WorldWideScience

Sample records for co2 capture pilot

  1. A new pilot absorber for CO2 capture from flue gases: Measuring and modelling capture with MEA solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Tim L.; Carlsen, Kim B.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2013-01-01

    A pilot absorber column for CO2 recovery from flue gases was constructed and tested with aqueous 30wt% monoethanolamine (MEA), a primary amine, as capture solvent. The pilot plant data were compared with a mathematical rate based packed-column model. The simulation results compared well with the ......A pilot absorber column for CO2 recovery from flue gases was constructed and tested with aqueous 30wt% monoethanolamine (MEA), a primary amine, as capture solvent. The pilot plant data were compared with a mathematical rate based packed-column model. The simulation results compared well...

  2. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and

  3. Direct Air Capture of CO2 - an Overview of Carbon Engineering's Technology and Pilot Plant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, G.; Corless, A.

    2014-12-01

    At Carbon Engineering, we are developing and commercializing technology to scrub CO2 directly from atmospheric air at industrial scale. By providing atmospheric CO2 for use in fuel production, we can enable production of transportation fuels with ultra-low carbon intensities, which command price premiums in the growing set of constrained fuels markets such as California's LCFS. We are a Calgary based startup founded in 2009 with 10 employees, and we are considered a global leader in the direct air capture (DAC) field. We will review CE's DAC technology, based on a wet-scrubbing "air contactor" which absorbs CO2 into aqueous solution, and a chemical looping "regeneration" component, which liberates pure CO2 from this aqueous solution while re-making the original absorption chemical. CE's DAC tecnology exports purified atmospheric CO2, combined with the combustion CO2 from plant energy usage, as the end product. We will also discuss CE's 2014-2015 end-to-end Pilot Demonstration Unit. This is a $7M technology demonstration plant that CE is building with the help of key industrial partners and equipment vendors. Vendor design and engineering requirements have been used to specify the pilot air contactor, pellet reactor, calciner, and slaker modules, as well as auxiliary systems. These modules will be run for several months to obtain the engineering and performance data needed for subsequent commercial plant design, as well as to test the residual integration risks associated with CE's process. By the time of the AGU conference, the pilot is expected to be in late stages of fabrication or early stages of site installation.

  4. Large Pilot-Scale Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Using Aminosilicone Solvent.Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancu, Dan [GE

    2017-12-21

    GE Global Research has developed, over the last 8 years, a platform of cost effective CO2 capture technologies based on a non-aqueous aminosilicone solvent (GAP-1m). As demonstrated in previous funded DOE projects (DE-FE0007502 and DEFE0013755), the GAP-1m solvent has increased CO2 working capacity, lower volatility and corrosivity than the benchmark aqueous amine technology. Performance of the GAP-1m solvent was recently demonstrated in a 0.5 MWe pilot at National Carbon Capture Center, AL with real flue gas for over 500 hours of operation using a Steam Stripper Column (SSC). The pilot-scale PSTU engineering data were used to (i) update the techno-economic analysis, and EH&S assessment, (ii) perform technology gap analysis, and (iii) conduct the solvent manufacturability and scale-up study.

  5. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  6. Recent development of capture of CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez, Rosa Hilda

    2014-01-01

    "Recent Technologies in the capture of CO2" provides a comprehensive summary on the latest technologies available to minimize the emission of CO2 from large point sources like fossil-fuel power plants or industrial facilities. This ebook also covers various techniques that could be developed to reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere. The contents of this book include chapters on oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized beds, gas separation membrane used in post-combustion capture, minimizing energy consumption in CO2 capture processes through process integration, characterization and application of structured packing for CO2 capture, calcium looping technology for CO2 capture and many more. Recent Technologies in capture of CO2 is a valuable resource for graduate students, process engineers and administrative staff looking for real-case analysis of pilot plants. This eBook brings together the research results and professional experiences of the most renowned work groups in the CO2 capture field...

  7. The CarbFix Pilot Project in Iceland - CO2 capture and mineral storage in basaltic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, H.; Sigfusson, B.; Aradottir, E. S.; Gunnlaugsson, E.; Gislason, S. R.; Alfredsson, H. A.; Broecker, W. S.; Matter, J. M.; Stute, M.; Oelkers, E.

    2010-12-01

    The overall objective of the CarbFix project is to develop and optimize a practical and cost-effective technology for capturing CO2 and storing it via in situ mineral carbonation in basaltic rocks, as well as to train young scientist to carry the corresponding knowledge into the future. The project consists of a field injection of CO2 charged water at the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in SW Iceland, laboratory experiments, numerical reactive transport modeling, tracer tests, natural analogue and cost analysis. The CO2 injection site is situated about 3 km south of the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant. Reykjavik Energy operates the power plant, which currently produces 60,000 tons/year CO2 of magmatic origin. The produced geothermal gas mainly consists of CO2 and H2S. The two gases will be separated in a pilot gas treatment plant, and CO2 will be transported in a pipeline to the injection site. There, CO2 will be fully dissolved in 20 - 25°C water during injection at 25 - 30 bar pressure, resulting in a single fluid phase entering the storage formation, which consists of relatively fresh basaltic lavas. The CO2 charged water is reactive and will dissolve divalent cations from the rock, which will combine with the dissolved carbon to form solid thermodynamically stable carbonate minerals. The injection test is designed to inject 2200 tons of CO2 per year. In the past three years the CarbFix project has been addressing background fluid chemistries at the injection site and characterizing the target reservoir for the planned CO2 injection. Numerous groundwater samples have been collected and analysed. A monitoring and accounting plan has been developed, which integrates surface, subsurface and atmospheric monitoring. A weather station is operating at the injection site for continuous monitoring of atmospheric CO2 and to track all key parameters for the injection. Environmental authorities have granted licenses for the CO2 injection and the use of tracers, based

  8. Online corrosion monitoring in a postcombustion CO2 capture pilot plant and its relation to solvent degradation and ammonia emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.; Mertens, J.; Huizinga, A.; Vroey, S. de; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Srinivasan, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion in amine treating plants is known to cause integrity failures, plant shutdown, costly repairs, and so forth. The use of an amine treatment system for postcombustion CO2 capture brings additional challenges in terms of the flue gas quality, flue gas composition, operating conditions, scale

  9. Dynamic simulation and analysis of a pilot-scale CO2 post-combustion capture unit using piperazine and MEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    Post-combustion capture is a promising technology-for developing CO2 neutral power plants. However, to make it economically and technically feasible, capture plants must follow the fast and large load changes of the power plants without decreasing the overall performance of the plant. Dynamic......'s temperature reduces using PZ solvent. Thus, we demonstrate that the dynamics of the MEA system cannot be extrapolated to other solvents. (C) 2016, IFAC (International Federation of Automatic Control) Hosting, by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  10. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  11. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    Production of cement is an energy intensive process and is the source of considerable CO2emissions. Itis estimated that the cement industry contributes around 8% of total global CO2emissions. CO2is oneof the major greenhouse gases. In the atmosphere, the CO2concentration has increased from 310...... ppmvin 1960 to 390 ppmv in 2012, probably due to human activity. A lot of research is being carried out forreducing CO2emissions from large stationary sources. Ofwhich, the carbonate looping process is anew process and has the potential to reduce CO2emissions with lower energy penalties. Most of thework...... performed recently has focused on CO2capture from fossil fuel-based power plants. Inherently,this process is especially suitablefor cement plants, as CaO used for CO2capture is also a majoringredient for clinker production. Thus, a detailed investigation was carried outto study the applicationof...

  12. Porous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Baiyang

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has long been regarded as the major greenhouse gas, which leads to numerous negative effects on global environment. The capture and separation of CO2 by selective adsorption using porous materials proves to be an effective way to reduce the emission of CO2 to atmosphere. Porous organic polymers (POPs) are promising candidates for this application due to their readily tunable textual properties and surface functionalities. The objective of this thesis work is to develop new POPs with high CO2 adsorption capacities and CO2/N2 selectivities for post-combustion effluent (e.g. flue gas) treatment. We will also exploit the correlation between the CO2 capture performance of POPs and their textual properties/functionalities. Chapters Two focuses on the study of a group of porous phenolic-aldehyde polymers (PPAPs) synthesized by a catalyst-free method, the CO2 capture capacities of these PPAPs exceed 2.0 mmol/g at 298 K and 1 bar, while keeping CO2/N2 selectivity of more than 30 at the same time. Chapter Three reports the gas adsorption results of different hyper-cross-linked polymers (HCPs), which indicate that heterocyclo aromatic monomers can greatly enhance polymers’ CO2/N2 selectivities, and the N-H bond is proved to the active CO2 adsorption center in the N-contained (e.g. pyrrole) HCPs, which possess the highest selectivities of more than 40 at 273 K when compared with other HCPs. Chapter Four emphasizes on the chemical modification of a new designed polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM) with high CO2/N2 selectivity (50 at 273 K), whose experimental repeatability and chemical stability prove excellent. In Chapter Five, we demonstrate an improvement of both CO2 capture capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity by doping alkali metal ions into azo-polymers, which leads a promising method to the design of new porous organic polymers.

  13. CO2 capture, transport, storage and utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing CO2 emissions requires an integrated CO2 management approach. The dependency between the different industry sectors is higher than commonly acknowledged and covers all areas; capture, transport, storage and utilisation. TNO is one of Europe’s largest independent research organisations and

  14. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture: A Scale-Up Study from Laboratory to Pilot Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabanon E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane contactors have been proposed for decades as a way to achieve intensified mass transfer processes. Post-combustion CO2 capture by absorption into a chemical solvent is one of the currently most intensively investigated topics in this area. Numerous studies have already been reported, unfortunately almost systematically on small, laboratory scale, modules. Given the level of flue gas flow rates which have to be treated for carbon capture applications, a consistent scale-up methodology is obviously needed for a rigorous engineering design. In this study, the possibilities and limitations of scale-up strategies for membrane contactors have been explored and will be discussed. Experiments (CO2 absorption from a gas mixture in a 30%wt MEA aqueous solution have been performed both on mini-modules and at pilot scale (10 m2 membrane contactor module based on PTFE hollow fibers. The results have been modelled utilizing a resistance in series approach. The only adjustable parameter is in fitting the simulations to experimental data is the membrane mass transfer coefficient (km, which logically plays a key role. The difficulties and uncertainties associated with scaleup computations from lab scale to pilot scale modules, with a particular emphasis on the km value, are presented and critically discussed.

  15. Enhanced Oil Recovery with CO2 Capture and Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, Maria; De Simoni, Michela; Delbianco, Alberto; Cazzani, Piero; Zanibelli, Laura

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility study aimed at extending the production life of a small oilfield in Italy through EOR, employing the CO2 captured from the flue gas streams of the refinery nearby. The EOR operation allows the recovery of additional reserves while a consistent amount of the CO2 injected remains permanently stored into the reservoir. The screening process selection for EOR-CO2 and the main elements of the pilot project for the proper upstream-downstream integration will be described. Evaluation of EOR-CO2 extension to other oilfields and its effect on oil production and project's economics will be reported.

  16. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  17. Aqueous ethylenediamine for CO(2) capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shan; Chen, Xi; Nguyen, Thu; Voice, Alexander K; Rochelle, Gary T

    2010-08-23

    Aqueous ethylenediamine (EDA) has been investigated as a solvent for CO(2) capture from flue gas. EDA can be used at 12 M (mol kg(-1) H(2)O) with an acceptable viscosity of 16 cP (1 cP=10(-3) Pa s) with 0.48 mol CO(2) per equivalent of EDA. Similar to monoethanolamine (MEA), EDA can be used up to 120 degrees C in a stripper without significant thermal degradation. Inhibitor A will effectively eliminate oxidative degradation. Above 120 degrees C, loaded EDA degrades with the production of its cyclic urea and other related compounds. Unlike piperazine, when exposed to oxidative degradation, EDA does not result in excessive foaming. Over much of the loading range, the CO(2) absorption rate with 12 M EDA is comparable to 7 M MEA. However, at typical rich loading, 12 M EDA absorbs CO(2) 2 times slower than 7 M MEA. The capacity of 12 M EDA is 0.72 mol CO(2)/(kg H(2)O+EDA) (for P(CO(2) )=0.5 to 5 kPa at 40 degrees C), which is about double that of MEA. The apparent heat of CO(2) desorption in EDA solution is 84 kJ mol(-1) CO(2); greater than most other amine systems.

  18. Upscaling of enzyme enhanced CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne Berthold

    Fossil fuels are the backbone of the energy generation in the coming decades for USA, China, India and Europe, hence high greenhouse gas emissions are expected in future. Carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) is the only technology that can mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel...... fired power by selectively capturing CO2 from flue gases. High capital and high operational costs of this process are the major obstacles of industrial implementation. In the field of CCS the chemical absorption process is the most mature technology. The use of kinetic rate promoters that enhance...

  19. Contactor Energy Requirements for Capturing CO2 From ambient air using NaOH determined in a pilot-scale prototype system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolaroff, J. K.; Keith, D.; Lowry, G.

    2005-12-01

    Systems for capturing CO2 from ambient air for sequestration have recently been proposed (e.g. Dubey et al., 2002; Zeman and Lackner, 2004; Keith et al., 2004). Capture from ambient air has a number of structural advantages over capture from point sources; in particular it makes possible future emissions scenarios with negative net CO2 emissions. The systems suggested use either a Ca(OH)2 or NaOH solution to capture CO2 and then regenerate the solution in a chemical loop. The energy requirements of such a system, however, have been hotly disputed (Herzog, 2003). The energy requirements and effectiveness of the chemical regeneration are well established as they are practiced on a large scale in the industrial kraft process used in pulp and paper production, but the energy and land use requirements of a contactor for this system are uncertain as this component of the system is not implemented industrially. In this research, we address the most controversial component of the system, the contactor, which extracts CO2 from air into solution. A prototype contactor with a spray tower design is constructed (1m by 6m), and CO2 absorption by a NaOH solution spray (5 l/min) is measured. The CO2 absorption efficiency and energy requirements per unit CO2 absorbed are calculated. The energy requirements of the contactor are found to be on the order of 10-40 kJ/mol-CO2, which is small compared to the energy of combustion of fossil fuels, and compared with the energy required for the regeneration steps. Thus, a NaOH-based spray tower design can serve as an energy-efficient contactor for capturing CO2 from ambient air. Dubey, M. K., Ziock, H., Rueff, G., Elliott, S., and Smith, W. S. (2002). ``Extraction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through engineered chemical sinkage''. ACS -- Division of Fuel Chemistry Reprints, 47(1):81--84. Herzog, H. (2003). Assessing the feasibility of capturing co2 from the air. Technical report, MIT Laboratory for Energy and the Environment. Keith

  20. CO2 Capture by Calcium Looping at Relevant Conditions for Cement Plants: Experimental Testing in a 30 kWth Pilot Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Rozada, Borja; Alonso Carreño, Mónica; Abanades García, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Calcium looping technology has a high potential for capturing CO2 in cement plants as the CaO-rich purge from the calciner can be used to replace a sizable fraction of the CaCO3 used as feedstock. Integrating the CaL process into the cement plant requires the carbonator reactor to operate under new conditions (i.e., a higher carbonator CO2 load, a more active sorbent, smaller particle sizes). This work analyzes the impact of some of the new CaL operating conditions on the pe...

  1. In silico screening of zeolite membranes for CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The separation of CO2/H-2, CO2/CH4, and CO2/N-2 mixtures is of practical importance for CO2 capture and other applications in the processing industries. Use of membranes with microporous layers of zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) offer

  2. Understanding and Modelling the Effect of Dissolved Metals on Solvent Degradation in Post Combustion CO2 Capture Based on Pilot Plant Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dhingra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant. Besides, most of the models fail to recognize the catalytic effect of metals. The objective of this work is to develop a representative kinetic model based on an apparent auto-catalytic reaction mechanism between solvent degradation, corrosion and ammonia emissions. Measurements from four different pilot plants: (i EnBW’s plant at Heilbronn, Germany (ii TNO’s plant at Maasvlakte, The Netherlands; (iii CSIRO’s plants at Loy Yang and Tarong, Australia and (iv DONG Energy’s plant at Esbjerg, Denmark are utilized to propose a degradation kinetic model for 30 wt % ethanolamine (MEA as the capture solvent. The kinetic parameters of the model were regressed based on the pilot plant campaign at EnBW. The kinetic model was validated by comparing it with the measurements at the remaining pilot campaigns. The model predicted the trends of ammonia emissions and metal concentration within the same order of magnitude. This study provides a methodology to establish a quantitative approach for predicting the onset of unacceptable degradation levels which can be further used to devise counter-measure strategies such as reclaiming and metal removal.

  3. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  4. Membrane Technologies for CO2 Capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons-Fischbein, K.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of membrane technology for the effective CO2/CH4 separation. The work focuses on two different membrane processes to accomplish the separation: 1) The use of a gas-liquid membrane contactor for the selective absorption of CO2 from CH4 2) The use of thin, dense

  5. CO2 capture research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerman, J.C.; Kuramochi, T.; Egmond, S. van

    2008-01-01

    The global climate is changing due to human activities. This human‑induced climate change is mainly caused by global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Most scientists agree that in order to mitigate climate change, by 2050, global CO2 emissions must be reduced by at least 50%

  6. Investigation into Optimal CO2 Concentration for CO2 Capture from Aluminium Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Anette; Sørensen, Henriette; Melaaen, Morten; Müller, Gunn-Iren

    2013-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from aluminum production has been simulated using Aspen Plus and Aspen Hysys. The technology used for aluminum production is the Hall-Héroult and the current cell design necessitates that large amounts of false air is supplied to the cells. This results in a CO2 concentration in the process gas at around 1 vol%, which is considered uneconomical for CO2 capture. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to evaluate the CO2 capture from aluminum production when the process gas ...

  7. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...... perspectives for decreasing the heat requirement. However, a scientific understanding of the processes is required. The thermodynamic properties of the NH3–CO2–H2O system were described using the extended UNIQUAC electrolyte model developed by Thomsen and Rasmussen in a temperature range from 0 to 110°C...... and pressure up to 100bars. The results show that solid phases consisting of ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate are formed in the absorber. The heat requirements in the absorber and in the desorber have been studied. The enthalpy calculations show that a heat requirement for the desorber lower than 2GJ/ton CO2...

  8. Recent enlightening strategies for co2 capture: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Qiu, Ziyang; Liu, Jia

    2017-05-01

    The global climate change has seriously affected the survival and prosperity of mankind, where greenhouse effect owing to atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment is a great cause. Accordingly, a series of down-to-earth measures need to be implemented urgently to control the output of CO2. As CO2 capture appears as a core issue in developing low-carbon economy, this review provides a comprehensive introduction of recent CO2 capture technologies used in power plants or other industries. Strategies for CO2 capture, e.g. pre-combustion, post-combustion and oxyfuel combustion, are covered in this article. Another enlightening technology for CO2 capture based on fluidized beds is intensively discussed.

  9. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...... C and pressure up to 100 bars [1]. The results show that solid phases consisting of ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate are formed in the absorber. The energy requirements in the absorber and in the desorber have been studied. The enthalpy calculations show that an energy requirement for the desorber...

  10. Direct Air Capture of CO2 with an Amine Resin: A Molecular Modeling Study of the CO2 Capturing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Wim; de Flart, Stijn

    2017-11-01

    Several reactions, known from other amine systems for CO2 capture, have been proposed for Lewatit R VP OC 1065. The aim of this molecular modeling study is to elucidate the CO2 capture process: the physisorption process prior to the CO2-capture and the reactions. Molecular modeling yields that the resin has a structure with benzyl amine groups on alternating positions in close vicinity of each other. Based on this structure, the preferred adsorption mode of CO2 and H2O was established. Next, using standard Density Functional Theory two catalytic reactions responsible for the actual CO2 capture were identified: direct amine and amine-H2O catalyzed formation of carbamic acid. The latter is a new type of catalysis. Other reactions are unlikely. Quantitative verification of the molecular modeling results with known experimental CO2 adsorption isotherms, applying a dual site Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, further supports all results of this molecular modeling study.

  11. The Li–CO2 battery: a novel method for CO2 capture and utilization

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Shaomao

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel primary Li-CO2 battery that consumes pure CO2 gas as its cathode. The battery exhibits a high discharge capacity of around 2500 mA h g-1 at moderate temperatures. At 100 °C the discharge capacity is close to 1000% higher than that at 40 °C, and the temperature dependence is significantly weaker for higher surface area carbon cathodes. Ex-situ FTIR and XRD analyses convincingly show that lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) is the main component of the discharge product. The feasibility of similar primary metal-CO2 batteries based on earth abundant metal anodes, such as Al and Mg, is demonstrated. The metal-CO2 battery platform provides a novel approach for simultaneous capturing of CO2 emissions and producing electrical energy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Feasibility study of CO2 capture by anti-sublimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schach, M.O.; Oyarzun, B.A.; Schramm, H.; Schneider, R.; Repke, J.U.

    2011-01-01

    Processes for carbon capture and storage have the drawback of high energy demand. In this work the application of CO2 capture by anti-sublimation is analyzed. The process was simulated using Aspen Plus. Process description is accomplished by phase equilibria models which are able to reproduce the

  13. Absorber Model for CO2 Capture by Monoethanolamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faramarzi, Leila; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2010-01-01

    The rate-based steady-state model proposed by Gabrielsen et al. (Gabrielsen, J.; Michelsen, M. L.; Kontogeorgis, G. M.; Stenby, E. H. AIChE J. 2006, 52, 10, 3443-3451) for the design of the CO2-2-amino-2-methylpropanol absorbers is adopted and improved for the design of the CO2-monoethanolamine......, and their impact on the model's prediction is compared. The model has been successfully applied to CO2 absorber packed columns and validated against pilot plant data with good agreement....

  14. Understanding and modelling the effect of dissolved metals on solvent degradation in post combustion CO2 capture based on pilot plant experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhingra, S.; Khakharia, P.; Rieder, A.; Cousins, A.; Reynolds, A.; Knudsen, J.; Andersen, J.; Irons, R.; Mertens, J.; Zahra, M.A.; Os, P. van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant.

  15. The Inherent Tracer Fingerprint of Captured CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gyore, Domokos; Stuart, Finlay; Boyce, Adrian; Haszeldine, Stuart; Chalaturnyk, Rick; Gilfillan, Stuart

    2017-04-01

    Inherent tracers, the isotopic and trace gas composition of captured CO2 streams, are potentially powerful tracers for use in CCS technology [1,2]. Despite this potential, the inherent tracer fingerprint in captured CO2 streams has yet to be robustly investigated and documented [3]. Here, we will present the first high quality systematic measurements of the carbon and oxygen isotopic and noble gas fingerprints measured in anthropogenic CO2 captured from combustion power stations and fertiliser plants, using amine capture, oxyfuel and gasification processes, and derived from coal, biomass and natural gas feedstocks. We will show that δ13C values are mostly controlled by the feedstock composition, as expected. The majority of the CO2 samples exhibit δ18O values similar to atmospheric O2 although captured CO2 samples from biomass and gas feedstocks at one location in the UK are significantly higher. Our measured noble gas concentrations in captured CO2 are generally as expected [2], typically being two orders of magnitude lower in concentration than in atmospheric air. Relative noble gas elemental abundances are variable and often show an opposite trend to that of a water in contact with the atmosphere. Expected enrichments in radiogenic noble gases (4He and 40Ar) for fossil fuel derived CO2 were not always observed due to dilution with atmospheric noble gases during the CO2 generation and capture process. Many noble gas isotope ratios indicate that isotopic fractionation takes place during the CO2 generation and capture processes, resulting in isotope ratios similar to fractionated air. We conclude that phase changes associated with CO2 transport and sampling may induce noble gas elemental and isotopic fractionation, due to different noble gas solubilities between high (liquid or supercritical) and low (gaseous) density CO2. Data from the Australian CO2CRC Otway test site show that δ13C of CO2 will change once injected into the storage reservoir, but that this

  16. Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

    2010-09-30

    For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and

  17. CO2 mitigation via capture and chemical conversion in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Greg H

    2011-02-01

    A lab-scale seawater/mineral carbonate gas scrubber was found to remove up to 97% of CO(2) in a simulated flue gas stream at ambient temperature and pressure, with a large fraction of this carbon ultimately converted to dissolved calcium bicarbonate. After full equilibration with air, up to 85% of the captured carbon was retained in solution, that is, it did not degas or precipitate. Thus, above-ground CO(2) hydration and mineral carbonate scrubbing may provide a relatively simple point-source CO(2) capture and storage scheme at coastal locations. Such low-tech CO(2) mitigation could be especially relevant for retrofitting to existing power plants and for deployment in the developing world, the primary source of future CO(2) emissions. Addition of the resulting alkaline solution to the ocean may benefit marine ecosystems that are currently threatened by acidification, while also allowing the utilization of the vast potential of the sea to safely sequester anthropogenic carbon. This approach in essence hastens Nature's own very effective but slow CO(2) mitigation process; carbonate mineral weathering is a major consumer of excess atmospheric CO(2) and ocean acidity on geologic times scales.

  18. Mesoporous amine-bridged polysilsesquioxane for CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel class of amine-supported sorbents based on amine-bridged mesoporous polysilsesquioxane was developed via a simple one-pot sol-gel process. The new sorbent allows the incorporation of a large amount of active groups without sacrificing surface area or pore volume available for CO2 capture, leading to a CO2 capture capacity of 3.2 mmol g−1 under simulated flue gas conditions. The sorbent is readily regenerated at 100°C and exhibits good stability over repetitive adsorption-desorption cycling.

  19. Atmospheric CO2 capture for the artificial photosynthetic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogalska Adrianna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of these studies is to evaluate the ambient CO2 capture abilities of the membrane contactor system in the same conditions as leaves works during photosynthesis, such as ambient temperature, pressure and low CO2 concentration, where the only driving force is the concentration gradient. The polysulfone membrane was made by phase inversion process and characterized by ESEM micrographs which were used to determine the thickness, asymmetry and pore size. Besides, the porosity of the membrane was measured from the membrane and polysulfone density correlation and hydrophobicity was analyzed by contact angle measurements. Moreover, the compatibility of the membrane and absorbent solution was evaluated, in order to exclude wetting issues. The prepared membranes were introduced in a cross flow module and used as contactor between the CO2 and the potassium hydroxide solution, as absorbing media. The influence of the membrane thickness, absorbent stirring rate and absorption time, on CO2 capture were evaluated. The results show that the efficiency of our CO2 capture system is similar to stomatal carbon dioxide assimilation rate.

  20. Atmospheric CO2 capture for the artificial photosynthetic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogalska, Adrianna; Zukowska, Adrianna; Garcia-Valls, Ricard

    2017-11-01

    The scope of these studies is to evaluate the ambient CO2 capture abilities of the membrane contactor system in the same conditions as leaves works during photosynthesis, such as ambient temperature, pressure and low CO2 concentration, where the only driving force is the concentration gradient. The polysulfone membrane was made by phase inversion process and characterized by ESEM micrographs which were used to determine the thickness, asymmetry and pore size. Besides, the porosity of the membrane was measured from the membrane and polysulfone density correlation and hydrophobicity was analyzed by contact angle measurements. Moreover, the compatibility of the membrane and absorbent solution was evaluated, in order to exclude wetting issues. The prepared membranes were introduced in a cross flow module and used as contactor between the CO2 and the potassium hydroxide solution, as absorbing media. The influence of the membrane thickness, absorbent stirring rate and absorption time, on CO2 capture were evaluated. The results show that the efficiency of our CO2 capture system is similar to stomatal carbon dioxide assimilation rate.

  1. Post combustion CO2 capture using zeolite membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Zunita, M.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon dioxide emission is the major cause of global warming. It is believed that reducing carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel combustion is the most effective way to prevent global warming. Membrane separation using zeolites offers energy efficient way to capture CO2 compared to conventional separation techniques such as amine absorption. In general, flue gas has high temperature and mainly consisting nitrogen, water, CO2 and traces of other compounds. These compounds have similar kinetic diameter thus simple Knudsen diffusion cannot separate CO2 from flue gas mixture. Zeolite is beneficial to post-combustion CO2 capture not only because it can withstand high temperature but also because of its unique sorption-diffusion separation mechanism. However, zeolite membrane faced a challenge to make it easier to fabricate. Relatively high zeolite price is also a significant hurdle to broaden its application. In order to relieve this problem, a lot of modifications have been performed. Zeolite modification by polymer has gained increased attention for post-combustion CO2 capture application. To present a clear background, this work will present modifications of zeolite membrane using polymer. Special attention will be given to composite and mixed matrix membrane configuration. Several drawbacks and problems encountered will also be discussed.

  2. CO2 capture by Li-functionalized silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2016-05-18

    CO2 capture and storage technology is of key importance to reduce the greenhouse effect. By its large surface area and sp3 hybridization, Li-functionalized silicene is demonstrated to be a promising CO2 absorbent that is stable up to at least 500 K and has a very high storage capacity of 28.6 mol/kg (55.7 wt%). The adsorption energy of CO2 on Li-functionalized silicene is enhanced as compared to pristine silicene, to attain an almost ideal value that still facilitates easy release. In addition, the band gap is found to change sensitively with the CO2 coverage. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  3. CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids : Experiments and Molecular Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdin, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigated the potential of physical ILs for CO2 capture at pre-combustion and natural gas sweetening conditions. The performance of ILs with respect to conventional solvents is assessed in terms of gas solubilities and selectivities. The work discussed in this thesis consists

  4. A low energy aqueous ammonia CO2 capture process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Blaker, Eirik Ask

    2014-01-01

    with existing aqueous ammonia CO2 capture processes. Moreover, the thermal reactor can operate at 1 bar and 86 °C, therefore the NH3 regeneration temperature is reduced by approximately 50 qC. The integration of low- and mid- temperature waste heat becomes possible which can greatly improve the economics...... of the process. The present capture alternative is especially convenient for power plants but is also beneficial for the cement, steel and aluminum industry. Special attention is given to the ammonia slip prediction. The calculations substantiate that the slip above the absorber is 0.1 mol % after washing...... by increasing temperature and L/G ratio but this leads to higher heat consumption, jeopardizing the economic feasibility. Here we developed, investigated, and optimized a novel CO2 capture process design using aqueous ammonia as solvent. The proposed configuration replaces the traditional stripper for solvent...

  5. CO2 Capture by Carbon Aerogel–Potassium Carbonate Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various composites for reducing CO2 emissions have been extensively studied. Because of their high sorption capacity and low cost, alkali metal carbonates are recognized as a potential candidate to capture CO2 from flue gas under moist conditions. However, undesirable effects and characteristics such as high regeneration temperatures or the formation of byproducts lead to high energy costs associated with the desorption process and impede the application of these materials. In this study, we focused on the regeneration temperature of carbon aerogel–potassium carbonate (CA–KC nanocomposites, where KC nanocrystals were formed in the mesopores of the CAs. We observed that the nanopore size of the original CA plays an important role in decreasing the regeneration temperature and in enhancing the CO2 capture capacity. In particular, 7CA–KC, which was prepared from a CA with 7 nm pores, exhibited excellent performance, reducing the desorption temperature to 380 K and exhibiting a high CO2 capture capacity of 13.0 mmol/g-K2CO3, which is higher than the theoretical value for K2CO3 under moist conditions.

  6. Greenhouse gas capture. Norwegian test facility for CO2-technology; Broeikasgasvangers. Noors testcentrum voor CO2-technologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Velzen, T.

    2012-02-03

    In Norway a large research center on the capture of CO2 will be opened in the spring of 2012: the CO2 Technology Centre Mongstad. It allows companies to test concepts for CCS (carbon dioxide capture and storage) [Dutch] In Noorwegen wordt in de lente van 2012 een groot centrum voor onderzoek naar het afvangen van CO2 geopend: het CO2 Technology Centre Mongstad. Daar kunnen bedrijven hun concepten voor CCS beproeven.

  7. Membrane contactors for CO2 capture processes - critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogalska, Adrianna; Trojanowska, Anna; Garcia-Valls, Ricard

    2017-07-01

    The use of membrane contactor in industrial processes is wide, and lately it started to be used in CO2 capture process mainly for gas purification or to reduce the emission. Use of the membrane contactor provides high contact surface area so the size of the absorber unit significantly decreases, which is an important factor for commercialization. The research has been caried out regarding the use of novel materials for the membrane production and absorbent solution improvements. The present review reveals the progress in membrane contactor systems for CO2 capture processes concerning solution for ceramic membrane wetting, comparison study of different polymers used for fabrication and methods of enzyme immobilization for biocomposite membrane. Also information about variety of absorbent solutions is described.

  8. REGENERATION OF AMMONIA SOLUTION FOR CO2 CAPTURE IN POSTCOMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROL TORO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated enthalpy of solutions and solubility for a NH3/CO2 system. Measurements were performed in a thermoregulated Lewis-type cell reactor, temperatures ranging from 278 to 303 K and mass concentrations from 2 wt% to 5 wt%. Enthalpies of solution of CO2 and solubility have been obtained as function of loading, α (moles CO2/mol NH3. Results show that ammonia solutions concentrations of 3 and 5 wt% promote the formation of ammonium bicarbonate. Beside, ammonia concentration of 2 wt% promotes the formation of ammonium carbonate. Therefore, to use ammonia concentrations of 3 and 5 wt% need less energy that a concentration of 2 wt% to reverse the reaction. Regeneration system was simulated using Aspen plus™ software for a pulverised coal fired power plant (CF in a post-combustion process. Model analysis established that NH3 heat duty is lower than MEA and MDEA ones. The energy consumption reaches 2.83 GJ•t-1 CO2. Regarding heat duty and ammonia losses, 3 wt% NH3 is the suitable concentration to capture CO2.

  9. Epoxy based oxygen enriched porous carbons for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Deepak; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.

    2017-08-01

    Oxygen enriched carbon adsorbents were successfully synthesized for the first time from template zeolite and epoxy resin as precursor using a nanocasting technique. Carbonization and CO2 activation were performed at various temperatures (500-800 °C) to prepare different carbon structure adsorbents. Several characterization techniques were used to characterize the textural structure, oxygen content and surface functional groups of the adsorbents. The carbon adsorbents show high oxygen content (47.51%), highest surface area (SBET = 686.37 m2 g-1) and pore volume (0.60 cm3 g-1), respectively. The materials were evaluated thermogravimetrically at different adsorption temperatures (30-100 °C) and CO2 concentrations (6-100%). Adsorbent prepared at 700 °C exhibited highest CO2 uptake of 0.91 mmol g-1 due to high surface basicity. Further, regeneration studies of adsorbent exhibited easy regenerability and stability over four multiple adsorptions-desorption cycles. Kinetic models for CO2 adsorption at various CO2 concentrations and temperatures were studied and it was found that the fractional order provided best fitting for the adsorption behavior with an error of less than 3%. The experimental data for CO2 adsorption were analyzed using different isothermal models and found that the Freundlich isothermal model presented perfect fit among all isotherm models depicting heterogeneous adsorbent surface. The isosteric heat of adsorption was estimated to be 11.75 kJ mol-1, indicating physiosorption process. Overall, the above results suggested that the synthesized adsorbent using nanocasting technique provides a feasible way for CO2 capture from point source due to their environmentally benign nature, low cost and stable adsorption capacity.

  10. CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids: Experiments and Molecular Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ramdin, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigated the potential of physical ILs for CO2 capture at pre-combustion and natural gas sweetening conditions. The performance of ILs with respect to conventional solvents is assessed in terms of gas solubilities and selectivities. The work discussed in this thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with experimental determination of gas solubilities in ILs, while in the second part molecular simulations are used to predict gas solubilities in physical solvent...

  11. CAPTURING EXHAUST CO2 GAS USING MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Dhawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide is considered as one of the major contenders when the question of greenhouse effect arises. So for any industry or power plant it is of utmost importance to follow certain increasingly stringent environment protection rules and laws. So it is significant to keep eye on any possible methods to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in an efficient way. This paper reviews the available literature so as to try to provide an insight of the possibility of using Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFCs as the carbon capturing and segregating devices and the various factors that affect the performance of MCFCs during the process of CO2 capture.

  12. Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

    2010-06-16

    This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporation’s Econamine Plus™ carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOE’s Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately

  13. Hollow fiber adsorbents for CO2 capture: Kinetic sorption performance

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2011-07-01

    We describe a CO 2 capture platform based on hollow polymeric fibers with sorbent particles embedded in the porous fiber wall for post-combustion CO 2 capture. These fibers are intended for use in a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) process. The RTSA system utilizes the hollow fiber morphology by flowing cooling water on the bore-side of the fibers during sorption to prevent temperature rise associated with the sorption enthalpy. Steam or hot water is flowed through the bores during desorption to desorb CO 2 rapidly. To minimize material transfer between the bore and the fiber wall, a dense Neoprene ® lumen layer is cast on the bore-side of the fiber wall. In this paper, the key sorption step and associated kinetic resistances for the uncooled fibers are examined and evaluated for this portion of the RTSA process. Chopped fibers in a packed bed, as well as fibers assembled into a parallel flow module, have been tested in a simulated flue gas stream. Kinetic limitations in the hollow fiber modules are largely overcome by increasing the superficial gas velocity and the fiber packing in the module-indicating that film diffusion is the controlling mass transfer limitation in the fiber system. The un-cooled fiber modules lose apparent capacity as superficial velocities are increased, likely indicating non-isothermal operation, whereas the actively-cooled fibers in the packed bed maintain apparent capacity at all flowrates studied. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Integrated Solvent Design for CO2 Capture and Viscosity Tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu Cantu, David; Malhotra, Deepika; Koech, Phillip K.; Heldebrant, David J.; Zheng, Feng; Freeman, Charles J.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2017-07-03

    We present novel design strategies for reduced viscosity single-component, water-lean CO2 capture organic solvent systems. Through molecular simulation, we identify the main molecular-level descriptor that influences bulk solvent viscosity. Upon loading, a zwitterionic structure forms with a small activation energy of ca 16 kJ/mol and a small stabilization of ca 6 kJ/mol. Viscosity increases exponentially with CO2 loading due to hydrogen-bonding between neighboring Zwitterions. We find that molecular structures that promote internal hydrogen bonding (within the same molecule) and suppress interactions with neighboring molecules have low viscosities. In addition, tuning the acid/base properties leads to a shift of the equilibrium toward a non-charged (acid) form that further reduces the viscosity. Based on the above structural criteria, a reduced order model is also presented that allows for the quick screening of large compound libraries and down selection of promising candidates for synthesis and testing.

  15. Thermodynamic Properties of CO2 Mixtures and Their Applications in Advanced Power Cycles with CO2 Capture Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hailong

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of CO2-mixtures are essential for the design and operation of CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) systems. A better understanding of the thermodynamic properties of CO2 mixtures could provide a scientific basis to define a proper guideline of CO2 purity and impure components for the CCS processes according to technical, safety and environmental requirements. However the available accurate experimental data cannot cover the whole operation conditions of CCS processes. In...

  16. Effect of impurities in captured CO2 on liquid-vapor equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Gernert, Johannes; Wilbers, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    The capture of large amounts of CO2 from power plants and other large CO2 point sources has become relevant within the concept to mitigate CO2 emissions via carbon capture and storage. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of some major impurities found in the CO2 stream captured

  17. Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

    2013-12-31

    % CO2 product purity was achieved throughout the test. Membrane contactor modules have been scaled from bench scale 2-inch diameter by 12-inch long (20 ft2 membrane surface area) modules to 4-inch diameter by 60-inch long pilot scale modules (165 ft2 membrane surface area). Pilot scale modules were tested in an integrated absorption/regeneration system for CO2 capture field tests at a coal-fired power plant (Midwest Generation’s Will County Station located in Romeoville, IL). Absorption and regeneration contactors were constructed utilizing high performance super-hydrophobic, nano-porous PEEK membranes with CO2 gas permeance of 2,000 GPU and a 1,000 GPU, respectively. Field tests using aMDEA solvent achieved greater than 90% CO2 removal in a single stage. The absorption mass transfer coefficient was 1.2 (sec)-1, exceeding the initial target of 1.0 (sec)-1. This mass transfer coefficient is over one order of magnitude greater than that of conventional gas/liquid contacting equipment. The economic evaluation based on field tests data indicates that the CO2 capture cost associated with membrane contactor technology is $54.69 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured when using aMDEA as a solvent. It is projected that the DOE’s 2025 cost goal of $40 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured can be met by decreasing membrane module cost and by utilizing advanced CO2 capture solvents. In the second stage of the field test, an advanced solvent, Hitachi’s H3-1 was utilized. The use of H3-1 solvent increased mass transfer coefficient by 17% as compared to aMDEA solvent. The high mass transfer coefficient of H3-1 solvent combined with much more favorable solvent regeneration requirements, indicate that the projected savings achievable with membrane contactor process can be further improved. H3-1 solvent will be used in the next pilot-scale development phase. The integrated absorption/regeneration process design and high performance membrane contactors developed in the current bench

  18. Cycle development and design for CO2 capture from flue gas by vacuum swing adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Webley, Paul A

    2008-01-15

    CO2 capture and storage is an important component in the development of clean power generation processes. One CO2 capture technology is gas-phase adsorption, specifically pressure (or vacuum) swing adsorption. The complexity of these processes makes evaluation and assessment of new adsorbents difficult and time-consuming. In this study, we have developed a simple model specifically targeted at CO2 capture by pressure swing adsorption and validated our model by comparison with data from a fully instrumented pilot-scale pressure swing adsorption process. The model captures nonisothermal effects as well as nonlinear adsorption and nitrogen coadsorption. Using the model and our apparatus, we have designed and studied a large number of cycles for CO2 capture. We demonstrate that by careful management of adsorption fronts and assembly of cycles based on understanding of the roles of individual steps, we are able to quickly assess the effect of adsorbents and process parameters on capture performance and identify optimal operating regimes and cycles. We recommend this approach in contrast to exhaustive parametric studies which tend to depend on specifics of the chosen cycle and adsorbent. We show that appropriate combinations of process steps can yield excellent process performance and demonstrate how the pressure drop, and heat loss, etc. affect process performance through their effect on adsorption fronts and profiles. Finally, cyclic temperature profiles along the adsorption column can be readily used to infer concentration profiles-this has proved to be a very useful tool in cyclic function definition. Our research reveals excellent promise for the application of pressure/vacuum swing adsorption technology in the arena of CO2 capture from flue gases.

  19. Chemical looping combustion. Fuel conversion with inherent CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandvoll, Oeyvind

    2005-07-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a new concept for fuel energy conversion with CO2 capture. In CLC, fuel combustion is split into separate reduction and oxidation processes, in which a solid carrier is reduced and oxidized, respectively. The carrier is continuously recirculated between the two vessels, and hence direct contact between air and fuel is avoided. As a result, a stoichiometric amount of oxygen is transferred to the fuel by a regenerable solid intermediate, and CLC is thus a variant of oxy-fuel combustion. In principle, pure CO2 can be obtained from the reduction exhaust by condensation of the produced water vapour. The thermodynamic potential and feasibility of CLC has been studied by means of process simulations and experimental studies of oxygen carriers. Process simulations have focused on parameter sensitivity studies of CLC implemented in 3 power cycles; CLC-Combined Cycle, CLC-Humid Air Turbine and CLC-Integrated Steam Generation. Simulations indicate that overall fuel conversion ratio, oxidation temperature and operating pressure are among the most important process parameters in CLC. A promising thermodynamic potential of CLC has been found, with efficiencies comparable to, - or better than existing technologies for CO2 capture. The proposed oxygen carrier nickel oxide on nickel spinel (NiONiAl) has been studied in reduction with hydrogen, methane and methane/steam as well as oxidation with dry air. It has been found that at atmospheric pressure and temperatures above 600 deg C, solid reduction with dry methane occurs with overall fuel conversion of 92%. Steam methane reforming is observed along with methane cracking as side reactions, yielding an overall selectivity of 90% with regard to solid reduction. If steam is added to the reactant fuel, coking can be avoided. A methodology for long-term investigation of solid chemical activity in a batch reactor is proposed. The method is based on time variables for oxidation. The results for Ni

  20. CO2 Capture and Storage in Coal Gasification Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Anand B.; Phadke, Pranav C.

    2017-07-01

    In response to the global climate change problem, the world community today is in search for an effective means of carbon mitigation. India is a major developing economy and the economic growth is driven by ever-increasing consumption of energy. Coal is the only fossil fuel that is available in abundance in India and contributes to the major share of the total primary energy supply (TPES) in the country. Owing to the large unmet demand for affordable energy, primarily driven by the need for infrastructure development and increasing incomes and aspirations of people, as well as the energy security concerns, India is expected to have continued dependence on coal. Coal is not only the backbone of the electric power generation, but many major industries like cement, iron and steel, bricks, fertilizers also consume large quantities of coal. India has very low carbon emissions (˜ 1.5 tCO2 per capita) as compared to the world average (4.7 tCO2 per capita) and the developed world (11.2 tCO2 per capita). Although the aggregate emissions of the country are increasing with the rising population and fossil energy use, India has a very little contribution to the historical GHG accumulation in the atmosphere linked to the climate change problem. However, a large fraction of the Indian society is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change - due to its geographical location, large dependence on monsoon-based agriculture and limited technical, financial and institutional capacity. Today, India holds a large potential to offer cost-effective carbon mitigation to tackle the climate change problem. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the process of extraction of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) from industrial and energy related sources, transport to storage locations and long-term isolation from the atmosphere. It is a technology that has been developed in recent times and is considered as a bridging technology as we move towards carbon-neutral energy sources in response to the growing

  1. Precipitating amino acid solvents for CO2 capture: opportunities to reduce costs in post combustion capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Heffernan, K.; Ham, L.V. van der; Linders, M.J.G.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post-combustion CO2 capture based on absorption and thermal desorption is considered a suitable technology for carbon abatement in fossil fuelled power plants. The economic viability of post-combustion capture has been widely studied. The major drawbacks of this technology are the efficiency

  2. Precipitating amino acid solvents for CO2 capture : Opportunities to reduce costs in post combustion capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Fernandez, E.; Heffernan, K.; Van der Ham, L.; Linders, M.J.G.; Goetheer, E.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post-combustion CO2 capture based on absorption and thermal desorption is considered a suitable technology for carbon abatement in fossil fuelled power plants. The economic viability of post-combustion capture has been widely studied. The major drawbacks of this technology are the efficiency

  3. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; A. Frank Seibert

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Progress has been made in this reporting period on three subtasks. A simple thermodynamic model has been developed to represent the CO{sub 2} vapor pressure and speciation of the new solvent. A rate model has been formulated to predict the CO{sub 2} flux with these solutions under absorber conditions. A process and instrumentation diagram and process flow diagram have been prepared for modifications of the existing pilot plant system.

  4. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; A. Frank Seibert; J. Tim Cullinane; Terraun Jones

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Progress has been made in this reporting period on three subtasks. The rigorous Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (electrolyte-NRTL) model has been regressed to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in potassium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions. An analytical method for piperazine has been developed using a gas chromatograph. Funding has been obtained and equipment has been donated to provide for modifications of the existing pilot plant system with stainless steel materials.

  5. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; J. Tim Cullinane; Marcus Hillard; Babatunde Oyenekan

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. A rigorous thermodynamic model has been further developed with a standalone FORTRAN code to represent the CO{sub 2} vapor pressure and speciation of the new solvent. The welding work has initiated and will be completed for a revised startup of the pilot plant in February 2004.

  6. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; J. Tim Cullinane; Marcus Hilliard; Babatunde Oyenekan; Terraun Jones

    2003-07-28

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. A rigorous thermodynamic model has been further developed with a standalone FORTRAN code to represent the CO{sub 2} vapor pressure and speciation of the new solvent. Gas chromatography has been used to measure the oxidative degradation of piperazine. The heat exchangers for the pilot plant have been received. The modifications are on schedule for start-up in November 2003.

  7. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; J. Tim Cullinane; Marcus Hilliard; Terraun Jones

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. A rigorous thermodynamic model has been developed with a stand-alone FORTRAN code to represent the CO{sub 2} vapor pressure and speciation of the new solvent. Parameters have been developed for use of the electrolyte NRTL model in AspenPlus. Analytical methods have been developed using gas chromatography and ion chromatography. The heat exchangers for the pilot plant have been ordered.

  8. Risk Assessment of a Post-Combustion and Amine-Based CO2 Capture Ready Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Krzemień

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 Capture Ready Process, as a part of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS technology, is a response to international political pressure and the priority of the European Commission to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions since it is connected with concerns regarding global warming. This is currently considered as an option for lessing CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Many laboratory experiments, as well as pilot projects, have been carried out using different capture systems, but until now no experience from the one-to-one size operational installation has been gained. The energy industry must meet several challenges associated with the start-up of the new full-scale project. This paper investigates the problems that can occur while linking a new technology like the CO2 Capture Ready Process to a working fossil fuel power plant. A Hazard and Operability study (HAZOP has been used, as it is a structured and systematic examination of a planned or existing process or operation, in order to identify and evaluate problems that may represent risks to personnel or equipment. A case study of a post-combustion CO2 capture system with an aqueous monoethanolamine as a solvent is presented, as it is the most likely system to be used in Polish power plants. Basic problems in the analysis as well as the parameters that should be considered to determine vulnerabilities of the process were successfully identified. Gaining experience about the installation’s behaviour while connected to the existing equipment of any power plant is critical for future CCS projects.

  9. Evaluation of Mars CO2 Capture and Gas Separation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    Recent national policy statements have established that the ultimate destination of NASA's human exploration program is Mars. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key technology required to ,enable such missions and it is appropriate to review progress in this area and continue to advance the systems required to produce rocket propellant, oxygen, and other consumables on Mars using the carbon dioxide atmosphere and other potential resources. The Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure CO2 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as well. To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from unreacted carbon oxides (C02-CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3)/carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include' freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents

  10. Dynamic Operation and Simulation of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Gladis, Arne; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    Thermal power need to operate, on a daily basis, with frequent and fast load changes to balance the large variations of intermittent energy sources, such as wind and solar energy. To make the integration of carbon capture to power plants economically and technically feasible, the carbon capture...... process has to be able to follow these fast and large load changes without decreasing the overall performance of the carbon capture plant. Therefore, dynamic models for simulation, optimization and control system design are essential. In this work, we compare the transient behavior of the model against...... dynamic pilot data for CO2 absorption and desorption for step-changes in the flue gas flow rate. In addition we investigate the dynamic behavior of a full-scale post-combustion capture plant using monoethanolamine (MEA) and piperazine (PZ). This analysis demonstrates the good agreement between...

  11. Membrane-assisted CO2 liquefaction: performance modelling of CO2 capture from flue gas in cement production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, R.H.B.; Vercauteren, F.F.; Os, P.J. van; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Berstad, D.; Anantharaman, R.

    2017-01-01

    CEMCAP is an international R&D project under the Horizon 2020 Programme preparing the ground for the large-scale implementation of CO2 capture in the European cement industry. This paper concerns the performance modeling of membraneassisted CO2 liquefaction as a possible retrofit application for

  12. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture: Modeling and Up-Scaling to CO2 Capture for an 800 MWe Coal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball Erin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A techno-economic analysis was completed to compare the use of Hollow Fiber Membrane Modules (HFMM with the more conventional structured packing columns as the absorber in amine-based CO2 capture systems for power plants. In order to simulate the operation of industrial scale HFMM systems, a two-dimensional model was developed and validated based on results of a laboratory scale HFMM. After successful experiments and validation of the model, a pilot scale HFMM was constructed and simulated with the same model. The results of the simulations, from both sizes of HFMM, were used to assess the feasibility of further up-scaling to a HFMM system to capture the CO2 from an 800 MWe power plant. The system requirements – membrane fiber length, total contact surface area, and module volume – were determined from simulations and used for an economic comparison with structured packing columns. Results showed that a significant cost reduction of at least 50% is required to make HFMM competitive with structured packing columns. Several factors for the design of industrial scale HFMM require further investigation, such as the optimal aspect ratio (module length/diameter, membrane lifetime, and casing material and shape, in addition to the need to reduce the overall cost. However, HFMM were also shown to have the advantages of having a higher contact surface area per unit volume and modular scale-up, key factors for applications requiring limited footprints or flexibility in configuration.

  13. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Marcus Hilliard; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Ross Dugas; John McLees; Andrew Sexton; Amorvadee Veawab

    2005-01-26

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. In Campaign 3 of the pilot plant, the overall mass transfer coefficient for the stripper with 7 m MEA decreased from 0.06 to 0.01 mol/(m{sup 3}.s.kPa) as the rich loading increased from 0.45 to 0.6 mol CO{sub 2}/mol MEA. Anion chromatography has demonstrated that nitrate and nitrite are major degradation products of MEA and PZ with pure oxygen. In measurements with the high temperature FTIR in 7 m MEA the MEA vapor pressure varied from 2 to 20 Pa at 35 to 70 C. In 2.5 m PZ the PZ vapor pressure varied from 0.2 to 1 Pa from 37 to 70 C.

