped ZnO thin films prepared by a sol-gel dip-coating method were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the thin films were grown with a c-axis preferred orientation. The position of the (002) peak was almost the same in all samples, irrespective of the Co concentration. It is thus clear that Co doping had little effect on the position of the (002) peak. To confirm that Co2+ was substituted for Zn2+ in the wurtzite structure, optical measurements were conducted at room temperature by a UV-visible spectrometer. Three absorption peaks are apparent in the Co-doped ZnO thin films that do not appear for the undoped ZnO thin film. As the Co concentration was increased, absorption related to characteristic Co2+ transitions increased because three absorption band intensities and the area underneath the absorption wells between 500 and 700 nm increased with increasing Co concentration. The optical band gap and static dielectric constant decreased and the Urbach energy and extinction coefficient increased with increasing Co concentration.

  13. High temperature oxidation behaviour of nanostructured cermet coatings in a mixed CO2 - O2 environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhzad, M. A.; Khan, T. I.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ceramic-metallic (cermet) coatings composed of nanosized ceramic particles (α-Al2O3 and TiO2) dispersed in a nickel matrix were co-electrodeposited and then oxidized at 500°C, 600°C and 700°C in a mixed gas using a Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA) apparatus. The mixed gas was composed of 15% CO2, 10% O2 and 75% N2. This research investigates the effects of CO2 and O2 partial pressures on time-depended oxidation rates for coatings and compared them to the results from atmospheric oxidation under similar temperatures. The increase in partial pressure of oxygen due to the presence of CO2 at each tested temperature was calculated and correlated to the oxidation rate of the coatings. The results showed that the presence of CO2 in the system increased the oxidation rate of cermet coatings when compared to atmospheric oxidation at the same temperature. It was also shown that the increase in the oxidation rate is not the result of CO2 acting as the primary oxidant but as a secondary oxidant which results in an increase of the total partial pressure of oxygen and consequently higher oxidation rates. The WDS and XRD analyses results showed that the presence of nanosized TiO2 particles in a nickel matrix can improve oxidation behaviour of the coatings by formation of Ni-Ti compounds on oxidizing surface of the coating which was found beneficiary in reducing the oxidation rates for cermet coatings.

  14. Atmospheric CO2 concentration effects on rice water use and biomass production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kumar

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have addressed effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on rice biomass production and yield but effects on crop water use are less well understood. Irrigated rice evapotranspiration (ET is composed of floodwater evaporation and canopy transpiration. Crop coefficient Kc (ET over potential ET, or ETo is crop specific according to FAO, but may decrease as CO2 concentration rises. A sunlit growth chamber experiment was conducted in the Philippines, exposing 1.44-m2 canopies of IR72 rice to four constant CO2 levels (195, 390, 780 and 1560 ppmv. Crop geometry and management emulated field conditions. In two wet (WS and two dry (DS seasons, final aboveground dry weight (agdw was measured. At 390 ppmv [CO2] (current ambient level, agdw averaged 1744 g m-2, similar to field although solar radiation was only 61% of ambient. Reduction to 195 ppmv [CO2] reduced agdw to 56±5% (SE, increase to 780 ppmv increased agdw to 128±8%, and 1560 ppmv increased agdw to 142±5%. In 2013WS, crop ET was measured by weighing the water extracted daily from the chambers by the air conditioners controlling air humidity. Chamber ETo was calculated according to FAO and empirically corrected via observed pan evaporation in chamber vs. field. For 390 ppmv [CO2], Kc was about 1 during crop establishment but increased to about 3 at flowering. 195 ppmv CO2 reduced Kc, 780 ppmv increased it, but at 1560 ppmv it declined. Whole-season crop water use was 564 mm (195 ppmv, 719 mm (390 ppmv, 928 mm (780 ppmv and 803 mm (1560 ppmv. With increasing [CO2], crop water use efficiency (WUE gradually increased from 1.59 g kg-1 (195 ppmv to 2.88 g kg-1 (1560 ppmv. Transpiration efficiency (TE measured on flag leaves responded more strongly to [CO2] than WUE. Responses of some morphological traits are also reported. In conclusion, increased CO2 promotes biomass more than water use of irrigated rice, causing increased WUE, but it does not help saving water. Comparability

  15. Soil CO2 concentration does not affect growth or root respiration in bean or citrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Lynch, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Contrasting effects of soil CO2 concentration on root respiration rates during short-term CO2 exposure, and on plant growth during long-term CO2 exposure, have been reported, Here we examine the effects of both short-and long-term exposure to soil CO2 on the root respiration of intact plants and on

  16. Magnetic properties of iron-based catalysts activated by various CO{sub 2} concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Dong Hyun; Park, Ji Chan [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Fresh catalyst samples of 100Fe/5.26Cu/4.76K/18.2SiO{sub 2} in part per weight were synthesized by using a combination of a co-precipitation technique and spray-drying method and were activated in situ by using syngas (H{sub 2}/CO/xCO{sub 2}) with different amounts of CO{sub 2} (x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0). All activated catalyst samples showed similar XRD patterns, a combination of ferrihydrite, magnetite, χ-carbide, and ε'-carbide, regardless of the CO{sub 2} contents. From the Moessbauer spectra, we also observed a combination of ferrihydrite, magnetite, χ-carbide, and ε'-carbide in all activated catalyst samples. The main compound of the activated catalyst sample activated by using CO{sub 2}-free syngas (H{sub 2}/CO) was magnetic χ-carbide, and the main compound changed from χ-carbide to ferrihydrite with increasing CO{sub 2} concentration, confirmed by both, Moessbauer spectra and XRD pattern.

  17. Degradation kinetics of monoethanolamine during CO2 and H2 S absorption from biogas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha Kasikamphaiboon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The rate of degradation of MEA during CO2 and H2 S absorption in the biogas upgrading process was examined in four degradation systems, i.e., MEA-CO2 , MEA-CO2 -O2 , MEA-CO2 -H2 S and MEA-CO2 -O2 -H2 S. Degradation experiments were performed in a 800-ml stainless steel autoclave reactor, using MEA concentrations of 3 and 5 mol/L, CO2 loadings of 0.4 and 0.5 mol CO2 /mol MEA, O2 pressure of 200 kPa, and H2 S concentrations of 84 and 87 mg/L at temperatures of 120 and 140C. The results showed that, for the MEA-CO2 system, an increase in temperature or MEA concentration resulted in a higher rate of MEA degradation. In contrast, an increase in CO2 loading in the MEA-CO2 -O2 system led to a reduction of MEA degradation. The degradation rate of the system with O2 was with 8.3 times as high as that of the system without O2 . The presence of H2 S did not appear to affect the rate of degradation in the MEA-CO2 -H2 S system. However, for the system in which both H2 S and O2 were present, the MEA degradation was additionally induced by H2 S, thus, resulting in higher degradation rates than those of the system with O2 only. The extent of degradation under the same period of time increased in the order MEA-CO2 , MEA-CO2 -H2 S < MEA-CO2 -O2 < MEA-CO2 -O2 -H2 S.

  18. Study on the adsorption of H2O and CO2 from the carrier gas of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Cuiping; Zheng Zhenhong; Shi Fuen; Zhou Dasen

    1998-01-01

    The author is focused on the experimental studies of the adsorption of moisture and carbon dioxide from the carrier gas of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). A suitable adsorbent--5A type molecular sieve spherical particles with an average diameter of 3 mm is chosen to purify the carrier gas with impurities of moisture and carbon dioxide. Experimental data at different concentration, flow rate, adsorptive temperature, pressure and bed depth are obtained from isothermal adsorption tests in order to examine the effects of these parameters on adsorption dynamic and for the optimal parameters selection of adsorption process. Experimental breakthrough curves, dynamic single component and multicomponent adsorption curves are obtained. The outlet concentration of H 2 O and CO 2 can reach below 1.0 x 10 -5 , so this purification system can meet the demands of HTGR

  19. Impact of CO_2 on the Evolution of Microbial Communities Exposed to Carbon Storage Conditions, Enhanced Oil Recovery, and CO_2 Leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliver, Djuna M.; Gregory, Kelvin B.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage (GCS) is a crucial part of a proposed mitigation strategy to reduce the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO_2) emissions to the atmosphere. During this process, CO_2 is injected as super critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO_2) in confined deep subsurface storage units, such as saline aquifers and depleted oil reservoirs. The deposition of vast amounts of CO_2 in subsurface geologic formations could unintentionally lead to CO_2 leakage into overlying freshwater aquifers. Introduction of CO_2 into these subsurface environments will greatly increase the CO_2 concentration and will create CO_2 concentration gradients that drive changes in the microbial communities present. While it is expected that altered microbial communities will impact the biogeochemistry of the subsurface, there is no information available on how CO_2 gradients will impact these communities. The overarching goal of this project is to understand how CO_2 exposure will impact subsurface microbial communities at temperatures and pressures that are relevant to GCS and CO_2 leakage scenarios. To meet this goal, unfiltered, aqueous samples from a deep saline aquifer, a depleted oil reservoir, and a fresh water aquifer were exposed to varied concentrations of CO_2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The microbial ecology of the samples was examined using molecular, DNA-based techniques. The results from these studies were also compared across the sites to determine any existing trends. Results reveal that increasing CO_2 leads to decreased DNA concentrations regardless of the site, suggesting that microbial processes will be significantly hindered or absent nearest the CO_2 injection/leakage plume where CO_2 concentrations are highest. At CO_2 exposures expected downgradient from the CO_2 plume, selected microorganisms emerged as dominant in the CO_2 exposed conditions. Results suggest that the altered microbial community was site specific and highly dependent on pH. The site

  20. Individual and interacting effects of pCO2 and temperature on Emiliania huxleyi calcification: study of the calcite production, the coccolith morphology and the coccosphere size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sabbe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ocean acidification and increased water temperature on marine ecosystems, in particular those involving calcifying organisms, has been gradually recognised. We examined the individual and combined effects of increased pCO2 (180 ppmV CO2, 380 ppmV CO2 and 750 ppmV CO2 corresponding to past, present and future CO2 conditions, respectively and temperature (13 °C and 18 °C during the exponential growth phase of the coccolithophore E. huxleyi using batch culture experiments. We showed that cellular production rate of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC increased from the present to the future CO2 treatments at 13 °C. A significant effect of pCO2 and of temperature on calcification was found, manifesting itself in a lower cellular production rate of Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC as well as a lower PIC:POC ratio at future CO2 levels and at 18 °C. Coccosphere-sized particles showed a size reduction with both increasing temperature and CO2 concentration. The influence of the different treatments on coccolith morphology was studied by categorizing SEM coccolith micrographs. The number of well-formed coccoliths decreased with increasing pCO2 while temperature did not have a significant impact on coccolith morphology. No interacting effects of pCO2 and temperature were observed on calcite production, coccolith morphology or on coccosphere size. Finally, our results suggest that ocean acidification might have a larger adverse impact on coccolithophorid calcification than surface water warming.

  1. Does carbon isotope data help explain atmospheric CO2 concentrations during glacial periods?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverson, K.; Le Grand, P.

    2002-01-01

    An inverse ocean box modeling approach is used to address the question of what may have caused decreased atmospheric CO 2 concentration during glacial periods. The inverse procedure seeks solutions that are consistent, within prescribed uncertainties, with both available paleodata constraints and box model conservation equations while relaxing traditional assumptions such as exact steady state and precise prescription of uncertain model parameters. Decreased ventilation of Southern Ocean deep water, decreased Southern Ocean air-sea gas exchange, and enhanced high latitude biological pumping are all shown to be individually capable of explaining available paleodata constraints provided that significant calcium carbonate compensation is allowed. None of the scenarios require more than a very minor (order 1 deg. C) glacial reduction in low to mid latitude sea surface temperature although scenarios with larger changes are equally plausible. One explanation for the fairly wide range of plausible solutions is that most paleo-data directly constrain the inventory of paleo-tracers but only indirectly constrain their fluxes. Because the various scenarios that have been proposed to explain pCO 2 levels during the last glacial maximum are distinguished primarily by different fluxes, the data, including ocean 13 C concentrations, do not allow one to confidently chose between them. Oceanic 14 C data for the last glacial maximum, which can constrain water mass fluxes, present an excellent potential solution to this problem if their reliability is demonstrated in the future. (author)

  2. Water Redistribution, Temperature Change and CO2 Diffusion of Reconstruction Soil Profiles Filled with Gangue in Coal Mining Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhan, H.; Chen, X.; Hu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    There were a great many projects of reconstruction soil profile filled with gangue to restore ecological environment and land resources in coal mining areas. A simulation experimental system in laboratory was designed for studying water transport and gas-heat diffusion of the reconstruction soil as to help the process of engineering and soil-ripening technology application. The system could be used for constantly measuring soil content, temperature and soil CO2 concentration by laid sensors and detectors in different depth of soil column. The results showed that soil water infiltration process was slowed down and the water-holding capacity of the upper soil was increased because of good water resistance from coal gangue layer. However, the water content of coal gangue layer, 10% approximately, was significantly lower than that of topsoil for the poor water-holding capacity of gangue. The temperature of coal gangue layer was also greater than that of soil layer and became easily sustainable temperature gradient under the condition with heating in reconstruction soil due to the higher thermal diffusivity from gangue, especially being plenty of temperature difference between gangue and soil layers. The effects of heated from below on topsoil was small, which it was mainly influenced from indoor temperature in the short run. In addition, the temperature changing curve of topsoil is similar with the temperature of laboratory and its biggest fluctuation range was for 2.89°. The effects of aerating CO2 from column bottom on CO2 concentration of topsoil soil was also very small, because gas transport from coal gangue layers to soil ones would easily be cut off as so to gas accumulated below the soil layer. The coal gangue could have a negative impact on microbial living environment to adjacent topsoil layers and declined microorganism activities. The effects of coal gangue on topsoil layer were brought down when the cove soil thickness was at 60 cm. And the influences

  3. In situ X-ray ptychography imaging of high-temperature CO2 acceptor particle agglomerates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høydalsvik, Kristin; Fløystad, Jostein Bø; Zhao, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    be used for in situ phase contrast imaging in structure studies at atmospheric pressure and elevated temperatures. Lithium zirconate, a candidate CO2 capture material, was studied at a pressure of one atmosphere in air and in CO2, at temperatures exceeding 600 °C. Images with a spatial resolution better...

  4. Performance Estimation of Supercritical Co2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) for Varying Cooling Air Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Kim, Seong Gu; Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2015-01-01

    A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) receives interests for the various application such as electricity co-generation, small-scale power generation, seawater desalination, district heating and propulsion. As a part of SMR development, supercritical CO2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) of 36.2MWth in power is under development by the KAIST research team. To enhance the mobility, the entire system including the power conversion system is designed for the full modularization. Based on the preliminary design, the thermal efficiency is 31.5% when CO2 is sufficiently cooled to the design temperature. A supercritical CO2 MMR is designed to supply electricity to the remote regions. The ambient temperature of the area can influence the compressor inlet temperature as the reactor is cooled with the atmospheric air. To estimate the S-CO2 cycle performance for various environmental conditions, A quasi-static analysis code is developed. For the off design performance of S-CO2 turbomachineries, the experimental result of Sandia National Lab (SNL) is utilized

  5. Chemical effects of a high CO2 concentration in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Bentzen, L.L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of methane in an atmospheric-pres sure flow reactor has been studied experimentally under highly diluted conditions in N-2 and CO2, respectively. The stoichiometry was varied from fuel-lean to fuel-rich, and the temperatures covered the range 1200-1800 K. The results were interpreted...... CO2. The high local CO levels may have implications for near-burner corrosion and stagging, but increased problems with CO emission in oxy-fuel combustion are not anticipated....

  6. Influence of temperature on thermoelectric properties of Fe{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}S{sub 2} thin films: A semiconductor to semimetal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clamagirand, J.M.; Ares, J.R., E-mail: joser.ares@uam.es; Flores, E.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Leardini, F.; Ferrer, I.J.; Sánchez, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the thermoelectric properties of p and n-type thin films obtained by cobalt doping of FeS{sub 2}. Films were synthesized by direct sulfuration of Co–Fe thin bilayers at 300 °C. It is found that at room temperature (RT), the Seebeck coefficient is reduced from 80 μV/K to − 70 μV/K when Co concentration is increased and the electrical resistivity of the films is decreased two orders of magnitude. X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements point out that Co is replacing Fe into the pyrite lattice and, subsequently is promoting a semiconductor to semimetal conversion. The influence of temperature on transport properties of different Fe{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}S{sub 2} films has been investigated. Whereas the Seebeck coefficient is hardly modified, the film resistivity is drastically decreased when temperature increases what has been attributed to the thermal activation of electrical carriers. The influence of Co doping on the band scheme of FeS{sub 2} is shown. To this aim, donor and acceptor states are included into its forbidden gap. Whereas the band scheme of FeS{sub 2} exhibits an acceptor level with an E = 0.11 ± 0.03 eV above the top of the valence band due to iron vacancies, a wide donor level close to the bottom of the conduction band (E = 0.08 ± 0.05 eV) is created by the progressive replacement of iron by cobalt into the FeS{sub 2} lattice. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric properties of pyrite and Co-doped pyrite thin films were measured. • Whereas ρ decreases, S remains practically unaltered on increasing temperature (RT-300 °C). • On increasing Co-concentration, films exhibit a p semiconductor to n type semimetal conversion. • Donor states close to the botton of the conduction band are created by Co doping. • Energy of the donor level decreases and gets wider due to Co-concentration.

  7. Decontamination of solid matrices using supercritical CO{sub 2}: study of contaminant-additives-CO{sub 2}; Decontamination de matrices organiques solides par CO{sub 2} supercritique: etude des interactions contaminant-additifs-CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galy, J

    2006-11-15

    This work deals with the decontamination of solid matrices by supercritical CO{sub 2} and more particularly with the study of the interactions between the surfactants and the CO{sub 2} in one part, and with the interactions between the contaminant and the surfactants in another part. The first part of this study has revealed the different interactions between the Pluronics molecules and the supercritical CO{sub 2}. The diagrams graphs have shown that the pluronics (PE 6100, PE 8100 and PE 10100) present a solubility in the supercritical CO{sub 2} low but sufficient (0.1% m/m at 25 MPa and 313 K) for the studied application: the treatment of weak quantities of cerium oxide (or plutonium). An empirical approach based on the evolutions of the slops value and of the origin ordinates of the PT diagrams has been carried out to simulate the phase diagrams PT of the Pluronics. A modeling based on the state equations 'SAFT' (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory) has been studied in order to confirm the experimental results of the disorder points and to understand the role of the different blocks 'PEO' and 'PPO' in the behaviour of Pluronics; this modeling confirms the evolution of the slopes value with the 'CO{sub 2}-phily' of the system. The measure of the surface tension in terms of the Pluronics concentration (PE 6100, 81000 and 10100) has shown different behaviours. For the PE 6100, the surface tension decreases when the surfactant concentration increases (at constant pressure and temperature); on the other hand, for the PE 8100 a slop rupture appears and corresponds to the saturation of the interface water/CO{sub 2} and allows then to determine the Interface Saturation Concentration (ISC). The ISC value (at constant pressure and temperature) increases with an increase of the 'CO{sub 2}-phily'). The model hydrophilous medium being an approximation, it has been replaced by a solid polar phase of CeO{sub 2}. A parallel has

  8. Effect of carbonation temperature on CO_2 adsorption capacity of CaO derived from micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni; Sreekantan, Srimala; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Thant, Aye Aye; Othman, Radzali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Salime, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Recent years, CaO-based synthetic materials have been attracted attention as potential adsorbents for CO_2 capture mainly due to their high CO_2 adsorption capacity. In this study, micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO_3 was synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method with using polyacrylamide (PAM). The structural, morphological and thermal properties of the synthesized sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TG-DTA). The XRD and FESEM results showed that the obtained sample was aragonite CaCO_3 with aggregated nanorods and microspheres composed of nanorods. A TG-DTA apparatus with Thermoplus 2 software was used to investigate the effect of carbonation temperature on the CO_2 adsorption capacity of CaO derived from aragonite CaCO_3 sample. At 300 °C, the sample reached the CO_2 adsorption capacity of 0.098 g-CO_2/g-adsorbent, whereas the sample achieved the highest capacity of 0.682 g-CO_2/g-adsorbent at 700 °C. The results showed that the carbonation temperature significantly influenced on the CO_2 adsorption capacity of the CaO derived from aragonite CaCO_3.

  9. Associations between classroom CO2 concentrations and student attendance in Washington and Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, D G; Prill, R; Fisk, W J; Apte, M G; Blake, D; Faulkner, D

    2004-10-01

    Student attendance in American public schools is a critical factor in securing limited operational funding. Student and teacher attendance influence academic performance. Limited data exist on indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, and how IEQ affects attendance, health, or performance. This study explored the association of student absence with measures of indoor minus outdoor carbon dioxide concentration (dCO(2)). Absence and dCO(2) data were collected from 409 traditional and 25 portable classrooms from 22 schools located in six school districts in the states of Washington and Idaho. Study classrooms had individual heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, except two classrooms without mechanical ventilation. Classroom attributes, student attendance and school-level ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status (SES) were included in multivariate modeling. Forty-five percent of classrooms studied had short-term indoor CO(2) concentrations above 1000 p.p.m. A 1000 p.p.m. increase in dCO(2) was associated (P student absence. Annual ADA was 2% higher (P student attendance, and occupant health and student performance, with longer term indoor minus outdoor CO(2) concentrations and more accurately measured ventilation rates. If our findings are confirmed, improving classroom ventilation should be considered a practical means of reducing student absence. Adequate or enhanced ventilation may be achieved, for example, with educational training programs for teachers and facilities staff on ventilation system operation and maintenance. Also, technological interventions such as improved automated control systems could provide continuous ventilation during occupied times, regardless of occupant thermal comfort demands.

  10. One pot synthesized Li, Zr doped porous silica nanoparticle for low temperature CO2 adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Ganesh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Li, Zr doped porous silica was synthesized in one pot and investigated for low temperature CO2 adsorption. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption–desorption measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The specific surface area, average pore diameter and pore volume were determined to be 962 m2/g, 2.3 nm and 0.56 cm3/g respectively. ICP-AES analysis revealed a metal content of 4 wt.% (Zr and 3.42 wt.% (Li. Their CO2 adsorption capacity was tested at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. An uptake of about 5 wt.% was observed and regenerable at a low temperature of 200 °C. This adsorption and desorption temperature of the sorbent is lower than the reported lithium silicate. The CO2 adsorption–desorption cyclic performance studies illustrated that Li, Zr doped porous silica is a recyclable, selective and potential sorbent for CO2 adsorption.

