WorldWideScience

Sample records for co-ordinating editor mustafizur

  1. Quantization in rotating co-ordinates revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.; Qadir, A.

    1982-07-01

    Recent work on quantization in rotating co-ordinates showed that no radiation would be seen by an observer rotating with a constant angular speed. This work used a Galilean-type co-ordinate transformation. We show that the same result holds for a Lorentz-type co-ordinate system, in spite of the fact that the metric has a co-ordinate singularity at rΩ = 1. Further, we are able to define positive and negative energy modes for a particular case of a non-static, non-stationary metric. (author)

  2. Co-ordinating Product Developing Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Søren Bendix

    1996-01-01

    The paper contains a presentation of research methods to be used in case studies in product development and a presentation on how to deal with Design Co-ordination according to litterature......The paper contains a presentation of research methods to be used in case studies in product development and a presentation on how to deal with Design Co-ordination according to litterature...

  3. INFCE technical co-ordinating committee documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    A collection of the documents covering the period December 1977 through February 1980 submitted to or generated by the Technical Co-ordinating Comittee is presented. The documents cover primarily the organizational aspects of INFCE, but conclusions from the various Working Groups are summarized.

  4. INFCE technical co-ordinating committee documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collection of the documents covering the period December 1977 through February 1980 submitted to or generated by the Technical Co-ordinating Comittee is presented. The documents cover primarily the organizational aspects of INFCE, but conclusions from the various Working Trays are summarized

  5. ITER co-ordinated technical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As agreed upon between the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) Parties 'Co-ordinated Technical Activities' (CTA) means technical activities which are deemed necessary to maintain the integrity of the international project, so as to prepare for the ITER joint implementation. The scope of these activities includes design adaptation to the specific site conditions, safety analysis and licensing preparation that are based on specific site offers, evaluation of cost and construction schedule, preparation of procurement documents and other issues raised by the Parties collectively, whilst assuring the coherence of the ITER project including design control

  6. Using GIS to check co-ordinates of genebank accessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, R.J.; Schreuder, M.; Cruz, de la J.; Guarino, L.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic co-ordinates of the locations where germplasm accessions have been collected are usually documented in genebank databases. However, the co-ordinate data are often incomplete and may contain errors. This paper describes procedures to check for errors, to determine the cause of these

  7. Open Method of Co-Ordination for Demoi-Cracy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Radaelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Under which conditions does the open method of co-ordination match the standards for demoi-cracy? To answer this question, we need some explicit standards about demoi-cracy. In fact, open co-ordination serves three different but interrelated purposes in European Union policy: to facilitate...... convergence; to support learning processes; and to encourage exploration of policy innovation. By intersecting standards and purposes, we find open co-ordination is neither inherently ‘good’ nor ‘bad’ for demoi-cracy, as it depends on how it has been put into practice. Therefore, we qualify the answer...

  8. Co-ordination Action on Ocean Energy (CA-OE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Frigaard, Peter

    In October 2004, the Co-ordination Action on Ocean Energy (CA-OE) was launched, co-financed by the European Commission, under the Renewable Energy Technologies priority within the 6th Framework programme, contract number 502701, chaired by Kim Nielsen, Rambøll, Denmark. The project involves 41...... partners. In general the public is not aware of the development of ocean energy and its exploitation. There is a need to make a united effort from the developers and research community to present the various principles and results in a coordinated manner with public appeal. The main objectives of the Co......-ordination Action on Ocean Energy are: To develop a common knowledge base necessary for coherent research and development policiesTo bring a co-ordinated approach within key areas of ocean energy research and development.To provide a forum for the longer term marketing of promising research developments...

  9. Co-ordination of heterovalent cation impurities in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, W.; Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    The local liquid structure around heterovalent cation impurities in molten chlorides is discussed in relation to spectroscopic data on solutions of transition metal ions. A tightly packed, low co-ordination shell is shown to be favoured by Coulomb ionic interactions for physically reasonable values of the size of the impurity. A competition between these forces and ''crystal field'' interactions favouring octahedral co-ordination is thus to be expected for many transition metal ions, as suggested by Gruen and McBeth. The transition observed for some transition metal ions from higher to lower co-ordination with increasing temperature is attributed primarily to entropy differences, that are roughly estimated in a solid-like model. (author)

  10. Roadside Judgments in Children with Developmental Co-ordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Catherine; Wann, John P.; Wilmut, Kate; Poulter, Damian

    2011-01-01

    As pedestrians, the perceptual ability to accurately judge the relative rate of approaching vehicles and select a suitable crossing gap requires sensitivity to looming. It also requires that crossing judgments are synchronized with motoric capabilities. Previous research has suggested that children with Developmental Co-ordination Disorder (DCD)…

  11. Lanthanide co-ordination frameworks: Opportunities and diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robert J.; Long, De-Liang; Hubberstey, Peter; Schroeder, Martin; Champness, Neil R.

    2005-01-01

    Significant successes have been made over recent years in preparing co-ordination framework polymers that show macroscopic material properties, but in the vast majority of cases this has been achieved with d-block metal-based systems. Lanthanide co-ordination frameworks also offer attractive properties in terms of their potential applications as luminescent, non-linear optical and porous materials. However, lanthanide-based systems have been far less studied to date than their d-block counterparts. One possible reason for this is that the co-ordination spheres of lanthanide cations are more difficult to control and, in the absence of design strategies for lanthanide co-ordination frameworks, it is significantly more difficult to target materials with specific properties. However, this article highlights some of the exciting possibilities that have emerged from the earliest investigations in this field with new topological families of compounds being discovered from relatively simple framework components, including unusual eight, seven and five-connected framework systems. Our own research, as well as others, is leading to a much greater appreciation of the factors that control framework formation and the resultant observed topologies of these polymers. As this understanding develops targeting particular framework types will become more straightforward and the development of designed polyfunctional materials more accessible. Thus, it can be seen that lanthanide co-ordination frameworks have the potential to open up previously unexplored directions for materials chemistry. This article focuses on the underlying concepts for the construction of these enticing and potentially highly important materials

  12. The Design Co-ordination Framework: key elements for effective product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Bowen, J.; Storm, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes a Design Co-ordination Framework (DCF) i.e. a concept for an ideal DC system with the abilities to support co-ordination of various complex aspects of product development. A set of frames, modelling key elements of co-ordination, which reflect the states of design, plans, orga...

  13. IAEA co-ordinated technical support programme to the NIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.; Murakami, K.; Blacker, C.; Sharma, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    With most Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union becoming parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty as Non-Nuclear Weapon States, there has been an acute need in these states for considerable assistance for the establishment of the necessary structure and resources to ensure that their commitments to non-proliferation are fully implemented in a timely manner. A number of IAEA Member States have offered and are now providing assistance to the NIS on a bilateral level to set up an appropriate State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) which includes Import/Export Control and Physical Protection of Nuclear Material in each state. The IAEA and these Member States established the Co-ordinated Technical Support Programme (CTSP) to ensure that the support given to the NIS was done in a co-ordinated and transparent manner and to avoid duplication of effort. The IAEA has played a coordinating role for the past 5 years by helping to identify detailed needs in individual States, by providing a platform for Member States to identify areas where they could provide the optimum support, and in developing and preparing the Co-ordinated Technical Support Plans. The IAEA organises annual meetings in Vienna attended by all donor and recipient countries to review the focus and implementation status of the co-ordinated technical support activities. A position statement is made by each donor and recipient country, and views and experiences are exchanged. The contents of the CTSPs and the role of the Agency in monitoring the progress of the individual tasks are reviewed in this paper. A summary comparing the implementation status of the Programme by each country is presented. (author)

  14. Normal co-ordinate analysis of 1, 8-dibromooctane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder; Jaggi, Neena; Singh, Nafa

    2010-02-01

    The organic compound 1,8-dibromooctane (1,8-DBO) exists in liquid phase at ambient temperatures and has versatile synthetic applications. In its liquid phase 1,8-DBO has been expected to exist in four most probable conformations, with all its carbon atoms in the same plane, having symmetries C 2h , C i , C 2 and C 1 . In the present study a detailed vibrational analysis in terms of assignment of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman bands of this molecule using normal co-ordinate calculations has been done. A systematic set of symmetry co-ordinates has been constructed for this molecule and normal co-ordinate analysis is carried out using the computer program MOLVIB. The force-field transferred from already studied lower chain bromo-alkanes is subjected to refinement so as to fit the observed infrared and Raman frequencies with those of calculated ones. The potential energy distribution (PED) has also been calculated for each mode of vibration of the molecule for the assumed conformations.

  15. Rain Scattering and Co-ordinate Distance Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hajny

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Calculations of scattered field on the rain objects are based on using of Multiple MultiPole (MMP numerical method. Both bi-static scattering function and bi-static scattering cross section are calculated in the plane parallel to Earth surface. The co-ordination area was determined using the simple model of scattering volume [1]. Calculation for frequency 9.595 GHz and antenna elevation of 25° was done. Obtained results are compared with calculation in accordance to ITU-R recommendation.

  16. 2D co-ordinate transformation based on a spike timing-dependent plasticity learning mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, QingXiang; McGinnity, Thomas Martin; Maguire, Liam; Belatreche, Ammar; Glackin, Brendan

    2008-11-01

    In order to plan accurate motor actions, the brain needs to build an integrated spatial representation associated with visual stimuli and haptic stimuli. Since visual stimuli are represented in retina-centered co-ordinates and haptic stimuli are represented in body-centered co-ordinates, co-ordinate transformations must occur between the retina-centered co-ordinates and body-centered co-ordinates. A spiking neural network (SNN) model, which is trained with spike-timing-dependent-plasticity (STDP), is proposed to perform a 2D co-ordinate transformation of the polar representation of an arm position to a Cartesian representation, to create a virtual image map of a haptic input. Through the visual pathway, a position signal corresponding to the haptic input is used to train the SNN with STDP synapses such that after learning the SNN can perform the co-ordinate transformation to generate a representation of the haptic input with the same co-ordinates as a visual image. The model can be applied to explain co-ordinate transformation in spiking neuron based systems. The principle can be used in artificial intelligent systems to process complex co-ordinate transformations represented by biological stimuli.

  17. Nuclear Safety Co-Ordination within Oak Ridge Operations Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W. A.; Pryor, W. A. [Research and Development Division, United States Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1966-05-15

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office of the USAEC has within its jurisdiction multiple contractors and facilities for research and for the production of fissile materials for the atomic energy programme. Among these facilities are gaseous diffusion plants for the production of {sup 235}U-enriched uranium hexafluoride, plants for the fabrication of special components and fuel for research and production reactors, and laboratories for pilot plant studies and basic research in nuclear technology. One research laboratory is also actively engaged in criticality experimental programmes and has been a major contributor of criticality data for safety applications. These diversified programmes include the processing, fabrication and transport of practically all forms and isotopic enrichments of uranium in quantities commensurate with both laboratory and volume production requirements. Consequently, adequate nuclear safety control with reasonable economy for operations of this magnitude demands not only co-ordination and liaison between contractor and USAEC staffs, but a continuing reappraisal of safety applications in light of the most advanced information. This report outlines the role of the Oak Ridge Operations Office in these pursuits and describes as examples some specific problems in which this office co-ordinated actions necessary for their resolution. Other examples are given of parametric and procedural applications in plant processes and fissile shipments emphasizing the use of recent experimental or calculated data. These examples involve the use of mass and geometric variables, neutron absorbers and moderation control. Departures from limits specified in existing nuclear safety guides are made to advantage in light of new data, special equipment design, contingencies and acceptable risks. (author)

  18. Co-ordinated research programme applications of stable isotope tracers in human nutrition research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this Co-ordinated Research Programme is to help establish competence in the use of stable isotope techniques, particularly in developing countries. This report summarizes the discussions that took, place during the Second Research Co-ordination Meeting, held in Bangalore in November 1990. Working papers presented by the participants are included as annexes. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. First IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'Tritium inventory in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2003-02-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the first Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Tritium Inventory in Fusion Reactors', held on November 4-6, 2002 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and the specific goals set by the participants of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). (author)

  20. Dominant supply chain co-ordination strategies in the Dutch aerospace industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordijk, Johannes T.; Meijboom, Bert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – Firms in the aerospace industry face considerable pressure to improve co-ordination in their supply chains. The major question of the present study is what supply chain co-ordination strategies are dominant in the Dutch aerospace industry given the market environment of this industry?

  1. Metal selective co-ordinative self-assembly of π-donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal selective co-ordinative nanostructures were constructed by the supramolecular ... observed an anomalous binding of metal ion to the core sulphur groups causing redox changes in the TTF ... attention on metal-assisted co-ordinative self-assembly ..... M TTF-Py in 1:1 CHCl3: MeCN and (c) photographs showing visual.