  14. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Amorvadee Veawab

    2006-07-28

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The pilot plant data have been reconciled using 17% inlet CO{sub 2}. A rate-based model demonstrates that the stripper is primarily controlled by liquid film mast transfer resistance, with kinetics at vacuum and diffusion of reactants and products at normal pressure. An additional major unknown ion, probably glyoxylate, has been observed in MEA degradation. Precipitation of gypsum may be a feasible approach to removing sulphate from amine solutions and providing for simultaneous removal of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. Corrosion of carbon steel in uninhibited MEA solution is increased by increased amine concentration, by addition of piperazine, and by greater CO{sub 2} loading.

  15. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; J.Tim Cullinane; Marcus Hilliard; Jennifer Lu; Babatunde Oyenekan; Ross Dugas

    2004-07-29

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. CO{sub 2} mass transfer rates are second order in piperazine concentration and increase with ionic strength. Modeling of stripper performance suggests that 5 m K{sup +}/2.5 m PZ will require 25 to 46% less heat than 7 m MEA. The first pilot plant campaign was completed on June 24. The CO{sub 2} penetration through the absorber with 20 feet of Flexipac{trademark} 1Y varied from 0.6 to 16% as the inlet CO{sub 2} varied from 3 to 12% CO{sub 2} and the gas rate varied from 0.5 to 3 kg/m{sup 2}-s.

  16. Applications of oxygen for NOx control and CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Châtel-Pélage Fabienne

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Two promising combustion modification approaches applicable to pulverized coal fired boilers are presented: "Oxygen-Enriched Combustion" (OEC for NOx control and "Oxy-Combustion" (PC-OC for CO2 capture. Oxygen-enriched air rather than air is used as an oxidizer in the OEC technology. Unlike flue gas treatment technologies, OEC directly impacts the NOx formation process by significantly reducing the conversion of coal bound nitrogen to NOx. Pilot-scale and full-scale tests have shown 20 to 30% NOx reduction from an optimized staged-air baseline. In addition to the overall cost competitiveness and the reduced capital requirements, other significant advantages of the O2-enriched technology vs. existing low NOx technologies are presented. The PC-OC technology is shown as a cost-effective technology for CO2 capture from existing or new coal-fired power plants. Pure oxygen diluted in recycled flue gases is used as an oxidizer. The process has been successfully demonstrated and extensively characterized at pilot-scale level (1.5 MWt. The tests have shown substantial benefits of the PC-OC technology, in terms of NOx reduction (60-70% from air-baseline, overall plant efficiency, etc. The cost effectiveness of this capture technology compared to competitive amine scrubbing technology was investigated. The cost of CO2 avoided was around $36/ton for the new PC-OC cases, about $48/ton on a retrofit PC-OC case, which is about 25 to 40% cheaper than the amine scrubbing system. Those numbers were calculated for sub-critical units and include the cost of CO2 compression up to 80 bar. .

  17. Measuring Nitrous Oxide Mass Transfer into Non-Aqueous CO2BOL CO2 Capture Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zwoster, Andy; Heldebrant, David J.

    2016-03-28

    This paper investigates CO2 absorption behavior in CO2BOL solvents by decoupling the physical and chemical effects using N2O as a non-reactive mimic. Absorption measurements were performed using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed using a “first generation” CO2 binding organic liquid (CO2BOL), comprised of an independent base and alcohol. Measurements were made with N2O at a lean (0.06 mol CO2/mol BOL) and rich (0.26 mol CO2/mol BOL) loading, each at three temperatures (35, 45 and 55 °C). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (kg') were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance – determined from a correlation from literature – from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting kg' values for N2O in CO2BOLs were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous MEA under comparable conditions, which is supported by published measurements of Henry’s coefficients for N2O in various solvents. These results suggest that the physical solubility contribution for CO2 absorption in CO2BOLs is greater than that of aqueous amines, an effect that may pertain to other non-aqueous solvents.

  18. Thermochemistry of a Biomimetic and Rubisco-Inspired CO2 Capture System from Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Muelleman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In theoretical studies of chemical reactions the reaction thermochemistry is usually reported for the stoichiometric reaction at standard conditions (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS°. We describe the computation of the equilibrium concentrations of the CO2-adducts for the general capture reaction CO2 + Capture System ⇆ CO2-adduct (GCR and the rubisco-type capture reaction CO2 + Capture System ⇆ CO2-adduct + H2O (RCR with consideration of the reaction CO2(g ⇆ CO2(aq via Henry’s law. The resulting equations are evaluated and graphically illustrated as a function of atmospheric CO2 concentration and as a function of temperature. The equations were applied to the thermochemistry of small molecule rubisco-model reactions and series of additional model reactions to illustrate the range of the Gibbs free enthalpy for the effective reversible capture and of the reaction entropy for economic CO2 release at elevated temperature. A favorable capture of free enthalpy is of course a design necessity, but not all exergonic reactions are suitable CO2 capture systems. Successful CO2 capture systems must allow for effective release as well, and this feature is controlled by the reaction entropy. The principle of using a two-pronged capture system to ensure a large negative capture entropy is explained and highlighted in the graphical abstract. It is hoped that the presentation of the numerical examples provides useful guidelines for the design of more efficient capture systems.

  19. Borophene as a Promising Material for Charge-Modulated Switchable CO2Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2017-06-14

    Ideal carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture materials for practical applications should bind CO 2 molecules neither too weakly to limit good loading kinetics nor too strongly to limit facile release. Although charge-modulated switchable CO 2 capture has been proposed to be a controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO 2 capture strategy, the development of a practical gas-adsorbent material remains a great challenge. In this study, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have examined the possibility of conductive borophene nanosheets as promising sorbent materials for charge-modulated switchable CO 2 capture. Our results reveal that the binding strength of CO 2 molecules on negatively charged borophene can be significantly enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO 2 capture coverage, the negatively charged borophene achieves CO 2 capture capacities up to 6.73 × 10 14 cm -2 . In contrast to the other CO 2 capture methods, the CO 2 capture/release processes on negatively charged borophene are reversible with fast kinetics and can be easily controlled via switching on/off the charges carried by borophene nanosheets. Moreover, these negatively charged borophene nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO 2 from mixtures with CH 4 , H 2 , and/or N 2 . This theoretical exploration will provide helpful guidance for identifying experimentally feasible, controllable, highly selective, and high-capacity CO 2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  20. Capturing atmospheric CO2 using supported amine sorbents for microalgae cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Garcia Alba, Laura; Veneman, Rens

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose, demonstrate and evaluate the concept of atmospheric CO2 capture for enhanced algae cultivation (and horticulture), as alternative to the application of flue gas derived CO2. A supported amine sorbent was prepared and able to capture CO2 at atmospheric conditions and

  1. New methodologies for integrating algae with CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Mireles, I.; Stel, R.W. van der; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally recognized, that algae could be an interesting option for reducing CO2 emissions. Based on light and CO2, algae can be used for the production various economically interesting products. Current algae cultivation techniques, however, still present a number of limitations. Efficient

  2. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Jennifer Lu; Babatunde Oyenekan; Ross Dugas

    2004-11-08

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The stripper model with Aspen Custom Modeler and careful optimization of solvent rate suggests that 7 m MEA and 5 m K+/2.5 m PZ will be practically equivalent in energy requirement and optimum solution capacity. The multipressure stripper reduces energy consumption by 15% with a maximum pressure of 5 atm. The use of vanadium as a corrosion inhibitor will carry little risk of long-term environmental or health effects liability, but the disposal of solvent with vanadium will be subject to regulation, probably as a hazardous waste. Analysis of the pilot plant data from Campaign 1 has given values of the mass transfer coefficient consistent with the rate data from the wetted wall column. With a rich end pinch, 30% MEA should provide a capacity of 1.3-1.4 mole CO{sub 2}/kg solvent.

  3. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Amorvadee Veawab

    2006-04-28

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The final campaign of the pilot plant was completed in February 2006 with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ using Flexipac AQ Style 20. The new cross-exchanger reduced the approach temperature to less than 9 C. Stripper modeling has demonstrated that a configuration with a ''Flashing Feed'' requires 6% less work that a simple stripper. The oxidative degradation of piperazine proceeds more slowly than that of monoethanolamine and produces ethylenediamine and other products. Uninhibited 5 m KHCO{sub 3}/2.5 m PZ corrodes 5 to 6 times faster that 30% MEA with 0.2 mol CO{sub 2}/mol MEA.

  4. Calcium and chemical looping technology for power generation and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture solid oxygen- and CO2-carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Fennell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and Chemical Looping Technology for Power Generation and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture reviews the fundamental principles, systems, oxygen carriers, and carbon dioxide carriers relevant to chemical looping and combustion. Chapters review the market development, economics, and deployment of these systems, also providing detailed information on the variety of materials and processes that will help to shape the future of CO2 capture ready power plants. Reviews the fundamental principles, systems, oxygen carriers, and carbon dioxide carriers relevant to calcium and chemical loopingProvi

  5. Challenges and opportunities for microalgae-mediated CO2 capture and biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Jyoti R; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-07-01

    Aquacultures of microalgae are frontrunners for photosynthetic capture of CO2 from flue gases. Expedient implementation mandates coupling of microalgal CO2 capture with synthesis of fuels and organic products, so as to derive value from biomass. An integrated biorefinery complex houses a biomass growth and harvesting area and a refining zone for conversion to product(s) and separation to desired purity levels. As growth and downstream options require energy and incur loss of carbon, put together, the loop must be energy positive, carbon negative, or add substantial value. Feasibility studies can, thus, aid the choice from among the rapidly evolving technological options, many of which are still in the early phases of development. We summarize basic engineering calculations for the key steps of a biorefining loop where flue gases from a thermal power station are captured using microalgal biomass along with subsequent options for conversion to fuel or value added products. An assimilation of findings from recent laboratory and pilot-scale experiments and life cycle analysis (LCA) studies is presented as carbon and energy yields for growth and harvesting of microalgal biomass and downstream options. Of the biorefining options, conversion to the widely studied biofuel, ethanol, and manufacture of the platform chemical, succinic acid are presented. Both processes yield specific products and do not demand high-energy input but entail 60-70% carbon loss through fermentative respiration. Thermochemical conversions, on the other hand, have smaller carbon and energy losses but yield a mixture of products. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. CO2 capture by biomimetic adsorption: enzyme mediated co2 absorption for post-combustion carbon sequestration and storage process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, M.E.; Olivieri, G.; Salatino, P.; Marzocchella, A.

    2013-01-01

    The huge emission of greenhouse gases from fossil-fuelled power plants is emphasizing the need for efficient Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies. The biomimetic CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions has been recently investigated as a promising innovative alternative for post-combustion CCS.

  7. Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Kurt Zenz; Baclig, Antonio C; Ranjan, Manya; van Nierop, Ernst A; Wilcox, Jennifer; Herzog, Howard J

    2011-12-20

    Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere ("air capture") in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO(2) concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per tonne of CO(2), making it cost competitive with mainstream CO(2) mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO(2) emitting point sources. We investigate the thermodynamic efficiencies of commercial separation systems as well as trace gas removal systems to better understand and constrain the energy requirements and costs of these air capture systems. Our empirical analyses of operating commercial processes suggest that the energetic and financial costs of capturing CO(2) from the air are likely to have been underestimated. Specifically, our analysis of existing gas separation systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mole of CO(2), requiring it to be powered by CO(2)-neutral power sources in order to be CO(2) negative. We estimate that total system costs of an air capture system will be on the order of $1,000 per tonne of CO(2), based on experience with as-built large-scale trace gas removal systems.

  8. Synthesis of mesoporous cerium compound for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guiqing; Tatsuda, Kou; Yoneyama, Yoshiharu; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2017-11-01

    A mesoporous adsorbent was simply synthesized by adding alkaline substances to cerium(III) nitric hydrate. The surface characteristics of the synthesized cerium compound were determined with BET, XRD and TEM analysis. It was found that although the specific surface areas of the synthesized cerium compounds were among about 120-200m2 per gram (BET area) which were smaller than the common used zeolite 13X (BET area 743 m2/g) and activated carbon (BET area 1079 m2/g), but the cerium compounds had excellent performances for CO2 adsorption as well as the CO2 desorption.

  9. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marus Hiilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1,2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

  10. Dynamic Behaviour CO2 Capture and Compression : An Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.; Khakharia, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; De Kler, R.

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  11. Dynamic behaviour CO2 capture and compression: an assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.H.L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Kler, R.F.C. de

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  12. Feasibility study of algae-based CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biomass of microalgae contains approximately 50% carbon, which is commonly obtained from the atmosphere, but can also be taken from commercial sources that produce CO2, such as coal-fired power plants. A study of operational demonstration projects is being undertaken to eval...

  13. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and

  14. On-board co2 capture and storage with metal organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-17

    In general, this disclosure describes method of capturing and storing CO2 on a vehicle. The method includes contacting an vehicle exhaust gas with one or more of a first metal organic framework (MOF) composition sufficient to separate CO2 from the exhaust gas, contacting the separated CO2 with one or more of a second MOF composition sufficient to store the CO2 and wherein the one or more first MOF composition comprises one or more SIFSIX-n-M MOF and wherein M is a metal and n is 2 or 3. Embodiments also describe an apparatus or system for capturing and storing CO2 onboard a vehicle.

  15. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 nanosheets can be dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets achieve CO2 capture capacities up to 73.9 × 10(13) cm(-2) or 42.3 wt%. In contrast to other CO2 capture approaches, the process of CO2 capture/release occurs spontaneously without any energy barriers once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled and reversed by switching on/off the charging voltage. In addition, these negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2 and/or N2. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of experimentally feasible high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  16. A Reversed Photosynthesis-like Process for Light-Triggered CO2 Capture, Release, and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingguan; Liao, Shenglong; Zhang, Shiming; Wang, Yapei

    2017-06-22

    Materials for CO2 capture have been extensively exploited for climate governance and gas separation. However, their regeneration is facing the problems of high energy cost and secondary CO2 contamination. Herein, a reversed photosynthesis-like process is proposed, in which CO2 is absorbed in darkness while being released under light illumination. The process is likely supplementary to natural photosynthesis of plants, in which, on the contrary, CO2 is released during the night. Remarkably, the material used here is able to capture 9.6 wt.% CO2 according to its active component. Repeatable CO2 capture at room temperature and release under light irradiation ensures its convenient and cost-effective regeneration. Furthermore, CO2 released from the system is successfully converted into a stable compound in tandem with specific catalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Aerosol-based Emission, Solvent Degradation, and Corrosion in Post Combustion CO2 Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Khakharia, P.

    2015-01-01

    Global greenhouse gas emissions, especially of CO2, have been increasing tremendously over the past century. This is known to cause not only an increase of temperature, but also a change in our climate. Along with a shift to renewable sources of energy, Carbon Capture and Storage is necessary to mitigate climate change. Power plants are the largest point source of CO2 emissions and therefore, capture of CO2 from such sources is a must. Post Combustion CO2 Capture (PCCC), and specifically abso...

  18. CO2 capture technologies: current status and new directions using supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolding, Helene; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Riisager, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art techniques for CO2 capture are presented and discussed. Post-combustion capture of CO2 by absorption is the technology most easily retrofitted to existing installations, but at present this is not economically viable to install and run. Using ionic liquids instead of aque...

  19. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best K{sup +}/PZ solvent, 4.5 m K{sup +}/4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJ/mole CO{sub 2} when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The oxidative degradation of piperazine or organic acids is reduced significantly by inhibitor A, but the production of ethylenediamine is unaffected. The oxidative degradation of piperazine in 7 m MEA/2 m PZ is catalyzed by Cu{sup ++}. The thermal degradation of MEA becomes significant at 120 C. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA/PZ solvents is increased at greater CO{sub 2} loading. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA

  20. Highly integrated CO2 capture and conversion: Direct synthesis of cyclic carbonates from industrial flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Barthel, Alexander

    2016-02-08

    Robust and selective catalytic systems based on early transition metal halides (Y, Sc, Zr) and organic nucleophiles were found able to quantitatively capture CO2 from diluted streams via formation of hemicarbonate species and to convert it to cyclic organic carbonates under ambient conditions. This observation was exploited in the direct and selective chemical fixation of flue gas CO2 collected from an industrial exhaust, affording high degrees of CO2 capture and conversion.

  1. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of dolomite decomposition under CO2 on its multicycle CO2 capture behaviour under calcium looping conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle Martos, Antonio; Valverde, Jose Manuel; Sanchez-Jimenez, Pedro E; Perejón, Antonio; García-Garrido, Cristina; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2016-06-28

    One of the major drawbacks that hinder the industrial competitiveness of the calcium looping (CaL) process for CO2 capture is the high temperature (∼930-950 °C) needed in practice to attain full calcination of limestone in a high CO2 partial pressure environment for short residence times as required. In this work, the multicycle CO2 capture performance of dolomite and limestone is analysed under realistic CaL conditions and using a reduced calcination temperature of 900 °C, which would serve to mitigate the energy penalty caused by integration of the CaL process into fossil fuel fired power plants. The results show that the fundamental mechanism of dolomite decomposition under CO2 has a major influence on its superior performance compared to limestone. The inert MgO grains resulting from dolomite decomposition help preserve a nanocrystalline CaO structure wherein carbonation in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase is promoted. The major role played by the dolomite decomposition mechanism under CO2 is clearly demonstrated by the multicycle CaO conversion behaviour observed for samples decomposed at different preheating rates. Limestone decomposition at slow heating rates yields a highly crystalline and poorly reactive CaCO3 structure that requires long periods to fully decarbonate and shows a severely reduced capture capacity in subsequent cycles. On the other hand, the nascent CaCO3 produced after dolomite half-decomposition consists of nanosized crystals with a fast decarbonation kinetics regardless of the preheating rate, thus fully decomposing from the very first cycle at a reduced calcination temperature into a CaO skeleton with enhanced reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO.

  3. Integrating MEA Regeneration with CO2 Compression and Peaking to Reduce CO2 Capture Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin S. Fisher; Carrie Beitler; Curtis Rueter; Katherine Searcy; Dr. Gary Rochelle; Dr. Majeed Jassim

    2005-06-09

    Capturing CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants is a necessary component of any large-scale effort to reduce anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. Conventional absorption/stripping with monoethanolamine (MEA) or similar solvents is the most likely current process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the flue gas at these facilities. However, one of the largest problems with MEA absorption/stripping is that conventional process configurations have energy requirements that result in large reductions in the net power plant output. Several alternative process configurations for reducing these parasitic energy requirements were investigated in this research with the assistance of the Platte River Power Authority, based on recovering energy from the CO{sub 2} compression train and using that energy in the MEA regeneration step. In addition, the feasibility of selective operation of the amine system at a higher CO{sub 2} removal efficiency during non-peak electricity demand periods was also evaluated. Four process configurations were evaluated: A generic base case MEA system with no compression heat recovery, CO{sub 2} vapor recompression heat recovery, and multipressure stripping with and without vapor recompression heat recovery. These configurations were simulated using a rigorous rate-based model, and the results were used to prepare capital and operating cost estimates. CO{sub 2} capture economics are presented, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture (cost per tonne avoided) is compared among the base case and the alternative process configurations. Cost savings per tonne of CO{sub 2} avoided ranged from 4.3 to 9.8 percent. Energy savings of the improved configurations (8-10%, freeing up 13 to 17 MW of power for sale to the grid based on 500 MW unit ) clearly outweighed the modest increases in capital cost to implement them; it is therefore likely that one of these improved configurations would be used whenever MEA-based (or similar) scrubbing technologies are implemented. In fact

  4. NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S

    2008-09-22

    A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

  5. COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-03-30

    Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

  6. Tuning the Surface Polarity of Microporous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Li, He; Zhong, Mingmei; Yang, Qihua

    2017-09-05

    CO2 capture is very important to reduce the CO2 concentration in atmosphere. Herein, we report the preparation of microporous polymers with tunable surface polarity for CO2 capture. Porous polymers functionalized with -NH2 , -SO3 H, and -SO3 Li have been successfully prepared by using a post-synthesis modification of microporous polymers (P-PhPh3 prepared with 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene as the monomer and AlCl3 as the catalyst) by chemical transformations, such as nitration-reduction, sulfonation, and cationic exchange. The CO2 adsorption selectivity (CO2 /N2 and CO2 /H2 ) and isosteric heats of the microporous polymers increase markedly after modification, P-PhPh3 -NH2 and P-PhPh3 -SO3 Li afford higher CO2 uptake capacity than P-PhPh3 at pressures of less than 0.15 bar due to the enhanced interaction between CO2 and the -NH2 and -SO3 Li functional groups. Moreover, functionalized porous polymers could be stably used for CO2 capture. Surface modification is an efficient approach to tune the CO2 capture properties of porous polymers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. High efficiency nanocomposite sorbents for CO2 capture based on amine-functionalized mesoporous capsules

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel high efficiency nanocomposite sorbent for CO2 capture has been developed based on oligomeric amine (polyethylenimine, PEI, and tetraethylenepentamine, TEPA) functionalized mesoporous silica capsules. The newly synthesized sorbents exhibit extraordinary capture capacity up to 7.9 mmol g-1 under simulated flue gas conditions (pre-humidified 10% CO 2). The CO2 capture kinetics were found to be fast and reached 90% of the total capacities within the first few minutes. The effects of the mesoporous capsule features such as particle size and shell thickness on CO2 capture capacity were investigated. Larger particle size, higher interior void volume and thinner mesoporous shell thickness all improved the CO2 capacity of the sorbents. PEI impregnated sorbents showed good reversibility and stability during cyclic adsorption-regeneration tests (50 cycles). © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. CO(2) capture from dilute gases as a component of modern global carbon management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    The growing atmospheric CO(2) concentration and its impact on climate have motivated widespread research and development aimed at slowing or stemming anthropogenic carbon emissions. Technologies for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) employing mass separating agents that extract and purify CO(2) from flue gas emanating from large point sources such as fossil fuel-fired electricity-generating power plants are under development. Recent advances in solvents, adsorbents, and membranes for postcombust- ion CO(2) capture are described here. Specifically, room-temperature ionic liquids, supported amine materials, mixed matrix and facilitated transport membranes, and metal-organic framework materials are highlighted. In addition, the concept of extracting CO(2) directly from ambient air (air capture) as a means of reducing the global atmospheric CO(2) concentration is reviewed. For both conventional CCS from large point sources and air capture, critical research needs are identified and discussed.

  9. CO 2 Capture from Dilute Gases as a Component of Modern Global Carbon Management

    KAUST Repository

    Jones, Christopher W.

    2011-07-15

    The growing atmospheric CO2 concentration and its impact on climate have motivated widespread research and development aimed at slowing or stemming anthropogenic carbon emissions. Technologies for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) employing mass separating agents that extract and purify CO2 from flue gas emanating from large point sources such as fossil fuel-fired electricity-generating power plants are under development. Recent advances in solvents, adsorbents, and membranes for postcombust- ion CO 2 capture are described here. Specifically, room-temperature ionic liquids, supported amine materials, mixed matrix and facilitated transport membranes, and metal-organic framework materials are highlighted. In addition, the concept of extracting CO2 directly from ambient air (air capture) as a means of reducing the global atmospheric CO2 concentration is reviewed. For both conventional CCS from large point sources and air capture, critical research needs are identified and discussed. © Copyright 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  10. Power to fuel using electrolysis and CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Graves, Christopher R.; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of renewable electricity to synthetic fuel using electrolysis to produce at H2 and CO, which is furtherused to form liquid or gaseous fuel, called “power to fuel” or “power2fuel” has got a lot of attention recently.This is because synthetic fuels (synfuels) in the form CO2 neutral “green......” hydrocarbon fuels seem particularlybenign to replace the fossil fuels, and electrolysis seems to be a feasible step in production of green fuels. In particular, synthetic hydrocarbon based fuel will be necessary for the heavy transportation vehicles such as airplanes, ships, and trucks. More than 65...... % of the cost of H2 produced by electrolysis originates from electricity cost. How much more depends on the actual electricity price and depends further on efficiency, investment cost and lifetime of electrolyzer. Investment costs are inversely proportional the current density at a given cell voltage...

  11. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas using Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    The reversible absorption of CO2 into a chemical solvent is currently the leading CO2 capture technology. Available solvents are almost exclusively based on aqueous alkanolamine solutions, which entail both economic and environmental complications, making the commercialization of the technology...... difficult. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions. A number of advantages make amino acid salt solutions attractive solvents for CO2 capture from flue gas. In the present study CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions of 0.5 M potassium glycinate and 0.5 M...

  12. Reducing the cost of Ca-based direct air capture of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Frank

    2014-10-07

    Direct air capture, the chemical removal of CO2 directly from the atmosphere, may play a role in mitigating future climate risk or form the basis of a sustainable transportation infrastructure. The current discussion is centered on the estimated cost of the technology and its link to "overshoot" trajectories, where atmospheric CO2 levels are actively reduced later in the century. The American Physical Society (APS) published a report, later updated, estimating the cost of a one million tonne CO2 per year air capture facility constructed today that highlights several fundamental concepts of chemical air capture. These fundamentals are viewed through the lens of a chemical process that cycles between removing CO2 from the air and releasing the absorbed CO2 in concentrated form. This work builds on the APS report to investigate the effect of modifications to the air capture system based on suggestions in the report and subsequent publications. The work shows that reduced carbon electricity and plastic packing materials (for the contactor) may have significant effects on the overall price, reducing the APS estimate from $610 to $309/tCO2 avoided. Such a reduction does not challenge postcombustion capture from point sources, estimated at $80/tCO2, but does make air capture a feasible alternative for the transportation sector and a potential negative emissions technology. Furthermore, air capture represents atmospheric reductions rather than simply avoided emissions.

  13. Field experiment on CO2 back-production at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Sonja; Möller, Fabian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Streibel, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Liebscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    The operational phase of the Ketzin pilot site for geological CO2 storage in Germany started in June 2008 and ended in August 2013. Over the period of approximately five years, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was successfully injected into a saline aquifer (Upper Triassic sandstone) at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. The CO2 used was mainly of food grade quality. In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (lignite power plant CO2) was used in 2011. At the end of the injection period, 32 t N2 and 613 t CO2 were co-injected during a four-week field test in July and August 2013. In October 2014, a field experiment was carried out at Ketzin with the aim to back-produce parts of the injected CO2 during a two-week period. This experiment addressed two main questions: (i) How do reservoir and wellbore behave during back-production of CO2? and (ii) What is the composition of the CO2 and the co-produced formation fluid? The back-production was carried out through the former injection well. It was conducted continuously over the first week and with an alternating regime including production during day-time and shut-ins during night-time in the second week. During the test, a total amount of 240 t of CO2 and 57 m3 of brine were safely back-produced from the reservoir. Production rates up to 3,200 kg/h - which corresponds to the former highest injection rate - could be tested. Vital monitoring parameters included production rates of CO2 and brine, wellhead and bottomhole pressure and temperature at the production and observation wells and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) along the production well. A permanently installed geoelectrical array was used for crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of the reservoir. Formation fluid and gas samples were collected and analysed. The measured compositions allow studying the geochemical interactions between CO2, formation fluid and rocks under in-situ conditions The field experiment

  14. N2-CO2 co-injection field test at the Ketzin pilot CO2 storage site

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Fischer; Martin Zimmer; Alexandra Szizybalski; Christian Kujawa; B. Plessen; A. Liebscher; F. Moeller;  & the Ketzin Team

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2013, a four week N2-CO2 co-injection field test was conducted at the Ketzin pilot site. Major objectives were (i) demonstrating the technical feasibility of a continuous N2-CO2 co-injection scenario, (ii) monitoring wellhead and reservoir pressure, (iii) monitoring spreading and behavior of the CO2-N2 gas mixture in the reservoir, and (iv) analyzing potential chromatographic effects within the reservoir. 10,000 L (10 Nm3) of krypton (Kr) were injected as an additional conservative ...

  15. European and global perspectives for CO2 capture and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenenberg, H.; Uyterlinde, M. [ECN Policy Studies (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly mentioned as one of the options in the portfolio to mitigate climate change. CCS involves the capture of CO{sub 2} from a large point source, compression, transport and subsequent storage in a geological reservoir, the ocean, or in mineral carbonates. This paper will provide results of the scenarios analysed using 10 advanced energy models. Two policy approaches are compared in order to address the question how to achieve significant CO{sub 2} emission reductions through the application of CCS technologies. The analysis shows that CCS can provide an important contribution to mitigating climate change. Up to 30% of global CO{sub 2} emissions could be captured in 2050, while for Europe, due to a more limited growth of the power sector than in some other world regions, this would amount to some 22% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. The CCS policies not only induce the large-scale introduction of CCS systems in the electricity sector, but they also accelerate the penetration of renewable energy sources and nuclear. Policies that provide flexibility, for instance through emission trading, are more cost-effective than those obliging CCS to be installed with all new fossil power plants. Therefore, it is recommended to employ mixes of the different CO{sub 2} emission reduction options available, also depending on regional circumstances. The uncertainties, particularly in storage capacities, are large. Being a new technology, the actual deployment of CCS will also depend on public perception and on how legal and regulatory aspects related to risks and liabilities are addressed. (au)

  16. Hollow fiber membrane contactors for CO2 capture: modeling and up-scaling to CO2 capture for an 800 MWe coal power station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Al-Azki, A.; Gomez, A.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Booth, N.; Adams, D.; Ferre, D.

    2014-01-01

    A techno-economic analysis was completed to compare the use of Hollow Fiber Membrane Modules (HFMM) with the more conventional structured packing columns as the absorber in amine-based CO2capture systems for power plants. In order to simulate the operation of industrial scale HFMMsystems, a

  17. The role of CO2 capture and utilization in mitigating climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Dowell, Niall; Fennell, Paul S.; Shah, Nilay; Maitland, Geoffrey C.

    2017-04-01

    To offset the cost associated with CO2 capture and storage (CCS), there is growing interest in finding commercially viable end-use opportunities for the captured CO2. In this Perspective, we discuss the potential contribution of carbon capture and utilization (CCU). Owing to the scale and rate of CO2 production compared to that of utilization allowing long-term sequestration, it is highly improbable the chemical conversion of CO2 will account for more than 1% of the mitigation challenge, and even a scaled-up enhanced oil recovery (EOR)-CCS industry will likely only account for 4-8%. Therefore, whilst CO2-EOR may be an important economic incentive for some early CCS projects, CCU may prove to be a costly distraction, financially and politically, from the real task of mitigation.

  18. More Energy-Efficient CO2 Capture from IGCC GE Flue Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakpong Peampermpool

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are one of the main reasons for the increase in greenhouse gasses in the earth’s atmosphere and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS is known as an effective method to reduce CO2 emissions on a larger scale, such as for fossil energy utilization systems. In this paper, the feasibility of capturing CO2 using cryogenic liquefaction and improving the capture rate by expansion will be discussed. The main aim was to design an energy-saving scheme for an IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 cryogenic liquefaction capture. The experimental results provided by the authors, using the feed gas specification of a 740 MW IGCC General Electric (GE combustion power plant, demonstrated that using an orifice for further expanding the vent gas after cryogenic capture from 57 bar to 24 bar gave an experimentally observed capture rate up to 65%. The energy-saving scheme can improve the overall CO2 capture rate, and hence save energy. The capture process has also been simulated using Aspen HYSYS simulation software to evaluate its energy penalty. The results show that a 92% overall capture rate can be achieved by using an orifice.

  19. Preparation Methods of Metal Organic Frameworks and Their Capture of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linjian; Liand, Fangqin; Luo, Liangfei

    2018-01-01

    The increasingly serious greenhouse effect makes people pay more attention to the capture and storage technology of CO2. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have the advantages of high specific surface area, porous structure and controllable structure, and become the research focus of CO2 emission reduction technology in recent years. In this paper, the characteristics, preparation methods and application of MOFs in the field of CO2 adsorption and separation are discussed, especially the application of flue gas environment in power plants.

  20. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Marcus Hilliard; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Ross Dugas; John McLees; Andrew Sexton; Daniel Ellenberger

    2005-10-26

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Modeling of stripper performance suggests that vacuum stripping may be an attractive configuration for all solvents. Flexipac 1Y structured packing performs in the absorber as expected. It provides twice as much mass transfer area as IMTP No.40 dumped packing. Independent measurements of CO{sub 2} solubility give a CO{sub 2} loading that is 20% lower than that Cullinane's values with 3.6 m PZ at 100-120 C. The effective mass transfer coefficient (K{sub G}) in the absorber with 5 m K/2.5 m PZ appears to be 0 to 30% greater than that of 30 wt% MEA.

  1. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Amornvadee Veawab

    2006-09-30

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Ethylenediamine was detected in a degraded solution of MEA/PZ solution, suggesting that piperazine is subject to oxidation. Stripper modeling has demonstrated that vacuum strippers will be more energy efficient if constructed short and fat rather than tall and skinny. The matrix stripper has been identified as a configuration that will significantly reduce energy use. Extensive measurements of CO{sub 2} solubility in 7 m MEA at 40 and 60 C have confirmed the work by Jou and Mather. Corrosion of carbon steel without inhibitors increases from 19 to 181 mpy in lean solutions of 6.2 m MEA/PZ as piperazine increases from 0 to 3.1 m.

  2. Ca-looping for postcombustion CO2 capture: A comparative analysis on the performances of dolomite and limestone

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde, J.M.; Sánchez-Jiménez, P.E.; Pérez-Maqueda, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. The low cost and wide availability of natural limestone (CaCO3) is at the basis of the industrial competitiveness of the Ca-looping (CaL) technology for postcombustion CO2 capture as already demonstrated by ~1Mwt scale pilot projects. A major focus of studies oriented towards further improving the efficiency of the CaL technology is how to prevent the gradual loss of capture capacity of limestone derived CaO as the number of carbonation/calcination cycles is increased. Na...

  3. Next generation post-combustion capture: combined CO2 and SO2 removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misiak, K.; Sanchez Sanchez, C.; Os, P.J. van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    A major consideration for post-combustion CO2 capture is the adverse effect of the presence of SO2 on the absorption desorption process. The most common approach is to remove the SO2 from the flue gases in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) unit prior the CO2 recovery process. This paper reports the

  4. Kinetic analysis of an anion exchange absorbent for CO2 capture from ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoyang; Li, Qibin; Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S

    2017-01-01

    This study reports a preparation method of a new moisture swing sorbent for CO2 capture from air. The new sorbent components include ion exchange resin (IER) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as a binder. The IER can absorb CO2 when surrounding is dry and release CO2 when surrounding is wet. The manuscript presents the studies of membrane structure, kinetic model of absorption process, performance of desorption process and the diffusivity of water molecules in the CO2 absorbent. It has been proved that the kinetic performance of CO2 absorption/desorption can be improved by using thin binder and hot water treatment. The fast kinetics of P-100-90C absorbent is due to the thin PVC binder, and high diffusion rate of H2O molecules in the sample. The impressive is this new CO2 absorbent has the fastest CO2 absorption rate among all absorbents which have been reported by other up-to-date literatures.

  5. A Methodology for a Sustainable CO2 Capture and Utilization Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Fjellerup, Kasper; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    are being investigated and implemented [1]. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the dominant method that is discussed. However, CO2 utilization is receiving increased attention for its ability to help in long-term CO2 reduction and the formation of various chemical products. One of the primary elements...... is the sustainable linkage of carbon capture to produce the CO2 feed and the subsequent conversion processes. A manipulation of an MEA absorption process, the current industrial standard for carbon capture [2], is investigated. The resulting CO2 stream can be directly fed into a variety of conversion processes...... hydrogenation highlights the application. This case study illustrates the utility of the utilization network and elements of the methodology being developed. In addition, the conversion process is linked with carbon capture to evaluate the overall sustainability. Finally, the production of the other raw...

  6. Carbon-Based Adsorbents for Postcombustion CO2 Capture: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Anne Elise; Gao, Bin

    2016-07-19

    The persistent increase in atmospheric CO2 from anthropogenic sources makes research directed toward carbon capture and storage imperative. Current liquid amine absorption technology has several drawbacks including hazardous byproducts and a high-energy requirement for regeneration; therefore, research is ongoing to develop more practical methods for capturing CO2 in postcombustion scenarios. The unique properties of carbon-based materials make them specifically promising for CO2 adsorption at low temperature and moderate to high partial pressure. This critical review aims to highlight the development of carbon-based solid sorbents for postcombustion CO2 capture. Specifically, it provides an overview of postcombustion CO2 capture processes with solid adsorbents and discusses a variety of carbon-based materials that could be used. This review focuses on low-cost pyrogenic carbon, activated carbon (AC), and metal-carbon composites for CO2 capture. Further, it touches upon the recent progress made to develop metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and carbon nanomaterials and their general CO2 sorption potential.

  7. Application of advanced technologies for CO2 capture from industrial sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, M.C. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Anantharaman, R. [SINTEF Energy Research, Sem Saelands vei 11, 7465 Trondheim (Norway); Arasto, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Ozcan, D.C.; Ahnd, Hyungwoong [IMP-SEE, The University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Dijkstra, J.W.; Carbo, M. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Boavida, D. [LNEG - Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22 Edif J, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    The great majority of the research on CO2 capture worldwide is today devoted to the integration of new technologies in power plants, which are responsible for about 80% of the worldwide CO2 emission from large stationary sources. The remaining 20% are emitted from industrial sources, mainly cement production plants ({approx}7% of the total emission), refineries ({approx}6%) and iron and steel industry ({approx}5%). Despite their lower overall contribution, the CO2 concentration in flue gas and the average emission per source can be higher than in power plants. Therefore, application of CO2 capture processes on these sources can be more effective and can lead to competitive cost of the CO2 avoided with respect to power plants. Furthermore, industrial CO2 capture could be an important early-opportunity application, or a facilitate demonstration of capture technology at a relative small scale or in a side stream. This paper results from a collaborative activity carried out within the Joint Programme on Carbon Capture and Storage of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA CCS-JP) and aims at investigating the potentiality of new CO2 technologies in the application on the major industrial emitters.

  8. Capture and separation of CO2 from flue gas by coupling free and immobilized amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yao; Li, Wei

    2002-10-01

    A novel system was proposed for the capture and separation of CO2 from flue gas. In this method, a resin was employed to regenerate the amine capturing CO2 from flue gas at room temperature. The feasibility for the resin to regenerate amines such as MEA, MAE, TEA, and ammonia was demonstrated. It was also discovered that the resin could be regenerated by hot water.

  9. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making

  10. Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Trachtenberg

    2007-05-31

    These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer

  11. CO2 Capture with Liquid-Liquid Phase Change Solvents: A Thermodynamic Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic framework was implemented in this work to model the aqueous blend of N, N-Diethylethanolamine (DEEA) and N-Methyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MAPA) for CO2 capture. The model parameters were estimated first for the two ternary systems, H2O-DEEA-CO2 and H2O-MAPA-CO2, followed...... by the quaternary H2O-DEEAMAPA-CO2 system which gives liquid-liquid phase split when reacted with carbon dioxide. A total of 94 model parameters and 6 thermodynamic properties were fitted to approximately 1500 equilibrium and thermal experimental data consisting of pureamine vapor pressure (Pvap), vapor...

  12. Engineering Carbon-Based Porous Materials from Selected Precursors for High-Capacity CO2 Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, B

    2015-01-01

    The mitigation of climate change is one of the major global challenges in the 21st Century. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a promising technology to effectively reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the Earth’s atmosphere. There are various candidate materials for CO2 capture but each has its own advatanges and disadvantages. Carbon-based materials are of low-cost and have relatively high cyclicity for CO2 and its porous structure and surface functional groups can be tailored to improv...

  13. CO2 capture performance of Ca-Mg acetates at realistic Calcium Looping conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Pizarro, Juan; Perejón, Antonio; Valverde, J.M.; Pérez-Maqueda, Luis A.; Sánchez-Jiménez, P.E.

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium Looping (CaL) process, based on the cyclic carbonation/calcination of CaO, has emerged in the last years as a potentially low cost technique for CO2 capture at reduced energy penalty. In the present work, natural limestone and dolomite have been pretreated with diluted acetic acid to obtain Ca and Ca-Mg mixed acetates, whose CO2 capture performance has been tested at CaL conditions that necessarily imply sorbent regeneration under high CO2 partial pressure. The CaL multicycle capt...

  14. Effect of SO 2 on CO 2 Capture Using Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2013-08-15

    Liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs), consisting of silica nanoparticles with a grafted polymeric canopy, were synthesized. Previous work on NOHMs has revealed that CO2 capture behaviors in these hybrid materials can be tuned by modifying the structure of the polymeric canopy. Because SO2, which is another acidic gas found in flue gas, would also interact with NOHMs, this study was designed to investigate its effect on CO2 capture in NOHMs. In particular, CO2 capture capacities as well as swelling and CO2 packing behaviors of NOHMs were analyzed using thermogravimetric analyses and Raman and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies before and after exposure of NOHMs to SO2. It was found that the SO2 absorption in NOHMs was only prominent at high SO2 levels (i.e., 3010 ppm; Ptot = 0.4 MPa) far exceeding the typical SO2 concentration in flue gas. As expected, the competitive absorption between SO2 and CO2 for the same absorption sites (i.e., ether and amine groups) resulted in a decreased CO2 capture capacity of NOHMs. The swelling of NOHMs was not notably affected by the presence of SO 2 within the given concentration range (Ptot = 0-0.68 MPa). On the other hand, SO2, owing to its Lewis acidic nature, interacted with the ether groups of the polymeric canopy and, thus, changed the CO2 packing behaviors in NOHMs. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Post-Combustion CO2 capture using supported amine sorbents: A process integration study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, Rens; Kamphuis, H.; Kamphuis, H.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of supported amine sorbents (SAS) for their application in post- combustion CO2 capture. For this, the energy efficiency of a power plant equipped with a supported amine based capture facility is compared with the energy efficiency of a power plant equipped with a

  16. Guidelines for process development and future cost reduction of CO 2 post-combustion capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, M.R.M.; Fernandez, E.S.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a perspective is given on the development lines for CO 2 post-combustion capture technology. Guidelines for cost reductions and suggestions for future research on solvent and process development are presented. By analyzing the post-combustion capture process in this work, it is evident

  17. Advanced Amine Solvent Formulations and Process Integration for Near-Term CO2 Capture Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Kevin S.; Searcy, Katherine; Rochelle, Gary T.; Ziaii, Sepideh; Schubert, Craig

    2007-06-28

    This Phase I SBIR project investigated the economic and technical feasibility of advanced amine scrubbing systems for post-combustion CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Numerous combinations of advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were screened for energy requirements, and three cases were selected for detailed analysis: a monoethanolamine (MEA) base case and two “advanced” cases: an MEA/Piperazine (PZ) case, and a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) / PZ case. The MEA/PZ and MDEA/PZ cases employed an advanced “double matrix” stripper configuration. The basis for calculations was a model plant with a gross capacity of 500 MWe. Results indicated that CO2 capture increased the base cost of electricity from 5 cents/kWh to 10.7 c/kWh for the MEA base case, 10.1 c/kWh for the MEA / PZ double matrix, and 9.7 c/kWh for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. The corresponding cost per metric tonne CO2 avoided was 67.20 $/tonne CO2, 60.19 $/tonne CO2, and 55.05 $/tonne CO2, respectively. Derated capacities, including base plant auxiliary load of 29 MWe, were 339 MWe for the base case, 356 MWe for the MEA/PZ double matrix, and 378 MWe for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. When compared to the base case, systems employing advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were estimated to reduce reboiler steam requirements by 20 to 44%, to reduce derating due to CO2 capture by 13 to 30%, and to reduce the cost of CO2 avoided by 10 to 18%. These results demonstrate the potential for significant improvements in the overall economics of CO2 capture via advanced solvent formulations and process configurations.

  18. Assessment of CO2 storage performance of the Enhanced Coalbed Methane pilot site in Kaniow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, F. van; Winthaegen, P.; Pagnier, H.; Krzystolik, P.; Jura, B.; Skiba, J.; Wageningen, N. van

    2009-01-01

    A pilot site for CO2 storage in coal seams was set-up in Poland, as has been reported on previous GHGT conferences. This site consisted of one injection and one production well. About 760 ton of CO2 has been injected into the reservoir from August 2004 to June 2005. Breakthrough of the injected CO2

  19. CO2 capture. Two new structures in the 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) – water – CO2 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhl, Kenny; Neerup, Randi; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2016-01-01

    for such CO2 capture. The problem is to make the absorption/desorption processes energetically and thereby economically viable. One process under investigation involves alkanoamines as absorbents in aqueous solutions. In these systems CO2 is captured either by carbonate and/orcarbamate formation. We have......Energy production and transportation is responsible for more than 60 % of our CO2 emission. In particular coal-fired power plants are big contributors. However, these large scale facilities offer the possibility to effective CO2 capture through post-combustion processes. There are several options...... studied the 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) and the AMP-water phase diagramand its ability for CO2 capture. The first crystal structure in the AMP – water system has been solved from powder diffraction data: AMP trihydrate (triclinic, P-1, a = 6.5897(3), b = 6.399 (2), c = 6.3399(2) Å and α = 92.40 (3...

  20. Lithium-functionalized germanene: A promising media for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Aghaei, S.; Monshi, M. M.; Torres, I.; Banakermani, M.; Calizo, I.

    2018-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is employed to investigate the interactions of CO2 gas molecules with pristine and lithium-functionalized germanene. It is discovered that although a single CO2 molecule is weakly physisorbed on pristine germanene, a significant improvement on its adsorption energy is found by utilizing Li-functionalized germanene as the adsorbent. Excitingly, the moderate adsorption energy at high CO2 coverage secures an easy release step. Moreover, the structure of Li-functionalized germanene can be fully recovered after removal of CO2 gas molecules. Our results suggest that Li-functionalized germanene show promise for CO2 sensing and capture with a storage capacity of 12.57 mol/kg.

  1. CO2 Capture from Flue gas using Amino acid salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    to storage. Typical solvents for the process are based on aqueous solutions of alkanolamines, such as mono-ethanolamine (MEA), but their use implies economic disadvantages and environmental complications. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamines, partlybecause...... to the concept of using amino acids salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture, it includes a description of general amino acids chemistry and an outline of the chemical reactions involved in CO2 absorption into amino acids salt solutions. Chapter 4 deals with the description and validation of the new apparatus...... for measuring of CO2 solubility based on the semi-flow method. A validation study of CO2 solubility in aqueous solutions of MEA is presented. Chapter 5 focuses on the determination of the chemical compositions of the precipitations, which arise in the five amino acid salt solutions upon CO2 absorption...

  2. Nanoporous amide networks based on tetraphenyladamantane for selective CO2capture

    KAUST Repository

    Zulfiqar, Sonia

    2016-04-19

    Reduction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and CO2 separation from post-combustion flue gases are among the imperative issues in the spotlight at present. Hence, it is highly desirable to develop efficient adsorbents for mitigating climate change with possible energy savings. Here, we report the design of a facile one pot catalyst-free synthetic protocol for the generation of three different nitrogen rich nanoporous amide networks (NANs) based on tetraphenyladamantane. Besides the porous architecture, CO2 capturing potential and high thermal stability, these NANs possess notable CO2/N2 selectivity with reasonable retention while increasing the temperature from 273 K to 298 K. The quantum chemical calculations also suggest that CO2 interacts mainly in the region of polar amide groups (-CONH-) present in NANs and this interaction is much stronger than that with N2 thus leading to better selectivity and affirming them as promising contenders for efficient gas separation. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.

  3. Optimal synthesis of a pressure swing adsorption process for CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2008-01-01

    The emission of carbon dioxide from cement industry and power plants that burn fossil fuels is the major cause for the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere, which causes long-range environmental problems. One option to mitigate the emission of CO2 is to capture it from the emission sources and store it to the ocean or depleted oil field or use it for enhanced oil recovery. CO2 recovery has been achieved by gas absorption employing solutions of carbonates and alkanolamines. However, this process is energy-intensive for the regeneration of solvent and also faces problems due to corrosion. Recently, the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process has been considered as an alternative to the absorption process. PSA processes have been widely applied for the removal of CO2 from various feed mixtures, such as CO2 in the steam reformer off gas, landfill gas and natural gas. In all these commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. On the other hand, for the capture of CO2 for sequestration, it is necessary to concentrate the CO2 to a high purity to reduce the compression and transportation cost. Thus, it is necessary to develop a PSA cycle by which a high-purity product for the strongly adsorbed component with a high recovery is obtained. A multitude of PSA cycles and adsorbents have been developed for producing highly pure heavy component (CO2) from feedstock with low CO2 concentration. Kikkinides et al. suggested a 4-bed 4-step process with activated carbon as the sorbent and could recover 68% of CO2 at 99.997% purity. Chue et al. compared activated carbon and zeolite 13X on a 3-bed 7-step process and concluded that the latter is better than the former for CO2 recovery. However, the CO2 recovery was low in their process due to the lack of a countercurrent step in the chosen cycle. Choi et al. reported more than 70% CO2 recovery at more than 90% purity for a modified 3

  4. Electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture: first principle computational exploration of carbon nanotubes with pyridinic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Smith, Sean C; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes with specific nitrogen doping are proposed for controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO2 capture. Using density functional theory incorporating long-range dispersion corrections, we investigated the adsorption behavior of CO2 on (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with several nitrogen doping configurations and varying charge states. Pyridinic-nitrogen incorporation in CNTs is found to induce an increasing CO2 adsorption strength with electron injecting, leading to a highly selective CO2 adsorption in comparison with N2 . This functionality could induce intrinsically reversible CO2 adsorption as capture/release can be controlled by switching the charge carrying state of the system on/off. This phenomenon is verified for a number of different models and theoretical methods, with clear ramifications for the possibility of implementation with a broader class of graphene-based materials. A scheme for the implementation of this remarkable reversible electrocatalytic CO2 -capture phenomenon is considered. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. CO2 capture and storage in Greece: A case study from komotini ngcc power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koukouzas Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the possibilities for the abatement of CO2 emissions in the Greek fossil fuel power generation sector. An overview of CO2 capture, transportation, and storage concepts, on which the R&D community is focused, is presented. The implementation of post-combustion CO2 capture options in an existing fossil fuel power plant is then examined and the consequences on the overall plant performance are determined. Finally, the possibilities of transportation and then underground storage of the pure CO2 stream are analyzed taking into account both technical and economical factors. The results of this analysis show that CO2 sequestration is technically feasible for existing fossil fuel fired power plants in Greece. However, substantial reduction in plant efficiency is observed due to increased energy demand of the technologies used as well as in electricity production cost due to capital and operation costs of capture, transport, and storage of CO2. .

  6. Anion-activated, thermoreversible gelation system for the capture, release, and visual monitoring of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Lee, Songyi; Liu, Yifan; Lee, Minji; Yin, Jun; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2014-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important green house gas. This is providing an incentive to develop new strategies to detect and capture CO2. Achieving both functions within a single molecular system represents an unmet challenge in terms of molecular design and could translate into enhanced ease of use. Here, we report an anion-activated chemosensor system, NAP-chol 1, that permits dissolved CO2 to be detected in organic media via simple color changes or through ratiometric differences in fluorescence intensity. NAP-chol 1 also acts as a super gelator for DMSO. The resulting gel is transformed into a homogeneous solution upon exposure to fluoride anions. Bubbling with CO2 regenerates the gel. Subsequent flushing with N2 or heating serves to release the CO2 and reform the sol form. This series of transformations is reversible and can be followed by easy-to-discern color changes. Thus, NAP-chol 1 allows for the capture and release of CO2 gas while acting as a three mode sensing system. In particular, it permits CO2 to be detected through reversible sol-gel transitions, simple changes in color, or ratiometric monitoring of the differences in the fluorescence features.

  7. Experimental validation of a rate-based model for CO2 capture using an AMP solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Jostein; Svendsen, H. F.; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2007-01-01

    Detailed experimental data, including temperature profiles over the absorber, for a carbon dioxide (CO"2) absorber with structured packing in an integrated laboratory pilot plant using an aqueous 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) solution are presented. The experimental gas-liquid material balance...

  8. Alkyl amine and vegetable oil mixture-a viable candidate for CO2 capture and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma Maheswari, A; Palanivelu, K

    2017-02-01

    In this present work, the absorption of CO2 in alkyl amines and vegetable oil mixture has been evaluated. The results showed that the absorption is higher in alkyl amines and vegetable oil mixture compared with the aqueous alkyl amines. In addition to that, by employing the greener and non-toxic vegetable oil media, the CO2 gas has been captured as well as converted into value-added products, such as carbamates of ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine, and triethylenetetramine. The carbamates have been isolated and characterized by Fourier transform infrared and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. The formation of these products in precipitate form has not been observed in the case of aqueous medium. Among the various alkyl amine and vegetable oil combinations, triethylenetetramine in coconut oil medium showed the maximum CO2 capture capacity of 72%. The coconut oil used for the process has been recovered, recycled, and reused for 3 cycles. Thus, this novel scheme seems to be a better alternative to conquer the drawback of aqueous amine-based CO2 capture as well as for the capture and utilization of the CO2 gas to gain the value-added products.