  11. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and atmosphere under various CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    A new continuous integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer and an automated soil chamber system were used to investigate the exchange processes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and the atmosphere under laboratory conditions. The exchange patterns of OCS between soils and the atmosphere were found to be highly dependent on soil moisture and ambient CO2 concentration. With increasing soil moisture, OCS exchange ranged from emission under dry conditions to an uptake within an optimum moisture range, followed again by emission at high soil moisture. Elevated CO2 was found to have a significant impact on the exchange rate and direction as tested with several soils. There is a clear tendency toward a release of OCS at higher CO2 levels (up to 7600 ppm), which are typical for the upper few centimeters within soils. At high soil moisture, the release of OCS increased sharply. Measurements after chloroform vapor application show that there is a biotic component to the observed OCS exchange. Furthermore, soil treatment with the fungi inhibitor nystatin showed that fungi might be the dominant OCS consumers in the soils we examined. We discuss the influence of soil moisture and elevated CO2 on the OCS exchange as a change in the activity of microbial communities. Physical factors such as diffusivity that are governed by soil moisture also play a role. Comparing KM values of the enzymes to projected soil water CO2 concentrations showed that competitive inhibition is unlikely for carbonic anhydrase and PEPCO but might occur for RubisCO at higher CO2 concentrations.

  12. CO and NO2 pollution in a long two-way traffic road tunnel: investigation of NO2/NOx ratio and modelling of NO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrehus, O; Vassbotn, P

    2001-02-01

    The CO, NO and NO2 concentrations, visibility and air flow velocity were measured using continuous analysers in a long Norwegian road tunnel (7.5 km) with traffic in both directions in April 1994 and 1995. The traffic density was monitored at the same time. The NO2 concentration exceeded Norwegian air quality limits for road tunnels 17% of the time in 1994. The traffic through the tunnel decreased from 1994 to 1995, and the mean NO2 concentration was reduced from 0.73 to 0.22 ppm. The ventilation fan control, based on the CO concentration only, was unsatisfactory and the air flow was sometimes low for hours. Models for NO2 concentration based on CO concentration and absolute air flow velocity were developed and tested. The NO2/NOx ratio showed an increase for NOx levels above 2 ppm; a likely explanation for this phenomenon is NO oxidation by O2. Exposure to high NO2 concentrations may represent a health risk for people with respiratory and cardiac diseases. In long road tunnels with two-way traffic, this study indicates that ventilation fan control based on CO concentration should be adjusted for changes in vehicle CO emission and should be supplemented by air flow monitoring to limit the NO2 concentration.

  13. All-epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeSi/Ge/Co{sub 2}FeSi trilayers fabricated by Sn-induced low-temperature epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, M.; Ikawa, M.; Arima, K.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Hamaya, K., E-mail: hamaya@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    We demonstrate low-temperature growth of all-epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeSi/Ge/Co{sub 2}FeSi trilayer structures by developing Sn-induced surfactant-mediated molecular beam epitaxy (SMBE) of Ge on Co{sub 2}FeSi. Despite the growth of a semiconductor on a metal, we verify that the inserted Sn monolayers between Ge and Co{sub 2}FeSi enable to promote the 2D epitaxial growth of Ge up to 5 nm at a T{sub G} of 250 °C. An understanding of the mechanism of the Sn-induced SMBE leads to the achievement of all-epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeSi/Ge/Co{sub 2}FeSi trilayer structures with spin-valve-like magnetization reversals. This study will open a way for vertical-type and high-performance Ge-based spintronics devices.

  14. Sensitivity of Mesoporous CoSb2O6 Nanoparticles to Gaseous CO and C3H8 at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Guillén-Bonilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous CoSb2O6 nanoparticles, synthesized through a nonaqueous method (using cobalt nitrate, antimony trichloride, ethylenediamine, and ethanol as a solvent, were tested to establish their sensitivity to CO and C3H8 atmospheres at relatively low temperatures. The precursor material was dried at 200°C and calcined at 600°C. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were employed to verify the existence of crystal phases (P42/mnm and the morphology of this trirutile-type CoSb2O6 oxide. Pyramidal and cubic shaped crystals (average size: 41.1 nm, embedded in the material’s surface, were identified. Mesopores (average size: 6.5 nm on the nanoparticles’ surface were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy. The best sensitivity of the CoSb2O6 in a CO atmosphere was at the relatively low temperatures of 250 and 350°C, whereas, in a C3H8 atmosphere, the sensitivity increased uniformly with temperature. These results encourage using the CoSb2O6 nanoparticles as gas sensors.

  15. High temperature CO2 capture of hydroxyapatite extracted from tilapia scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar H. Ojeda-Niño

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp was obtained from tilapia scales by two extraction methods: direct calcination and acid-base treatment. The physicochemical characteristics of the obtained HAps were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, surface area, infrared spectroscopy, and basicity measurement at 298 K by CO2-pulse titration. Furthermore, the CO2 capture capacity of the solids at high temperature was also determined. Both methods showed the presence of a HAp phase although significant differences in the properties of the solids were found. The HAp obtained by direct calcination exhibited a lower crystallinity and a greater surface area and basicity than the HAp obtained by the acid-base treatment. These features were correlated with the solid’s CO2 capture capacity. In this work, CO2 capture capacity values for HAp yielded by calcination ranged from 2.5 to 3.2 mg CO2 /g captured at 973 K, and for the acid-base treatment-derived HAp, CO2 capture capacity values between 1.2 to 2.5 mg CO2 /g were recorded. These results reveal the potential of HAps extracted from tilapia scales as solids with high CO2 capture capacity, thermal stability, and capture/release cycles reversibility.

  16. CO2 Fixation by Membrane Separated NaCl Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Hyun Sic; Lee, Ju Sung; Han, Junyoung

    2015-01-01

    for converting CO2 into CaCO3 requires high temperature and high pressure as reaction conditions. This study proposes a method to fixate CaCO3 stably by using relatively less energy than existing methods. After forming NaOH absorbent solution through electrolysis of NaCl in seawater, CaCO3 was precipitated...... crystal product was high-purity calcite. The study shows a successful method for fixating CO2 by reducing carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere while forming high-purity CaCO3.......Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), a major cause of global warming, have been rising due to industrial development. Carbon capture and storage (CCS), which is regarded as the most effective way to reduce such atmospheric CO2 concentrations, has several environmental and technical...

  17. The relationship between termite mound CH4/CO2 emissions and internal concentration ratios are species specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, H.; Livesley, S. J.; Hutley, L. B.; Fest, B.; Arndt, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    1. We investigated the relative importance of CH4 and CO2 fluxes from soil and termite mounds at four different sites in the tropical savannas of Northern Australia near Darwin and assessed different methods to indirectly predict CH4 fluxes based on CO2 fluxes and internal gas concentrations. 2. The annual flux from termite mounds and surrounding soil was dominated by CO2 with large variations among sites. On a CO2-e basis, annual CH4 flux estimates from termite mounds were 5- to 46-fold smaller than the concurrent annual CO2 flux estimates. Differences between annual soil CO2 and soil CH4 (CO2-e) fluxes were even greater, soil CO2 fluxes being almost three orders of magnitude greater than soil CH4 (CO2-e) fluxes at site. 3. There were significant relationships between mound CH4 flux and mound CO2 flux, enabling the prediction of CH4 flux from measured CO2 flux, however, these relationships were clearly termite species specific. 4. We also observed significant relationships between mound flux and gas concentration inside mound, for both CH4 and CO2, and for all termite species, thereby enabling the prediction of flux from measured mound internal gas concentration. However, these relationships were also termite species specific. Using the relationship between mound internal gas concentration and flux from one species to predict mound fluxes from other termite species (as has been done in past) would result in errors of more than 5-fold for CH4 and 3-fold for CO2. 5. This study highlights that CO2 fluxes from termite mounds are generally more than one order of magnitude greater than CH4 fluxes. There are species-specific relationships between CH4 and CO2 fluxes from a~mound, and between the inside mound concentration of a gas and the mound flux emission of the same gas, but these relationships vary greatly among termite species. Consequently, there is no generic relationship that will allow for the prediction of CH4 fluxes from termite mounds of all species.

  18. The relationships between termite mound CH4/CO2 emissions and internal concentration ratios are species specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jamali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relative importance of CH4 and CO2 fluxes from soil and termite mounds at four different sites in the tropical savannas of northern Australia near Darwin and assessed different methods to indirectly predict CH4 fluxes based on CO2 fluxes and internal gas concentrations. The annual flux from termite mounds and surrounding soil was dominated by CO2 with large variations among sites. On a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e basis, annual CH4 flux estimates from termite mounds were 5- to 46-fold smaller than the concurrent annual CO2 flux estimates. Differences between annual soil CO2 and soil CH4 (CO2-e fluxes were even greater, soil CO2 fluxes being almost three orders of magnitude greater than soil CH4 (CO2-e fluxes at site. The contribution of CH4 and CO2 emissions from termite mounds to the total CH4 and CO2 emissions from termite mounds and soil in CO2-e was less than 1%. There were significant relationships between mound CH4 flux and mound CO2 flux, enabling the prediction of CH4 flux from measured CO2 flux; however, these relationships were clearly termite species specific. We also observed significant relationships between mound flux and gas concentration inside mound, for both CH4 and CO2, and for all termite species, thereby enabling the prediction of flux from measured mound internal gas concentration. However, these relationships were also termite species specific. Using the relationship between mound internal gas concentration and flux from one species to predict mound fluxes from other termite species (as has been done in the past would result in errors of more than 5-fold for mound CH4 flux and 3-fold for mound CO2 flux. This study highlights that CO2 fluxes from termite mounds are generally more than one order of magnitude greater than CH4 fluxes. There are species-specific relationships between CH4 and CO2 fluxes from a mound, and between the inside mound concentration of a gas and the mound flux emission of the

  19. The relationships between termite mound CH4/CO2 emissions and internal concentration ratios are species specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, H.; Livesley, S. J.; Hutley, L. B.; Fest, B.; Arndt, S. K.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the relative importance of CH4 and CO2 fluxes from soil and termite mounds at four different sites in the tropical savannas of northern Australia near Darwin and assessed different methods to indirectly predict CH4 fluxes based on CO2 fluxes and internal gas concentrations. The annual flux from termite mounds and surrounding soil was dominated by CO2 with large variations among sites. On a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) basis, annual CH4 flux estimates from termite mounds were 5- to 46-fold smaller than the concurrent annual CO2 flux estimates. Differences between annual soil CO2 and soil CH4 (CO2-e) fluxes were even greater, soil CO2 fluxes being almost three orders of magnitude greater than soil CH4 (CO2-e) fluxes at site. The contribution of CH4 and CO2 emissions from termite mounds to the total CH4 and CO2 emissions from termite mounds and soil in CO2-e was less than 1%. There were significant relationships between mound CH4 flux and mound CO2 flux, enabling the prediction of CH4 flux from measured CO2 flux; however, these relationships were clearly termite species specific. We also observed significant relationships between mound flux and gas concentration inside mound, for both CH4 and CO2, and for all termite species, thereby enabling the prediction of flux from measured mound internal gas concentration. However, these relationships were also termite species specific. Using the relationship between mound internal gas concentration and flux from one species to predict mound fluxes from other termite species (as has been done in the past) would result in errors of more than 5-fold for mound CH4 flux and 3-fold for mound CO2 flux. This study highlights that CO2 fluxes from termite mounds are generally more than one order of magnitude greater than CH4 fluxes. There are species-specific relationships between CH4 and CO2 fluxes from a mound, and between the inside mound concentration of a gas and the mound flux emission of the same gas, but

  20. Promoting Ethylene Selectivity from CO2 Electroreduction on CuO Supported onto CO2 Capture Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Juan; Yang, Hong; Hong, Yu-Hao; Zhang, Peng-Yang; Wang, Tao; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Feng-Yang; Wu, Qi-Hui; Tian, Na; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2018-03-09

    Cu is a unique catalyst for CO 2 electroreduction, since it can catalyze CO 2 reduction to a series of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and carboxylic acids. Nevertheless, such Cu catalysts suffer from poor selectivity. High pressure of CO 2 is considered to facilitate the activity and selectivity of CO 2 reduction. Herein, a new strategy is presented for CO 2 reduction with improved C 2 H 4 selectivity on a Cu catalyst by using CO 2 capture materials as the support at ambient pressure. N-doped carbon (N x C) was synthesized through high-temperature carbonization of melamine and l-lysine. We observed that the CO 2 uptake capacity of N x C depends on both the microporous area and the content of pyridinic N species, which can be controlled by the carbonization temperature (600-800 °C). The as-prepared CuO/N x C catalysts exhibit a considerably higher C 2 H 4 faradaic efficiency (36 %) than CuO supported on XC-72 carbon black (19 %), or unsupported CuO (20 %). Moreover, there is a good linear relationship between the C 2 H 4 faradaic efficiency and CO 2 uptake capacity of the supports for CuO. The local high CO 2 concentration near Cu catalysts, created by CO 2 capture materials, was proposed to increase the coverage of CO intermediate, which is favorable for the coupling of two CO units in the formation of C 2 H 4 . This study demonstrates that pairing Cu catalysts with CO 2 capture supports is a promising approach for designing highly effective CO 2 reduction electrocatalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1). The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Absorption of CO2 from modified flue gases of power generation Tarahan chemically using NaOH and Na2CO3 and biologically using microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Elida; Agustina, Dewi; Putri Pertama, Finka; Senja, Fita

    2018-03-01

    This research was carried out on the absorption of CO2 from the modified flue gases of power generation Tarahan using NaOH (sodium hydroxide) and Na2CO3 (sodium carbonate). The operation was conducted in a packed column absorber and then the output gases from the packed column was fed into photo-bioreactor for biological absorption. In the photo-bioreactor, two species of microalgae, N. occulata and T. chuii, were cultivated to both absorb CO2 gas and to produce biomass for algal oil. The aims of this research were, first, to determine the effect of absorbent flow rate on the reduction of CO2 and on the decrease of output gas temperature, second, to determine the characteristics of methyl ester obtained from biological absorption process. Flow rates of the absorbent were varied as 1, 2, and 3 l/min. The concentrations of NaOH and Na2CO3 were 1 M at a constant gas flow rate of 6 l/min. The output concentrations of CO2 from the absorber was analyzed using Gas Chromatography 2014-AT SHIMADZU Corp 08128. The results show that both of the absorbents give different trends. From the absorption using NaOH, it can be concluded that the higher the flow rate, the higher the absorption rate obtained. The highest flow rate achieved maximum absorption of 100%. On the other hand, absorption with Na2CO3 revealed the opposite trend where the higher the flow rates the lower the absorption rate. The highest absorption using Na2CO3 was obtained with the lowest flow rate, 1 l/min, that was 45,5%. As the effect of flow rate on output gas temperature, the temperature decreased with increasing flow rates for both absorbents. The output gas temperature for NaOH and Na2CO3 were consecutively 35 °C and 31 °C with inlet gas temperature of 50°C. Absorption of CO2 biologically resulted a reduction of CO2 up to 60% from the input gas concentration. Algal oil was extracted with mixed hexane and chloroform to obtain algal oil. Extracted oil was transesterified to methyl ester using sodium

  3. Efficient MgO-based mesoporous CO2 trapper and its performance at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun Kun; Zhou, Yu; Chun, Yuan; Zhu, Jian Hua

    2012-02-15

    A novel MgO-based porous adsorbent has been synthesized in a facile co-precipitation method for the first time, in order to provide a candidate for trapping CO(2) in flue gas at high temperature. The resulting composite exhibits a mesoporous structure with a wide pore size distribution, due to the even dispersion and distribution of microcrystalline MgO in the framework of alumina to form a concrete-like structure. These sorbents can capture CO(2) at high temperature (150-400°C), possessing high reactivity and stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption processes, providing competitive candidates to control CO(2) emission. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Calibration of Relative Humidity Devices in Low-pressure, Low-temperature CO2 Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Maria; Polkko, Jouni; Nikkanen, Timo; Hieta, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2017-04-01

    Calibration of relative humidity devices requires in minimum two humidity points - dry (0%RH) and (near)saturation (95-100%RH) - over the expected operational temperature and pressure range of the device. In terrestrial applications these are relatively easy to achieve using for example N2 gas as dry medium, and water vapor saturation chambers for producing saturation and intermediate humidity points. But for example in applications intended for meteorological measurements on Mars there is a need to achieve at least dry and saturation points in low-temperature, low-pressure CO2 environment. We have developed a custom-made, small, relatively low-cost calibration chamber able to produce both dry points and saturation points in Martian range pressure CO2, in temperatures down to -70°C. The system utilizes a commercially available temperature chamber for temperature control, vacuum vessels and pumps. The main pressure vessel with the devices under test inside is placed inside the temperature chamber, and the pressure inside is controlled by pumps and manual valves and monitored with a commercial pressure reference with calibration traceable to national standards. Air, CO2, or if needed another gas like N2, is used for filling the vessel until the desired pressure is achieved. Another pressure vessel with a dedicated pressure pump is used as the saturation chamber. This vessel is placed in the room outside the temperature chamber, partly filled with water and used for achieving saturated water vapor in room-temperature low-pressure environment. The saturation chamber is connected to the main pressure vessel via valves. In this system dry point, low-pressure CO2 environment is achieved by filling the main pressure vessel with dry CO2 gas until the desired pressure is achieved. A constant flow of gas is maintained with the pump and valves and monitored with the pressure reference. The saturation point is then achieved by adding some water vapor from the saturation

  5. In-depth numerical analysis on the determination of amount of CO2 recirculation in LNG/O2/CO2 combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hey-Suk; Shin, Mi-Soo; Jang, Dong-Soon; Lee, Dae Keun

    2010-01-01

    The determination of proper amount of CO 2 recirculation is one of the critical issues in oxy-fuel combustion technology for the reduction of CO 2 emissions by the capture and sequestration of CO 2 species in flue gas. The objective of this study is to determine the optimum value of O 2 fraction in O 2 /CO 2 mixture to obtain similar flame characteristics with LNG-air combustion. To this end, a systematic numerical investigation has been made in order to resolve the physical feature of LNG/O 2 /CO 2 combustion. For this, SIMPLEC algorithm is used for the resolution of pressure velocity coupling. And for the Reynolds stresses and turbulent reaction the popular two-equation (k-ε) model by Launder and Spalding and eddy breakup model by Magnussen and Hjertager were incorporated, respectively. The radiative heat transfer is calculated from the volumetric energy loss rate from flame, considering absorption coefficient of H 2 O, CO 2 and CO gases. A series of parametric investigation has been made as function of oxidizer type, O 2 fraction and fuel type for the resolution of combustion characteristics such as flame temperature, turbulent mixing and species concentration. Further the increased effect of CO 2 species on the flame temperature is carefully examined by the consideration of change of specific heat and radiation effect. Based on this study, it was observed that the same mass flow rate of CO 2 with N 2 appears as the most adequate value for the amount of CO 2 recirculation for LNG fuel since the lower C p value for the CO 2 relative to N 2 species at lower temperatures cancels the effect of the higher C p value at higher temperatures over the range of flame temperatures present in this study. However, for the fuel with high C/H ratio, for example of coal, the reduced amount of CO 2 recirculation is recommended in order to compensate the increased radiation heat loss. In general, the calculation results were physically acceptable and consistent with reported data

  6. Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Mn-Co/TiO2 Catalysts for NO Oxidation to NO2 at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Mn-Co/TiO2 catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method and evaluated for the oxidation of NO to NO2. The effects of Co amounts and calcination temperature on NO oxidation were investigated in detail. The catalytic oxidation ability in the temperature range of 403–473 K was obviously improved by doping cobalt into Mn/TiO2. These samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, transmission electron microscope (TEM and hydrogen temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR. The results indicated that the formation of dispersed Co3O4·CoMnO3 mixed oxides through synergistic interaction between Mn-O and Co-O was directly responsible for the enhanced activities towards NO oxidation at low temperatures. Doping of Co enhanced Mn4+ formation and increased chemical adsorbed oxygen amounts, which also accelerated NO oxidation.

  7. Revealing Transient Concentration of CO2 in a Mixed Matrix Membrane by IR Microimaging and Molecular Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Hwang, Seungtaik

    2018-02-21

    Through IR microimaging the spatially and temporally resolved development of the CO2 concentration in a ZIF-8@6FDA-DAM mixed matrix membrane was visualized during transient adsorption. By recording the evolution of the CO2 concentration, it is observed that the CO2 molecules propagate from the ZIF-8 filler, which acts as a transport

  8. Revealing Transient Concentration of CO2 in a Mixed Matrix Membrane by IR Microimaging and Molecular Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Hwang, Seungtaik; Semino, Rocio; Seoane, Beatriz; Zahan, Marufa; Chmelik, Christian; Valiullin, Rustem; Bertmer, Marko; Haase, Jü rgen; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge; Maurin, Guillaume; Kä rger, Jö rg

    2018-01-01

    Through IR microimaging the spatially and temporally resolved development of the CO2 concentration in a ZIF-8@6FDA-DAM mixed matrix membrane was visualized during transient adsorption. By recording the evolution of the CO2 concentration, it is observed that the CO2 molecules propagate from the ZIF-8 filler, which acts as a transport

  9. Effects of export concentration on CO2 emissions in developed countries: an empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apergis, Nicholas; Can, Muhlis; Gozgor, Giray; Lau, Chi Keung Marco

    2018-03-08

    This paper provides the evidence on the short- and the long-run effects of the export product concentration on the level of CO 2 emissions in 19 developed (high-income) economies, spanning the period 1962-2010. To this end, the paper makes use of the nonlinear panel unit root and cointegration tests with multiple endogenous structural breaks. It also considers the mean group estimations, the autoregressive distributed lag model, and the panel quantile regression estimations. The findings illustrate that the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis is valid in the panel dataset of 19 developed economies. In addition, it documents that a higher level of the product concentration of exports leads to lower CO 2 emissions. The results from the panel quantile regressions also indicate that the effect of the export product concentration upon the per capita CO 2 emissions is relatively high at the higher quantiles.