  2. Radioactive waste management in Spain: co-ordination and projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The sixth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ENRESA, the Spanish agency responsible for the management of radioactive waste and the dismantling of nuclear power plants, and the Council of Nuclear Safety (CSN), with the support of the Association of Spanish Municipalities in Areas Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants (AMAC). The workshop took place at L'Hospitalet de l'Infant, Catalonia, Spain, on 21-23 November 2005. At this workshop, Spanish stakeholders and delegates from 14 countries discussed current co-ordination of radioactive waste management decision making in Spain. Findings were shared from Cowam-Spain, a co-operative research project on the involvement of local stakeholders, the relationship between national and local levels of decision making, and the long-term sustainability of decisions regarding the siting of a centralized interim storage facility for high-level waste. These proceedings include the workshop presentations and discussions, as well as the rapporteurs' reflections on what was learned about policy making and participative decision making. (author)

  3. Some Problems of Rocket-Space Vehicles' Characteristics co- ordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergienko, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    of the XX century suffered a reverse. The designers of the United States' firms and enterprises of aviation and rocket-space industry (Boeing, Rocketdyne, Lockheed Martin, McDonnell Douglas, Rockwell, etc.) and NASA (Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center and Lewis Research Center and others) could not correctly co-ordinate the characteristics of a propulsion system and a space vehicle for elaboration of the "Single-Stage-To-Orbit" reusable vehicle (SSTO) as an integral whole system, which is would able to inject a payload into an orbit and to return back on the Earth. jet nozzle design as well as the choice of propulsion system characteristics, ensuring the high ballistic efficiency, are considered in the present report. The efficiency criterions for the engine and launch system parameters optimization are discussed. The new methods of the nozzle block optimal parameters' choice for the satisfaction of the object task of flight are suggested. The family of SSTO with a payload mass from 5 to 20 ton and initial weight under 800 ton is considered.

  4. Eurotrac: a co-ordinated project for applied tropospheric research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, P [EUROTRAC International Scientific Secretariat, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    It was with the realisation that the scientific problems associated with regional air pollution could only be solved within the framework of an international interdisciplinary approach that in 1985 EUROTRAC, the European co-ordinated research project, was formed. Such an approach provides the scientific consensus necessary for the acceptance of regional air-pollution abatement measures by the countries affected. EUROTRAC is a EUREKA environmental project, studying the transport and chemical transformation of trace substances and pollutants in the troposphere. Three goals were specified the outset: (1) to increase the basic knowledge in atmospheric science, (2) to promote the technological development of sensitive, specific and fast response instruments for environmental research and development, and (3) to improve the scientific basis for taking future political decisions on environmental management in the European countries. Thus EUROTRAC was founded as a scientific project but had the specific intention that its results should be utilised in the formulation of policy. This presentation reviews the progress made towards each of the three goals and also indicates the proposed direction which a follow-on project is likely to take when EUROTRAC finishes at the end of 1995. (author)

  5. Eurotrac: a co-ordinated project for applied tropospheric research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, P. [EUROTRAC International Scientific Secretariat, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    It was with the realisation that the scientific problems associated with regional air pollution could only be solved within the framework of an international interdisciplinary approach that in 1985 EUROTRAC, the European co-ordinated research project, was formed. Such an approach provides the scientific consensus necessary for the acceptance of regional air-pollution abatement measures by the countries affected. EUROTRAC is a EUREKA environmental project, studying the transport and chemical transformation of trace substances and pollutants in the troposphere. Three goals were specified the outset: (1) to increase the basic knowledge in atmospheric science, (2) to promote the technological development of sensitive, specific and fast response instruments for environmental research and development, and (3) to improve the scientific basis for taking future political decisions on environmental management in the European countries. Thus EUROTRAC was founded as a scientific project but had the specific intention that its results should be utilised in the formulation of policy. This presentation reviews the progress made towards each of the three goals and also indicates the proposed direction which a follow-on project is likely to take when EUROTRAC finishes at the end of 1995. (author)

  6. Co-ordinate activation of lipogenic enzymes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Naoya; Shimano, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Najima, Yuho; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tomita, Sachiko; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Iizuka, Yoko; Ohashi, Ken; Nagai, Ryozo; Ishibashi, Shun; Kadowaki, Takashi; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Ohnishi, Shin; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Nobuhiro

    2005-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a very common neoplastic disease in countries where hepatitis viruses B and/or C are prevalent. Small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions detected by ultrasonography at an early stage are often hyperechoic because they are composed of well-differentiated cancer cells that are rich in triglyceride droplets. The triglyceride content of hepatocytes depends in part on the rate of lipogenesis. Key lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase, are co-ordinately regulated at the transcriptional level. We therefore examined the mRNA expression of lipogenic enzymes in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples from 10 patients who had undergone surgical resection. All of the samples exhibited marked elevation of expression of mRNA for lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and ATP citrate lyase, compared with surrounding non-cancerous liver tissue. In contrast, the changes in mRNA expression of SREBP-1, a transcription factor that regulates a battery of lipogenic enzymes, did not show a consistent trend. In some cases where SREBP-1 was elevated, the main contributing isoform was SREBP-1c rather than SREBP-1a. Thus, lipogenic enzymes are markedly induced in hepatocellular carcinomas, and in some cases SREBP-1c is involved in this activation.

  7. How protein kinases co-ordinate mitosis in animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2011-04-01

    Mitosis is associated with profound changes in cell physiology and a spectacular surge in protein phosphorylation. To accomplish these, a remarkably large portion of the kinome is involved in the process. In the present review, we will focus on classic mitotic kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinases, Polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases, as well as more recently characterized players such as NIMA (never in mitosis in Aspergillus nidulans)-related kinases, Greatwall and Haspin. Together, these kinases co-ordinate the proper timing and fidelity of processes including centrosomal functions, spindle assembly and microtubule-kinetochore attachment, as well as sister chromatid separation and cytokinesis. A recurrent theme of the mitotic kinase network is the prevalence of elaborated feedback loops that ensure bistable conditions. Sequential phosphorylation and priming phosphorylation on substrates are also frequently employed. Another important concept is the role of scaffolds, such as centrosomes for protein kinases during mitosis. Elucidating the entire repertoire of mitotic kinases, their functions, regulation and interactions is critical for our understanding of normal cell growth and in diseases such as cancers.

  8. Co-ordinated action between youth-care and sports: facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermens, Niels; de Langen, Lisanne; Verkooijen, Kirsten T; Koelen, Maria A

    2017-07-01

    In the Netherlands, youth-care organisations and community sports clubs are collaborating to increase socially vulnerable youths' participation in sport. This is rooted in the idea that sports clubs are settings for youth development. As not much is known about co-ordinated action involving professional care organisations and community sports clubs, this study aims to generate insight into facilitators of and barriers to successful co-ordinated action between these two organisations. A cross-sectional study was conducted using in-depth semi-structured qualitative interview data. In total, 23 interviews were held at five locations where co-ordinated action between youth-care and sports takes place. Interviewees were youth-care workers, representatives from community sports clubs, and Care Sport Connectors who were assigned to encourage and manage the co-ordinated action. Using inductive coding procedures, this study shows that existing and good relationships, a boundary spanner, care workers' attitudes, knowledge and competences of the participants, organisational policies and ambitions, and some elements external to the co-ordinated action were reported to be facilitators or barriers. In addition, the participants reported that the different facilitators and barriers influenced the success of the co-ordinated action at different stages of the co-ordinated action. Future research is recommended to further explore the role of boundary spanners in co-ordinated action involving social care organisations and community sports clubs, and to identify what external elements (e.g. events, processes, national policies) are turning points in the formation, implementation and continuation of such co-ordinated action. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. About local fractional three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations in Cantor-type cylindrical co-ordinate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate the local fractional 3-D compressible Navier-Stokes equation via local fractional derivative. We use the Cantor-type cylindrical co-ordinate method to transfer 3-D compressible Navier-Stokes equation from the Cantorian co-ordinate system to the Cantor-type cylindrical co-ordinate system.

  10. Co-ordinated research programme on applications of stable isotope tracers in human nutrition research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a very brief report on the final Research Co-ordination Meeting of this Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP): the final report on the CRP will be published by the IAEA in the IAEA-TECDOC series. The present document contains a detailed proposal for a new Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Stable Isotope Tracer Techniques for Studies on Protein-Energy Interactions'', and a brief series of notes on stable isotopic methods for investigating protein and amino-acid metabolism in man. Refs

  11. Nuclear techniques for toxic elements in foodstuffs. Report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The document includes 10 final reports on the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Nuclear Techniques for Toxic Elements in Foodstuffs. A separate abstract was prepared for each report. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Nuclear techniques for toxic elements in foodstuffs. Report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The document includes 10 final reports on the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Nuclear Techniques for Toxic Elements in Foodstuffs. A separate abstract was prepared for each report. Refs, figs and tabs.

  13. Information Design for Synchronization and Co-ordination of Modern, Complex, Multi-National Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    1 16th ICCRTS Information design for synchronization and co-ordination of modern, complex, multi- national operations “Collective C2 in...REPORT DATE JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Information design for synchronization and co...at 11th ICCRTS) who emphasise that information needs to be designed, not merely found or catalogued, to achieve synchronizations and co-ordinations

  14. Care co-ordination for older people in the third sector: scoping the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendstern, Michele; Hughes, Jane; Jasper, Rowan; Sutcliffe, Caroline; Challis, David

    2018-05-01

    The third sector has played a significant role internationally in the delivery of adult social care services for many years. Its contribution to care co-ordination activities for older people, however, in England and elsewhere, is relatively unknown. A scoping review was therefore conducted to ascertain the character of the literature, the nature and extent of third sector care co-ordination activity, and to identify evidence gaps. It was undertaken between autumn 2013 and summer 2014 and updated with additional searches in 2016. Electronic and manual searches of international literature using distinct terms for different approaches to care co-ordination were undertaken. From a total of 835 papers, 26 met inclusion criteria. Data were organised in relation to care co-ordination approaches, types of third sector organisation and care recipients. Papers were predominantly from the UK and published this century. Key findings included that: a minority of literature focused specifically on older people and that those doing so described only one care co-ordination approach; third sector services tended to be associated with independence and person-centred practice; and working with the statutory sector, a prerequisite of care co-ordination, was challenging and required a range of features to be in place to support effective partnerships. Strengths and weaknesses of care co-ordination practice in the third sector according to key stakeholder groups were also highlighted. Areas for future research included the need for: a specific focus on older people's experiences; an investigation of workforce issues; detailed examination of third sector practices, outcomes and costs; interactions with the statutory sector; and an examination of quality assurance systems and their appropriateness to third sector practice. The main implication of the findings is a need to nurture variety within the third sector in order to provide older people and other adults with the range of service

  15. Anatomical localization of electrophysiological recording sites by co-ordinate transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinex, D G

    1997-07-18

    A method for estimating the anatomical locations of the units recorded in electrophysiological mapping experiments is described. A total of three locations must be marked by dye injections or electrolytic lesions and identified in tissue sections. From those locations, equations are derived to translate, scale, and rotate the three-dimensional co-ordinates of the recording sites, so that they are correct for a second, three-dimensional co-ordinate system based on the anatomy of the mapped structure. There is no limit to the number of recording sites that can be localized. This differs from methods that require a dye injection or lesion to be made at the exact location at which a particular unit was recorded. The accuracy of the transformed co-ordinates is limited by the accuracy with which the co-ordinates can be measured: in test measurements and in the experiments for which this algorithm was developed, the computed co-ordinates were typically accurate to within 100 microns or less.

  16. On three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid on cantor sets in spherical Cantor type co-ordinate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the systems of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on Cantor sets without the external force involving the fractal heat-conduction problem vial local fractional derivative. The spherical Cantor type co-ordinate method is used to transfer the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation from the Cantorian co-ordinate system into the spherical Cantor type co-ordinate system.

  17. Information on Nea programmes on nuclear energy and civil society and their co-ordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, C.; Riotte, H.

    2004-01-01

    At its session in May 2002, the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy welcomed the activities that the NEA standing technical committees were carrying out in the field of nuclear energy and civil society, and agreed on the value of existing co-ordination among them. Tile Committee asked the Secretariat to prepare an information document on such co-ordination activities. With this in mind, the present room document offers an up-to-date account of relevant NEA activities and their co-ordination, pending a broader review of NEA's involvement in the area of nuclear energy and civil society, in the context of the NEA Strategic Plan at an appropriate time. (author)

  18. UK Natural Analogue Co-Ordinating Group: first annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.J.; Chapman, N.A.

    1987-11-01

    The British Geological Survey is reponsible for co-ordinating the Department of the Environment's programme of natural analogue studies of radionuclide migration, a research programme that involved both UK and overseas sites. Co-ordination is achieved through the UK Natural Analogue Co-ordinating Group (NACG) which was established in October 1986. It has met three times to date and its function is to ensure that the different research projects have an integrated purpose aimed at improving and applying our understanding of natural geochemical processes in a way that will increase our confidence in long-term modelling predictions. Improved modelling prediction of radionuclide transport in the geosphere will directly benefit the performance and safety assessments of proposed radioactive waste repositories. (author)

  19. Pappas' scheme of correlating R6 and R4 co-ordinate transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teli, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    Pappas has suggested that R 4 co-ordinates can be connected with those in the R 6 by taking t'sub(x)=t'sub(y)=t'sub(z)=t'. Such connection is here obtained by introducing the scaling of space-time co-ordinates xsub(i), tsub(i) in all the frames by the corresponding factor c/c'sub(i) and have shown that taking of t'sub(x)=t'sub(y)=t'sub(z)=t' for this purpose is not necessary. The scaling factors get ignored after the connection

  20. Analysis of the morphology of oral structures from 3-D co-ordinate data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovski, V; Lynch, E

    2000-01-01

    A non-intrusive method is described which can be used to determine the forms of oral structures. It is based on the digitising of standard replicas with a co-ordinate-measuring machine. Supporting software permits a mathematical model of the surface to be reconstructed and visualised from captured three-dimensional co-ordinates. A series of surface data sets can be superposed into a common reference frame without the use of extrinsic markers, allowing changes in the shapes of oral structures to be quantified accurately over an extended period of time. The system has found numerous applications.