  9. Sequential capture of CO2 and SO2 in a pressurized TGA simulating FBC conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Grace, John R; Lim, C Jim; Anthony, Edward J

    2007-04-15

    Four FBC-based processes were investigated as possible means of sequentially capturing SO2 and CO2. Sorbent performance is the key to their technical feasibility. Two sorbents (a limestone and a dolomite) were tested in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (PTGA). The sorbent behaviors were explained based on complex interaction between carbonation, sulfation, and direct sulfation. The best option involved using limestone or dolomite as a SO2-sorbent in a FBC combustor following cyclic CO2 capture. Highly sintered limestone is a good sorbent for SO2 because of the generation of macropores during calcination/carbonation cycling.

  10. Computational investigation of the nitrosation mechanism of piperazine in CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi; Wang, Pan; Ma, Fangfang; Xie, Hong-Bin; He, Ning; Chen, Jingwen

    2017-11-01

    Quantum chemistry calculations and kinetic modeling were performed to investigate the nitrosation mechanism and kinetics of diamine piperazine (PZ), an alternative solvent for widely used monoethanolamine in postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC), by two typical nitrosating agents, NO2(-) and N2O3, in the presence of CO2. Various PZ species and nitrosating agents formed by the reactions of PZ, NO2(-), and N2O3 with CO2 were considered. The results indicated that the reactions of PZ species having NH group with N2O3 contribute the most to the formation of nitrosamines in the absorber unit of PCCC and follow a novel three-step nitrosation mechanism, which is initiated by the formation of a charge-transfer complex. The reactions of all PZ species with NO2(-) proceed more slowly than the reactions of PZ species with ONOCO2(-), formed by the reaction of NO2(-) with CO2. Therefore, the reactions of PZ species with ONOCO2(-) contribute more to the formation of nitrosamines in the desorber unit of PCCC. In view of CO2 effect on the nitrosation reaction of PZ, the effect through the reaction of PZ with CO2 shows a completely different tendency for different nitrosating agents. More importantly, CO2 can greatly accelerate the nitrosation reactions of PZ by NO2(-) through the formation of ONOCO2(-) in the reaction of CO2 with NO2(-). This work can help to better understand the nitrosation mechanism of diamines and in the search for efficient methods to prevent the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines in CO2 capture unit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reversible CO2 Capture by Conjugated Ionic Liquids through Dynamic Covalent Carbon-Oxygen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mingguang; Cao, Ningning; Lin, Wenjun; Luo, Xiaoyan; Chen, Kaihong; Che, Siying; Li, Haoran; Wang, Congmin

    2016-09-08

    The strong chemisorption of CO2 is always accompanied by a high absorption enthalpy, and traditional methods to reduce the absorption enthalpy lead to decreased CO2 capacities. Through the introduction of a large π-conjugated structure into the anion, a dual-tuning approach for the improvement of CO2 capture by anion-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in a high capacity of up to 0.96 molCO2  mol-1IL and excellent reversibility. The increased capacity and improved desorption were supported by quantum chemical calculations, spectroscopic investigations, and thermogravimetric analysis. The increased capacity may be a result of the strengthened dynamic covalent bonds in these π-electron-conjugated structures through anion aggregation upon the uptake of CO2 , and the improved desorption originates from the charge dispersion of interaction sites through the large π-electron delocalization. These results provide important insights into effective strategies for CO2 capture. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. An Innovative Configuration for CO2 Capture by High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Rossi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many technological solutions have been proposed for CO2 capture in the last few years. Most of them are characterized by high costs in terms of energy consumption and, consequently, higher fossil fuel use and higher economic costs. High temperature fuel cells are technological solutions currently developed for energy production with low environmental impact. In CIRIAF—University of Perugia labs, cylindrical geometry, small-sized molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC prototypes were built and tested with good energy production and lifetime performances. In the present work, an innovative application for MCFCs is proposed, and an innovative configuration for CO2 capture/separation is investigated. The plant scheme is based on a reformer and a cylindrical MCFC. MCFCs are the most suitable solutions, because CO2 is used in their operating cycle. An analysis in terms of energy consumption/kgCO2 captured is made by coupling the proposed configuration with a gas turbine plant. The proposed configuration is characterized by a theoretical energy consumption of about 500 kJ/kgCO2, which is quite lower than actual sequestration technologies. An experimental campaign will be scheduled to verify the theoretical findings.

  13. Pre-combustion CO2 capture by transition metal ions embedded in phthalocyanine sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Kun; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Le; Chen, X S; Chan, Siew Hwa; Sun, Qiang

    2012-06-21

    Transition metal (TM) embedded two-dimensional phthalocyanine (Pc) sheets have been recently synthesized in experiments [M. Abel, S. Clair, O. Ourdjini, M. Mossoyan, and L. Porte, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 1203 (2010)], where the transition metal ions are uniformly distributed in porous structures, providing the possibility of capturing gas molecules. Using first principles and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, TMPc sheets (TM = Sc, Ti, and Fe) are studied for pre-combustion CO(2) capture by considering the adsorptions of H(2)/CO(2) gas mixtures. It is found that ScPc sheet shows a good selectivity for CO(2), and the excess uptake capacity of single-component CO(2) on ScPc sheet at 298 K and 50 bar is found to be 2949 mg/g, larger than that of any other reported porous materials. Furthermore, electrostatic potential and natural bond orbital analyses are performed to reveal the underlying interaction mechanisms, showing that electrostatic interactions as well as the donation and back donation of electrons between the transition metal ions and the CO(2) molecules play a key role in the capture.

  14. Measurement and Modelling of the Piperazine Potassium Carbonate Solutions for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad

    The climate is in a critical state due to the impact of pollution by CO2 and similar greenhouse gasses. Action needs to be taken in order reduce the emission of harmful components. CO2 capture is one process to help the world population back on track in order to return to normal condition, obtain...... with the purpose of simulating the CO2 capture process. This involves equilibrium studies on physical properties in the activated carbonate solvent. Energy consumption while applying the promoted carbonate solutions using piperazine is given in overview.......The climate is in a critical state due to the impact of pollution by CO2 and similar greenhouse gasses. Action needs to be taken in order reduce the emission of harmful components. CO2 capture is one process to help the world population back on track in order to return to normal condition......, obtaining a sustainable use of natural organic resources. In this work the solid solubility has been measured for the promoted hot carbonate process using piperazine and K2CO3/KHCO3. It entails a comparison of several newly developed methods in order to guarantee the accuracy of determined experimental work...

  15. Detection of CO2 leaks from carbon capture and storage sites with combined atmospheric CO2 and O-2 measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Charlotte; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a transportable instrument that simultaneously measures the CO2 and (relative) O-2 concentration of the atmosphere with the purpose to aid in the detection of CO2 leaks from CCS sites. CO2 and O-2 are coupled in most processes on earth (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration and

  16. Characterization of Qatar's surface carbonates for CO2 capture and thermochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.; Al-Haddad, Ghadeer; Sakellariou, Kyriaki G.; Pagkoura, Chrysa; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2017-06-01

    Samples of surface carbonates were collected from three different areas of the Qatar peninsula. We employed material characterization techniques to examine the morphology and composition of the samples, while their CO2 capture capacity was assessed via multiple successive calcination-carbonation cycles. Our samples were mainly calcite and dolomite based. Calcite samples showed higher initial capacity of around 11 mmol CO2 g-1 which decayed rapidly to less than 2 mmol CO2 g-1. On the other hand, dolomite samples showed an excellent stability (˜15 cycles) with a capacity of 6 mmol CO2 g-1. The performance of the dolomite samples is better compared to other similar natural samples, from literature. A promising result for future studies towards improving their performance by physical and chemical modification.

  17. Efficient Theoretical Screening of Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture Applications*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Luebke, David; Pennline, Henry

    2012-03-31

    By combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations, a theoretical screening methodology to identify the most promising CO2 sorbent candidates from the vast array of possible solid materials has been proposed and validated. The ab initio thermodynamic technique has the advantage of allowing identification of thermodynamic properties of CO2 capture reactions without any experimental input beyond crystallographic structural information of the solid phases involved. For a given solid, the first step is to attempt to extract thermodynamic properties from thermodynamic databases and the available literatures. If the thermodynamic properties of the compound of interest are unknown, an ab initio thermodynamic approach is used to calculate them. These properties expressed conveniently as chemical potentials and heat of reactions, which obtained either from databases or from calculations, are further used for computing the thermodynamic reaction equilibrium properties of the CO2 absorption/desorption cycles. Only those solid materials for which lower capture energy costs are predicted at the desired process conditions are selected as CO2 sorbent candidates and are further considered for experimental validations. Solid sorbents containing alkali and alkaline earth metals have been reported in several previous studies to be good candidates for CO2 sorbent applications due to their high CO2 absorption capacity at moderate working temperatures. In addition to introducing our computational screening procedure, in this presentation we will summarize our results for solid systems composed by alkali and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides, and carbon- ates/bicarbonates to validate our methodology. Additionally, applications of our computational method to mixed solid systems of Li2O with SiO2/ZrO2 with different mixing ratios, our preliminary results showed that increasing the Li2O/SiO2 ratio in

  18. Novel ZIF-300 Mixed-Matrix Membranes for Efficient CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianwei; Zhu, Haipeng; Sun, Jiajia; Mao, Yangyang; Liu, Gongping; Jin, Wanqin

    2017-10-27

    Because of the high separation performance and easy preparation, mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) consisting of metal-organic frameworks have received much attention. In this article, we report a novel ZIF-300/PEBA MMM consisting of zeolite imidazolate framework (ZIF-300) crystals and polyether block amide (PEBA) matrix. The ZIF-300 crystal size was effectively reduced by optimizing the hydrothermal reaction condition from ∼15 to ∼1 μm. The morphology and physicochemical and sorption properties of the synthesized ZIF-300 crystals and as-prepared ZIF-300/PEBA MMMs were systematically studied. The results showed that ZIF-300 crystals with a size of ∼1 μm maintained excellent preferential CO2 sorption over N2 without degradation of the crystal structure in the MMMs. As a result, uniformly incorporated ZIF-300 crystals highly enhanced both the CO2 permeability and the CO2/N2 selectivity of pure PEBA membrane. The optimized ZIF-300-PEBA MMMs with a ZIF-300 loading of 30 wt % exhibited a high and stable CO2 permeability of 83 Barrer and CO2/N2 selectivity of 84, which are 59.2% and 53.5% higher than pure PEBA membrane, respectively. The obtained performance surpassed the upper bound of state-of-the-art membranes for CO2/N2 separation. This work demonstrated that the proposed ZIF-300/PEBA MMM could be a potential candidate for an efficient CO2 capture process.

  19. Kinetic analysis of an anion exchange absorbent for CO2 capture from ambient air.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Shi

    Full Text Available This study reports a preparation method of a new moisture swing sorbent for CO2 capture from air. The new sorbent components include ion exchange resin (IER and polyvinyl chloride (PVC as a binder. The IER can absorb CO2 when surrounding is dry and release CO2 when surrounding is wet. The manuscript presents the studies of membrane structure, kinetic model of absorption process, performance of desorption process and the diffusivity of water molecules in the CO2 absorbent. It has been proved that the kinetic performance of CO2 absorption/desorption can be improved by using thin binder and hot water treatment. The fast kinetics of P-100-90C absorbent is due to the thin PVC binder, and high diffusion rate of H2O molecules in the sample. The impressive is this new CO2 absorbent has the fastest CO2 absorption rate among all absorbents which have been reported by other up-to-date literatures.

  20. Aerosol-based Emission, Solvent Degradation, and Corrosion in Post Combustion CO2 Capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.

    2015-01-01

    Global greenhouse gas emissions, especially of CO2, have been increasing tremendously over the past century. This is known to cause not only an increase of temperature, but also a change in our climate. Along with a shift to renewable sources of energy, Carbon Capture and Storage is necessary to

  1. Benchmarking and comparing first and second generation post combustion CO2 capture technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gaspar, Jozsef; Ehlers, Sören

    2014-01-01

    The Octavius FP7 project focuses on demonstration of CO2 capture for zero emission power generation. As part of this work many partners are involved using different rate based simulation tools to develop tomorrow’s new power plants. A benchmarking is performed, in order to synchronize accuracy...... and quality control the used modeling tools....

  2. CO2 capture in industries and distributed systems: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramochi, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838683

    2011-01-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is considered an important option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Large scale centralized power plants have been the main research focus of CCS, but the potential of CCS in the industry and petroleum refineries is also significant. Moreover, a large transition from

  3. The impacts of CO2 capture on transboundary air pollution in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, J.; Harmelen, T. van; Horssen, A. van; Gijlswijk, R. van; Ramirez, A.; Faaij, A.; Turkenburg, W.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this research is to develop a first assessment of the impacts of the implementation of CO2 capture technologies in the Dutch power sector on the transboundary air pollution (SO2,NOX,NH3,NMV OC,PM10 and PM2.5) levels in 2020. Results show that for the power sector SO2 emissions will be

  4. Metal–organic framework based mixed matrix membranes : A solution for highly efficient CO2 capture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seoane, B.; Coronas, J.; Gascon, I.; Benavides, M.E.; Karvan, O.; Caro, J.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of metal–organic framework based mixed matrix membranes (M4s) is critically reviewed, with special emphasis on their application in CO2 capture during energy generation. After introducing the most relevant parameters affecting membrane performance, we define targets in terms of selectivity

  5. Energetic evaluation of a power plant integrated with a piperazine-based CO2 capture process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvamsdal, H.M.; Romano, M.C.; Ham, L.V. van der; Bonalumi, D.; Os, P.J. van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been applied to obtain more efficient and less cost-intensive absorption-based processes and solvent systems for CO2capture during the last 15–20 years. High concentratedaqueous solutions of piperazine (PZ) have been suggested as a good replacement for the current

  6. CO2 capture in a continuous gas–solid trickle flow reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, Rens; Hilbers, T.J.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the selection, design and experimental validation of a gas–solid trickle flow adsorber for post-combustion CO2 capture using a supported amine sorbents (Lewatit® VP OC 1065). The experimental work presented here summarizes over 300 h of operating experience, which is equivalent

  7. Rational design of temperature swing adsorption cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joss, Lisa; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The design of temperature swing adsorption (TSA) cycles aimed at recovering the heavy product at high purity is investigated by model-based design and applied to the capture of CO2 from flue gases. This model based design strategy and an extensive parametric analysis enables gaining an understanding

  8. NOx reduction using amine reclaimer wastes (ARW) generated in post combustion CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botheju, Deshai; Glarborg, Peter; Tokheim, Lars-Andre

    2012-01-01

    Amine reclaimer wastes (ARW) generated in CO2 capture processes demand suitable disposal means. Such wastes contain remaining amine, NH3 and other degradation compounds. This study investigated the potential of using ARW as a NOx reducing agent, under laboratory conditions in a flow reactor. A si...... to combustion processes, including cement industry kilns....

  9. Acid wash scrubbing as a countermeasure for ammonia emissions from a postcombustion CO2 Capture Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Huizinga, A.; Jurado Lopez, C.; Sanchez Sanchez, C.; Miguel Mercader, F. de; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Amine-based absorption-desorption processes are considered to be the state-of-the-art technology for CO2 capture. However, the typical amines used are susceptible to oxidative and thermal degradation. Ammonia is formed as a result of oxidative solvent degradation. Because of the volatility of

  10. Aerosol-based emission, solvent degradation, and corrosion in post combustion CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.

    2015-01-01

    Global greenhouse gas emissions, especially of CO2, have been increasing tremendously over the past century. This is known to cause not only an increase of temperature, but also a change in our climate. Along with a shift to renewable sources of energy, Carbon Capture and Storage is necessary to

  11. Effects of heat exchanger tubes on hydrodynamics and CO 2 capture of a sorbent-based fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Canhai; Xu, Zhijie; Li, Tingwen; Lee, Andrew; Dietiker, Jean-François; Lane, William; Sun, Xin

    2017-12-01

    In virtual design and scale up of pilot-scale carbon capture systems, the coupled reactive multiphase flow problem must be solved to predict the adsorber’s performance and capture efficiency under various operation conditions. This paper focuses on the detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of a pilot-scale fluidized bed adsorber equipped with vertical cooling tubes. Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFiX), an open-source multiphase flow CFD solver, is used for the simulations with custom code to simulate the chemical reactions and filtered models to capture the effect of the unresolved details in the coarser mesh for simulations with reasonable simulations and manageable computational effort. Previously developed two filtered models for horizontal cylinder drag, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics have been modified to derive the 2D filtered models representing vertical cylinders in the coarse-grid CFD simulations. The effects of the heat exchanger configurations (i.e., horizontal or vertical) on the adsorber’s hydrodynamics and CO2 capture performance are then examined. The simulation result subsequently is compared and contrasted with another predicted by a one-dimensional three-region process model.

  12. Effect of fossil fuels on the parameters of CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Tibor; Mizsey, Peter

    2013-08-06

    The carbon dioxide capture is a more and more important issue in the design and operation of boilers and/or power stations because of increasing environmental considerations. Such processes, absorber desorber should be able to cope with flue gases from the use of different fossil primary energy sources, in order to guarantee a flexible, stable, and secure energy supply operation. The changing flue gases have significant influence on the optimal operation of the capture process, that is, where the required heating of the desorber is the minimal. Therefore special considerations are devoted to the proper design and control of such boiler and/or power stations equipped with CO2 capture process.

  13. CO2 post-combustion capture in coal-fired power plants integrated with solar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapellucci, R.; Giordano, L.; Vaccarelli, M.

    2015-11-01

    The majority of the World's primary energy consumption is still based on fossil fuels, representing the largest source of global CO2 emissions. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), such emissions must be significantly reduced in order to avoid the dramatic consequences of global warming. A potential way to achieve this ambitious goal is represented by the implementation of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) technologies. However, the significant amount of energy required by the CCS systems still represents one the major barriers for their deployment. Focusing on post-combustion capture based on amine absorption, several interesting options have been investigated to compensate the energy losses due to solvent regeneration, also using renewable energy sources. One of the most promising is based on the use of concentrating solar power (CSP), providing a part of the energy requirement of the capture island. In this study the integration of a CSP system into a coal-fired power plant with CO2 postcombustion capture is investigated. Basically, a CSP system is used to support the heat requirement for amine regeneration, by producing saturated steam at low temperature. This allows to reduce or even eliminate the conventional steam extraction from the main power plant, affecting positively net power production and efficiency. The energy analysis of the whole system is carried out using the GateCycle software to simulate the coal-fired power plant and ChemCad platform for the CO2 capture process based on amine absorption.

  14. Performance Analysis of Cold Energy Recovery from CO2 Injection in Ship-Based Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)

    OpenAIRE

    Hwalong You; Youngkyun Seo; Cheol Huh; Daejun Chang

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology is one of the practical solutions for mitigating the effects of global warming. When captured CO 2 is injected into storage sites, the CO 2 is subjected to a heating process. In a conventional CO 2 injection system, CO 2 cold energy is wasted during this heating process. This study proposes a new CO 2 injection system that takes advantage of the cold energy using the Rankine cycle. The study compared the conventional system with the new CO 2 injecti...

  15. Enhancement of CO2 capture in limestone and dolomite granular beds by high intensity sound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde Jose Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcium looping (CaL process, based on the calcination/carbonation of CaCO3 at high temperatures, has emerged in the last years as a potentially low cost technology for CO2 capture. In this work, we show that the application of high intensity sound waves to granular beds of limestone and dolomite in a CaL reactor enhances significantly their multicycle CO2 capture capacity. Sound waves are applied either during the calcination stage of each CaL cycle or in the carbonation stage. The effect of sound is to intensify the transfer of heat, mass and momentum and is more marked when sound is applied during calcination by promoting CaO regeneration. The application of sound would allow reducing the calcination temperature thereby mitigating the decay of capture capacity with the number of cycles and reducing the energy penalty of the technology.

  16. Enhancement of CO2 capture in limestone and dolomite granular beds by high intensity sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perez-Ebri, Jose Manuel; Sanchez-Quintanilla, Miguel Angel

    2017-06-01

    The calcium looping (CaL) process, based on the calcination/carbonation of CaCO3 at high temperatures, has emerged in the last years as a potentially low cost technology for CO2 capture. In this work, we show that the application of high intensity sound waves to granular beds of limestone and dolomite in a CaL reactor enhances significantly their multicycle CO2 capture capacity. Sound waves are applied either during the calcination stage of each CaL cycle or in the carbonation stage. The effect of sound is to intensify the transfer of heat, mass and momentum and is more marked when sound is applied during calcination by promoting CaO regeneration. The application of sound would allow reducing the calcination temperature thereby mitigating the decay of capture capacity with the number of cycles and reducing the energy penalty of the technology.

  17. CO2 Capture from the Air: Technology Assessment and Implications for Climate Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, D. W.

    2002-05-01

    It is physically possible to capture CO2 directly from the air and immobilize it in geological structures. Today, there are no large-scale technologies that achieve air capture at reasonable cost. Yet, strong arguments suggest that it will comparatively easy to develop practical air capture technologies on the timescales relevant to climate policy [1]. This paper first analyzes the cost of air capture and then assesses the implications for climate policy. We first analyze the lower bound on the cost needed for air capture, describing the thermodynamic and physical limits to the use of energy and land. We then compare the costs of air capture to the cost of capture from combustion exhaust streams. While the intrinsic minimum energy requirement is larger for air capture, we argue that air capture has important structural advantages, such as the reduction of transport costs and the larger potential for economies of scale. These advantages suggest that, in the long-run air capture be competitive with other methods of achieving deep emissions reductions. We provide a preliminary engineering-economic analysis of an air capture system based on CaO to CaCO3 chemical looping [1]. We analyze the possibility of doing the calcination in a modified pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) burning coal in a CO2 rich atmosphere with oxygen supplied by an air separation unit. The CaCO3-to-coal ratio would be ~2:1 and the system would be nearly thermally neutral. PFBC systems have been demonstrated at capacities of over 100 MW. Such systems already include CaCO3 injection for sulfur control, and operate at suitable temperatures and pressures for calcination. We assess the potential to recover heat from the dissolution of CaO in order to reduce the overall energy requirements. We analyze the possibility of adapting existing large water/air heat exchangers for use as contacting systems to capture CO2 from the air using the calcium hydroxide solution. The implications of air capture

  18. Heteroatom-doped nanoporous carbon derived from MOF-5 for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiancheng; Li, Liqing; Chen, Ruofei; Wang, Chunhao; Li, Hailong; Wang, Shaobin

    2018-03-01

    Four nanoporous carbons (MUCT) were prepared from metal-organic framework (MOF-5) template and additional carbon source (i.e. urea) by carbonization at different temperatures (600-900 °C). The results showed that specific surface area of four samples was obtained in the range from 1030 to 2307 m2 g-1. By changing the carbonization temperature it can finely tune the pore volume of the MUCT, which having a uniform pore size of around 4.0 nm. With an increasing carbonization temperature, the micropore surface area of MUCT samples varied slightly, but mesopore surface area increased obviously, which had little influence on carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption capacity. The as-obtained sample MUC900 exhibited the superior CO2 capture capacity of 3.7 mmol g-1 at 0 °C (1 atm). First principle calculations were conducted on carbon models with various functional groups to distinguish heterogeneity and understand carbon surface chemistry for CO2 adsorption. The interaction between CO2 and N-containing functional groups is mainly weak Lewis acid-base interaction. On the other hand, the pyrrole and amine groups show exceptional hydrogen-bonding interaction. The hydroxyls promote the interaction between carbon dioxide and functional groups through hydrogen-bonding interactions and electrostatic potentials, thereby increasing CO2 capture of MUCT.

  19. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco José; Rosas, Juana; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-05-01

    A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2). In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt). Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  1. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa M Calvo-Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2. In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  2. A single-ligand ultra-microporous MOF for precombustion CO2 capture and hydrogen purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shyamapada; De Luna, Phil; Daff, Thomas D; Rother, Jens; Liu, Ming; Buchanan, William; Hawari, Ayman I; Woo, Tom K; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2015-12-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) built from a single small ligand typically have high stability, are rigid, and have syntheses that are often simple and easily scalable. However, they are normally ultra-microporous and do not have large surface areas amenable to gas separation applications. We report an ultra-microporous (3.5 and 4.8 Å pores) Ni-(4-pyridylcarboxylate)2 with a cubic framework that exhibits exceptionally high CO2/H2 selectivities (285 for 20:80 and 230 for 40:60 mixtures at 10 bar, 40°C) and working capacities (3.95 mmol/g), making it suitable for hydrogen purification under typical precombustion CO2 capture conditions (1- to 10-bar pressure swing). It exhibits facile CO2 adsorption-desorption cycling and has CO2 self-diffusivities of ~3 × 10(-9) m(2)/s, which is two orders higher than that of zeolite 13X and comparable to other top-performing MOFs for this application. Simulations reveal a high density of binding sites that allow for favorable CO2-CO2 interactions and large cooperative binding energies. Ultra-micropores generated by a small ligand ensures hydrolytic, hydrostatic stabilities, shelf life, and stability toward humid gas streams.

  3. Novel porous carbon materials with ultrahigh nitrogen contents for selective CO 2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon materials were prepared by a nanocasting route using tri-continuous mesoporous silica IBN-9 as a hard template. Rationally choosing carbon precursors and carefully controlling activation conditions result in an optimized material denoted as IBN9-NC1-A, which possesses a very high nitrogen doping concentration (∼13 wt%) and a large surface area of 890 m 2 g -1 arising from micropores (<1 nm). It exhibits an excellent performance for CO 2 adsorption over a wide range of CO 2 pressures. Specifically, its equilibrium CO 2 adsorption capacity at 25 °C reaches up to 4.50 mmol g -1 at 1 bar and 10.53 mmol g -1 at 8 bar. In particular, it shows a much higher CO 2 uptake at low pressure (e.g. 1.75 mmol g -1 at 25 °C and 0.2 bar) than any reported carbon-based materials, owing to its unprecedented nitrogen doping level. The high nitrogen contents also give rise to significantly enhanced CO 2/N 2 selectivities (up to 42), which combined with the high adsorption capacities, make these new carbon materials promising sorbents for selective CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas and other relevant applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Microbial electrolytic capture, separation and regeneration of CO2 for biogas upgrading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Xiangdan; Zhang, Yifeng; Li, Xiaohu

    2017-01-01

    Biogas upgrading to natural gas quality is essential for the efficient use of biogas in various applications. Carbon dioxide (CO2) which constitutes a major part of the biogas is generally removed by physicochemical methods. However, most of the methods are expensive and often present environmental...... challenges. In this study, an innovative microbial electrolytic system was developed to capture, separate and regenerate CO2 for biogas upgrading without external supply of chemicals, and potentially to treat wastewater. The new system was operated at varied biogas flow rates and external applied voltages...

  5. Integrated CO2 Capture and Utilization Using Non-Thermal Plasmolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Moss

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two simple processes for carbon dioxide (CO2 such as capture and utilization have been combined to form a whole systems approach to carbon capture and utilization (CCU. The first stage utilizes a pressure swing adsorption (PSA system, which offers many benefits over current amine technologies. It was found that high selectivity can be achieved with rapid adsorption/desorption times while employing a cheap, durable sorbent that exhibits no sorbent losses and is easily regenerated by simple pressure drops. The PSA system is capable of capturing and upgrading the CO2 concentration of a waste gas stream from 12.5% to a range of higher purities. As many CCU end processes have some tolerance toward impurities in the feed, in the form of nitrogen (N2, for example, this is highly advantageous for this PSA system since CO2 purities in excess of 80% can be achieved with only a few steps and minimal energy input. Non-thermal plasma is one such technology that can tolerate, and even benefit from, small N2 impurities in the feed, therefore a 100% pure CO2 stream is not required. The second stage of this process deploys a nanosecond pulsed corona discharge reactor to split the captured CO2 into carbon monoxide (CO, which can then be used as a chemical feedstock for other syntheses. Corona discharge has proven industrial applications for gas cleaning and the benefit of pulsed power reduces the energy consumption of the system. The wire-in-cylinder geometry concentrates the volume of gas treated into the area of high electric field. Previous work has suggested that moderate conversions can be achieved (9%, compared to other non-thermal plasma methods, but with higher energy efficiencies (>60%.

  6. CO2 Capture in Ionic Liquids: A Review of Solubilities and Experimental Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Torralba-Calleja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern of climate change and global warming has in turn given rise to a thriving research field dedicated to finding solutions. One particular area which has received considerable attention is the lowering of carbon dioxide emissions from large-scale sources, that is, fossil fuel power. This paper focuses on ionic liquids being used as novel media for CO2 capture. In particular, solubility data and experimental techniques are used at a laboratory scale. Cited CO2 absorption data for imidazolium-, pyrrolidinium-, pyridinium-, quaternary-ammonium-, and tetra-alkyl-phosphonium-based ionic liquids is reviewed, expressed as mole fractions (X of CO2 to ionic liquid. The following experimental techniques are featured: gravimetric analysis, the pressure drop method, and the view-cell method.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of MOF-aminated graphite oxide composites for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunxia; Ding, Huiling; Zhong, Qin

    2013-11-01

    A kind of metal-organic frameworks (MOF-5) and aminated graphite oxide (AGO) composites were prepared for CO2 capture to mitigate global warming. MOF-5, MOF-5/GO (composite of MOF-5 and graphite oxide) and MOF-5/AGO samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), nitrogen adsorption as well as thermogravimetric analysis to figure out their chemistry and structure information. Three types of samples with suitable specific surface area and pore diameter were chosen to test CO2 adsorption performance and stability under humidity conditions. The results indicate that high surface area and pore volume, pore similar in size to the size of gas adsorbate, and extra reactive sites modified in the composites contributes to the high CO2 capacity. Besides, the composites involved by GO or AGO show better anti-moisture performance than the parent MOF.

  8. Sustainable Poly(Ionic Liquids) for CO2 Capture Based on Deep Eutectic Monomers

    KAUST Repository

    Isik, Mehmet

    2016-10-05

    The design of high performance solid sorbent materials for CO2 capture is a technology which has been employed to mitigate global warming. However, the covalent incorporation of functionalities into polymeric supports usually involves multistep energy-intensive chemical processes. This fact makes the net CO2 balance of the materials negative even though they possess good properties as CO2 sorbents. Here we show a new family of polymers which are based on amines, amidoximes, and natural carboxylic acids and can be obtained using sustainable low energy processes. Thus, deep eutectic monomers based on natural carboxylic acids, amidoximes, and amines have been prepared by just mixing with cholinium type methacrylic ammonium monomer. The formation of deep eutectic monomers was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements. In all cases, the monomers displayed glass transition temperatures well below room temperature. Computational studies revealed that the formation of eutectic complexes lengthens the distance between the cation and the anion causing charge delocalization. The liquid nature of the resulting deep eutectic monomers (DEMs) made it possible to conduct a fast photopolymerization process to obtain the corresponding poly(ionic liquids). Materials were characterized by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction to evaluate the properties of the polymers. The polymers were then used as solid sorbents for CO2 capture. It has been shown that the polymers prepared with citric acid displayed better performance both experimentally and computationally. The current endeavor showed that sustainable poly(ionic liquids) based on deep eutectic monomers can be easily prepared to produce low-energy-cost alternatives to the materials currently being researched for CO2 capture. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  9. Detection of CO2 leaks from carbon capture and storage sites to the atmosphere with combined CO2 and O2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Charlotte; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-04-01

    One of the main issues in carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the possibility of leakage of CO2 from the storage reservoir to the atmosphere, both from a public health and a climate change combat perspective. Detecting these leaks in the atmosphere is difficult due to the rapid mixing of the emitted CO2 with the surrounding air masses and the high natural variability of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Instead of measuring only the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere, its isotopes or chemical tracers that are released together with the CO2, our method uses O2 measurements in addition to CO2 measurements to detect a leak from a CCS site. CO2 and O2 are coupled in most processes on earth. In photosynthesis, plants take up CO2 and release O2 at the same time. In respiration and fossil fuel burning, O2 is consumed while CO2 is released. In case of a leak from a CCS site, however, there is no relationship between CO2 and O2. A CO2 leak can therefore be distinguished from other sources of CO2 by looking at the atmospheric CO2-O2 ratio. A natural increase of the CO2 concentration is accompanied by a drop in the O2 concentration, while an increase in the CO2 concentration caused by a leak from a CCS site does not have any effect on the O2 concentration. To demonstrate this leak detection strategy we designed and built a transportable CO2 and O2 measurement system, that is capable of measuring the relatively minute (ppm's variations on a 21% concentration) changes in the O2 concentration. The system comprises of three cases that contain the instrumentation and gas handling equipment, the gas cylinders used as reference and calibration gases and a drying system, respectively. Air is pumped to the system from an air inlet that is placed in a small tower in the field. At the conference, we will demonstrate the success of leak detection with our system by showing measurements of several CO2 release experiments, where CO2 was released at a small distance from the air inlet of

  10. EDGAR CO2 purity. Type and quantities of impurities related to CO2 point source and capture technology. A Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walspurger, S.; Van Dijk, H.A.J. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an important tool that will contribute significantly to CO2 emissions abatement both in power and industrial sectors. Capture technologies as well as transport and distribution infrastructure development need to be carried out to ensure efficient CO2 separation and safe transport to storage sites. This study aimed at identifying, and when possible quantifying, the impurities present in CO2 streams resulting from various CO2 capture plants, such that challenges in development of appropriate materials and cleaning technologies for future CCS infrastructure may be anticipated. In its first part, the study provides a description of the characteristics of the different CO2 capture technologies with respect to their response to different type and quantity of impurities, striving for describing realistic combinations of point sources and capture technologies. Composition of CO2 gaseous streams was found to be highly dependent upon the type of CO2 point source and the removal technology selected. In most of the capture processes, most impurities concentration may be minimised by fine tuning of process operation. However plant economics eventually govern the impurity level in the CO2 stream. For mature technologies such as absorption by chemical or physical solvents lower impurity levels were found to be theoretically quite low, but when energy spent for regeneration is lowered, or when second generation capture with lower energy requirement are considered, the impurity level in CO2 stream increases. Accordingly, the report also addresses the conditioning technologies that are available or need to be developed for removal of traces elements such as mercury, volatile compounds and other condensable and points at technologies to be developed, especially in the sulphur compounds removal from CO2. In its final part the report addresses the quantification of future specification and concludes based on literature study that pipeline

  11. Solid amine sorbents for CO2 capture by chemical adsorption: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Erdal Ünveren

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Amines are well-known for their reversible reactions with CO2, which make them ideal for CO2 capture from several gas streams, including flue gas. In this respect, selective CO2 absorption by aqueous alkanolamines is the most mature technology but the process is energy intensive and has also corrosion problems. Both disadvantages can be diminished to a certain extent by chemical adsorption of CO2 selectively. The most important element of the chemical adsorption of CO2 involves the design and development of a suitable adsorbent which consist of a porous support onto which an amine is attached or immobilized. Such an adsorbent is often called as solid amine sorbent. This review covers solid amine-based studies which are developed and published in recent years. First, the review examines several different types of porous support materials, namely, three mesoporous silica (MCM-41, SBA-15 and KIT-6 and two polymeric supports (PMMA and PS for CO2 adsorption. Emphasis is given to the synthesis, modifications and characterizations -such as BET and PXRD data-of them. Amination of these supports to obtain a solid amine sorbent through impregnation or grafting is reviewed comparatively. Focus is given to the adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods which are discussed in detail. Significant amount of original data are also presented which makes this review unique. Finally, relevant CO2 adsorption (or equilibrium capacity data, and cyclic adsorption/desorption performance and stability of important classes of solid amine sorbents are critically reviewed. These include severa PEI or TEPA impregnated adsorbents and APTES-grafted systems.

  12. Biomass waste carbon materials for post-combustion CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco J.; Rosas, Juana M.; Rodríguez-Mirasol, J.; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Low-carbon energy systems based on carbon capture and storage (CCS) have become of great interest due to the imperative necessity of mitigating the carbon footprint derived from the currently fossil fuels-based energy technologies. In this sense, post-combustion CO2 adsorption over porous solids results particularly attractive from several viewpoints. In a green context, the use of carbon-based materials as adsorbents would entail important economic and environmental profits, such as the valo...

  13. Prospective techno-economic and environmental assessment of carbon capture at a refinery and CO2 utilisation in polyol synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández-Dacosta, Cora; Van Der Spek, Mijndert; Hung, Christine Roxanne; Oregionni, Gabriel David; Skagestad, Ragnhild; Parihar, Prashant; Gokak, D. T.; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Ramirez, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    CO2 utilisation is gaining interest as a potential element towards a sustainable economy. CO2 can be used as feedstock in the synthesis of fuels, chemicals and polymers. This study presents a prospective assessment of carbon capture from a hydrogen unit at a refinery, where the CO2 is either stored,

  14. Comparison of volatiles and mosquito capture efficacy for three carbohydrate sources in a yeast-fermentation CO2 generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquito surveillance in remote areas with limited access to canisters of CO2 or dry ice will benefit from an effective alternative CO2 source. In this study, we document the differences in mosquito and non-mosquito capture rates from CO2 baited (dry ice or yeast fermentation of carbohydrates) CDC t...

  15. Contribution of seagrass plants to CO2 capture in a tropical seagrass meadow under experimental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Deyanova

    Full Text Available Coastal vegetative habitats are known to be highly productive environments with a high ability to capture and store carbon. During disturbance this important function could be compromised as plant photosynthetic capacity, biomass, and/or growth are reduced. To evaluate effects of disturbance on CO2 capture in plants we performed a five-month manipulative experiment in a tropical seagrass (Thalassia hemprichii meadow exposed to two intensity levels of shading and simulated grazing. We assessed CO2 capture potential (as net CO2 fixation using areal productivity calculated from continuous measurements of diel photosynthetic rates, and estimates of plant morphology, biomass and productivity/respiration (P/R ratios (from the literature. To better understand the plant capacity to coping with level of disturbance we also measured plant growth and resource allocation. We observed substantial reductions in seagrass areal productivity, biomass, and leaf area that together resulted in a negative daily carbon balance in the two shading treatments as well as in the high-intensity simulated grazing treatment. Additionally, based on the concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and starch in the rhizomes, we found that the main reserve sources for plant growth were reduced in all treatments except for the low-intensity simulated grazing treatment. If permanent, these combined adverse effects will reduce the plants' resilience and capacity to recover after disturbance. This might in turn have long-lasting and devastating effects on important ecosystem functions, including the carbon sequestration capacity of the seagrass system.

  16. PVTxy properties of CO2 mixtures relevant for CO2 capture, transport and storage: Review of available experimental data and theoretical models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hailong; Jakobsen, Jana P.; Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Yan, Jinyue

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge about pressure–volume–temperature–composition (PVTxy) properties plays an importantrole in the design and operation of many processes involved in CO2 capture and storage (CCS) systems.A literature survey was conducted on both the available experimental data and the theoreticalmodels associated with the thermodynamic properties of CO2 mixtures within the operation windowof CCS. Some gaps were identified between available experimental data and requirements of the systemdesign and ...

  17. CO2 capture from power plants: Part I. A parametric study of the technical performance based on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, Mohammad R.M.; Schneiders, Léon H.J.; Niederer, John; Feron, Paul H.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2007-01-01

    Capture and storage of CO2 from fossil fuel fired power plants is drawing increasing interest as a potential method for the control of greenhouse gas emissions. An optimization and technical parameter study for a CO2 capture process from flue gas of a 600 MWe bituminous coal fired power plant, based

  18. CO2 capture from power plants: Part II. A parametric study of the economical performance based on mono-ethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, Mohammad R.M.; Niederer, John; Feron, Paul H.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2007-01-01

    While the demand for reduction in CO2 emission is increasing, the cost of the CO2 capture processes remains a limiting factor for large-scale application. Reducing the cost of the capture system by improving the process and the solvent used must have a priority in order to apply this technology in

  19. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  20. CO2 capture from power plants. Part II : A parametric study of the economical performance based on mono-ethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, M. R. M.; Niederer, J. P. M.; Feron, P. H. M.; Versteeg, G. F.

    While the demand for reduction in CO2 emission is increasing, the cost of the CO2 capture processes remains a limiting factor for large-scale application. Reducing the cost of the capture system by improving the process and the solvent used must have a priority in order to apply this technology in

  1. CO2 capture from power plants. Part I : A parametric study of the technical performance based on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, M. R. M.; Schneiders, L. H. J.; Niederer, J. P. M.; Feron, P. H. M.; Versteeg, G. F.

    Capture and storage of CO2 from fossil fuel fired power plants is drawing increasing interest as a potential method for the control of greenhouse gas emissions. An optimization and technical parameter study for a CO2 capture process from flue gas of a 600 MWe bituminous coal fired power plant, based

  2. Metal-organic framework supported ionic liquid membranes for CO2 capture: anion effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishna M; Chen, Yifei; Hu, Zhongqiao; Jiang, Jianwen

    2012-04-28

    IRMOF-1 supported ionic liquid (IL) membranes are investigated for CO(2) capture by atomistic simulation. The ILs consist of identical cation 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium [BMIM](+), but four different anions, namely hexafluorophosphate [PF(6)](-), tetrafluoroborate [BF(4)](-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [Tf(2)N](-), and thiocyanate [SCN](-). As compared with the cation, the anion has a stronger interaction with IRMOF-1 and a more ordered structure in IRMOF-1. The small anions [PF(6)](-), [BF(4)](-), and [SCN](-) prefer to locate near to the metal-cluster, particularly the quasi-spherical [PF(6)](-) and [BF(4)](-). In contrast, the bulky and chain-like [BMIM](+) and [Tf(2)N](-) reside near the phenyl ring. Among the four anions, [Tf(2)N](-) has the weakest interaction with IRMOF-1 and thus the strongest interaction with [BMIM](+). With increasing the weight ratio of IL to IRMOF-1 (W(IL/IRMOF-1)), the selectivity of CO(2)/N(2) at infinite dilution is enhanced. At a given W(IL/IRMOF-1), the selectivity increases as [Tf(2)N](-) calculation. In the [BMIM][SCN]/IRMOF-1 membrane with W(IL/IRMOF-1) = 1, [SCN](-) is identified to be the most favorable site for CO(2) adsorption. [BMIM][SCN]/IRMOF-1 outperforms polymer membranes and polymer-supported ILs in CO(2) permeability, and its performance surpasses Robeson's upper bound. This simulation study reveals that the anion has strong effects on the microscopic properties of ILs and suggests that MOF-supported ILs are potentially intriguing for CO(2) capture. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  3. Cellulose-Supported Ionic Liquids for Low-Cost Pressure Swing CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Reed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the cost of capturing CO2 from point source emitters is a major challenge facing carbon capture, utilization, and storage. While solid ionic liquids (SoILs have been shown to allow selective and rapid CO2 capture by pressure swing separation of flue gases, expectations of their high cost hinders their potential application. Cellulose is found to be a reliable, cheap, and sustainable support for a range of SoILs, reducing the total sorbent cost by improving the efficiency of the ionic liquid (IL through increased ionic surface area that results from coating. It was also found that cellulose support imparts surface characteristics, which increased total sorbent uptake. Combined, these effects allowed a fourfold to eightfold improvement in uptake per gram of IL for SoILs that have previously shown high uptake and a 9- to 39-fold improvement for those with previously poor uptake. This offers the potential to drastically reduce the amount of IL required to separate a given gas volume. Furthermore, the fast kinetics are retained, with adsorb–desorb cycles taking place over a matter of seconds. This means that rapid cycling can be achieved, which results in high cumulative separation capacity relative to a conventional temperature swing process. The supported materials show an optimum at 75% cellulose:25% IL as a result of even coating of the cellulose surface. The projected reduction in plant size and operational costs represents a potentially ground-breaking step forward in carbon dioxide capture technologies.

  4. Low concentration CO2 capture using physical adsorbents: Are Metal-Organic Frameworks becoming the new benchmark materials?

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2016-03-30

    The capture and separation of traces and concentrated CO2 from important commodities such as CH4, H2, O2 and N2, is becoming important in many areas related to energy security and environmental sustainability. While trace CO2 concentration removal applications have been modestly studied for decades, the spike in interest in the capture of concentrated CO2 was motivated by the need for new energy vectors to replace highly concentrated carbon fuels and the necessity to reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. CO2 capture from various gas streams, at different concentrations, using physical adsorbents, such as activated carbon, zeolites, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), is attractive. However, the adsorbents must be designed with consideration of many parameters including CO2 affinity, kinetics, energetics, stability, capture mechanism, in addition to cost. Here, we perform a systematic analysis regarding the key technical parameters that are required for the best CO2 capture performance using physical adsorbents. We also experimentally demonstrate a suitable material model of Metal Organic Framework as advanced adsorbents with unprecedented properties for CO2 capture in a wide range of CO2 concentration. These recently developed class of MOF adsorbents represent a breakthrough finding in the removal of traces CO2 using physical adsorption. This platform shows colossal tuning potential for more efficient separation agents.

  5. Predicting mixed-gas adsorption equilibria on activated carbon for precombustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, S; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F; Pevida, C

    2013-05-21

    We present experimentally measured adsorption isotherms of CO2, H2, and N2 on a phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbon, which had been previously synthesized for the separation of CO2 in a precombustion capture process. The single component adsorption isotherms were measured in a magnetic suspension balance at three different temperatures (298, 318, and 338 K) and over a large range of pressures (from 0 to 3000-4000 kPa). These values cover the temperature and pressure conditions likely to be found in a precombustion capture scenario, where CO2 needs to be separated from a CO2/H2/N2 gas stream at high pressure (~1000-1500 kPa) and with a high CO2 concentration (~20-40 vol %). Data on the pure component isotherms were correlated using the Langmuir, Sips, and dual-site Langmuir (DSL) models, i.e., a two-, three-, and four-parameter model, respectively. By using the pure component isotherm fitting parameters, adsorption equilibrium was then predicted for multicomponent gas mixtures by the extended models. The DSL model was formulated considering the energetic site-matching concept, recently addressed in the literature. Experimental gas-mixture adsorption equilibrium data were calculated from breakthrough experiments conducted in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor and compared with the predictions from the models. Breakthrough experiments were carried out at a temperature of 318 K and five different pressures (300, 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 kPa) where two different CO2/H2/N2 gas mixtures were used as the feed gas in the adsorption step. The DSL model was found to be the one that most accurately predicted the CO2 adsorption equilibrium in the multicomponent mixture. The results presented in this work highlight the importance of performing experimental measurements of mixture adsorption equilibria, as they are of utmost importance to discriminate between models and to correctly select the one that most closely reflects the actual process.

  6. An Intergrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

    2006-03-15

    The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, the project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted.

  7. An air-liquid contactor for large-scale capture of CO2 from air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Geoffrey; Keith, David W

    2012-09-13

    We present a conceptually simple method for optimizing the design of a gas-liquid contactor for capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air, or 'air capture'. We apply the method to a slab geometry contactor that uses components, design and fabrication methods derived from cooling towers. We use mass transfer data appropriate for capture using a strong NaOH solution, combined with engineering and cost data derived from engineering studies performed by Carbon Engineering Ltd, and find that the total costs for air contacting alone-no regeneration-can be of the order of $60 per tonne CO(2). We analyse the reasons why our cost estimate diverges from that of other recent reports and conclude that the divergence arises from fundamental design choices rather than from differences in costing methodology. Finally, we review the technology risks and conclude that they can be readily addressed by prototype testing.

  8. Process simulation of CO2 capture with aqueous ammonia using the Extended UNIQUAC model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; van Well, Willy J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of aqueous ammonia is a promising option to capture carbon dioxide from power plants thanks to the potential low heat requirement during the carbon dioxide desorption compared to monoethanolamine (MEA) based process. The patented Chilled Ammonia Process developed by Alstom absorbs carbon...... of the process is necessary.In this work, the performance of the carbon dioxide capture process using aqueous ammonia has been analyzed by process simulation. The Extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model available for the CO2–NH3–H2O system has been implemented in the commercial simulator Aspen Plus®1 by using...... to be in the same range as the values reported recently for advanced amine processes. Assuming that cold cooling water is available, the electricity consumption remains limited. Hence the Chilled Ammonia Process is a promising option for post combustion carbon dioxide capture....

  9. Capture and conversion of CO2 at ambient conditions by a conjugated microporous polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yong; Wang, Ting-Ting; Liu, Xiao-Huan; Zou, Kun; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Conjugated microporous polymers are a new class of porous materials with an extended π-conjugation in an amorphous organic framework. Owing to the wide-ranging flexibility in the choice and design of components and the available control of pore parameters, these polymers can be tailored for use in various applications, such as gas storage, electronics and catalysis. Here we report a class of cobalt/aluminium-coordinated conjugated microporous polymers that exhibit outstanding CO2 capture and conversion performance at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. These polymers can store CO2 with adsorption capacities comparable to metal-organic frameworks. The cobalt-coordinated conjugated microporous polymers can also simultaneously function as heterogeneous catalysts for the reaction of CO2 and propylene oxide at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, wherein the polymers demonstrate better efficiency than a homogeneous salen-cobalt catalyst. By combining the functions of gas storage and catalysts, this strategy provides a direction for cost-effective CO2 reduction processes. PMID:23727768

  10. Life cycle assessment of CO2 capture and utilization: a tutorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Assen, Niklas; Voll, Philip; Peters, Martina; Bardow, André

    2014-12-07

    Capturing CO2 and using it as an alternative carbon feedstock for chemicals, fuels and materials has the potential to reduce both CO2 emissions and fossil resource depletion. To assess the actual environmental benefits of CO2 capture and utilization (CCU), life cycle assessment (LCA) is considered as suitable metric. To enhance the use of LCA of CCU, this tutorial review gives a jargon-free introduction of LCA of CCU directed at LCA novices. Nine particularly important aspects for conducting an LCA of CCU are identified and illustrated with CCU examples. These aspects, phrased as action items, can serve LCA novices as a checklist through all steps in LCA of CCU: from defining the LCA purpose and the system boundaries, over data collection and environmental impact computation, to interpretation and sensitivity analysis of the results. Finally, in the context of CCU, an outlook is given on recent developments in LCA that aim to cover all pillars of sustainability (people, planet, and profit).

  11. A Review of the Role of Vegetal Ecosystems in CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Di Vita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of carbon emissions is a worldwide global challenge and represents the objective of many scientists that are trying to modify the role of carbon, turning a problem into an opportunity. The potential of CO2 capture and storage by vegetal species is significant because of their capacity to absorb exceeding carbon emission. The purpose of the present paper is to draw a picture of the role of vegetal ecosystems on carbon fixation by identifying the most significant scientific contributions related to the absorption by vegetal species. In particular the aim of this paper is to examine different forms of CO2 sequestration made by plants and crops involved in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG emission. Results highlight the important role played by agricultural soils, forests, perennial plants, and algae, looking at the overall reduction of carbon emissions. In addition, results show that some bioenergy crops allow substantial storage of carbon dioxide, providing a significant contribution to climate change mitigation.

  12. Investigation of CO2 capture mechanisms of liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials via structural characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Youngjune

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) have been recently developed that comprise an oligomeric or polymeric canopy tethered to surface-modified nanoparticles via ionic or covalent bonds. It has already been shown that the tunable nature of the grafted polymeric canopy allows for enhanced CO 2 capture capacity and selectivity via the enthalpic intermolecular interactions between CO2 and the task-specific functional groups, such as amines. Interestingly, for the same amount of CO2 loading NOHMs have also exhibited significantly different swelling behavior compared to that of the corresponding polymers, indicating a potential structural effect during CO2 capture. If the frustrated canopy species favor spontaneous ordering due to steric and/or entropic effects, the inorganic cores of NOHMs could be organized into unusual structural arrangements. Likewise, the introduction of small gaseous molecules such as CO2 could reduce the free energy of the frustrated canopy. This entropic effect, the result of unique structural nature, could allow NOHMs to capture CO2 more effectively. In order to isolate the entropic effect, NOHMs were synthesized without the task-specific functional groups. The relationship between their structural conformation and the underlying mechanisms for the CO2 absorption behavior were investigated by employing NMR and ATR FT-IR spectroscopies. The results provide fundamental information needed for evaluating and developing novel liquid-like CO2 capture materials and give useful insights for designing and synthesizing NOHMs for more effective CO2 capture. © the Owner Societies 2011.