  10. High-temperature electrolysis of CO2-enriched mixtures by using fuel-electrode supported La0.6Sr0.4CoO3/YSZ/Ni-YSZ solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si-Won; Bae, Yonggyun; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jong-Heun; Hong, Jongsup

    2018-02-01

    To mitigate CO2 emissions, its reduction by high-temperature electrolysis using solid oxide cells is extensively investigated, for which excessive steam supply is assumed. However, such condition may degrade its feasibility due to massive energy required for generating hot steam, implying the needs for lowering steam demand. In this study, high-temperature electrolysis of CO2-enriched mixtures by using fuel-electrode supported La0.6Sr0.4CoO3/YSZ/Ni-YSZ solid oxide cells is considered to satisfy such needs. The effect of internal and external steam supply on its electrochemical performance and gas productivity is elucidated. It is shown that the steam produced in-situ inside the fuel-electrode by a reverse water gas shift reaction may decrease significantly the electrochemical resistance of dry CO2-fed operations, attributed to self-sustaining positive thermo-electrochemical reaction loop. This mechanism is conspicuous at low current density, whereas it is no longer effective at high current density in which total reactant concentrations for electrolysis is critical. To overcome such limitations, a small amount of external steam supply to the CO2-enriched feed stream may be needed, but this lowers the CO2 conversion and CO/H2 selectivity. Based on these results, it is discussed that there can be minimum steam supply sufficient for guaranteeing both low electrochemical resistance and high gas productivity.

  11. Concurrent CO2 Control and O2 Generation for Advanced Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.; Duncan, Keith L.; Hagelin-Weaver, Helena E.; Bishop, Sean R.; Wachsman, Eric D.

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) using ceramic oxygen generators (COGs) is well known and widely studied, however, conventional devices using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes operate at temperatures greater than 700 C. Operating at such high temperatures increases system mass compared to lower temperature systems because of increased energy overhead to get the COG up to operating temperature and the need for heavier insulation and/or heat exchangers to reduce the COG oxygen (O2) output temperature for comfortable inhalation. Recently, the University of Florida developed novel ceramic oxygen generators employing a bilayer electrolyte of gadolinia-doped ceria and erbia-stabilized bismuth for NASA's future exploration of Mars. To reduce landed mass and operation expenditures during the mission, in-situ resource utilization was proposed using these COGs to obtain both lifesupporting oxygen and oxidant/propellant fuel, by converting CO2 from the Mars atmosphere. The results showed that oxygen could be reliably produced from CO2 at temperatures as low as 400 C. These results indicate that this technology could be adapted to CO2 removal from a spacesuit and other applications in which CO2 removal was an issue. The strategy proposed for CO2 removal for advanced life support systems employs a catalytic layer combined with a COG so that it is reduced all the way to solid carbon and oxygen. Hence, a three-phased approach was used for the development of a viable low weight COG for CO2 removal. First, to reduce the COG operating temperature a high oxide ion conductivity electrolyte was developed. Second, to promote full CO2 reduction while avoiding the problem of carbon deposition on the COG cathode, novel cathodes and a removable catalytic carbon deposition layer were designed. Third, to improve efficiency, a pre-stage for CO2 absorption was used to concentrate CO2 from the exhalate before sending it to the COG. These subsystems were then

  12. Performance of a geostationary mission, geoCARB, to measure CO2, CH4 and CO column-averaged concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Polonsky

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available GeoCARB is a proposed instrument to measure column averaged concentrations of CO2, CH4 and CO from geostationary orbit using reflected sunlight in near-infrared absorption bands of the gases. The scanning options, spectral channels and noise characteristics of geoCARB and two descope options are described. The accuracy of concentrations from geoCARB data is investigated using end-to-end retrievals; spectra at the top of the atmosphere in the geoCARB bands are simulated with realistic trace gas profiles, meteorology, aerosol, cloud and surface properties, and then the concentrations of CO2, CH4 and CO are estimated from the spectra after addition of noise characteristic of geoCARB. The sensitivity of the algorithm to aerosol, the prior distributions assumed for the gases and the meteorology are investigated. The contiguous spatial sampling and fine temporal resolution of geoCARB open the possibility of monitoring localised sources such as power plants. Simulations of emissions from a power plant with a Gaussian plume are conducted to assess the accuracy with which the emission strength may be recovered from geoCARB spectra. Scenarios for "clean" and "dirty" power plants are examined. It is found that a reliable estimate of the emission rate is possible, especially for power plants that have particulate filters, by averaging emission rates estimated from multiple snapshots of the CO2 field surrounding the plant. The result holds even in the presence of partial cloud cover.

  13. The carbonate-silicate cycle and CO2/climate feedbacks on tidally locked terrestrial planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Adam R; Kasting, James F; Pollard, David; Lee, Sukyoung; Bannon, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric gaseous constituents play an important role in determining the surface temperatures and habitability of a planet. Using a global climate model and a parameterization of the carbonate-silicate cycle, we explored the effect of the location of the substellar point on the atmospheric CO(2) concentration and temperatures of a tidally locked terrestrial planet, using the present Earth continental distribution as an example. We found that the substellar point's location relative to the continents is an important factor in determining weathering and the equilibrium atmospheric CO(2) level. Placing the substellar point over the Atlantic Ocean results in an atmospheric CO(2) concentration of 7 ppmv and a global mean surface air temperature of 247 K, making ∼30% of the planet's surface habitable, whereas placing it over the Pacific Ocean results in a CO(2) concentration of 60,311 ppmv and a global temperature of 282 K, making ∼55% of the surface habitable.

  14. Meta-analysis of warmed versus standard temperature CO2 insufflation for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Abdul R; Birks, Theodore; Azeem, Qasim; Di Franco, Filippo; Gergely, Szabolcs; Harris, Adrian M

    2016-06-01

    There is conflicting evidence for the use of warmed, humidified carbon dioxide (CO2) for creating pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Few studies have reported less post-operative pain and analgesic requirement when warmed CO2 was used. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to analyse the literature on the use of warmed CO2 in comparison to standard temperature CO2 during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Systematic review and meta-analysis carried out in line with the PRISMA guidelines. Primary outcomes of interest were post-operative pain at 6 h, day 1 and day 2 following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Secondary outcomes were analgesic usage and drop in intra-operative core body temperature. Standard Mean Difference (SMD) was calculated for continuous variables. Six randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria (n = 369). There was no significant difference in post-operative pain at 6 h [3 RCTs; SMD = -0.66 (-1.33, 0.02) (Z = 1.89) (P = 0.06)], day 1 [4 RCTs; SMD = -0.51 (-1.47, 0.44) (Z = 1.05) (P = 0.29)] and day 2 [2 RCTs; SMD = -0.96 (-2.30, 0.37) (Z = 1.42) (P = 0.16)] between the warmed CO2 and standard CO2 group. There was no difference in analgesic usage between the two groups, but pooled analysis was not possible. Two RCTs reported significant drop in intra-operative core body temperature, but there were no adverse events related to this. This review showed no difference in post-operative pain and analgesic requirements between the warmed and standard CO2 insufflation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Currently there is not enough high quality evidence to suggest routine usage of warmed CO2 for creating pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High temperature oxidation behaviour of nanostructured cermet coatings in a mixed CO2 – O2 environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokhzad, M A; Khan, T I

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ceramic-metallic (cermet) coatings composed of nanosized ceramic particles (α-Al 2 O3 and TiO 2 ) dispersed in a nickel matrix were co-electrodeposited and then oxidized at 500°C, 600°C and 700°C in a mixed gas using a Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA) apparatus. The mixed gas was composed of 15% CO 2 , 10% O 2 and 75% N 2 . This research investigates the effects of CO 2 and O 2 partial pressures on time-depended oxidation rates for coatings and compared them to the results from atmospheric oxidation under similar temperatures. The increase in partial pressure of oxygen due to the presence of CO 2 at each tested temperature was calculated and correlated to the oxidation rate of the coatings. The results showed that the presence of CO 2 in the system increased the oxidation rate of cermet coatings when compared to atmospheric oxidation at the same temperature. It was also shown that the increase in the oxidation rate is not the result of CO2 acting as the primary oxidant but as a secondary oxidant which results in an increase of the total partial pressure of oxygen and consequently higher oxidation rates. The WDS and XRD analyses results showed that the presence of nanosized TiO 2 particles in a nickel matrix can improve oxidation behaviour of the coatings by formation of Ni-Ti compounds on oxidizing surface of the coating which was found beneficiary in reducing the oxidation rates for cermet coatings

  16. Determining the high variability of pCO2 and pO2 in the littoral zone of a subtropical coastal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Tonetta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic metabolism comprises production and mineralization of organic matter through biological processes, such as primary production and respiration that can be estimated by gases concentration in the water column. AIM: The study aimed to assess the temporal variability of pCO2 and pO2 in the littoral zone of a subtropical coastal lake. Our hypotheses are i high variability in meteorological conditions, such as temperature and light, drive the high variability in pCO2 and pO2, and ii the lake is permanently heterotrophic due to the low phosphorus concentration. METHODS: We estimated pCO2 from pH-alkalinity method, and pO2 from dissolved oxygen concentration and water temperature measured in free-water during 24 hours in the autumn, winter, spring and summer. RESULTS: Our findings showed that limnological variables had low temporal variability, while the meteorological variables and pCO2 presented a high coefficient of variation, which is representative of each climatic season. In autumn and winter, it was recorded that the lake was supersaturated in CO2 relative to the atmosphere, while in spring and summer CO2 concentration was below the concentration found in the atmosphere. Over 24 hours, pCO2 also showed high variability, with autumn presenting higher concentration during the night when compared to daytime. Water temperature and chlorophyll a were negatively correlated with pCO2, while pO2 was positively correlated with wind and light. CONCLUSION: Agreeing with our first hypothesis, pCO2 showed an expressive temporal variation in a subtropical lake associated to the high variability in meteorological conditions. On the other hand, our second hypothesis was not confirmed, since Peri Lake exported CO2 to the atmosphere in some periods and in others, CO2 was removed from the atmosphere.

  17. Advances in Geological CO{sub 2} Sequestration and Co-Sequestration with O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe A; O& #x27; Connor, William K.; Ideker, J.H.

    2012-10-28

    The injection of CO{sub 2} for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and sequestration in brine-bearing formations for long term storage has been in practice or under investigation in many locations globally. This study focused on the assessment of cement wellbore seal integrity in CO{sub 2}- and CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-saturated brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} environments. Brine chemistries (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}) at various saline concentrations were investigated at a pressure of 28.9 MPa (4200 psi) at both 50{degree}C and 85{degree}C. These parameters were selected to simulate downhole conditions at several potential CO{sub 2} injection sites in the United States. Class H portland cement is not thermodynamically stable under these conditions and the formation of carbonic acid degrades the cement. Dissociation occurs and leaches cations, forming a CaCO{sub 3} buffered zone, amorphous silica, and other secondary minerals. Increased temperature affected the structure of C-S-H and the hydration of the cement leading to higher degradation rates.

  18. High-temperature resistivity and thermoelectric properties of coupled substituted Ca3Co2O6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshisundaram Senthilkumar and Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline samples of Ca3−xNaxCo2−xMnxO6 (x=0.0–0.5 have been prepared by the sol-gel cum combustion method using sucrose in order to investigate the effects of the coupled substitution of Na and Mn on Ca and Co sites on the transport properties of Ca3Co2O6(Co326. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetry (TGA, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. XRD patterns reveal the formation of single-phase products up to x=0.5. Coupled substitution increases the solubility of both Na and Mn on Ca and Co sites, respectively, in contrast to the limited solubility of Na and Mn (x=0.2 when separately substituted. TGA confirms the formation of the Ca3Co2O6 phase at temperatures ~720 °C. The grain size of the parent and substituted products is in the range 150–250 nm. Electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured in the temperature range 300–800 K. Resistivity shows semiconducting behavior for all the compositions, particularly in the low-temperature regime. The Seebeck coefficient increases with temperature throughout the measured temperature range for all compositions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient (200 μV K−1 is observed for x=0.5 at 825 K, and this composition may be optimal for high-temperature thermoelectric applications.

  19. Spring photosynthetic recovery of boreal Norway spruce under conditions of elevated [CO(2)] and air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Göran; Hall, Marianne; Slaney, Michelle; Räntfors, Mats; Medhurst, Jane; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    Accumulated carbon uptake, apparent quantum yield (AQY) and light-saturated net CO2 assimilation (Asat) were used to assess the responses of photosynthesis to environmental conditions during spring for three consecutive years. Whole-tree chambers were used to expose 40-year-old field-grown Norway spruce trees in northern Sweden to an elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, [CO2], of 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1) (CE) and an air temperature (T) between 2.8 and 5.6 °C above ambient T (TE), during summer and winter. Net shoot CO2 exchange (Anet) was measured continuously on 1-year-old shoots and was used to calculate the accumulated carbon uptake and daily Asat and AQY. The accumulated carbon uptake, from 1 March to 30 June, was stimulated by 33, 44 and 61% when trees were exposed to CE, TE, and CE and TE combined, respectively. Air temperature strongly influenced the timing and extent of photosynthetic recovery expressed as AQY and Asat during the spring. Under elevated T (TE), the recovery of AQY and Asat commenced ∼10 days earlier and the activity of these parameters was significantly higher throughout the recovery period. In the absence of frost events, the photosynthetic recovery period was less than a week. However, frost events during spring slowed recovery so that full recovery could take up to 60 days to complete. Elevated [CO2] stimulated AQY and Asat on average by ∼10 and ∼50%, respectively, throughout the recovery period, but had minimal or no effect on the onset and length of the photosynthetic recovery period during the spring. However, AQY, Asat and Anet all recovered at significantly higher T (average +2.2 °C) in TE than in TA, possibly caused by acclimation or by shorter days and lower light levels during the early part of the recovery in TE compared with TA. The results suggest that predicted future climate changes will cause prominent stimulation of photosynthetic CO2 uptake in boreal Norway spruce forest during spring, mainly caused by elevated T

  20. Carbon Dioxide Exchange and Acidity Levels in Detached Pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.), Merr., Leaves during the Day at Various Temperatures, Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradshahi, A; Vines, H M; Black, C C

    1977-02-01

    The effects of temperature, O(2), and CO(2) on titratable acid content and on CO(2) exchange were measured in detached pineapple (Ananas comosus) leaves during the daily 15-hour light period. Comparative measurements were made in air and in CO(2)-free air. Increasing the leaf temperature from 20 to 35 C decreased the total CO(2) uptake in air and slightly increased the total CO(2) released into CO(2)-free air. Between 25 and 35 C, the activation energy for daily acid loss was near 12 kcal mol(-1), but at lower temperatures the activation energy was much greater.Increasing O(2) or decreasing the CO(2) concentration decreased the total CO(2) fixation in air, whereas the total CO(2) released in CO(2)-free air was increased. The total acid content remained constant at 20 C, but it decreased progressively with increasing temperature both in air and in CO(2)-free air. The total acid content at 30 C remained constant in 2% O(2) irrespective of CO(2) concentration. The total acid content decreased in 21 and 50% O(2) as the CO(2) increased from 0 to 300, and 540 mul/l of CO(2). The data indicate that photorespiration is present in pineapple. The lack of acid loss in 2% O(2) suggests that light deacidification is dependent upon respiration and that higher O(2) concentrations are required to saturate deacidification.

  1. Mesoporous Mn promoted Co3O4 oxides as an efficient and stable catalyst for low temperature oxidation of CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changxiang; Gong, Lei; Dai, Runying; Lu, Meijuan; Sun, Tingting; Liu, Qian; Huang, Xigen; Huang, Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Mesoporous Mn-doped Co3O4 catalysts were successfully prepared via a dry soft reactive grinding method based on solid state reaction, and their catalytic performances on CO oxidation were evaluated at a high space velocity of 49,500 mL g-1 h-1. A significant promoted effect was observed once the atomic ratios of Mn/(Co+Mn) were lower than 10%, for instance, the temperature for 50% conversion decreased to about -60 °C, showing superior catalytic performance compared to the single metal oxide. Especially, the Mn-promoted Co3O4 catalyst with a Mn/(Co+Mn) molar ratio of 10% could convert 100% CO after 3000 min of time-on-steam without any deactivation at room temperature. As prepared catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2-adsorption/desorption, TEM, H2-TPR, O2-TPD and CO-titration analysis. The significant enhancement of performance for oxidation of CO over Mn-Co-O mixed oxides was associated with the high active oxygen species concentrations formed during the pretreatment in O2 atmosphere.

  2. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (Δ) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to Δ, and thus Δ is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in Δ upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in Δ suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the

  3. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogle, Stephen M; Davis, Kenneth; Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L; Richardson, Scott; Schuh, Andrew; Cooley, Dan; Breidt, F Jay; West, Tristram O; Heath, Linda S; Smith, James E; McCarty, Jessica L; Gurney, Kevin R; Tans, Pieter; Denning, A Scott

    2015-01-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO 2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO 2 emissions. The biogenic CO 2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of −408 ± 136 Tg CO 2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of −478 ± 146 Tg CO 2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO 2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO 2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC. (letter)

  4. Above room temperature ferromagnetism in Si:Mn and TiO(2-delta)Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, A; Orlov, A; Perov, N; Gan'shina, E; Semisalova, A; Balagurov, L; Kulemanov, I; Sapelkin, A; Rogalev, A; Smekhova, A

    2012-09-01

    We present recent experimental results on the structural, electrical, magnetic, and magneto-optical properties of Mn-implanted Si and Co-doped TiO(2-delta) magnetic oxides. Si wafers, both n- and p-type, with high and low resistivity, were used as the starting materials for implantation with Mn ions at the fluencies up to 5 x 10(16) cm(-2). The saturation magnetization was found to show the lack of any regular dependence on the Si conductivity type, type of impurity and the short post-implantation annealing. According to XMCD Mn impurity in Si does not bear any appreciable magnetic moment at room temperature. The obtained results indicate that above room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted Si originates not from Mn impurity but rather from structural defects in Si. The TiO(2-delta):Co thin films were deposited on LaAlO3 (001) substrates by magnetron sputtering in the argon-oxygen atmosphere at oxygen partial pressure of 2 x 10(-6)-2 x 10(-4) Torr. The obtained transverse Kerr effect spectra at the visible and XMCD spectra indicate on intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism in TiO(2-delta):Co thin films at low (< 1%) volume fraction of Co.

  5. Measurements and modeling of absorption by CO2 + H2O mixtures in the spectral region beyond the CO2 ν3-band head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Turbet, M.; Chelin, P.; Landsheere, X.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we measured the absorption by CO2 + H2O mixtures from 2400 to 2600 cm-1 which corresponds to the spectral region beyond the ν3 band head of CO2. Transmission spectra of CO2 mixed with water vapor were recorded with a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for various pressure, temperature and concentration conditions. The continuum absorption by CO2 due to the presence of water vapor was determined by subtracting from measured spectra the contribution of local lines of both species, that of the continuum of pure CO2 as well as of the self- and CO2-continua of water vapor induced by the H2O-H2O and H2O-CO2 interactions. The obtained results are in very good agreement with the unique previous measurement (in a narrower spectral range). They confirm that the H2O-continuum of CO2 is significantly larger than that observed for pure CO2. This continuum thus must be taken into account in radiative transfer calculations for media involving CO2+ H2O mixture. An empirical model, using sub-Lorentzian line shapes based on some temperature-dependent correction factors χ is proposed which enables an accurate description of the experimental results.

  6. Elevated CO2 and temperature increase soil C losses from a soybean-maize ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher K; Davis, Sarah C; Hudiburg, Tara W; Bernacchi, Carl J; DeLucia, Evan H

    2017-01-01

    Warming temperatures and increasing CO 2 are likely to have large effects on the amount of carbon stored in soil, but predictions of these effects are poorly constrained. We elevated temperature (canopy: +2.8 °C; soil growing season: +1.8 °C; soil fallow: +2.3 °C) for 3 years within the 9th-11th years of an elevated CO 2 (+200 ppm) experiment on a maize-soybean agroecosystem, measured respiration by roots and soil microbes, and then used a process-based ecosystem model (DayCent) to simulate the decadal effects of warming and CO 2 enrichment on soil C. Both heating and elevated CO 2 increased respiration from soil microbes by ~20%, but heating reduced respiration from roots and rhizosphere by ~25%. The effects were additive, with no heat × CO 2 interactions. Particulate organic matter and total soil C declined over time in all treatments and were lower in elevated CO 2 plots than in ambient plots, but did not differ between heat treatments. We speculate that these declines indicate a priming effect, with increased C inputs under elevated CO 2 fueling a loss of old soil carbon. Model simulations of heated plots agreed with our observations and predicted loss of ~15% of soil organic C after 100 years of heating, but simulations of elevated CO 2 failed to predict the observed C losses and instead predicted a ~4% gain in soil organic C under any heating conditions. Despite model uncertainty, our empirical results suggest that combined, elevated CO 2 and temperature will lead to long-term declines in the amount of carbon stored in agricultural soils. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stips, Adolf; Macias, Diego; Coughlan, Clare; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Liang, X. San

    2016-01-01

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aerosol direct and indirect forcing, and on short time periods, volcanic forcings. In contrast the causality contribution from natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic forcing) to the long term trend is not significant. The spatial explicit analysis reveals that the anthropogenic forcing fingerprint is significantly regionally varying in both hemispheres. On paleoclimate time scales, however, the cause-effect direction is reversed: temperature changes cause subsequent CO2/CH4 changes. PMID:26900086

  8. Upgrading biogas by a low-temperature CO2 removal techni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M.I. Yousef

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogas, a renewable energy source, is primarily composed of methane and carbon dioxide and other gaseous species. Biogas upgrading for removing CO2 from raw biogas is a necessary step before the biogas to be used as vehicle fuel or injected into the natural gas grid. Therefore, the present work aimed to propose a low-temperature CO2 removal process as an alternative to the conventional biogas upgrading technologies (water scrubbing, chemical and physical scrubbing, membranes and Pressure swing adsorption. A typical model biogas mixture of 60 mol.% CH4 and 40 mol.% CO2 is considered. The present process showed that a product purity of 94.5 mol.% CH4 is obtained from compressed biogas by combining distillation, flash separation, auxiliary refrigeration and internal heat recovery with a potential specific energy consumption of 0.26 kW h/Nm3 raw biogas. The process has been simulated in Aspen HYSYS with avoiding the occurrence of CO2 freeze-out. The process delivers the captured CO2 in liquid form with a purity of 99.7 mol.% as a by-product for transport at 110 bar. It is concluded that the proposed upgrading process can serve as a new environmentally friendly approach to CO2 removal with an interesting energy-efficient alternative to the conventional upgrading techniques.

  9. Seasonal Variations of Isotope Ratios and CO2 Concentrations in Firn Air

    OpenAIRE

    Weiler, Karin; Schwander, Jakob; Leuenberger, Markus; Blunier, Thomas; Mulvaney, Robert; Anderson, Philip S.; Salmon, Rhian; Sturges, William T.