  1. Cross-organisational workflow management and co-ordination: WACC'99 workshop report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, Heiko; Bussler, Christoph; Shan, Ming-Chien; Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    The increasing deployment of Workflow Management Systems (WfMSs) and other co-ordination and process support systems on the one hand and the proliferation of cheap networking, namely the Internet, on the other hand raises the issue of how to connect these systems across organisational boundaries.

  2. A Coding of Real Null Four-Momenta into World-Sheet Co-ordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Fairlie, David B.

    2008-01-01

    The results of minimizing the action for string-like systems on a simply-connected world sheet are shown to encode the Cartesian components of real null momentum four-vectors into co-ordinates on the world sheet. This identification arises consistently from different approaches to the problem.

  3. The Standards Agenda: Reflections of a Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazzard, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This study is a life history account of Bev, a special educational needs co-ordinator who works in a primary school in England. The research examines how, within Bev's experiences, the discourses of integration and inclusion have affected learners with special educational needs. Additionally, the study examines the impact of the…

  4. Rigid Body Motion Calculated From Spatial Co-ordinates of Markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we present a unified method for calculating spatial coordinates of markers for a rigid body motion such as in bones. Kinematical analysis of bone movement in cadaveric specimens or living objects had been developed. Here, we show how spatial co-ordinates of markers in or on bone can be calculated from ...

  5. On Constancy of Second Co-ordinate of the gonality sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Sarbeswar

    2017-01-01

    Let $X$ be a K3 surface and $L$ be an ample line bundle on it. In this article we will prove that under certain condition the second co-ordinate of the gonality sequence is constant along the smooth curves in the linear system $|L|$.

  6. Feasibility of central co-ordinated EMA/CO for gestational trophoblastic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Houwen, Clasien; Rietbroek, Ron C.; Lok, Christianne A. R.; ten Kate-Booij, Marianne J.; Lammes, Frits B.; Ansink, Anca C.

    2004-01-01

    In the Netherlands, high risk gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) patients are treated in different referral hospitals with a national working party on trophoblastic tumours having a co-ordinating function. Our purpose was to evaluate whether this policy is a satisfactory alternative to complete

  7. Educating Leaders for Social Justice: The Case of Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasidou, Anastasia; Svensson, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    In the light of policy imperatives to initiate and maintain inclusive education reforms, the role of special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCOs) in England and Wales should be reconceptualised with a view to their leading school reforms commensurate with the principles of an inclusive discourse. The article concentrates on the social justice…

  8. Co-ordinated traffic control in freeway corridors : A proposed evaluation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Bovy, P.H.L.; Van der Zijpp, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    In the course of the Telematics implications Programme Transport of the European Commission Fourth Framework Research Programme much attention is devoted to evaluation and demonstration. This report is part of the DACCORD project TR1017, devoted to the development and application of co-ordinated

  9. Changing Housing for Elderly People and Co-ordination Issues in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, P.P.J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The inter-sectoral policy systems of housing for elderly people in the EU-countries change with the implementation of ageing in place and by general processes of modernisation of society and welfare state. For implementation of the innovations the relevance of co-ordination between the sector

  10. Supply chain co-ordination and industry clockspeed: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordijk, Johannes T.; Akkermans, Henk; Meijboom, Bert

    2003-01-01

    The increasing velocity of change, or clockspeed, in the business environment is a key challenge for firms and industries nowadays. In this study, the impact of industry and organisation clockspeed on specific mechanisms used for supply chain co-ordination is investigated from an

  11. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  12. Co-ordinated research project on comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques. Report on the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency started the five-year Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Comparative International Studies of Osteoporosis Using Isotope Techniques. The objectives of this study were: To harmonize the techniques of measuring BMD within the participating countries and to obtain data that can be compared between the different study groups (countries); To determine whether early adult PBM varies between populations over the age range from 15 to 50 years. In other words, to determine the age of peak bone mass in selected populations from developing countries; To explore environmental and nutritional contributions to any determined differences. Further information about the purpose and scope of the CRP may be found in the report of the Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) held in 19921 and other reports of this CRP. The fourth Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants of the CRP, which is the subject of the present report, was held at the University of Sheffield Medical School; WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases in Sheffield, UK from 28 Feb. to 3 March 2000

  13. Co-ordinating innate and adaptive immunity to viral infection: mobility is the key

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wern, Jeanette Erbo; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2009-01-01

    The host counters a viral infection through a complex response made up of components belonging to both the innate and the adaptive immune system. In this report, we review the mechanisms underlying this response, how it is induced and how it is co-ordinated. As cell-cell communication represents...... the very essence of immune system physiology, a key to a rapid, efficient and optimally regulated immune response is the ability of the involved cells to rapidly shift between a stationary and a mobile state, combined with stringent regulation of cell migration during the mobile state. Through the co......-ordinated recruitment of different cell types intended to work in concert, cellular co-operation is optimized particularly under conditions that may involve rare cells. Consequently, a major focus is placed on presenting an overview of the co-operative events and the associated cell migration, which is essential...

  14. Co-ordinated voltage control of DFIG wind turbines in uninterrupted operation during grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Michalke, G.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2007-01-01

    Emphasis in this article is on the design of a co-ordinated voltage control strategy for doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbines that enhances their capability to provide grid support during grid faults. In contrast to its very good performance in normal operation, the DFIG wind turbine...... concept is quite sensitive to grid faults and requires special power converter protection. The fault ride-through and grid support capabilities of the DFIG address therefore primarily the design of DFIG wind turbine control with special focus on power converter protection and voltage control issues....... A voltage control strategy is designed and implemented in this article, based on the idea that both converters of the DFIG (i.e. rotor-side converter and grid-side converter) participate in the grid voltage control in a co-ordinated manner. By default the grid voltage is controlled by the rotor...

  15. Encouraging ethical considerations - One important task for a national co-ordinator for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper is a brief description of the role and tasks of the Swedish National Co-ordinator for Nuclear Waste Disposal with special regard to one of his activities encouraging ethical considerations in the nuclear waste management issue. Examples are given of ethical considerations which have emerged during discussions among representatives of municipalities which are affected by the current search for a site for a deep geological repository in Sweden for spent nuclear fuel

  16. Nuclear material accounting and control: Co-ordinating assistance to newly independent States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorstensen, S.

    1995-01-01

    This article outlines work under way among the IAEA, its Member States, and the Newly Independent States (NIS) relating to the establishment and development in the NIS of State Systems of Accounting and Control (SSACs) of nuclear material. It describes IAEA activities in the NIS, including fact-finding missions at technical visits, the successful attempts to find donor States providing voluntary funding and expertise, and the co-ordination of technical support between the IAEA and the donor States. 3 tabs

  17. A microscopic study of the S band in the generator co-ordinate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, E.; Ansari, A.

    1985-04-01

    Using particle number and spin projected cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov (CHFB) wave functions in the generator co-ordinate method (GCM) with the cranking frequency as a GC the shortcomings of the usual CHFB theory are removed and the ground as well as the s band are studied simultaneously. In particular, low-spin properties of the s band are discussed for a backbending nucleus 158 Dy. (author)

  18. Vibrational spectra and normal co-ordinate analysis of 2-aminopyridine and 2-amino picoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sujin P; Mohan, S

    2006-05-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman (FT-R) spectra of 2-aminopyridine and 2-amino picoline were recorded and the observed frequencies were assigned to various modes of vibration in terms of fundamentals by assuming Cs point group symmetry. A normal co-ordinate analysis was also carried out for the proper assignment of the vibrational frequencies using simple valence force field. A complete vibrational analysis is presented here for the molecules and the results are briefly discussed.

  19. Handbook for the planning, co-ordination and evaluation of emergency exercises in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtborn, I.; Bath, N.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of the on-site emergency organization in German nuclear power plants is tested regularly through emergency exercises. To achieve federal harmonization on a high level of quality a handbook for the planning, co-ordination and evaluation of such exercises has been developed in the frame of the regulatory investigation programme. In this handbook requirements are set out for emergency training. Key elements are a modular structure, rules to be observed and guidance for post-exercise evaluation. (orig.) [de

  20. The use of the co-ordinate measuring machine for the study of three-dimensional biomechanics of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselko, M; Jenko, M; Lipuscek, I

    1998-07-01

    Original methodology for the study of three-dimensional biomechanics of the knee is presented in the paper. Defining the geometry of the rigid body in the body-fixed reference frame and the orientation of the body-fixed reference frame in the global co-ordinate system are the theoretic basis. The data in the form of co-ordinates of the Cartesian frame are gathered by the co-ordinate measuring machine and analysed by specially computer program. The theory and a practical example of the study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of the knee are presented. Various possibilities of the use of the methodology are discussed.

  1. An Integrated Model of Co-ordinated Community-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew E; Graham, Carrie L; Berridge, Clara

    2015-08-01

    Co-ordinated approaches to community-based care are a central component of current and proposed efforts to help vulnerable older adults obtain needed services and supports and reduce unnecessary use of health care resources. This study examines ElderHelp Concierge Club, an integrated community-based care model that includes comprehensive personal and environmental assessment, multilevel care co-ordination, a mix of professional and volunteer service providers, and a capitated, income-adjusted fee model. Evaluation includes a retrospective study (n = 96) of service use and perceived program impact, and a prospective study (n = 21) of changes in participant physical and social well-being and health services utilization. Over the period of this study, participants showed greater mobility, greater ability to meet household needs, greater access to health care, reduced social isolation, reduced home hazards, fewer falls, and greater perceived ability to obtain assistance needed to age in place. This study provides preliminary evidence that an integrated multilevel care co-ordination approach may be an effective and efficient model for serving vulnerable community-based elders, especially low and moderate-income elders who otherwise could not afford the cost of care. The findings suggest the need for multisite controlled studies to more rigorously evaluate program impacts and the optimal mix of various program components. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. First research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research programme on development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major reasons for mortality and a great deal of research goes on in many areas related to cancer all through the world. The concept of 'tumor markers' has greatly aided the management of cancer, especially for follow up of the treated patients. Immunoassays that are used for measurement of sub-picomolar quantities of biomolecules such as hormones have been developed for the measurement of tumor markers too and these are widely used for monitoring the patients. The current co-ordinated research program on 'Development of Immunometric Assays for the Tumor Makers: PSA, free PSA and TPS' was born out of the advise from a group of specialists from the field oncology and nuclear medicine who met to discuss initially (Advisory Group Meeting, Colombo, August 1996) to identify the most appropriate markers and later (Consultants' Meeting, Glasgow, 21-25 April 1997) to identify the details of the procedure to follow. The first Research Co-ordination Meeting of this group was held in Vienna from 9-12 December 1997 to review the plans of each participant and the steps to be taken to realize the goal of this CRP. The meeting was attended by participants from the ten laboratories. The meeting discussed all salient aspects of the IRMA development for PSA and TPS. The modalities of working out the plans were thoroughly considered and the key inputs for the program to take off were identified. In conclusion, all the nine contract holding participants would develop the IRMAs for PSA (free and total) and TPS (Uruguay)

  3. Co-ordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These co-ordinated research activities are normally implemented through Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports several Doctoral CRPs. This new, optional type of CRP has been designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs are currently being carried out by the Human Health programme. Further information on the Agency's co-ordinated research activities, including current information on CRPs and programme areas supported, information on policies and procedures and the administration of the activities is contained in the Agency's website at http://www-crp.iaea.org. The co-ordinated research activities reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable

  4. Co-ordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-15

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These co-ordinated research activities are normally implemented through Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports several Doctoral CRPs. This new, optional type of CRP has been designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs are currently being carried out by the Human Health programme. Further information on the Agency's co-ordinated research activities, including current information on CRPs and programme areas supported, information on policies and procedures and the administration of the activities is contained in the Agency's website at http://www-crp.iaea.org. The co-ordinated research activities reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable

  5. Organization of the ITER Co-ordinated Technical Activities International Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At its meeting in Toronto on 7 November 2001, the ITER Co-ordinated Technical Activities (CTA) project board took note of the organizational arrangements for the CTA International Team at the Garching and Naka joint work sites. The organization chart of the team remains almost unchanged from that of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA). However, there is no special division responsible for plasma and field control. Activities in plasma control will be taken over by the Physics Unit. This newsletter also includes the ITER CTA International Team structure

  6. The fourth UNDP/RCA/IAEA/meeting of national co-ordinators for radiation technology. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the Meeting were to provide information for the Terminal Report of the joint UNDP/RCA/IAEA project RAS/92/073 and to look into future activities under the Radiation Technology project. The main achievements of this Meeting are: The Meeting reviewed the implementation of all radiation technology sub-projects and agreed that all of them were successful but not yet equally developed among RCA Member States. The Meeting recommended to have three projects carried out in the form of Co-ordinated Research Programs and requested the IAEA to find new ways to implement the organized in RCA Member States to carry these CRPs out. Figs, tabs

  7. Nuclear techniques in the coal industry. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    With the aim of promoting advanced research and facilitating a more extensive application of nuclear techniques for environmental protection in the exploration and exploitation of coal, the IAEA established the present co-ordinated research programme (CRP) in 1989. This report includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in the coal industry and the results obtained by the participants at the CRP. Proceedings of the final CRP on ``Nuclear Techniques in Exploration and Exploitation of Coal: On-line and Bulk Analysis and Evaluation of Potential Environmental Pollutants in Coal and Coke``, was held in Krakow, Poland, from 9 to 12 May 1994. Refs, figs, tabs.