  13. High pressure solubility of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous solution of piperazine (PZ) activated N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solvent for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saleem Nawaz; Hailegiorgis, Sintayehu Mekuria; Man, Zakaria; Shariff, Azmi Mohd

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the solubility of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the aqueous solution of piperazine (PZ) activated N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was investigated. In the aqueous solution the concentrations of the N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and piperazine (PZ) were kept constant at 30 wt. % and 3 wt. %, respectively. The solubility experiments were carried out between the temperatures ranges of 303.15 to 333.15 K. The pressure range was selected as 2-50 bar for solubility of carbon dioxide in the aqueous solution. The solubility of the CO2 is reported in terms of CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. The loading capacity of the solvent is the ratio between the numbers of moles of CO2 absorbed to the numbers of moles of solvent used. The experimental data showed that the CO2 loading increased with increase in CO2 partial pressure, while it decreased with increase in system's temperature. It was also observed from the experimental data that the higher pressure favors the absorption process while the increased temperature hinders the absorption process of CO2 capture. The loading capacity of the investigated solvent was compared with the loading capacity of the solvents reported in the literature. The investigated solvent showed better solubility in terms of loading capacity.

  14. Commerical-Scale CO2 Capture and Sequestration for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolfo Garza

    2010-07-28

    On June 8, 2009, DOE issued Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number DE-FOA-000015 seeking proposals to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources. This FOA called for what was essentially a two-tier selection process. A number of projects would receive awards to conduct front-end engineering and design (FEED) studies as Phase I. Those project sponsors selected would be required to apply for Phase II, which would be the full design, construction, and operation of their proposed technology. Over forty proposals were received, and ten were awarded Phase I Cooperative Agreements. One of those proposers was CEMEX. CEMEX proposed to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from one of their existing cement plants and either sequester the CO2 in a geologic formation or use it for enhanced oil recovery. The project consisted of evaluating their plants to identify the plant best suited for the demonstration, identify the best available capture technology, and prepare a design basis. The project also included evaluation of the storage or sequestration options in the vicinity of the selected plant.

  15. Capturing Coupled Effects of CO2 and Brine Leakage in Cemented Wellbores at CO2 Storage Sites using Decoupled Reduced Order Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, D. R.; Carey, J. W.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the potential significance and risk of CO2 and brine leakage from wells at proposed geologic storage sites is a key goal of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). In this study, we developed reduced order models (ROMs) of cemented-wellbore leakage that are being incorporated into systems models in order to determine CO2 storage risk profiles. ROMs are used to capture general trends in numerically simulated leakage in a computationally efficient manner, allowing for large numbers of evaluations required by stochastic evaluations of risk. In this study, we perform the wellbore leakage numerical simulations using the multi-phase Finite Element Heat and Mass (FEHM) code. The constituents of interest are water, supercritical CO2, dissolved CO2, liquid CO2, and gaseous CO2. The computational domain is a full 3D mesh with a 0.1 m wellbore at the center. A storage reservoir is located below the impermeable rock and the wellbore is connected directly to the atmosphere or to a shallow aquifer above. Injector wells introduce CO2 into the reservoir for 20 years followed by a 30 year relaxation period. Reservoir depth, cement permeability, relative permeability model parameters, and injection rate are sampled by Latin Hypercube sampling. For each sample, simulations are performed with and without a wellbore in the model. Transient pressures and CO2 saturations are collected at the top of the reservoir at the location where the wellbore would be located from the model without a wellbore. CO2 and brine flow rates (leakage) are collected near the top of the wellbore from the models with a wellbore. ROM model inputs are the sampled parameters, transient pressures and CO2 saturations and their first and second derivatives calculated by backward finite differences. Using these inputs, ROMs are generated for CO2 and brine leakage using the Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) regression technique. ROM development, evaluation, and use will be

  16. Monolith-Supported Amine-Functionalized Mg2(dobpdc) Adsorbents for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darunte, Lalit A; Terada, Yuri; Murdock, Christopher R; Walton, Krista S; Sholl, David S; Jones, Christopher W

    2017-05-24

    The potential of using an amine-functionalized metal organic framework (MOF), mmen-M2(dobpdc) (M = Mg and Mn), supported on a structured monolith contactor for CO2 capture from simulated flue gas is explored. The stability of the unsupported MOF powders under humid conditions is explored using nitrogen physisorption and X-ray diffraction analysis before and after exposure to humidity. Based on its superior stability to humidity, mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) is selected for further growth on a honeycomb cordierite monolith that is wash-coated with α-alumina. A simple approach for the synthesis of an Mg2(dobpdc) MOF film using MgO nanoparticles as the metal precursor is used. Rapid drying of MgO on the monolith surface followed by a hydrothermal treatment is demonstrated to allow for the synthesis of a MOF film with good crystallite density and favorable orientation of the MOF crystals. The CO2 adsorption behavior of the monolith-supported mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) material is assessed using 10% CO2 in helium and 100% CO2, demonstrating a CO2 uptake of 2.37 and 2.88 mmol/g, respectively. Excellent cyclic adsorption/desorption performance over multiple cycles is also observed. This is one of the first examples of the deployment of an advanced MOF adsorbent in a scalable, low-pressure drop gas-solid contactor. Such demonstrations are critical to the practical application of MOF materials in adsorptive gas separations, as structured contactors have many practical advantages over packed or fluidized beds.

  17. Low transition temperature mixtures as innovative and sustainable CO2 capture solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubeir, Lawien F; Lacroix, Mark H M; Kroon, Maaike C

    2014-12-11

    The potential of three newly discovered low transition temperature mixtures (LTTMs) is explored as sustainable substituents for the traditional carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbents. LTTMs are mixtures of two solid compounds, a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), which form liquids upon mixing with melting points far below those of the individual compounds. In this work the HBD is lactic acid and the HBAs are tetramethylammonium chloride, tetraethylammonium chloride, and tetrabutylammonium chloride. These compounds were found to form LTTMs for the first time at molar ratios of HBD:HBA = 2:1. First, the LTTMs were characterized by determining the thermal operating window (e.g., decomposition temperature and glass transition temperature) and the physical properties (e.g., density and viscosity). Thereafter, the phase behavior of CO2 with the LTTMs has been measured using a gravimetric magnetic suspension balance operating in the static mode at 308 and 318 K and pressures up to 2 MPa. The CO2 solubility increased with increasing chain length, increasing pressure, and decreasing temperature. The Peng-Robinson equation of state was applied to correlate the phase equilibria. From the solubility data, thermodynamic parameters were determined (e.g., Henry's law coefficient and enthalpy of absorption). The heat of absorption was found to be similar to that in conventional physical solvents (-11.21 to -14.87 kJ·mol(-1)). Furthermore, the kinetics in terms of the diffusion coefficient of CO2 in all LTTMs were determined (10(-11)-10(-10) m(2)·s(-1)). Even though the CO2 solubilities in the studied LTTMs were found to be slightly lower than those in thoroughly studied conventional physical solvents, LTTMs are a promising new class of absorbents due to their low cost, their environmentally friendly character, and their easy tunability, allowing further optimization for carbon capture.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Lithium Zirconium Silicate for CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Bhosale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were prepared by precipitation, template and sol-gel meth-ods. The samples were prepared with several mol ratios of Li:Zr:Si. The preparation of lithium zirco-nium silicate samples by precipitation method were carried out by using the lithium nitrate, zirconyl nitrate, zirconium(IV oxypropoxide and tetramethylorthosilicate (TEOS as precursors. The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were prepared by using cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (C-TAB and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAOH by template method. The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, 29Si-MAS NMR and FTIR. The surface area, alkalinity / acidity of the samples of lithium zirconium silicate were measured. The TGA analysis of lithium zirco-nium silicate samples was done. The CO2 captured by the samples of lithium zirconium silicate was es-timated. The captured CO2 by the samples of lithium zirconium silicate was found to be in the range 3.3 to 8.6 wt%. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 27th March 2014; Revised: 31st July 2014; Accepted: 2nd August 2014How to Cite: Bhosale, T.S. , Gaikwad, A.G. (2014. Preparation and Characterization of Lithium Zirconium Silicate for CO2 Capture. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9(3: 249-262. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6646.249-262Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6646.249-262

  19. A fine-tuned fluorinated MOF addresses the needs for trace CO2 removal and air capture using physisorption.

    KAUST Repository

    Bhatt, Prashant

    2016-07-08

    The development of functional solid-state materials for carbon capture at low carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, from con-fined spaces (<0.5 %) and particularly from air (400 ppm), is of prime importance with respect to energy and environment sustainability. Herein, we report the deliberate construction of a hydrolytically stable fluorinated metal-organic framework (MOF), NbOFFIVE-1-Ni, with the proper pore system (size, shape and functionality), ideal for efficient and effective traces carbon dioxide removal. Markedly, the CO2-selective NbOFFIVE-1-Ni exhibits the highest CO2 gravimetric and volumetric uptake (ca. 1.3 mmol/g and 51.4 cm3.cm-3) for physical adsorbents at 400 ppm CO2 and 298 K. Practically, the NbOFFIVE-1-Ni affords the complete CO2 desorption at 328 K under vacuum with an associated moderate energy input of 54 kJ/mol, typical for the full CO2 desorption in reference physical adsorbents but considerably lower than the conventional chemical sorbents. Noticeably, the contracted square-like channels, affording the close proximity of the fluorine centers, permitted the enhancement of the CO2-framework interactions and subsequently the attainment of an unprecedented CO2-selectivity at very low CO2 concentrations. The precise localization of the adsorbed CO2 at the vicinity of the periodically aligned fluorine centers, promoting the selective adsorption of CO2, is evidenced by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction study on the NbOFFIVE-1-Ni hosting CO2 molecules. Cyclic CO2/N2 mixed-gas column breakthrough experiments under dry and humid conditions corroborate the excellent CO2-selectivity under practical carbon capture conditions. Pertinently, the no-table hydrolytic stability positions the NbOFFIVE-1-Ni as the new benchmark adsorbent for direct air capture and CO2 removal from confined spaces.

  20. A Fine-Tuned Fluorinated MOF Addresses the Needs for Trace CO2 Removal and Air Capture Using Physisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Prashant M; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cadiau, Amandine; Adil, Karim; Shekhah, Osama; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Barbour, Leonard J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-07-27

    The development of functional solid-state materials for carbon capture at low carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, namely, from confined spaces (MOF), NbOFFIVE-1-Ni, with the appropriate pore system (size, shape, and functionality), ideal for the effective and energy-efficient removal of trace carbon dioxide. Markedly, the CO2-selective NbOFFIVE-1-Ni exhibits the highest CO2 gravimetric and volumetric uptake (ca. 1.3 mmol/g and 51.4 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3)) for a physical adsorbent at 400 ppm of CO2 and 298 K. Practically, NbOFFIVE-1-Ni offers the complete CO2 desorption at 328 K under vacuum with an associated moderate energy input of 54 kJ/mol, typical for the full CO2 desorption in conventional physical adsorbents but considerably lower than chemical sorbents. Noticeably, the contracted square-like channels, affording the close proximity of the fluorine centers, permitted the enhancement of the CO2-framework interactions and subsequently the attainment of an unprecedented CO2 selectivity at very low CO2 concentrations. The precise localization of the adsorbed CO2 at the vicinity of the periodically aligned fluorine centers, promoting the selective adsorption of CO2, is evidenced by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction study on NbOFFIVE-1-Ni hosting CO2 molecules. Cyclic CO2/N2 mixed-gas column breakthrough experiments under dry and humid conditions corroborate the excellent CO2 selectivity under practical carbon capture conditions. Pertinently, the notable hydrolytic stability positions NbOFFIVE-1-Ni as the new benchmark adsorbent for direct air capture and CO2 removal from confined spaces.

  1. Iron phthalocyanine modified mesoporous titania nanoparticles for photocatalytic activity and CO2 capture applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramacharyulu, P V R K; Muhammad, Raeesh; Praveen Kumar, J; Prasad, G K; Mohanty, Paritosh

    2015-10-21

    An iron(II)phthalocyanine (Fepc) modified mesoporous titania (Fepc-TiO2) nanocatalyst with a specific surface area of 215 m(2) g(-1) has been synthesized by a hydrothermal method. Fepc-TiO2 degrades one of the highly toxic chemical warfare agents, sulfur mustard (SM), photocatalytically under sunlight with an exposure time of as low as 70 min. Furthermore, the mesoporous Fepc-TiO2 also captured 2.1 mmol g(-1) of CO2 at 273 K and 1 atm.

  2. Porous materials as high performance adsorbents for CO2 capture, gas separation and purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun

    has been conducted to mimic industrial application. We found that resultant carbons showed better CO2 capture ability and selectivity than parental MIL-100(Al).

  3. CO2 capture using aqueous ammonia: kinetic study and process simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; van Well, Willy J.M.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture using aqueous ammonia is a post-combustion technology that has shown a good potential. Therefore this process is studied by measuring the rate of absorption of carbon dioxide by aqueous ammonia and by performing process simulation. The rate of absorption of carbon dioxide...... by aqueous ammonia solvent has been studied by applying a wetted wall column apparatus. The rate of absorption is crucial regarding the sizing of the absorber columns. The overall mass transfer coefficient has been measured at temperatures from 279 to 304 K for 1 to 10 wt% ammonia solutions at loadings up...... to 0.6. The results were compared with those found for 30 wt% mono-ethanolamine (MEA) solutions.The capture process was simulated successfully using the simulator Aspen Plus coupled with the extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model available for the NH3–CO2–H2O system. For this purpose, a user model...

  4. Acidic gases (CO2, NO2 and SO2) capture and dissociation on metal decorated phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Anlong; Kuang, Minquan; Yuan, Hongkuan; Wang, Guangzhao; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xiaolan

    2017-07-01

    Density functional theory is employed to investigate the adsorption and dissociation of several acidic gases (CO2, NO2 and SO2) on metal (Li, Al, Ni and Pt) decorated phosphorene. The results show that light metal (Li, Al) decorated phosphorene exhibits a strong adsorption of acidic gases, i.e., the adsorption energy of CO2 on Li decorated phosphorene is 0.376 eV which is the largest in all adsorption of CO2 on metal decorated phosphorene and Al decorated phosphorene is most effective for capture of NO2 and SO2 due to large adsorption energies of 3.951 and 3.608 eV, respectively. Moreover, Li and Al light metals have stronger economic effectiveness and more friendly environment compared with the transition metals, the strong adsorption ability of acidic gases and low price suggest that Li, Al decorated phosphorene may be useful and promising for collection and filtration of exhaust gases. The reaction energy barriers of acidic gases dissociated process on Pt decorated phosphorene are relatively low and the reaction processes are significantly exothermic, indicating that the dissociation process is favorable.

  5. CO2 Capture and Crystallization of Ammonia Bicarbonate in a Lab-Scale Scrubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao Chi Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A lab-scale bubble-column scrubber is used to capture CO2 gas and produce ammonia bicarbonate (ABC using aqueous ammonia as an absorbent under a constant pH and temperature. The CO2 concentration is adjusted by mixing N2 and CO2 in the range of 15–60 vol % at 55 °C. The process variables are the pH of the solution, temperature, gas-flow rate and the concentration of gas. The effects of the process variables on the removal efficiency (E, absorption rate (RA and overall mass-transfer coefficient (KGa were explored. A multiple-tube mass balance model was used to determine RA and KGa, in which RA and KGa were in the range of 2.14 × 10−4–1.09 × 10−3 mol/(s·L and 0.0136–0.5669 1/s, respectively. Results found that, RA showed an obvious increase with the increase in pH, inlet gas concentration and gas temperature, while KGa decreased with an increase in inlet gas concentration. Using linear regression, an empirical expression for KGa/E was obtained. On the other hand, ammonia bicarbonate crystals could be produced at a pH of 9.5 when the gas concentration was higher than 30% and γ (=Fg/FA, the gas-liquid molar flow rate ratio ≥ 1.5.

  6. Preliminary results of a techno-economic assessment of CO2 capture-network configurations in the industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghout, N.A.; Kuramochi, T.; van den Broek, M.A.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluated the techno economic performance of several CO2 capture-network configurations for a cluster of sixteen industrial plants in the Netherlands using bottom up analysis. Preliminary findings indicate that centralizing capture equipment instead of capture equipment at plant sites

  7. Bench-Scale Testing and Process Performance Projections of CO2 Capture by CO2–Binding Organic Liquids (CO2BOLs) With and Without Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J.; Mathias, Paul M.; Koech, Phillip K.; Bhakta, Mukund; Freeman, Charles J.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zwoster, Andy

    2016-01-12

    This manuscript provides a detailed analysis of a continuous flow, bench scale study of the CO2BOL solvent platform with and without its Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed four months of continuous flow testing of a candidate CO2BOL with a thermal regeneration and PSAR regeneration using decane antisolvent. In both regeneration schemes, steady state capture of >90 %CO2 was achieved using simulated flue gas at acceptable L/G ratios. Aspen Plus™ modeling was performed to assess process performance compared to previous equilibrium performance projections. This paper also includes net power projections, and comparisons to DOE’s Case 10 amine baseline.

  8. Encapsulated Ionic Liquids for CO2 Capture: Using 1-Butyl-methylimidazolium Acetate for Quick and Reversible CO2 Chemical Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Cristian; Alonso-Morales, Noelia; Gilarranz, Miguel A; Rodriguez, Juan J; Palomar, Jose

    2016-12-05

    The potential advantages of applying encapsulated ionic liquid (ENIL) to CO2 capture by chemical absorption with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [bmim][acetate] are evaluated. The [bmim][acetate]-ENIL is a particle material with solid appearance and 70 % w/w in ionic liquid (IL). The performance of this material as CO2 sorbent was evaluated by gravimetric and fixed-bed sorption experiments at different temperatures and CO2 partial pressures. ENIL maintains the favourable thermodynamic properties of the neat IL regarding CO2 absorption. Remarkably, a drastic increase of CO2 sorption rates was achieved using ENIL, related to much higher contact area after discretization. In addition, experiments demonstrate reversibility of the chemical reaction and the efficient ENIL regeneration, mainly hindered by the unfavourable transport properties. The common drawback of ILs as CO2 chemical absorbents (low absorption rate and difficulties in solvent regeneration) are overcome by using ENIL systems. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Performance Analysis of Cold Energy Recovery from CO2 Injection in Ship-Based Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwalong You

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture and storage (CCS technology is one of the practical solutions for mitigating the effects of global warming. When captured CO2 is injected into storage sites, the CO2 is subjected to a heating process. In a conventional CO2 injection system, CO2 cold energy is wasted during this heating process. This study proposes a new CO2 injection system that takes advantage of the cold energy using the Rankine cycle. The study compared the conventional system with the new CO2 injection system in terms of specific net power consumption, exergy efficiency, and life-cycle cost (LCC to estimate the economic effects. The results showed that the new system reduced specific net power consumption and yielded higher exergy efficiency. The LCC of the new system was more economical. Several cases were examined corresponding to different conditions, specifically, discharge pressure and seawater temperature. This information may affect decision-making when CCS projects are implemented.

  10. Effect of dolomite decomposition under CO2 on its multicycle CO2 capture behaviour under calcium looping conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Calle, Antonio de la; Valverde, J. M.; Sánchez-Jiménez, P.E.; Perejón, Antonio; García-Garrido, Cristina; Pérez-Maqueda, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks that hinder the industrial competitiveness of the calcium looping (CaL) process for CO capture is the high temperature (∼930-950 °C) needed in practice to attain full calcination of limestone in a high CO partial pressure environment for short residence times as required. In this work, the multicycle CO capture performance of dolomite and limestone is analysed under realistic CaL conditions and using a reduced calcination temperature of 900 °C, which would serve to ...

  11. Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahdat, Nader

    2013-09-30

    The project provided hands-on training and networking opportunities to undergraduate students in the area of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and transport, through fundamental research study focused on advanced separation methods that can be applied to the capture of CO2 resulting from the combustion of fossil-fuels for power generation . The project team’s approach to achieve its objectives was to leverage existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) course materials and teaching methods to create and implement an annual CCS short course for the Tuskegee University community; conduct a survey of CO2 separation and capture methods; utilize data to verify and develop computer models for CO2 capture and build CCS networks and hands-on training experiences. The objectives accomplished as a result of this project were: (1) A comprehensive survey of CO2 capture methods was conducted and mathematical models were developed to compare the potential economics of the different methods based on the total cost per year per unit of CO2 avoidance; and (2) Training was provided to introduce the latest CO2 capture technologies and deployment issues to the university community.

  12. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld; Berghout, Niels; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience

  13. Thermodynamic assessment of amine based CO2 capture technologies in power plants based on European Benchmarking Task Force methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Manzolini, G.; Macchi, E.; Rezvani, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post combustion CO2 capture (PCC) with amine solvents is seen as one of the possible technologies which can be implemented in the near term to significantly reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants. One of the major concerns for its implementation at large scale in power plants is the high

  14. A low-energy chilled ammonia process exploiting controlled solid formation for post-combustion CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A new ammonia-based process for CO2 capture from flue gas has been developed, which utilizes the formation of solid ammonium bicarbonate to increase the CO2 concentration in the regeneration section of the process. Precipitation, separation, and dissolution of the solid phase are realized in a

  15. A perfluorinated covalent triazine-based framework for highly selective and water-tolerant CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    We designed and synthesized a perfluorinated covalent triazine-based framework (FCTF-1) for selective CO2 capture. The incorporation of fluorine (F) groups played multiple roles in improving the framework\\'s CO 2 adsorption and separation capabilities. Thermodynamically, the strongly polar C-F bonds promoted CO2 adsorption via electrostatic interactions, especially at low pressures. FCTF-1\\'s CO2 uptake was 1.76 mmol g-1 at 273 K and 0.1 bar through equilibrium adsorption, exceeding the CO2 adsorption capacity of any reported porous organic polymers to date. In addition, incorporating F groups produced a significant amount of ultra-micropores (<0.5 nm), which offered not only high gas adsorption potential but also kinetic selectivity for CO2-N 2 separation. In mixed-gas breakthrough experiments, FCTF-1 exhibited an exceptional CO2-N2 selectivity of 77 under kinetic flow conditions, much higher than the selectivity (31) predicted from single-gas equilibrium adsorption data. Moreover, FCTF-1 proved to be tolerant to water and its CO2 capture performance remained excellent when there was moisture in the gas mixture, due to the hydrophobic nature of the C-F bonds. In addition, the moderate adsorbate-adsorbent interaction allowed it to be fully regenerated by pressure swing adsorption processes. These attributes make FCTF-1 a promising sorbent for CO2 capture from flue gas. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Optimal Scheduling and its Lyapunov Stability for Advanced Load-Following Energy Plants with CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, Stephen E.; Bankole, T.; Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.

    2017-10-01

    Citation: Bankole, T., D. Jones, D. Bhattacharyya, R. Turton, and S.E. Zitney, "Optimal Scheduling and its Lyapunov Stability for Advanced Load-Following Energy Plants with CO2 Capture," Accepted for publication in Computers & Chemical Engineering (2017).

  17. Silicon oxynitrides of KCC-1, SBA-15 and MCM-41 for CO 2 capture with excellent stability and regenerability

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of silicon oxynitrides as novel adsorbents for CO 2 capture. Three series of functionalized materials based on KCC-1, SBA-15 and MCM-41 with Si-NH 2 groups were prepared using a simple one-step process via thermal ammonolysis using ammonia gas, and they demonstrated excellent CO 2 capture capabilities. These materials overcome several limitations of conventional amine-grafted mesoporous silica. They offer good CO 2 capture capacity, faster adsorption-desorption kinetics, efficient regeneration and reuse, more crucially excellent thermal and mechanical stability even in oxidative environments, and a clean and green synthesis route, which allows the overall CO 2 capture process to be practical and sustainable. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  18. The environmental impact and risk assessment of CO2 capture, transport and storage - an evaluation of the knowledge base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, J.M.; Ramirez, C.A.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we identify and characterize known and new environmental consequences associated with CO2 capture from power plants, transport by pipeline and storage in geological formations. We have reviewed (analogous) environmental impact assessment procedures and scientific literature on

  19. Tuning the physicochemical properties of diverse phenolic ionic liquids for equimolar CO2 capture by the substituent on the anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congmin; Luo, Huimin; Li, Haoran; Zhu, Xiang; Yu, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2012-02-13

    Phenolic ionic liquids for the efficient and reversible capture of CO(2) were designed and prepared from phosphonium hydroxide and substituted phenols. The electron-withdrawing or electron-donating ability, position, and number of the substituents on the anion of these ionic liquids were correlated with the physicochemical properties of the ionic liquids. The results show that the stability, viscosity, and CO(2)-capturing ability of these ionic liquids were significantly affected by the substituents. Furthermore, the relationship between the decomposition temperature, the CO(2)-absorption capacity, and the basicity of these ionic liquids was quantitatively correlated and further rationalized by theoretical calculation. Indeed, these ionic liquids showed good stability, high absorption capacity, and low absorption enthalpy for CO(2) capture. This method, which tunes the physicochemical properties by making use of substituent effects in the anion of the ionic liquid, is important for the design of highly efficient and reversible methods for CO(2)-capture. This CO(2) capture process using diverse phenolic ionic liquids is a promising potential method for CO(2) absorption with both high absorption capacity and good reversibility. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Development of CO2 Selective Poly(Ethylene Oxide-Based Membranes: From Laboratory to Pilot Plant Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Brinkmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Membrane gas separation is one of the most promising technologies for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2 from various gas streams. One application of this technology is the treatment of flue gases from combustion processes for the purpose of carbon capture and storage. For this application, poly(ethylene oxide-containing block copolymers such as Pebax® or PolyActive™ polymer are well suited. The thin-film composite membrane that is considered in this overview employs PolyActive™ polymer as a selective layer material. The membrane shows excellent CO2 permeances of up to 4 m3(STP·(m2·h·bar−1 (1 bar = 105 Pa at a carbon dioxide/nitrogen (CO2/N2 selectivity exceeding 55 at ambient temperature. The membrane can be manufactured reproducibly on a pilot scale and mounted into flat-sheet membrane modules of different designs. The operating performance of these modules can be accurately predicted by specifically developed simulation tools, which employ single-gas permeation data as the only experimental input. The performance of membranes and modules was investigated in different pilot plant studies, in which flue gas and biogas were used as the feed gas streams. The investigated processes showed a stable separation performance, indicating the applicability of PolyActive™ polymer as a membrane material for industrial-scale gas processing.

  1. Superior capture of CO2 achieved by introducing extra-framework cations into N-doped microporous carbon

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2012-12-21

    We designed and prepared a novel microporous carbon material (KNC-A-K) for selective CO2 capture. The combination of a high N-doping concentration (>10 wt %) and extra-framework cations, which were introduced into carbonaceous sorbents for the first time, endowed KNC-A-K with exceptional CO2 adsorption capabilities, especially at low pressures. Specifically, KNC-A-K exhibited CO2 uptake of 1.62 mmol g -1 at 25 C and 0.1 bar, far exceeding the CO2 adsorption capability of most reported carbon material to date. Single component adsorption isotherms indicated that its CO2/N2 selectivity was 48, which also significantly surpasses the selectivity of conventional carbon materials. Furthermore, breakthrough experiments were conducted to evaluate the CO2 separation capability of KNC-A-K on CO2/N2 (10:90 v/v) mixtures under kinetic flow conditions, and the obtained CO 2/N2 selectivity was as high as 44, comparable to that predicted from equilibrium adsorption data. Upon facile regeneration, KNC-A-K showed constant CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity during multiple mixed-gas separation cycles. Its outstanding low-pressure CO 2 adsorption ability makes KNC-A-K a promising candidate for selective CO2 capture from flue gas. Theoretical calculations indicated that K+ ions play a key role in promoting CO2 adsorption via electrostatic interactions. In addition, we found that HCl molecules anchored in N-doped carbon have a similar promotion effect on CO 2 adsorption, which contradicts the conventional wisdom that the neutralization of basic sites by acids diminishes the adsorption of acidic CO2 gas. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. The importance of CO2 capture and storage: A geopolitical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnsson Filip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 capture and storage (CCS technology is since more than ten years considered one of the key options for the future climate change mitigation. This paper discusses the implications for the further development of CCS, particularly with respect to climate change policy in an international geopolitics context. The rationale for developing CCS should be the over-abundance of fossil fuel reserves (and resources in a climate change context. From a geopolitical point, it can be argued that the most important outcome from the successful commercialisation of CCS will be that fossil fuel-dependent economies with large fossil fuel resources will find it easier to comply with stringent greenhouse gas (GHG reduction targets (i.e. to attach a price to CO2 emissions. This should be of great importance since, from a geopolitical view, the curbing on GHG emissions cannot be isolated from security of supply and economic competition between regions. Thus, successful application of CCS may moderate geopolitical risks related to regional differences in the possibilities and thereby willingness to comply with large emission cuts. In Europe, application of CCS will enhance security of supply by fuel diversification from continued use of coal, especially domestic lignite. Introduction of CCS will also make possible negative emissions when using biomass as a fuel, i.e. in so called Biomass Energy CCS (BECCS. Yet, the development of BECCS relies on the successful development of fossil fuelled CCS since BECCS in itself is unlikely to be sufficient for establishing a cost efficient CCS infrastructure for transport and storage and because BECCS does not solve the problem with the abundant resources of fossil fuels. Results from research and development of capture, transport and storage of CO2 indicate that the barriers for commercialization of CCS should not be technical. Instead, the main barriers for implementation of CCS seem to be how to reach public acceptance

  3. Cauliflower-derived porous carbon without activation for electrochemical capacitor and CO2 capture applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Yu, Yifeng; Lv, Haijun; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Aibing

    2018-01-01

    Carbon materials have attracted great attention in CO2 capture and energy storage due to their excellent characteristics such as tunable pore structure, modulated surface properties and superior bulk conductivities, etc. Biomass, provided by nature with non-toxic, widespread, abundant, and sustainable advantages, is considered to be a very promising precursor of carbons for the view of economic, environmental, and societal issues. However, the preparation of high-performance biomass-derived carbons is still a big challenge because of the multistep process for their synthesis and subsequent activation. Herein, hierarchically porous structured carbon materials have been prepared by directly carbonizing dried cauliflowers without any addition of agents and activation process, featuring with large specific surface area, hierarchically porous structure and improved pore volume, as well as suitable nitrogen content. Being used as a solid-state CO2 adsorbent, the obtained product exhibited a high CO2 adsorption capacity of 3.1 mmol g-1 under 1 bar and 25 °C and a remarkable reusability of 96.7% retention after 20 adsorption/regeneration cycles. Our study reveals that choosing a good biomass source was significant as the unique structure of precursor endows the carbonized product with abundant pores without the need of any post-treatment. Used as an electrode material in electrochemical capacitor, the non-activated porous carbon displayed a fairly high specific capacitance of 228.9 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and an outstanding stability of 99.2% retention after 5000 cycles at 5 A g-1. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. The global carbon nation: Status of CO2 capture, storage and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocs, Elizabeth A.

    2017-07-01

    As the world transitions toward cleaner and more sustainable energy generation, Carbon Capture and Sequestration/Storage (CCS) plays an essential role in the portfolio of technologies to help reduce global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The projected increase in population size and its resulting increase in global energy consumption, for both transportation and the electricity grid —the largest emitters of greenhouse gases, will continue to add to current CO2 emissions levels during this transition. Since eighty percent of today's global energy continues to be generated by fossil fuels, a shift to low-carbon energy sources will take many decades. In recent years, shifting to renewables and increasing energy efficiencies have taken more importance than deploying CCS. Together, this triad —renewables, energy efficiency, and CCS— represent a strong paradigm for achieving a carbon-free world. Additionally, the need to accelerate CCS in developing economies like China and India are of increasing concern since migration to renewables is unlikely to occur quickly in those countries. CCS of stationary sources, accounting for only 20% reduction in emissions, as well as increasing efficiency in current systems are needed for major reductions in emissions. A rising urgency for fifty to eighty percent reduction of CO2 emissions by 2050 and one hundred percent reduction by 2100 makes CCS all that more critical in the transition to a cleaner-energy future globally.

  5. The global carbon nation: Status of CO2 capture, storage and utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocs Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the world transitions toward cleaner and more sustainable energy generation, Carbon Capture and Sequestration/Storage (CCS plays an essential role in the portfolio of technologies to help reduce global greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. The projected increase in population size and its resulting increase in global energy consumption, for both transportation and the electricity grid —the largest emitters of greenhouse gases, will continue to add to current CO2 emissions levels during this transition. Since eighty percent of today’s global energy continues to be generated by fossil fuels, a shift to low-carbon energy sources will take many decades. In recent years, shifting to renewables and increasing energy efficiencies have taken more importance than deploying CCS. Together, this triad —renewables, energy efficiency, and CCS— represent a strong paradigm for achieving a carbon-free world. Additionally, the need to accelerate CCS in developing economies like China and India are of increasing concern since migration to renewables is unlikely to occur quickly in those countries. CCS of stationary sources, accounting for only 20% reduction in emissions, as well as increasing efficiency in current systems are needed for major reductions in emissions. A rising urgency for fifty to eighty percent reduction of CO2 emissions by 2050 and one hundred percent reduction by 2100 makes CCS all that more critical in the transition to a cleaner-energy future globally.

  6. Functional zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-templated porous carbon materials for CO2 capture and enhanced capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingfei; Xia, Wei; Guo, Wenhan; An, Li; Xia, Dingguo; Zou, Ruqiang

    2013-08-01

    Three types of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) with different topological structures and functional imidazolate-derived ligands, namely, ZIF-8, ZIF-68, and ZIF69, have been directly carbonized to prepare porous carbon materials at 1000 °C. These as-synthesized porous carbon materials were activated with fused KOH to increase their surface areas and pore volumes for use in gas storage and supercapacitors. The relationship between the local structure of the products and the composition of the precursors has been investigated in detail. The BET surface areas of the resultant activated carbon materials are 2437 (CZIF8a), 1861 (CZIF68a), and 2264 m(2) g(-1) (CZIF69a). CZIF8a exhibits the highest H2 -storage capacities of 2.59 wt.% at 1 atm and 77 K, whereas CZIF69a has the highest CO2 uptake of 4.76 mmol g(-1) at 1 atm and 273 K, owing to its local structure and pore chemical environment. The specific capacities are calculated from the CV curves. CZIF69a exhibits the highest supercapacitor performance of 168 F g(-1) at a scan speed of 5 mV s(-1). These results indicate that the functional chloride group on the benzimidazolate ligand plays a very important role in improving the surface area, pore volume, and, therefore, CO2-capture and supercapacitor properties of the corresponding porous carbon materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. ASPEN plus modelling of air–steam gasification of biomass with sorbent enabled CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rupesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The work deals with the modelling and simulation of carbon dioxide capture in air–steam gasification of saw dust using ASPEN Plus process simulator. The proposed quasi-steady state model incorporates pyrolysis, tar cracking and char conversion using existing experimental data. Prediction accuracy of the developed model is validated by comparing with available experimental results. Effects of CaO addition in air–steam gasification are analysed through key operating parameters such as gasification temperature, equivalence ratio, steam to biomass ratio and gasification efficiency. Maximum H2 mole fraction of 31.17% is obtained at a temperature of 900 K, equivalence ratio of 0.25, and steam to biomass ratio and sorbent to biomass ratio of unity. The H2 and CO2 mole fractions are found to be increased and decreased by 28.10% and 42.6%, respectively, when compared with the corresponding non- sorbent case.

  8. Controllability and flexibility analysis of CO2 post-combustion capture using piperazine and MEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    -points in the presence of disturbances in the flue gas flow and heat duty is larger using PZ compared to MEA. The settling time for the PZ plant is generally larger than for MEA. However, the PZ plant rejects the disturbances faster and with less variability in the load of the power plant. Furthermore, this study...... indicates that the proposed PI-based control structure can handle large changes in the load provided that the manipulated variables, i.e. lean solvent flow or reboiler duty, do not reach their saturation limit. Additionally, we observed that shortage in the steam supply (reboiler duty) may represent...... a critical operational bottleneck, especially when PZ is being used. The MEA plant controllers drive the system towards drying out/flooding while the CO2 capture rate performance of the PZ plant reduces drastically in the presence of constraints in the availability of steam. These findings suggest the need...

  9. Porous Ionic Polymers as a Robust and Efficient Platform for Capture and Chemical Fixation of Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi; Jin, Yingyin; Aguila, Briana; Meng, Xiangju; Ma, Shengqian; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2017-03-22

    Direct use of atmospheric CO 2 as a C 1 source to synthesize high-value chemicals through environmentally benign processes is of great interest, yet challenging. Porous heterogeneous catalysts that are capable of simultaneously capturing and converting CO 2 are promising candidates for such applications. Herein, a family of organic ionic polymers with nanoporous structure, large surface area, strong affinity for CO 2 , and very high density of catalytic active sites (halide ions) was synthesized through the free-radical polymerization of vinylfunctionalized quaternary phosphonium salts. The resultant porous ionic polymers (PIPs) exhibit excellent activities in the cycloaddition of epoxides with atmospheric CO 2 , outperforming the corresponding soluble phosphonium salt analogues and ranking among the highest of known metal-free catalytic systems. The high CO 2 uptake capacity of the PIPs facilitates the enrichment of CO 2 molecules around the catalytic centers, thereby benefiting its conversion. We have demonstrated for the first time that atmospheric CO 2 can be directly converted to cyclic carbonates at room temperature using a heterogeneous catalytic system under metal-solvent free conditions. Moreover, the catalysts proved to be robust and fully recyclable, demonstrating promising potential for practical utilization for the chemical fixation of CO 2 . Our work thereby paves a way to the advance of PIPs as a new type of platform for capture and conversion of CO 2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Selection of amine combination for CO2 capture in a packed bed scrubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was to test different blends of tertiary amine; triethanolamine (TEA into primary amine; Monoethanolamine (MEA used to capture CO2 in packed bed scrubber with recycle stream. Four different operating parameters: Amine Combination (A, Dilution Water (B, Liquid Flow rate (C, and Gas Flow rate (D were varied to study the behavior of the system. Moreover, Taguchi method was employed to establish the order of importance of different parameters in the process. A 4 factor and 3 level was chosen for the study and it was explored using L9 (34 orthogonal array design. According to 3-level design 0%, 20% and 30% were chosen for A, 10%, 20% and 30% for B, 1 Lmin−1, 1.5 Lmin−1 and 2 Lmin−1 for C, 8 Lmin−1, 16 Lmin−1 and 20 Lmin−1 for D. To understand the effectiveness order of different operating parameters, three factors namely Absorption efficiency (E, Absorption Rate (RA, and Scrubbing Factor (E were calculated upon which the order was compared. The highest efficiency of 92.2% was achieved with 20% TEA. However, with 30% of TEA and 20% solvent mix maximum scrubbing factor (E of 0.63 mol-CO2/mol-Solvent was achieved. As per Taguchi analysis the significance sequence for absorption efficiency (ϕ was B > C > D > A; for absorption rate C > B > D > A and for scrubbing factor it was C > B > D > A. The blending of tertiary amine seemed advantageous for carbon dioxide capture process.

  11. Aminosilane-Functionalized Hollow Fiber Sorbents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2013-07-03

    Increasing carbon dioxide emissions are generally believed to contribute to global warming. Developing new materials for capturing CO2 emitted from coal-fired plants can potentially mitigate the effect of these CO 2 emissions. In this study, we developed and optimized porous hollow fiber sorbents with both improved sorption capacities and rapid sorption kinetics by functionalizing aminosilane (N-(2-aminoethyl)-3- aminoisobutyldimethylmethoxysilane) to cellulose acetate hollow fibers as a "proof of concept". A lumen-side barrier layer was also developed in the aminosilane-functionalized cellulose acetate fiber sorbent to allow for facile heat exchange without significant mass transfer with the bore-side heat transfer fluid. The functionalized cellulose acetate fiber sorbents were characterized by pressure decay sorption measurements, multicomponent column chromatography, FT-IR, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The carbon dioxide sorption capacity at 1 atm is 0.73 mmol/g by using the pressure decay apparatus. Multicomponent column chromatography measurements showed that aminosilane functionalized cellulose acetate fiber sorbent has a CO2 sorption capacity of 0.23 mmol/g at CO2 partial pressure 0.1 atm and 35 C in simulated flue gas. While this capacity is low, our proof of concept positions the technology to move forward to higher capacity with work that is underway. The presence of silicon and nitrogen elements in the elemental analysis confirmed the success of grafting along with FT-IR spectra which showed the absorbance peak (∼810 cm-1) for Si-C stretching. A cross-linked Neoprene material was used to form the lumen-side barrier layer. Preliminary data showed the required reduction in gas permeance to eliminate mixing between shell side and bore side fluid flows. Specifically the permeance was reduced from 10 000 GPUs for the neat fibers to 6.6 ± 0.1 and 3.3 ± 0.3 GPUs for the coated fibers. The selected lumen layer formation materials

  12. A Highly Stable Microporous Covalent Imine Network Adsorbent for Natural Gas Upgrading and Flue Gas CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2016-06-06

    The feasible capture and separation of CO2 and N2 from CH4 is an important task for natural gas upgrading and the control of greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we studied the microporous covalent imine networks (CIN) material prepared through Schiff base condensation and exhibited superior chemical robustness under both acidic and basic conditions and high thermal stability. The material possesses a relatively uniform nanoparticle size of approximately 70 to 100 nm. This network featured permanent porosity with a high surface area (722 m2g-1) and micropores. A single-component gas adsorption study showed enhanced CO2 and CH4 uptakes of 3.32 mmol/g and 1.14 mmol/g, respectively, at 273 K and 1 bar, coupled with high separation selectivities for CO2/CH4, CH4/N2, and CO2/N2 of 23, 11.8 and 211, respectively. The enriched Lewis basicity in the porous skeletons favours the interaction of quadrupolar CO2 and polarizable CH4, resulting in enhanced CH4 and CO2 uptake and high CH4/N2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 selectivities. Breakthrough experiments showed high CO2/CH4, CH4/N2 and CO2/N2 selectivities of 7.29, 40 and 125, respectively, at 298 K and 1 bar. High heats of adsorption for CH4 and CO2 (QstCH4; 32.61 kJ mol-1 and QstCO2; 42.42 kJ mol-1) provide the ultimate validation for the high selectivity. To the best of our knowledge, such a versatile adsorbent material that displays both enhanced uptake and selectivity for a variety of binary gas mixtures, including CO2/ CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2, has not been extensively explored.

  13. Concentrated aqueous piperazine as CO2 capture solvent: detailed evaluation of the integration with a power plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, L.V. van der; Romano, M.C.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Bonalumi, D.; Os, P.J. van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated energetic evaluation has been performed of a reference coal-fired power plant, a power plant with an advanced MEA-based post-combustion CO2 capture plant, and a power plant with a capture plant using concentrated piperazine (PZ) and high-pressure flash regeneration. This comparison

  14. Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Liang; Li, Fanxing; Kim, Ray; Bayham, Samuel; McGiveron, Omar; Tong, Andrew; Connell, Daniel; Luo, Siwei; Sridhar, Deepak; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhenchao; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-09-30

    A novel Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) system is proposed to effectively capture CO2 from existing PC power plants. The work during the past three years has led to an oxygen carrier particle with satisfactory performance. Moreover, successful laboratory, bench scale, and integrated demonstrations have been performed. The proposed project further advanced the novel CDCL technology to sub-pilot scale (25 kWth). To be more specific, the following objectives attained in the proposed project are: 1. to further improve the oxygen carrying capacity as well as the sulfur/ash tolerance of the current (working) particle; 2. to demonstrate continuous CDCL operations in an integrated mode with > 99% coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite) conversion as well as the production of high temperature exhaust gas stream that is suitable for steam generation in existing PC boilers; 3. to identify, via demonstrations, the fate of sulfur and NOx; 4. to conduct thorough techno-economic analysis that validates the technical and economical attractiveness of the CDCL system. The objectives outlined above were achieved through collaborative efforts among all the participants. CONSOL Energy Inc. performed the techno-economic analysis of the CDCL process. Shell/CRI was able to perform feasibility and economic studies on the large scale particle synthesis and provide composite particles for the sub-pilot scale testing. The experience of B&W (with boilers) and Air Products (with handling gases) assisted the retrofit system design as well as the demonstration unit operations. The experience gained from the sub-pilot scale demonstration of the Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process at OSU was able to ensure the successful handling of the solids. Phase 1 focused on studies to improve the current particle to better suit the CDCL operations. The optimum operating conditions for the reducer reactor such as the temperature, char gasification enhancer type, and flow rate were identified. The

  15. Synthesis, characterization and application of 1-(2-cyanoethyl-3-(3-methoxypropaneimidazolium bromide for CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandar Shantini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amine scrubbing is dominating in carbon dioxide (CO2 capturing technology because of its high affinity towards CO2. However, the drawbacks of amine solvents are its high corrosivity and volatility. Ionic liquids (ILs have gained a lot of attention in recent years for CO2 capturing and have been proposed to be one of the promising alternative to the conventional solvents. The objective of this research is to design a new imidazolium based ether-nitrile functionalized ionic liquid of low viscosity to improve CO2 capturing. The molecular structure of the ionic liquid were confirmed by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FTIR. The thermal properties; glass transition temperature, thermal decomposition temperature, and their physical properties; water content and density were determined. The solubility of CO2 in the synthesized ionic liquid was measured using pressure drop method. They showed high thermal stability above 200°C and the glass transition temperature was -49.80°C. The CO2 sorption in the newly synthesized IL was 0.08, 0.12, 0.29, 1.01, 2.30 mol of CO2/mol of IL at pressures 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar respectively.

  16. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Canopy Configurations in Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials of Various Grafting Densities during CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Camille

    2012-01-12

    Novel liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) made of polyetheramine chains tethered onto functionalized silica nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized before and after exposure to CO 2 using NMR, Raman, and ATR FT-IR spectroscopies in order to investigate the effect of the grafting densities on the NOHM canopy structure. Considering the promising tunable properties for CO 2 capture of NOHMs, this study was conducted to provide important structural information to better design NOHMs for CO 2 capture. In order to minimize the CO 2 absorption via enthalpic effect and provide a more accurate assessment of the structural effects, the NOHMs were synthesized without task-specific groups. A greater chain ordering and decreased intermolecular interactions were observed in NOHMs compared to the unbound polymer. This was attributed to the specific structural arrangement of the frustrated canopy. The distinct configuration of grafted polymer chains caused different CO 2 packing and CO 2-induced swelling behaviors between the NOHMs and the unbound polymer. The grafting density influenced the ordering and coupling of the polymer chains and CO 2-induced swelling. Its effect on the CO 2 packing behavior was less pronounced. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Polyvinylidene fluoride/siloxane nanofibrous membranes for long-term continuous CO2 -capture with large absorption-flux enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Feng; Wang, Chi-Sen; Ko, Chia-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Hua; Chang, Kai-Shiun; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Lee, Kueir-Rarn

    2014-02-01

    In a CO2 membrane contactor system, CO2 passes through a hydrophobic porous membrane in the gas phase to contact the amine absorbent in the liquid phase. Consequently, additional CO2 gas is absorbed by amine absorbents. This study examines highly porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/siloxane nanofibrous layers that are modified with hydrophobic fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) functional groups and successfully coated onto a macroporous Al2 O3 membrane. The performance of these materials in a membrane contactor system for CO2 absorption is also investigated. Compared with pristine PVDF nanofibrous membranes, the PVDF/siloxane nanofibrous membranes exhibit greater solvent resistance and mechanical strength, making them more suitable for use in CO2 capture by the membrane contactor. The PVDF/siloxane nanofibrous layer in highly porous FAS-modified membranes can prevent the wetting of the membrane by the amine absorbent; this extends the periods of continuous CO2 absorption and results in a high CO2 absorption flux with a minimum of 500 % enhancement over that of the uncoated membranes. This study suggests the potential use of an FAS-modified PVDF/siloxane nanofibrous membrane in a membrane contactor system for CO2 absorption. The resulting hydrophobic membrane contactor also demonstrates the potential for large-scale CO2 absorption during post-combustion processes in power plants. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Compact, Lightweight Adsorber and Sabatier Reactor for CO2 Capture and Reduction for Consumable and Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Busby, Stacy A.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce (or recycle) life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, and to generate propellant fuels is an important aspect of NASA's concept for future, long duration planetary exploration. One potential approach is to capture and use CO2 from the Martian atmosphere to generate the consumables and propellant fuels. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, continues to develop its regenerable adsorber technology for capturing CO2 from gaseous atmospheres (for cabin atmosphere revitalization and in-situ resource utilization applications) and its Sabatier reactor for converting CO2 to methane and water. Both technologies are based on PCI's Microlith(R) substrates and have been demonstrated to reduce size, weight, and power consumption during CO2 capture and methanation process. For adsorber applications, the Microlith substrates offer a unique resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirements compared to conventional systems. For the Sabatier applications, the combination of the Microlith substrates and durable catalyst coating permits efficient CO2 methanation that favors high reactant conversion, high selectivity, and durability. Results from performance testing at various operating conditions will be presented. An effort to optimize the Sabatier reactor and to develop a bench-top Sabatier Development Unit (SDU) will be discussed.

  20. Dynamic simulation and optimization of an industrial-scale absorption tower for CO2 capturing from ethane gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Pouladi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article considers a process technology based on absorption for CO2 capturing of ethane gas in phase 9 and 10 of south pars in Iran using diethanolamine (DEA as absorbent solvent. This CO2 capture plant was designed to achieve 85% CO2 recovery and obtain 19 ppm the CO2 concentration in the outlet of absorber. ASPEN–HYSYS software was used for the dynamic simulation of a commercial-scale CO2 capture plant and amine Pkg equation was chosen from the fluid property package for calculating the thermodynamic properties of the process. A static approach for optimization was used to evaluate the optimum conditions. This research revealed that pressure variation does not have any considerable changes in the absorption process, while both amine inlet temperature and volumetric flow rate increment enhance the absorption tower efficiency. The effect of temperature was very significant as shown in the dynamic study plots. The optimum condition for CO2 absorption from a stream of ethane gas with molar flow rate of 2118 kg mol h−1 was obtained 75 m3  h−1 of amine at 53 °C and 24 bar. This optimized condition is acceptable from economical, safe as well as feasible point of view.

  1. Pillar[5]arene-based supramolecular organic frameworks for highly selective CO2-capture at ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Li; Li, Haiwei; Tao, Yanchun; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An; Wang, Bo; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2014-11-05

    Low-density, solid-state, porous supramolecular organic frameworks are constructed using pillarenes. The frameworks have a honeycomb-like structure, permanent porosity, high thermal stability, and selective and reversible sorption properties toward CO2. The exceptionally selective CO2-sorption properties (375/1, 339/1) of one framework over N2 and CH4 indicate potential applications in CO2-capture for post-combustion power plants and natural gas sweetening. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Condensation analysis of water vapour in the presence of inert gas(ses) for the CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Sivalingam, S.;Raindl, M.;Gleis, S.;Spliethoff, H.

    2017-01-01

    The vapour in oxy fuel combustion flue gasses can be condensed using an atmospheric condenser in order to separate and capture the CO2. The conditions of heat transfer are considerably impaired in the presence of non-condensable gasses e.g.CO2, and the over all heat transfer coefficient is drastically reduced when compared to that of the pure vapour. The presented experimental works are conducted to determine the effects of CO2 and N2 as non-condensable gasses in the condensation heat transfe...

  3. Effects of Sulfur Doping and Humidity on CO2 Capture by Graphite Split Pore: A Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Xue, Qingzhong; Chang, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Ling, Cuicui; Zheng, Haixia

    2017-03-08

    By use of grand canonical Monte Carlo calculations, we study the effects of sulfur doping and humidity on the performance of graphite split pore as an adsorbent for CO2 capture. It is demonstrated that S doping can greatly enhance pure CO2 uptake by graphite split pore. For example, S-graphite split pore with 33.12% sulfur shows a 39.85% rise in pure CO2 uptake (51.001 mmol/mol) compared with pristine graphite split pore at 300 K and 1 bar. More importantly, it is found that S-graphite split pore can still maintain much higher CO2 uptake than that by pristine graphite split pore in the presence of water. Especially, uptake by 33.12% sulfur-doped S-graphite split pore is 51.963 mmol of CO2/mol in the presence of water, which is 44.34% higher than that by pristine graphite split pore at 300 K and 1 bar. In addition, CO2/N2 selectivity of S-graphite split pore increases with increasing S content, resulting from stronger interactions between CO2 and S-graphite split pore. Moreover, by use of density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that S doping can enhance adsorption energy between CO2 molecules and S-graphene surface at different humidities and furthermore enhance CO2 uptake by S-graphite split pore. Our results indicate that S-graphite split pore is a promising adsorbent material for humid CO2 capture.