    2009-01-01

    A first year-round firn air sampling carried out at the British Antarctic station Halley in 2003 shows isotope and CO2 changes owing to diffusive mixing driven by seasonal variations of surface temperature, and gas composition of the atmosphere. Seasonal firn temperatures are well reproduced from the atmospheric temperature history. Based on these profiles thermal diffusion is forced with thermal diffusion factors αT with respect to air. Application of the available literature data for αT (15...

  10. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Performance Characterisation with CO and CO2 using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    at different temperatures, currents, and different content of CO, CO2 and H2 in the anode gas. The impedance spectrum at each operating point is fitted to an equivalent circuit and an analysis to identify the different mechanisms governing the impedance is performed. The trends observed, when varying...

  11. Carbon assimilation in Eucalyptus urophylla grown under high atmospheric CO2 concentrations: A proteomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruna Marques Dos; Balbuena, Tiago Santana

    2017-01-06

    Photosynthetic organisms may be drastically affected by the future climate projections of a considerable increase in CO 2 concentrations. Growth under a high concentration of CO 2 could stimulate carbon assimilation-especially in C3-type plants. We used a proteomics approach to test the hypothesis of an increase in the abundance of the enzymes involved in carbon assimilation in Eucalyptus urophylla plants grown under conditions of high atmospheric CO 2 . Our strategy allowed the profiling of all Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes and associated protein species. Among the 816 isolated proteins, those involved in carbon fixation were found to be the most abundant ones. An increase in the abundance of six key enzymes out of the eleven core enzymes involved in carbon fixation was detected in plants grown at a high CO 2 concentration. Proteome changes were corroborated by the detection of a decrease in the stomatal aperture and in the vascular bundle area in Eucalyptus urophylla plantlets grown in an environment of high atmospheric CO 2 . Our proteomics approach indicates a positive metabolic response regarding carbon fixation in a CO 2 -enriched atmosphere. The slight but significant increase in the abundance of the Calvin enzymes suggests that stomatal closure did not prevent an increase in the carbon assimilation rates. The sample enrichment strategy and data analysis used here enabled the identification of all enzymes and most protein isoforms involved in the Calvin-Benson-Bessham cycle in Eucalyptus urophylla. Upon growth in CO 2 -enriched chambers, Eucalyptus urophylla plantlets responded by reducing the vascular bundle area and stomatal aperture size and by increasing the abundance of six of the eleven core enzymes involved in carbon fixation. Our proteome approach provides an estimate on how a commercially important C3-type plant would respond to an increase in CO 2 concentrations. Additionally, confirmation at the protein level of the predicted genes involved in

  12. Cycling-induced degradation of LiCoO{sub 2} thin-film cathodes at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sluytman, J.S.; Alamgir, F.M.; Greenbaum, S.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); West, W.C.; Whitacre, J.F. [Electrochemical Technologies Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2006-04-01

    The cycle life of LiCoO{sub 2}-based all solid-state thin-film cells has been studied at room temperature, and at elevated temperatures of 50, 100, and 150{sup o}C. X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman analysis, has been used to complement the electrochemical data in examining structural and chemical changes. XRD and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that elevated temperature soaks of the thin-film batteries in the quiescent state causes no discernible changes in the LiCoO{sub 2} cathode layer. However, when the thin-film batteries are cycled at elevated temperatures, decreases in average grain size of the LiCoO{sub 2} film occur with dramatic concomitant charge and discharge capacity loss. (author)

  13. Novel CO2 Foam Concepts and Injection Schemes for Improving CO2 Sweep Efficiency in Sandstone and Carbonate Hydrocarbon Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Quoc [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Department of Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering; Hirasaki, George [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering; Johnston, Keith [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2015-02-05

    We explored cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic surfactants to identify candidates that have the potential to satisfy all the key requirements for CO2 foams in EOR. We have examined the formation, texture, rheology and stability of CO2 foams as a function of the surfactant structure and formulation variables including temperature, pressure, water/CO2 ratio, surfactant concentration, salinity and concentration of oil. Furthermore, the partitioning of surfactants between oil and water as well as CO2 and water was examined in conjunction with adsorption measurements on limestone by the Hirasaki lab to develop strategies to optimize the transport of surfactants in reservoirs.

  14. CO2 and solar radiation: cause of global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayona Gabriel; Garcia, Yuri C.; Sarmiento Heiner R

    2010-01-01

    A cause-effect relationship between global temperature as a climatic change indicator and some of the main forcing mechanisms (Atmospheric CO 2 concentration, solar radiation and volcanic activity) are analyzed in this paper through time series analysis for the 1610-1990 AD period comparing trends and variability for the frequency spectrums. Temperature seems to fit the CO 2 trend for the last century, but we found no cause-effect relationship for this interval. The frequency analysis shows a correlation between radiation and temperature for a period of 22 years. Volcanism presents an inverse relationship with temperature better seen at a decadal scale.

  15. CO{sub 2} as an Oxidant for High-Temperature Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawi, Sibudjing, E-mail: chekawis@nus.edu.sg; Kathiraser, Yasotha [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-03-18

    This paper presents a review on the developments in catalyst technology for the reactions utilizing CO{sub 2} for high-temperature applications. These include dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins, the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene, and finally CO{sub 2} reforming of hydrocarbon feedstock (i.e., methane) and alcohols. Aspects on the various reaction pathways are also highlighted. The literature on the role of promoters and catalyst development is critically evaluated. Most of the reactions discussed in this review are exploited in industries and related to on-going processes, thus providing extensive data from literature. However, some reactions, such as CO{sub 2} reforming of ethanol and glycerol, which have not reached industrial scale, are also reviewed owing to their great potential in terms of sustainability, which is essential as energy for the future. This review further illustrates the building-up of knowledge that shows the role of support and catalysts for each reaction and the underlying linkage between certain catalysts, which can be adapted for the multiple CO{sub 2}-related reactions.

  16. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON SOIL CARBON DENSITY FRACTIONS IN A DOUGLAS FIR MESOCOSM STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a 4-year full-factorial study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on Douglas fir seedlings growing in reconstructed native forest soils in mesocosms. The elevated CO2 treatment was ambient CO2 plus 200 ppm CO2. The elevated temperature treatm...

  17. CO concentration and temperature sensor for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 4.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei; Farooq, Aamir; Davidson, David Frank; Hanson, Ronald Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    A sensor for sensitive in situ measurements of carbon monoxide and temperature in combustion gases has been developed using absorption transitions in the (v′ = 1 ← v″ = 0) and (v′ = 2 ← v″ = 1) fundamental bands of CO. Recent availability of mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) lasers provides convenient access to the CO fundamental band near 4.7 μm, having approximately 104 and 102 times stronger absorption line-strengths compared to the overtone bands near 1.55 μm and 2.3 μm used previously to sense CO in combustion gases. Spectroscopic parameters of the selected transitions were determined via laboratory measurements in a shock tube over the 1100-2000 K range and also at room temperature. A single-laser absorption sensor was developed for accurate CO measurements in shock-heated gases by scanning the line pair v″ = 0, R(12) and v″ = 1, R(21) at 2.5 kHz. To capture the rapidly varying CO time-histories in chemical reactions, two different QC lasers were then used to probe the line-center absorbance of transitions v″ = 0, P(20) and v″ = 1, R(21) with a bandwidth of 1 MHz using fixed-wavelength direct absorption. The sensor was applied in successful shock tube measurements of temperature and CO time-histories during the pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl formate, illustrating the capability of this sensor for chemical kinetic studies. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  18. CO concentration and temperature sensor for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 4.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei

    2012-05-25

    A sensor for sensitive in situ measurements of carbon monoxide and temperature in combustion gases has been developed using absorption transitions in the (v′ = 1 ← v″ = 0) and (v′ = 2 ← v″ = 1) fundamental bands of CO. Recent availability of mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) lasers provides convenient access to the CO fundamental band near 4.7 μm, having approximately 104 and 102 times stronger absorption line-strengths compared to the overtone bands near 1.55 μm and 2.3 μm used previously to sense CO in combustion gases. Spectroscopic parameters of the selected transitions were determined via laboratory measurements in a shock tube over the 1100-2000 K range and also at room temperature. A single-laser absorption sensor was developed for accurate CO measurements in shock-heated gases by scanning the line pair v″ = 0, R(12) and v″ = 1, R(21) at 2.5 kHz. To capture the rapidly varying CO time-histories in chemical reactions, two different QC lasers were then used to probe the line-center absorbance of transitions v″ = 0, P(20) and v″ = 1, R(21) with a bandwidth of 1 MHz using fixed-wavelength direct absorption. The sensor was applied in successful shock tube measurements of temperature and CO time-histories during the pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl formate, illustrating the capability of this sensor for chemical kinetic studies. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Phase behavior for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+supercritical CO2+DME mixture at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Chio, Sang-Won; Byun, Hun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The phase behavior curves of binary and ternary system were measured for poly(alkyl methacrylate) in supercritical CO 2 , as well as for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+dimethyl ether (DME) (or 1-butene) in CO 2 . The solubility curves are reported for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+DME in supercritical CO 2 at temperature from (300 to 465) K and a pressure from (3.66 to 248) MPa. Also, The high-pressure static-type apparatus of cloud-point curve was tested by comparing the measured phase behavior data of the poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA]+CO 2 +20.0 and 30.4 wt% methyl methacrylate (MMA) system with literature data of 10.4, 28.8 and 48.4 wt% MMA concentration. The phase behavior data for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+CO 2 +DME mixture were measured in changes of the pressure-temperature (p, T) slope and with DME concentrations. Also, the cloud-point pressure for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+1- butene solution containing supercritical CO 2 shows from upper critical solution temperature (UCST) region to lower critical solution temperature (LCST) region at concentration range from (0.0 to 95) wt% 1-butene at below 455 K and at below 245MPa.

  20. Characterization of Cu/CeO2/Al2O3 catalysts by temperature programmed reduction and activity for CO oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataluna, Renato; Baibich, Ione M.; Dallago, R.M.; Picinini, C.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Soria, J.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetic parameters for the CO oxidation reaction using copper/alumina-modified ceria as catalysts were determined. The catalysts with different concentrations of the metals were prepared using impregnation methods. In addition, the reduction-oxidation behaviour of the catalysts were investigated by temperature-programmed reduction. The activity results show that the mechanism for CO oxidation is bifunctional: oxygen is activated on the anionic vacancies of ceria surface, while carbon monoxide is adsorbed preferentially on the higher oxidation copper site. Therefore, the reaction occurs on the interfacial active centers. Temperatures-programmed Reduction patterns show a higher dispersion when cerium oxide is present. (author)

  1. The Density and Compressibility of BaCO3-SrCO3-CaCO3-K2CO3-Na2CO3-Li2CO3 Liquids: New Measurements and a Systematic Trend with Cation Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, S. M.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The volumetric properties of multi-component carbonate liquids are required to extend thermodynamic models that describe partial melting of the deep mantle (e.g. pMELTS; Ghiorso et al., 2003) to carbonate-bearing lithologies. Carbonate in the mantle is an important reservoir of carbon, which is released to the atmosphere as CO2 through volcanism, and thus contributes to the carbon cycle. Although MgCO3 is the most important carbonate component in the mantle, it is not possible to directly measure the 1-bar density and compressibility of MgCO3 liquid because, like other alkaline-earth carbonates, it decomposes at a temperature lower than its melting temperature. Despite this challenge, Liu and Lange (2003) and O'Leary et al. (2015) showed that the one bar molar volume, thermal expansion and compressibility of the CaCO3 liquid component could be obtained by measuring the density and sound speeds of stable liquids in the CaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary system at one bar. In this study, this same strategy is employed on SrCO3- and BaCO3-bearing alkali carbonate liquids. The density and sound speed of seven liquids in the SrCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary and three liquids in the BaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary were measured from 739-1367K, with SrCO3 and BaCO3 concentrations ranging from 10-50 mol%. The density measurements were made using the double-bob Archimedean method and sound speeds were obtained with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer. The molar volume and sound speed measurements were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility of each liquid, and the results show the volumetric properties mix ideally with composition. The partial molar volume and compressibility of the SrCO3 and BaCO3 components are compared to those obtained for the CaCO3 component as a function of cation field strength. The results reveal a systematic trend that allows the partial molar volume and compressibility of the MgCO3 liquid component to be estimated.

  2. High temperature oxidation behaviour of nanostructured cermet coatings in amixed CO/sub 2/ - O/sub 2/ environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokhzad, M. A.; Khan, T. I.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured ceramic-metallic (cermet) coatings composed of nanosized ceramic particles (alpha-Al /sub 2/O/sub 3/ and TiO/sub 2/) dispersed in a nickel matrix were co-electrodeposited and then oxidized at 500 degree C, 600 degree C and 700 degree C in a mixed gas using a Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA) apparatus. The mixed gas was composed of 15 percentage CO/sub 2/, 10 percentage O/sub 2/ and 75 percentage N/sub 2/. This research investigates the effects of CO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ partial pressures on time-depended oxidation rates for coatings and compared them to the results from atmospheric oxidation under similar temperatures. The increase in partial pressure of oxygen due to the presence of CO/sub 2/ at each tested temperature was calculated and correlated to the oxidation rate of the coatings. The results showed that the presence of CO/sub 2/ in the system increased the oxidation rate of cermet coatings when compared to atmospheric oxidation at the same temperature. It was also shown that the increase in the oxidation rate is not the result of CO/sub 2/ acting as the primary oxidant but as a secondary oxidant which results in an increase of the total partial pressure of oxygen and consequently higher oxidation rates. The WDS and XRD analyses results showed that the presence of nanosized TiO/sub 2/ particles in a nickel matrix can improve oxidation behaviour of the coatings by formation of Nu i-Tau i compounds on oxidizing surface of the coating which was found beneficiary in reducing the oxidation rates for cermet coatings. (author)

  3. Effect of ethanol concentrations on temperature driven structural changes of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanta, Dayanidhi; Jana, Madhurima, E-mail: janam@nitrkl.ac.in [Molecular Simulation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela 769008 (India)

    2016-04-28

    A series of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a small enzymatic protein Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 (CI2) in water-ethanol mixed solutions were carried out to explore the underlying mechanism of ethanol driven conformational changes of the protein. Efforts have been made to probe the influence of ethanol concentrations ranging from 0% to 75% (v/v) at ambient condition (300 K (T1)) and at elevated temperatures (375 K (T2) and 450 K (T3)) to investigate the temperature induced conformational changes of the protein further. Our study showed that the effect of varying ethanol concentrations on protein’s structure is almost insignificant at T1 and T2 temperatures whereas at T3 temperature, partial unfolding of CI2 in 10% ethanol solution followed by full unfolding of the protein at ethanol concentrations above 25% occurs. However, interestingly, at T3 temperature CI2’s native structure was found to be retained in pure water (0% ethanol solution) indicating that the cosolvent ethanol do play an important role in thermal denaturation of CI2. Such observations were quantified in the light of root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) and radius of gyration. Although higher RMSD values of β-sheet over α-helix indicate complete destruction of the β-structure of CI2 at high ethanol concentrations, the associated time scale showed that the faster melting of α-helix happens over β-sheet. Around 60%-80% of initial native contacts of the protein were found broken with the separation of hydrophobic core consisting eleven residues at ethanol concentrations greater than 25%. This leads protein to expand with the increase in solvent accessible surface area. The interactions between protein and solvent molecules showed that protein’s solvation shell preferred to accommodate ethanol molecules as compared to water thereby excluded water molecules from CI2’s surface. Further, concentration dependent differential self-aggregation behavior of ethanol is likely to regulate

  4. Does the growth response of woody plants to elevated CO2 increase with temperature? A model-oriented meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Sofia; Medlyn, Belinda E; Mercado, Lina M; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics of the Rubisco enzyme implies that, at the level of a chloroplast, the response of photosynthesis to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca ) will increase with increasing air temperature. Vegetation models incorporating this interaction predict that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated CO2 (eCa ) will increase with rising temperature and will be substantially larger in warm tropical forests than in cold boreal forests. We tested these model predictions against evidence from eCa experiments by carrying out two meta-analyses. Firstly, we tested for an interaction effect on growth responses in factorial eCa  × temperature experiments. This analysis showed a positive, but nonsignificant interaction effect (95% CI for above-ground biomass response = -0.8, 18.0%) between eCa and temperature. Secondly, we tested field-based eCa experiments on woody plants across the globe for a relationship between the eCa effect on plant biomass and mean annual temperature (MAT). This second analysis showed a positive but nonsignificant correlation between the eCa response and MAT. The magnitude of the interactions between CO2 and temperature found in both meta-analyses were consistent with model predictions, even though both analyses gave nonsignificant results. Thus, we conclude that it is not possible to distinguish between the competing hypotheses of no interaction vs. an interaction based on Rubisco kinetics from the available experimental database. Experiments in a wider range of temperature zones are required. Until such experimental data are available, model predictions should aim to incorporate uncertainty about this interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and leaf nitrogen partition in process of photosynthetic carbon cycle in Musa paradisiaca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G; Zhao, P; Zeng, X; Peng, S

    2001-06-01

    The photosynthetic rate (Pn) in leaves of Musa paradisiaca grown under elevated CO2 concentration (700 +/- 56 microliters.L-1) for one week was 5.14 +/- 0.32 mumol.m-2.s-1, 22.1% higher than that under ambient CO2 concentration, while under elevated CO2 concentration for 8 week, the Pn decreased by 18.1%. It can be inferred that the photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO2 concentration and the Pn inhibition occurred in leaves of M. paradisiaca. The respiration rate in light (Rd) was lower in leaves under higher CO2 concentration, compared with that under ambient CO2 concentration. If the respiration in light was not included, the difference in CO2 compensation point for the leaves of both plants was not significant. Under higher CO2 concentration for 8 weeks, the maximum carboxylation rate(Vcmax) and electron transportation rate (J) in leaves decreased respectively by 30.5% and 14.8%, compared with that under ambient CO2 concentration. The calculated apparent quantum yield (alpha) in leaves under elevated CO2 concentration according to the initial slope of Pn/PAR was reduced to 0.014 +/- 0.010 molCO2.mol-1 quanta, compared with the value of 0.025 +/- 0.005 molCO2.mol-1 quanta in the control. The efficiency of light energy conversion also decreased from 0.203 to 0.136 electrons.quanta-1 in plants under elevated CO2 concentration. A lower partitioning coefficient for leaf nitrogen in Rubisco, bioenergetics and thylakoid light-harvesting components was observed in plants under higher CO2 concentration. The results indicated that the multi-process of photosynthesis was suppressed significantly by a long-term (8 weeks) higher CO2 concentration incubation.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Exchange and Acidity Levels in Detached Pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.), Merr., Leaves during the Day at Various Temperatures, Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradshahi, Ali; Vines, H. Max; Black, Clanton C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, O2, and CO2 on titratable acid content and on CO2 exchange were measured in detached pineapple (Ananas comosus) leaves during the daily 15-hour light period. Comparative measurements were made in air and in CO2-free air. Increasing the leaf temperature from 20 to 35 C decreased the total CO2 uptake in air and slightly increased the total CO2 released into CO2-free air. Between 25 and 35 C, the activation energy for daily acid loss was near 12 kcal mol−1, but at lower temperatures the activation energy was much greater. Increasing O2 or decreasing the CO2 concentration decreased the total CO2 fixation in air, whereas the total CO2 released in CO2-free air was increased. The total acid content remained constant at 20 C, but it decreased progressively with increasing temperature both in air and in CO2-free air. The total acid content at 30 C remained constant in 2% O2 irrespective of CO2 concentration. The total acid content decreased in 21 and 50% O2 as the CO2 increased from 0 to 300, and 540 μl/l of CO2. The data indicate that photorespiration is present in pineapple. The lack of acid loss in 2% O2 suggests that light deacidification is dependent upon respiration and that higher O2 concentrations are required to saturate deacidification. PMID:16659832

  7. CO2 and the hydrologic cycle: Simulation of two Texas river basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, K.W.; Srinivasan, R.; Arnold, J.G.; Williams, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO 2 , in the atmosphere have been speculated to have a major effect on water supplies as well as other ecological characteristics. SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) is a river basin scale hydrologic model that was modified to simulate the impact of CO 2 concentration on ET and biomass production. The model was utilized to analyze the impact of global climate change on two contrasting Texas basins. Climatic changes included doubling of CO 2 concentration from 330 ppm to 660 ppm and varying temperatures 0, ±2, and ±4 C from present values. Potential impacts of six hydrologic parameters including ET, potential ET, water yield, water stress, soil water, and biomass were simulated. CO 2 doubling had a more pronounced effect than did temperature variances. When temperature alone was varied, water yield at the outlet of the basins ranged from -4.4% to 6.5% for basin 1202 and from 2.9% to 26.7% for basin 1208. But, when coupled with an elevated CO 2 concentration, water yields increased in the range of 13.1% to 24.5% for basin 1202 and 5.6% to 33.7% for basin 1208. Rising CO 2 levels reduced ET for both basins, representing an enhanced water use efficiency. Seasonal fluctuations of soil water were a result of different growing periods and are evident from water stress encountered by the plant. With enriched CO 2 levels, increases in biomass production ranged from 6.9% to 47.4% and from 14.5 % to 31.4% for basins 1202 and 1208, respectively. 42 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Concentrations, Co-spectra and Fluxes from Latest Standardized Automated CO2/H2O Flux Systems versus Established Analyzer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, G. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Begashaw, I.; Franzen, D.; Welles, J.; McDermitt, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial and temporal flux data coverage have improved significantly in recent years, due to standardization, automation and management of data collection, and better handling of the generated data. With more stations and networks, larger data streams from each station, and smaller operating budgets, modern tools are required to effectively and efficiently handle the entire process.These tools should produce standardized verifiable datasets, and provide a way to cross-share the standardized data with external collaborators to leverage available funding, and promote data analyses and publications. In 2015, new open-path and enclosed flux measurement systems1 were developed, based on established gas analyzer models2,3, with the goal of improving stability in the presence of contamination, refining temperature control and compensation, and providing more accurate gas concentration measurements. In 2017, the new open-path system was further refined to simplify hardware configuration, and to reduce power consumption and cost. Additionally, all new systems incorporate complete automated on-site flux calculations using EddyPro® Software4 run by a weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer to provide standardized traceable data sets for fluxes and supporting variables. This presentation will describe details and results from the field tests of the new flux systems, in comparison to older models and reference instruments. References:1 Burba G., W. Miller, I. Begashaw, G. Fratini, F. Griessbaum, J. Kathilankal, L. Xu, D. Franz, E. Joseph, E. Larmanou, S. Miller, D. Papale, S. Sabbatini, T. Sachs, R. Sakai, D. McDermitt, 2017. Comparison of CO2 Concentrations, Co-spectra and Flux Measurements between Latest Standardized Automated CO2/H2O Flux Systems and Older Gas Analysers. 10th ICDC Conference, Switzerland: 21-25/08 2 Metzger, S., G. Burba, S. Burns, P. Blanken, J. Li, H. Luo, R. Zulueta, 2016. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy

  9. Response to multi-generational selection under elevated [CO2] in two temperature regimes suggests enhanced carbon assimilation and increased reproductive output in Brassica napus L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    different temperature regimes. To reveal phenotypic divergence at the manipulated [CO2] and temperature conditions, a full-factorial natural selection regime was established in a phytotron environment over the range of four generations. It is demonstrated that a directional response to selection at elevated......Functional plant traits are likely to adapt under the sustained pressure imposed by environmental changes through natural selection. Employing Brassica napus as a model, a multi-generational study was performed to investigate the potential trajectories of selection at elevated [CO2] in two...... subjected to increased levels of CO2 over the generational range investigated. The results of this study suggest that phenotypic divergence of plants selected under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration may drive the future functions of plant productivity to be different from projections that do...