  8. Insulation co-ordination in high-voltage electric power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Diesendorf, W

    2015-01-01

    Insulation Co-ordination in High-Voltage Electric Power Systems deals with the methods of insulation needed in different circumstances. The book covers topics such as overvoltages and lightning surges; disruptive discharge and withstand voltages; self-restoring and non-self-restoring insulation; lightning overvoltages on transmission lines; and the attenuation and distortion of lightning surges. Also covered in the book are topics such as the switching surge designs of transmission lines, as well as the insulation coordination of high-voltage stations. The text is recommended for electrical en

  9. Case management for high-intensity service users: towards a relational approach to care co-ordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Phil; Escott, Diane; Bee, Penny

    2011-01-01

    This study is based on a formative evaluation of a case management service for high-intensity service users in Northern England. The evaluation had three main purposes: (i) to assess the quality of the organisational infrastructure; (ii) to obtain a better understanding of the key influences that played a role in shaping the development of the service; and (iii) to identify potential changes in practice that may help to improve the quality of service provision. The evaluation was informed by Gittell's relational co-ordination theory, which focuses upon cross-boundary working practices that facilitate task integration. The Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Survey was used to assess the organisational infrastructure and qualitative interviews with front line staff were conducted to explore the key influences that shaped the development of the service. A high level of strategic commitment and political support for integrated working was identified. However, the quality of care co-ordination was variable. The most prominent operational factor that appeared to influence the scope and quality of care co-ordination was the pattern of interaction between the case managers and their co-workers. The co-ordination of patient care was much more effective in integrated co-ordination networks. Key features included clearly defined, task focussed, relational workspaces with interactive forums where case managers could engage with co-workers in discussions about the management of interdependent care activities. In dispersed co-ordination networks with fewer relational workspaces, the case managers struggled to work as effectively. The evaluation concluded that the creation of flexible and efficient task focused relational workspaces that are systemically managed and adequately resourced could help to improve the quality of care co-ordination, particularly in dispersed networks. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Co-ordinated research programme on development and application of isotopic techniques in studies of vitamin A nutrition. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In Vitamin A nutrition, evaluations to ascertain the efficacy of intervention strategies are becoming increasingly important. However, state-of-the-art methods for evaluating vitamin A status often do not provide enough quantitative information on vitamin A status and the bioconversion of carotenoids, particularly in people with subclinical vitamin A deficiency. These limitations have had programmatic consequences. The principal reason the new Coordinated Research programme (CRP) was formulated was to improve techniques for measuring vitamin A status and the bioconversion of carotenoids to vitamin A with the expectation that the new methods could contribute meaningfully to field-based evaluations of the efficacy of intervention strategies. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is sponsoring programmes to develop and transfer isotopic techniques to improve nutrition monitoring in developing countries. The New CRP ''Development and Application of Isotopic Techniques in Studies of Vitamin A Nutrition'' has seven teams, six of which are working to develop methods based on orally administered isotopically labelled retinol which will be a valid measure of whole body retinol (mostly hepatic reserves) and useful under typical field conditions, particularly in women and children with marginal vitamin A deficiency. The seventh team is biosynthesizing uniformly deuterated β-carotene by growing foods in deuterated water. This report summarizes the research to be undertaken, as presented at the first Research Co-ordination Meeting

  11. Co-ordinated research programme on development and application of isotopic techniques in studies of vitamin A nutrition. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    In Vitamin A nutrition, evaluations to ascertain the efficacy of intervention strategies are becoming increasingly important. However, state-of-the-art methods for evaluating vitamin A status often do not provide enough quantitative information on vitamin A status and the bioconversion of carotenoids, particularly in people with subclinical vitamin A deficiency. These limitations have had programmatic consequences. The principal reason the new Coordinated Research programme (CRP) was formulated was to improve techniques for measuring vitamin A status and the bioconversion of carotenoids to vitamin A with the expectation that the new methods could contribute meaningfully to field-based evaluations of the efficacy of intervention strategies. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is sponsoring programmes to develop and transfer isotopic techniques to improve nutrition monitoring in developing countries. The New CRP ``Development and Application of Isotopic Techniques in Studies of Vitamin A Nutrition`` has seven teams, six of which are working to develop methods based on orally administered isotopically labelled retinol which will be a valid measure of whole body retinol (mostly hepatic reserves) and useful under typical field conditions, particularly in women and children with marginal vitamin A deficiency. The seventh team is biosynthesizing uniformly deuterated {beta}-carotene by growing foods in deuterated water. This report summarizes the research to be undertaken, as presented at the first Research Co-ordination Meeting. Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on 'Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition' held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers

  13. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on `Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition` held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers Refs, figs, tabs, graphs

  14. Insulation co-ordination aspects for power stations with generator circuit-breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, M.; Koeppl, G.; Kreuzer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The generator circuit-breaker (gen. c.b.) located between the generator and the step-up transformer, is now being applied world-wide. It has become a recognized electrical component of power stations which is largely due to economical advantages and increased power station availability. Technical protection considerations for power stations have always been the reason for discussion and the object of improvement. With the use of a gen. c.b., some points of view need to be considered anew. Not only the protection system in case of fault conditions will be influenced, but also the insulation co-ordination philosophy. Below the results of some calculations concerning expected overvoltages are presented. These calculations are based on a transformer rated 264/15.5kV, 220 MVA. But the results are transferable to other power plants. Some measurements carried out on a transformer of the same rating complement the calculations. The findings may contribute to an improvement in insulation co-ordination and protection of the electrical system generator--step-up transformer

  15. Co-ordinated research programme on operator support systems in nuclear power plants. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In September 1991 the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Operator Support Systems (OSSs) in Nuclear Power Plants'' was approved in the framework of the Project ''Man-Machine Interface Studies''. The main objective of the programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer in the development and implementation of OSSs. This includes the experience with man-machine interfaces and closely related issues such as control and instrumentation, the use of computers, and operator qualification. The first Co-ordinated Research Meeting held in Vienna, 13-16 October 1992, prepared a summary report which defined the tasks and the responsibilities of the CRP participants. A time schedule and future actions were also agreed upon at this meeting. The second meeting was held in Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 8 October 1993 and was sponsored by the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute. The meeting reviewed the progress of the tasks defined by the first meeting, considered reports on national activities in the subject area, and agreed on time schedule and future actions. The present volume contains: (1) report prepared by the CRP meeting, (2) reports presented by the national delegates, and (3) CRP background and working plan. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Overcurrent protection co-ordination. A modern approach for modern devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, P. [GEC Alsthom Engineering Systems Ltd., Whetstone (United Kingdom); Sanderson, J.V.H. [Power Engineering Consultants Ltd., Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    A modern approach to relay co-ordination that takes advantage of the improved performance of modern protective relays and circuits was proposed. The proposed method dealt with a mixture of new and old equipment and was most useful when implemented using common spreadsheet software. The suggested approach justified reduced time margins for relay co-ordination in many difficult applications. Other established approaches were reviewed. A discussion of fixed and variable time margin allowances was presented. The formulation of an equation to determine the required upstream relay operating time was explained, with sample calculations. Relay performance standards and modern protective equipment were discussed. It was concluded that modern relays and circuit breakers are much more advanced than designs of the recent past. The method described allowed significant reductions in margins which enabled modern relays to operate faster. While calculations for the procedures were said to be tedious to perform by hand, they can be easily done with spreadsheet software. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Co-ordinated research programme on nuclear techniques for toxic elements in foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) was started by the Agency in 1985, within the framework of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology in the Asia and Pacific Region (RCA). Its main purpose has been to obtain comparative data on existing elemental concentrations of potentially toxic elements in foodstuffs in various Asian countries. The elements to be studied include the potentially most toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Se) as well as others of relevance to national monitoring programmes, such as Br, Cr, Cu, Fe, I, Mn, Sb, Tl, and Zn. An important supplementary purpose of the programme is to help establish analytical expertise for work of this kind in the individual countries. Scientists from several RCA Member States have participated in it, namely from Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Thailand, and also from institutes in several countries outside the region, i.e., Argentina, Brazil, Jamaica and The Netherlands. This report summarizes the discussions that took place during the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the programme from 20-24 November 1989, in Jakarta, Indonesia. This document includes the progress reports presented by the participants as well as discussions and conclusions drawn from the meeting

  18. Co-ordinate regulation of genes involved in storage lipid mobilization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylott, E L; Hooks, M A; Graham, I A

    2001-05-01

    Molecular genetic approaches in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Col0) are shedding new light on the role and control of the pathways associated with the mobilization of lipid reserves during oilseed germination and post-germinative growth. Numerous independent studies have reported on the expression of individual genes encoding enzymes from the three major pathways: beta-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis. However, a single comprehensive study of representative genes and enzymes from the different pathways in a single plant species has not been done. Here we present results from Arabidopsis that demonstrate the co-ordinate regulation of gene expression and enzyme activities for the acyl-CoA oxidase- and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase-mediated steps of beta-oxidation, the isocitrate lyase and malate synthase steps of the glyoxylate cycle and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase step of gluconeogenesis. The mRNA abundance and enzyme activities increase to a peak at stage 2, 48 h after the onset of seed germination, and decline thereafter either to undetectable levels (for malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) or low basal levels (for the genes of beta-oxidation and gluconeogenesis). The co-ordinate induction of all these genes at the onset of germination raises the possibility that a global regulatory mechanism operates to induce the expression of genes associated with the mobilization of storage reserves during the heterotrophic growth period.

  19. Efficient nonlinear registration of 3D images using high order co-ordinate transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D C

    1999-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in image registration for a variety of medical imaging applications. Image registration is achieved through the use of a co-ordinate transfer function (CTF) which maps voxels in one image to voxels in the other image, including in the general case changes in mapped voxel intensity. If images of the same subject are to be registered the co-ordinate transfer function needs to implement a spatial transformation consisting of a displacement and a rigid rotation. In order to achieve registration a common approach is to choose a suitable quality-of-registration measure and devise a method for the efficient generation of the parameters of the CTF which minimize this measure. For registration of images from different subjects more complex transforms are required. In general function minimization is too slow to allow the use of CTFs with more than a small number of parameters. However, provided the images are from the same modality and the CTF can be expanded in terms of an appropriate set of basis functions this paper will show how relatively complex CTFs can be used for registration. The use of increasingly complex CTFs to minimize the within group standard deviation of a set of normal single photon emission tomography brain images is used to demonstrate the improved registration of images from different subjects using CTFs of increasing complexity.

  20. Co-ordinated research programme on applications of stable isotope tracers in human nutrition research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) was formally established by the Agency in October 1988, and has since then expanded to encompass 13 participants in 13 countries. Its general objective is to help establish competence in the use of stable isotope techniques, particularly in developing countries, and particularly with reference to applications of 2 H, 13 C, 15 N, and 18 O. This report summarizes the discussions that took place during the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM). Working papers (progress reports) presented by the participants are included as annexes together with a preliminary report on the results of a series of intercomparison exercises involving enriched stable isotope reference materials containing 2 H, 13 C, 15 N and 18 O. For the future it was agreed that more work needs to be done to harmonize the analytical techniques being used, and to obtain support for new CRPs relating to human energy expenditure studies in pregnancy, lactation, growth and other conditions, and to studies of nitrogen turnover in relation to malnutrition and liver function. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Copying you copying me: interpersonal motor co-ordination influences automatic imitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Joel Shaw

    Full Text Available Moving in a co-ordinated fashion with another individual changes our behaviour towards them; we tend to like them more, find them more attractive, and are more willing to co-operate with them. It is generally assumed that this effect on behaviour results from alterations in representations of self and others. Specifically, through neurophysiological perception-action matching mechanisms, interpersonal motor co-ordination (IMC is believed to forge a neural coupling between actor and observer, which serves to blur boundaries in conceptual self-other representations and causes positive views of the self to be projected onto others. An investigation into this potential neural mechanism is lacking, however. Moreover, the specific components of IMC that might influence this mechanism have not yet been specified. In the present study we exploited a robust behavioural phenomenon--automatic imitation--to assess the degree to which IMC influences neural action observation-execution matching mechanisms. This revealed that automatic imitation is reduced when the actions of another individual are perceived to be synchronised in time, but are spatially incongruent, with our own. We interpret our findings as evidence that IMC does indeed exert an effect on neural perception-action matching mechanisms, but this serves to promote better self-other distinction. Our findings demonstrate that further investigation is required to understand the complex relationship between neural perception-action coupling, conceptual self-other representations, and social behaviour.

  2. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Report of the third research co-ordination meeting of FAO/IAEA/ITALY co-ordinated research programme. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Programme, on ``Improvement of basic food corps in Africa through plant breeding including the use of induced mutations``, funded by the Italian Governmnet, was initiated in the Joint Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization and International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of staple food crops of Africa with main emphasis on the indigenous species and local cultivars. The Third Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) under the FAO/IAEA/ITALY Co-ordinated Research Programme was held in Nairobi, Kenya, 20-24 September 1993 in which 24 persons participated and 18 scientific reports were presented. These included reports from 10 Research Contract holders from Africa, 3 Technical Contract holders from Italy and the update on the backstopping of research carried out at the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf. The reports, and conclusions and recommendations made by the participants are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs.