  4. Enhanced performance of a biomimetic membrane for Na2CO3 crystallization in the scenario of CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Wenyuan; Lin, Jiuyang; Tækker Madsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Membrane assisted crystallization (MACr) offers an innovative platform for crystallizing Na2CO3, allowing its reuse after CO2 capture from flue gases by an alkaline solution (i.e., NaOH). In this study, the biomimetic aquaporin Inside™ membrane AIM60 was employed to enhance water removal, facilit......Membrane assisted crystallization (MACr) offers an innovative platform for crystallizing Na2CO3, allowing its reuse after CO2 capture from flue gases by an alkaline solution (i.e., NaOH). In this study, the biomimetic aquaporin Inside™ membrane AIM60 was employed to enhance water removal......, a proper control of the supersaturation level induces crystallization of Na2CO3·10H2O crystals with a purity of 99.94%. Hence, the aquaporin Inside™ FO membrane may be a promising alternative to existing methods for Na2CO3 crystallization for its application in a CO2 capture scenario....

  5. Mesoporous fluorocarbon-modified silica aerogel membranes enabling long-term continuous CO2 capture with large absorption flux enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Feng; Chen, Chien-Hua; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Wei, Te-Yu; Lu, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Kai-Shiun

    2013-03-01

    The use of a membrane contactor combined with a hydrophobic porous membrane and an amine absorbent has attracted considerable attention for the capture of CO2 because of its extensive use, low operational costs, and low energy consumption. The hydrophobic porous membrane interface prevents the passage of the amine absorbent but allows the penetration of CO2 molecules that are captured by the amine absorbent. Herein, highly porous SiO2 aerogels modified with hydrophobic fluorocarbon functional groups (CF3 ) were successfully coated onto a macroporous Al2 O3 membrane; their performance in a membrane contactor for CO2 absorption is discussed. The SiO2 aerogel membrane modified with CF3 functional groups exhibits the highest CO2 absorption flux and can be continuously operated for CO2 absorption for extended periods of time. This study suggests that a SiO2 aerogel membrane modified with CF3 functional groups could potentially be used in a membrane contactor for CO2 absorption. Also, the resulting hydrophobic SiO2 aerogel membrane contactor is a promising technology for large-scale CO2 absorption during the post-combustion process in power plants. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  7. CO2 Separation and Capture Properties of Porous Carbonaceous Materials from Leather Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, José M.; Dominguez, Pablo Haro; Arenillas, Ana; Cot, Jaume; Weber, Jens; Luque, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous porous materials derived from leather skin residues have been found to have excellent CO2 adsorption properties, with interestingly high gas selectivities for CO2 (α > 200 at a gas composition of 15% CO2/85% N2, 273K, 1 bar) and capacities (>2 mmol·g−1 at 273 K). Both CO2 isotherms and the high heat of adsorption pointed to the presence of strong binding sites for CO2 which may be correlated with both: N content in the leather residues and ultrasmall pore sizes. PMID:28788352

  8. CO2 Separation and Capture Properties of Porous Carbonaceous Materials from Leather Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Arenillas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous porous materials derived from leather skin residues have been found to have excellent CO2 adsorption properties, with interestingly high gas selectivities for CO2 (α > 200 at a gas composition of 15% CO2/85% N2, 273K, 1 bar and capacities (>2 mmol·g−1 at 273 K. Both CO2 isotherms and the high heat of adsorption pointed to the presence of strong binding sites for CO2 which may be correlated with both: N content in the leather residues and ultrasmall pore sizes.

  9. Oxidative Degradation of Aminosilica Adsorbents Relevant to Postcombustion CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Bollini, Praveen

    2011-05-19

    Coal-fired power plant flue gas exhaust typically contains 3-10% oxygen. While it is known that the monoethanolamine (MEA) oxidative degradation rate is a critical parameter affecting liquid amine absorption processes, the effect of oxygen on the stability of solid amine adsorbents remains unexplored. Here, oxidative degradation of aminosilica materials is studied under accelerated oxidizing conditions to assess the stability of different supported amine structures to oxidizing conditions. Adsorbents constructed using four different silane coupling agents are evaluated, three with a single primary, secondary, or tertiary amine at the end of a propyl surface linker, with the fourth having one secondary propylamine separated from a primary amine by an ethyl linker. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, it was found that both amine type and proximity had a significant effect on oxidative degradation rates. In particular, the supported primary and tertiary amines proved to be stable to the oxidizing conditions used, whereas the secondary amines degraded at elevated treatment temperatures. Because secondary amines are important components of many supported amine adsorbents, it is suggested that the oxidative stability of such species needs to be carefully considered in assessments of postcombustion CO2 capture processes based on supported amines. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. A Life Cycle Assessment Case Study of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation with Humidity Swing Direct Air Capture of CO2 versus MEA-Based Postcombustion Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Giesen, Coen; Meinrenken, Christoph J; Kleijn, René; Sprecher, Benjamin; Lackner, Klaus S; Kramer, Gert Jan

    2017-01-17

    Most carbon capture and storage (CCS) envisions capturing CO2 from flue gas. Direct air capture (DAC) of CO2 has hitherto been deemed unviable because of the higher energy associated with capture at low atmospheric concentrations. We present a Life Cycle Assessment of coal-fired electricity generation that compares monoethanolamine (MEA)-based postcombustion capture (PCC) of CO2 with distributed, humidity-swing-based direct air capture (HS-DAC). Given suitable temperature, humidity, wind, and water availability, HS-DAC can be largely passive. Comparing energy requirements of HS-DAC and MEA-PCC, we find that the parasitic load of HS-DAC is less than twice that of MEA-PCC (60-72 kJ/mol versus 33-46 kJ/mol, respectively). We also compare other environmental impacts as a function of net greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation: To achieve the same 73% mitigation as MEA-PCC, HS-DAC would increase nine other environmental impacts by on average 38%, whereas MEA-PCC would increase them by 31%. Powering distributed HS-DAC with photovoltaics (instead of coal) while including recapture of all background GHG, reduces this increase to 18%, hypothetically enabling coal-based electricity with net-zero life-cycle GHG. We conclude that, in suitable geographies, HS-DAC can complement MEA-PCC to enable CO2 capture independent of time and location of emissions and recapture background GHG from fossil-based electricity beyond flue stack emissions.

  11. Monitoring Shallow Subsurface CO2 Migration using Electrical Imaging Technique, Pilot Site in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, A.; Chang, H. K.; Moreira, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Geological Sequestration (CCGS or CCS) is one of the main technological strategies targeting Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions reduction, with special emphasis on carbon dioxide (CO2) coming from industrial sources. CCGS integrates the so called Carbon Management Strategies, as indicated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and is the basis of main technical route likely to enable substantial emission reduction in a safe, quick and cost-effective way. Currently one of the main challenges in the area of CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient measuring, monitoring and verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. The implementation of the first CO2 MMV field lab in Brazil, located in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina state, offered an excellent opportunity for running controlled release experiments in a real open air environment. The purpose of this work is to present the results of a time lapse monitoring experiment of CO2 migration in both saturated and unsaturated sand-rich sediments, using electrical imaging technique. The experiment covered an area of approximately 6300 m2 and CO2 was continuously injected at depth of 8 m, during 12 days, at an average rate of 90 g/ day, totalizing 1080 g of injected CO2. 2D and 3D electrical images using Wenner array were acquired daily during 13 consecutive days. Comparison of post injection electrical imaging results with pre injection images shows change in resistivity values consistent with migration pathways of CO2. A pronounced increase in resistivity values (up to ~ 500 ohm.m) with respect to the pre-injection values occurs in the vicinity of the injection well. Background values of 530 ohm.m have changed to 1118 ohm.m, right after injection. Changes in resistivity values progressively diminish outward of the well, following

  12. Full Life Cycle Research at the Ketzin Pilot Site, Germany - From Safe and Successful CO2 Injection Operation to Post-Injection Monitoring and Site Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Ketzin pilot site near Berlin, Germany, was initiated in 2004 as the first European onshore storage project for research and development on geological CO2 storage. The operational CO2 injection period started in June 2008 and ended in August 2013 when the site entered the post-injection closure period. During these five years, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into a saline aquifer (Upper Triassic sandstone) at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. In fall 2013, the first observation well was partially plugged in the reservoir section; full abandonment of this well finished in 2015 after roughly 2 years of well closure monitoring. Abandonment of the remaining 4 wells will be finished by 2017 and hand-over of liability to the competent authority is planned for end of 2017. The CO2 injected was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (oxyfuel power plant CO2 with purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. The injection period terminated with a CO2-N2 co-injection experiment of 650 t of a 95% CO2/5% N2 mixture in summer 2013 to study the effects of impurities in the CO2 stream on the injection operation. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 40 - 45°C prior to injection to ensure a single-phase injection process and avoid any phase transition or transient states within the injection facility or the reservoir. Between March and July 2013, just prior to the CO2-N2 co-injection experiment, the injection temperature was stepwise decreased down to 10°C within a "cold-injection" experiment to study the effects of two-phase injection conditions. During injection operation, the combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods enabled detection and mapping of the spatial and temporal in-reservoir behaviour of the injected CO2 even for small quantities. After the cessation of CO2 injection, post-injection monitoring continued and two additional

  13. Theoretical simulation of CO2 capture in organic cage impregnated with polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingyuan; Li, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingping

    2017-04-05

    To explore the adsorption and separation properties of CO2 in a novel material consisting of a series of polyoxometalates (POMs) impregnated within supramolecular porous catenane (shorted as SPC), grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations and ab initio calculations were used. GCMC simulations showed this impregnation can enhance CO2 /CH4 (or CO2 /N2 ) selectivity almost 30 times compared to the bare SPC due to the strong interaction of CO2 with the nPOMs@SPC structures. And, the loading of CO2 inhibits the adsorption of CH4 (or N2 ) as CO2 occupying the preferred adsorption sites. Furthermore, the effect of number, mass, and volume of POMs inserted in SPC on CO2 /CH4 (or CO2 /N2 ) selectivity over large pressure range was investigated in detail. Additionally, the accurate ab initio calculations further confirmed our GCMC simulations. As a result, the proposed nPOMs@SPC structures are promising candidates for CO2 /N2 and CO2 /CH4 separations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Balsam-Pear-Skin-Like Porous Polyacrylonitrile Nanofibrous Membranes Grafted with Polyethyleneimine for Postcombustion CO2Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufei; Guan, Jiming; Wang, Xianfeng; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2017-11-22

    Amine-containing sorbents have been extensively studied for postcombustion carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture because of their ability to chemisorb CO 2 from the flue gas. However, most sorbents are in the form of powders currently, which is not the ideal configuration for the flue gas separation because of the fragile nature and poor mechanical properties, resulting in blocking of the flow pipes and difficult recycling. Herein, we present a novel approach for the facile fabrication of flexible, robust, and polyethyleneimine-grafted (PEI-grafted) hydrolyzed porous PAN nanofibrous membranes (HPPAN-PEI NFMs) through the combination of electrospinning, pore-forming process, hydrolysis reaction, and the subsequent grafting technique. Excitingly, we find that all the resultant porous PAN (PPAN) fibers exhibit a balsam-pear-skin-like porous structure due to the selective removal of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) from PAN/PVP fibers by water extraction. Significantly, the HPPAN-PEI NFMs retain their mesoporosity, as well as exhibit good thermal stability and prominent tensile strength (11.1 MPa) after grafting, guaranteeing their application in CO 2 trapping from the flue gas. When exposed to CO 2 at 40 °C, the HPPAN-PEI NFMs show an enhanced CO 2 adsorption capacity of 1.23 mmol g -1 (based on the overall quantity of the sample) or 6.15 mmol g -1 (based on the quantity of grafted PEI). Moreover, the developed HPPAN-PEI NFMs display significantly selective capture for CO 2 over N 2 and excellent recyclability. The CO 2 capacity retains 92% of the initial value after 20 adsorption-desorption cycle tests, indicating that the resultant HPPAN-PEI NFMs have good long-term stability. This work paves the way for fabricating NFM-based solid adsorption materials endowed with a porous structure applied to efficient postcombustion CO 2 capture.

  15. Synthetic Architecture of MgO/C Nanocomposite from Hierarchical-Structured Coordination Polymer toward Enhanced CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Liu, Wen; Dennis, John S; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2017-03-22

    Highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant solid sorbents are of paramount importance for practical carbon capture, storage, and utilization. Here, we report a novel and facile two-step strategy to synthesize a group of hierarchically structured porous MgO/C nanocomposites using flowerlike Mg-containing coordination polymer as a precursor. The new nanocomposites exhibit superb CO2 capture performance with sorption capacity up to 30.9 wt % (at 27 °C, 1 bar CO2), fast sorption kinetics, and long cycling life. Importantly, the achieved capacity is >14 times higher than that of commercial MgO, and favorably exceeds the highest value recorded to date for MgO-based sorbents under similar operating conditions. On the basis of the morphological and textural property analysis, together with CO2 sorption mechanism study using CO2-TPD and DRIFT techniques, the outstanding performance in CO2 uptake originates from unique features of this type of sorbent materials, which include hierarchical architecture, porous building blocks of nanosheets, high specific surface area (ca. 300 m2/g), evenly dispersed MgO nanocrystallites (ca. 3 nm) providing abundant active sites, and the in situ generated carbon matrix that acts as a stabilizer to prevent the growth and agglomeration of MgO crystallites. The nanocomposite system developed in this work shows good potential for future low-cost CO2 abatement and utilization.

  16. The Role of Ruthenium in CO2 Capture and Catalytic Conversion to Fuel by Dual Function Materials (DFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuoxun Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of sustainable energy technologies and reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are the two effective strategies in dealing with current environmental issues. Herein we report a Dual Function Material (DFM consisting of supported sodium carbonate in intimate contact with dispersed Ru as a promising catalytic solution for combining both approaches. The Ru-Na2CO3 DFM deposited on Al2O3 captures CO2 from a flue gas and catalytically converts it to synthetic natural gas (i.e., methane using H2 generated from renewable sources. The Ru in the DFM, in combination with H2, catalytically hydrogenates both adsorbed CO2 and the bulk Na2CO3, forming methane. The depleted sites adsorb CO2 through a carbonate reformation process and in addition adsorb CO2 on its surface. This material functions well in O2- and H2O-containing flue gas where the favorable Ru redox property allows RuOx, formed during flue gas exposure, to be reduced during the hydrogenation cycle. As a combined CO2 capture and utilization scheme, this technology overcomes many of the limitations of the conventional liquid amine-based CO2 sorbent technology.

  17. A low-energy chilled ammonia process exploiting controlled solid formation for post-combustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2016-10-20

    A new ammonia-based process for CO2 capture from flue gas has been developed, which utilizes the formation of solid ammonium bicarbonate to increase the CO2 concentration in the regeneration section of the process. Precipitation, separation, and dissolution of the solid phase are realized in a dedicated process section, while the packed absorption and desorption columns remain free of solids. Additionally, the CO2 wash section applies solid formation to enable a reduction of the wash water consumption. A rigorous performance assessment employing the SPECCA index (Specific Primary Energy Consumption for CO2 Avoided) has been implemented to allow for a comparison of the overall energy penalty between the new process and a standard ammonia-based capture process without solid formation. A thorough understanding of the relevant solid-solid-liquid-vapor phase equilibria and an accurate modeling of them have enabled the synthesis of the process, and have inspired the development of the optimization algorithm used to screen a wide range of operating conditions in equilibrium-based process simulations. Under the assumptions on which the analysis is based, the new process with controlled solid formation achieved a SPECCA of 2.43 MJ kgCO2-1, corresponding to a reduction of 17% compared to the process without solid formation (with a SPECCA of 2.93 MJ kgCO2-1). Ways forward to confirm this significant improvement, and to increase the accuracy of the optimization are also discussed.

  18. Highly Stable Porous Covalent Triazine-Piperazine Linked Nanoflower as a Feasible Adsorbent for Flue Gas CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2016-02-11

    Here, we report a porous covalent triazine-piperazine linked polymer (CTPP) featuring 3D nanoflower morphology and enhanced capture/removal of CO2, CH4 from air (N2), essential to control greenhouse gas emission and natural gas upgrading. 13C solid-state NMR and FTIR analyses and CHN and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) elemental analyses confirmed the integration of triazine and piperazine components in the network. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses revealed a relatively uniform particle size of approximately 400 to 500 nm with 3D nanoflower microstructure, which was formed by the self-assembly of interwoven and slight bent nanoflake components. The material exhibited outstanding chemical robustness under acidic and basic medium and high thermal stability up to 773 K. The CTPP possess high surface area (779 m2/g) and single-component gas adsorption study exhibited enhanced CO2 and CH4 uptake of 3.48 mmol/g, 1.09 mmol/g, respectively at 273 K, 1 bar; coupled with high sorption selectivities for CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 of 128 and 17, respectively. The enriched Lewis basicity of the CTPP favors the interaction with CO2, which results in an enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity and high CO2/N2 selectivity. The binary mixture breakthrough study for the flue gas composition at 298 K showed a high CO2/N2 selectivity of 82. CO2 heats of adsorption for the CTPP (34 kJ mol−1) were realized at the borderline between strong physisorption and weak chemisorption (QstCO2; 25−50 kJ mol−1) and low Qst value for N2 (22.09 kJ mol−1), providing the ultimate validation for the high selectivity of CO2 over N2.

  19. Efficient and reversible CO2 capture by amine functionalized-silica gel confined task-specific ionic liquid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Aboudi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Simple, efficient and practical CO2 capture method is reported using task-specific ionic liquid (IL supported onto the amine-functionalized silica gel. The results have been shown that both the capacity and rate of the CO2 absorption notably increase in the supported IL/molecular sieve 4 Å system in comparison of homogeneous IL. Additionally, it has shown that the prepared material is capable for reversible carbon dioxide absorption for at least 10 cycles without significant loss of efficiency. The presence of the amine-based IL and the surface bonded amine groups increase the capacity of CO2 absorption even in a CO2/CH4 gas mixture through the formation of ammonium carbamate onto the surface of mesoporous material.

  20. Efficient and reversible CO2 capture by amine functionalized-silica gel confined task-specific ionic liquid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudi, Javad; Vafaeezadeh, Majid

    2015-07-01

    Simple, efficient and practical CO2 capture method is reported using task-specific ionic liquid (IL) supported onto the amine-functionalized silica gel. The results have been shown that both the capacity and rate of the CO2 absorption notably increase in the supported IL/molecular sieve 4 Å system in comparison of homogeneous IL. Additionally, it has shown that the prepared material is capable for reversible carbon dioxide absorption for at least 10 cycles without significant loss of efficiency. The presence of the amine-based IL and the surface bonded amine groups increase the capacity of CO2 absorption even in a CO2/CH4 gas mixture through the formation of ammonium carbamate onto the surface of mesoporous material.

  1. CO2 abatement in the iron and steel industry - the case for carbon capture and storage (CCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Todorut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The steel industry is amongst the most energy-intensive industries also consuming large amounts of coal and emitting significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2. Studies indicate that steelmaking accounts for 6 - 7 % of world anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and 27 % of the total emissions of the world’s manufacturing sector. Steel manufacturers have responded to sustainable resource use and development adopting several measures attaining a reduction in energy consumption of 60 % in the last 50 years. The paper discusses Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS as a CO2 mitigation option, after the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP 21 and in relation to the European Regulation for CO2 measurement, reporting and verification.

  2. Decreasing the Viscosity in CO2 Capture by Amino-Functionalized Ionic Liquids through the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Y; Fan, Xi; Shi, Gui L; Li, Hao R; Wang, Cong M

    2016-03-17

    A strategy for decreasing the viscosity variation in the process of CO2 capture by amino-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) through the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bond was reported. Different with the dramatic increase in viscosity during CO2 uptake by traditional amino-functionalized ILs, slight increase or even decrease in viscosity was achieved through introducing a N or O atom as hydrogen acceptor into amino-functionalized anion, which could stabilize the active hydrogen of produced carbamic acid. Quantum chemical calculations and spectroscopic investigations demonstrated that the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bond between introduced hydrogen acceptor and carbamic acid was the key to avoid the dramatic increase in viscosity during the capture of CO2 by these amino-functionalized ILs.

  3. Stability of a Benzyl Amine Based CO2 Capture Adsorbent in View of Regeneration Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the chemical and thermal stability of a primary amine-functionalized ion-exchange resin (Lewatit VP OC 1065) is studied in view of the potential options of regenerating this sorbent in a CO2 removal application. The adsorbent was treated continuously in the presence of air, different O2/CO2/N2 mixtures, concentrated CO2, and steam, and then the remaining CO2 adsorption capacity was measured. Elemental analysis, BET/BJH analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis were applied to characterize adsorbent properties. This material was found to be thermally and hydrothermally stable at high temperatures. However, significant oxidative degradation occurred already at moderate temperatures (above 70 °C). Temperatures above 120 °C lead to degradation in concentrated dry CO2. Adding moisture to the concentrated CO2 stream improves the CO2-induced stability. Adsorbent regeneration with nitrogen stripping is studied with various parameters, focusing on minimizing the moles of purge gas required per mole of CO2 desorbed. PMID:28405055

  4. Synthesis of trinity metal-organic framework membranes for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Congyang; Meng, Qin; Fan, Zheng; Gao, Congjie

    2014-03-25

    Mixed-matrix membranes and MOF layer membranes were integrated to synthesize novel trinity MOF membranes by using different substrates such as polymeric hollow fiber membranes. The trinity membranes exhibited excellent performance for both H2/CO2 and N2/CO2 separation.

  5. Precipitation regime for selected amino acid salts for CO2 capture from flue gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majchrowicz, Magdalena E.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Groeneveld, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The tendency of alkaline (sodium, potassium and lithium) salts of taurine, β-alanine, sarcosine and L-proline to form precipitates under varying operational conditions of CO2 absorption has been investigated. CO2 absorption experiments have been performed at 293.15 and 313.15 K, at partial pressures

  6. Autothermal reforming of methane with integrated CO2 capture in a novel fluidized bed membrane reactor. Part 1: experimental demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Two fluidized bed membrane reactor concepts for hydrogen production via autothermal reforming of methane with integrated CO2 capture are proposed. Ultra-pure hydrogen is obtained via hydrogen perm-selective Pd-based membranes, while the required reaction energy is supplied by oxidizing part of the

  7. Predicting Aerosol Based Emissions in a Post Combustion CO2 Capture Process Using an Aspen Plus Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Mertens, J.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial scale implementation of post combustion CO2 capture (PCCC) can be hindered by solvent emissions due to its impact on the environment and the operating costs. The issue of aerosol based emissions has only been recently reported for a PCCC process and very little fundamental knowledge is

  8. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture : Part B: Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-01-01

    An important advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as future systems for large scale power generation is the possibility of being efficiently integrated with processes for CO2 capture. Focusing on natural gas power generation, Part A of this work assessed the performances of advanced

  9. Online monitoring of the solvent and absorbed acid gas concentration in a CO2 capture process using monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckeveld, A.C. van; Ham, L.V. van der; Geers, L.F.G.; Broeke, L.J.P. van den; Boersma, B.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    method has been developed for online liquid analysis of the amine and absorbed CO2 concentrations in a postcombustion capture process using monoethanolamine (MEA) as a solvent. Online monitoring of the dynamic behavior of these parameters is important in process control and is currently achieved

  10. New process concepts for CO2 post-combustion capture process integrated with co-production of hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, M.R.M.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansens, P.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a study in advanced post-combustion based on CO2-capture technologies to be integrated within the Hypogyny concept (electricity generation with co-hydrogen production). Two different Hypogen concepts based on integrating IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) and

  11. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr

    2004-04-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies

  12. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre

  13. Pilot project at Hazira, India, for capture of carbon dioxide and its biofixation using microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anant; Choudhary, Piyush; Atri, Neelam; Teir, Sebastian; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to set up a small-scale pilot reactor at ONGC Hazira, Surat, for capturing CO 2 from vent gas. The studies were carried out for CO 2 capture by either using microalgae Chlorella sp. or a consortium of microalgae (Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorococcum humicola). The biomass harvested was used for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. The carbonation column was able to decrease the average 34 vol.% of CO 2 in vent gas to 15 vol.% of CO 2 in the outlet gas of the carbonation column. The yield of Chlorella sp. was found to be 18 g/m 2 /day. The methane yield was 386 l CH 4 /kg VS fed of Chlorella sp. whereas 228 l CH 4 /kg VS fed of the consortium of algae.

  14. Energy and exergy analyses of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture using hot potassium carbonate solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Jin, Hongguang; Gao, Lin; Mumford, Kathryn Anne; Smith, Kathryn; Stevens, Geoff

    2014-12-16

    Energy and exergy analyses were studied for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture using hot potassium carbonate solvent. The study focused on the combined impact of the CO conversion ratio in the water gas shift (WGS) unit and CO2 recovery rate on component exergy destruction, plant efficiency, and energy penalty for CO2 capture. A theoretical limit for the minimal efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was also provided. It was found that total plant exergy destruction increased almost linearly with CO2 recovery rate and CO conversion ratio at low CO conversion ratios, but the exergy destruction from the WGS unit and the whole plant increased sharply when the CO conversion ratio was higher than 98.5% at the design WGS conditions, leading to a significant decrease in plant efficiency and increase in efficiency penalty for CO2 capture. When carbon capture rate was over around 70%, via a combination of around 100% CO2 recovery rate and lower CO conversion ratios, the efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was reduced. The minimal efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was estimated to be around 5.0 percentage points at design conditions in an IGCC plant with 90% carbon capture. Unlike the traditional aim of 100% CO conversion, it was recommended that extremely high CO conversion ratios should not be considered in order to decrease the energy penalty for CO2 capture and increase plant efficiency.

  15. Comparative Assessment of Gasification Based Coal Power Plants with Various CO2 Capture Technologies Producing Electricity and Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjay; Kumar, Prashant; Hosseini, Ali; Yang, Aidong; Fennell, Paul

    2014-02-20

    Seven different types of gasification-based coal conversion processes for producing mainly electricity and in some cases hydrogen (H2), with and without carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, were compared on a consistent basis through simulation studies. The flowsheet for each process was developed in a chemical process simulation tool "Aspen Plus". The pressure swing adsorption (PSA), physical absorption (Selexol), and chemical looping combustion (CLC) technologies were separately analyzed for processes with CO2 capture. The performances of the above three capture technologies were compared with respect to energetic and exergetic efficiencies, and the level of CO2 emission. The effect of air separation unit (ASU) and gas turbine (GT) integration on the power output of all the CO2 capture cases is assessed. Sensitivity analysis was carried out for the CLC process (electricity-only case) to examine the effect of temperature and water-cooling of the air reactor on the overall efficiency of the process. The results show that, when only electricity production in considered, the case using CLC technology has an electrical efficiency 1.3% and 2.3% higher than the PSA and Selexol based cases, respectively. The CLC based process achieves an overall CO2 capture efficiency of 99.9% in contrast to 89.9% for PSA and 93.5% for Selexol based processes. The overall efficiency of the CLC case for combined electricity and H2 production is marginally higher (by 0.3%) than Selexol and lower (by 0.6%) than PSA cases. The integration between the ASU and GT units benefits all three technologies in terms of electrical efficiency. Furthermore, our results suggest that it is favorable to operate the air reactor of the CLC process at higher temperatures with excess air supply in order to achieve higher power efficiency.

  16. Comparative Assessment of Gasification Based Coal Power Plants with Various CO2 Capture Technologies Producing Electricity and Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Seven different types of gasification-based coal conversion processes for producing mainly electricity and in some cases hydrogen (H2), with and without carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, were compared on a consistent basis through simulation studies. The flowsheet for each process was developed in a chemical process simulation tool “Aspen Plus”. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA), physical absorption (Selexol), and chemical looping combustion (CLC) technologies were separately analyzed for processes with CO2 capture. The performances of the above three capture technologies were compared with respect to energetic and exergetic efficiencies, and the level of CO2 emission. The effect of air separation unit (ASU) and gas turbine (GT) integration on the power output of all the CO2 capture cases is assessed. Sensitivity analysis was carried out for the CLC process (electricity-only case) to examine the effect of temperature and water-cooling of the air reactor on the overall efficiency of the process. The results show that, when only electricity production in considered, the case using CLC technology has an electrical efficiency 1.3% and 2.3% higher than the PSA and Selexol based cases, respectively. The CLC based process achieves an overall CO2 capture efficiency of 99.9% in contrast to 89.9% for PSA and 93.5% for Selexol based processes. The overall efficiency of the CLC case for combined electricity and H2 production is marginally higher (by 0.3%) than Selexol and lower (by 0.6%) than PSA cases. The integration between the ASU and GT units benefits all three technologies in terms of electrical efficiency. Furthermore, our results suggest that it is favorable to operate the air reactor of the CLC process at higher temperatures with excess air supply in order to achieve higher power efficiency. PMID:24578590

  17. The role of zinc(II) in the absorption-desorption of CO2 by aqueous NH3, a potentially cost-effective method for CO2 capture and recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Fabrizio; Peruzzini, Maurizio; Barzagli, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The absorption of CO2 by aqueous NH3 solutions has been investigated at atmospheric pressure and 0 degrees C. The CO2 absorption is fast and occurs with high efficiency (88-99%). The maximum CO2-removal efficiency increases slightly with the NH3 concentration. Addition of zinc(II) salts (as chloride, nitrate or sulfate) to the NH3 absorbent solution increases the overall CO2-absorption capacity without appreciably affecting the removal efficiency. Stripping of pure CO2 from HCO3(-) solutions is achieved by adding the calculated amount of ZnII salts, which under ambient conditions lead to rapid release of about 30-35% of the initially captured CO2. At the same time, about 65-70% of the captured CO2 is transformed into solid basic zinc carbonates. The recovery of these valuable solid products and the release of only 1/3 of free CO2 at room temperature and pressure reduces the cost of the overall process of CO2 capture, making it a potentially attractive method for CO2 capture on a larger scale.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition on chabazite (CHA) zeolite membranes for effective post-combustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Lee, Taehee; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Won-Jin; Han, Doug-Young; Baik, Hionsuck; Choi, Nakwon; Choi, Jungkyu

    2014-12-16

    Chabazite (CHA) zeolites with a pore size of 0.37 × 0.42 nm(2) are expected to separate CO2 (0.33 nm) from larger N2 (0.364 nm) in postcombustion flue gases by recognizing their minute size differences. Furthermore, the hydrophobic siliceous constituent in CHA membranes can allow for maintaining the CO2/N2 separation performance in the presence of H2O in contrast with the CO2 affinity-based membranes. In an attempt to increase the molecular sieving ability, the pore mouth size of all silica CHA (Si-CHA) particles was reduced via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a silica precursor (tetraethyl orthosilicate). Accordingly, an increase of the CVD treatment duration decreased the penetration rate of CO2 into the CVD-treated Si-CHA particles. Furthermore, the CVD process was applied to siliceous CHA membranes in order to improve their CO2/N2 separation performance. Compared to the intact CHA membranes, the CO2/N2 maximum separation factor (max SF) for CVD-treated CHA membranes was increased by ∼ 2 fold under dry conditions. More desirably, the CO2/N2 max SF was increased by ∼ 3 fold under wet conditions at ∼ 50 °C, a representative temperature of the flue gas stream. In fact, the presence of H2O in the feed disfavored the permeation of N2 more than that of CO2 through CVD-modified CHA membranes and thus, contributed to the increased CO2/N2 separation factor.

  19. Integration between a demo size post-combustion CO2 capture and full size power plant: an integral approach on energy penalty for different process options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, F. de; Magneschi, G.; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Stienstra, G.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    CO2 capture based on post-combustion capture has the potential to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, this capture process reduces considerably the energy efficiency of the power plant. To reduce this energy penalty, this paper studies different

  20. CO2 capture from air by Chlorella vulgaris microalgae in an airlift photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghizadeh, Aziz; Farhad Dad, Farid; Moghaddasi, Leila; Rahimi, Rahbar

    2017-11-01

    In this work, hydrodynamics and CO2 biofixation study was conducted in an airlift bioreactor at the temperature of 30±2°C. The main objective of this work was to investigate the effect of high gas superficial velocity on CO2 biofixation using Chlorella vulgaris microalgae and its growth. The study showed that Chlorella vulgaris in high input gas superficial velocity also had the ability to grow and remove the CO2 by less than 80% efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. About how to capture and exploit the CO2 surplus that nature, per se, is not capable of fixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Manuel S; Mongili, Beatrice; Fino, Debora; Prieto, M Auxiliadora

    2017-09-01

    Human activity has been altering many ecological cycles for decades, disturbing the natural mechanisms which are responsible for re-establishing the normal environmental balances. Probably, the most disrupted of these cycles is the cycle of carbon. In this context, many technologies have been developed for an efficient CO2 removal from the atmosphere. Once captured, it could be stored in large geological formations and other reservoirs like oceans. This strategy could present some environmental and economic problems. Alternately, CO2 can be transformed into carbonates or different added-value products, such as biofuels and bioplastics, recycling CO2 from fossil fuel. Currently different methods are being studied in this field. We classified them into biological, inorganic and hybrid systems for CO2 transformation. To be environmentally compatible, they should be powered by renewable energy sources. Although hybrid systems are still incipient technologies, they have made great advances in the recent years. In this scenario, biotechnology is the spearhead of ambitious strategies to capture CO2 and reduce global warming. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Development of nitrogen enriched nanostructured carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon adsorbents containing high nitrogen content were developed by templating melamine-formaldehyde resin in the pores of mesoporous silica by nanocasting technique. A series of adsorbents were prepared by altering the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700 °C and characterized in terms of their textural and morphological properties. CO2 adsorption performance was investigated at various temperatures from 30 to 100 °C by using a thermogravimetric analyzer under varying CO2 concentrations. Multiple adsorption-desorption experiments were also carried out to investigate the adsorbent regenerability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the development of nanostructured materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis indicated the development of carbon adsorbents having high nitrogen content. The surface area and pore volume of the adsorbent carbonized at 700 °C were found to be 266 m(2) g(-1) and 0.25 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. CO2 uptake profile for the developed adsorbents showed that the maximum CO2 adsorption occurred within ca. 100 s. CO2 uptake of 0.792 mmol g(-1) at 30 °C was exhibited by carbon obtained at 700 °C with complete regenerability in three adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the developed adsorbents was studied by fitting the experimental data of CO2 uptake to three kinetic models with best fit being obtained by fractional order kinetic model with error% within range of 5%. Adsorbent surface was found to be energetically heterogeneous as suggested by Temkin isotherm model. Also the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2 was observed to increase from ca. 30-44 kJ mol(-1) with increase in surface coverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CO2 capture by nitrogen-doped porous carbons derived from nitrogen-containing hyper-cross-linked polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lishu; Liu, Mingqiang; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, You-Nian

    2017-11-15

    The N-containing hyper-cross-linked polymers with different porosity and polarity were prepared from 4-vinylbenzyl chloride and 4-vinyl pyridine by the suspension polymerization and Friedel-Crafts reaction. A carbonization process by KOH chemical activation was carried out for the N-containing hyper-cross-linked polymers, and hence a series of N-doped porous carbons (NDPC) was easily fabricated. These porous materials were comparatively evaluated for CO2 adsorption. The NDPC were much more efficient than the N-containing hyper-cross-linked polymers for the CO2 capture and the CO2 uptake had a linear correlation to the ultramicropore volume (d ≤ 0.8 nm) with R2 = 0.9737. NDPC-10% possessed the highest CO2 uptake around 270 mg/g, and had the sufficient CO2/N2 selectivity of 20.2 at 273 K and 1.0 bar. The CO2/N2 selectivity of the N-containing hyper-cross-linked polymers was much higher than the NDPC due to the higher nitrogen content. The isosteric heat of adsorption on the N-containing hyper-cross-linked polymers ranged 29.0-41.2 kJ/mol while that on the NDPC was much lower (24.6-29.2 kJ/mol). The NDPC developed in this study may provide promising candidates for the CO2 capture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Energy and exergy analysis of chemical looping combustion technology and comparison with pre-combustion and oxy-fuel combustion technologies for CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sanjay; Kumar, Prashant; Yang, Aidong; Fennell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from conventional coal-based power plants is a growing concern for the environment. Chemical looping combustion (CLC), pre-combustion and oxy-fuel combustion are promising CO2 capture technologies which allow clean electricity generation from coal in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. This work compares the characteristics of the above three capture technologies to those of a conventional IGCC plant without CO2 capture. CLC tech...

  5. Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

  6. Molecular sieve supported ionic liquids as efficient adsorbent for CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [NH3e-mim][BF4], [OHe-mim][BF4] and [HOEAm] were selected and supported onto molecular sieves NaY, USY, SAPO-34 and MCM-41, to prepare supported ionic liquids. It was found that [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY has excellent CO2 adsorption performance, with adsorption capacity of 0.108 mmolCO2/g. This paper investigates the optimal adsorption conditions and recyclability of [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY. The results show that [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY has good CO2 adsorption under the condition of 20°C and 20% ILs loading amount. By vacuum heating, CO2 adsorption capacity reaches 0.451mmolCO2/g at fifth runs and reduces to 0.29mmolCO2/g at tenth runs. The structure and characterization of the [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY was examined by FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TG-DSC. TG-DSC also shows that it has good thermostability below 50°C.

  7. Modeling Effects of Bicarbonate Release on Carbonate Chemistry and pH of the North Sea: A Pilot Study for Atmospheric CO2 Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettmann, K.; Kirchner, J.; Schnetger, B.; Wolff, J. O.; Brumsack, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Rising CO2-emissions accompanying the industrial revolution are the main drivers for climate change and ocean acidification. Several methods have been developed to capture CO2 from effluents and reduce emission. Here, we consider a promising approach that mimics natural limestone weathering: CO2 in effluent gas streams reacts with calcium carbonate in a limestone suspension. The resulting bicarbonate-rich solution can be released into natural systems. In comparison to classical carbon capture and storage (CCS) methods this artificial limestone weathering is cheaper and does not involve using toxic chemical compounds. Additionally there is no need for the controversially discussed storage of CO2 underground. The reduction of CO2-emissions becomes more important for European industries as the EU introduced a system that limits the amount of allowable CO2-emissions. Therefore, large CO2 emitters are forced to find cheap methods for emission reduction, as they often cannot circumvent CO2-production. The method mentioned above is especially of interest for power plants located close to the coast that are already using seawater for cooling purposes. Thus, it is important to estimate the environmental effects if several coastal power plants will release high amounts of bicarbonate-rich waters into coastal waters, e.g. the North Sea. In a first pilot study, the unstructured-grid finite-volume community ocean model (FVCOM) was combined with a chemical submodul (mocsy 2.0) to model the hydrodynamic circulation and mixing of bicarbonate-rich effluents from a gas power plant located at the German North Sea coast. Here, we present the first preliminary results of this project, which include modelled changes of the North Sea carbonate system and changes in pH value after the introduction of these bicarbonate-rich waters on short time scales up to one year.

  8. CO2leakage from carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems affects organic matter cycling in surface marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Amaro, Teresa; Greco, Silvestro; Lo Martire, Marco; Carugati, Laura; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), involving the injection of CO 2 into the sub-seabed, is being promoted worldwide as a feasible option for reducing the anthropogenic CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, the effects on the marine ecosystems of potential CO 2 leakages originating from these storage sites have only recently received scientific attention, and little information is available on the possible impacts of the resulting CO 2 -enriched seawater plumes on the surrounding benthic ecosystem. In the present study, we conducted a 20-weeks mesocosm experiment exposing coastal sediments to CO 2 -enriched seawater (at 5000 or 20,000 ppm), to test the effects on the microbial enzymatic activities responsible for the decomposition and turnover of the sedimentary organic matter in surface sediments down to 15 cm depth. Our results indicate that the exposure to high-CO 2 concentrations reduced significantly the enzymatic activities in the top 5 cm of sediments, but had no effects on subsurface sediment horizons (from 5 to 15 cm depth). In the surface sediments, both 5000 and 20,000 ppm CO 2 treatments determined a progressive decrease over time in the protein degradation (up to 80%). Conversely, the degradation rates of carbohydrates and organic phosphorous remained unaltered in the first 2 weeks, but decreased significantly (up to 50%) in the longer term when exposed at 20,000 ppm of CO 2 . Such effects were associated with a significant change in the composition of the biopolymeric carbon (due to the accumulation of proteins over time in sediments exposed to high-pCO 2 treatments), and a significant decrease (∼20-50% at 5000 and 20,000 ppm respectively) in nitrogen regeneration. We conclude that in areas immediately surrounding an active and long-lasting leak of CO 2 from CCS reservoirs, organic matter cycling would be significantly impacted in the surface sediment layers. The evidence of negligible impacts on the deeper sediments should be

  9. Effective Approach for Increasing the Heteroatom Doping Levels of Porous Carbons for Superior CO2 Capture and Separation Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoaty, Yomna H; Tessema, Tsemre-Dingel; Norouzi, Nazgol; El-Kadri, Oussama M; Turner, Joseph B McGee; El-Kaderi, Hani M

    2017-10-18

    Development of efficient sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas or its removal from natural gas and landfill gas is very important for environmental protection. A new series of heteroatom-doped porous carbon was synthesized directly from pyrazole/KOH by thermolysis. The resulting pyrazole-derived carbons (PYDCs) are highly doped with nitrogen (14.9-15.5 wt %) as a result of the high nitrogen-to-carbon ratio in pyrazole (43 wt %) and also have a high oxygen content (16.4-18.4 wt %). PYDCs have a high surface area (SABET = 1266-2013 m(2) g(-1)), high CO2 Qst (33.2-37.1 kJ mol(-1)), and a combination of mesoporous and microporous pores. PYDCs exhibit significantly high CO2 uptakes that reach 2.15 and 6.06 mmol g(-1) at 0.15 and 1 bar, respectively, at 298 K. At 273 K, the CO2 uptake improves to 3.7 and 8.59 mmol g(-1) at 0.15 and 1 bar, respectively. The reported porous carbons also show significantly high adsorption selectivity for CO2/N2 (128) and CO2/CH4 (13.4) according to ideal adsorbed solution theory calculations at 298 K. Gas breakthrough studies of CO2/N2 (10:90) at 298 K showed that PYDCs display excellent separation properties. The ability to tailor the physical properties of PYDCs as well as their chemical composition provides an effective strategy for designing efficient CO2 sorbents.

  10. Sustainable and hierarchical porous Enteromorpha prolifera based carbon for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanquan; Wang, Ke; Atkinson, John D; Yan, Xinlong; Li, Xiang; Rood, Mark J; Yan, Zifeng

    2012-08-30

    Nitrogen-containing porous carbon was synthesized from an ocean pollutant, Enteromorpha prolifera, via hydrothermal carbonization and potassium hydroxide activation. Carbons contained as much as 2.6% nitrogen in their as-prepared state. Physical and chemical properties were characterized by XRD, N(2) sorption, FTIR, SEM, TEM, and elemental analysis. The carbon exhibited a hierarchical structure with interconnected microporosity, mesoporosity and macroporosity. Inorganic minerals in the carbon matrix contributed to the development of mesoporosity and macroporosity, functioning as an in situ hard template. The carbon manifested high CO(2) capacity and facile regeneration at room temperature. The CO(2) sorption performance was investigated in the range of 0-75°C. The dynamic uptake of CO(2) is 61.4 mg/g and 105 mg/g at 25°C and 0°C, respectively, using 15% CO(2) (v/v) in N(2). Meanwhile, regeneration under Ar at 25°C recovered 89% of the carbon's initial uptake after eight cycles. A piecewise model was employed to analyze the CO(2) adsorption kinetics; the Avrami model fit well with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.98 and 0.99 at 0°C and 25°C, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. New Solid-Base Cu-MgO for CO2 Capture at 473 K and Removal of Nitrosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Y; Dong, Xin Y M; Sun, Xiao D; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Jian H

    2016-11-09

    To fabricate a new solid base with high efficiency in the adsorption of CO2 at 473 K and catalytic activity in the degradation of nitrosamines, magnesium oxalate and copper nitrate are mixed with the assistance of microwave irradiation followed by calcination to immobilize CuO among MgO particles. The binary solid base CuO-MgO is thus moderately reduced to form the Cu-inserted MgO composite with highly exposed strong basic sites, and it can capture 34.6 mg g-1 of CO2 in the harsh instantaneous adsorption at 473 K and keep a high strong basicity while trapping the CO2 mixed with SO2 and NO. Besides this, the new solid base exhibits high activity in the removal of volatile nitrosamine N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), for the first time expanding the application of solid bases to environmental catalysis.

  12. Robust C–C bonded porous networks with chemically designed functionalities for improved CO2 capture from flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Thirion

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective carbon dioxide (CO2 capture requires solid, porous sorbents with chemically and thermally stable frameworks. Herein, we report two new carbon–carbon bonded porous networks that were synthesized through metal-free Knoevenagel nitrile–aldol condensation, namely the covalent organic polymer, COP-156 and 157. COP-156, due to high specific surface area (650 m2/g and easily interchangeable nitrile groups, was modified post-synthetically into free amine- or amidoxime-containing networks. The modified COP-156-amine showed fast and increased CO2 uptake under simulated moist flue gas conditions compared to the starting network and usual industrial CO2 solvents, reaching up to 7.8 wt % uptake at 40 °C.

  13. Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

    2011-06-02

    In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

  14. Amino acid salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture from flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    formed is a decisive factor in determining the effect of precipitation on the process. For the purpose of studying the CO2 loading capacity of amino acid salt solutions, we developed an experimental set-up based on a dynamic analytical mode, with analysis of the effluent gas. Using this set-up, the CO2...... loading capacity of aqueous solutions of the potassium salts of selected amino-acids (glycine, taurine, lysine proline, and glutamic acid) were examined, and the relation between the initial amino acid salt concentration and precipitation ability of each solution were determined. Experiments were...... performed at a partial pressure of CO2 close to 10 kPa, and a total pressure around 100 kPa, and a temperature close to 298 K. The obtained precipitates were analyzed using X-ray diffraction and infra-red spectroscopy. It was verified that the precipitate consisted of the amino acid itself in the case...

  15. Technology options for clean coal power generation with CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Song; Bergins, Christian; Kikkawa, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Hironobu; Kawasaki, Terufumi

    2010-09-15

    The state-of-the-art coal-fired power plant today is about 20% more efficient than the average operating power plants, and can reduce emissions such as SO2, NOx, and mercury to ultra-low levels. Hitachi is developing a full portfolio of clean coal technologies aimed at further efficiency improvement, 90% CO2 reduction, and near-zero emissions, including 700 deg C ultrasupercritical boilers and turbines, post-combustion CO2 absorption, oxyfuel combustion, and IGCC with CCS. This paper discusses the development status, performance and economic impacts of these technologies with focus on post combustion absorption and oxyfuel combustion - two promising CO2 solutions for new and existing power plants.

  16. Polyethyleneimine-Functionalized Polyamide Imide (Torlon) Hollow-Fiber Sorbents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2013-05-24

    Carbon dioxide emitted from existing coal-fired power plants is a major environmental concern due to possible links to global climate change. In this study, we expand upon previous work focused on aminosilane-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents by introducing a new class of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. Different molecular weight PEIs (Mn≈600, 1800, 10 000, and 60 000) were studied as functional groups on polyamide imide (PAI, Torlon) hollow fibers. This imide ring-opening modification introduces two amide functional groups and was confirmed by FTIR attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The carbon dioxide equilibrium sorption capacities of PEI-functionalized Torlon materials were characterized by using both pressure decay and gravimetric sorption methods. For equivalent PEI concentrations, PAI functionalized with lower molecular weight PEI exhibited higher carbon dioxide capacities. The effect of water in the ring-opening reaction was also studied. Up to a critical value, water in the reaction mixture enhanced the degree of functionalization of PEI to Torlon and resulted in higher carbon dioxide uptake within the functionalized material. Above the critical value, roughly 15 % w/w water, the fiber morphology was lost and the fiber was soluble in the solvent. PEI-functionalized (Mn≈600) PAI under optimal reaction conditions was observed to have the highest CO2 uptake: 4.9 g CO2 per 100 g of polymer (1.1 mmol g-1) at 0.1 bar and 35°C with dry 10 % CO2/90 % N2 feed for thermogravimetric analysis. By using water-saturated feeds (10 % CO2/90 % N2 dry basis), CO2 sorption was observed to increase to 6.0 g CO2 per 100 g of sorbent (1.4 mmol g-1). This material also demonstrated stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption operations, even under wet conditions at which some highly effective sorbents tend to lose performance. Thus, PEI-functionalized PAI fibers can be

  17. Modified dolomite in biomass gasification with simultaneous tar reformation and CO2 capture: effect of metal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Felice, L.; Courson, C.; Foscolo, P. U.; Kiennemann, A.

    2011-03-01

    The CO2 absorption capacity of calcined dolomite [a (CaMg)O solid solution] doped with iron and nickel transition metals has been investigated in a fixed bed reactor operating at temperature conditions (650°C) at which the sorption process is thermodynamically favoured at ambient pressure. The presence of metals (catalytic sites) between CaO grains (CO2 absorption sites) may improve the potential of dolomite for the simultaneous process of catalytic tar reforming and CO2 capture in biomass gasification, with the aim of developing an effective combined catalyst and sorbent particle. It was found that iron and nickel may be optimised in the substrate reducing critical limitations on CO2 capture capacity. A Sorption Enhanced Reforming test is proposed, at 650°C, for both iron and nickel doped calcined dolomite, using toluene as model tar compound: iron has been found to be not active in such conditions, whereas the 4% Ni/(CaMg)O has been indicated as the most suitable combined catalyst and sorbent particle.

  18. Water Vapor Adsorption on Biomass Based Carbons under Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Conditions: Effect of Post-Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausika Querejeta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of post-treatment upon the H2O adsorption performance of biomass-based carbons was studied under post-combustion CO2 capture conditions. Oxygen surface functionalities were partially replaced through heat treatment, acid washing, and wet impregnation with amines. The surface chemistry of the final carbon is strongly affected by the type of post-treatment: acid treatment introduces a greater amount of oxygen whereas it is substantially reduced after thermal treatment. The porous texture of the carbons is also influenced by post-treatment: the wider pore volume is somewhat reduced, while narrow microporosity remains unaltered only after acid treatment. Despite heat treatment leading to a reduction in the number of oxygen surface groups, water vapor adsorption was enhanced in the higher pressure range. On the other hand acid treatment and wet impregnation with amines reduce the total water vapor uptake thus being more suitable for post-combustion CO2 capture applications.

  19. Water Vapor Adsorption on Biomass Based Carbons under Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Conditions: Effect of Post-Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta, Nausika; Plaza, Marta G.; Rubiera, Fernando; Pevida, Covadonga

    2016-01-01

    The effect of post-treatment upon the H2O adsorption performance of biomass-based carbons was studied under post-combustion CO2 capture conditions. Oxygen surface functionalities were partially replaced through heat treatment, acid washing, and wet impregnation with amines. The surface chemistry of the final carbon is strongly affected by the type of post-treatment: acid treatment introduces a greater amount of oxygen whereas it is substantially reduced after thermal treatment. The porous texture of the carbons is also influenced by post-treatment: the wider pore volume is somewhat reduced, while narrow microporosity remains unaltered only after acid treatment. Despite heat treatment leading to a reduction in the number of oxygen surface groups, water vapor adsorption was enhanced in the higher pressure range. On the other hand acid treatment and wet impregnation with amines reduce the total water vapor uptake thus being more suitable for post-combustion CO2 capture applications. PMID:28773488

  20. The Potential of CO2 Capture and Storage Technology in South Africa’s Coal-Fired Thermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin O. Yoro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The global atmospheric concentration of anthropogenic gases, such as carbon dioxide, has increased substantially over the past few decades due to the high level of industrialization and urbanization that is occurring in developing countries, like South Africa. This has escalated the challenges of global warming. In South Africa, carbon capture and storage (CCS from coal-fired power plants is attracting increasing attention as an alternative approach towards the mitigation of carbon dioxide emission. Therefore, innovative strategies and process optimization of CCS systems is essential in order to improve the process efficiency of this technology in South Africa. This review assesses the potential of CCS as an alternative approach to reducing the amount CO2 emitted from the South African coal-fired power plants. It examines the various CCS processes that could be used for capturing the emitted CO2. Finally, it proposes the use of new adsorbents that could be incorporated towards the improvement of CCS technology.