  10. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in pure and Co doped CeO2 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Qiye; Zhang Huaiwu; Song Yuanqiang; Yang Qinghui; Zhu Hao; Xiao, John Q

    2007-01-01

    We report the room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism (FM) observed in pure and Co doped CeO 2 powder. An insulating nonmagnetic CeO 2 single crystal, after grinding into fine powder, shows an RT-FM with a small magnetization of 0.0045 emu g -1 . However, the CeO 2 powder became paramagnetic after oxygen annealing, which strongly suggests an oxygen vacancy meditated FM ordering. Furthermore, by doping Co into CeO 2 powder the FM can significantly enhance through a F-centre exchange (FCE) coupling mechanism, in which both oxygen vacancies and magnetic ions are involved. As the Co content increases, the FM of Co doped CeO 2 initially increases to a maximum 0.47 emu g -1 , and then degrades very quickly. The complex correlation between the Co content and saturation magnetization was well interpreted by supposing the coexistence of three subsets of Co ions in CeO 2 . Our results reveal that the large RT-FM observed in Co doped CeO 2 powder originates from a combination effect of oxygen vacancies and transition metal doping

  11. Sensitive indicators of Stipa bungeana response to precipitation under ambient and elevated CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yaohui; Zhou, Guangsheng; Jiang, Yanling; Wang, Hui; Xu, Zhenzhu

    2018-02-01

    Precipitation is a primary environmental factor in the semiarid grasslands of northern China. With increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, precipitation regimes will change, and high-impact weather events may be more common. Currently, many ecophysiological indicators are known to reflect drought conditions, but these indicators vary greatly among species, and few studies focus on the applicability of these drought indicators under high CO2 conditions. In this study, five precipitation levels (- 30%, - 15%, control, + 15%, and + 30%) were used to simulate the effects of precipitation change on 18 ecophysiological characteristics in Stipa bungeana, including leaf area, plant height, leaf nitrogen (N), and chlorophyll content, among others. Two levels of CO2 concentration (ambient, 390 ppm; 550 ppm) were used to simulate the effects of elevated CO2 on these drought indicators. Using gray relational analysis and phenotypic plasticity analysis, we found that total leaf area or leaf number (morphology), leaf water potential or leaf water content (physiology), and aboveground biomass better reflected the water status of S. bungeana under ambient and elevated CO2 than the 13 other analyzed variables. The sensitivity of drought indicators changed under the elevated CO2 condition. By quantifying the relationship between precipitation and the five most sensitive indicators, we found that the thresholds of precipitation decreased under elevated CO2 concentration. These results will be useful for objective monitoring and assessment of the occurrence and development of drought events in S. bungeana grasslands.

  12. Estimating Indoor PM2.5 and CO Concentrations in Households in Southern Nepal: The Nepal Cookstove Intervention Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chen

    Full Text Available High concentrations of household air pollution (HAP due to biomass fuel usage with unvented, insufficient combustion devices are thought to be an important health risk factor in South Asia population. To better characterize the indoor concentrations of particulate matter (PM2.5 and carbon monoxide (CO, and to understand their impact on health in rural southern Nepal, this study analyzed daily monitoring data collected with DataRAM pDR-1000 and LASCAR CO data logger in 2980 households using traditional biomass cookstove indoor through the Nepal Cookstove Intervention Trial-Phase I between March 2010 and October 2011. Daily average PM2.5 and CO concentrations collected in area near stove were 1,376 (95% CI, 1,331-1,423 μg/m3 and 10.9 (10.5-11.3 parts per million (ppm among households with traditional cookstoves. The 95th percentile, hours above 100μg/m3 for PM2.5 or 6ppm for CO, and hours above 1000μg/m3 for PM2.5 or 9ppm for CO were also reported. An algorithm was developed to differentiate stove-influenced (SI periods from non-stove-influenced (non-SI periods in monitoring data. Average stove-influenced concentrations were 3,469 (3,350-3,588 μg/m3 for PM2.5 and 21.8 (21.1-22.6 ppm for CO. Dry season significantly increased PM2.5 concentration in all metrics; wood was the cleanest fuel for PM2.5 and CO, while adding dung into the fuel increased concentrations of both pollutants. For studies in rural southern Nepal, CO concentration is not a viable surrogate for PM2.5 concentrations based on the low correlation between these measures. In sum, this study filled a gap in knowledge on HAP in rural Nepal using traditional cookstoves and revealed very high concentrations in these households.

  13. Dynamics of Soil CO2 Profiles of Pinus sylvestris var. sylvestriformis Seedlings Under CO2 Concentration Doubled%CO2倍增条件下长白赤松幼苗土壤CO2廓线的动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩士杰; 张军辉; 周玉梅; 邹春静

    2002-01-01

    The gas-well system permanently installed in the soil was adopted for studying the dynamic relationship between CO2 profiles and seedling root growth of Pinus sylvestris var. sylvestriformis (Takenouchi) Cheng et C. D. Chu. The study was conducted in the Open Research Station of Changbai Mountain Forest Ecological System, The Chinese Academy of Sciences from 1999 to 2001. Four treatments were arranged in the rectangular open-top chambers (OTCs): ambient CO2+no-seedling, 700 μmol/mol CO2+no-seedling, ambient CO2 +seedlings, 700 μmol/mol CO2+seedlings. By collecting and analyzing soil gas synchronously, it was found that the dynamics of CO2 profiles were related to the biological activity of seedlings. There were more roots distributed in the top soil and the boundary layer across soil and sand, which made more contributions to the CO2 profiles due to respiration root. Compared with the ambient CO2, elevated CO2 led to the peak of CO2 concentration distribution shifted from soil surface layer to the boundary layer as seasonally growing of seedling roots. It is suggested the gas-well system is an inexpensive, non-destructive and relatively sensitive method for study of soil CO2 concentration profiles.%采用固定在土壤中的气井系统,监测土壤剖面的CO2动态及其与长白赤松 (Pinus sylvestris var. sylvestriformis (Takenouchi) Cheng et C. D. Chu) 幼苗根系发展之间的关系.实验研究共设4种CO2处理,分别是环境CO2浓度,无苗;CO2为700 μmol/mol,无苗;环境CO2浓度,有苗;CO2为700 μmol/mol,有苗.通过对土壤剖面CO2气体的同步采集与分析表明:土壤CO2廓线与幼苗根系的生物活性密切相关.在土壤表面及壤土和沙土的边界层中,根系分布密集,根系的呼吸作用对那两个土层CO2贡献大;随着幼苗的季节生长,与环境CO2浓度比较,CO2倍增将导致土壤剖面上CO2

  14. [Effects of fertilization on soil CO2 flux in Castanea mollissima stand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Yong-Fu; Jiang, Pei-Kun; Zhou, Guo-Mo; Shen, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Juan; Wang, Zhan-Lei

    2013-09-01

    In June 2011-June 2012, a fertilization experiment was conducted in a typical Castanea mollissima stand in Lin' an of Zhejiang Province, East China to study the effects of inorganic and organic fertilization on the soil CO2 flux and the relationships between the soil CO2 flux and environmental factors. Four treatments were installed, i. e., no fertilization (CK), inorganic fertilization (IF), organic fertilization (OF), half organic plus half inorganic fertilization (OIF). The soil CO2 emission rate was determined by the method of static closed chamber/GC technique, and the soil temperature, soil moisture content, and soil water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) concentration were determined by routine methods. The soil CO2 emission exhibited a strong seasonal pattern, with the highest rate in July or August and the lowest rate in February. The annual accumulative soil CO2 emission in CK was 27.7 t CO2 x hm(-2) x a(-1), and that in treatments IF, OF, and OIF was 29.5%, 47.0%, and 50.7% higher than the CK, respectively. The soil WSOC concentration in treatment IF (105.1 mg kg(-1)) was significantly higher than that in CK (76.6 mg x kg(-1)), but was obviously lower than that in treatments OF (133.0 mg x kg(-1)) and OIF (121.2 mg x kg(-1)). The temperature sensitivity of respiration (Q10) in treatments CK, IF, OF, and OIF was 1.47, 1.75, 1.49, and 1.57, respectively. The soil CO2 emission rate had significant positive correlations with the soil temperature at the depth of 5 cm and the soil WSOC concentration, but no significant correlation with soil moisture content. The increase of the soil WSOC concentration caused by fertilization was probably one of the reasons for the increase of soil CO2 emission from the C. mollissima stand.

  15. Synergism between elevated pCO2 and temperature on the Antarctic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Torstensson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Polar oceans are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and warming. Diatoms play a significant role in sea ice biogeochemistry and provide an important food source to grazers in ice-covered oceans, especially during early spring. However, the ecophysiology of ice-living organisms has received little attention in terms of ocean acidification. In this study, the synergism between temperature and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 was investigated in relationship to the optimal growth temperature of the Antarctic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei. Diatoms were kept in cultures at controlled levels of pCO2 (∼390 and ∼960 μatm and temperature (−1.8 and 2.5 °C for 14 days. Synergism between temperature and pCO2 was detected in growth rate and acyl lipid fatty acid (FA content. Optimal growth rate was observed around 5 °C in a separate experiment. Carbon enrichment only promoted (6% growth rate closer to the optimal growth, but not at the control temperature (−1.8 °C. At −1.8 °C and at ∼960 μatm pCO2, the total FA content was reduced relative to the ∼390 μatm treatment, although no difference between pCO2 treatments was observed at 2.5 °C. A large proportion (97% of the total FAs comprised on average of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA at −1.8 °C. Cellular PUFA content was reduced at ∼960 relative to ∼390 μatm pCO2. Effects of carbon enrichment may be different depending on ocean warming scenario or season, e.g. reduced cellular FA content in response to elevated CO2 at low temperatures only, reflected as reduced food quality for higher trophic levels. Synergy between warming and acidification may be particularly important in polar areas since a narrow thermal window generally limits cold-water organisms.

  16. Dissolved organic carbon, CO2, and CH4 concentrations and their stable isotope ratios in thermokarst lakes on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Mu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermokarst lakes are widely distributed on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP, which accounts for 8% of the global permafrost area. These lakes probably promote organic matter biodegradation and thus accelerate the emission of carbon-based greenhouse gases. However, little is known about greenhouse gas concentrations and their stable isotopes characteristics of these lakes. In this study, we measured the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved CO2 and CH4, as well as the distribution of δ13CCO2, δ13CCH4, and δ13COM (organic matter of lake sediments in thermokarst lakes on the QTP. Results showed that the OM of the lake sediments was highly decomposed. The concentrations of DOC, CO2 and CH4 in the lake water on the QTP were 1.2–49.6 mg L–1, 3.6–45.0 μmol L–1 and 0.28–3.0 μmol L–1, respectively. The highest CO2 and CH4 concentrations were recorded in July while the lowest values in September, which suggested that temperature had an effect on greenhouse gas production, although this pattern may also relate to thermal stratification of the water column. The results implied that thermokast lakes should be paid more attention to regarding carbon cycle and greenhouse gas emissions on the QTP.

  17. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO 2 responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO 2 responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO 2 responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO 2 exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO 2 scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  18. Effect of Activation Temperature on CO{sub 2} Capture Behaviors of Resorcinol-based Carbon Aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Cheolwhan; Im, Seungsoon; Park, Soojin [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngjoo [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    In this study, carbon aerogel (CA) was synthesized using a soft-template method, and the optimum conditions for the adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by the carbon aerogel were evaluated by controlling the activation temperature. KOH was used as the activation agent at a KOH/CA activation ratio of 4:1. Three types of activated CAs were synthesized at activation temperatures of 800 .deg. C (CA-K-800), 900 .deg. C (CA-K-900), and 1000 .deg. C (CA-K-1000), and their surface and pore characteristics along with the CO{sub 2} adsorption characteristics were examined. The results showed that with the increase in activation temperature from 800 to 900 .deg. C, the total pore volume and specific surface area sharply increased from 1.2165 to 1.2500 cm{sup 3}/g and 1281 to 1526 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. However, the values for both these parameters decreased at temperatures above 1000 .deg. C. The best CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 10.9 wt % was obtained for the CA-K-900 sample at 298 K and 1 bar. This result highlights the importance of the structural and textural characteristics of the carbon aerogel, prepared at different activation temperatures on CO{sub 2} adsorption behaviors.

  19. Flow Distribution Measurement Feasibility in Supercritical CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance, Blake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 (sCO2) is a fluid of interest for advanced power cycles that can reach thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 50% or higher. Of particular interest for fossil-fired natural gas is the Allam cycle that captures nearly all CO2 emissions and exports it as a fluid stream where it may be of value. The combustion process conditions are unlike any before realized with 90-95% CO2 concentration, temperatures around 1000°C, and pressures near 300 bar. This work outlines the experimental feasibility of flow measurements to acquire the first known data in pure sCO2 at similar but reduced temperature and pressure conditions.

  20. Catalytic combustion of the retentate gas from a CO2/H2 separation membrane reactor for further CO2 enrichment and energy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyung-Ran; Park, Jin-Woo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Hong, Sungkook; Lee, Chun-Boo; Oh, Duck-Kyu; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Dong-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The CCR (catalytic combustion reaction) of the retentate gas, consisting of 90% CO 2 and 10% H 2 obtained from a CO 2 /H 2 separation membrane reactor, was investigated using a porous Ni metal catalyst in order to recover energy and further enrich CO 2 . A disc-shaped porous Ni metal catalyst, namely Al[0.1]/Ni, was prepared by a simple method and a compact MCR (micro-channel reactor) equipped with a catalyst plate was designed for the CCR. CO 2 and H 2 concentrations of 98.68% and 0.46%, respectively, were achieved at an operating temperature of 400 °C, GHSV (gas-hourly space velocity) of 50,000 h −1 and a H 2 /O 2 ratio (R/O) of 2 in the unit module. In the case of the MCR, a sheet of the Ni metal catalyst was easily installed along with the other metal plates and the concentration of CO 2 in the retentate gas increased up to 96.7%. The differences in temperatures measured before and after the CCR were 31 °C at the product outlet and 19 °C at the N 2 outlet in the MCR. The disc-shaped porous metal catalyst and MCR configuration used in this study exhibit potential advantages, such as high thermal transfer resulting in improved energy recovery rate, simple catalyst preparation, and easy installation of the catalyst in the MCR. - Highlights: • The catalytic combustion of a retentate gas obtained from the H 2 /CO 2 separation membrane. • A disc-shaped porous nickel metal catalyst and a micro-channel reactor for catalytic hydrogen combustion. • CO 2 enrichment up to 98.68% at 400 °C, 50,000 h −1 and H 2 /O 2 ratio of 2.

  1. Impact of drought and increasing temperatures on soil CO2 emissions in a Mediterranean shrubland (gariga)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Dato, Giovanbattista Domenico; De Angelis, Paolo; Sirca, Costantino

    2010-01-01

    the soil and air night-time temperatures and to reduce water input from precipitation. The objective was to analyze the extent to which higher temperatures and a drier climate influence soil CO2 emissions in the short term and on an annual basis. The microclimate was manipulated in field plots (about 25 m2...... temperature probe. The seasonal pattern of soil CO2 efflux was characterized by higher rates during the wet vegetative season and lower rates during the dry non-vegetative season (summer). The Warming treatment did not change SR fluxes at any sampling date. The Drought treatment decreased soil CO2 emissions...... on only three of 10 occasions during 2004. The variation of soil respiration with temperature and soil water content did not differ significantly among the treatments, but was affected by the season. The annual CO2 emissions were not significantly affected by the treatments. In the semi-arid Mediterranean...

  2. Inverse CeO2sbnd Fe2O3 catalyst for superior low-temperature CO conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongming; Chen, Ran; Peng, Wen; Tang, Guangbei; Gao, Xiaoya

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents a rational design of highly efficient and affordable catalysts for CO oxidation with a low operating temperature. A series of ceria-iron catalysts were inversely built via a co-precipitation method. The catalytic activity of low-temperature CO oxidation was much higher with CeO2-modified Fe2O3 (CeO2sbnd Fe2O3) than with Fe2O3-modified CeO2 (Fe2O3sbnd CeO2). In particular, the 7.5% CeO2sbnd Fe2O3 catalyst had the highest activity, reaching 96.17% CO conversion at just 25 °C. Catalyst characterization was carried out to explore the cause of the significantly different CO conversion efficiencies between the Fe2O3sbnd CeO2 and Fe2O3sbnd CeO2 catalysts. HRTEM showed a significant inhomogeneous phase in 7.5% CeO2sbnd Fe2O3 with small CeO2 nanoparticles highly dispersed on the rod-shaped Fe2O3 surface. Furthermore, the 7.5% CeO2sbnd Fe2O3 composite catalyst exhibited the highest ratios of Fe2+/Fe3+ and Ce3+/Ce4+ as well as the largest pore volume. These properties are believed to benefit the CO conversion in 7.5% CeO2sbnd Fe2O3.

  3. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Binlin; Song Yongchen; Liu Yingguang; Feng Cong

    2010-01-01

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO 2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO 2 gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO 2 level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO 2 capture at 550 deg. C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900 deg. C by pure N 2 flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO 2 were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer.

  4. Concentration effect of Ca2+ co-doping on Eu3+ doped YPO4 host nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaiphaba, N.; Phaomei, G.; Singh, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    YPO 4 doped Eu nanoparticles have been synthesized by ethylene glycol route at low temperature of 120 ℃. The host is co-doped with different concentration of Ca 2+ (Ca 2+ =0, 2, 3, 10 at.%). The samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. XRD results show that the samples have only single tetragonal structure. Fig. 1 shows the expanded region of (hkl = 200) peak of all the samples in the range 25 to 27 ℃ in 2θ on the same day. The (200) peak position is shifted to higher 2θ from 25.8℃ to 26.2℃ when the concentration of Ca +2 increases upto 10 at.%. The crystallite size also decreases from 32 nm to 20 nm with increase in the concentration of Ca 2+ indicating decrease in the crystallinity of the prepared samples. Photoluminescence excitation spectra results show that the phosphor can be efficiently excited by ultra violet light from 250 to 400 nm including three peaks at 230, 255, and 394 nm. Emission spectra of Ca x Eu 0.05 Y 0.95-x PO 4 (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.10) at 230 nm excitation shows that the intensity of the peak increases upto 1 atom % of Ca (x=0.01) and then decreases due to concentration quenching. These nanoparticles are found to be re-dispersible in water and ethanol and are incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol film homogeneously. This film showed bright red emission. (author)

  5. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on growth and leaf litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Fraxinus rhynchophylla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsub Cha

    Full Text Available The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 level is expected to increase substantially, which may change the global climate and carbon dynamics in ecosystems. We examined the effects of an elevated atmospheric CO2 level on the growth of Quercus acutissima and Fraxinus rhynchophylla seedlings. We investigated changes in the chemical composition of leaf litter, as well as litter decomposition. Q. acutissima and F. rhynchophylla did not show differences in dry weight between ambient CO2 and enriched CO2 treatments, but they exhibited different patterns of carbon allocation, namely, lower shoot/root ratio (S/R and decreased specific leaf area (SLA under CO2-enriched conditions. The elevated CO2 concentration significantly reduced the nitrogen concentration in leaf litter while increasing lignin concentrations and carbon/nitrogen (C/N and lignin/N ratios. The microbial biomass associated with decomposing Q. acutissima leaf litter was suppressed in CO2 enrichment chambers, while that of F. rhynchophylla was not. The leaf litter of Q. acutissima from the CO2-enriched chambers, in contrast with F. rhynchophylla, contained much lower nutrient concentrations than that of the litter in the ambient air chambers. Consequently, poorer litter quality suppressed decomposition.

  6. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on growth and leaf litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Fraxinus rhynchophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Sangsub; Chae, Hee-Myung; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Shim, Jae-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) level is expected to increase substantially, which may change the global climate and carbon dynamics in ecosystems. We examined the effects of an elevated atmospheric CO2 level on the growth of Quercus acutissima and Fraxinus rhynchophylla seedlings. We investigated changes in the chemical composition of leaf litter, as well as litter decomposition. Q. acutissima and F. rhynchophylla did not show differences in dry weight between ambient CO2 and enriched CO2 treatments, but they exhibited different patterns of carbon allocation, namely, lower shoot/root ratio (S/R) and decreased specific leaf area (SLA) under CO2-enriched conditions. The elevated CO2 concentration significantly reduced the nitrogen concentration in leaf litter while increasing lignin concentrations and carbon/nitrogen (C/N) and lignin/N ratios. The microbial biomass associated with decomposing Q. acutissima leaf litter was suppressed in CO2 enrichment chambers, while that of F. rhynchophylla was not. The leaf litter of Q. acutissima from the CO2-enriched chambers, in contrast with F. rhynchophylla, contained much lower nutrient concentrations than that of the litter in the ambient air chambers. Consequently, poorer litter quality suppressed decomposition.