  3. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Report of the third research co-ordination meeting of FAO/IAEA/ITALY co-ordinated research programme. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Programme, on ''Improvement of basic food corps in Africa through plant breeding including the use of induced mutations'', funded by the Italian Governmnet, was initiated in the Joint Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization and International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of staple food crops of Africa with main emphasis on the indigenous species and local cultivars. The Third Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) under the FAO/IAEA/ITALY Co-ordinated Research Programme was held in Nairobi, Kenya, 20-24 September 1993 in which 24 persons participated and 18 scientific reports were presented. These included reports from 10 Research Contract holders from Africa, 3 Technical Contract holders from Italy and the update on the backstopping of research carried out at the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf. The reports, and conclusions and recommendations made by the participants are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Co-ordinated research programme on isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets. Report of the second research co-ordination meeting, Hyderabad, India, 16-20 November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Isotope-Aided Studies on the Bioavailability of Iron and Zinc from Human Diets'' was initiated by the IAEA in 1990, and presently encompasses participating institutes in 11 countries. A summary of the discussions that took place during thr second Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Hyderabad, India, between 16-20 November 1992, is given in this report together with 12 working papers (progress reports) presented by individual participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Preparation and crystal structure of carbonyltris (diethyldithiocarbamato) technetium (III): an unexpected source of co-ordinated carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Bonnyman, J.; Pojer, P.M.; Williams, G.A.

    1981-10-01

    Tc(S 2 CNEt 2 ) 3 CO has been prepared by the reduction of NH 4 TcO 4 with formamidinesulphinic acid in the presence of NaS 2 CNEt 2 . It is suggested that the co-ordinated carbon monoxide is formed after co-ordination of formamidinesulphinic acid, or some decomposition product, with technetium. The crystal structure of Tc(S 2 CNEt 2 ) 3 CO has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods at 17 deg. C. Diffractometry has provided significant Bragg intensities for 2045 independent reflections and the structure has been refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R 0.049. The compound is isostructural with the rhenium analogue and consists of discrete Tc(S 2 CNEt 2 ) 3 CO molecules, each containing a terminal linear CO group. The technetium atom has a seven co-ordinate environment which is best described as a distorted pentagonal bipyramid

  6. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  7. A co-ordinate system for reactor physics calculations in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burte, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    A method for generating all the geometric information concerning typical reactor physics calculations for a basically hexagonal reactor core or its sector involving any of the possible symmetries is presented. The geometrically allowed symmetries for regular hexagons are discussed. The approach is based on the choice of a suitable co-ordinate system, viz. one using three coplanar (including one redundant) axes, each at 120 0 with its cyclically preceding one. A code named KEKULE' is developed for a 2-D, finite difference, one-group diffusion analysis of a hexagonal core using the approach. It can cater to a full hexagonal core as well as to any symmetric sectorial part of it. The main feature of the code is that the input concerning geometry is a bare minimum. It is hoped that the approach presented will be useful even for the calculations for hexagonal fuel assemblies. (author)

  8. IAEA technical meeting: Assess and co-ordinate modelling needs and data providers. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2004-05-01

    This report briefly describes the proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the Technical Meeting to 'Assess and Co-ordinate Modelling Needs and Data Providers', held on 4-5 December 2003. Eight international experts on atomic and molecular data related to fusion energy research activities participated in the meeting. Each participant reviewed the current status of their own speciality and current lines of research as well as anticipated needs in new data for nuclear fusion energy research. Current CRPs on related topics were reviewed. In light of current research activities and anticipated data needs for fusion, a detailed set of tasks appropriate for a new CRP was developed. This meeting completely fulfilled the specified goals. (author)

  9. Bulk hydrogen analysis, using neutrons. Final report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The aims of the Second Co-ordination Meting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) were to report on and review progress against the work programme set at the beginning of the CRP and to discuss the work plans for the second half of the programme. In many cases hydrogen is required to be measured in a bulk medium rather than merely at a surface. For this reason neutrons are used due to their high penetrating power in dense material. In addition, the mass attenuation coefficient for neutrons in hydrogen is significantly larger than for all other elements, meaning that neutrons have a higher probability of interacting with hydrogen than with other elements in the sample matrix. Neutrons have been used in the following areas: Fast Neutron Transmission, Scattering and Activation Technique; Digital Neutron Imaging; Hydrogen Detection by Epithermal Neutrons; Microscopic Behaviour of Hydrogen in Bulk Materials

  10. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Schwerer, O.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ''EXFOR'' system, and the further development of this system; the ''CINDA'' system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ''ENDF'' format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author)

  11. Co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Lemmel, H D [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the 1996 co-ordination meeting in Brookhaven, U.S.A., of the national and regional nuclear reaction data center, convened by the IAEA at regular intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with the goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author). Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Co-ordination of the nuclear reactions data centers. Report on an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Schwerer, O [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the 1998 co-ordination meeting at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna of the regional, national and specialized nuclear reaction data centers, concerned by the IAEA at two-year intervals. The main topics are: the international exchange of nuclear reaction data by means of the ``EXFOR`` system, and the further development of this system; the ``CINDA`` system as an international index and bibliography to neutron reaction data; the sharing of the workload for speedy and reliable nuclear data compilation and data center services; the exchange and documentation of evaluated data libraries in ``ENDF`` format; the rapid advances of online electronic information technologies, with goal of rendering data center services to data users in IAEA Member States by means of computer retrievals, online services and printed materials. The scope of data covers microscopic cross-sections and related parameters of nuclear reactions induced by neutrons, charged-particles and photons. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Report of the research co-ordination meeting on labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The CRP's focus is on the preparation of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals labelled with with β - emitters for the treatment of cancer. The radiopharmaceuticals should be designed in such a way to deliver the therapeutic doses with high specificity to tumour sites and with minimum dose to other organs. The 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) took place in Mumbai, India from 31 January to 4 February 2000. The present report includes the results of all the participants including the report of the participant from Pakistan who could not attend the meeting. During the second RCM, three main aspects were dealt with viz. the different therapeutic isotopes studied, different carrier molecules like peptides and antibody and the biological aspects of these preparations

  14. Report of the research co-ordination meeting on labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The CRP's focus is on the preparation of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals labelled with β-emitters for the treatment of cancer. The radiopharmaceuticals should be designed in such a way to deliver the therapeutic doses with high specificity to tumour sites and with minimum dose to other organs. The 2. Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) took place in Mumbai, India from 31 January to 4 February 2000. The present report includes the results of all the participants including the report of the participant from Pakistan who could not attend the meeting. During the second RCM, three main aspects were dealt with viz. the different therapeutic isotopes studied, different carrier molecules like peptides and antibody and the biological aspects of these preparations

  15. Three ancient hormonal cues co-ordinate shoot branching in a moss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, Yoan; Palubicki, Wojtek; Ljung, Karin; Novak, Ondrej; Leyser, Ottoline; Harrison, C Jill

    2015-03-25

    Shoot branching is a primary contributor to plant architecture, evolving independently in flowering plant sporophytes and moss gametophytes. Mechanistic understanding of branching is largely limited to flowering plants such as Arabidopsis, which have a recent evolutionary origin. We show that in gametophytic shoots of Physcomitrella, lateral branches arise by re-specification of epidermal cells into branch initials. A simple model co-ordinating the activity of leafy shoot tips can account for branching patterns, and three known and ancient hormonal regulators of sporophytic branching interact to generate the branching pattern- auxin, cytokinin and strigolactone. The mode of auxin transport required in branch patterning is a key divergence point from known sporophytic pathways. Although PIN-mediated basipetal auxin transport regulates branching patterns in flowering plants, this is not so in Physcomitrella, where bi-directional transport is required to generate realistic branching patterns. Experiments with callose synthesis inhibitors suggest plasmodesmal connectivity as a potential mechanism for transport.

  16. Report of the research co-ordination meeting on labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The CRP's focus is on the preparation of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals labelled with {beta}-emitters for the treatment of cancer. The radiopharmaceuticals should be designed in such a way to deliver the therapeutic doses with high specificity to tumour sites and with minimum dose to other organs. The 2. Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) took place in Mumbai, India from 31 January to 4 February 2000. The present report includes the results of all the participants including the report of the participant from Pakistan who could not attend the meeting. During the second RCM, three main aspects were dealt with viz. the different therapeutic isotopes studied, different carrier molecules like peptides and antibody and the biological aspects of these preparations.

  17. Co-ordinated research and environmental surveillance programme related to sea disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The co-ordinated Research and Environmental Surveillance Programme relevant to sea disposal of radioactive waste (CRESP) was created in 1981 in the framework of the 1977 Decision of the OECD Council establishing a Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Waste. CRESP was essentially a scientific research programme. Its main objective was to increase the knowledge of processes controlling the transfer of radionuclides in the marine environment, so that safety assessments could be based on more accurate and comprehensive scientific data. From 1986, in response to a request from the Paris Commission, CRESP also considered the scientific aspects of coastal releases. CRESP made it possible to co-ordinate national research activities and generated an important international co-operation in its areas of work. The vast amount of scientific information gathered in this framework increased strongly our knowledge of the impact of radionuclides introduced to the deep sea environment. In particular, CRESP provided the basis for a comprehensive safety analysis of sea dumping operations. This study, published by the NEA in 1985, is still e reference on the subject. In November 1993, the Sixteenth Consultative Meeting of Contracting Parties to the London Convention 1972 voted a total ban on the disposal at sea of radioactive wastes and other radioactive matter. Considering this decision, the conclusions of the 1985 safety analysis, and CRESP's view that new scientific findings are unlikely to alter these conclusions, the NEA Steering Committee for nuclear Energy decided in October 1995 to terminate the programme. The present report summarises the knowledge accumulated within CRESP over its fifteen years of existence. (author)

  18. Low pH induces co-ordinate regulation of gene expression in oesophageal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Shane P; Gallagher, William M; Fox, Edward J P; Abdel-Latif, Mohammed M; Reynolds, John V; Kelleher, Dermot

    2006-02-01

    The development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is known to be a causative risk factor in the evolution of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus. The major component of this reflux is gastric acid. However, the impact of low pH on gene expression has not been extensively studied in oesophageal cells. This study utilizes a transcriptomic and bioinformatic approach to assess regulation of gene expression in response to low pH. In more detail, oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines were exposed to a range of pH environments. Affymetrix microarrays were used for gene-expression analysis and results were validated using cycle limitation and real-time RT-PCR analysis, as well as northern and western blotting. Comparative promoter transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis (MatInspector) of hierarchically clustered gene-expression data was employed to identify the elements which may co-ordinately regulate individual gene clusters. Initial experiments demonstrated maximal induction of EGR1 gene expression at pH 6.5. Subsequent array experimentation revealed significant induction of gene expression from such functional categories as DNA damage response (EGR1-4, ATF3) and cell-cycle control (GADD34, GADD45, p57). Changes in expression of EGR1, EGR3, ATF3, MKP-1, FOSB, CTGF and CYR61 were verified in separate experiments and in a variety of oesophageal cell lines. TFBS analysis of promoters identified transcription factors that may co-ordinately regulate gene-expression clusters, Cluster 1: Oct-1, AP4R; Cluster 2: NF-kB, EGRF; Cluster 3: IKRS, AP-1F. Low pH has the ability to induce genes and pathways which can provide an environment suitable for the progression of malignancy. Further functional analysis of the genes and clusters identified in this low pH study is likely to lead to new insights into the pathogenesis and therapeutics of GORD and oesophageal cancer.

  19. Co-ordinate induction of hepatic mitochondrial and peroxisomal carnitine acyltransferase synthesis by diet and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, P S; Marine, K A; Brady, L J; Ramsay, R R

    1989-01-01

    The present studies examined the effect of agents that induce peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation on hepatic mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) and peroxisomal carnitine acyltransferase [CPTs of Ramsay (1988) Biochem. J. 249, 239-245; COT of Farrell & Bieber (1983) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 222, 123-132 and Miyazawa, Ozasa, Osumi & Hashimoto (1983) J. Biochem. 94, 529-542]. In the first studies, high fat diets containing corn oil or fish oil were used to induce peroxisomal and mitochondrial enzymes. Rats were fed one of three diets for 4 weeks: (1) low fat, with corn oil as 11% of energy (kJ); (2) high fat, with corn oil as 45% of kJ; (3) high fat, with fish oil as 45% of kJ. At the end of 4 weeks, both mitochondrial CPT and peroxisomal CPTs exhibited increases in activity, immunoreactive protein, mRNA levels and transcription rates in livers of rats fed either high-fat diet compared to the low fat diet. Riboflavin deficiency or starvation for 48 h also increased the peroxisomal CPTs mRNA. A second set of studies used the plasticizer 2-(diethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), 0.5% clofibrate or 1% acetylsalicylic acid (fed for 3 weeks) to alter peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. With DEHP, the mitochondrial CPT and peroxisomal CPTs activity, immunoreactive protein, mRNA levels and and transcription rate were all increased by 3-5-fold. The peroxisomal CPTs activity, immunoreactive protein, mRNA levels and transcription rate were increased 2-3-fold by clofibrate and acetylsalicylic acid, again similar to mitochondrial CPT. The results of the combined studies using both diet and drugs to cause enzyme induction suggest that the synthesis of the carnitine acyltransferases (mitochondrial CPT and peroxisomal CPTs) may be co-ordinated with each other; however, the co-ordinate regulatory factors have not yet been identified. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2775196