  1. Investigation of Redox Metal Oxides for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion and CO2 Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, Nathan Lee

    The chemical looping combustion (CLC) process uses metal oxides, also referred to as oxygen carriers, in a redox scheme for conversion of carbonaceous fuels into a concentrated stream of CO2 and steam while also producing heat and electricity. The unique redox scheme of CLC allows CO2 capture with minimal energy penalty. The CLC process performance greatly depends on the oxygen carrier that is chosen. To date, more than 1000 oxygen carriers have been developed for chemical-looping processes using metal oxides containing first-row transition metals. Oxygen carriers are typically mixed with an inert ceramic support to improve their overall mechanical stability and recyclability. This study focuses on design of (i) iron oxide oxygen carriers for conversion of gaseous carbonaceous fuels and (ii) development of perovskite CaMnO 3-d with improved stability and redox properties for conversion of solid fuels. Iron oxide is cheap and environmentally benign. However, it suffers from low activity with carbonaceous fuels due partially to the low ionic conductivity of iron oxides. In order to address the low activity of iron-oxide-based oxygen carriers, support addition has been shown to lower the energy barrier of oxygen anion transport within the oxygen carrier. This work adds a mixed-ionic-and-electronic-conductor (MIEC) support to iron oxide to help facilitate O2- transport inside the lattice of iron oxide. The MIEC-supported iron oxide is compared to commonly used supports including TiO2 and Al2O 3 and the pure ionic conductor support yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) for conversion of different carbonaceous fuels and hydrogen. Results show that the MIEC-supported iron oxide exhibits up to 70 times higher activity than non-MIEC-supported iron oxides for methane conversion. The MIEC supported iron oxide also shows good recyclability with only minor agglomeration and carbon formation observed. The effect of support-iron oxide synergies is further investigated to understand

  2. Development of a mechanistic model for prediction of CO2capture from gas mixtures by amine solutions in porous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Mehdi; Marjani, Azam; Shirazian, Saeed

    2017-06-01

    A mechanistic model was developed in order to predict capture and removal of CO 2 from air using membrane technology. The considered membrane was a hollow-fiber contactor module in which gas mixture containing CO 2 was assumed as feed while 2-amino-2-metyl-1-propanol (AMP) was used as an absorbent. The mechanistic model was developed according to transport phenomena taking into account mass transfer and chemical reaction between CO 2 and amine in the contactor module. The main aim of modeling was to track the composition and flux of CO 2 and AMP in the membrane module for process optimization. For modeling of the process, the governing equations were computed using finite element approach in which the whole model domain was discretized into small cells. To confirm the simulation findings, model outcomes were compared with experimental data and good consistency was revealed. The results showed that increasing temperature of AMP solution increases CO 2 removal in the hollow-fiber membrane contactor.

  3. Facile synthesis of triazine-triphenylamine-based microporous covalent polymer adsorbent for flue gas CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Swapan Kumar

    2017-07-17

    The sustainable capture and sequestration of CO2 from flue gas emission is an important and unavoidable challenge to control greenhouse gas release and climate change. In this report, we describe a triazine-triphenylamine-based microporous covalent organic polymer under mild synthetic conditions. 13C and 15N solid-state NMR and FTIR analyses confirm the linkage of the triazine and triphenylamine components in the porous polymer skeleton. The material is composed of spherical particles 1.0 to 2.0 μm in size and possesses a high surface area (1104 m2/g). The material exhibits superb chemical robustness under acidic and basic conditions and high thermal stability. Single-component gas adsorption exhibits an enhanced CO2 uptake of 3.12 mmol/g coupled with high sorption selectivity for CO2/N2 of 64 at 273 K and 1 bar, whereas the binary gas mixture breakthrough study using a model flue gas composition at 298 K shows a high CO2/N2 selectivity of 58. The enhanced performance is attributed to the high Lewis basicity of the framework, as it favors the interaction with CO2.

  4. highly selective amino acid salt solutions as absorption liquid for CO(2) capture in gas-liquid membrane contactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Katja; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Mengers, Harro; Brilman, Wim; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-08-23

    The strong anthropogenic increase in the emission of CO(2) and the related environmental impact force the developments towards sustainability and carbon capture and storage (CCS). In the present work, we combine the high product yields and selectivities of CO(2) absorption processes with the advantages of membrane technology in a membrane contactor for the separation of CO(2) from CH(4) using amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquid to alkanol amine solutions. Amino acids, such as sarcosine, have the same functionality as alkanol amines (e.g., monoethanolamine=MEA), but in contrast, they exhibit a better oxidative stability and resistance to degradation. In addition, they can be made nonvolatile by adding a salt functionality, which significantly reduces the liquid loss due to evaporation at elevated temperatures in the desorber. Membrane contactor experiments using CO(2)/CH(4) feed mixtures to evaluate the overall process performance, including a full absorption/desorption cycle show that even without a temperature difference between absorber and desorber, a CO(2)/CH(4) selectivity of over 70 can be easily achieved with the sarcosine salt solution as absorption liquid. This selectivity reaches values of 120 at a temperature difference between absorber and desorber of 35 degrees C, compared to a value of only 60 for MEA under the same conditions. Although CO(2) permeance values are somewhat lower than the values obtained for MEA, the results clearly show the potential of amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquids for the energy efficient removal of CO(2). In addition, due to the low absorption of CH(4) in sarcosine compared to MEA, the loss of CH(4) is reduced and significantly higher CH(4) product yields can be obtained.

  5. CO2 Capture and Separation Properties in the Ionic Liquid 1-n-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Nonafluorobutylsulfonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Zhou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of ionic liquids (ILs for carbon capture and separation processes has gained great interest by many researchers due to the high solubility of CO2 in ILs. In the present work, solubility measurements of CO2 in the novel IL 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nonafluorobutylsulfonate [C4mim][CF3CF2CF2CF2SO3] were performed with a high-pressure view-cell technique in the temperature range from 293.15 to 343.15 K and pressures up to about 4.2 MPa. For comparison, solubilities of H2, N2, and O2 in the IL were also measured at 323.15 K via the same procedure. The Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation was employed to correlate the measured solubility data. Henry’s law constants, enthalpies, and entropies of absorption for CO2 in the IL were also determined and presented. The CO2 solubility in this IL was compared with other ILs sharing the same cation. It was shown that the solubility of CO2 in these ILs follows the sequence: [C4mim][CF3CF2CF2CF2SO3] ≈ [C4mim][Tf2N] > [C4mim][CF3CF2CF2COO] > [C4mim][BF4], and the solubility selectivity of CO2 relative to O2, N2, and H2 in [C4mim][CF3CF2CF2CF2SO3] was 8, 16, and 22, respectively. Furthermore, this IL is regenerable and exhibits good stability. Therefore, the IL reported here would be a promising sorbent for CO2.

  6. A comparison of electricity and hydrogen production systems with CO2 capture and storage. Part B: Chain analysis of promising CCS options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, K.J.; van Troost, M.M.; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X; Turkenburg, W.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073416355

    2007-01-01

    Promising electricity and hydrogen production chains with CO2 capture, transport and storage (CCS) and energy carrier transmission, distribution and end-use are analysed to assess (avoided) CO2 emissions, energy production costs and CO2 mitigation costs. For electricity chains, the performance is

  7. Carbamate Stabilities of Sterically Hindered Amines from Quantum Chemical Methods: Relevance ofr CO2 Capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gangarapu, S.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of electronic and steric effects on the stabilities of carbamates formed from the reaction of CO2 with a wide range of alkanolamines was investigated by quantum chemical methods. For the calculations, B3LYP, M11-L, MP2, and spin-component-scaled MP2 (SCS-MP2) methods were used, coupled

  8. Directing the structural features of N(2)-phobic nanoporous covalent organic polymers for CO(2) capture and separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Je, Sang Hyun; Park, Joonho; Jung, Yousung; Coskun, Ali; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2014-01-13

    A family of azo-bridged covalent organic polymers (azo-COPs) was synthesized through a catalyst-free direct coupling of aromatic nitro and amine compounds under basic conditions. The azo-COPs formed 3D nanoporous networks and exhibited surface areas up to 729.6 m(2)  g(-1) , with a CO2 -uptake capacity as high as 2.55 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 1 bar. Azo-COPs showed remarkable CO2 /N2 selectivities (95.6-165.2) at 298 K and 1 bar. Unlike any other porous material, CO2 /N2 selectivities of azo-COPs increase with rising temperature. It was found that azo-COPs show less than expected affinity towards N2 gas, thus making the framework "N2 -phobic", in relative terms. Our theoretical simulations indicate that the origin of this unusual behavior is associated with the larger entropic loss of N2 gas molecules upon their interaction with azo-groups. The effect of fused aromatic rings on the CO2 /N2 selectivity in azo-COPs is also demonstrated. Increasing the π-surface area resulted in an increase in the CO2 -philic nature of the framework, thus allowing us to reach a CO2 /N2 selectivity value of 307.7 at 323 K and 1 bar, which is the highest value reported to date. Hence, it is possible to combine the concepts of "CO2 -philicity" and "N2 -phobicity" for efficient CO2 capture and separation. Isosteric heats of CO2 adsorption for azo-COPs range from 24.8-32.1 kJ mol(-1) at ambient pressure. Azo-COPs are stable up to 350 °C in air and boiling water for a week. A promising cis/trans isomerization of azo-COPs for switchable porosity is also demonstrated, making way for a gated CO2 uptake. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Potentiel des méthodes de séparation et stockage du CO2 dans la lutte contre l'effet de serreThe role of CO2 capture and sequestration in mitigation of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Ducroux, René

    2003-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric level of greenhouse gases are causing global warming and putting at risk the global climate system. The main anthropogenic greenhouse gas is CO 2. Technical solutions exist to reduce CO 2 emission and stabilise atmospheric CO 2 concentration, including energy saving and energy efficiency, switch to lower carbon content fuels like natural gas and to energy sources that operate with zero CO 2 emissions such as renewable or nuclear energy, enhance the natural sinks for CO 2 (forests, soils, etc.), and last but not least, sequester CO 2 from fossil fuels combustion. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the technology and cost for capture and storage of CO 2. Some of the factors that will influence application, including environmental impact, cost and efficiency, are also discussed. Capturing CO 2 and storing it in underground geological reservoirs appears as the best environmentally acceptable option. It can be done with existing technology; however, substantial R&D is needed to improve available technology and to lower the cost. Applicable to large CO 2 emitting industrial facilities such as power plants, cement factories, steel industry, etc., which amount to more than 30% of the global anthropogenic CO 2 emission, it represents a valuable tool in the battle against global warming. To cite this article: P. Jean-Baptiste, R. Ducroux, C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  10. Advances in Model-Based Design of Flexible and Prompt Energy Systems -- The CO2 Capture Plant at the Buggenum IGCC Power Station as a Test Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-combustion CO2 capture applied to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is a promising technical solution to reduce CO2 emissions due to fossil-fuelled electricity generation in order to meet environmental targets in a carbon-constrained future. The pre-combustion capture

  11. CO2 capture with solid sorbents: materials characterization and reaction kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Biasin, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The enormous anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide is most likely one of the main reasons for the global warming and the climate change problems ([1], [2], [3]). Considering the continuing and progressively growing utilization of fossil fuels, mainly in the power generation sector where fossil fuel-based combustion and gasification power plants are predominant, the development and implementation of processes that avoid the associated CO2 emissions must be urgently identified. Carbon dioxid...

  12. Efficiency enhancement for natural gas liquefaction with CO2 capture and sequestration through cycles innovation and process optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulkarem, Abdullah

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants are energy intensive. As a result, the power plants operating these LNG plants emit high amounts of CO2 . To mitigate global warming that is caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) using amine absorption is proposed. However, the major challenge of implementing this CCS system is the associated power requirement, increasing power consumption by about 15--25%. Therefore, the main scope of this work is to tackle this challenge by minimizing CCS power consumption as well as that of the entire LNG plant though system integration and rigorous optimization. The power consumption of the LNG plant was reduced through improving the process of liquefaction itself. In this work, a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize a propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) LNG plant modeled using HYSYS software. An optimization platform coupling Matlab with HYSYS was developed. New refrigerant mixtures were found, with savings in power consumption as high as 13%. LNG plants optimization with variable natural gas feed compositions was addressed and the solution was proposed through applying robust optimization techniques, resulting in a robust refrigerant which can liquefy a range of natural gas feeds. The second approach for reducing the power consumption is through process integration and waste heat utilization in the integrated CCS system. Four waste heat sources and six potential uses were uncovered and evaluated using HYSYS software. The developed models were verified against experimental data from the literature with good agreement. Net available power enhancement in one of the proposed CCS configuration is 16% more than the conventional CCS configuration. To reduce the CO2 pressurization power into a well for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, five CO2 pressurization methods were explored. New CO2 liquefaction cycles were developed and modeled using HYSYS software. One of the developed

  13. How much CO2 does vegetation capture in tropical cities? Case study of a residential neighborhood in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S.; Quak, M.; Seth, N.; Norford, L.

    2012-12-01

    Urban vegetation might have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly in cities with extensive and/or evergreen vegetation. In a few urban sites negative daytime CO2 fluxes during the growing season have been observed. These sites correspond to suburban neighborhoods with abundant vegetation and low population density. Usually urban surfaces are net sources of CO2 modulated in some cases by vegetation during daytime. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is a difficult task due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the CO2 flux from a residential neighborhood in Singapore using two different approaches. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance were compared with emissions estimated by emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should primarily correspond to the biogenic flux. Independently, a tree survey was conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations and an alternative model of the theory of metabolic ecology for tropical forests. This model predicts the biomass growth rate of woody trees as a function of their size. Palm trees were also included in the survey, but their annual CO2 uptake was obtained from growth curves/rates published in the literature. Both approaches suggest that vegetation captures between 5% and 8% of the CO2 emitted in this neighborhood. Annual uptakes of 510 and 324 ton km-2 were obtained from the difference between measured fluxes and estimated emissions, and the approach based on allometric equations, respectively. The difference between both approaches can be due to uncertainties in the emissions estimates and

  14. Preparation and characterization of a solid amine adsorbent for capturing CO2 by grafting allylamine onto PAN fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Li, Haichao; Chen, Shuixia; Zhao, Yongning; Li, Qihan

    2010-09-07

    Solid amine adsorbents using synthetic fibers instead of silica as the matrix are expected to offer more benefits for the adsorption of CO(2) because of high external surface area, low pressure drops, and flexibility of the matrix fibers. A novel kind of solid amine-containing fibrous adsorbent (PAN-AF) was prepared by preirradiation grafting copolymerization of allylamine onto polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber, using the redox system of (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8)/NaHSO(3) as initiator. The effects of the reaction conditions such as reaction time, temperature, monomer concentration, amount of the initiator on grafting degree were studied. The results showed that the optimal conditions for the grafting copolymerization were using 50% allylamine monomer (V/V) and 1.5% (W/V) initiator and reacting at 100 degrees C for 10 h. FTIR was employed to characterize the corresponding changes on the surface chemical structure of PAN and PAN-AF. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to evaluate the thermal stability of the materials. Equilibrium adsorption capacities for CO(2) and regeneration behaviors of PAN-AF were determined. Adsorption capacity for CO(2) of PAN-AF with 60.0 wt % grafting degree was 6.22 mmol CO(2)/g PAN-AF. PAN-AF could be completely regenerated by heating in boiling water for 30 min. The CO(2) adsorption performance of the regenerated PAN-AF was almost the same as that of the fresh adsorbent after several cycles, which revealed that PAN-AF exhibited good regenerating stability. The high speed and effective regeneration process proves that PAN-AF has great potential in industrial applications for CO(2) capture.

  15. Effects of Bonding Types and Functional Groups on CO 2 Capture using Novel Multiphase Systems of Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2011-08-01

    Novel liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) which possess unique features including negligible vapor pressure and a high degree of tunability were synthesized and their physical and chemical properties as well as CO 2 capture capacities were investigated. NOHMs can be classified based on the synthesis methods involving different bonding types, the existence of linkers, and the addition of task-specific functional groups including amines for CO 2 capture. As a canopy of polymeric chains was grafted onto the nanoparticle cores, the thermal stability of the resulting NOHMs was improved. In order to isolate the entropy effect during CO 2 capture, NOHMs were first prepared using polymers that do not contain functional groups with strong chemical affinity toward CO 2. However, it was found that even ether groups on the polymeric canopy contributed to CO 2 capture in NOHMs via Lewis acid-base interactions, although this effect was insignificant compared to the effect of task-specific functional groups such as amine. In all cases, a higher partial pressure of CO 2 was more favorable for CO 2 capture, while a higher temperature caused an adverse effect. Multicyclic CO 2 capture tests confirmed superior recyclability of NOHMs and NOHMs also showed a higher selectivity toward CO 2 over N 2O, O 2 and N 2. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Thermodynamic and Process Modelling of Gas Hydrate Systems in CO2 Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen

    A novel gas separation technique based on gas hydrate formation (solid precipitation) is investigated by means of thermodynamic modeling and experimental investigations. This process has previously been proposed for application in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases......-Plus-Association equation of state and the van der Waals-Platteeuw hydrate model is presented. This model enables the performance of a thermodynamic evaluation of gas hydrate forming systems relevant for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. All model details and complete lists of model parameters are provided. Three...... simplified carbon dioxide capture processes are simulated by use of the model. Three to four capture stages are needed in all processes to obtain a product stream richer than 95 mole percent in terms of carbon dioxide. The modeling results presented here are discouraging for the post-combustion carbon...

  17. Tuning the Basicity of Ionic Liquids for Equimolar CO(2) Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Wang, Xiqing [ORNL; Li, Haoran [Zhejiang University; Luo, Xiaoyan [Zhejiang University; Luo, Huimin [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Basic ionic liquids (ILs) based on a phosphonium hydroxide derivative can be tuned for CO{sub 2} capture by varying the weak proton donors, which have different pK{sub a} values. The stability, absorption capacity, and absorption enthalpy of the ILs could be easily tuned: the best IL for CO{sub 2} capture has good stability (>300 C), energy saving (ca. 56 kJ mol{sup -1}), and equimolar absorption capability.

  18. Imine-Linked Polymer Based Nitrogen-Doped Porous Activated Carbon for Efficient and Selective CO2 Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabadi, Akram; Abbood, Hayder A.; Li, Qingyin; Jing, Ni; Tan, Bien

    2016-12-01

    The preparation of nitrogen-doped activated carbon (NACs) has received significant attention because of their applications in CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) owing to abundant nitrogen atoms on their surface and controllable pore structures by carefully controlled carbonization. We report high-surface-area porous N-doped activated carbons (NAC) by using soft-template-assisted self-assembly followed by thermal decomposition and KOH activation. The activation process was carried out under different temperature conditions (600-800 °C) using polyimine as precursor. The NAC-800 was found to have a high specific surface area (1900 m2 g-1), a desirable micropore size below 1 nm and, more importantly, a large micropore volume (0.98 cm3 g-1). NAC-800 also exhibits a significant capacity of CO2 capture i.e., over 6. 25 and 4.87 mmol g-1 at 273 K and 298 K respectively at 1.13 bar, which is one of among the highest values reported for porous carbons so far. Moreover, NAC also shows an excellent separation selectivity for CO2 over N2.

  19. Research and development of CO2 Capture and Storage Technologies in Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Pilař

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research project on the suitability of post-combustion CCS technology in the Czech Republic. It describes the ammonia CO2 separation method and its advantages and disadvantages. The paper evaluates its impact on the recent technology of a 250 MWe lignite coal fired power plant. The main result is a decrease in electric efficiency by 11 percentage points, a decrease in net electricity production by 62 MWe, and an increase in the amount of waste water. In addition, more consumables are needed.

  20. NREL's Cyanobacteria Engineering Shortens Biofuel Production Process, Captures CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    This highlight describes NREL's work to systematically analyze the flow of energy in a photosynthetic microbe and show how the organism adjusts its metabolism to meet the increased energy demand for making ethylene. This work successfully demonstrates that the organism could cooperate by stimulating photosynthesis. The results encourage further genetic engineering for the conversion of CO2 to biofuels and chemicals. This highlight is being developed for the September 2015 Alliance S&T Board meeting. biofuels and chemicals. This highlight is being developed for the September 2015 Alliance S&T Board meeting.

  1. Popcorn-Derived Porous Carbon for Energy Storage and CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ting; Chen, Chunlin; Li, Xing; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-16

    Porous carbon materials have drawn tremendous attention due to its applications in energy storage, gas/water purification, catalyst support, and other important fields. However, producing high-performance carbons via a facile and efficient route is still a big challenge. Here we report the synthesis of microporous carbon materials by employing a steam-explosion method with subsequent potassium activation and carbonization of the obtained popcorn. The obtained carbon features a large specific surface area, high porosity, and doped nitrogen atoms. Using as an electrode material in supercapacitor, it displays a high specific capacitance of 245 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and a remarkable stability of 97.8% retention after 5000 cycles at 5 A g(-1). The product also exhibits a high CO2 adsorption capacity of 4.60 mmol g(-1) under 1066 mbar and 25 °C. Both areal specific capacitance and specific CO2 uptake are directly proportional to the surface nitrogen content. This approach could thus enlighten the batch production of porous nitrogen-doped carbons for a wide range of energy and environmental applications.

  2. Poly(ethyleneimine) infused and functionalized Torlon®-silica hollow fiber sorbents for post-combustion CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials functionalized with amine-containing reagents are emerging as an important class of materials for capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymeric silica hollow fiber sorbents are fabricated through the proven dry-jet/wet-quench spinning process. In our study, a new technique for functionalizing polymeric silica hollow fiber sorbents with poly(ethyleneimine), followed by a post-spinning infusion step was studied. This two step process introduces a sufficient amount of poly(ethyleneimine) to the polymeric silica hybrid material support to improve the CO2 sorption capacity due to the added amine groups. The poly(ethyleneimine) infused and functionalized hollow fiber sorbents are also characterized by a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) to assess their CO2 sorption capacities. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Amine-tethered adsorbents based on three-dimensional macroporous silica for CO(2) capture from simulated flue gas and air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa-Qian; Wang, Lei; Huang, Zhao-Ge; Li, Chao-Qin; Li, Wei; Li, Rong-Xun; Li, Wei-Hua

    2014-03-26

    New covalently tethered CO2 adsorbents are synthesized through the in situ polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) of l-alanine from amine-functionalized three-dimensional (3D) interconnected macroporous silica (MPS). The interconnected macropores provide low-resistant pathways for the diffusion of CO2 molecules, while the abundant mesopores ensure the high pore volume. The adsorbents exhibit high molecular weight (of up to 13058 Da), high amine loading (more than 10.98 mmol N g(-1)), fast CO2 capture kinetics (t1/2 < 1 min), high adsorption capacity (of up to 3.86 mmol CO2 g(-1) in simulated flue gas and 2.65 mmol CO2 g(-1) in simulated ambient air under 1 atm of dry CO2), as well as good stability over 120 adsorption-desorption cycles, which allows the overall CO2 capture process to be promising and sustainable.

  4. Multishelled CaO Microspheres Stabilized by Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2 O3 for Enhanced CO2 Capture Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armutlulu, Andac; Naeem, Muhammad Awais; Liu, Hsueh-Ju; Kim, Sung Min; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka; Fedorov, Alexey; Müller, Christoph R

    2017-11-01

    CO2 capture and storage is a promising concept to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The most established technology for capturing CO2 relies on amine scrubbing that is, however, associated with high costs. Technoeconomic studies show that using CaO as a high-temperature CO2 sorbent can significantly reduce the costs of CO2 capture. A serious disadvantage of CaO derived from earth-abundant precursors, e.g., limestone, is the rapid, sintering-induced decay of its cyclic CO2 uptake. Here, a template-assisted hydrothermal approach to develop CaO-based sorbents exhibiting a very high and cyclically stable CO2 uptake is exploited. The morphological characteristics of these sorbents, i.e., a porous shell comprised of CaO nanoparticles coated by a thin layer of Al2 O3 (CO2 capture and release, and (iii) a minimal quantity of Al2 O3 for structural stabilization, thus maximizing the fraction of CO2 -capture-active CaO. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Mesoporous carbon stabilized MgO nanoparticles synthesized by pyrolysis of MgCl2 preloaded waste biomass for highly efficient CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke; Ding, Yan-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-08-20

    Anthropogenic CO2 emission makes significant contribution to global climate change and CO2 capture and storage is a currently a preferred technology to change the trajectory toward irreversible global warming. In this work, we reported a new strategy that the inexhaustible MgCl2 in seawater and the abundantly available biomass waste can be utilized to prepare mesoporous carbon stabilized MgO nanoparticles (mPC-MgO) for CO2 capture. The mPC-MgO showed excellent performance in the CO2 capture process with the maximum capacity of 5.45 mol kg(-1), much higher than many other MgO based CO2 trappers. The CO2 capture capacity of the mPC-MgO material kept almost unchanged in 19-run cyclic reuse, and can be regenerated at low temperature. The mechanism for the CO2 capture by the mPC-MgO was investigated by FTIR and XPS, and the results indicated that the high CO2 capture capacity and the favorable selectivity of the as-prepared materials were mainly attributed to their special structure (i.e., surface area, functional groups, and the MgO NPs). This work would open up a new pathway to slow down global warming as well as resolve the pollution of waste biomass.

  6. Co-firing coal and biomass blends and their influence on the post-combustion CO2 capture installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więckol-Ryk, Angelika; Smoliński, Adam

    2017-10-01

    Co-firing of biomass with coal for energy production is a well-known technology and plays an important role in the electricity sector. The post-combustion capture integrated with biomass-fired power plants (Bio-CCS) seems to be a new alternative for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This study refers to the best known and advanced technology for post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) based on a chemical absorption in monoethanolamine (MEA). The co-firing of hard coal with four types of biomass was investigated using a laboratory fixed bed reactor system. The comparison of gaseous products emitted from the combustion of coal and different biomass blends were determined using gas chromatography. Research proved that co-firing of biomass in fossil fuel power plants is beneficial for PCC process. It may also reduce the corrosion of CO2 capture installation. The oxygen concentration in the flue gases from hard coal combustion was comparable with the respective value for a fuel blend of biomass content of 20% w/w. It was also noted that an increase in biomass content in a sample from 20 to 40 % w/w increased the concentration of oxygen in the flue gas streams. However, this concentration should not have a significant impact on the rate of amine oxidative degradation.

  7. Post-Synthesis Functionalization of Porous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Al Otaibi, Mona S.

    2014-07-01

    Solid porous materials are network materials that contain space void. Porous Organic Polymers (POPs) are porous materials, which are constructed from organic building blocks and exhibit large surface area with low densities. Due to these characteristics, POPs have attracted attentions because of their potential use in application such as gas storage and chemical separation. This thesis presents a study of the synthesis of novel POP being a network based on 2,5- dibromobenzaldehyde and 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene linked together via Sonogashira- Hagihara (SH) coupling. This network showed a relatively good surface area of 770 m2/g and total pore volume of 0.59 cc/g. In addition, it proved to be chemically and thermally stable, maintaining the thermal stability up to 350oC. In addition to synthesize novel aldehyde-POP network, it was also possible to post synthetically modify a network via one-step post synthetic functionalization by amine. Ethelynediamine (EDA), Diethylenetriamine (DETA), and Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tris-amine) are three different amines used for aldehyde-POP functionalization. The produced networks were aminated via different amine species substitution the aldehyde group present within the network. Modification to these networks resulted in a decrease in surface area from 770 m2.g-1 to 333 m2.g-1, 162 m2.g-1, and 211 m2.g-1 in respective to EDA, DETA, and Tris-amine. Although the surface areas were decreased, the CO2 adsorption was enhanced as evidenced by the increase of Qst (i.e., from 25 to 45 kJ.mol-1 for DETA at low coverage). Our findings are expected to strengthen existing research areas of the influence of different type of amines (e.g aromatic amine) on CO2 adsorption. Although amine grafting has been studied in other systems (e.g., PAFs and MOFs), we are the first to reported amine functionalized POPs using a novel one-step amine grafting PSM procedure. Future research might extend to study the interaction between CO2 and amine species under

  8. Post combustion CO2 capture with substituted ethanolamines and piperazines : Ab initio and DFT studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gangarapu, S.

    2014-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, particularly carbon dioxide, caused by fossil fuel combustion, has been claimed to be responsible for global warming. Capturing of carbon dioxide from exhaust gases by using aqueous amine solutions is an important process for the reduction of the

  9. Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, Charles; Liotta, Charles

    2011-09-30

    We have developed a novel class of CO{sub 2} capture solvents, Reversible Ionic Liquids (RevILs), that offer high absorption capacity through two modes of capture: chemical reaction (chemisorption) and physical solubility (physisorption). These solvents are silicon containing alkaline compounds such as silylamines that form a liquid salt (ionic liquid) upon reaction with CO{sub 2}. Subsequently, modest elevations in temperature reverse the reaction and yield pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. By incorporating Si in the molecules we have reduced the viscosity, thereby improving the mass transfer rates of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption and decreasing the processing costs for pumping the solvent. In this project, we have made systematic changes to the structure of these compounds to improve several physical and thermodynamic properties important for CO{sub 2} capture. Through these structure-property paradigms, we have obtained a RevIL which requires only a third of the energy required by conventional aqueous MEA process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture.

  10. Noninvasive functionalization of polymers of intrinsic microporosity for enhanced CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2012-10-14

    Modifying sorbents for the purpose of improving carbon dioxide capture often results in the loss of surface area or accessible pores, or both. We report the first noninvasive functionalization of the polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) where inclusion of the amidoxime functionality in PIM-1 increases carbon dioxide capacity up to 17% and micropore surface area by 20% without losing its film forming ability.

  11. Structure stability of HKUST-1 towards water and ethanol and their effect on its CO2 capture properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, J Raziel; Sánchez-González, Elí; Pérez, Eric; Schneider-Revueltas, Emilia; Martínez, Ana; Tejeda-Cruz, Adriana; Islas-Jácome, Alejandro; González-Zamora, Eduardo; Ibarra, Ilich A

    2017-07-18

    Water and ethanol stabilities of the crystal structure of the Cu-based metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 have been investigated. Vapour (water and ethanol) sorption isotherms and cyclability were measured by a dynamic strategy. The ethanol sorption capacity of HKUST-1 at 303 K remained unchanged contrasting water sorption (which decreased along with the sorption experiment time). Considering the binding energy of each sorbate with the open Cu(ii) sites, obtained by the use of diffusion coefficients, we showed the superior crystal stability of the HKUST-1 framework towards ethanol. Finally, a small quantity of ethanol (pre-adsorbed) slightly enhanced CO2 capture without crystal structure degradation.

  12. Co-firing coal and biomass blends and their influence on the post-combustion CO2 capture installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Więckol-Ryk Angelika

    2017-01-01

    Research proved that co-firing of biomass in fossil fuel power plants is beneficial for PCC process. It may also reduce the corrosion of CO2 capture installation. The oxygen concentration in the flue gases from hard coal combustion was comparable with the respective value for a fuel blend of biomass content of 20% w/w. It was also noted that an increase in biomass content in a sample from 20 to 40 % w/w increased the concentration of oxygen in the flue gas streams. However, this concentration should not have a significant impact on the rate of amine oxidative degradation.

  13. The chemistry of metal-organic frameworks for CO2 capture, regeneration and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Christopher A.; Helal, Aasif; Al-Maythalony, Bassem A.; Yamani, Zain H.; Cordova, Kyle E.; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2017-08-01

    The carbon dioxide challenge is one of the most pressing problems facing our planet. Each stage in the carbon cycle — capture, regeneration and conversion — has its own materials requirements. Recent work on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) demonstrated the potential and effectiveness of these materials in addressing this challenge. In this Review, we identify the specific structural and chemical properties of MOFs that have led to the highest capture capacities, the most efficient separations and regeneration processes, and the most effective catalytic conversions. The interior of MOFs can be designed to have coordinatively unsaturated metal sites, specific heteroatoms, covalent functionalization, other building unit interactions, hydrophobicity, porosity, defects and embedded nanoscale metal catalysts with a level of precision that is crucial for the development of higher-performance MOFs. To realize a total solution, it is necessary to use the precision of MOF chemistry to build more complex materials to address selectivity, capacity and conversion together in one material.

  14. A Technical Evaluation, Performance Analysis and Risk Assessment of Multiple Novel Oxy-Turbine Power Cycles with Complete CO 2 Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, F. C.; Sanchez, Guillermo Martinez-Denegri; Segui, Blanca Soler; Darabkhani, Hamidreza Gohari; Anthony, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been growing concern about greenhouse gas emissions (particularly CO2 emissions) and global warming. Oxyfuel combustion is one of the key technologies for tackling CO2 emissions in the power industry and reducing their contribution to global warming. The technology involves burning fuel with high-purity oxygen to generate mainly CO2 and steam, enabling easy CO2 separation from the flue gases by steam condensation. In fact, 100% CO2 capture and near-zero NOx emissions...

  15. Theoretical Predictions of the thermodynamic Properties of Solid Sorbents Capture CO2 Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan; Luebke David; Pennline, Henry

    2012-05-02

    We are establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank to meet the DOE programmatic goal for energy conversion; and to explore the optimal working conditions for the promising CO{sub 2} solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage, used for both pre- and post-combustion capture technologies.

  16. CO2 capture and storage (Breaking the Climate Deadlock Briefing Paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, S.J.A.; De Coninck, H.C.; Groenenberg, H. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-08-15

    This paper explores opportunities for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies to abate carbon dioxide under anticipated conditions of continued fossil fuel use, and sets out the need for early demonstration of the technologies to overcome barriers to their deployment. The paper covers: CCS technology and its role in global mitigation scenarios; The maturity of the various components of CCS technology; Costs and required investment; Policy issues and barriers to be overcome.

  17. Energy Efficient Solvents for CO2 Absorption from Flue Gas: Vapor Liquid Equilibrium and Pilot Plant Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, Prachi; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-01-01

    From solvent screening for new, amine based solvents for CO2 recovery from flue gas, two most promising solvent formulations, a 51 wt% New Solvent (NS) and a 26.7% AMP-11.9% HMDA mixture were selected and tested in an industrial pilot plant, mainly to identify the regeneration energy requirement. In

  18. Pilot-scale multistage membrane process for the separation of CO2 from LNG-fired flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Seung Hak

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a multistage pilot-scale membrane plant was constructed and operated for the separation of CO2 from Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)-fired boiler flue gas of 1000 Nm3/day. The target purity and recovery of CO2 were 99 vol.% and 90%, respectively. For this purpose, asymmetric polyethersulfone (PES) hollow fibers membranes has been developed in our previous work and has evaluated the effects of operating pressure and feed concentration of CO2 on separation performance. The operating and permeation data obtained were also analyzed in relation with the numerical simulation data using countercurrent flow model. Based on these results, in this study, four-staged membrane process including dehumidification process has been designed, installed, and operated to demonstrate the feasibility of multistage membrane systems for removing CO2 from flue gases. The operation results using this plant were compared to the numerical simulation results on multistage membrane process. The experimental results matched well with the numerical simulation data. The concentration and the recovery of CO2 in the permeate stream of final stage were ranged from 95-99 vol.% and 70-95%, respectively, depending on the operating conditions. This study demonstrated the applicability of the membrane-based pilot plant for CO2 recovery from flue gas. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  20. CO2capture performance of bi-functional activated bleaching earth modified with basic-alcoholic solution and functionalization with monoethanolamine: isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongstabodee, Sangobtip; Pornaroontham, Phuwadej; Pintuyothin, Nuthapol; Pootrakulchote, Nuttapol; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich

    2016-10-01

    CO 2 capture performance of bifunctional activated bleaching earth (ABE) was investigated at atmospheric pressure. The sorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Caron-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analysis (CHN), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The CO 2 capacity was enhanced via basic-modification and monoethanolamine (MEA) loading of the ABE sorbent to obtain a bifunctional surface property. Here, basic-modified calcined ABE with a 30wt.% MEA loading (SAB-30) showed the highest CO 2 capture capacity, but this was decreased with excess MEA loading (>30wt.%). At a 10% (V/V) initial CO 2 concentration feed, the maximum capacity of SAB-30 increased from 2.71mmol/g at 30°C (without adding moisture to the feed) to 3.3mmol/g at 50°C when adding 10% (V/V) moisture to the feed. Increasing the moisture concentration further reduced the maximum CO 2 capacity due to the blocking effect of the excess moisture on the sorbent surface. However, SAB-30 could completely capture CO 2 even in a 100% (V/V) initial CO 2 concentration feed. A maximum CO 2 capacity of 5.7mmol/g for SAB-30 was achieved at 30°C. Varying the ratio of sorbent weight to total flow rate of the gas stream had no discernible effect on the equilibrium CO 2 capture capacity. Avrami's equation and Toth's isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data and suggested the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the CO 2 capture process and the heterogeneous adsorption surface of SAB-30. Thermodynamics studies revealed that CO 2 capture on the bifunctional SAB-30 is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Covalent organic polymer functionalized activated carbon: A novel material for water contaminant removal and CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Thirion, Damien; Uthuppu, Basil

    Covalent organic polymers (COPs) have emerged as one of the leading advanced materials for environmental applications, such as the capture and recovery of carbon dioxide and the removal of contaminants from polluted water. COPs exhibit many remarkable properties that other leading advanced...... materials do not all-encompassing possess. Moreover, COPs have proven to be extremely stable in a wide variety of conditions, i.e. extremely high temperatures and boiling water for weeks at a time, which make them ideal for environmental applications; ranging from CO2 capture and recovery to organic solvent...... uptake in concentrated streams to metal and organic pollutant adsorption in contaminated waters. However, given the nanoscale structure of these COPs, real-world application has yet remained elusive for these materials. Herein, we report the functionalization of COPs onto the surface of activated carbon...

  2. Uncertainties in assessing the environmental impact of amine emissions from a CO2 capture plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, M.; Castell, N.; Simpson, D.; Solberg, S.; Starrfelt, J.; Svendby, T.; Walker, S.-E.; Wright, R. F.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a new model framework that couples the atmospheric chemistry transport model system Weather Research and Forecasting-European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (WRF-EMEP) and the multimedia fugacity level III model was used to assess the environmental impact of in-air amine emissions from post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. The modelling framework was applied to a typical carbon capture plant artificially placed at Mongstad, on the west coast of Norway. The study region is characterized by high precipitation amounts, relatively few sunshine hours, predominantly westerly winds from the North Atlantic and complex topography. Mongstad can be considered as moderately polluted due to refinery activities. WRF-EMEP enables a detailed treatment of amine chemistry in addition to atmospheric transport and deposition. Deposition fluxes of WRF-EMEP simulations were used as input to the fugacity model in order to derive concentrations of nitramines and nitrosamine in lake water. Predicted concentrations of nitramines and nitrosamines in ground-level air and drinking water were found to be highly sensitive to the description of amine chemistry, especially of the night-time chemistry with the nitrate (NO3) radical. Sensitivity analysis of the fugacity model indicates that catchment characteristics and chemical degradation rates in soil and water are among the important factors controlling the fate of these compounds in lake water. The study shows that realistic emission of commonly used amines result in levels of the sum of nitrosamines and nitramines in ground-level air (0.6-10 pg m-3) and drinking water (0.04-0.25 ng L-1) below the current safety guideline for human health that is enforced by the Norwegian Environment Agency. The modelling framework developed in this study can be used to evaluate possible environmental impacts of emissions of amines from post-combustion capture in other regions of the world.

  3. Uncertainties in assessing the environmental impact of amine emissions from a CO2 capture plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new model framework that couples the atmospheric chemistry transport model system Weather Research and Forecasting–European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (WRF-EMEP and the multimedia fugacity level III model was used to assess the environmental impact of in-air amine emissions from post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. The modelling framework was applied to a typical carbon capture plant artificially placed at Mongstad, on the west coast of Norway. The study region is characterized by high precipitation amounts, relatively few sunshine hours, predominantly westerly winds from the North Atlantic and complex topography. Mongstad can be considered as moderately polluted due to refinery activities. WRF-EMEP enables a detailed treatment of amine chemistry in addition to atmospheric transport and deposition. Deposition fluxes of WRF-EMEP simulations were used as input to the fugacity model in order to derive concentrations of nitramines and nitrosamine in lake water. Predicted concentrations of nitramines and nitrosamines in ground-level air and drinking water were found to be highly sensitive to the description of amine chemistry, especially of the night-time chemistry with the nitrate (NO3 radical. Sensitivity analysis of the fugacity model indicates that catchment characteristics and chemical degradation rates in soil and water are among the important factors controlling the fate of these compounds in lake water. The study shows that realistic emission of commonly used amines result in levels of the sum of nitrosamines and nitramines in ground-level air (0.6–10 pg m−3 and drinking water (0.04–0.25 ng L−1 below the current safety guideline for human health that is enforced by the Norwegian Environment Agency. The modelling framework developed in this study can be used to evaluate possible environmental impacts of emissions of amines from post-combustion capture in other regions of the world.

  4. Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max Christie; Rick Victor; Bart van Hassel; Nagendra Nagabushana; Juan Li; Joseph Corpus; Jamie Wilson

    2007-03-31

    The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

  5. Analysis of Combined Cycle Power Plants with Chemical Looping Reforming of Natural Gas and Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shareq Mohd Nazir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a gas-fired combined cycle power plant subjected to a pre-combustion CO2 capture method has been analysed under different design conditions and different heat integration options. The power plant configuration includes the chemical looping reforming (CLR of natural gas (NG, water gas shift (WGS process, CO2 capture and compression, and a hydrogen fuelled combined cycle to produce power. The process is denoted as a CLR-CC process. One of the main parameters that affects the performance of the process is the pressure for the CLR. The process is analysed at different design pressures for the CLR, i.e., 5, 10, 15, 18, 25 and 30 bar. It is observed that the net electrical efficiency increases with an increase in the design pressure in the CLR. Secondly, the type of steam generated from the cooling of process streams also effects the net electrical efficiency of the process. Out of the five different cases including the base case presented in this study, it is observed that the net electrical efficiency of CLR-CCs can be improved to 46.5% (lower heating value of NG basis by producing high-pressure steam through heat recovery from the pre-combustion process streams and sending it to the Heat Recovery Steam Generator in the power plant.

  6. Convenient and large-scale synthesis of nitrogen-rich hierarchical porous carbon spheres for supercapacitors and CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Binbin; Zhang, Shouren; Yin, Hang; Yang, Baocheng

    2017-08-01

    Herein, considering the great potential of nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons in energy storage and CO2 capture, we designed a convenient and easily large-scale production strategy for preparing nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbon sphere (NHPCS) materials. In this synthesis route, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins were selected as carbon precursor, and then the ZnCl2-impregnated RF resin spheres were carbonized in a NH3 atmosphere at a temperature range of 600-800 °C. During the one-step heat-treatment process, nitrogen atom could be efficiently incorporated into the carbon skeleton, and the interconnected and hierarchical pore structure with different micro/mesopore proportion could be generated and tuned by adjusting the activating agent ZnCl2 dosage and carbonization temperature. The resultant nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbon sphere materials exhibited a satisfactory charge storage capacity, and the optimal sample of NHPCS-2-8 with a high mesopore proportion obtained at 800 °C with a ZnCl2/RF mass ratio of 2:1 presented a specific capacitance of 273.8 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1. More importantly, the assembled NHPCS-2-8-based symmetric capacitor displayed a high energy density of 17.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 178.9 W kg-1 within a voltage window of 0 ∼ 1.8 V in 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. In addition, the CO2 capture application of these NHPCS materials was also explored, and the optimal sample of NHPCS-0-8 with a large micropore proportion prepared at 800 °C exhibited an exceptional CO2 uptake capacity at ambient pressures of up to 4.23 mmol g-1 at 0 °C.

  7. A methodology of the assessment of environmental and human health risks from amine emissions from post combustion CO2 capture technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korre, Anna; Manzoor, Saba; Simperler, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    Post combustion CO2 capture (PCCC) technology in power plants using amines as solvent for CO2 capture, is one of the reduction technologies employed to combat escalating levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, amine solvents used for capturing CO2 produce negative emissions such as, nitrosamines and nitramines, which are suspected to be potent carcinogens. It is therefore essential to assess the atmospheric fate of these amine emissions in the atmosphere by studying their atmospheric chemistry, dispersion and transport pathways away from the source and deposition in the environment, so as to be able to assess accurately the risk posed to human health and the natural environment. An important knowledge gap until recently has been the consideration of the atmospheric chemistry of these amine emissions simultaneously with dispersion and deposition studies so as to perform reliable human health and environmental risk assessments. The authors have developed a methodology to assess the distribution of such emissions away from a post-combustion facility by studying the atmospheric chemistry of monoethanolamine, the most commonly used solvent for CO2 capture, and those of the resulting degradation amines, methylamine and dimethylamine. This was coupled with dispersion modeling calculations (Manzoor, et al., 2014; Manzoor et al,2015). Rate coefficients describing the entire atmospheric chemistry schemes of the amines studied were evaluated employing quantum chemical theoretical and kinetic modeling calculations. These coefficients were used to solve the advection-dispersion-chemical equation using an atmospheric dispersion model, ADMS 5. This methodology is applicable to any size of a power plant and at any geographical location. In this paper, the humman health risk assessment is integrated in the modelling study. The methodology is demonstrated on a case study on the UK's largest capture pilot plant, Ferrybridge CCPilot 100+, to estimate the dispersion, chemical

  8. Evaluation of the impact of H2O, O2, and SO2 on postcombustion CO2 capture in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiamei; Ma, Yuguang; Balbuena, Perla B

    2012-05-29

    Molecular modeling methods are used to estimate the influence of impurity species: water, O(2), and SO(2) in flue gas mixtures present in postcombustion CO(2) capture using a metal organic framework, HKUST-1, as a model sorbent material. Coordinated and uncoordinated water effects on CO(2) capture are analyzed. Increase of CO(2) adsorption is observed for both cases, which can be attributed to the enhanced binding energy between CO(2) and HKUST-1 due to the introduction of a small amount of water. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the binding energy between CO(2) and HKUST-1 with coordinated water is ~1 kcal/mol higher than that without coordinated water. It is found that the improvement of CO(2)/N(2) selectivity induced by coordinated water may mainly be attributed to the increased CO(2) adsorption on the hydrated HKUST-1. On the other hand, the enhanced selectivity induced by uncoordinated water in the flue gas mixture can be explained on the basis of the competition of adsorption sites between water and CO(2) (N(2)). At low pressures, a significant CO(2)/N(2) selectivity increase is due to the increase of CO(2) adsorption and decrease of N(2) adsorption as a consequence of competition of adsorption sites between water and N(2). However, with more water molecules adsorbed at higher pressures, the competition between water and CO(2) leads to the decrease of CO(2) adsorption capacity. Therefore, high pressure operation should be avoided in HKUST-1 sorbents for CO(2) capture. In addition, the effects of O(2) and SO(2) on CO(2) capture in HKUST-1 are investigated: The CO(2)/N(2) selectivity does not change much even with relatively high concentrations of O(2) in the flue gas (up to 8%). A slightly lower CO(2)/N(2) selectivity of a CO(2)/N(2)/H(2)O/SO(2) mixture is observed compared with that in a CO(2)/N(2)/H(2)O mixture, especially at high pressures, due to the strong SO(2) binding with HKUST-1.

  9. Investigation of aerosol based emission of MEA due to sulphuric acid aerosol and soot in a post combustion CO2 capture process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Brachert, L.; Mertens, J.; Huizinga, A.; Schallert, B.; Schaber, K.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of emissions of amine species is of high importance for the overall sustainability and performance of Post Combustion CO2 Capture facilities. There is a clear understanding of amine emissions based on volatility in the treated flue gas. Emission via aerosols from Post Combustion CO2

  10. Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

    2003-12-31

    This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2

  11. Highly Efficient Oxygen-Storage Material with Intrinsic Coke Resistance for Chemical Looping Combustion-Based CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Qasim; Kurlov, Alexey; Rupp, Jennifer Lilia Marguerite; Müller, Christoph Rüdiger

    2015-06-22

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) are emerging thermochemical CO2 capture cycles that allow the capture of CO2 with a small energy penalty. Here, the development of suitable oxygen carrier materials is a key aspect to transfer these promising concepts to practical installations. CuO is an attractive material for CLC and CLOU because of its high oxygen-storage capacity (20 wt %), fast reaction kinetics, and high equilibrium partial pressure of oxygen at typical operating temperatures (850-1000 °C). However, despite its promising characteristics, its low Tammann temperature requires the development of new strategies to phase-stabilize CuO-based oxygen carriers. In this work, we report a strategy based on stabilization by co-precipitated ceria (CeO2-x ), which allowed us to increase the oxygen capacity, coke resistance, and redox stability of CuO-based oxygen carriers substantially. The performance of the new oxygen carriers was evaluated in detail and compared to the current state-of-the-art materials, that is, Al2 O3 -stabilized CuO with similar CuO loadings. We also demonstrate that the higher intrinsic oxygen uptake, release, and mobility in CeO2-x -stabilized CuO leads to a three times higher carbon deposition resistance compared to that of Al2 O3 -stabilized CuO. Moreover, we report a high cyclic stability without phase intermixing for CeO2-x -supported CuO. This was accompanied by a lower reduction temperature compared to state-of-the-art Al2 O3 -supported CuO. As a result of its high resistance towards carbon deposition and fast oxygen uncoupling kinetics, CeO2-x -stabilized CuO is identified as a very promising material for CLC- and CLOU-based CO2 capture architectures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Enhanced selectivity in mixed matrix membranes for CO2 capture through efficient dispersion of amine-functionalized MOF nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalei, Behnam; Sakurai, Kento; Kinoshita, Yosuke; Wakimoto, Kazuki; Isfahani, Ali Pournaghshband; Song, Qilei; Doitomi, Kazuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Hirao, Hajime; Kusuda, Hiromu; Kitagawa, Susumu; Sivaniah, Easan

    2017-07-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) for gas separation applications have enhanced selectivity when compared with the pure polymer matrix, but are commonly reported with low intrinsic permeability, which has major cost implications for implementation of membrane technologies in large-scale carbon capture projects. High-permeability polymers rarely generate sufficient selectivity for energy-efficient CO2 capture. Here we report substantial selectivity enhancements within high-permeability polymers as a result of the efficient dispersion of amine-functionalized, nanosized metal-organic framework (MOF) additives. The enhancement effects under optimal mixing conditions occur with minimal loss in overall permeability. Nanosizing of the MOF enhances its dispersion within the polymer matrix to minimize non-selective microvoid formation around the particles. Amination of such MOFs increases their interaction with thepolymer matrix, resulting in a measured rigidification and enhanced selectivity of the overall composite. The optimal MOF MMM performance was verified in three different polymer systems, and also over pressure and temperature ranges suitable for carbon capture.

  13. A PILOT STUDY OF THE ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO2 data that are used to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air supply. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements and to save energy by avoiding ventilation rates exceeding design requirements. However, there have been many anecdotal reports of poor CO2 sensor performance in actual commercial building applications. This study evaluated the accuracy of 44 CO2 sensors located in nine commercial buildings to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. CO2 measurement errors varied widely and were sometimes hundreds of parts per million. Despite its small size, this study provides a strong indication that the accuracy of CO2 sensors, as they are applied and maintained in commercial buildings, is frequently less than needed to measure typical values of maximum one-hour-average indoor-outdoor CO2 concentration differences with less than a 20percent error. Thus, we conclude that there is a need for more accurate CO2 sensors and/or better sensor maintenance or calibration procedures.

  14. Emissions to the Atmosphere from Amine-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Plant – Regulatory Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzi Merched

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amine-based Post Combustion Capture (PCC of CO2 is a readily available technology that can be deployed to reduce CO2 emissions from coal fired power plants. However, PCC plants will likely release small quantities of amine and amine degradation products to the atmosphere along with the treated flue gas. The possible environmental effects of these emissions have been examined through different studies carried out around the world. Based on flue gas from a 400 MW ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant Aspen-Plus PCC process simulations were used to predict the potential atmospheric emissions from the plant. Different research initiatives carried out in this area have produced new knowledge that has significantly reduced the risk perception for the release of amine and amine degradation products to the atmosphere. In addition to the reduction of the CO2 emissions, the PCC technology will also help in reducing SOx and NO2 emissions. However, some other pollutants such as NH3 and aerosols will increase if appropriate control technologies are not adopted. To study the atmospheric photo-oxidation of amines, attempts are being made to develop chemical reaction schemes that can be used for air quality assessment. However, more research is still required in this area to estimate the reactivity of amino solvents in the presence of other pollutants such as NOx and other volatile organic compounds in the background air. Current air quality guidelines may need to be updated to include limits for the additional pollutants such as NH3, nitrosamines and nitramines once more information related to their emissions is available. This paper focuses on describing the predicted concentrations of major pollutants that are expected to be released from a coal fired power plant obtained by ASPEN-Plus PCC process simulations in terms of current air quality regulations and other regulatory aspects.