  7. Solubility of krypton in liquid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Meservey, A.B.

    1976-06-01

    The solubility of krypton in liquid CO 2 was measured experimentally over essentially the entire liquid range of CO 2 , from -53 to 29 0 C. A tracer technique using 85 Kr was employed, and equilibrated gas-liquid samples were analyzed in situ with a collimated counter. Dilute concentrations of krypton were used, and the data are expressed as a distribution ratio, Y/sub Kr//X/sub Kr/, the log of which is nearly linear with respect to temperature from the lowest temperature to about 20 0 C, above which the values fall off rapidly toward a value of unity at the critical temperature. The numerical values obtained for the distribution ratio increase from 1.44 at 29 0 C to 29.4 at -53 0 C

  8. CO{sub 2} solubility in brines of sedimentary basins. Application to CO{sub 2} sequestration (greenhouse gas); Solubilite de CO{sub 2} dans les saumures des bassins sedimentaires. Application au stockage de CO{sub 2} (gaz a effet de serre)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, S.

    2005-04-01

    Large scale combustion of fossil energy leads today to a production of 20 billions tons of CO{sub 2} annually. This increases continuously the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere, responsible of the observed climatic increase of the temperature since one century. One of the most acceptable solutions consists in the so called CO{sub 2} sequestration in natural geological formations. The control of the process and the prediction of the final quantity of CO{sub 2} trapped in the deep saline aquifers depend on the knowledge of the solubility of acid gas in natural brines in the in situ temperature and pressure conditions. The possible dissolution of acid gases in aqueous phases brings a new complexity, owing to the fact that they behave like electrolytes in aqueous mediums A thermodynamic model for CO{sub 2} solubility is presented. The vapour phase is described by a cubic state equation. The aqueous phase is described by apparent constants of CO{sub 2} dissolution and dissociation, adjusted on literature data. This model is validated by measurements of the British Geological Survey (CO{sub 2} sequestration at Sleipner oil field, North Sea). The results of this study made it possible to calculate the impact of a CO{sub 2} injection on the solubility of calcite by acidification of formation water. The consequences in terms of CO{sub 2} storage capacity of deep saline aquifers are estimated. (author)

  9. Elevated CO2 response of photosynthesis depends on ozone concentration in aspen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noormets, Asko; Kull, Olevi; Sober, Anu; Kubiske, Mark E.; Karnosky, David F.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of elevated CO 2 and O 3 on apparent quantum yield (φ), maximum photosynthesis (P max ), carboxylation efficiency (V cmax ) and electron transport capacity (J max ) at different canopy locations was studied in two aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones of contrasting O 3 tolerance. Local light climate at every leaf was characterized as fraction of above-canopy photosynthetic photon flux density (%PPFD). Elevated CO 2 alone did not affect φ or P max , and increased J max in the O 3 -sensitive, but not in the O 3 -tolerant clone. Elevated O 3 decreased leaf chlorophyll content and all photosynthetic parameters, particularly in the lower canopy, and the negative impact of O 3 increased through time. Significant interaction effect, whereby the negative impact of elevated O 3 was exaggerated by elevated CO 2 was seen in Chl, N and J max , and occurred in both O 3 -tolerant and O 3 -sensitive clones. The clonal differences in the level of CO 2 x O 3 interaction suggest a relationship between photosynthetic acclimation and background O 3 concentration. - Photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO 2 depends on the background oxidant levels.

  10. Co-doped sodium chloride crystals exposed to different irradiation temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Morales, A. [Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria y Tecnologias Avanzadas, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2580, Col. La Laguna Ticoman, 07340 Mexico D.F., Mexico and Unidad de Irradiacion y Segurid (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C. [Unidad de Irradiacion y Seguridad Radiologica, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F (Mexico); Kitis, G. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Flores J, C.; Hernandez A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    Monocrystals of NaCl:XCl{sub 2}:MnCl{sub 2}(X = Ca,Cd) at four different concentrations have been analyzed. The crystals were exposed to different irradiation temperature, such as at room temperature (RT), solid water (SW), dry ice (DI) and liquid nitrogen (LN). The samples were irradiated with photon from {sup 60}Co irradiators. The co-doped sodium chloride crystals show a complex structure of glow curves that can be related to different distribution of traps. The linearity response was analyzed with the F(D) index. The F(D) value was less than unity indicating a sub-linear response was obtained from the TL response on the function of the dose. The glow curves were deconvoluted by using the CGCD program based on the first, second and general order kinetics.

  11. Co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O in solid oxide cells: Performance and durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the initial performance and durability of a solid oxide cell applied for co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O. Such a cell, when powered by renewable/nuclear energy, could be used to recycle CO2 into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance...... systematically varied test conditions enabled clear visual identification of five electrode processes that contribute to the cell resistance. The processes could be assigned to each electrode and to gas concentration effects by examining their dependence on gas composition changes and temperature. This study...

  12. CO{sub 2} threshold for millennial-scale oscillations in the climate system: implications for global warming scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Katrin J.; Eby, Michael; Weaver, Andrew J. [University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC (Canada); Saenko, Oleg A. [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria (Canada)

    2008-02-15

    We present several equilibrium runs under varying atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). The model shows two very different responses: for CO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppm or lower, the system evolves into an equilibrium state. For CO{sub 2} concentrations of 440 ppm or higher, the system starts oscillating between a state with vigorous deep water formation in the Southern Ocean and a state with no deep water formation in the Southern Ocean. The flushing events result in a rapid increase in atmospheric temperatures, degassing of CO{sub 2} and therefore an increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, and a reduction of sea ice cover in the Southern Ocean. They also cool the deep ocean worldwide. After the flush, the deep ocean warms slowly again and CO{sub 2} is taken up by the ocean until the stratification becomes unstable again at high latitudes thousands of years later. The existence of a threshold in CO{sub 2} concentration which places the UVic ESCM in either an oscillating or non-oscillating state makes our results intriguing. If the UVic ESCM captures a mechanism that is present and important in the real climate system, the consequences would comprise a rapid increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations of several tens of ppm, an increase in global surface temperature of the order of 1-2 C, local temperature changes of the order of 6 C and a profound change in ocean stratification, deep water temperature and sea ice cover. (orig.)

  13. A modeling analysis of the interaction between forest age and forest responsiveness to increasing CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschbaum, M.U.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, both young forest plants and established forest stands were examined to gain insight into likely plant responses to increases in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), temperature and altered rainfall patterns. Forests have rotations of about 10 to 200 years, during which time anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations and the associated changes in climate change can be substantial. The changes are most likely to influence the growth of established forest stands. The CenW forest growth model was used to examine the mechanisms that are responsible for the slowing of forest growth with age, including the response to increasing carbon dioxide. It was shown that inclusion of allocation shifts with tree height, individual tree mortality, changing respiration load and nutrient changes has only a small effect on the response to increasing carbon dioxide. When photosynthesis of mature trees decreases, growth response to increasing CO 2 is reduced. Since the number of interacting processes is so large, no simple and broad interaction between increased carbon dioxide and forest age were identified. It was concluded that it is not yet possible to predict the change in carbon dioxide response by forest age. 54 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  14. Flexible and High Performance Supercapacitors Based on NiCo2O4for Wide Temperature Range Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ram K.; Candler, John; Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Ramasamy, Karthik; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Binder free nanostructured NiCo2O4 were grown using a facile hydrothermal technique. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the phase purity of NiCo2O4. The surface morphology and microstructure of the NiCo2O4 analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed flower-like morphology composed of needle-like structures. The potential application of binder free NiCo2O4 as an electrode for supercapacitor devices was investigated using electrochemical methods. The cyclic voltammograms of NiCo2O4 electrode using alkaline aqueous electrolytes showed the presence of redox peaks suggesting pseudocapacitance behavior. Quasi-solid state supercapacitor device fabricated by sandwiching two NiCo2O4 electrodes and separating them by ion transporting layer. The performance of the device was tested using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The device showed excellent flexibility and cyclic stability. The temperature dependent charge storage capacity was measured for their variable temperature applications. Specific capacitance of the device was enhanced by ~150% on raising the temperature from 20 to 60 °C. Hence, the results suggest that NiCo2O4 grown under these conditions could be a suitable material for high performance supercapacitor devices that can be operated at variable temperatures.

  15. [Effect of air temperature and rainfall on wetland ecosystem CO2 exchange in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiao-jing; Han, Guang-xuan

    2015-10-01

    Wetland can be a potential efficient sink to reduce global warming due to its higher primary productivity and lower carbon decomposition rate. While there has been a series progress on the influence mechanism of ecosystem CO2 exchange over China' s wetlands, a systematic metaanalysis of data still needs to be improved. We compiled data of ecosystem CO2 exchange of 21 typical wetland vegetation types in China from 29 papers and carried out an integrated analysis of air temperature and precipitation effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP), the response of NEE to PAR, and the response of Reco to temperature. The results showed that there were significant responses (P0.05). Across different Chinese wetlands, both precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on apparent quantum yield (α) or ecosystem respiration in the daytime (Reco,day, P>0.05). The maximum photosynthesis rate (Amax) was remarkably correlated with precipitation (P 0.05). Precipitation was negatively correlated with temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10, P<0.05). Furthermore, temperature accounted for 35% and 46% of the variations in temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10) and basal respiration (Rref P<0.05), respectively.

  16. Problems in the Relationship between CO2 Emissions and Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Kovács

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In the analysis of environmental conditions and impacts, the viewpoint that greenhouse gases, primarily anthropogenic (industrial, human carbon dioxide, play a determining role in the change of global temperatures, ( the increase experienced in the last one and a half decade, has been given widespread publicity recently. Coal-fired power plants are the first to blame for the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the last two centuries. The study indicates possibilities to increase the efficiency of coal-fired power plants, which would involve a considerable reduction in CO2 emissions with an identical production volume of electrical energy. On the basis of the analysis of the amount of fossil fuels used, the amount of CO2 emissions and changes in the concentrations of atmospheric CO2, it is shown that no correlation can be proved between the factors investigated and changes in global temperatures.

  17. Temperature dependence of bioelectrochemical CO2 conversion and methane production with a mixed-culture biocathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hou-Yun; Bao, Bai-Ling; Liu, Jing; Qin, Yuan; Wang, Yi-Ran; Su, Kui-Zu; Han, Jun-Cheng; Mu, Yang

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of temperature on methane production by CO 2 reduction during microbial electrosynthesis (MES) with a mixed-culture biocathode. Reactor performance, in terms of the amount and rate of methane production, current density, and coulombic efficiency, was compared at different temperatures. The microbial properties of the biocathode at each temperature were also analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed that the optimum temperature for methane production from CO 2 reduction in MES with a mixed-culture cathode was 50°C, with the highest amount and rate of methane production of 2.06±0.13mmol and 0.094±0.01mmolh -1 , respectively. In the mixed-culture biocathode MES, the coulombic efficiency of methane formation was within a range of 19.15±2.31% to 73.94±2.18% due to by-product formation at the cathode, including volatile fatty acids and hydrogen. Microbial analysis demonstrated that temperature had an impact on the diversity of microbial communities in the biofilm that formed on the MES cathode. Specifically, the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium became the predominant archaea for methane production from CO 2 reduction, while the abundance of the aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta decreased with increased temperature. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Growth under elevated CO2 concentration affects the temperature response of photosynthetic rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holišová, Petra; Šigut, Ladislav; Klem, Karel; Urban, Otmar

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 43-52 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA ČR GA13-28093S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : CO2 assimilation rate * Fagus sylvatica * chlorophyll fluorescence * Picea abies * Rubisco Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://dx.doi.org/10.11118/beskyd201306010043

  19. A terrestrial biosphere model optimized to atmospheric CO2 concentration and above ground woody biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, M.; Ito, A.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    This study documents an optimization of a prognostic biosphere model (VISIT; Vegetation Integrative Similator for Trace gases) to observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration and above ground woody biomass by using a Bayesian inversion method combined with an atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM; National Institute for Environmental Studies / Frontier Research Center for Global Change (NIES/FRCGC) off-line global atmospheric tracer transport model). The assimilated observations include 74 station records of surface atmospheric CO2 concentration and aggregated grid data sets of above ground woody biomass (AGB) and net primary productivity (NPP) over the globe. Both the biosphere model and the atmospheric transport model are used at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid with temporal resolutions of a day and an hour, respectively. The atmospheric transport model simulates atmospheric CO2 concentration with nine vertical levels using daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange rate (NEE) from the biosphere model, oceanic CO2 flux, and fossil fuel emission inventory. The models are driven by meteorological data from JRA-25 (Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis) and JCDAS (JMA Climate Data Assimilation System). Statistically optimum physiological parameters in the biosphere model are found by iterative minimization of the corresponding Bayesian cost function. We select thirteen physiological parameter with high sensitivity to NEE, NPP, and AGB for the minimization. Given the optimized physiological parameters, the model shows error reductions in seasonal variation of the CO2 concentrations especially in the northern hemisphere due to abundant observation stations, while errors remain at a few stations that are located in coastal coastal area and stations in the southern hemisphere. The model also produces moderate estimates of the mean magnitudes and probability distributions in AGB and NPP for each biome. However, the model fails in the simulation of the terrestrial

  20. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on photosynthesis, dark res-piration and RuBPcase activity of three species seedlings in Changbai Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two-year-old seedlings of Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sylvestriformis and Fraxinus mandshurica were treated in open-top chambers with elevated CO2 concentrations (700 μL·L-1, 500 μL·L-1) and ambient CO2 concentrations (350 μL·L-1) in Changbai Mountain from June to Sept. in 1999 and 2001. The net photosynthetic rate, dark respiration rate, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxlase (RuBPcase) activity, and chlorophyll content were analyzed. The results indicated the RuBPcase activity of the three species seedlings increased at elevated CO2 concentrations. The elevated CO2 concentrations stimulated the net photosynthetic rates of three tree species except P. sylvestriformis grown under 500 μL·L-1 CO2 concentration. The dark respiration rates of P. koraiensis and P. sylvestriformis increased under concentration of 700 μL·L-1 CO2, but that of F. mandshurica decreased under both concentrations 700 μL·L-1 and 500 μL·L-1 CO2. The seedlings of F. mandshurica decreased in chlorophyll contents at elevat-ed CO2 concentrations.

  1. IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid B. Grigg

    2003-10-31

    The second annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies have been undertaken with the intention to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Many items presented in this report are applicable to other interest areas: e.g. gas injection and production, greenhouse gas sequestration, chemical flooding, reservoir damage, etc. Major areas of studies include reduction of CO{sub 2} mobility to improve conformance, determining and understanding injectivity changes in particular injectivity loses, and modeling process mechanisms determined in the first two areas. Interfacial tension (IFT) between a high-pressure, high-temperature CO{sub 2} and brine/surfactant and foam stability are used to assess and screen surfactant systems. In this work the effects of salinity, pressure, temperature, surfactant concentration, and the presence of oil on IFT and CO{sub 2} foam stability were determined on the surfactant (CD1045{trademark}). Temperature, pressure, and surfactant concentration effected both IFT and foam stability while oil destabilized the foam, but did not destroy it. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) can be used as a sacrificial and an enhancing agent. This work indicates that on Berea sandstone CLS concentration, brine salinity, and temperature are dominant affects on both adsorption and desorption and that adsorption is not totally reversible. Additionally, CLS adsorption was tested on five minerals common to oil reservoirs; it was found that CLS concentration, salinity, temperature, and mineral type had significant effects on adsorption. The adsorption density from most to least was: bentonite > kaolinite > dolomite > calcite > silica. This work demonstrates the extent of dissolution and precipitation from co-injection of CO{sub 2} and

  2. Soil CO2 concentrations and efflux dynamics of a tree island in the Pantanal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathuillière, Michael J.; Pinto, Osvaldo B.; Johnson, Mark S.; Jassal, Rachhpal S.; Dalmagro, Higo J.; Leite, Nei K.; Speratti, Alicia B.; Krampe, Daniela; Couto, Eduardo G.

    2017-08-01

    The Pantanal is the largest tropical wetland on the planet, and yet little information is available on the biome's carbon cycle. We used an automatic station to measure soil CO2 concentrations and oxidation-reduction potential over the 2014 and 2015 flood cycles of a tree island in the Pantanal that is immune to inundation during the wetland's annual flooding. The soil CO2 concentration profile was then used to estimate soil CO2 efflux over the two periods. In 2014, subsurface soil saturation at 0.30 m depth created conditions in that layer that led to CO2 buildup close to 200,000 ppm and soil oxidation-reduction potential below -300 mV, conditions that were not repeated in 2015 due to annual variability in soil saturation at the site. Mean CO2 efflux over the 2015 flood cycle was 0.023 ± 0.103 mg CO2-C m-2 s-1 representing a total annual efflux of 593 ± 2690 mg CO2-C m-2 y-1. Unlike a nearby tree island site that experiences full inundation during the wet season, here the soil dried quickly following repeated rain events throughout the year, which led to the release of CO2 pulses from the soil. This study highlights not only the complexity and heterogeneity in the Pantanal's carbon balance based on differences in topography, flood cycles, and vegetation but also the challenges of applying the gradient method in the Pantanal due to deviations from steady state conditions.

  3. Steady-state room temperature fluorescence and CO/sub 2/ assimilation rates in intact leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris; Xanthium strumarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, T D

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state room temperature variable fluorescence from leaves was measured as a function of CO/sub 2/ pressure in Xanthium strumarium L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Measurements were made in a range of light intensities, at normal and low O/sub 2/ partial pressure and over a range of temperatures. At low CO/sub 2/ pressure fluorescence increased with increasing CO/sub 2/. At higher CO/sub 2/ pressure fluorescence usually decreased with increasing CO/sub 2/ but occasionally increased slightly. The transition CO/sub 2/ pressure between the responses could be changed by changing light, O/sub 2/ pressure, or temperature. This breakpoint in the fluorescence-CO/sub 2/ curve was a reliable indicator of the transition between ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) saturated assimilation and RuBP regeneration limited assimilation. The fluorescence signal was not a reliable indicator of O/sub 2/-insensitive assimilation in these C/sub 3/ species. 21 references, 8 figures.

  4. Optimization of a cascade refrigeration system using refrigerant C_3H_8 in high temperature circuits (HTC) and a mixture of C_2H_6/CO_2 in low temperature circuits (LTC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasruddin; Sholahudin, S.; Giannetti, N.; Arnas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi-objective optimization is conducted in the cascade refrigeration system. • Combination of operating temperature and refrigerant performance has been studied. • Characteristic of C_3H_8 and a mixture of C_2H_6/CO_2 have been investigated. • Determining of CO_2 fraction to optimize refrigeration system has been done. - Abstract: This paper discusses the multi-objectives optimization of a cascade refrigeration system using refrigerant C_3H_8 in high temperature circuits (HTC) and a mixture of C_2H_6/CO_2 in low temperature circuits (LTC). The evaporator temperature, condenser temperature, C_2H_6/CO_2 mixture condensation temperature, cascade temperature differences, and the CO_2 mass fraction are chosen as the decision variables. Whereas cooling capacity, cold space temperature, and ambient temperature are taken as the constraints. The purpose of this research is to design a cascade refrigeration system whose optimum performance are defined in terms of economics and thermodynamics. Accordingly, there are two objective functions that should be simultaneously optimized including the total annual cost which consists of the capital and operational cost and the total exergy destruction of the system. To this aim, the optimum operating temperature of the system and CO_2 fraction should be determined so that the system has minimum exergy destruction and annual cost. Results show that, the optimum value of the decision variables for this system can be determined by trade-off between annual cost and exergy destruction.

  5. Does long-term cultivation of saplings under elevated CO2 concentration influence their photosynthetic response to temperature?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šigut, Ladislav; Holišová, Petra; Klem, Karel; Šprtová, Miroslava; Calfapietra, Carlo; Marek, Michal V.; Špunda, Vladimír; Urban, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 6 (2015), s. 929-939 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA ČR GA13-28093S; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0246; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : CO2 assimilation * climate change * CO2 assimilation * elevat ed CO2 * acclimation * European beech * Fagus sylvatica * Norway spruce * photorespiration * photosystem II photochemistry * thermotolerance Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2015

  6. Enclathration of CO2 as a co-guest of structure H hydrates and its implications for CO2 capture and sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yohan; Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Jong-Won; Seo, Yongwon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine sH hydrates with CO 2 + N 2 + neohexane for CO 2 capture and sequestration. • The structural transition occurs in the CO 2 (40%) + N 2 (60%) + neohexane system. • CO 2 molecules are enclathrated into sH hydrates in the N 2 -rich systems. • CO 2 selectivity in sH hydrates is slightly lower than that in sI hydrates. • ΔH d values provide information on the structural transition of sH to sI hydrates. - Abstract: In this study, the thermodynamic behaviors, cage-specific guest distributions, structural transition, and dissociation enthalpies of sH hydrates with CO 2 + N 2 gas mixtures were investigated for their potential applications to hydrate-based CO 2 capture and sequestration. The stability conditions of the CO 2 + N 2 + water systems and the CO 2 + N 2 + neohexane (2,2-dimethylbutane, NH) + water systems indicated that the gas mixtures in the range of flue gas compositions could form sH hydrates, thereby mitigating the pressure and temperature required for gas hydrate formation. Structure identification using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the coexistence of sI and sH hydrates in the CO 2 (40%) + N 2 (60%) + NH system and the hydrate structure transformed from sH into sI as the CO 2 concentration increased. In addition, the Raman analysis clearly demonstrated that CO 2 molecules were enclathrated into the cages of sH hydrates in the N 2 -rich systems. It was found from direct CO 2 composition measurements that CO 2 selectivity in the sH hydrate phase was slightly lower than that in the corresponding sI hydrate phase. Dissociation enthalpy (ΔH d ) measurements using a high-pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter (HP μ-DSC) indicated that the ΔH d values could also provide valuable information on the structural transition of sH to sI hydrates with respect to the CO 2 concentration in the feed gas. This study provides a better understanding of the thermodynamic and physicochemical background for CO 2

  7. Climatic change on a water planet. Critical review of the CO2 problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roersch, A.; Thoenes, D.; De Wit, F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to bring the discussion about climatic change back to a scientific level. One of the conclusions is that the increased concentration of CO2 is more the result of increased solar activity than of human activities. This conclusion is based on two hypotheses: the A-theory that fossil fuel combustion leads to accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere and thus a rise of temperature and climatic change, and the Z-theory that a rise of temperature is caused by exceptional activity of the sun and thus an increase of the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere [nl

  8. Effect of carbonation temperature on CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CaO derived from micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni, E-mail: nwenihlaing76@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Yangon, 11041 Kamayut, Yangon (Myanmar); Sreekantan, Srimala, E-mail: srimala@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Hinode, Hirofumi, E-mail: hinode@ide.titech.ac.jp; Kurniawan, Winarto, E-mail: Kurniawan.w.ab@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Thant, Aye Aye, E-mail: a2thant@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Yangon, 11041 Kamayut, Yangon (Myanmar); Othman, Radzali, E-mail: radzali@utem.edu.my [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Malacca (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Rahman, E-mail: chrahman@eng.usm.my [Low Carbon Economy (LCE) Research Group, School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Salime, Chris, E-mail: chris.salim@surya.ac.id [Environmental Engineering, Surya University, Tangerang, 15810 Banten (Indonesia)

    2016-07-06

    Recent years, CaO-based synthetic materials have been attracted attention as potential adsorbents for CO{sub 2} capture mainly due to their high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. In this study, micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO{sub 3} was synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method with using polyacrylamide (PAM). The structural, morphological and thermal properties of the synthesized sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TG-DTA). The XRD and FESEM results showed that the obtained sample was aragonite CaCO{sub 3} with aggregated nanorods and microspheres composed of nanorods. A TG-DTA apparatus with Thermoplus 2 software was used to investigate the effect of carbonation temperature on the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CaO derived from aragonite CaCO{sub 3} sample. At 300 °C, the sample reached the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 0.098 g-CO{sub 2}/g-adsorbent, whereas the sample achieved the highest capacity of 0.682 g-CO{sub 2}/g-adsorbent at 700 °C. The results showed that the carbonation temperature significantly influenced on the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of the CaO derived from aragonite CaCO{sub 3}.