  20. Mutation breeding of oil seed crops. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme held in Vienna, 11-15 January 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The document contains 19 papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Mutation Breeding of Oil Seed Crops' held in Vienna between 11-15 January 1993. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Diagnosis and epidemiology of animal diseases in Latin America. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meetings of FAO/IAEA/SIDA co-ordinated research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    In 1986 the Animal Production and Health Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture embarked on a programme of support to scientists in developing countries focused on improving animal disease diagnosis through the use of nuclear and related technologies. As part of this programme the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) agreed to provide support for a FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) concerned with the introduction and use of such technologies in Latin America. Through this programme, which was entitled Regional Network for Latin America on Animal Disease Diagnosis Using Immunoassays and Labeled DNA Probe Techniques, studies were supported on a number of diseases considered to be of substantial economic and social importance to the region, including brucellosis, tuberculosis, babesiosis, leukosis, bluetongue and chlamydia infection in cattle and psedorabies in pigs. One significant conclusion was that large number of diseases studied limited research findings owing to the lack of a critical mass of scientists studying any one specific disease problem. Thus when in 1991, SIDA agreed to follow-up CRP on Immunoassay Methods for the Diagnosis and Epidemiology of Animal Diseases in Latin America, the work was restricted to three diseases, i.e. foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), bovine brucellosis and bovine babesiosis. In 1994 results were presented in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, France. The outcome of this meeting was the validation of ELISAs for the above mentioned diseases and a recommendation that future research should focus on diagnosis and epidemiology to support existing control and eradication campaigns against the two diseases of major importance in the region (FMD and Brucellosis). A follow-up CRP (1994-1997) entitled the Use of ELISA for Epidemiology and Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Bovine Brucellosis in Latin America focused on the further validation and subsequent use of a

  2. Diagnosis and epidemiology of animal diseases in Latin America. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meetings of FAO/IAEA/SIDA co-ordinated research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    In 1986 the Animal Production and Health Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture embarked on a programme of support to scientists in developing countries focused on improving animal disease diagnosis through the use of nuclear and related technologies. As part of this programme the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) agreed to provide support for a FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) concerned with the introduction and use of such technologies in Latin America. Through this programme, which was entitled Regional Network for Latin America on Animal Disease Diagnosis Using Immunoassays and Labeled DNA Probe Techniques, studies were supported on a number of diseases considered to be of substantial economic and social importance to the region, including brucellosis, tuberculosis, babesiosis, leukosis, bluetongue and chlamydia infection in cattle and psedorabies in pigs. One significant conclusion was that large number of diseases studied limited research findings owing to the lack of a critical mass of scientists studying any one specific disease problem. Thus when in 1991, SIDA agreed to follow-up CRP on Immunoassay Methods for the Diagnosis and Epidemiology of Animal Diseases in Latin America, the work was restricted to three diseases, i.e. foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), bovine brucellosis and bovine babesiosis. In 1994 results were presented in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, France. The outcome of this meeting was the validation of ELISAs for the above mentioned diseases and a recommendation that future research should focus on diagnosis and epidemiology to support existing control and eradication campaigns against the two diseases of major importance in the region (FMD and Brucellosis). A follow-up CRP (1994-1997) entitled the Use of ELISA for Epidemiology and Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Bovine Brucellosis in Latin America focused on the further validation and subsequent use of a

  3. The effect of industry clockspeed on supply chain co-ordination: Classical theory to sharpen an emerging concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijboom, Bert; Voordijk, Johannes T.; Akkermans, Henk

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The relevance of “industry clockspeed” to supply chain co-ordination (SCC) has recently been stressed but hardly been researched. Taking an information-processing perspective, the purpose of this paper is to examine the development of SCC theory under varying clockspeed circumstances.

  4. Comparison of the precision of two standardized co-ordinate systems for the quantitation of brain anatomy: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, T; Tieman, J; Ong, H T; Moss, M B; Jolesz, F; Albert, M

    1994-10-01

    We assessed reproducible definition of two standardized co-ordinate systems for intersubject analysis of brain images. The baselines in the two co-ordinate systems were a modification of the canthomeatal (mCM) line and the anterior-posterior commissural (AC-PC) line. Axial spin-echo MR images of four subjects at 1.5T were used. Operator error was computed from the replicate analyses of two operators. The mCM line was determined by the lens of the eye and the internal auditory canal, and the AC-PC line was determined by the intersection of AC and PC with the interhemispheric fissure. Reproducibility of the mCM markers (SD = 0.59 mm) did not differ significantly from that of the AC-PC line (SD = 0.68 mm). The measurement error of the angle of the baseline (delta alpha), however, was more than 7 times as large for the AC-PC line as for the mCM line. An additional error affecting the rostrocaudal rotation of the co-ordinate systems, attributable to the distance between the anatomic markers, was 2.1 and 3.6 degrees (3 mm and 5 mm slice thickness) for the mCM co-ordinate system and 8.2 and 11.0 degrees (3 mm and 5 mm slice thickness) for the AC-PC system. The AC-PC line based co-ordinate system is therefore, less reproducible than the mCM line based system. This could be improved if a combination of axial and sagittal images were used for the definition of the AC-PC line.

  5. Self-processing 2A-polyproteins--a system for co-ordinate expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, C; Cooke, S E; Barakate, A; El Amrani, A; Ryan, M D

    1999-02-01

    Achieving co-ordinate, high-level and stable expression of multiple transgenes in plants is currently difficult. Expression levels are notoriously variable and influenced by factors that act independently on transgenes at different genetic loci. Instability of expression due to loss, re-arrangement or silencing of transgenes may occur, and is exacerbated by increasing numbers of transgenic loci and repeated use of homologous sequences. Even linking two or more genes within a T-DNA does not necessarily result in co-ordinate expression. Linking proteins in a single open reading frame--a polyprotein--is a strategy for co-ordinate expression used by many viruses. After translation, polyproteins are processed into constituent polypeptides, usually by proteinases encoded within the polyprotein itself. However, in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), a sequence (2A) of just 16-20 amino acids appears to have the unique capability to mediate cleavage at its own C-terminus by an apparently enzyme-independent, novel type of reaction. This sequence can also mediate cleavage in a heterologous protein context in a range of eukaryotic expression systems. We have constructed a plasmid in which the 2A sequence is inserted between the reporter genes chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS), maintaining a single open reading frame. Here we report that expression of this construct in wheatgerm lysate and transgenic plants results in efficient cleavage of the polyprotein and co-ordinate expression of active CAT and GUS. Self-processing polyproteins using the FMDV 2A sequence could therefore provide a system for ensuring co-ordinated, stable expression of multiple introduced proteins in plant cells.

  6. Editor\\'s welcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Food and Nutrition Security (FNS has an evolving nature and during the last decades its theoretical, conceptual, structural, practical and programmatic notions evolved significantly and approaches toward food and nutrition have changed drastically. Now, more than ever before, the issue is considered as a fundamental component of sustainable development globally. For a better grasp of the complexities of the field, we need to remind ourselves that “nutrition” as science has a history of more than 100 years while nutrition as a “factor” in “National development” has a history of around fifty years. Considering distinct levels of development status in different contexts, FNS pattern is non-monotonic even in one country. Accordingly, struggling against food and nutrition insecurity is very thought to deal with and multi disciplinary and multi sectorial approaches should be applied. Providing robust evidences to feed policy making processes is one of the main prerequisites for evidence informed policy making and repositioning nutrition as central to sustainable development. This is a professional duty of scholars in different sectors engaging with human development. The journal of Nutrition and Food Security (JNFS as a new journal in the field of food and nutrition security is trying to provide an excellent opportunity for researchers and scholars to publish their original works on approaches, challenges and solutions of food and nutrition hoping to provide data for decision makers to better design interventional programs aiming to eradicate food and nutrition insecurity. Editor in chief H. Mozaffari-Khosravi 22 Sep 2016

  7. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-15

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. In addition, the introduction of a new type of CRP (called Thematic CRP), meant to complement traditional CRPs, is currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency?s Website at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/ri/uc.html. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technology; Comparative Assessment for Sustainable Energy Development; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Marine Environment and Water Resources; Applications of Physical and Chemical Sciences; Nuclear Safety; Radiation Safety; Radioactive Waste Safety; Co-ordination of Safety Activities; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national

  8. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. In addition, the introduction of a new type of CRP (called Thematic CRP), meant to complement traditional CRPs, is currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency?s Website at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/ri/uc.html. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technology; Comparative Assessment for Sustainable Energy Development; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Marine Environment and Water Resources; Applications of Physical and Chemical Sciences; Nuclear Safety; Radiation Safety; Radioactive Waste Safety; Co-ordination of Safety Activities; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national

  9. Combination processes for food irradiation. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing consumer demand for food that is safe, minimally processed, visually attractive, full flavoured, nutritious, and convenient to prepare and serve, that has fewer preservatives, and that is available throughout the year at an affordable cost. Consumer concern and regulatory restrictions on the use of preservatives and pesticides in food are adversely affecting international trade in many food products. As a result, minimally processed, chilled foods and ready to eat foods are increasingly being marketed to satisfy consumer demand in both developed and developing countries. However, such foods could introduce new microbiological risks to the population, especially to those who are immunocompromised or generally at risk (children, pregnant women, the elderly, etc.). In view of these factors, a 5 year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Irradiation in Combination with Other Processes for Improving Food Quality was initiated in 1991 by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency through their Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The objectives of this CRP were to evaluate: 1) Combination treatment involving irradiation in order to extend the self-life of meat, seafood, fruits and vegetables at refrigeration temperatures and under ambient conditions; 2) Combination treatment involving irradiation in order to ensure the microbiological safety of foods, both individual and composite, including prepared meals; 3) Shelf-life extension of chilled, prepared meals and the development of shelf stable food and food components through combination treatment involving irradiation; 4) Energy requirements of combination processes involving irradiation in comparison to other food processes. Scientists from 14 countries participated in the CRP by carrying out the work under Research Contracts and Agreements with the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. The first Research Co-ordination

  10. Co-ordinated research project: comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Poor bone health is a major public health problem of worldwide concern. No country is immune. One of the main concerns - osteoporosis - is a bone disease that usually affects older people (primarily post-menopausal women), leading to hip fractures, vertebral compression fractures, and other related problems.In 1994 the IAEA (henceforth the `Agency`) started a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) which addresses one particular measure of bone health - bone mineral density (BMD). The main concept underpinning this CRP is that good bone health in later years is primarily determined by the attainment of a sufficiently high BMD during early adulthood. The `core` objective of the Agency`s CRP is to investigate how BMD varies with the age, sex, ethnicity and geographical origin of the subjects over the age range from 15 to 50 years. This is being done in the hopeful expectation that, by looking at a large number of population groups with different lifestyle, nutritional and other parameters, it might be possible to obtain some new insights into which factors are important for attaining a high value of BMD during early adulthood, and for being able to maintain it at a sufficiently high level into old age. The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants in the CRP - which is the subject of the present report - was held at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), USA. An overview of the data on BMD reported by the participants during the meeting. It is concluded that the CRP participants have gathered an impressive amount of data over the last 2 years. Given the fact that some age groups contain relatively small numbers of subjects, the statistical uncertainties are still relatively large. Nevertheless, there do appear to be quite marked differences in BMD across the centres, approaching approximately 10%. If confirmed, this could represent a major difference in fracture risk for the future, if all other factors (bone quality, weight, fall

  11. Co-ordinated research project: comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Poor bone health is a major public health problem of worldwide concern. No country is immune. One of the main concerns - osteoporosis - is a bone disease that usually affects older people (primarily post-menopausal women), leading to hip fractures, vertebral compression fractures, and other related problems.In 1994 the IAEA (henceforth the 'Agency') started a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) which addresses one particular measure of bone health - bone mineral density (BMD). The main concept underpinning this CRP is that good bone health in later years is primarily determined by the attainment of a sufficiently high BMD during early adulthood. The 'core' objective of the Agency's CRP is to investigate how BMD varies with the age, sex, ethnicity and geographical origin of the subjects over the age range from 15 to 50 years. This is being done in the hopeful expectation that, by looking at a large number of population groups with different lifestyle, nutritional and other parameters, it might be possible to obtain some new insights into which factors are important for attaining a high value of BMD during early adulthood, and for being able to maintain it at a sufficiently high level into old age. The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants in the CRP - which is the subject of the present report - was held at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), USA. An overview of the data on BMD reported by the participants during the meeting. It is concluded that the CRP participants have gathered an impressive amount of data over the last 2 years. Given the fact that some age groups contain relatively small numbers of subjects, the statistical uncertainties are still relatively large. Nevertheless, there do appear to be quite marked differences in BMD across the centres, approaching approximately 10%. If confirmed, this could represent a major difference in fracture risk for the future, if all other factors (bone quality, weight, fall

  12. Co-ordination of satellite and data programs: The committee on earth observation satellites' approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, B. J. J.; Kingwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Every year, an average of eight new civilian remote sensing satellite missions are launched. Cumulatively, over 250 such missions, each with a cost equivalent in current value to between US 100 million to US 1000 million, have been sponsored by space agencies in perhaps two dozen countries. These missions produce data and information products which are vital for informed decision making all over the world, on matters relating to natural resource exploitation, health and safety, sustainable national development, infrastructure planning, and a host of other applications. By contributing to better scientific understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, land surface, oceans and ice caps, these silently orbiting sentinels in the sky make it possible for governments and industries to make wiser environmental policy decisions and support the economic development needs of humanity. The international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is the premier world body for co-ordinating and planning civilian satellite missions for Earth observation. Through its technical working groups and special task teams, it endeavours to: • maximise the international benefits from Earth observation satellites; and • harmonise practice in calibration, validation, data management and information systems for Earth observation. CEOS encompasses not only space agencies (data providers), but also the great international scientific and operational programs which rely on Earth science data from space. The user organisations affiliated with CEOS, together with the mission operators, attempt to reconcile user needs with the complex set of considerations — including national interests, cost, schedule — which affect the undertaking of space missions. Without such an internationally co-ordinated consensual approach, there is a much greater risk of waste through duplication, and of missed opportunity, or through the absence of measurements of some vital physical or biological