  15. A Pilot Study to Evaluate California's Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Using Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Fischer, M. L.; Lueker, T.; Guilderson, T.; Brophy, K. J.; Keeling, R. F.; Arnold, T.; Bambha, R.; Callahan, W.; Campbell, J. E.; Cui, X.; Frankenberg, C.; Hsu, Y.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Lehman, S.; Manning, A.; Michelsen, H. A.; Miller, J. B.; Newman, S.; Paplawsky, B.; Parazoo, N.; Sloop, C.; Walker, S.; Whelan, M.; Wunch, D.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is influenced by human activities and by natural exchanges. Studies of CO2 fluxes using atmospheric CO2 measurements typically focus on natural exchanges and assume that CO2 emissions by fossil fuel combustion and cement production are well-known from inventory estimates. However, atmospheric observation-based or "top-down" studies could potentially provide independent methods for evaluating fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in support of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. Observation-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 may also improve estimates of biospheric CO2 exchange, which could help to characterize carbon storage and climate change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems. We have been developing a top-down framework for estimating fossil fuel CO2 emissions in California that uses atmospheric observations and modeling. California is implementing the "Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006" to reduce total greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, and it has a diverse array of ecosystems that may serve as CO2 sources or sinks. We performed three month-long field campaigns in different seasons in 2014-15 to collect flask samples from a state-wide network of 10 towers. Using measurements of radiocarbon in CO2, we estimate the fossil fuel-derived CO2 present in the flask samples, relative to marine background air observed at coastal sites. Radiocarbon (14C) is not present in fossil fuel-derived CO2 because of radioactive decay over millions of years, so fossil fuel emissions cause a measurable decrease in the 14C/C ratio in atmospheric CO2. We compare the observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to simulations based on atmospheric modeling and published fossil fuel flux estimates, and adjust the fossil fuel flux estimates in a statistical inversion that takes account of several uncertainties. We will present the results of the top-down technique to estimate fossil fuel emissions for our field

  16. Brain MRI CO2 stress testing: a pilot study in patients with concussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Alan C Mutch

    Full Text Available There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition.This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS patients--both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied--baseline 1 (BL1--at basal CO2 tension, hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg, BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for 1st level analysis to compare each subject's response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient's response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level.We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response controls.Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.

  17. Brain MRI CO2 stress testing: a pilot study in patients with concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan C; Ellis, Michael J; Graham, M Ruth; Wourms, Vincent; Raban, Roshan; Fisher, Joseph A; Mikulis, David; Leiter, Jeffrey; Ryner, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition. This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS) patients--both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied--baseline 1 (BL1--at basal CO2 tension), hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg), BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg) and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for 1st level analysis to compare each subject's response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient's response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level. We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response controls). Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.

  18. Effect of pCO2 on direct flue gas mineral carbonation at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouedhen, Ikbel; Kemache, Nassima; Pasquier, Louis-César; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2017-08-01

    Concerns about global warming phenomena induced the development of research about the control of anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions. The current work studies on the scaling up of aqueous mineral carbonation route to reduce the CO2 emissions at the chimney of industrial emitters. The reactivity of serpentinite in a stirred tank reactor was studied for several partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2) (0.4, 0.7, 1.3 and 1.6 bar). Prior to carbonation, the feedstock was finely grinded and dehydroxyled at 650 °C by a thermal treatment. The major content of magnetite was removed (7.5 wt% · total weight(-1)). Experiments were carried out under batch mode at room temperature using real cement plant flue gas (14-18 vol% CO2) and open pit drainage water. The effect of the raw water and the pCO2 on the carbonation efficiency was measured. First, the main results showed a positive effect of the quarry water as a slight enhancement of the Mg leaching in comparison with distilled water. Secondly, a pCO2 of 1.3 bar was the optimal working pressure which provided the highest efficiency of the carbonation reaction (0.8 gCO2 · g residue(-1)). Precipitation rates of dissolved CO2 ranged from 7% to 33%. Pure precipitate was obtained and essentially composed of Nesquehonite. At a pCO2 of 1.3 bar, additional physical retreatment of the solid material after being contacted with 6 batches of gas enhanced considerably mineral carbonation efficiency (0.17 gCO2 · g residue(-1).). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating the impact of an ammonia-based post-combustion CO2 capture process on a steam power plant with different cooling water temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnenberg, Sebastian; Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Oexmann, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The use of aqueous ammonia is a promising option to capture carbon dioxide from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Compared to a capture process using monoethanolamine (MEA), the use of ammonia can reduce the heat requirement of the CO2 desorption significantly, although an additional effor...

  20. Sequential Design of Experiments to Maximize Learning from Carbon Capture Pilot Plant Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soepyan, Frits B.; Morgan, Joshua C.; Omell, Benjamin P.; Zamarripa-Perez, Miguel A.; Matuszewski, Michael S.; Miller, David C.

    2018-02-06

    Pilot plant test campaigns can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, it is of interest to maximize the amount of learning and the efficiency of the test campaign given the limited number of experiments that can be conducted. This work investigates the use of sequential design of experiments (SDOE) to overcome these challenges by demonstrating its usefulness for a recent solvent-based CO2 capture plant test campaign. Unlike traditional design of experiments methods, SDOE regularly uses information from ongoing experiments to determine the optimum locations in the design space for subsequent runs within the same experiment. However, there are challenges that need to be addressed, including reducing the high computational burden to efficiently update the model, and the need to incorporate the methodology into a computational tool. We address these challenges by applying SDOE in combination with a software tool, the Framework for Optimization, Quantification of Uncertainty and Surrogates (FOQUS) (Miller et al., 2014a, 2016, 2017). The results of applying SDOE on a pilot plant test campaign for CO2 capture suggests that relative to traditional design of experiments methods, SDOE can more effectively reduce the uncertainty of the model, thus decreasing technical risk. Future work includes integrating SDOE into FOQUS and using SDOE to support additional large-scale pilot plant test campaigns.

  1. Gas monitoring during the CO2 back production field test at the Ketzin pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Kujawa, Christian; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences operates Europe's first on-shore CO2 storage site in Ketzin, a small town near Berlin. From June 2008 until August 2013 about 67 kt of CO2 were injected into Upper Triassic sandstones in 630 to 650 m depth. The injection phase ended with an experiment to evaluate the influence of additives on CO2 storage. During this experiment 32 t N2 and 613 t CO2 were co-injected into the borehole over a period of 25 days followed by the final injection of 66 t pure CO2. At the beginning of the experiment 10,000 l (10 Nm3) Kr were pumped into the borehole, to separate the previous pure CO2 and the CO2-N2 mixture. For the same reason, CO2 with a different isotopic composition (δ13C = -3.4±0.2o instead of δ13C = -30.6±0.4) was used for the first 548 t of the total 613 t. To demonstrate that the stored CO2 is retrievable a field test was carried out in October 2014 during a period of two weeks. Of interest, in this context, is the composition of the back-produced gas which delivers key information on possible interactions between the CO2, formation fluid and rocks. In total 240 t of gas were produced via the former injection well. The flow rates ranged between 800 and 3,200 kg gas/h. The gas was sampled after the gas/water separator and continuously analysed using a mass spectrometer, a gas chromatograph and a photoacoustic sensor, thus covering all gas components and concentrations. In addition, gas samples were collected for stable carbon isotopes investigations in the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the produced gas consists of > 97% CO2 plus mainly N2. The N2 was detected from the beginning, although the injection in 2013 ended with pure CO2. The N2 concentration decreased from about 3% to 1% during the two weeks of the experiment. In addition to these major components CH4, CO and H2 (up to 0.01%) as well as Kr and SF6 (up to 0.001%, both were used as tracers in 2013) were detected. The gas composition of natural

  2. CO 2 Capture Capacity and Swelling Measurements of Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials via Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Youngjune

    2012-01-12

    Novel nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs), which are comprised of organic oligomers or polymers tethered to an inorganic nanosized cores of various sizes, have been synthesized, and their solvating property for CO 2 was investigated using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Simultaneous measurements of CO 2 capture capacity and swelling behaviors of polyetheramine (Jeffamine M-2070) and its corresponding NOHMs (NOHM-I-PE2070) were reported at temperatures of (298, 308, 323 and 353) K and CO 2 pressure conditions ranging from (0 to 5.5) MPa. The polymeric canopy, or polymer bound to the nanoparticle surface, showed significantly less swelling behavior with enhanced or comparable CO 2 capture capacity compared to pure unbound polyetheramine. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  4. Normalizing CO2 in chronic hyperventilation by means of a novel breathing mask: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Troels; Jack, Sandy; Dahl, Ronald

    2013-10-01

    Chronic idiopathic hyperventilation (CIH) is a form of dysfunctional breathing that has proven hard to treat effectively. To perform a preliminary test of the hypothesis that by periodically inducing normocapnia over several weeks, it would be possible to raise the normal resting level of CO2 and achieve a reduction of symptoms. Six CIH patients were treated 2 h a day for 4 weeks with a novel breathing mask. The mask was used to induce normocapnia in these chronically hypocapnic patients. Capillary blood gases and acid/base parameters [capillary CO2 tension (PcapCO2 ), pH, and standard base excess (SBE)] were measured at baseline and once each week at least 3 h after mask use, as well as spirometric values, breath-holding tolerance and hyperventilation symptoms as per the Nijmegen Questionnaire (NQ). The mask treatment resulted in a significant increase of resting PcapCO2 (+0.45 kPa, P = 0.028), a moderate increase in SBE (+1.4 mEq/L, P = 0.035) and a small reduction in daily symptoms (-3.8 NQ units, P = 0.046). The effect was most pronounced in the first 2 weeks of treatment. By inducing normocapnia with the breathing mask 2 h a day for 4 weeks, the normal resting CO2 and acid/base levels in chronically hyperventilating patients were partially corrected, and symptoms were reduced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Sustainable microalgae for the simultaneous synthesis of carbon quantum dots for cellular imaging and porous carbon for CO2capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Li, Wen-Cui

    2017-05-01

    Microalgae biomass is a sustainable source with the potential to produce a range of products. However, there is currently a lack of practical and functional processes to enable the high-efficiency utilization of the microalgae. We report here a hydrothermal process to maximize the utilizability of microalgae biomass. Specifically, our concept involves the simultaneous conversion of microalgae to (i) hydrophilic and stable carbon quantum dots and (ii) porous carbon. The synthesis is easily scalable and eco-friendly. The microalgae-derived carbon quantum dots possess a strong two-photon fluorescence property, have a low cytotoxicity and an efficient cellular uptake, and show potential for high contrast bioimaging. The microalgae-based porous carbons show excellent CO 2 capture capacities of 6.9 and 4.2mmolg -1 at 0 and 25°C respectively, primarily due to the high micropore volume (0.59cm 3 g -1 ) and large specific surface area (1396m 2 g -1 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical and chemical hazards of CO2 sequestration activity State of the art and experience feedback at Krechba (In Salah pilot site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakima Hamida

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the CO2 release into atmosphere and thus contribute to reducing the greenhouse effect, the industrial process of CO2 sequestration is still at an experimental stage. This technique of CO2 geological sequestration are not fully controlled and raise issue of technological, environmental, human and organizational hazards and their effects on human health, environment and economy. From CO2 capture to transportation then injecting it into underground natural reservoirs where it is stored, geochemical, geophysical and generally industrial risks are still not very well recognized and identified. The behaviour of CO2 is not yet fully identified deep geological environment. It is therefore necessary to build, in support of this industrial CO2 storage process, proactive analysis of more transversal and overall risk for better control, technological processes of capture, Transport, Storage of CO2 (CTSC. 

  7. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li+-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Zhen Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li+ and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well as the CO2 capacity of the chelated ILs obtained were investigated. For example, the CO2 capacity of PEG150MeBu2N increased steadily from 0.10 to 0.66 (mol CO2 absorbed per mol of base through the formation of zwitterionic adducts being stabilized by Li+.

  8. The hybrid MPC-MINLP algorithm for optimal operation of coal-fired power plants with solvent based post-combustion CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhuda Abdul Manaf

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm that combines model predictive control (MPC with MINLP optimization and demonstrates its application for coal-fired power plants retrofitted with solvent based post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC plant. The objective function of the optimization algorithm works at a primary level to maximize plant economic revenue while considering an optimal carbon capture profile. At a secondary level, the MPC algorithm is used to control the performance of the PCC plant. Two techno-economic scenarios based on fixed (capture rate is constant and flexible (capture rate is variable operation modes are developed using actual electricity prices (2011 with fixed carbon prices ($AUD 5, 25, 50/tonne-CO2 for 24 h periods. Results show that fixed operation mode can bring about a ratio of net operating revenue deficit at an average of 6% against the superior flexible operation mode.

  9. Reaction-driven cracking during hydration and carbonation of olivine: Implications for in situ CO2 capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    Reactions forming serpentine and/or Mg-carbonates via reaction of fluid with olivine may increase the solid volume, due to increasing solid mass and decreasing solid density, provided that fluid is supplied in an open system, and that dissolution does not remove significant solid mass. Increasing solid volume can create deviatoric stress within a rock, potentially causing fracture. In turn, this can provide a positive feedback to the alteration process, maintaining or increasing permeability and reactive surface area. This could be important - or even essential - for proposed in situ mineral carbonation for CO2 storage, and potentially for geological CO2 capture from surface waters. We use several methods to estimate the 'force of crystallization' during hydration and carbonation of olivine. The free energy changes driving these processes can potentially generate overpressures of 100's to 1000's of MPa. These potential stresses are larger for a given temperature for carbonation compared to serpentinization. Thermodynamic upper bounds can be compared to estimates based on microstructure in natural samples. Evans (Int Geol Rev 2004) and Jamtveit et al. (EPSL 2008) provide microphotographs of igneous troctolites, with interstitial plagioclase surrounding rounded olivine grains. The olivine grains are partially serpentinized, and the plagioclase has closely spaced fractures interpreted as a result of expansion during serpentinization. Strain energy due to expansion should be greater than surface energy on new fractures. Spacing and length of fractures in plagioclase yields a minimum of about 260 MPa for the differential stress. Alternatively, if fractures did not form, elastic stress in the plagioclase resulting from expansion during serpentinization should be proportional to the strain. Because some strain could be accommodated by irreversible mechanisms, such as friction and dilation on cracks and/or viscous flow, this yields a maximum stress of 270 MPa. The close

  10. Competitiveness of CO2 capture from an industrial solid oxide fuel cell combined heat and power system in the early stage of market introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramochi, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838683; Turkenburg, W.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073416355; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2011-01-01

    In this article, it was investigated whether potentially low-cost CO2 capture from SOFC systems could enhance the penetration of SOFC in the energy market in a highly carbon-constrained society in the mid-term future (up to year 2025). The application of 5 MWe SOFC systems for industrial combined

  11. A facile approach for the synthesis of monolithic hierarchical porous carbons – high performance materials for amine based CO2 capture and supercapacitor electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis

    2013-05-03

    An ice templating coupled with hard templating and physical activation approach is reported for the synthesis of hierarchically porous carbon monoliths with tunable porosities across all three length scales (macro- meso- and micro), with ultrahigh specific pore volumes [similar]11.4 cm3 g−1. The materials function well as amine impregnated supports for CO2 capture and as supercapacitor electrodes.

  12. Important Roles of Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to CO 2 Capture from Simulated Flue Gas and Ambient Air Using Mesoporous Silica Grafted Amines

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhabbaz, Mustafa A.

    2014-09-24

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The measurement of isosteric heats of adsorption of silica supported amine materials in the low pressure range (0- 0.1 bar) is critical for understanding the interactions between CO2 and amine sites at low coverage and hence to the development of efficient amine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas and ambient air. Heats of adsorption for an array of silica-supported amine materials are experimentally measured at low coverage using a Calvet calorimeter equipped with a customized dosing manifold. In a series of 3-aminopropylfunctionalized silica materials, higher amine densities resulted in higher isosteric heats of adsorption, clearly showing that the density/proximity of amine sites can influence the amine efficiency of adsorbents. In a series of materials with fixed amine loading but different amine types, strongly basic primary and secondary amine materials are shown to have essentially identical heats of adsorption near 90 kJ/mol. However, the adsorption uptakes vary substantially as a function of CO2 partial pressure for different primary and secondary amines, demonstrating that entropic contributions to adsorption may play a key role in adsorption at secondary amine sites, making adsorption at these sites less effi cient at the low coverages that are important to the direct capture of CO2 from ambient air. Thus, while primary amines are confirmed to be the most effective amine types for CO2 capture from ambient air, this is not due to enhanced enthalpic contributions associated with primary amines over secondary amines, but may be due to unfavorable entropic factors associated with organization of the second alkyl chain on the secondary amine during CO2 adsorption. Given this hypothesis, favorable entropic factors may be the main reason primary amine based adsorbents are more effective under air capture conditions.

  13. Forward modeling of 4D seismic response to the CO2 injection at the Ketzin pilot site with the reflectivity method

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Ivanova; Monika Ivandic; Thomas Kempka; M. Diersch [Gil; P. Bergmann; S. Lueth

    2014-01-01

    When CO2 replaces brine as a free gas it is well known to affect the elastic properties of porous media considerably. 3D seismic time-lapse surveys (4D seismics) have proven to be a suitable technique for monitoring of injected CO2. Forward modeling of a 4D seismic response to the CO2 fluid substitution in a storage reservoir is an important step in such studies. In order to track the migration of CO2 at the Ketzin pilot site (Germany), 3D time-lapse seismic data were acquired by means of ...

  14. Impact of CO2 leakage from sub-seabed carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS reservoirs on benthic virus-prokaryote interactions and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio eRastelli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 emissions are a global concern due to their predicted impact on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human life. Among the proposed mitigation strategies, CO2 capture and storage (CCS, primarily the injection of CO2 into marine deep geological formations has been suggested as a technically practical option for reducing emissions. However, concerns have been raised that possible leakage from such storage sites, and the associated elevated levels of pCO2 could locally impact the biodiversity and biogeochemical processes in the sediments above these reservoirs. Whilst a number of impact assessment studies have been conducted, no information is available on the specific responses of viruses and virus-host interactions. In the present study, we tested the impact of a simulated CO2 leakage on the benthic microbial assemblages, with specific focus on microbial activity and virus-induced prokaryotic mortality. We found that exposure to levels of CO2 in the overlying seawater from 1,000 ppm to 20,000 ppm for a period up to 140 days, resulted in a marked decrease in heterotrophic carbon production and organic matter degradation rates in the sediments, associated with lower rates of virus-induced prokaryotic mortality, and a progressive accumulation of sedimentary organic matter with increasing CO2 concentrations. These results suggest that the increase in seawater pCO2 levels that may result from CO2 leakage, can severely reduce the rates of microbial-mediated recycling of the sedimentary organic matter and viral infections, with major consequences on C cycling and nutrient regeneration, and hence on the functioning of benthic ecosystems.

  15. CO2-Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Full Technology Feasibility Study B1 - Solvent-based Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldebrant, David J

    2014-08-31

    PNNL, Fluor Corporation and Queens University (Kingston, ON) successfully completed a three year comprehensive study of the CO2BOL water-lean solvent platform with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed solvent synthesis, characterization, environmental toxicology, physical, thermodynamic and kinetic property measurements, Aspen Plus™ modeling and bench-scale testing of a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule. Key Program Findings The key program findings are summarized as follows: • PSAR favorably reduced stripper duties and reboiler temperatures with little/no impact to absorption column • >90% CO2 capture was achievable at reasonable liquid-gas ratios in the absorber • High rich solvent viscosities (up to 600 cP) were successfully demonstrated in the bench-scale system. However, the projected impacts of high viscosity to capital cost and operational limits compromised the other levelized cost of electricity benefits. • Low thermal conductivity of organics significantly increased the required cross exchanger surface area, and potentially other heat exchange surfaces. • CO2BOL had low evaporative losses during bench-scale testing • There was no evidence of foaming during bench scale testing • Current CO2BOL formulation costs project to be $35/kg • Ecotoxicity (Water Daphnia) was comparable between CO2BOL and MEA (169.47 versus 103.63 mg/L) • Full dehydration of the flue gas was determined to not be economically feasible. However, modest refrigeration (13 MW for the 550 MW reference system) was determined to be potentially economically feasible, and still produce a water-lean condition for the CO2BOLs (5 wt% steady-state water loading). • CO2BOLs testing with 5 wt% water loading did not compromise anhydrous performance behavior, and showed actual enhancement of CO2 capture performance. • Mass transfer of CO2BOLs was not greatly impeded by viscosity • Facile separation of antisolvent from lean CO2BOL was

  16. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Study of the CO2 Capture Properties of Potassium Carbonate Sesquihydrate, K2CO3·1.5H2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Luebkes,David R.; Pennline, Henry W; Li, Bingyun Li; Janik, Michael J.; Halley, Woods

    2012-01-01

    By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO2 absorption/desorption reactions with dehydrated potassium carbonates through K2CO3·1.5H2O + CO2 = 2KHCO3 + 0.5H2O(g) are analyzed. The energy change and the chemical potential of this reaction have been calculated and used to evaluate its thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. The results indicate that the K2CO3·1.5H2O can only be applied for postcombustion CO2 capture technology at temperatures lower than its phase transition temperature, which depends on the CO2 pressure and the steam pressure with the best range being PH2O ≤ 1.0 bar. Above the phase transition temperature, the sorbent will be regenerated into anhydrous K2CO3. If the steam pressure PH2O is much greater than 1.0 bar, it is possible to use the K2CO3·1.5H2O sorbent for precombustion CO2 capture technology. Compared to anhydrous K2CO3, K2CO3·1.5H2O requires less energy for regeneration.

  17. Enhanced CO2 capture in binary mixtures of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tricyanomethanide ionic liquids with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, George E; Zubeir, Lawien F; Likodimos, Vlassis; Falaras, Polycarpos; Kroon, Maaike C; Iliev, Boyan; Adamova, Gabriela; Schubert, Thomas J S

    2013-10-10

    Absorption of carbon dioxide and water in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliun tricyanomethanide ([C4C1im][TCM]) and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tricyanomethanide ([C8C1im][TCM]) ionic liquids (ILs) was systematically investigated for the first time as a function of the H2O content by means of a gravimetric system together with in-situ Raman spectroscopy, excess molar volume (V(E)), and viscosity deviation measurements. Although CO2 absorption was marginally affected by water at low H2O molar fractions for both ILs, an increase of the H2O content resulted in a marked enhancement of both the CO2 solubility (ca. 4-fold) and diffusivity (ca. 10-fold) in the binary [C(n)C1im][TCM]/H2O systems, in contrast to the weak and/or detrimental influence of water in most physically and chemically CO2-absorbing ILs. In-situ Raman spectroscopy on the IL/CO2 systems verified that CO2 is physically absorbed in the dry ILs with no significant effect on their structural organization. A pronounced variation of distinct tricyanomethanide Raman modes was disclosed in the [C(n)C1im][TCM]/H2O mixtures, attesting to the gradual disruption of the anion-cation coupling by the hydrogen-bonded water molecules to the [TCM](-) anions, in accordance with the positive excess molar volumes and negative viscosity deviations for the binary systems. Most importantly, CO2 absorption in the ILs/H2O mixtures at high water concentrations revealed that the [TCM](-) Raman modes tend to restore their original state for the heavily hydrated ILs, in qualitative agreement with the intriguing nonmonotonous transients of CO2 absorption kinetics unveiled by the gravimetric measurements for the hybrid solvents. A molecular exchange mechanism between CO2 in the gas phase and H2O in the liquid phase was thereby proposed to explain the enhanced CO2 absorption in the hybrid [C(n)C1im][TCM]//H2O solvents based on the subtle competition between the TCM-H2O and TCM-CO2 interactions, which renders these ILs very promising for CO2

  18. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-04

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  19. Electricity from fossil fuels without CO2 emissions: assessing the costs of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration in U.S. electricity markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T L; Keith, D W

    2001-10-01

    The decoupling of fossil-fueled electricity production from atmospheric CO2 emissions via CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) is increasingly regarded as an important means of mitigating climate change at a reasonable cost. Engineering analyses of CO2 mitigation typically compare the cost of electricity for a base generation technology to that for a similar plant with CO2 capture and then compute the carbon emissions mitigated per unit of cost. It can be hard to interpret mitigation cost estimates from this plant-level approach when a consistent base technology cannot be identified. In addition, neither engineering analyses nor general equilibrium models can capture the economics of plant dispatch. A realistic assessment of the costs of carbon sequestration as an emissions abatement strategy in the electric sector therefore requires a systems-level analysis. We discuss various frameworks for computing mitigation costs and introduce a simplified model of electric sector planning. Results from a "bottom-up" engineering-economic analysis for a representative U.S. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region illustrate how the penetration of CCS technologies and the dispatch of generating units vary with the price of carbon emissions and thereby determine the relationship between mitigation cost and emissions reduction.

  20. EVALUATION OF SOLID SORBENTS AS A RETROFIT TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly Krutka; Sharon Sjostrom

    2011-07-31

    Through a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) has begun evaluating the use of solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The project objective was to address the viability and accelerate development of a solid-based CO{sub 2} capture technology. To meet this objective, initial evaluations of sorbents and the process/equipment were completed. First the sorbents were evaluated using a temperature swing adsorption process at the laboratory scale in a fixed-bed apparatus. A slipstream reactor designed to treat flue gas produced by coal-fired generation of nominally 1 kWe was designed and constructed, which was used to evaluate the most promising materials on a more meaningful scale using actual flue gas. In a concurrent effort, commercial-scale processes and equipment options were also evaluated for their applicability to sorbent-based CO{sub 2} capture. A cost analysis was completed that can be used to direct future technology development efforts. ADA completed an extensive sorbent screening program funded primarily through this project, DOE NETL cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649, with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and other industry participants. Laboratory screening tests were completed on simulated and actual flue gas using simulated flue gas and an automated fixed bed system. The following types and quantities of sorbents were evaluated: 87 supported amines; 31 carbon based materials; 6 zeolites; 7 supported carbonates (evaluated under separate funding); and 10 hydrotalcites. Sorbent evaluations were conducted to characterize materials and down-select promising candidates for further testing at the slipstream scale. More than half of the materials evaluated during this program were supported amines. Based on the laboratory screening four supported amine sorbents were selected for evaluation at the 1 kW scale at two different

  1. A Geochemical Approach for Monitoring a CO2 Pilot Site: Rousse, France. A Major gases, CO2-Carbon Isotopes and Noble Gases Combined Approach Une méthode géochimique pour la surveillance d’un site pilote de stockage de CO2 : Rousse, France. Approche combinant les gaz majeurs, l’isotopie du carbone du CO2 et les gaz rares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia B.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the geochemical characterization of various gas end-members involved in a depleted gas field CO2 storage pilot (Rousse, France. In this pilot, CO2 is produced by oxycombustion from natural gas transformed into fuel gas at the Lacq plant, and transported in a pipeline 30 km away to the depleted gas reservoir of Rousse. Gases produced at Rousse before CO2 injection, the Lacq fuel gas and the CO2 resulting from the oxy-fuel combustion were sampled, together with gases from a –45 m monitoring well and from soils in the vicinity of the Rousse structure. For all samples, the bulk gas composition, the carbon isotopic compositions and the abundance and isotopic signatures of the noble gases were determined. The bulk gas compositions of the Rousse natural gas are comparable to the Lacq fuel gas with methane as the main compound with residual C2-C5 and CO2. Soil gases are typical mixtures of air with biogenic CO2 (up to 9-10%, while the monitoring well gases display typical air compositions with no excess CO2 The Rousse gas and the Lacq fuel gas have δ13CCH4 values of –41.0‰ and –43.0‰ respectively. The injected CO2 out of the oxycombustion chamber has a δ13CCO2 of –40.0‰, whereas δ13CCO2 value for soils samples is comprised between –15 and –25‰. The Rousse natural gas and the Lacq fuel gas are both characterized by a high He enrichment, and depletion in Ne, Ar and Kr compared to the air values. The oxyfuel combustion process provides a CO2 with the He enrichment of the Lacq fuel gas, and a Ne, Ar and Kr composition reflecting that of the oxygen produced at the Air Separation Unit (ASU. Indeed, Ne is depleted relatively to the air, while Kr is enriched up to tenfold, which results from the cryogenic separation of the air noble gases within the ASU. Soil samples noble gas compositions are equivalent to that of the air. In the light of these results, the compositions of the various end-members involved in this CO2

  2. Risk management in a large-scale CO2 geosequestration pilot project, Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, K.; Chabora, E.; Finley, R.J.; Greenberg, S.E.; Marsteller, S.

    2011-01-01

    Like most large-scale infrastructure projects, carbon dioxide (CO 2) geological sequestration (GS) projects have multiple success criteria and multiple stakeholders. In this context "risk evaluation" encompasses multiple scales. Yet a risk management program aims to maximize the chance of project success by assessing, monitoring, minimizing all risks in a consistent framework. The 150,000-km2 Illinois Basin underlies much of the state of Illinois, USA, and parts of adjacent Kentucky and Indiana. Its potential for CO2 storage is first-rate among basins in North America, an impression that has been strengthened by early testing of the injection well of the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium's (MGSC's) Phase III large scale demonstration project, the Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP). The IBDP, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), represents a key trial of GS technologies and project-management techniques. Though risks are specific to each site and project, IBDP risk management methodologies provide valuable experience for future GS projects. IBDP views risk as the potential for negative impact to any of these five values: health and safety, environment, financial, advancing the viability and public acceptability of a GS industry, and research. Research goals include monitoring one million metric tonnes of injected CO2 in the subsurface. Risk management responds to the ways in which any values are at risk: for example, monitoring is designed to reduce uncertainties in parameter values that are important for research and system control, and is also designed to provide public assurance. Identified risks are the primary basis for risk-reduction measures: risks linked to uncertainty in geologic parameters guide further characterization work and guide simulations applied to performance evaluation. Formally, industry defines risk (more precisely risk criticality) as the product L*S, the Likelihood multiplied

  3. The Sulcis Storage Project: Status of the First Italian Initiative for Pilot-Scale Geological Sequestration of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisant, A.; Maggio, E.; Pettinau, A.

    2016-12-01

    The deep aquifer located at a depth of about 1000-1500 m within fractured carbonate in the Sulcis coal basin (South-West Sardinia, Italy) constitutes a potential reservoir to develop a pilot-scale CO2 storage site. The occurrence of several coal mines and the geology of the basin also provide favourable condition to install a permanent infrastructures where advanced CO2 storage technologies can be developed. Overall, the Sulcis project will allow to characterize the Sulcis coal basin (South West Sardinia, Italy) and to develop a permanent infrastructure (know-how, equipment, laboratories, etc.) for advanced international studies on CO2 storage. The research activities are structured in two different phases: (i) site characterization, including the construction of an underground and a fault laboratories and (ii) the installation of a test site for small-scale injection of CO2. In particular, the underground laboratory will host geochemical and geophysical experiments on rocks, taking advantages of the buried environment and the very well confined conditions in the galleries; in parallel, the fault laboratory will be constructed to study CO2 leakage phenomena in a selected fault. The project is currently ongoing and some preliminary results will be presented in this work as well as the structure of the project as a whole. More in detail, preliminary activities comprise: (i) geochemical monitoring; (ii) the minero-petrographycal, physical and geophysical characterization of the rock samples; (iii) the development of both static and dynamic geological models of the reservoir; (iv) the structural geology and fault analysis; (v) the assessment of natural seismicity through a monitoring network (vi) the re-processing and the analysis of the reflection seismic data. Future activities will comprise: (i) the drilling of shallow exploration wells near the faults; (ii) the construction of both the above mentioned laboratories; (iii) drilling of a deep exploration well (1,500 m

  4. Hydro-mechanical simulations of well abandonment at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage verify wellbore system integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Victoria; Kempka, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In geological underground utilisation, operating and abandoned wells have been identified as a main potential leakage pathways for reservoir fluids. In the scope of the well abandonment procedure currently carried out at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage in Germany, a hydro-mechanical model was built to carry out a coupled analysis of the integrity in the entire wellbore system. The main aim of the present study was to assess the impacts of stress changes associated with CO2 injection as well as the cement backfill undertaken in the scope of well abandonment. A numerical model comprising cement sheaths, steel casings, tubing, multiple packers and wellbore annuli was implemented to enable a detailed representation of the entire wellbore system. The numerical model grid has a horizontal discretisation of 5 m x 5 m to focus on near wellbore effects, whereby element sizes increase with increasing distance from the wellbore. Vertical grid discretisation uses a tartan grid type over the entire model thickness of 1,500 m to ensure a sufficient discretisation of all wellbore system elements as well as of the reservoir unit. The total number of elements amounts to 210,672. Mechanical model parameters were taken from geological, drilling, logging and laboratory test data based on Ketzin pilot site-specific information as well as related literature (Kempka et al., 2014). The coupled calculations were performed using an elasto-plastic constitutive law, whereby an initial simulation run ensured a static mechanical equilibrium to represent the initial state before the start of CO2 injection. Thereto, gravitational load of the overburden rocks and pore pressure distribution following available well logs were integrated for initial model parameterisation including a normal faulting stress regime defined by a horizontal to vertical total stress ratio of 0.85. A correction accounting for the temperature and pressure dependent CO2 density was carried out in advance of each

  5. Results from twelve years of continuous monitoring of the soil CO2 flux at the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szizybalski, Alexandra; Zimmer, Martin; Pilz, Peter; Liebscher, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Under the coordination of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences the complete life-cycle of a geological storage site for CO2 has been investigated and studied in detail over the past 12 years at Ketzin near Berlin, Germany. The test site is located at the southern flank of an anticlinal structure. Beginning with an exploration phase in 2004, drilling of the first three wells took place in 2007. From June 2008 to August 2013 about 67 kt of CO2 were injected into Upper Triassic sandstones at a depth of 630 to 650 m overlain by more than 165 m of shaley cap rocks. A comprehensive operational and scientific monitoring program forms the central part of the Ketzin project targeting at the reservoir itself, its overburden or above-zone and the surface. The surface monitoring is done by continuous soil CO2 flux measurements. These already started in 2005, more than three years prior to the injection phase using a survey chamber from LI-COR Inc. Twenty sampling locations were selected in the area of the anticline covering about 3 x 3 km. In order to obtain information on seasonal trends, measurements are performed at least once a month. The data set obtained prior to the injection serves as a basis for comparison with all further measurements during the injection and storage operations [Zimmer et al., 2010]. To refine the monitoring network, eight automatic, permanent soil CO2 flux stations were additionally installed in 2011 in the direct vicinity of the boreholes. Using this system, the CO2 soil flux is measured on an hourly basis. Over the whole monitoring time, soil temperature and moisture are recorded simultaneously and soil samples down to 70 cm depth were studied for their structure, carbon and nitrogen content. ver the whole monitoring time. Both, diurnal and seasonal flux variations can be detected and hence, provide a basis for interpretation of the measured data. Detailed analysis of the long-term monitoring at each station clearly reveals the influence

  6. Poly(Ionic Liquid)-Derived Carbon with Site-Specific N-Doping and Biphasic Heterojunction for Enhanced CO2Capture and Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jiang; Antonietti, Markus; Yuan, Jiayin

    2017-06-19

    CO 2 capture is a pressing global environmental issue that drives scientists to develop creative strategies for tackling this challenge. The concept in this contribution is to produce site-specific nitrogen doping in microporous carbon fibers. Following this approach a carbon/carbon heterojunction is created by using a poly(ionic liquid) (PIL) as a "soft" activation agent that deposits nitrogen species exclusively on the surface of commercial microporous carbon fibers. This type of carbon-based biphasic heterojunction amplifies the interaction between carbon fiber and CO 2 molecule for unusually high CO 2 uptake and resistive sensing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Towards cleaner geothermal energy utilization: capturing and sequestering CO2 and H2S emissions from geothermal power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Edda S.P. Aradóttir et al

    2012-01-01

    Field-scale reactive transport models of CO2 and H2S mineral sequestration are in development, with a focus on Reykjavík Energy’s ongoing gas reinjection tests at Hellisheidi geothermal power plant. A new thermodynamic dataset describing the minerals of interest was developed as a part of this study, since widely used thermodynamic databases did not contain the mineral assemblage needed for the simulations. Simulations predict efficient precipitation of both CO2 and H2S into ther...

  8. Towards Cleaner Geothermal Energy Utilization: Capturing and Sequestering CO2 and H2S Emissions from Geothermal Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Edda S.P. Aradóttir et al

    2012-01-01

    Field-scale reactive transport models of CO2 and H2S mineral sequestration are in development, with a focus on Reykjavík Energy’s ongoing gas reinjection tests at Hellisheidi geothermal power plant. A new thermodynamic dataset describing the minerals of interest was developed as a part of this study, since widely used thermodynamic databases did not contain the mineral assemblage needed for the simulations. Simulations predict efficient precipitation of both CO2 and H2S into ther...

  9. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Selective CO 2 Capture Processes from Biogas Streams Using Ionic Liquids as Physical Absorbents

    OpenAIRE

    García-Gutiérrez, P.; Jacquemin, J.; McCrellis, C.; Dimitriou, I; Taylor, S.F.R.; Hardacre, C.; R. W. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is a renewable resource with high energy content, which is composed mainly of CH4 (40–75 vol %) and CO2 (15–60 vol %). Other components, such as water (H2O, 5–10 vol %) and trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide and siloxanes, can also be present. A CH4-rich stream can be produced by removing the CO2 and other impurities so that the upgraded biomethane can be injected into the natural gas grid or used as a vehicle fuel. The main objective of this pa...

  10. Hierarchical Nanocomposite by the Integration of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Amorphous Carbon with Ultrafine MgO Nanocrystallites for Enhanced CO2Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2017-11-07

    Exploring efficient and low-cost solid sorbents is essential for carbon capture and storage. Herein, a novel class of high-performance CO 2 adsorbent (rGO@MgO/C) is engineered based on the controllable integration of reduced graphene oxide (rGO), amorphous carbon, and MgO nanocrystallites. The optimized rGO@MgO/C nanocomposite exhibits remarkable CO 2 capture capacity (up to 31.5 wt % at 27 °C, 1 bar CO 2 , and 22.5 wt % under the simulated flue gas), fast sorption rate, and strong process durability. The enhanced capture capability of CO 2 is the best among all of the MgO-based sorbents reported so far. The high performance of rGO@MgO/C nanocomposite can be ascribed to the hierarchical architecture and special physicochemical features, including the sheet-on-sheet sandwich-like structure, ultrathin nanosheets with abundant nanopores, large surface area, and highly dispersed ultrafine MgO nanocrystallites (ca. 3 nm in size), together with the rGO sheets and in situ generated amorphous carbon that serve as a dual carbon support and protectant system with which to prevent MgO nanocrystallites from agglomeration. In addition, the CO 2 -uptake capacity at intermediate temperature (e.g., 350 °C) can be further improved threefold through alkali metal salt promotion treatment. This work provides a facile and effective strategy with which to engineer advanced graphene-based functional nanocomposites with rationally designed compositions and architectures for potential applications in the field of gas storage and separation.

  11. From Site Characterization through Safe and Successful CO2 Injection Operation to Post-injection Monitoring and Site Closure - Closing the Full Life Cycle Research at the Ketzin Pilot Site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Initiated in 2004, the Ketzin pilot site near Berlin, Germany, was the first European onshore storage project for research and development on geological CO2 storage. After comprehensive site characterization the site infrastructure was build comprising three deep wells and the injection facility including pumps and storage tanks. The operational CO2 injection period started in June 2008 and ended in August 2013 when the site entered the post-injection closure period. During these five years, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into an Upper Triassic saline sandstone aquifer at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. In fall 2013, the first observation well was partially plugged in the reservoir section with CO2 resistant cement; full abandonment of this well finished in 2015 after roughly 2 years of cement plug monitoring. Abandonment of the remaining wells will be finished by summer 2017 and hand-over of liability to the competent authority is scheduled for end of 2017. The CO2 injected was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the oxyfuel pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. The injection period terminated with a CO2-N2 co-injection experiment of 650 t of a 95% CO2/5% N2 mixture in summer 2013 to study the effects of impurities in the CO2 stream on the injection operation. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 40°C prior to injection to ensure a single-phase injection process and avoid any phase transition or transient states within the injection facility or the reservoir. Between March and July 2013, just prior to the CO2-N2 co-injection experiment, the injection temperature was stepwise decreased down to 10°C within a "cold-injection" experiment to study the effects of two-phase injection conditions. During injection operation, the combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods enabled detection and mapping of the spatial and

  12. Facile Synthesis of MgO-Modified Carbon Adsorbents with Microwave- Assisted Methods: Effect of MgO Particles and Porosities on CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young-Jung; Park, Soo-Jin

    2017-07-18

    In this study, magnesium oxide (MgO)-modified carbon adsorbents were fabricated using a nitrogen-enriched carbon precursor by microwave-assisted irradiation for CO2 capture. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed the characteristic diffraction peaks of MgO at 43° and 62.5°, and no impurities were apparent. By changing the microwave reaction time, the spherical structure of the parent material was transformed to a hybrid structure with MgO crystalline particles in a carbon matrix. The morphology evolution and properties of the prepared materials were also investigated using transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption, respectively. On optimising the conditions, the prepared sample attained a high CO2 uptake of 1.22 mmol/g (5.3 wt.%) under flue gas conditions (15% CO2 in N2). It was found that MgO affected the CO2 capture behaviour by enhancing the fundamental characteristics of the carbon surfaces.

  13. Modelling of a tubular membrane contactor for pre-combustion CO2 capture using ionic liquids: Influence of the membrane configuration, absorbent properties and operation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongde Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A membrane contactor using ionic liquids (ILs as solvent for pre-combustion capture CO2 at elevated temperature (303–393 K and pressure (20 bar has been studied using mathematic model in the present work. A comprehensive two-dimensional (2D mass-transfer model was developed based on finite element method. The effects of liquid properties, membrane configurations, as well as operation parameters on the CO2 removal efficiency were systematically studied. The simulation results show that CO2 can be effectively removed in this process. In addition, it is found that the liquid phase mass transfer dominated the overall mass transfer. Membranes with high porosity and small thickness could apparently reduce the membrane resistance and thus increase the separation efficiency. On the other hand, the membrane diameter and membrane length have a relatively small influence on separation performance within the operation range. Keywords: CO2 capture, Pre-combustion, Membrane contactor, Ionic liquids, Modelling

  14. Shape- and morphology-controlled sustainable synthesis of Cu, Co, and in metal organic frameworks with high CO2 capture capacity

    KAUST Repository

    Sarawade, Pradip

    2012-11-06

    We studied the effects of various surfactants on the shape and morphology of three metal organic frameworks (MOFs), i.e., Co-MOF, Cu-MOF, and In-MOF, which were synthesized under microwave irradiation. The as-synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen sorption. The effects of microwave irradiation time, temperature, and surfactant template were investigated. The synthetic parameters, including the type of surfactant template and the reaction temperature, played crucial roles in the size, shape, and morphology of the MOF microcrystals. We also evaluated these MOFs as sorbents for capturing CO2. Of the synthesized materials, Cu-MOF demonstrated the highest CO2 capture capacity, even at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Solid Formation in Ammonia-based Processes for CO2 Capture - Turning a Challenge into an Opportunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Pérez-Calvo, José Francisco; Leopold, Clemens; Milella, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    This article gives an overview of our holistic approach for the optimization of the Chilled Ammonia Process by (i) understanding the thermodynamics and kinetics of solid formation in the CO2-NH3-H2O system and finding criticalities with respect to solid formation in the process, and by (ii)

  16. Comparative Study of Molecular Basket Sorbents Consisting of Polyallylamine and Polyethylenimine Functionalized SBA-15 for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxiang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2017-09-20

    Polyallylamine (PAA)-based molecular basket sorbents (MBS) have been studied for CO2 capture in comparison with polyethylenimine (PEI)-based MBS. The characterizations including N2 physisorption, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that PAA (Mn =15 000) is more rigid and has more steric hindrance inside SBA-15 pores than PEI owing mainly to its different polymer structure. The effects of temperature and PAA loading on the CO2 sorption capacity of PAA-based MBS have been examined by TGA by using 100 % CO2 gas stream and compared with PEI/SBA-15. It was found that the capacity of the PAA/SBA-15 sorbent increased with increasing temperature. The optimum capacity of 88 mgCO2  gsorb(-1) was obtained at 140 °C for PAA(50)/SBA-15 whereas the optimum sorption temperature was 75 and 90 °C for PEI-I(50)/SBA-15 (PEI-I, Mn =423) and PEI-II(50)/SBA-15 (PEI-II, Mn =25 000), respectively. The capacity initially increased with the increase of PAA loading and then dropped at high amine contents, owing to the increased diffusion barrier. The highest CO2 capacity of 109 mgCO2  gsorb(-1) was obtained at a PAA loading of 65 wt %, whereas the PAA(50)/SBA-15 sorbent gave the best amine efficiency of 0.23 molCO2  molN(-1) . The effect of moisture was examined in a fixed-bed flow system with simulated flue gas containing 15 % CO2 and 4.5 % O2 in N2 . It was found that the presence of moisture significantly enhanced CO2 sorption over PAA(50)/SBA-15 and greatly improved its cyclic stability and regenerability. Compared with PEI/SBA-15, PAA/SBA-15 possesses a better thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidative degradation. However, the CO2 sorption rate over the PAA(50)/SBA-15 sorbent was much slower. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. In-vivo occlusal caries prevention by pulsed CO2 -laser and fluoride varnish treatment--a clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Charland, Daniel A; Rechmann, Beate M T; Le, Charles Q; Featherstone, John D B

    2013-07-01

    High caries prevalence in occlusal pits and fissures warrants novel prevention methods. An 86% reduction in dental enamel smooth surface demineralization in-vivo following short-pulsed 9.6 µm-CO(2) -laser irradiation was recently reported. The objective of this study was to conduct a blinded 12-month-pilot clinical trial of occlusal pit and fissure caries inhibition using the same CO(2) -laser irradiation conditions. Twenty subjects, average age 14 years, were recruited. At baseline, second molars were randomized into test and control groups, assessed by International Caries Detection & Assessment System (ICDAS-II), SOPROLIFE light-induced fluorescence evaluator in daylight and blue-fluorescence mode and DIAGNOdent. An independent investigator irradiated test molars with a CO(2) -laser, wavelength 9.6 µm, pulse-duration 20 µs, pulse-repetition-rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 800 µm, average fluence 4.5 ± 0.5 J/cm(2), 20 laser pulses per spot. At 3-, 6- and 12-month recall teeth were assessed by ICDAS, SOPROLIFE and DIAGNOdent. All subjects received fluoride varnish applications at baseline and 6-month recall. All subjects completed the 3-month, 19 the 6-month and 16 the 12-month recall. At all recalls average ICDAS scores had decreased for the test and increased for the control fissures (laser vs. control, 3-month: -0.10 ± 0.14, 0.30 ± 0.18, P > 0.05; 6-month: -0.26 ± 0.13, 0.47 ± 0.16, P = 0.001; 12-month: -0.31 ± 0.15, 0.75 ± 0.17, P laser vs. control, 6-month: 0.22 ± 0.13, 0.17 ± 0.09, P = 0.02; 12-month: 0.28 ± 0.19, 0.25 ± 0.17, P = 0.03). For SOPROLIFE blue-fluorescence evaluation mean changes in comparison to baseline for the control and the laser treated teeth were also statistically significant for the 6- and 12-month recall. Specific microsecond short-pulsed 9.6 µm CO(2) -laser irradiation markedly inhibits caries progression in pits and fissures in comparison to

  18. Density functional theory studies of the structural, electronic, and phonon properties of Li2O and Li2CO3 : Application to CO2 capture reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2009-01-01

    The structural, electronic, and phonon properties of Li2O and Li2CO3 solids are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and their thermodynamic properties for CO2 absorption and desorption reactions are analyzed. The calculated bulk properties for both the ambient- and the high-pressure phases of Li2O and Li2CO3 are in good agreement with available experimental measurements. The calculated band gap of the high-pressure phase of Li2O (8.37 eV, indirect) is about 3 eV larger than the one corresponding to the ambient Li2O phase (5.39 eV, direct), whereas the calculated band gap for the high-pressure phase of Li2CO3 (3.55 eV, indirect) is about 1.6 eV smaller than that for the ambient phase of Li2CO3 (5.10 eV, direct). The oxygen atoms in the ambient phase of the Li2CO3 crystal are not equivalent as reflected by two different sets of C-O bond lengths (1.28 and 1.31Å ) and they form two different groups. When Li2CO3 dissociates, one group of O forms Li2O , while the other group of O forms CO2 . The calculated phonon dispersion and density of states for the ambient phases of Li2O and Li2CO3 are in good agreement with experimental measurements and other available theoretical results. Li2O(s)+CO2(g)↔Li2CO3(s) is the key reaction of lithium salt sorbents (such as lithium silicates and lithium zircornates) for CO2 capture. The energy change and the chemical potential of this reaction have been calculated by combining DFT with lattice dynamics. Our results indicate that although pure Li2O can absorb CO2 efficiently, it is not a good solid sorbent for CO2 capture because the reverse reaction, corresponding to Li2CO3 releasing CO2 , can only occur at very low CO2 pressure and/or at very high temperature when Li2CO3 is in liquid phase.

  19. A Preliminary Assessment of the Initial Compression Power Requirement in CO2 Pipeline “Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS Technologies”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussalam El-Suleiman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 captured from fossil-fueled power generation plants is said to be economically transported via pipelines over long distances. The CO2 must be compressed to pipeline specifications using compressors and pumps that are driven by gas turbine (GT or other prime movers. This paper presents the evaluation of actual work transfer or required prime power by modeling the governing equations of compression using the Peng–Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS. A computer code was developed to carry out the modeling and subsequent simulation of the compression power requirement. The simulation of prime mover power was carried out for different technology (head per stage of the compressor ranging from 10-staged compression to double stage compression. The results show that the current technology of the centrifugal compressor could require as much as 23MW of prime mover power to compress 1.5 million tonnes per year of CO2—a projected equivalent CO2 released from a 530MW combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT power generation plant.

  20. Public Perception of Carbon Capture and Storage. Qualitative Study Results; Percepcion Publica de la captura y almacenamiento de CO2. Resultados de un Estudio Cualitativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, R.; Sala, R.; Oltra, C.

    2007-09-27

    In recent years, public perception and acceptance of Carbon Capture and Storage has become a key issue for research as technological projects have been initiated in USA, Canada and Europe. It has been considered that public opposition could be an important barrier for technological deployment. This report is part of the sub project Acceptability and Governance of CO2 storage processes, started in 2005 as a part of the technological project Advanced technologies of CO2 generation, capture and storage. The study is based on the application of focus groups with lay people. This qualitative social research technique was applied to get a deeper knowledge of the elements influencing the public acceptability of CO2 storage sites. Results indicate that there exists a low level of awareness about the technology among participants. After providing some information about the technology, the initial reaction stays between rejection and ambivalence. A reluctant acceptance appears when significant importance is given to the perceived benefits. The perception of risk from climate change plays an essential role. (Author) 25 refs.

  1. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Topical Report EH&S Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Herwig, Mark; Giolando, Salvatore; Green, Dianne; Morall, Donna

    2016-05-11

    GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2 capture solvent (award number DEFE0013687). As part of this program, a technology EH&S assessment (Subtask 5.1) has been completed for a CO2 capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. The assessment focuses on two chemicals used in the process, the aminosilicone solvent, GAP-0, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA), the GAP-0 carbamate formed upon reaction of the GAP-0 with CO2, and two potential byproducts formed in the process, GAP-0/SOx salts and amine-terminated, urea-containing silicone (also referred to as “ureas” in this report). The EH&S assessment identifies and estimates the magnitude of the potential air and water emissions and solid waste generated by the process and reviews the toxicological profiles of the chemicals associated with the process. Details regarding regulatory requirements, engineering controls, and storage and handling procedures are also provided in the following sections.

  2. A general enhancement factor model for absorption and desorption systems: A CO2 capture case-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    kinetics and applied for the CO2-MEA-H2O second order reversible system. The results show that the GM predicts the two-film theory within 2% accuracy and the surface renewal model within 10% accuracy, both at absorber and desorber conditions and for high driving force and pinch conditions. GM is compared......This study derives a general method (GM) for reactive absorption and desorption calculation. It connects the Onda's approximation for reversible reactions with the van Krevelen's approach for instantaneous irreversible reactions. It is set-up for a reversible (m+n)-th order, forward reaction...

  3. Tuning the Physicochemical Properties of Diverse Phenolic Ionic Liquids for Equimolar CO2 Capture by the Substituent on the Anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Yu, Bo [ORNL; Li, Haoran [Zhejiang University; Wang, Congmin [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic ionic liquids for the efficient and reversible capture of CO{sub 2} were designed and prepared from phosphonium hydroxide and substituted phenols. The electron-withdrawing or electron-donating ability, position, and number of the substituents on the anion of these ionic liquids were correlated with the physicochemical properties of the ionic liquids. The results show that the stability, viscosity, and CO{sub 2}-capturing ability of these ionic liquids were significantly affected by the substituents. Furthermore, the relationship between the decomposition temperature, the CO{sub 2}-absorption capacity, and the basicity of these ionic liquids was quantitatively correlated and further rationalized by theoretical calculation. Indeed, these ionic liquids showed good stability, high absorption capacity, and low absorption enthalpy for CO{sub 2} capture. This method, which tunes the physicochemical properties by making use of substituent effects in the anion of the ionic liquid, is important for the design of highly efficient and reversible methods for CO{sub 2}-capture. This CO{sub 2} capture process using diverse phenolic ionic liquids is a promising potential method for CO{sub 2} absorption with both high absorption capacity and good reversibility.