  9. Concurrent separation of CO2 and H2O from air by a temperature-vacuum swing adsorption/desorption cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzbacher, Jan Andre; Gebald, Christoph; Piatkowski, Nicolas; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2012-08-21

    A temperature-vacuum swing (TVS) cyclic process is applied to an amine-functionalized nanofibrilated cellulose sorbent to concurrently extract CO(2) and water vapor from ambient air. The promoting effect of the relative humidity on the CO(2) capture capacity and on the amount of coadsorbed water is quantified. The measured specific CO(2) capacities range from 0.32 to 0.65 mmol/g, and the corresponding specific H(2)O capacities range from 0.87 to 4.76 mmol/g for adsorption temperatures varying between 10 and 30 °C and relative humidities varying between 20 and 80%. Desorption of CO(2) is achieved at 95 °C and 50 mbar(abs) without dilution by a purge gas, yielding a purity exceeding 94.4%. Sorbent stability and a closed mass balance for both H(2)O and CO(2) are demonstrated for ten consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. The specific energy requirements of the TVS process based on the measured H(2)O and CO(2) capacities are estimated to be 12.5 kJ/mol(CO2) of mechanical (pumping) work and between 493 and 640 kJ/mol(CO2) of heat at below 100 °C, depending on the air relative humidity. For a targeted CO(2) capacity of 2 mmol/g, the heat requirement would be reduced to between 272 and 530 kJ/mol(CO2), depending strongly on the amount of coadsorbed water.

  10. Measurements of the total CO2 concentration and partial pressure of CO2 in seawater during WOCE expeditions in the South Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Goddard, J.G.; Chipman, D.W.; Rubin, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    During the first year of the grant, we participated in three WOCE expeditions (a total of 152 days at sea) in the South Pacific Ocean, and the field phase of the proposed investigation has been successfully completed. The total CO 2 concentration and pCO 2 were determined at sea in 4419 water samples collected at 422 stations. On the basis of the shipboard analyses of SIO Reference Solutions for CO, and a comparison with the results of previous expeditions, the overall precision of our total CO 2 determinations is estimated to be about ±2 uM/kg. The deep water data indicate that there is a CO 2 maximum centered about 2600 meters deep. This appears to represent a southward return flow from the North Pacific. The magnitude and distribution of the CO, maximum observed along the 135.0 degrees W meridian differ from those observed along the 150.5 degrees W meridian due to Tuamotu Archipelago, a topographic high which interferes with the southward return flow. The surface water pCO 2 data indicate that the South Pacific sub-tropical gyre water located between about 15 degrees S and 50 degrees S is a sink for atmospheric CO 2

  11. Vegetative biomass predicts inflorescence production along a CO2 concentration gradient in mesic grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, P. A.; Collins, H.; Polley, W.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration will likely exceed 500 µL L-1 by 2050, often increasing plant community productivity in part by increasing abundance of species favored by increased CA . Whether increased abundance translates to increased inflorescence production is poorly understood, and is important because it indicates the potential effects of CO2 enrichment on genetic variability and the potential for evolutionary change in future generations. We examined whether the responses of inflorescence production to CO2 enrichment in four C4 grasses and a C3 forb were predicted their vegetative biomass, and by soil moisture, soil nitrogen, or light availability. Inflorescence production was studied in a long-term CO2 concentration gradient spanning pre-industrial to anticipated mid-21st century values (250 - 500 µL L-1) maintained on clay, silty clay and sandy loam soils common in the U.S. Southern Plains. We expected that CO2 enrichment would increase inflorescence production, and more so with higher water, nitrogen, or light availability. However, structural equation modeling revealed that vegetative biomass was the single consistent direct predictor of flowering for all species (p grass) and Solidago canadensis (C3 forb), direct CO2 effects on flowering were only weakly mediated by indirect effects of soil water content and soil NO3-N availability. For the decreasing species (Bouteloua curtipendula, C4 grass), the negative CO2-flowering relationship was cancelled (p = 0.39) by indirect effects of increased SWC and NO3-N on clay and silty clay soils. For the species with no CO2 response, inflorescence production was predicted only by direct water content (p grass) or vegetative biomass (p = 0.0009, Tridens albescens, C4 grass) effects. Light availability was unrelated to inflorescence production. Changes in inflorescence production are thus closely tied to direct and indirect effects of CO2 enrichment on vegetative biomass, and may either increase, decrease, or leave

  12. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration on growth and water usage of tomato seedlings under different ammonium/nitrate ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is generally expected to enhance photosynthesis and growth of agricultural C3 vegetable crops,and therefore results in an increase in crop yield.However,little is known about the combined effect of elevated CO2 and N species on plant growth and development.Two growth-chamber experiments were conducted to determine the effects of NH4+/NO3- ratio and elevated CO2 concentration on the physiological development and water use of tomato seedlings.Tomato was grown for 45 d in containers with nutrient solutions varying in NH4+/NO3- ratios and CO2 concentrations in growth chambers.Results showed that plant height,stem thickness,total dry weight,dry weight of the leaves,stems and roots,G value (total plant dry weight/seedling days),chlorophyll content,photosynthetic rate,leaf-level and whole plant-level water use efficiency and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings were increased with increasing proportion of NO3- in nutrient solutions in the elevated CO2 treatment.Plant biomass,plant height,stem thickness and photosynthetic rate were 67%,22%,24% and 55% higher at elevated CO2 concentration than at ambient CO2 concentration,depending on the values of NH4+/NO3- ratio.These results indicated that elevating CO2 concentration did not mitigate the adverse effects of 100% NH4+-N (in nutrient solution) on the tomato seedlings.At both CO2 levels,NH4+/NO3- ratios of nutrient solutions strongly influenced almost every measure of plant performance,and nitrate-fed plants attained a greater biomass production,as compared to ammonium-fed plants.These phenomena seem to be related to the coordinated regulation of photosynthetic rate and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings.

  13. Soil CO2, CH4 and N2O effluxes and concentrations in soil profiles down to 15.5m depth in eucalypt plantations under contrasted rainfall regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germon, A.; Nouvellon, Y.; Christophe, J.; Chapuis-Lardy, L.; Robin, A.; Rosolem, C. A.; Gonçalves, J. L. D. M.; Guerrini, I. A.; Laclau, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Silvicultural practices in planted forests affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases at the soil surface and the major factors driving greenhouse gas production in forest soils (substrate supply, temperature, water content,…) vary with soil depth. Our study aimed to assess the consequences of drought on the temporal variability of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes throughout very deep soil profiles in Eucalyptus grandis plantations 3 months before the harvest then in coppice, the first 18 months after clear-cutting. Two treatments were compared: one with 37% of throughfall excluded by plastic sheets (TE), and one without rainfall exclusion (WE). Measurements of soil CO2 efflux were made every two weeks for 30 months using a closed-path Li8100 system in both treatment. Every two weeks for 21 months, CO2, CH4 and N2O surface effluxes were measured using the closed-chamber method and concentrations in the soil were measured at 7 depths down to 15.5 m in both TE and WE. At most measurement dates, soil CO2 efflux were significantly higher in TE than in WE. Across the two treatments and the measurement dates, CO2 concentrations increased from 4446 ± 2188 ppm at 10 cm deep to 15622 ± 3523 ppm at 15.5 m, CH4 concentrations increased from 0.41 ± 0.17 ppm at 10 cm deep to 0.77 ± 0.24 ppm at 15.5 m and N2O concentrations remained roughly constant and were on average 478 ± 55 ppb between soil surface and 15.5 m deep. CO2 and N2O concentrations were on average 20.7 and 7.6% lower in TE than in WE, respectively, across the sampling depths. However, CH4 concentrations in TE were on average 44.4% higher than in WE, throughout the soil profile. Those results suggest that extended drought periods might reduce the production of CO2 and N2O but increase the accumulation of CH4 in eucalypt plantations established in deep tropical soils. Very deep tropical soils cover huge areas worldwide and improving our understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics of gas concentrations in deep soil layers

  14. Complex interplay of future climate levels of CO2, ozone and temperature on susceptibility to fungal diseases in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bolette Lind; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke; Lyngkjær, Michael Foged

    2015-01-01

    efficiency of PSII, both at ambient and elevated [CO2], suggesting that photosynthesis was not limited by [CO2] at ambient temperature. When growing under elevated temperature or [O3], infection by the biotrophic powdery mildew fungus decreased, whereas disease symptoms and growth of the toxin......Barley (Hordeum vulgare) was grown in different climatic environments with elevated [CO2] (700 vs 385 ppm), [O3] (60/90 vs 20 ppb) and temperature (24/19 vs 19/12°C day/night) as single factors and in combinations, to evaluate the impact of these climatic factors on photosynthesis...... and susceptibility to powdery mildew and spot blotch disease. No significant increase in net CO2 assimilation rate was observed in barley grown under elevated [CO2] at ambient temperature. However, this rate was positively stimulated under elevated temperature together with a slightly higher potential quantum...

  15. Implications for carbon processing beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet from dissolved CO2 and CH4 concentrations of subglacial discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, A.; Martin, J.; Martin, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    Subglacial carbon processes are of increasing interest as warming induces ice melting and increases fluxes of glacial meltwater into proglacial rivers and the coastal ocean. Meltwater may serve as an atmospheric source or sink of carbon dioxide (CO2) or methane (CH4), depending on the magnitudes of subglacial organic carbon (OC) remineralization, which produces CO2 and CH4, and mineral weathering reactions, which consume CO2 but not CH4. We report wide variability in dissolved CO2 and CH4 concentrations at the beginning of the melt season (May-June 2017) between three sites draining land-terminating glaciers of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Two sites, located along the Watson River in western Greenland, drain the Isunnguata and Russell Glaciers and contained 1060 and 400 ppm CO2, respectively. In-situ CO2 flux measurements indicated that the Isunnguata was a source of atmospheric CO2, while the Russell was a sink. Both sites had elevated CH4 concentrations, at 325 and 25 ppm CH4, respectively, suggesting active anaerobic OC remineralization beneath the ice sheet. Dissolved CO2 and CH4 reached atmospheric equilibrium within 2.6 and 8.6 km downstream of Isunnguata and Russell discharge sites, respectively. These changes reflect rapid gas exchange with the atmosphere and/or CO2 consumption via instream mineral weathering. The third site, draining the Kiagtut Sermiat in southern Greenland, had about half atmospheric CO2 concentrations (250 ppm), but approximately atmospheric CH4 concentrations (2.1 ppm). Downstream CO2 flux measurements indicated ingassing of CO2 over the entire 10-km length of the proglacial river. CO2 undersaturation may be due to more readily weathered lithologies underlying the Kiagtut Sermiat compared to Watson River sites, but low CH4 concentrations also suggest limited contributions of CO2 and CH4 from OC remineralization. These results suggest that carbon processing beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet may be more variable than previously recognized

  16. Temperature and Salinity Effects on Quantitative Raman Spectroscopic Analysis of Dissolved Volatiles Concentration in Geofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Lu, W.

    2017-12-01

    The concentration detection of the volatiles such as CH4 and CO2 in the hydrothermal systems and fluid inclusions is critical for understanding the fluxes of volatiles from mantle to crust and atmosphere. In-situ Raman spectroscopy has been developed successfully in laboratory, fluid inclusions and submarine environment because of its non-destructive and non-contact advantages. For improving the ability of detecting different species quantitatively by in-situ Raman spectroscopy in the extreme environment, such as the hydrothermal system and fluid inclusion, we studied the temperature- and salinity-dependence of Raman scattering cross section (RSCS) of the water OH stretching band at temperatures from 20 to 300 oC under 30 MPa. This is important because the water is often used as internal standard in the Raman quantitative application. Based on our previous study of NaCl-H2O system, we made further investigation on the CaCl2-H2O system. Our results revealed that the cation shows negligible effect on the RSCS of water OH stretching band, while the cations seems to have more obvious different effect on the structure of water within high temperatures. Besides the NaCl-CH4-H2O system, we also take the CO2-H2O system into account. Further conclusion can be made that the variation of the Raman quantitative factor (QF) (both PAR/mCH4 and PAR/mCO2) with the temperature and salinity is mainly caused by the temperature- and Cl- concentration-dependence of the relative RSCS of the water OH stretching band. If the Raman quantitative factor at ambient condition still being used, the RSCS of the water OH stretching band would induce about 47%, 34% and 29% error for the determined concentration of dissolved CH4 or CO2 (in mol/kg·H2O) by in-situ Raman spectroscopy for 0 m Cl-, 3 m Cl- and 5 m Cl- aqueous system when the temperature increases from 20 to 300 oC, respectively. Considering the wide range of the temperature and salinity in hydrothermal systems and fluid inclusions, the

  17. Impact of CO2 on the Evolution of Microbial Communities Exposed to Carbon Storage Conditions, Enhanced Oil Recovery, and CO2 Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Djuna [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Gregory, Kelvin B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lowry, Gregorgy V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Geologic carbon storage (GCS) is a crucial part of a proposed mitigation strategy to reduce the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere. During this process, CO2 is injected as super critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) in confined deep subsurface storage units, such as saline aquifers and depleted oil reservoirs. The deposition of vast amounts of CO2 in subsurface geologic formations could unintentionally lead to CO2 leakage into overlying freshwater aquifers. Introduction of CO2 into these subsurface environments will greatly increase the CO22 concentration and will create CO2 concentration gradients that drive changes in the microbial communities present. While it is expected that altered microbial communities will impact the biogeochemistry of the subsurface, there is no information available on how CO2 gradients will impact these communities. The overarching goal of this project is to understand how CO2 exposure will impact subsurface microbial communities at temperatures and pressures that are relevant to GCS and CO2 leakage scenarios. To meet this goal, unfiltered, aqueous samples from a deep saline aquifer, a depleted oil reservoir, and a fresh water aquifer were exposed to varied concentrations of CO2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The microbial ecology of the samples was examined using molecular, DNA-based techniques. The results from these studies were also compared across the sites to determine any existing trends. Results reveal that increasing CO2 leads to decreased DNA concentrations regardless of the site, suggesting that microbial processes will be significantly hindered or absent nearest the CO2 injection/leakage plume where CO2 concentrations are highest. At CO2 exposures expected downgradient from the CO2 plume, selected microorganisms

  18. Enhanced growth of the red alga Porphyra-Yezoensis Ueda in high CO sub 2 concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, K.; Aruga, Y.; Asada, K.; Ishihara, T.; Akano, T.; Kiyohara, M. (Kansai Environmental Engineering Centre, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Leafy thalli of the red alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda, initiated from conchospores released from free-living conchocelis, were cultured using aeration with high CO{sub 2}. It was found that the higher the CO{sub 2} concentration, the faster the growth of the thalli. Aeration with elevated CO{sub 2} lowered pH in dark, but raised pH remarkably in light with the thalli, because the photosynthetic conversion of HCO{sub 3} {sup -} to OH{sup -} and CO{sub 2} proceeded much faster than the dissociation of hydrated CO{sub 2} releasing H{sup +}. Photosynthesis of the alga was found to be enhanced in the seawater of elevated dissolved inorganic carbon DIC, CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup -} + CO{sub 3}{sup -}. It is concluded that the increased pH in the light resulted in the increase of DIC in the culture media, thus enhancing photosynthesis and growth. The relevance of the results to removal of atmospheric CO{sub 2} by marine algae is discussed.

  19. Impact of CO2 on the Evolution of Microbial Communities Exposed to Carbon Storage Conditions, Enhanced Oil Recovery, and CO2 Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Djuna M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Gregory, Kelvin B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lowry, Gregory V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2016-06-20

    Geologic carbon storage (GCS) is a crucial part of a proposed mitigation strategy to reduce the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere. During this process, CO2 is injected as super critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) in confined deep subsurface storage units, such as saline aquifers and depleted oil reservoirs. The deposition of vast amounts of CO2 in subsurface geologic formations could unintentionally lead to CO2 leakage into overlying freshwater aquifers. Introduction of CO2 into these subsurface environments will greatly increase the CO2 concentration and will create CO2 concentration gradients that drive changes in the microbial communities present. While it is expected that altered microbial communities will impact the biogeochemistry of the subsurface, there is no information available on how CO2 gradients will impact these communities. The overarching goal of this project is to understand how CO2 exposure will impact subsurface microbial communities at temperatures and pressures that are relevant to GCS and CO2 leakage scenarios. To meet this goal, unfiltered, aqueous samples from a deep saline aquifer, a depleted oil reservoir, and a fresh water aquifer were exposed to varied concentrations of CO2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The microbial ecology of the samples was examined using molecular, DNA-based techniques. The results from these studies were also compared across the sites to determine any existing trends. Results reveal that increasing CO2 leads to decreased DNA concentrations regardless of the site, suggesting that microbial processes will be significantly hindered or absent nearest the CO2 injection/leakage plume where CO2 concentrations are highest. At CO2 exposures expected downgradient from the CO2 plume, selected microorganisms

  20. Phase behavior for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+supercritical CO{sub 2}+DME mixture at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Chio, Sang-Won; Byun, Hun-Soo [Chonnam National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The phase behavior curves of binary and ternary system were measured for poly(alkyl methacrylate) in supercritical CO{sub 2}, as well as for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+dimethyl ether (DME) (or 1-butene) in CO{sub 2}. The solubility curves are reported for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+DME in supercritical CO{sub 2} at temperature from (300 to 465) K and a pressure from (3.66 to 248) MPa. Also, The high-pressure static-type apparatus of cloud-point curve was tested by comparing the measured phase behavior data of the poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA]+CO{sub 2}+20.0 and 30.4 wt% methyl methacrylate (MMA) system with literature data of 10.4, 28.8 and 48.4 wt% MMA concentration. The phase behavior data for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+CO{sub 2}+DME mixture were measured in changes of the pressure-temperature (p, T) slope and with DME concentrations. Also, the cloud-point pressure for the poly(alkyl methacrylate)+1- butene solution containing supercritical CO{sub 2} shows from upper critical solution temperature (UCST) region to lower critical solution temperature (LCST) region at concentration range from (0.0 to 95) wt% 1-butene at below 455 K and at below 245MPa.

  1. Magnetic, transport and magnetocaloric properties in the Laves phase intermetallic Ho (Co1−xAlx)2 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T.I.; Nikitin, S.A.; Tskhadadze, G.A.; Koshkid’ko, Yu.S.; Suski, W.; Iwasieczko, W.; Badurski, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Al influence on magnetic properties of the Ho (Co 1-x Al x ) 2 compounds is analyzed. • The first-order magnetic transition appears in sample with Al concentrations x ≤ 0.06. • The MCE and Curie temperature TC demonstrate complex Al concentration dependences. • The magnetoresistance for sample with Al concentration x = 0.06 (58%) is maximum. • High magnetic fields changes the Curie temperature T c of the Ho (Co 1−x Al x ) 2 compounds. - Abstract: The magnetization, magnetoresistivity and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the Ho (Co 1−x Al x ) 2 Laves phase intermetallic compounds for x ⩽ 0.2 have been investigated. Complex measurements have been carried out in order to determine the influence of substitution in the Co sublattice by Al on the Co moment, type of the magnetic transition and related properties of these compounds. A comparative analysis of the magnetic, transport and magnetocaloric properties of Ho (Co 1−x Al x ) 2 alloys under various Al concentration is represented. Substitutions at the Co site by Al are found to result in the appearance of itinerant electron metamagnetism (IEM) at the small Al concentrations and in positive magnetovolume effect, leading to an initial increase in the ordering temperature; on the other hand the magnetic phase transition temperature as well as ΔT (MCE) do not depend in direct way on the Al concentration. The 16% increase of magnetocaloric effect for the alloy with x = 0.02 is detected in relation to maternal HoCo 2 . A giant value of magnetoresistivity (58%) is observed for the alloy with the same Al concentration

  2. Response of needle dark respiration of Pinus koraiensis and Pinus sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations for four growing seasons' exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YuMei; HAN ShiJie; ZHANG HaiSen; XIN LiHua; ZHENG JunQiang

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effect of elevated CO2 concentrations on needle dark respiration of two coniferous species-Pinus koraiensis and Pinus sylvestriformis on the Changbai Mountain was investigated using open-top chambers. P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis were exposed to 700,500μmol·mol-1 CO2 and ambient CO2(approx.350 μmol·mol-1)for four growing seasons. Needle dark respiration was measurd during the second, third and fourth growing seasons' exposure to elevated CO2.The results showed that needle dark respiration rate increased for P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis grown at elevated CO2 concentrations during the second growing season, could be attributed to the change of carbohydrate and/or nitrogen content of needles. Needle dark respiration of P. Koraiensis was stimulated and that of P. Sylvestriformis was inhibited by elevated CO2 concentrations during the third growing season. Different response of the two tree species to elevated CO2 mainly resulted from the difference in the growth rate. Elevated CO2 concentrations inhibited needle dark respiration of both P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis during the fourth growing season. There was consistent trend between the short-term effect and the long-term effect of elevated CO2 on needle dark respiration in P. Sylvestriformis during the third growing season by changing measurement CO2 concentrations. However, the short-term effect was different from the long-term effect for P. Koraiensis. Response of dark respiration of P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations was related to the treatment time of CO2 and the stage of growth and development of plant. The change of dark respiration for the two tree species was determined by the direct effect of CO2 and long-term acclimation. The prediction of the long-term response of needle dark respiration to elevated CO2 concentration based on the short-term response is in dispute.