  13. Co-ordinated research and environmental surveillance programme related to sea disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Sea disposal operations of packaged low-level radioactive waste are carried out under the provisions of the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, also referred to as the London Dumping Convention. The environmental impact of this disposal method is continuously kept under review, in particular within the IAEA which has provided the ''Definition of High-Level Radioactive Waste or Other High-Level Radioactive Matter Unsuitable for Dumping at Sea'' for the purpose of the Convention and within the OECD-NEA in the framework of its Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Waste. The NEA Co-Ordinated Research and Environmental Surveillance Programme (CRESP) is focussed on the actual North-East Atlantic dump site. Its objective is to increase the available scientific data base related to the oceanographic and biological characteristics of the dump site and elaborate a site specific model of the transfers of radionuclides to human populations. Future site suitability reviews, as periodically requested under the terms of the Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism, will therefore be based on a more accurate and comprehensive scientific basis

  14. Bonegilla Heritage Park: Contesting and Co-ordinating a Public History Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dellios

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, efforts to publically commemorate the former migrant training and reception centre of Bonegilla, while intermittent, have increased. I am referring to: reunions and anniversaries, state and national heritage listings, the erection of museum displays, temporary and touring exhibitions, the on-site Heritage Park, and forms of popular culture. For the national audience, as well as several ethnic communities, Bonegilla now plays a role in the collective imagination of the post-war period and the migrant journey. Furthermore, the nature of Bonegilla’s public representation has evolved since the late 1980s. Bonegilla has become much more than a place of personal migrant memory, and its previous negative connotations in the public arena have been erased. This public evolution is linked to much wider processes in our national history. This article thus explores the contestation and co-ordination of collective memories—that is, multiple narratives of Bonegilla’s past, which, while in constant dialogue with each other, are framed and sanctioned by the limits of Australian multiculturalism and heritage discourses. While the earliest efforts to commemorate Bonegilla might be typified as ‘participatory’ and vernacular, they might now be described in reference to ‘retrospective commemoration’, in which Bonegilla’s public history is framed by state-sanctioned narratives and other attendant discursive frameworks.

  15. International outage coding system for nuclear power plants. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The experience obtained in each individual plant constitutes the most relevant source of information for improving its performance. However, experience of the level of the utility, country and worldwide is also extremely valuable, because there are limitations to what can be learned from in-house experience. But learning from the experience of others is admittedly difficult, if the information is not harmonized. Therefore, such systems should be standardized and applicable to all types of reactors satisfying the needs of the broad set of nuclear power plant operators worldwide and allowing experience to be shared internationally. To cope with the considerable amount of information gathered from nuclear power plants worldwide, it is necessary to codify the information facilitating the identification of causes of outages, systems or component failures. Therefore, the IAEA established a sponsored Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the International Outage Coding System to develop a general, internationally applicable system of coding nuclear power plant outages, providing worldwide nuclear utilities with a standardized tool for reporting outage information. This TECDOC summarizes the results of this CRP and provides information for transformation of the historical outage data into the new coding system, taking into consideration the existing systems for coding nuclear power plant events (WANO, IAEA-IRS and IAEA PRIS) but avoiding duplication of efforts to the maximum possible extent

  16. Co-ordinated research programme on nuclear techniques for toxic elements in foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) is to obtain comparative data on the existing elemental concentrations of potentially toxic elements in foodstuffs in various countries. This study is also intended to provide information on the dietary intakes of toxic elements as a means to detect potential health hazards to the population groups concerned. This study has important economic implications since trade in foodstuffs is dependent on compliance with regulations pertaining to maximum permissible concentrations. An important supplementary purpose of the programme is to help establish analytical expertise for work of this kind in individual countries, allowing such laboratories to offer analytical quality control services. The programme has centred its objective on the determination of important toxic elements such as As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb and Se, in addition to Cu, Sb and Zn, which are also potentially toxic but are generally of minor importance from the point of view of public health. The matrices of interest are foodstuffs which comprise together more than 50% of the average daily intake. Drinking water is also of high importance and should be analysed as well. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Isotope studies on plant productivity. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    In order to explore this approach, a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Studies for Increasing and Stabilizing Plant Productivity in Low Phosphate and Semi-arid and Sub-humid Soils of the Tropics and Sub-tropics was initiated in October 1989 and complete in October 1994. Almost half of the work carried out under this programme concentrated on water use efficiency and the rest on phosphate use efficiency. Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia focused on wheat; Nigeria and Sierra Leone on cowpea; Kenya, Sudan and the United Republic of Tanzania on nitrogen fixing trees such as Prosopis, Acacia and Gliricidia; and Viet Nam on rice. Experiments conducted in the field showed that there is a wealth of genetic diversity among the genotypes/provenances of crop and tree species in their capacity for uptake and use of phosphorus and water from soils limited in resources. Several elite genotypes/provenances were identified which are highly efficient in water or phosphate use. In a few cases, the high water use efficiency (or the high phosphorus use efficiency) feature was seen in the same genotype where the grain yield was also high. Morphological parameters responsible for making some genotypes superior in their capacity to use phosphorus or water have also been investigated. It is our hope that the findings reported in this publication will help agricultural scientists in the Member States, particularly in Africa, in their quest of finding solutions to problems of food security. Refs, figs, tabs.

  18. Weight status is associated with cross-sectional trajectories of motor co-ordination across childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, V P; Stodden, D F; Rodrigues, L P

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates the development of motor co-ordination (MC) may be an important contributing factor to positive or negative weight trajectories across childhood. To analyse cross-sectional associations between MC and weight status in children (boys n = 3344 - girls n = 3281), aged 6-11 years and assess overweight/obese risk across different ages. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated [body mass (kg)/height (m(2))]. MC was evaluated using the Körperkoordination Test für Kinder (KTK) and a motor quotient (MQ) was calculated. MQ distribution data were split into tertiles. The effect of age, sex and MQ tertiles on BMI and MC was tested with a factorial anova. A logistic regression also was performed to calculate odd ratios (OR) for being overweight/obese at each age. Children with higher MQ demonstrated lower BMI levels (F(2,6224) = 222.09; P < 0.001). Differences in BMI among MQ tertiles became larger across age (F(10,6224) = 4.53; P < 0.001). The OR of being overweight/obese in both sexes within the lowest MQ tertile increased in each age group from 6 to 11 years. Specifically, OR increased from 2.26 to 27.77 and from 1.87 to 6.81 in boys and girls respectively. Children with low levels of MC have a higher risk of being overweight/obese and this risk increases with age. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. An international co-ordinated research programme on nuclear accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1977-01-01

    Where fissile materials are being processed in quantities exceeding the minimum critical amounts, a radiation risk to workers arises from the possibility of criticality excursions. Despite the fact that techniques for preventing the occurende of such accidental excursions have reached very high standards it is generally agreed that the availability of suitable nuclear accident dosimetry (NAD) systems is very important. Following the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting on NAD, the IAEA had established in 1969 an international coordinated research programme on NAD systems and elaborating standarized systems. A large number of research groups from 14 Member States throughout the world participated in this co-ordinated work. Since 1970 four international multilaboratory intercomparison experiments on NAD have been organized and the response of a variety of dosimeters examined in different neutron spectra under simulated accident conditions at Valduc (France), Oak Ridge (USA), Vinca (Yugoslavia) and Harwell (UK). The results achieved in these intercomparison studies show that NAD systems have been substantially improved and that several systems are available now in a number of laboratories throughout the world that perform within the criteria laid down by the initiating advisory group in 1969. A compendium of neutron leakage spectra has also been elaborated for facilitating the determination of dose from readings of detectors exposed to various neutron fields in criticality accidents

  20. Isotope studies on plant productivity. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    In order to explore this approach, a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Studies for Increasing and Stabilizing Plant Productivity in Low Phosphate and Semi-arid and Sub-humid Soils of the Tropics and Sub-tropics was initiated in October 1989 and complete in October 1994. Almost half of the work carried out under this programme concentrated on water use efficiency and the rest on phosphate use efficiency. Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia focused on wheat; Nigeria and Sierra Leone on cowpea; Kenya, Sudan and the United Republic of Tanzania on nitrogen fixing trees such as Prosopis, Acacia and Gliricidia; and Viet Nam on rice. Experiments conducted in the field showed that there is a wealth of genetic diversity among the genotypes/provenances of crop and tree species in their capacity for uptake and use of phosphorus and water from soils limited in resources. Several elite genotypes/provenances were identified which are highly efficient in water or phosphate use. In a few cases, the high water use efficiency (or the high phosphorus use efficiency) feature was seen in the same genotype where the grain yield was also high. Morphological parameters responsible for making some genotypes superior in their capacity to use phosphorus or water have also been investigated. It is our hope that the findings reported in this publication will help agricultural scientists in the Member States, particularly in Africa, in their quest of finding solutions to problems of food security. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. nilR is necessary for co-ordinate repression of Xenorhabdus nematophila mutualism genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Charles E; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2006-11-01

    The bacterial mutualist Xenorhabdus nematophila colonizes a specific region of its nematode host Steinernema carpocapsae. We previously reported the identification of a chromosomal locus encoding three X. nematophila genes of unknown function, nilA, B and C, that are each necessary for colonization. Subsequent work indicated the global regulator Lrp is a repressor of nilC: nilC transcription is elevated in an lrp mutant and Lrp interacts directly with the nilC promoter. In this manuscript, we report the identification of an additional gene, nilR, required for repression of nilC transcription. We show that nilR and lrp mutants also have elevated expression of nilA and nilB, demonstrating that nilA, B and C are co-ordinately regulated. nil gene expression is derepressed most strongly when both nilR and lrp are lacking, suggesting NilR and Lrp synergistically repress nil transcription. NilR contains a helix-turn-helix-type DNA binding domain and likely acts directly at promoters. A comparison of the wild type and nilR proteomes indicates that NilR, unlike Lrp, regulates a small number of genes. Finally, X. nematophila carrying an ectopic copy of nilR colonizes at approximately 60-fold lower levels than the control strain, suggesting that derepression of nil gene expression is necessary for nematode colonization.

  2. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-Insulin dependent diseases) in ageing. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations.

  3. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-Insulin dependent diseases) in ageing. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations

  4. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  5. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC)/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  6. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  7. Seven-co-ordination in chlorohexakis(trimethylphosphine oxide)- uranium(IV) trichloride: crystal and molecular structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombieri, G; Forsellini, E [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi; Brown, D; Whittaker, B

    1976-01-01

    The structure of the title compound has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods from diffractometer data and refined to a final R of 0.023. The compound crystallises in space group R3c with asub(hex) = 18.447(3), csub(hex) = 19.348(3) A, Z = 6. The uranium atom is co-ordinated to one chlorine (U-Cl 2.813 A) and six oxygen atoms (mean U-O 2.26 A); the co-ordination polyhedron can be described as a distorted monocapped trigonal antiprism or as a distorted monocapped octahedron. The anionic chlorines are more than 6.22 A from the uranium atoms. The results are discussed in relation to spectral data for this and related uranium(IV) complexes.

  8. Intercomparison and biokinetic model validation of radionuclide intake assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment, including the conclusions of a Research Co-ordination Meeting held from 6 to 8 July 1998. The present CRP on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment is part of the activities of the IAEA's Occupational Protection programme. The objective of this programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA's activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques; and the promotion of application of these guidelines

  9. Use of isotope techniques in lake dynamics investigations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Techniques in Lake Dynamics Investigations was launched with the aim of assessing the potential of environmental isotope techniques in studying the dynamics of surface water bodies and related problems such as: dynamics of solutes; sediment focusing; establishment of water balance components; vulnerability to pollution. The CRP enabled a number of isotope and geochemical studies to be carried out on small and large water bodies, with the general aim of understanding of the dynamics of these systems under the growing anthropogenic influence. This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) held in Rehovot, Israel, from 10 to 13 March 1997. Individual contributions have been indexed separately

  10. 2. IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'Atomic and molecular data for fusion plasma diagnostics'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2004-05-01

    This report briefly describes the proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion Plasma Diagnostics' held on 16-18 June 2003 at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna. During the course of the meeting the progress achieved to data was thoroughly reviewed. It was noted that during the course of the research several new areas of data needs were revealed. During detailed discussions proposals from all participants on ongoing data needs indicated that a one year extension of the CRP would be extremely valuable with an additional RCM to be held in 2004. A specific proposal for such an extension was formulated along with the summary of the results achieved to date. (author)

  11. 2. IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'Data for molecular processes in edge plasmas'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2004-05-01

    This report briefly describes the proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Data for Molecular Processes in Edge Plasmas' held on 12-14 May 2003 at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna. During the course of the meeting the progress achieved to data was thoroughly reviewed. During the course of the meeting many areas in need of further research were noted. In addition there are specific important processes with lingering discrepancies between theory and experiment. Strong collaborations built during the course of this CRP have the potential to address these issues. Therefore, one outcome of the RCM was a detailed proposal to extend the CRP for an additional year with a final RCM in 2004. (author)

  12. How can the co-ordinate transformation method of beam matching be extended to include separately labelled collimators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fletcher, S; McKenzie, A L

    1996-03-01

    The problem of matching radiation beams was tackled by Siddon in 1980 using co-ordinate transformations. Since then, the need to distinguish between individual collimators in prescriptions of treatment set-up, brought about by the widespread use of 3-D treatment planning systems and asymmetric fields, as well as a reversal of the rotation sense in the turntable co-ordinate system proposed by the International Electrotechnical Commission, have made it necessary to revisit this particular problem. This paper builds upon Siddon's general equations for the particular case of matching beams, and derives expressions for calculating treatment-unit settings which may be used in a computer program without the need to perform matrix manipulation. The expression treat the individual collimator jaws separately.