  4. Neutralization of acid mine drainage using the final product from CO2 emissions capture with alkaline paper mill waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Castillo, Julio; Quispe, Dino; Nieto, José Miguel

    2010-05-15

    In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the applicability of low-cost alkaline paper mill wastes as acidity neutralizing agents for treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). Paper wastes include a calcium mud by-product from kraft pulping, and a calcite powder from a previous study focused on sequestering CO(2) by carbonation of calcium mud. The neutralization process consisted of increase of pH by alkaline additive dissolution, decrease of metals solubility and precipitation of gypsum and poorly crystallized Fe-Al oxy-hydroxides/oxy-hydroxysulphates, which acted as a sink for trace elements to that extent that solutions reached the pre-potability requirements of water for human consumption. This improvement was supported by geochemical modelling of solutions using PHREEQC software, and observations by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction of reaction products. According to PHREEQC simulations, the annual amount of alkaline additive is able to treat AMD (pH 3.63, sulphate 3800 mg L(-1), iron 348 mg L(-1)) with an average discharge of about 114 and 40 Ls(-1) for calcium mud and calcite powder, respectively. Likewise, given the high potential of calcium mud to sequester CO(2) and of resulting calcite powder to neutralize AMD, paper wastes could be a promising solution for facing this double environmental problem. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomass Steam Gasification with In-Situ CO2 Capture for Enriched Hydrogen Gas Production: A Reaction Kinetics Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim Abdul Mutalib

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to energy and environmental issues, hydrogen has become a more attractive clean fuel. Furthermore, there is high interest in producing hydrogen from biomass with a view to sustainability. The thermochemical process for hydrogen production, i.e. gasification, is the focus of this work. This paper discusses the mathematical modeling of hydrogen production process via biomass steam gasification with calcium oxide as sorbent in a gasifier. A modelling framework consisting of kinetics models for char gasification, methanation, Boudouard, methane reforming, water gas shift and carbonation reactions to represent the gasification and CO2 adsorption in the gasifier, is developed and implemented in MATLAB. The scope of the work includes an investigation of the influence of the temperature, steam/biomass ratio and sorbent/biomass ratio on the amount of hydrogen produced, product gas compositions and carbon conversion. The importance of different reactions involved in the process is also discussed. It is observed that hydrogen production and carbon conversion increase with increasing temperature and steam/biomass ratio. The model predicts a maximum hydrogen mole fraction in the product gas of 0.81 occurring at 950 K, steam/biomass ratio of 3.0 and sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.0. In addition, at sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.52, purity of H2 can be increased to 0.98 mole fraction with all CO2 present in the system adsorbed.

  6. Synthesis of Two-dimensional Microporous Carbonaceous Polymer Nanosheets and Their Application as High-performance CO2 Capture Sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Lin; He, Teng; Wu, Guotao; Chen, Ping

    2016-06-21

    The synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) polymer nanosheets with a well-defined microporous structure remains challenging in materials science. Here, a new kind of 2D microporous carbonaceous polymer nanosheets was synthesized through polymerization of a very low concentration of 1,4-dicyanobenzene in molten zinc chloride at 400-500 °C. This type of nanosheets has a thickness in the range of 3-20 nm, well-defined microporosity, a high surface area (∼537 m(2)  g(-1) ), and a large micropore volume (∼0.45 cm(3)  g(-1) ). The microporous carbonaceous polymer nanosheets exhibit superior CO2 sorption capability (8.14 wt % at 298 K and 1 bar) and a relatively high CO2 selectivity toward N2 (25.6). Starting from different aromatic nitrile monomers, a variety of 2D carbonaceous polymer nanosheets can be obtained showing a certain universality of the ionothermal method reported herein. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plantduring process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic and flexible operation of a carbon capture plant is important as thermal power plants must be operated very flexibly to accommodate large shares of intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar energy. To facilitate such operation, dynamic models for simulation, optimization...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  8. Application of a computer-aided framework for the design of CO2 capture and utilization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    Currently, close to 50 gigatonnes per year of carbon dioxide are emitted to the atmosphere. As carbon dioxide is the dominant greenhouse gas that contributes to sustainability concerns, these emissions need to be targeted for reduction. Carbon dioxide capture and utilization shows promise due...... to the ability to offset (economically) the cost of carbon capture. However, in order to ensure the sustainability of these processes, methods and tools need to be developed and implemented. To this end, a framework for sustainable process synthesis-design, comprising three stages, (1) synthesis, (2) design......, and (3) innovation, has been developed. In order to facilitate the implementation and ensure sustainability, this framework integrates a number of computer-aided methods and tools, that are important for carbon dioxide capture and utilization. Applying this framework helps to address the questions about...

  9. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plant during process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic and flexible operation of a carbon capture plant is important as thermal power plants must be operated very flexibly to accommodate large shares of intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar energy. To facilitate such operation, dynamic models for simulation, optimization...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  10. Potassium and Zeolitic Structure Modified Ultra-microporous Adsorbent Materials from a Renewable Feedstock with Favorable Surface Chemistry for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Jingjing; Sun, Chenggong; Liu, Hao; Xue, Qian; Smith, Emily; Snape, Colin

    2017-08-16

    Novel hierarchically structured microporous biocarbons with exceptionally high capacities for CO2 capture have been synthesized from the abundant agricultural waste of rice husk (RH), using a facile methodology that effectively integrated carbonization, activation, and potassium intercalation into a one-step process. Textural characterization demonstrates that the synthesized biocarbons exhibit exceedingly high ultra-microporosity accounting for up to 95% of total porosity mainly as a result of the naturally occurring silicon compounds within the RH molecular framework structures. With a modest surface area of up to 1035 m(2)/g and a total pore volume of 0.43 cm(3)/g, the best performing RH carbon has shown exceptionally high and fully reversible CO2 uptake capacity of 2.0 mmol/g at 25 °C and a CO2 partial pressure of 0.15 bar, which represents one of the highest uptakes ever reported for both carbon and MOF materials usually prepared from using cost-prohibitive precursor materials with cumbersome methodologies. It has been found that up to 50% of the total CO2 uptake is attributable to the unique surface chemistry of the RH carbons, which appears to be dominated by the enhanced formation of extra-framework potassium cations owing to the exceedingly high levels of ultra-microporosity and the presence of zeolitic structures incorporated within the carbon matrices. Characterizations by EDX element mapping, XPS, and heat of adsorption measurements confirm the existence of a range of zeolitic structures, which essentially transforms the RH carbons into a kind of zeolite-carbon nanocomposite material with strong surface affinity for CO2.

  11. Hydroquinone and quinone-grafted porous carbons for highly selective CO2 capture from flue gases and natural gas upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Krishna, R.; Yang, J.; Deng, S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were

  12. Nanometric thin film membranes manufactured on square meter scale: ultra-thin films for CO 2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Yave, Wilfredo

    2010-09-01

    Miniaturization and manipulation of materials at nanometer scale are key challenges in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In membrane science and technology, the fabrication of ultra-thin polymer films (defect-free) on square meter scale with uniform thickness (<100 nm) is crucial. By using a tailor-made polymer and by controlling the nanofabrication conditions, we developed and manufactured defect-free ultra-thin film membranes with unmatched carbon dioxide permeances, i.e. >5 m3 (STP) m-2 h -1 bar-1. The permeances are extremely high, because the membranes are made from a CO2 philic polymer material and they are only a few tens of nanometers thin. Thus, these thin film membranes have potential application in the treatment of large gas streams under low pressure like, e.g., carbon dioxide separation from flue gas. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. Na(+) doping induced changes in the reduction and charge transport characteristics of Al2O3-stabilized, CuO-based materials for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Q; Abdala, P M; Kierzkowska, A M; van Beek, W; Schweiger, S; Rupp, J L M; Müller, C R

    2016-04-28

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) are emerging CO2 capture technologies that could reduce appreciably the costs associated with the capture of CO2. In CLC and CLOU, the oxygen required to combust a hydrocarbon is provided by a solid oxygen carrier. Among the transition metal oxides typically considered for CLC and CLOU, copper oxide (CuO) stands out owing to its high oxygen carrying capacity, exothermic reduction reactions and fast reduction kinetics. However, the low Tammann (sintering) temperature of CuO is a serious drawback. In this context, it has been proposed to support CuO on high Tammann temperature and low cost alumina (Al2O3), thus, reducing the morphological changes occurring over multiple CLC or CLOU redox cycles and stabilizing, in turn, the high activity of CuO. However, in CuO-Al2O3 systems, phase stabilization and avoiding the formation of the CuAl2O4 spinel is key to obtaining a material with a high redox stability and activity. Here, we report a Na(+) doping strategy to phase stabilize Al2O3-supported CuO, yielding in turn an inexpensive material with a high redox stability and CO2 capture efficiency. We also demonstrate that doping CuO-Al2O3 with Na(+) improves the oxygen uncoupling characteristics and coke resistance of the oxygen carriers. Utilizing in situ and ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the local structure of Cu and the reduction pathways of CuO were determined as a function of the Na(+) content and cycle number. Finally, using 4-point conductivity measurements, we confirm that doping of Al2O3-supported CuO with Na(+) lowers the activation energy for charge transport explaining conclusively the improved redox characteristics of the new oxygen carriers developed.

  14. Multi-criteria screening of chemicals considering thermodynamic and life cycle assessment metrics via data envelopment analysis: Application to CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    G. Guillén-Gosálbez; P. Limleamthong; M. Gonzalez-Miquel; S. Papadokonstantakis; A. I. Papadopoulos; P. Seferlis

    2016-01-01

    Multi-criteria screening of chemicals considering thermodynamic and life cycle assessment metrics via data envelopment analysis: Application to CO2 capture DOI: 10.1039/c6gc01696k URL: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2016/GC/C6GC01696K#!divAbstract Filiació URV: SI Inclòs a la memòria: SI Paraules en blanc With the growing trend of incorporating sustainability principles in the chemical industry, there is a clear need to develop decision-making tools to quantif...

  15. Application of a computer-aided framework for the design of CO2 capture and utilization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Woodley, John; Gani, Rafiqul

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and utilization is a vital element of carbon dioxide emission reduction to address global warming. An integrated, computer-aided framework has been developed to achieve this. This framework adopts a three-stage approach to sustainable process synthesis-design: (i) process...... of dimethyl carbonate via ethylene carbonate; in Stage 3, the downstream separation is targeted for improvement and the use of reactive distillation as the more sustainable alternative, is obtained....

  16. Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the People’s Republic of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

    2009-12-01

    This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

  17. Correlated formation of the excited states of recoil and scattered ions in multiple electron capture collision of Ar8+ with CO2 and OCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, H.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumoto, J.; Karimi, R.; Sanderson, J. H.; Shiromaru, H.

    2018-02-01

    Multiple ionization events induced by low energy collisions between Ar8+ projectiles and linear triatomic molecular targets, CO2 and OCS, were studied in order to shed light on the correlation between the electronic states of the scattered ion and the ionic fragmentation processes. Position-sensitive time-of-flight measurements of all the recoil fragments, triggered by detection of a charge-selected scattered ion, allowed us to distinguish between ionic fragmentation processes in which different numbers of Auger electrons were emitted by the projectile, just after multiple electron capture. A strong correlation is found for triple capture collisions, between fragmentation with high kinetic energy and events when only single Auger electron emission takes place.

  18. Tuning of ZIF-Derived Carbon with High Activity, Nitrogen Functionality, and Yield - A Case for Superior CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadipelli, Srinivas; Guo, Zheng Xiao

    2015-06-22

    A highly effective and facile synthesis route is developed to create and tailor metal-decorated and nitrogen-functionalized active microporous carbon materials from ZIF-8. Clear metal- and pyrrolic-N-induced enhancements of the cyclic CO2 uptake capacities and binding energies are achieved, particularly at a much lower carbonization temperature of 700 °C than those often reported (1000 °C). The high-temperature carbonization can enhance the porosity but only at the expense of considerable losses of sample yield and metal and N functional sites. The findings are comparatively discussed with carbons derived from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) reported previously. Furthermore, the porosity of the MOF-derived carbon is critically dependent on the structure of the precursor MOF and the crystal growth. The current strategy offers a new and effective route for the creation and tuning of highly active and functionalized carbon structures in high yields and with low energy consumption. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  19. AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

    2001-06-30

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

  20. Eliminating non-renewable CO2 emissions from sewage treatment: an anaerobic migrating bed reactor pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Ken; Lant, Paul

    2006-10-20

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate at pilot scale a high level of energy recovery from sewage utilising a primary Anaerobic Migrating Bed Reactor (AMBR) operating at ambient temperature to convert COD to methane. The focus is the reduction in non-renewable CO(2) emissions resulting from reduced energy requirements for sewage treatment. A pilot AMBR was operated on screened sewage over the period June 2003 to September 2004. The study was divided into two experimental phases. In Phase 1 the process operated at a feed rate of 10 L/h (HRT 50 h), SRT 63 days, average temperature 28 degrees C and mixing time fraction 0.05. In Phase 2 the operating parameters were 20 L/h, 26 days, 16 degrees C and 0.025. Methane production was 66% of total sewage COD in Phase 1 and 23% in Phase 2. Gas mixing of the reactor provided micro-aeration which suppressed sulphide production. Intermittent gas mixing at a useful power input of 6 W/m(3) provided satisfactory process performance in both phases. Energy consumption for mixing was about 1.5% of the energy conversion to methane in both operating phases. Comparative analysis with previously published data confirmed that methane supersaturation resulted in significant losses of methane in the effluent of anaerobic treatment systems. No cases have been reported where methane was considered to be supersaturated in the effluent. We have shown that methane supersaturation is likely to be significant and that methane losses in the effluent are likely to have been greater than previously predicted. Dissolved methane concentrations were measured at up to 2.2 times the saturation concentration relative to the mixing gas composition. However, this study has also demonstrated that despite methane supersaturation occurring, micro-aeration can result in significantly lower losses of methane in the effluent (<11% in this study), and has demonstrated that anaerobic sewage treatment can genuinely provide energy recovery. The goal of demonstrating a

  1. APPLICATION OF CYCLIC CO2 METHODS IN AN OVER-MATURE MISICBLE CO2 PILOT PROJECT-WEST MALLALIEU FIELD, LINCOLN COUNTY, MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd Stevens Getz

    2001-09-01

    This progress report summarizes the results of a miscible cyclic CO{sub 2} project conducted at West Mallalieu Field Unit (WMU) Lincoln County, MS by J.P. Oil Company, Inc. Lafayette, LA. Information is presented regarding the verification of the mechanical integrity of the present candidate well, WMU 17-2B, to the exclusion of nearby more desirable wells from a reservoir standpoint. Engineering summaries of both the injection and flow back phases of the cyclic process are presented. The results indicate that the target volume of 63 MMCF of CO{sub 2} was injected into the candidate well during the month of August 2000 and a combined 73 MMCF of CO{sub 2} and formation gas were recovered during September, October, and November 2000. The fact that all of the injected CO{sub 2} was recovered is encouraging; however, only negligible volumes of liquid were produced with the gas. A number of different factors are explored in this report to explain the lack of economic success. These are divided into several groupings and include: Reservoir Factors, Process Factors, Mechanical Factors, and Special Circumstances Factors. It is impossible to understand precisely the one or combination of interrelated factors responsible for the failure of the experiment but I feel that the original reservoir quality concerns for the subject well WMU 17-2B were not surmountable. Based on the inferences made as to possible failure mechanisms, two future test candidates were selected, WMU 17-10 and 17-14. These lie a significant distance south of the WMU Pilot area and each have a much thicker and higher quality reservoir section than does WMU 17-2B. Both of these wells were productive on pumping units in the not too distant past. This was primary production not influenced by the distant CO{sub 2} injection. These wells are currently completed within somewhat isolated reservoir channels in the Lower Tuscaloosa ''A'' and ''B-2'' Sands that overlie the much

  2. Reactivity of sandstone and siltstone samples from the Ketzin pilot CO2 storage site-Laboratory experiments and reactive geochemical modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Fischer; Axel Liebscher; Marco De Lucia; L. Hecht; Ketzin Team and the

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate mineralogical-geochemical changes within the reservoir of the Ketzin pilot CO2 storage site in Brandenburg, Germany, two sets of laboratory experiments on sandstone and siltstone samples from the Stuttgart Formation have been performed. Samples were exposed to synthetic brine and pure CO2 at experimental conditions and run durations of 5.5 MPa/40 °C/40 months for sandstone and 7.5 MPa/40 °C/6 months for siltstone samples, respectively. Mineralogical changes in both sets of experim...

  3. Multi-Pollutant Emissions Control: Pilot Plant Study of Technologies for Reducing Hg, SO3, NOx and CO2 Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Fenger; Richard A. Winschel

    2005-08-31

    A slipstream pilot plant was built and operated to investigate technology to adsorb mercury (Hg) onto the existing particulate (i.e., fly ash) by cooling flue gas to 200-240 F with a Ljungstrom-type air heater or with water spray. The mercury on the fly ash was then captured in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). An alkaline material, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}), is injected into flue gas upstream of the air heater to control sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), which prevents acid condensation and corrosion of the air heater and ductwork. The slipstream was taken from a bituminous coal-fired power plant. During this contract, Plant Design and Construction (Task 1), Start Up and Maintenance (Task 2), Baseline Testing (Task 3), Sorbent Testing (Task 4), Parametric Testing (Task 5), Humidification Tests (Task 6), Long-Term Testing (Task 7), and a Corrosion Study (Task 8) were completed. The Mercury Stability Study (Task 9), ESP Report (Task 11), Air Heater Report (Task 12) and Final Report (Task 14) were completed. These aspects of the project, as well as progress on Public Outreach (Task 15), are discussed in detail in this final report. Over 90% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 200-210 F at the ESP inlet; baseline conditions with 290 F flue gas gave about 26% removal. Mercury removal is sensitive to flue gas temperature and carbon content of fly ash. At 200-210 F, both elemental and oxidized mercury were effectively captured at the ESP. Mg(OH){sub 2} injection proved effective for removal of SO{sub 3} and eliminated rapid fouling of the air heater. The pilot ESP performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions. Mercury volatility and leaching tests did not show any stability problems. No significant corrosion was detected at the air heater or on corrosion coupons at the ESP. The results justify larger-scale testing/demonstration of the technology. These conclusions are presented and discussed in two presentations given in July and

  4. Four years of experience with a permanent seismic monitoring array at the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Verdel, A.R.; Meekes, J.A.C.; Steeghs, T.P.H.; Vandeweijer, V.P.; Neele, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    CO2 was injected into a saline aquifer near the town of Ketzin in Germany from July 2008 to August 2013. To monitor CO2- migration close to the injection well, TNO installed a fixed 2D seismic array of 120 meters length in 2009, with 3- component (3- C) geophones at the surface, 4-component

  5. Promoting alkali and alkaline-earth metals on MgO for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Jeong Woo; Lee, Kwang Soon; Lee, Won Bo

    2014-12-07

    Developing next-generation solid sorbents to improve the economy of pre- and post-combustion carbon capture processes has been challenging for many researchers. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising sorbent because of its moderate sorption-desorption temperature and low heat of sorption. However, its low sorption capacity and thermal instability need to be improved. Various metal-promoted MgO sorbents have been experimentally developed to enhance the CO2 sorption capacities. Nevertheless, rigorous computational studies to screen an optimal metal promoter have been limited to date. We conducted first-principles calculations to select metal promoters of MgO sorbents. Five alkali (Li-, Na-, K-, Rb-, and Cs-) and 4 alkaline earth metals (Be-, Ca-, Sr-, and Ba-) were chosen as a set of promoters. Compared with the CO2 adsorption energy on pure MgO, the adsorption energy on the metal-promoted MgO sorbents is higher, except for the Na-promoter, which indicates that metal promotion on MgO is an efficient approach to enhance the sorption capacities. Based on the stabilized binding of promoters on the MgO surface and the regenerability of sorbents, Li, Ca, and Sr were identified as adequate promoters among the 9 metals on the basis of PW91/GGA augmented with DFT+D2. The adsorption energies of CO2 on metal-promoted MgO sorbents for Li, Ca, and Sr atoms are -1.13, -1.68, and -1.48 eV, respectively.

  6. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO2 Storage in the Paris Basin (GéoCarbone-PICOREF Choix et caractérisation de sites géologiques propices à l’installation d’un pilote pour le stockage de CO2 dans le bassin de Paris (GéoCarbone-PICOREF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brosse É.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the GéoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO2 storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO2 per year. GéoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a “Regional Domain”, ca. 200 × 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: detailed geological data is available, due to 50 years of petroleum exploration; basin-scale deep saline aquifers are present, with a preliminary estimate of storage capacity which is at the Gt CO2 level, namely the carbonate Oolithe Blanche Formation, of Middle Jurassic age, generally located between 1500 and 1800 m depths in the studied area, and several sandstone formations of Triassic age, located between 2000 and 3000 m; several depleted oil fields exist: although offering storage capacities at a much lower level, they do represent very well constrained geological environments, with proven sealing properties; several sources of pure CO2 were identified in the area, at a flow rate compatible with the pilot size, that would avoid capture costs. 750 km of seismic lines were reprocessed and organized in six sections fitted on well logs. This first dataset provided improved representations of: the gross features of the considered aquifers in the Regional Domain; the structural scheme; lateral continuity of the sealing cap rocks. An inventory of the environmental characteristics was also made, including human occupancy, protected areas, water resource, natural hazards, potential conflicts of use with other resources of the subsurface, etc. From all these criteria, a more restricted geographical domain named the “Sector”, ca. 70 × 70 km, was chosen, the most appropriate for further selection of storage site(s. The geological characterization of the Sector has

  7. A Facile and Low-Cost Route to Heteroatom Doped Porous Carbon Derived from Broussonetia Papyrifera Bark with Excellent Supercapacitance and CO2 Capture Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tongye; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Xiaolin; Gao, Yong; Li, Huaming

    2016-03-03

    In this work, we present a facile and low-cost approach to synthesize heteroatom doped porous carbon via hydrothermal treatment of stem bark of broussonetia papyrifera (BP) as the biomass precursor in diluted sulfuric acid, and following thermal activation by KOH at 800 °C. The morphology, structure and textural property of the prepared porous carbon (PC) are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 sorption isotherms, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The porous carbon possesses a high BET surface area of 1759 m(2) g(-1) and an average pore size of 3.11 nm as well as hetero-oxygen (9.09%) and nitrogen (1.7%) doping. Such porous carbon shows outstanding capacitive performances of 416 F g(-1) and 300 F g(-1) in three and two-electrode systems, respectively. As a solid-state adsorbent, the obtained porous carbon has an excellent CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient pressures of up to 6.71 and 4.45 mmol g(-1) at 0 and 25 °C, respectively. The results present one novel precursor-synthesis route for facile large-scale production of high performance porous carbon for a variety of great applications including energy storage and CO2 capture.

  8. Design and Assessment of an IGCC Concept with CO2 Capture for the Co-Generation of Electricity and Substitute Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Blumberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is on the modeling and the thermodynamic evaluation of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC for the co-production of electricity and substitute natural gas (SNG. At first, an IGCC with CO2 capture for electricity generation is analyzed. Coal-derived syngas is conditioned in a water gas shift unit (WGS, and cleaned in an acid gas removal system including carbon capture. Eventually, the conditioned syngas is fed to a combined cycle. A second case refers to a complete conversion of syngas to SNG in an integrated commercial methanation unit (TREMP™ process, Haldor Topsøe, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. Due to the exothermic reaction, a gas recycling and intercooling stages are necessary to avoid catalyst damage. Based on a state-of-the-art IGCC plant, an optimal integration of the synthetic process considering off-design behavior was determined. The raw syngas production remains constant in both cases, while one shift reactor in combination with a bypass is used to provide an adequate H2/CO-ratio for the methanation unit. Electricity has to be purchased from the grid in order to cover the internal consumption when producing SNG. The resulting heat and power distributions of both cases are discussed.

  9. The impact of CO 2 capture in the power and heat sector on the emission of SO 2, NO x, particulate matter, volatile organic compounds and NH 3 in the European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koornneef, Joris; Ramirez, Andrea; van Harmelen, Toon; van Horssen, Arjan; Turkenburg, Wim; Faaij, Andre

    2010-04-01

    This study quantifies the trade-offs and synergies between climate and air quality policy objectives for the European power and heat (P&H) sector. An overview is presented of the expected performance data of CO 2 capture systems implemented at P&H plants, and the expected emission of key air pollutants, being: SO 2, NO X, NH 3, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM). The CO 2 capture systems investigated include: post-combustion, oxyfuel combustion and pre-combustion capture. For all capture systems it was found that SO 2, NO x and PM emissions are expected to be reduced or remain equal per unit of primary energy input compared to power plants without CO 2 capture. Increase in primary energy input as a result of the energy penalty for CO 2 capture may for some technologies and substances result in a net increase of emissions per kWh output. The emission of ammonia may increase by a factor of up to 45 per unit of primary energy input for post-combustion technologies. No data are available about the emission of VOCs from CO 2 capture technologies. A simple model was developed and applied to analyse the impact of CO 2 capture in the European P&H sector on the emission level of key air pollutants in 2030. Four scenarios were developed: one without CO 2 capture and three with one dominantly implemented CO 2 capture system, varying between: post-combustion, oxyfuel combustion and pre-combustion. The results showed a reduction in GHG emissions for the scenarios with CO 2 capture compared to the baseline scenario between 12% and 20% in the EU 27 region in 2030. NO x emissions were 15% higher in the P&H sector in a scenario with predominantly post-combustion and lower when oxyfuel combustion (-16%) or pre-combustion (-20%) were implemented on a large scale. Large scale implementation of the post-combustion technology in 2030 may also result in significantly higher, i.e. increase by a factor of 28, NH 3 emissions compared to scenarios with other CO 2

  10. Atmospheric measurement of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M.; Zondervan, A.

    2013-11-01

    We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes CO2 from locally extracted natural gas and vents that CO2 to the atmosphere, at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. The plant is located in a rural dairy farming area, with no other significant CO2ff sources nearby, but large, diurnally varying, biospheric CO2 fluxes from the surrounding highly productive agricultural grassland. We made flask measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 (from which we derive the CO2ff component) and in situ measurements of CO2 downwind of the Kapuni plant, using a Helikite to sample transects across the emission plume from the surface up to 100 m a.g.l. We also determined the surface CO2ff content averaged over several weeks from the 14CO2 content of grass samples collected from the surrounding area. We use the WindTrax plume dispersion model to compare the atmospheric observations with the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant, and to determine how well atmospheric measurements can constrain the emissions. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the fluctuations and short-term variability in the Helikite samples, but does quite well in representing the observed CO2ff in 15 min averaged surface flask samples and in ~1 week integrated CO2ff averages from grass samples. In this pilot study, we found that using grass samples, the modeled and observed CO2ff emissions averaged over one week agreed to within 30%. The results imply that greater verification accuracy may be achieved by including more detailed meteorological observations and refining 14CO2 sampling strategies.

  11. CO2 absorption into aqueous amine blended solutions containing monoethanolamine (MEA), N,N-dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), N,N-diethylethanolamine (DEEA) and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) for post-combustion capture processes

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, William; Bruggink, Stefan; Beyad, Yaser; Luo, Weiliang; Melián-Cabrera, Ignacio; Puxty, Graeme; Feron, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Presently monoethanolamine (MEA) remains the industrial standard solvent for CO2 capture processes. Operating issues relating to corrosion and degradation of MEA at high temperatures and concentrations, and in the presence of oxygen, in a traditional PCC process, have introduced the requisite for higher quality and costly stainless steels in the construction of capture equipment and the use of oxygen scavengers and corrosion inhibitors. While capture processes employing MEA have improved sign...

  12. Changes in the Chemistry of Groundwater Reacted with CO2: Comparison of Laboratory Results with the ZERT Field Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Thordsen, James J.; Abedini, Atosa A.; Beers, Sarah; Thomas, Burt

    2017-01-01

    As part of the ZERT program, sediments from two wells at the ZERT site, located in Bozeman, Montana, USA were reacted with a solution having the composition of local groundwater. A total of 50 water samples were collected from 7 containers placed for 15 days in a glove box with one atmosphere of CO2 to investigate detailed changes in the concentrations of major, minor and trace inorganic compounds, and to compare these with changes observed in groundwater at the ZERT site following CO2 injection. Laboratory results included rapid changes in pH (8.6 to 5.7), alkalinity (243 to 1295 mg/L as HCO3), electrical conductance (539 to 1822 μS/cm), Ca (28 to 297 mg/L), Mg (18 to 63 mg/L), Fe (5 to 43 μg/L) and Mn (2 to 837 μg/L) following CO2 injection. These chemical changes, which are in general agreement with those obtained from sampling the ZERT monitoring wells, could provide early detection of CO2 leakage into shallow groundwater. Dissolution of calcite, some dolomite and minor Mn-oxides, and desorption/ion exchange are likely the main geochemical processes responsible for the observed changes.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study on Ablative Fractional CO2 Laser for Consecutive Patients Presenting With Various Scar Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drooge, Anne Margreet; Vrijman, Charlotte; van der Veen, Wietze; Wolkerstorfer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although ablative fractional laser is the gold standard for acne scars, evidence is still lacking for other types of scars. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the ablative fractional 10,600-nm CO2 laser in the treatment of various scar types. MATERIALS AND METHODS The

  14. Economic modelling of the capture-transport-sink scenario of industrial CO2 emissions: The Estonian-Latvian cross-border case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shogenova, A.; Shogenov, K.; Pomeranceva, R.; Nulle, I.; Neele, F.; Hendriks, C.

    2011-01-01

    Industrial CO2 emissions and opportunities for CO2 geological storage in the Baltic Region were studied within the EU GeoCapacity project supported by the European Union Framework Programme 6. Estonia produces the largest amounts of CO2 emissions in the region, due to the combustion of Estonian oil

  15. CO2 capture and separation from N2/CH4 mixtures by Co@B8/Co@B8(-) and M@B9/M@B9(-) (M = Ir, Rh, Ru) clusters: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Ping; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Ren, Cong; Guo, Chao

    2015-01-29

    The discovery of advanced materials with high selectivity and efficiency is essential to realize practical carbon capture and sequestration. Here, we have investigated the interactions of the Co@B8/Co@B8(-) and M@B9/M@B9(-) (M = Ir, Rh, Ru) clusters with CO2, N2, and CH4 gas molecules theoretically. We found that neutral boron clusters have weak interaction with CO2, N2, and CH4 molecules. Similarly, the clusters with their negative charge states have also weak interaction with N2 and CH4 molecules. However, anionic clusters have a strong interaction with CO2, which can be explained by the Lewis acid-base interaction as CO2 (Lewis acid) can gain electron easily from the electron-rich anionic clusters. Moreover, the kinetic stability of the formed complexes after CO2 capture has been validated by ab initio molecular dynamics. In all, the present study demonstrates, for the first time, that the anionic boron wheel ring clusters can be used as potential advanced materials for CO2 capture and separation from flue gas and natural gas mixtures.

  16. Coal-fuelled systems for peaking power with 100% CO2 capture through integration of solid oxide fuel cells with compressed air energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nease, Jake; Adams, Thomas A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a coal-fuelled integrated solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and compressed air energy storage (CAES) system in a load-following power production scenario is discussed. Sixteen SOFC-based plants with optional carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and syngas shifting steps are simulated and compared to a state-of-the-art supercritical pulverised coal (SCPC) plant. Simulations are performed using a combination of MATLAB and Aspen Plus v7.3. It was found that adding CAES to a SOFC-based plant can provide load-following capabilities with relatively small effects on efficiencies (1-2% HHV depending on the system configuration) and levelized costs of electricity (∼0.35 ¢ kW-1 h-1). The load-following capabilities, as measured by least-squares metrics, show that this system may utilize coal and achieve excellent load-tracking that is not adversely affected by the inclusion of CCS. Adding CCS to the SOFC/CAES system reduces measurable direct CO2 emission to zero. A seasonal partial plant shutdown schedule is found to reduce fuel consumption by 9.5% while allowing for cleaning and maintenance windows for the SOFC stacks without significantly affecting the performance of the system (∼1% HHV reduction in efficiency). The SOFC-based systems with CCS are found to become economically attractive relative to SCPC above carbon taxes of 22 ton-1.

  17. The Effects of Thermal Treatment and Steam Addition on Integrated CuO/CaO Chemical Looping Combustion for CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Recio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC with Calcium Looping (CaL using integrated pellets is an alternative CO2 capture process to the current amine-based sorbent processes, but the pellets lose sorption capacity over time. In this paper, the deactivation behavior of CaO, CuO and CuO/CaO integrated pellets used for multiple (16–20 cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer was studied. The impact of thermal treatment and the presence of steam on the deactivation were also investigated. Nitrogen physisorption and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the pellets. The analysis revealed significant migration of the copper to the surface of the composite pellets, which likely suppressed carbonation capacity by reducing the accessibility of the CaO. While thermal pre-treatment and steam addition enhanced the performance of the base CaO pellets, the former led to cracks in the pellets. In contrast, thermal pretreatment of the CuO/CaO composite pellets resulted in worse CLC and CaL performance.

  18. Atmospheric measurement of point source fossil CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, T.; Brailsford, G.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M.; Zondervan, A.

    2014-05-01

    We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes CO2 from locally extracted natural gas and vents that CO2 to the atmosphere, at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. The plant is located in a rural dairy farming area, with no other significant CO2ff sources nearby, but large, diurnally varying, biospheric CO2 fluxes from the surrounding highly productive agricultural grassland. We made flask measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 (from which we derive the CO2ff component) and in situ measurements of CO2 downwind of the Kapuni plant, using a Helikite to sample transects across the emission plume from the surface up to 100 m above ground level. We also determined the surface CO2ff content averaged over several weeks from the 14C content of grass samples collected from the surrounding area. We use the WindTrax plume dispersion model to compare the atmospheric observations with the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant, and to determine how well atmospheric measurements can constrain the emissions. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the fluctuations and short-term variability in the Helikite samples, but does quite well in representing the observed CO2ff in 15 min averaged surface flask samples and in ~ one week integrated CO2ff averages from grass samples. In this pilot study, we found that using grass samples, the modeled and observed CO2ff emissions averaged over one week agreed to within 30%. The results imply that greater verification accuracy may be achieved by including more detailed meteorological observations and refining 14C sampling strategies.

  19. Developing a Pilot Case and Modelling the Development of a Large European CO2 Transport Infrastructure -The GATEWAY H2020 Project: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT 2016. 14 November 2016 through 18 November 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakobsen, J.; Bysveen, M.; Vågenes, E.; Eickhoff, C.; Mikunda, T.; Neele, F.; Brunner, L.; Heffron, R.; Schumann, D.; Downes, L.; Hanstock, D.

    2017-01-01

    The H2020 GATEWAY project aims to develop a comprehensive model Pilot Case which, intentionally, will pave the ground for CCS deployment in Europe. It will result from the assessment of, technical, commercial, judicial and societal issues related to a future CO2 transport infrastructure. The Pilot

  20. CO2 capture by polymeric membranes composed of hyper-branched polymers with dense poly(oxyethylene comb and poly(amidoamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniguchi Ikuo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to CO2-philic nature of polyoxyethylene (POE, a dense POE comb structure was tethered onto PMMA backbone to develop CO2 separation membranes over N2. The resulting hyper-branched polymers displayed preferential CO2 permeation. When the polymer thin layer was formed on a high gas permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS support by a spray-coating manner, the resulting thin film composite (TFC membranes displayed very high CO2 permeability. However, the CO2 selectivity, which was the permeability ratio of CO2 over N2, was moderate and lower than 50. To enhance the selectivity, poly(amidoamine (PAMAM was introduced to the hyper-branched polymers in the CO2-selective layer of the TFC membranes. The CO2 selectivity increased from 47 to 90 with increasing PAMAM content to 40 wt%, and it was drastically enhanced to 350 with PAMAM content of 50 wt%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and laser microscope revealed formation of PAMAM-rich domain at the higher amine content, where CO2 could readily migrate in comparison to the other polymeric fractions.

  1. CO2 Absorption and Magnesium Carbonate Precipitation in MgCl2–NH3–NH4Cl Solutions: Implications for Carbon Capture and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2 absorption and carbonate precipitation are the two core processes controlling the reaction rate and path of CO2 mineral sequestration. Whereas previous studies have focused on testing reactive crystallization and precipitation kinetics, much less attention has been paid to absorption, the key process determining the removal efficiency of CO2. In this study, adopting a novel wetted wall column reactor, we systematically explore the rates and mechanisms of carbon transformation from CO2 gas to carbonates in MgCl2–NH3–NH4Cl solutions. We find that reactive diffusion in liquid film of the wetted wall column is the rate-limiting step of CO2 absorption when proceeding chiefly through interactions between CO2(aq and NH3(aq. We further quantified the reaction kinetic constant of the CO2–NH3 reaction. Our results indicate that higher initial concentration of NH4Cl ( ≥ 2 mol · L − 1 leads to the precipitation of roguinite [ ( NH 4 2 Mg ( CO 3 2 · 4 H 2 O ], while nesquehonite appears to be the dominant Mg-carbonate without NH4Cl addition. We also noticed dypingite formation via phase transformation in hot water. This study provides new insight into the reaction kinetics of CO2 mineral carbonation that indicates the potential of this technique for future application to industrial-scale CO2 sequestration.

  2. CO2 capture by polymeric membranes composed of hyper-branched polymers with dense poly(oxyethylene) comb and poly(amidoamine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Ikuo; Wada, Norihisa; Kinugasa, Kae; Higa, Mitsuru

    2017-11-01

    Due to CO2-philic nature of polyoxyethylene (POE), a dense POE comb structure was tethered onto PMMA backbone to develop CO2 separation membranes over N2. The resulting hyper-branched polymers displayed preferential CO2 permeation. When the polymer thin layer was formed on a high gas permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) support by a spray-coating manner, the resulting thin film composite (TFC) membranes displayed very high CO2 permeability. However, the CO2 selectivity, which was the permeability ratio of CO2 over N2, was moderate and lower than 50. To enhance the selectivity, poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) was introduced to the hyper-branched polymers in the CO2-selective layer of the TFC membranes. The CO2 selectivity increased from 47 to 90 with increasing PAMAM content to 40 wt%, and it was drastically enhanced to 350 with PAMAM content of 50 wt%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and laser microscope revealed formation of PAMAM-rich domain at the higher amine content, where CO2 could readily migrate in comparison to the other polymeric fractions.

  3. Rolling stones; fast weathering of olivine in shallow seas for cost-effective CO2 capture and mitigation of global warming and ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.; Boer, P.L. de

    2011-01-01

    Human CO2 emissions may drive the Earth into a next greenhouse state. They can be mitigated by accelerating weathering of natural rock under the uptake of CO2. We disprove the paradigm that olivine weathering in nature would be a slow process, and show that it is not needed to mill olivine to very

  4. Techno-economic assessment and comparison of CO2 capture technologies for industrial processes: Preliminary results for the iron and steel sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramochi, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838683; Ramírez Ramírez, C.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/284852414; Turkenburg, W.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073416355; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and the preliminary results of a techno-economic assessment of CCS implementation on the iron and steel sector. The results show that for the short-mid term, a CO2 avoidance cost of less than 50 €/tonne at a CO2 avoidance rate of around 50% are possible by

  5. Integrated system for capturing CO2 as feedstock for algae production: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT 2016, 14-18 November 2016, Lausanne, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Könst, P.M.; Hernandez Mireles, I.; Stel, R.W. van der; Os, P.M van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2017-01-01

    In view of its promise as sustainable process for CO2 capture and its potential in the production of feed, food and natural high value products such as omega-3 fatty acids and anti-oxidants such as astaxanthin, large scale algae cultivation is gaining commercial interest. Currently, most systems are

  6. CO2 absorption into aqueous amine blended solutions containing monoethanolamine (MEA), N,N-dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), N,N-diethylethanolamine (DEEA) and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) for post-combustion capture processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conway, William; Bruggink, Stefan; Beyad, Yaser; Luo, Weiliang; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio; Puxty, Graeme; Feron, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Presently monoethanolamine (MEA) remains the industrial standard solvent for CO2 capture processes. Operating issues relating to corrosion and degradation of MEA at high temperatures and concentrations, and in the presence of oxygen, in a traditional PCC process, have introduced the requisite for

  7. Optimal Bidding and Operation of a Power Plant with Solvent-Based Carbon Capture under a CO2 Allowance Market: A Solution with a Reinforcement Learning-Based Sarsa Temporal-Difference Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziang Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a reinforcement learning (RL-based Sarsa temporal-difference (TD algorithm is applied to search for a unified bidding and operation strategy for a coal-fired power plant with monoethanolamine (MEA-based post-combustion carbon capture under different carbon dioxide (CO2 allowance market conditions. The objective of the decision maker for the power plant is to maximize the discounted cumulative profit during the power plant lifetime. Two constraints are considered for the objective formulation. Firstly, the tradeoff between the energy-intensive carbon capture and the electricity generation should be made under presumed fixed fuel consumption. Secondly, the CO2 allowances purchased from the CO2 allowance market should be approximately equal to the quantity of CO2 emission from power generation. Three case studies are demonstrated thereafter. In the first case, we show the convergence of the Sarsa TD algorithm and find a deterministic optimal bidding and operation strategy. In the second case, compared with the independently designed operation and bidding strategies discussed in most of the relevant literature, the Sarsa TD-based unified bidding and operation strategy with time-varying flexible market-oriented CO2 capture levels is demonstrated to help the power plant decision maker gain a higher discounted cumulative profit. In the third case, a competitor operating another power plant identical to the preceding plant is considered under the same CO2 allowance market. The competitor also has carbon capture facilities but applies a different strategy to earn profits. The discounted cumulative profits of the two power plants are then compared, thus exhibiting the competitiveness of the power plant that is using the unified bidding and operation strategy explored by the Sarsa TD algorithm.

  8. Application of a high-throughput analyzer in evaluating solid adsorbents for post-combustion carbon capture via multicomponent adsorption of CO2, N2, and H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jarad A; McDonald, Thomas M; Bae, Tae-Hyun; Bachman, Jonathan E; Sumida, Kenji; Dutton, Justin J; Kaye, Steven S; Long, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 ± 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 °C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O.

  9. Reduction of post-surgical scarring with the use of ablative fractional CO2 lasers: A pilot study using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Marissa E; Neaman, Keith C; Rapp, Derek A; Burton, Michael E; Mann, Robert J; Renucci, John D

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing inevitably leads to scarring, which leads to functional and cosmetic defects. It is the goal of this study to investigate the immediate use of ablative fractional CO2 lasers to reduce post-operative scarring secondary to surgical wounds. In this prospective controlled study, 20 surgical incisions were created on each of three pigs. Fifteen of the incisions were treated with an ablative fractional CO2 laser at one of three laser settings. The remaining five incisions served as a control. Punch biopsies were taken post-operatively over time. Digital photographs were taken of each incisional scar at each time period. Blinded evaluators used a previously verified scoring system to score photographs of the incisional scars taken at the 6 month time period. With regards to the comparison between the three individual laser treatment groups and the control, there were no statistically significant effects for treatment (P = 0.40), time (P = 0.48), or for the interaction of time and treatment (P = 0.57). With regards to the visual assessment tool, there were no statistically significant differences between treatments for Overall Appearance (P = 0.21) or for Total Score (P = 0.24). In the limited setting of this pilot study, treatment of surgical incisions with ablative fractional CO2 lasers does not significantly lessen scar formation. In addition, photographic analysis was not able to demonstrate a significant difference. Future studies on this topic will need a larger sample size to better answer whether a statistically significant difference may exist. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:122-128, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Olivine dissolution in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria (Pseudomonas reactants) extracted from Icelandic groundwater of the CO2 injection pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Liudmila; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Benezeth, Pascale; Gerard, Emmanuelle; Menez, Benedicte; Alfredsson, Helgi

    2010-05-01

    This work is aimed at experimental modeling of the effect of heterotrophic bacteria on dissolution of important rock-forming mineral, olivine, at the conditions of CO2 storage and sequestration. Heterotrophic aerobic gram-negative bacteria were extracted from deep underground water (HK31, 1700 m deep and, t = 25-30°C) of basaltic aquifer located within the Hellisheidi CO2 injection pilot site (Iceland). Following this sampling, we separated, using culture on nutrient agar plates, four different groups of gram-negative aerobic bacteria. The enzymatic activity of studied species has been evaluated using Biolog Ecoplates and their genetic identification was performed using 18-S RNA analysis. The optimal growth conditions of bacteria on Brain Hearth Broth nutrient have been determined as 5 to 37°C and growth media pH varied from 7.0-8.2. Culturing experiments allowed determining the optimal physico-chemical conditions for bacteria experiments in the presence of basic Ca, Mg-containing silicates. Olivine (Fo92) was chosen as typical mineral of basalt, widely considered in carbon dioxide sequestration mechanisms. Dissolution experiments were performed in constant-pH (7 to 9), bicarbonate-buffered (0.001 to 0.05 M) nutrient-diluted media in batch reactors at 0-30 bars of CO2 in the presence of various biomass of Pseudomonas reactants. The release rate of magnesium, silica and iron was measured as a function of time in the presence of live, actively growing, dead (autoclaved or glutaraldehyde-treated) cells and bacteria exometabolites. Both nutrient media diluted 10 times (to 100 mg DOC/L) and inert electrolyte (NaCl, no DOC) were used. Our preliminary results indicate that the pH and dissolved organic matter are the first-order parameters that control the element release from olivine at far from equilibrium conditions. The SEM investigation of reacted surfaces reveal formation of surface roughness with much stronger mineral alteration in the presence of live bacteria

  11. Revisiting the Aluminum Trimesate-based MOF (MIL-96): from Structure Determination to the Processing of Mixed Matrix Membranes for CO2 Capture.

    KAUST Repository

    Benzaqui, Marvin

    2017-11-08

    A microporous Al trimesate-based metal-organic framework (MOF), denoted MIL-96-(Al), was selected as a porous hybrid filler for the processing of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) for CO2/N-2 postcombustion separation. First, the structural model of MIL-96-(Al) initially reported was revisited using a combination of synchrotron-based single-crystal X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In a second step, pure MIL-96-(Al) crystals differing by their size and aspect ratio, including anisotropic hexagonal platelets and nanoparticles of about 70 nm in diameter, were prepared. Then, a combination of in situ IR spectroscopy, single-gas, and CO2/N-2 coadsorption experiments, calorimetry, and molecular simulations revealed that MIL-96-(Al) nanoparticles show a relatively high CO2 affinity over N-2 owing to strong interactions between CO2 molecules and several adsorption sites such as Al3+ Lewis centers, coordinated water, and hydroxyl groups. Finally, the high compatibility between MIL-96-(Al) nanoparticles and the 6FDA-DAM polymer allowed the processing of homogeneous and defect-free MMMs with a high MOF loading (up to 25 wt %) that outperform pure polymer membranes for CO2/N-2 separation.

  12. The Analysis of Pipeline Transportation Process for CO2 Captured From Reference Coal-Fired 900 MW Power Plant to Sequestration Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkowski Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three commercially available intercooled compression strategies for compressing CO2 were studied. All of the compression concepts required a final delivery pressure of 153 bar at the inlet to the pipeline. Then, simulations were used to determine the maximum safe pipeline distance to subsequent booster stations as a function of inlet pressure, environmental temperature, thickness of the thermal insulation and ground level heat flux conditions. The results show that subcooled liquid transport increases energy efficiency and minimises the cost of CO2 transport over long distances under heat transfer conditions. The study also found that the thermal insulation layer should not be laid on the external surface of the pipe in atmospheric conditions in Poland. The most important problems from the environmental protection point of view are rigorous and robust hazard identification which indirectly affects CO2 transportation. This paper analyses ways of reducing transport risk by means of safety valves.

  13. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    cycle is established by powering the conversion step by renewable energy and recapturing the CO2 emitted after combustion, ultimately from the surrounding air to cover emissions from distributed source. Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU coupled to P2G thus creates a CO2-neutral energy system based on synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. It would enable a circular economy where the carbon cycle is closed by recovering the CO2 emitted after reuse of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. The critical step, technically as well as economically, is the conversion of feedstock CO2/H2O into syngas rather than the capture of CO2 from ambient air.

  14. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    established by powering the conversion step by renewable energy and recapturing the CO2 emitted after combustion, ultimately from the surrounding air to cover emissions from distributed source. Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) coupled to P2G thus creates a CO2-neutral energy system based on synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. It would enable a circular economy where the carbon cycle is closed by recovering the CO2 emitted after reuse of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. The critical step, technically as well as economically, is the conversion of feedstock CO2/H2O into syngas rather than the capture of CO2 from ambient air.

  15. Toward the understanding of chemical absorption processes for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide: electronic and steric considerations from the kinetics of reactions of CO2(aq) with sterically hindered amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, William; Wang, Xiaoguang; Fernandes, Debra; Burns, Robert; Lawrance, Geoffrey; Puxty, Graeme; Maeder, Marcel

    2013-01-15

    The present study reports (a) the determination of both the kinetic rate constants and equilibrium constants for the reaction of CO(2)(aq) with sterically hindered amines and (b) an attempt to elucidate a fundamental chemical understanding of the relationship between the amine structure and chemical properties of the amine that are relevant for postcombustion capture of CO(2) (PCC) applications. The reactions of CO(2)(aq) with a series of linear and methyl substituted primary amines and alkanolamines have been investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and (1)H NMR measurements at 25.0 °C. The specific mechanism of absorption for each of the amines, that is CO(2) hydration and/or carbamate formation, is examined and, based on the mechanism, the kinetic and equilibrium constants for the formation of carbamic acid/carbamates, including protonation constants of the carbamate, are reported for amines that follow this pathway. A Brønsted correlation relating the kinetic rate constants and equilibrium constants for the formation of carbamic acid/carbamates with the protonation constant of the amine is reported. Such a relationship facilitates an understanding of the effects of steric and electronic properties of the amine toward its reactivity with CO(2). Further, such relationships can be used to guide the design of new amines with improved properties relevant to PCC applications.

  16. "Applications and future trends in polymer materials for green energy systems: from energy generation and storage, to CO2 capture and transportaion"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafiris, George

    2010-08-24

    Presentation describes United Technologies Research Center's recent work in green energy systems, including APRA-E project content to create a synthetic analogue of the carbonic anhydrase enzyme and incorporate it into a membrane for CO2 separation from the flue gas of a coal power plant.

  17. MoS2 Nanosheets Functionalized Composite Mixed Matrix Membrane for Enhanced CO2 Capture via Surface Drop-Coating Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yijia; Wang, Huixian; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Yatao

    2016-09-07

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a graphene-like two-dimensional inorganic material, which has been used for the first time as an inorganic nanofiller to prepare a composite mixed matrix membrane to separate CO2 and N2. Polysulfone (PSf) was used as a support substrate and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was used as the gutter layer. The selective layer was prepared by mixing a CO2-philic copolymer Pebax 1657 with MoS2 nanosheets to enhance CO2 permeance. In addition, a simple drop-coating and evaporation method was developed to prepare the selective layer. Both permeability and selectivity of the MoS2-Pebax membrane have exceeded the pristine Pebax membrane. The permeability and selectivity reached to the maximum values of 64 Barrer and 93, respectively, at 0.15 wt % MoS2 nanosheets loadings. This result has been on the Robeson's upper bound line. The membrane also showed higher stability. The separation mechanism of the membrane is based on the well-known solution-diffusion mechanism. In addition, the stronger adsorption energy of MoS2 nanosheets to CO2 than N2 also provides the enhancement of gas selectivity.

  18. Total chain dynamical assessment with an integrated model of a Post Combustion Capture Plant at a Pulverized Coal Plant and CO2 downstream infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kler, R.C.F. de; Haar, A.M. van de

    2013-01-01

    The application of Post Combustion Capture has a significant advantage for mitigating the anthropogenic greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, in comparison to other capture technologies, since it is a so called “End of the Pipe” retrofit and therefore potentially applicable to existing power plants.

  19. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases Preliminary Year 1 Techno-Economic Study Results and Methodology for Gas Pressurized Stripping Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2013-03-01

    Under the DOE’s Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) is developing a novel gas pressurized stripping (GPS) process to enable efficient post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) from coal-fired power plants. A technology and economic feasibility study is required as a deliverable in the project Statement of Project Objectives. This study analyzes a fully integrated pulverized coal power plant equipped with GPS technology for PCC, and is carried out, to the maximum extent possible, in accordance to the methodology and data provided in ATTACHMENT 3 – Basis for Technology Feasibility Study of DOE Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL report on “Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity (Original Issue Date, May 2007), NETL Report No. DOE/NETL-2007/1281, Revision 1, August 2007” was used as the main source of reference to be followed, as per the guidelines of ATTACHMENT 3 of DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL-2007/1281 study compared the feasibility of various combinations of power plant/CO2 capture