  3. Assessing the Suitability and Limitations of Satellite-based Measurements for Estimating CO, CO2, NO2 and O3 Concentrations over the Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagbeja, M. A.; Hill, J. L.; Chatterton, T. J.; Longhurst, J. W.; Akinyede, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    Space-based satellite sensor technology may provide important tools in the study and assessment of national, regional and local air pollution. However, the application of optical satellite sensor observation of atmospheric trace gases, including those considered to be 'air pollutants', within the lower latitudes is limited due to prevailing climatic conditions. The lack of appropriate air pollution ground monitoring stations within the tropical belt reduces the ability to verify and calibrate space-based measurements. This paper considers the suitability of satellite remotely sensed data in estimating concentrations of atmospheric trace gases in view of the prevailing climate over the Niger Delta region. The methodological approach involved identifying suitable satellite data products and using the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst kriging interpolation technique to generate surface concentrations from satellite column measurements. The observed results are considered in the context of the climate of the study area. Using data from January 2001 to December 2005, an assessment of the suitability of satellite sensor data to interpolate column concentrations of trace gases over the Niger Delta has been undertaken and indicates varying degrees of reliability. The level of reliability of the interpolated surfaces is predicated on the number and spatial distributions of column measurements. Accounting for the two climatic seasons in the region, the interpolation of total column concentrations of CO and CO2 from SCIAMACHY produced both reliable and unreliable results over inland parts of the region during the dry season, while mainly unreliable results are observed over the coastal parts especially during the rainy season due to inadequate column measurements. The interpolation of tropospheric measurements of NO2 and O3 from GOME and OMI respectively produced reliable results all year. This is thought to be due to the spatial distribution of available column measurements

  4. Evasion of CO2 injected into the ocean in the context of CO2 stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.

    2004-01-01

    The eventual evasion of injected CO 2 to the atmosphere is one consideration when assessing deep-sea disposal of CO 2 as a potential response option to climate change concerns. Evasion estimated using an ocean carbon cycle model is compared to long-term trajectories for future CO 2 emissions, including illustrative cases leading to stabilization of CO 2 concentration at various levels. Modeled residence time for CO 2 injected into the deep ocean exceeds the 100-year time-scale usually considered in scenarios for future emissions, and the potential impacts of climate change. Illustrative cases leading monotonically to constant CO 2 concentration have been highlighted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to give guidance on possible timing of emission reductions that may be required to stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations at various levels. For stabilization cases considered, significant modeled evasion does not occur until long after CO 2 emissions have reached a maximum and begun to decline. Illustrative cases can also lead to a maximum in CO 2 concentration followed by a decline to slowly decreasing concentrations. In such cases, future injection of emissions into the deep ocean leads to lower maximum CO 2 concentration, with less effect on concentration later on in time

  5. New Electrolytes for CO2 Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Pia Lolk

    The aim of this thesis has been to explore the potential of aqueous immobilized K2CO3 as a possible electrolyte for co-electrolysis of CO2 and water at approx. 200 °C. This has been done by exploring the properties of pure K2CO3 (aq) and immobilized K2CO3 (aq) as well as the properties...... was observed for 10 wt% K2CO3 immobilized in TiO2 when changing the atmosphere from N2 to CO2. K2CO3 (aq) immobilized in TiO2 shows good promise as a potential electrolyte for co-electrolysis of CO2 and water at 200 °C....... in a 10 wt% K2CO3 (aq) solution are K+ and HCO3-. The water partial pressure as well as the amount of water vapour at different temperatures, pressures and K2CO3 (aq) concentrations was also calculated using FactSage. K2CO3 (aq) was immobilized in both SrTiO3 and TiO2. It was found that a loss...

  6. Integrated optimization of temperature, CO2, screen use and artificial lighting in greenhouse crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaslyng, J.M.; Körner, O.; Andreassen, A.U.

    2005-01-01

    A leaf photosynthesis model is suggested for integrated optimization of temperature, CO2, screen use and artificial lighting in greenhouse crops. Three different approaches for the optimization are presented. First, results from greenhouse experiments with model based optimization are presented....... Second, a model-based analysis of a commercial grower's production possibility is shown. Third, results from a simulation of the effect of a new lighting strategy are demonstrated. The results demonstrate that it is possible to optimize plant production by using a model-based integrated optimization...... of temperature, CO2, and light in the greenhouse...

  7. The crystallization kinetic model of nano-CaCO3 in CO2-ammonia-phosphogypsum three-phase reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Lan, Peiqiang; Lu, Shangqing; Wu, Sufang

    2018-06-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) as a low-cost calcium resource was used to prepare nano-CaCO3 in a three-phase system by reactions. Based on the population balance equation, nano-CaCO3 crystal nucleation and growth model in the gas (CO2)-liquid (NH3·H2O)-solid (CaSO4) three-phase system was established. The crystallization kinetic model of nano-CaCO3 in CO2-NH3·H2O-CaSO4 reactions system was experimental developed over an optimized temperature range of 20-40 °C and CO2 flow rate range of 138-251 ml/min as rCaCO3 =kn 32 πM2γ3/3R3ρ2T3 (C -C∗)0.8/[ ln (C /C∗) ]3 + πρ/3M kg3 kn(C -C∗) 2t3 , where nano-CaCO3 nucleation rate constant was kn = 6.24 ×1019 exp(-15940/RT) and nano-CaCO3 growth rate constant was kg = 0.79 exp(-47650/RT) respectively. Research indicated that nucleation rates and growth rates both increased with the increasing of temperature and CO32- ion concentration. And crystal growth was dependent on temperature more than that of nucleation process because the activation energy of CaCO3 growth was bigger than that of CaCO3 nucleation. Decreasing the reaction temperature and CO2 flow rate was more beneficial for producing nano-size CaCO3 because of the lower CaCO3 growth rates. The deduced kinetic equation could briefly predict the average particle sizes of nano-CaCO3.

  8. Elevated CO2 concentration affects vertical distribution of photosynthetic activity in Calamagrostis arundinacea (L.) Roth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Urban, Otmar

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, 1-2 (2017), s. 67-74 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : chlorophyll * CO2 assimilation * elevated CO2 * concentration * transpiration * vertical gradient * water-use efficiency Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) https://beskydy.mendelu.cz/10/1/0067/

  9. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R. [eds.

    1993-10-01

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO{sub 2} responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO{sub 2} responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO{sub 2} responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO{sub 2} exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO{sub 2} scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  10. Impact of elevated CO_2 concentrations on carbonate mineral precipitation ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria and implications for CO_2 sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Varun G.; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in anthropogenic CO_2 release and associated global climatic change has prompted numerous laboratory-scale and commercial efforts focused on capturing, sequestering or utilizing CO_2 in the subsurface. Known carbonate mineral precipitating microorganisms, such as the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), could enhance the rate of conversion of CO_2 into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage of captured gasses. The ability of SRB to induce carbonate mineral precipitation, when exposed to atmospheric and elevated pCO_2, was investigated in laboratory scale tests with bacteria from organic-rich sediments collected from hypersaline Lake Estancia, New Mexico. The enriched SRB culture was inoculated in continuous gas flow and batch reactors under variable headspace pCO_2 (0.0059 psi to 20 psi). Solution pH, redox conditions, sulfide, calcium and magnesium concentrations were monitored in the reactors. Those reactors containing SRB that were exposed to pCO_2 of 14.7 psi or less showed Mg-calcite precipitation. Reactors exposed to 20 psi pCO_2 did not exhibit any carbonate mineralization, likely due to the inhibition of bacterial metabolism caused by the high levels of CO_2. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for the SRB metabolism and related carbonate mineralization. Carbon isotopic studies confirmed that ∼53% of carbon in the precipitated carbonate minerals was derived from the CO_2 headspace, with the remaining carbon being derived from the organic electron donors, and the bicarbonate ions available in the liquid medium. The ability of halotolerant SRB to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals can potentially be applied to the long-term storage of anthropogenic CO_2 in saline aquifers and other ideal subsurface rock units by converting the gas into solid immobile phases. - Highlights: • SRB under study are capable of precipitating calcite up to 14.7 psi pCO_2. • At 20 psi pCO_2, bacterial activity

  11. Maximizing growth of vegetable seedlings in controlled environments at elevated temperature, light and CO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krizek, D.T.; Bailey, W.A.; Klueter, H.; Liu, R.C.

    1974-01-01

    Seedlings of cucumber Burpee Hybrid, tomato Michigan-Ohio and lettuce Grand Rapids were germinated in the greenhouse for 5, 8, and 11 days respectively, and then grown for 15 days at elevated temperature (30/24/sup 0/C), light (43.1 klx), and CO/sub 2/ (2000 ppm) a 16-hr photoperiod, 65% relative humidity, and fertilized 4 times daily. At the end of this time, they weighed 2 to 4.6 times those grown at standard environmental conditions in the growth chamber (24/18/sup 0/C, 21.5 klx, and 400 ppm CO/sub 2/) and 10 to 25 times those of greenhouse controls kept on natural days (24/18/sup 0/C, 350 ppm CO/sub 2/, and ca 12-hr photoperiod). Leaf expansion of seedlings grown under elevated growth chamber conditions was double that of seedlings in standard growth chamber conditions, and 6 to 7 times greater than under natural days in the greenhouse. Temperature was the most limiting factor for seedling growth. At the levels of light and CO/sub 2/ used in the experiment, CO/sub 2/ was more limiting than light intensity. In general, optimum seedling growth was obtained when temperature, light, and CO/sub 2/ were increased simultaneously. The most striking effects of CO/sub 2/ enrichment were precocious flower bud formation in tomato and cucumber and extensive growth of the lateral buds in all three species.

  12. Assessing Methods for Mapping 2D Field Concentrations of CO2 Over Large Spatial Areas for Monitoring Time Varying Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Botos, C.; Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.; Levine, Z. H.; Pintar, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for constructing 2D estimates of CO2 field concentrations from integrated open path measurements of CO2 concentrations. It provides a description of the methodology, an assessment based on simulated data and results from preliminary field trials. The Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE) system, currently under development by Exelis and AER, consists of a set of laser-based transceivers and a number of retro-reflectors coupled with a cloud-based compute environment to enable real-time monitoring of integrated CO2 path concentrations, and provides 2D maps of estimated concentrations over an extended area of interest. The GreenLITE transceiver-reflector pairs provide laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) measurements of differential absorption due to CO2 along intersecting chords within the field of interest. These differential absorption values for the intersecting chords of horizontal path are not only used to construct estimated values of integrated concentration, but also employed in an optimal estimation technique to derive 2D maps of underlying concentration fields. This optimal estimation technique combines these sparse data with in situ measurements of wind speed/direction and an analytic plume model to provide tomographic-like reconstruction of the field of interest. This work provides an assessment of this reconstruction method and preliminary results from the Fall 2014 testing at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) site in Bozeman, Montana. This work is funded in part under the GreenLITE program developed under a cooperative agreement between Exelis and the National Energy and Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Department of Energy (DOE), contract # DE-FE0012574. Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. is a major partner in this development.

  13. Temperature responses of growth and wood anatomy in European beech saplings grown in different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdieck, Dieter; Ziche, Daniel; Böttcher-Jungclaus, Kerstin

    2007-02-01

    Effects of temperature on growth and wood anatomy were studied in young European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) grown in 7-l pots for 2.5 years in field-phytotron chambers supplied with an ambient (approximately 400 micromol mol-1) or elevated (approximately 700 micromol mol-1) carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]). Temperatures in the chambers ranged in increments of 2 degrees C from -4 degrees C to +4 degrees C relative to the long-term mean monthly (day and night) air temperature in Berlin-Dahlem. Soil was not fertilized and soil water and air humidity were kept constant. Data were evaluated by regression analysis. At final harvest, stem diameter was significantly greater at increased temperature (Delta1 degrees C: 2.4%), stems were taller (Delta1 degrees C: 8.5%) and stem mass tree-1 (Delta1 degrees C: 10.9%) and leaf area tree-1(Delta1 degrees C: 6.5%) were greater. Allocation pattern was slightly influenced by temperature: leaf mass ratio and leaf area ratio decreased with increasing temperature (Delta1 degrees C: 2.3% and 2.2% respectively), whereas stem mass/total mass increased (Delta1 degrees C: 2.1%). Elevated [CO2] enhanced height growth by 8.8% and decreased coarse root mass/total mass by 10.3% and root/shoot ratio by 11.7%. Additional carbon was mainly invested in aboveground growth. At final harvest a synergistic interaction between elevated [CO2] and temperature yielded trees that were 3.2% taller at -4 degrees C and 12.7% taller at +4 degrees C than trees in ambient [CO2]. After 2.5 seasons, cross-sectional area of the oldest stem part was approximately 32% greater in the +4 degrees C treatment than in the -4 degrees C treatment, and in the last year approximately 67% more leaf area/unit tree ring area was produced in the highest temperature regime compared with the lowest. Elevated [CO2] decreased mean vessel area of the 120 largest vessels per mm2 by 5.8%, causing a decrease in water conducting capacity. There was a positive interaction between

  14. Effects of CO 2 concentration and moisture content of sugar-free media on the tissue-cultured plantlets in a large growth chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Y. H.; Lin, C.; Zhou, W.; Li, Y.; Chen, B.; Chen, G. Q.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic fluctuations of CO 2 concentration in the tissue culture growth chamber after transplantation of petunia, chrysanthemum and tomato plantlets were recorded with a real-time control system to determine the critical CO 2 concentration levels of 35 μl l -1 at which CO 2 enrichment is needed. The experimental data showed that the tissue-cultured plantlets of petunia, chrysanthemum and tomato had the same CO 2 concentration dynamics. The results indicated that CO 2 enrichment was proper on the second day after transplantation. Petunia plantlets were used to conduct experiments under PPFD of 80 μmol m -2 s -1, and CO 2 concentrations of 350 ± 50 μl l -1, 650 ± 50 μl l -1 and 950 ± 50 μl l -1 as well as medium moisture contents of 60%, 70% and 80%, with the result that plantlets grew better under CO 2 concentration of 650 ± 50 μl l -1 than under the other two concentrations with all the different media water contents. Three media water contents under the same CO 2 concentration produced plantlets with the same quality. The impacts of CO 2 concentrations on plantlets are more important than those of the media water contents. Sugar-free tissue culture, as compared with the conventional culture, showed that CO 2 enrichment to 350 ± 50 μl l -1 can promote the growth of the cultured plantlets. Sugar-free tissue culture produced healthy plantlets with thick roots, almost equivalent to the common plantlets.

  15. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration on dynamics of leaf photosynthesis in Fagus sylvatica is modulated by sky conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Otmar; Klem, Karel; Holišová, Petra; Šigut, Ladislav; Šprtová, Mirka; Teslová-Navrátilová, Petra; Zitová, Martina; Špunda, Vladimír; Marek, Michal V.; Grace, John

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that atmospheric CO 2 concentration and frequency of cloud cover will increase in future. It remains unclear, however, how elevated CO 2 influences photosynthesis under complex clear versus cloudy sky conditions. Accordingly, diurnal changes in photosynthetic responses among beech trees grown at ambient (AC) and doubled (EC) CO 2 concentrations were studied under contrasting sky conditions. EC stimulated the daily sum of fixed CO 2 and light use efficiency under clear sky. Meanwhile, both these parameters were reduced under cloudy sky as compared with AC treatment. Reduction in photosynthesis rate under cloudy sky was particularly associated with EC-stimulated, xanthophyll-dependent thermal dissipation of absorbed light energy. Under clear sky, a pronounced afternoon depression of CO 2 assimilation rate was found in sun-adapted leaves under EC compared with AC conditions. This was caused in particular by stomata closure mediated by vapour pressure deficit. -- Highlights: • Sky conditions affect the relative impact of elevated CO 2 on photosynthesis. • Cloudy skies reduce light use efficiency and carbon gain when CO 2 is elevated. • Stimulation of photosynthesis by high CO 2 may decline with increasing cloud cover. • High CO 2 leads to marked afternoon photosynthesis depression in sun-adapted leaves. -- The stimulatory effect of elevated CO 2 concentration on photosynthetic carbon assimilation can be expected to diminish as cloud cover increases

  16. Thermodynamic modelling of a recompression CO_2 power cycle for low temperature waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banik, Shubham; Ray, Satyaki; De, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic model for recompression T-CO_2 is developed. • Energetic and exergetic analysis compared with S-CO_2 and Reg. Brayton cycle. • Maximum efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for T-CO_2 cycle. • Optimum recompression ratio of 0.48 is obtained for minimum irreversibility. • Reg. Brayton has better efficiency, T-CO_2 offers minimum irreversibility. - Abstract: Due to the rising prices of conventional fossil fuels, increasing the overall thermal efficiency of a power plant is essential. One way of doing this is waste heat recovery. This recovery is most difficult for low temperature waste heat, below 240 °C, which also covers majority of the waste heat source. Carbon dioxide, with its low critical temperature and pressure, offers an advantage over ozone-depleting refrigerants used in Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs) and hence is most suitable for the purpose. This paper introduces parametric optimization of a transcritical carbon dioxide (T-CO_2) power cycle which recompresses part of the total mass flow of working fluid before entering the precooler, thereby showing potential for higher cycle efficiency. Thermodynamic model for a recompression T-CO_2 power cycle has been developed with waste heat source of 2000 kW and at a temperature of 200 °C. Results obtained from this model are analysed to estimate effects on energetic and exergetic performances of the power cycle with varying pressure and mass recompression ratio. Higher pressure ratio always improves thermodynamic performance of the cycle – both energetic and exergetic. Higher recompression ratio also increases exergetic efficiency of the cycle. However, it increases energy efficiency, only if precooler inlet temperature remains constant. Maximum thermal efficiency of the T-CO_2 cycle with a recompression ratio of 0.26 has been found to be 13.6%. To minimize total irreversibility of the cycle, an optimum ratio of 0.48 was found to be suitable.

  17. Transport and absorption of CO2 in the ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nydal, Reidar; Gislefoss, Jorunn S.

    1999-01-01

    The overview gives an account of C 1 4. C 1 3, C 1 2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), CO 2 , salt and plankton concentration and sea temperature during the last 2 decades in the Atlantic Ocean and particularly in the Norwegian Ocean. Atmospheric radioactive carbon concentrations, sea water flow patterns as well as carbon, salt, temperature and plankton depth profiles have been studied. There does not seem to be significant alterations in the C 1 4 concentration in the Norwegian Sea. Measurements from the Scotland - Greenland ridge have not yet been carried out. -Significant rise in DIC concentrations were not found but it is most likely that the alterations will increase during the 21st century. The plankton concentrations showed seasonal variations and decreased with sea depth. Proposals for further investigations are made

  18. Robust high temperature composite and CO sensor made from such composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Prabir K.; Ramasamy, Ramamoorthy; Li, Xiaogan; Akbar, Sheikh A.

    2010-04-13

    Described herein is a composite exhibiting a change in electrical resistance proportional to the concentration of a reducing gas present in a gas mixture, detector and sensor devices comprising the composite, a method for making the composite and for making devices comprising the composite, and a process for detecting and measuring a reducing gas in an atmosphere. In particular, the reducing gas may be carbon monoxide and the composite may comprise rutile-phase TiO2 particles and platinum nanoclusters. The composite, upon exposure to a gas mixture containing CO in concentrations of up to 10,000 ppm, exhibits an electrical resistance proportional to the concentration of the CO present. The composite is useful for making sensitive, low drift, fast recovering detectors and sensors, and for measuring CO concentrations in a gas mixture present at levels from sub-ppm up to 10,000 ppm. The composites, and devices made from the composites, are stable and operable in a temperature range of from about 450.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C., such as may be found in a combustion chamber.

  19. Thermodynamic balance of photosynthesis and transpiration at increasing CO2 concentrations and rapid light fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Dolores; Martín, Mercedes; Serrot, Patricia H; Sabater, Bartolomé

    2014-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical flux models have been developed to reveal the influence of sun flecks and increasing CO2 concentrations on the energy and entropy balances of the leaf. The rapid and wide range of fluctuations in light intensity under field conditions were simulated in a climatic gas exchange chamber and we determined the energy and entropy balance of the leaf based on radiation and gas exchange measurements. It was estimated that the energy of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) accounts for half of transpiration, which is the main factor responsible for the exportation of the entropy generated in photosynthesis (Sg) out of the leaf in order to maintain functional the photosynthetic machinery. Although the response of net photosynthetic production to increasing concentrations of CO2 under fluctuating light is similar to that under continuous light, rates of transpiration respond slowly to changes of light intensity and are barely affected by the concentration of CO2 in the range of 260-495 ppm, in which net photosynthesis increases by more than 100%. The analysis of the results confirms that future increases of CO2 will improve the efficiency of the conversion of radiant energy into biomass, but will not reduce the contribution of plant transpiration to the leaf thermal balance. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Contrasting effects of elevated CO2 and warming on temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a Chinese paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaozhi; Wang, Bingyu; Wang, Jinyang; Pan, Genxing; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-10-01

    Climate changes including elevated CO2 and temperature have been known to affect soil carbon (C) storage, while the effects of climate changes on the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) are unclear. A 365-day laboratory incubation was used to investigate the temperature sensitivity for decomposition of labile (Q 10-L) and recalcitrant (Q 10-R) SOMs by comparing the time required to decompose a given amount of C at 25 and 35 °C. Soils were collected from a paddy field that was subjected to four treatments: ambient CO2 and temperature, elevated CO2 (500 μmol/mol), enhanced temperature (+2 °C), and their combination. The results showed that the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition increased with increasing SOM recalcitrance in this paddy soil (Q 10-L = 2.21 ± 0.16 vs. Q 10-R = 2.78 ± 0.42; mean ± SD). Elevated CO2 and enhanced temperature showed contrasting effects on the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. Elevated CO2 stimulated Q 10-R but had no effect on Q 10-L; in contrast, enhanced temperature increased Q 10-L but had no effect on Q 10-R. Furthermore, the elevated CO2 combined with enhanced temperature treatment significantly increased Q 10-L and Q 10-R by 18.9 and 10.2 %, respectively, compared to the ambient conditions. Results suggested that the responses of SOM to temperature, especially for the recalcitrant SOM pool, were altered by climate changes. T