  13. Nuclear techniques to assess irrigation schedules for field crops. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This TECDOC summarizes the results of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques in Assessment of Irrigation Schedules of Field Crops to Increase Effective Use of Water in Irrigation Projects. The programme was carried out between 1990 and 1995 through the technical co-ordination of the Soil Fertility, Irrigation and Crop Production Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Fourteen Member States of the IAEA and FAO carried out a series of field experiments aimed at improving irrigation water use efficiency through a type of irrigation scheduling known as deficit irrigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. Nuclear techniques to assess irrigation schedules for field crops. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This TECDOC summarizes the results of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques in Assessment of Irrigation Schedules of Field Crops to Increase Effective Use of Water in Irrigation Projects. The programme was carried out between 1990 and 1995 through the technical co-ordination of the Soil Fertility, Irrigation and Crop Production Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Fourteen Member States of the IAEA and FAO carried out a series of field experiments aimed at improving irrigation water use efficiency through a type of irrigation scheduling known as deficit irrigation. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Seven-co-ordination in chlorohexakis(trimethylphosphine oxide)- uranium(IV) trichloride: crystal and molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombieri, G.; Forsellini, E.; Brown, D.; Whittaker, B.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of the title compound has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods from diffractometer data and refined to a final R of 0.023. The compound crystallises in space group R3c with asub(hex) = 18.447(3), csub(hex) = 19.348(3) A, Z = 6. The uranium atom is co-ordinated to one chlorine (U-Cl 2.813 A) and six oxygen atoms (mean U-O 2.26 A); the co-ordination polyhedron can be described as a distorted monocapped trigonal antiprism or as a distorted monocapped octahedron. The anionic chlorines are more than 6.22 A from the uranium atoms. The results are discussed in relation to spectral data for this and related uranium(IV) complexes. (author)

  16. Report on the consultants' meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centres. (Technical aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Lammer, M.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1999-08-01

    This report summarizes the 1999 Co-ordination Meeting on Technical Aspects of the Co-operation of the Nuclear Reaction Data Centres, hold at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, 18 to 20 May 1999. The meeting was attended by scientists from 11 Nuclear Data Centres from 7 Member States and 2 International Organizations. The present document contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and actions, and progress reports of the Participating Data Centres. (author)

  17. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting on measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1996-12-01

    The present report contains the summary of the Second Research Co-ordination Meeting on ''Measurement, Calculation and Evaluation of Photon Production Data'', held in Vienna, Austria, from 21 to 24 May 1996. Summarized are conclusions and recommendations of the meeting together with a detailed list of actions and deadlines, including procedures to prepare the final document of the project. Attached is the agenda of the meeting, list of participants and extended abstracts of their presentations. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Report on the IAEA consultants' meeting on the co-ordination of nuclear reaction data centres (technical aspects)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Co-ordination of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (Technical Aspects), held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, 28 to 30 May 2001. The meeting was attended by 16 participants from 10 co-operating data centres from six Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and actions, progress and status reports of the participating data centres and working papers considered at the meeting. (author)

  19. Summary report of the third research co-ordination meeting on measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1998-01-01

    The present report contains the account of the last meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Project on ''Measurement, Calculation and Evaluation of Photon Production Data''. In addition to the summary of the meeting, the overall results achieved under the project in 1994-1997 are summarized, including the list of publications. The status of work on the Final Report of the project is also given. (author)

  20. Irradiated sewage sludge for application to cropland. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    Modern urban societies produce large volumes of sewage, which are transported through a network of underground sewers to wastewater treatment plants, where one or more stages of physical, biological and chemical treatment are imposed. Considerable tonnages of aerobically, and sometimes anaerobically, digested sludge are produced, and treated or untreated effluent is discharged to lagoons, waterways or the ocean. The disposal of sewage sludge is a major issue for municipal authorities. There are increasing legislative restrictions in many countries on disposal methods (e.g. incineration, landfill, composting) including surface application to agricultural land. Sludge can either be viewed as a dangerous waste requiring expensive disposal procedures, or it can be seen as a resource for possible use in agriculture as a soil conditioning agent and a source of plant nutrients. Untreated sewage sludge presents a public-health hazard as it contains human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and other harmful organisms. Although it has been demonstrated that an appropriate dose of gamma-irradiation can eliminate human parasites and bacterial pathogens from sewage sludge, there is still public concern about the presence of viruses, as well as heavy metals and toxic organic compounds from industrial sources that could enter the food chain if sludge is applied to croplands. More information is also needed on the value of sludge as a source of plant nutrients, expressed in terms of fertilizer equivalence. In this regard, isotopic labelling techniques have a unique role to play in estimating the contribution of sewage sludge to crop nutrition. As a result of recommendations formulated at a Consultants Meeting organized by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture and the IAEA Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, 5-9 December 1994 (IAEA-TECDOC-971, Sewage Sludge and Wastewater for Use in Agriculture) the Joint Division implemented a Co-ordinated

  1. Rice breeding with induced mutations II. Report of an FAO/IAEA research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-03-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the fourth meeting of participants in the FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Program of Research on the Use of Induced Mutations in Rice Breeding, a program which was initiated in 1964. The three previous meetings were reported as follows: First: proceedings published in the International Rice Commission Newsletter, Vol. XV, No. 1 (1966). Second: report presented to the IRC Working Party meeting at Lake Charles, Louisiana, 18-30 July 1966. Third: proceedings published by the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 86 under the title 'Rice breeding with induced mutations'. The fourth meeting was held at Oiso, Japan, on 12-14 August 1968. Co-operators from nine countries attended, together with scientists from five other countries, the International Rice Research Institute, the Rockefeller Foundation, the International Rice Commission, and the FAO and IAEA. In addition, a number of scientists from the host country were present. The purpose of the meeting was to present reports on research related to or carried out under the co-ordinated program in 1967/68, to review and co-ordinate research plans for 1968/69, and to draw up technical recommendations for future work.

  2. IAEA-RCA Co-ordinated Research Program on Reference Asian Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Taku

    1990-01-01

    The Research Coordination Meeting was held in Mito City, Japan on October 17-21, 1988, inviting the chief investigating scientists from 11 RCA member countries to discuss practical plans for the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on 'Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man' based on the decision taken at the Project Formulation Meeting for the RCA Project 'Strengthening Radiation Protection' Tokyo, November 1987. Significance of the setting 'Reference Man' for Asian peoples to estimate more realistic radiation doses by applying the real typical physical, physiological and metabolic parameters for them instead of those recommended by ICRP based on the data for 'Caucasian Man' has been indicated by whole member countries and recognized again at the Meeting. The present status of 'Reference Man-oriented Studies' in each countries was presented by the participants and certain difference or difficulties were pointed out among the countries depending on the geographical, social, or economical conditions as well as the ethnic circumstances. After the mutual discussions and exchange of up-to-date information, the general conclusions were drawn as follows: acknowledging the importance of the CRP, research works should be carried out in each country with the expected supports from IAEA and other member countries. The first priority is given on the measurements of human physique (and internal organs) followed by the food consumption survey. Trace element analysis would be done by the countries where possible. The standard manual for data collection might be necessary. The establishments of Co-ordination Center or central body with data base and also subgroup systems are desirable to promote the CRP. (author)

  3. Bone SPECT in low back pain: Results of an IAEA co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J.; Cwikla, J.B.; Kolasinska, A.D.; Xing-Dang, L.; Dave, P.K.; Dougall, P.; Fettich, J.; Fettich-Seliger, M.; Frangos, S.; Van Heerden, B.B.; Kanmaz, B.; Lele, V.; Szilvasi, I.; Soricelli, A.; Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if it would be possible to use spinal bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with unexplained back pain in varied clinical backgrounds and to determine if a positive or negative study had any prognostic value. The study was co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and involved 8 centres in 7 countries. A total of 174 patients (mean age 42 years, range 15-80 years) were screened and found to have no obvious cause for their back pain at the time of the SPECT scan. All patients had a CT, and planar radiology. There was clinical follow-up data for 6 months without active treatment (such as surgery) in 147 patients. A panel of 9 specialists in nuclear medicine, radiology and orthopaedics reviewed all images and histories. Final assessment determined that 141 patients had skeletal causes for their back pain. SPECT was abnormal in 64% of these patients as compared to 58% with CT and 18% with planar radiology. CT was most likely to be diagnostic in disc degeneration (sensitivity 92%). SPECT was most diagnostic in facet joint disease (sensitivity 96%). In the 43 patients without any skeletal disease the specificity of SPECT was 79%, compared to 65% for CT. Follow-up of patients at 6 months showed that on average 71% had improvement of symptoms, suggesting a benign course for their back pain, with the exception of patients with pure facet joint disease, identified on SPECT but with no treatment. Spinal skeletal SPECT can be applied in a wide range of social and clinical settings. Results compare well with CT, providing additional information in 30% of patients, especially in facet joint disease where a positive SPECT study, suggests a worse clinical outcome at 6 months. (author)

  4. Cycles of light and dark co-ordinate reversible colony differentiation in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensuu, Teresa; Andersson, Christopher; Rydén, Patrik; Johansson, Jörgen

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several light receptors have been identified in non-phototrophic bacteria, but their physiological roles still remain rather elusive. Here we show that colonies of the saprophytic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes undergo synchronized multicellular behaviour on agar plates, in response to oscillating light/dark conditions, giving rise to alternating ring formation (opaque and translucent rings). On agar plates, bacteria from opaque rings survive increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as repeated cycles of light and dark, better than bacteria from translucent rings. The ring formation is strictly dependent on a blue-light receptor, Lmo0799, acting through the stress-sigma factor, σ(B) . A transposon screening identified 48 mutants unable to form rings at alternating light conditions, with several of them showing a decreased σ(B) activity/level. However, some of the tested mutants displayed a varied σ(B) activity depending on which of the two stress conditions tested (light or H(2) O(2) exposure). Intriguingly, the transcriptional regulator PrfA and the virulence factor ActA were shown to be required for ring formation by a mechanism involving activation of σ(B) . All in all, this suggests a distinct pathway for Lmo0799 that converge into a common signalling pathway for σ(B) activation. Our results show that night and day cycles co-ordinate a reversible differentiation of a L. monocytogenes colony at room temperature, by a process synchronized by a blue-light receptor and σ(B) . © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The neural correlates of visual imagery: A co-ordinate-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winlove, Crawford I P; Milton, Fraser; Ranson, Jake; Fulford, Jon; MacKisack, Matthew; Macpherson, Fiona; Zeman, Adam

    2018-01-02

    Visual imagery is a form of sensory imagination, involving subjective experiences typically described as similar to perception, but which occur in the absence of corresponding external stimuli. We used the Activation Likelihood Estimation algorithm (ALE) to identify regions consistently activated by visual imagery across 40 neuroimaging studies, the first such meta-analysis. We also employed a recently developed multi-modal parcellation of the human brain to attribute stereotactic co-ordinates to one of 180 anatomical regions, the first time this approach has been combined with the ALE algorithm. We identified a total 634 foci, based on measurements from 464 participants. Our overall comparison identified activation in the superior parietal lobule, particularly in the left hemisphere, consistent with the proposed 'top-down' role for this brain region in imagery. Inferior premotor areas and the inferior frontal sulcus were reliably activated, a finding consistent with the prominent semantic demands made by many visual imagery tasks. We observed bilateral activation in several areas associated with the integration of eye movements and visual information, including the supplementary and cingulate eye fields (SCEFs) and the frontal eye fields (FEFs), suggesting that enactive processes are important in visual imagery. V1 was typically activated during visual imagery, even when participants have their eyes closed, consistent with influential depictive theories of visual imagery. Temporal lobe activation was restricted to area PH and regions of the fusiform gyrus, adjacent to the fusiform face complex (FFC). These results provide a secure foundation for future work to characterise in greater detail the functional contributions of specific areas to visual imagery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Services for children with developmental co-ordination disorder: an evaluation against best practice principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Jacqueline; Maciver, Donald; Owen, Christine; Forsyth, Kirsty; Irvine, Linda; Walsh, Mike; Crowe, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The National Health Service in Scotland published a best practice framework to support occupational therapists and physiotherapists to deliver effective services for children with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD); however, adherence is variable. To highlight areas for development, this study compared the care pathway within a paediatric DCD service against the NHS Scotland framework. A partnership of researchers and clinicians based in the United Kingdom conducted a qualitative study with 37 participants (N = 13 interview participants, N = 24 workshop participants). In-depth interviews and/or workshops were used to map the DCD service against the NHS framework. Identified gaps were aligned with four key stages of the care pathway. Qualitative analysis software was used to analyse the data. Core principles to guide future development were identified for each phase of the pathway. These core principles related to the NHS framework and focused on issues such as involving the family, defining clear pathways and enhancing children's participation. Participants identified potential strategies for service improvement such as developing community-based interventions and information provision. Challenges when providing services for children with DCD include confusing service pathways and poor partnership working. It is, therefore, important that clinicians utilise collaborative working strategies that support children's participation. There are numerous challenges related to the implementation of best practice principles into the provision of therapy services for children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). It is important that AHPs seek ways of engaging parents and educational professionals at all stages of the care pathway in order to ensure optimum service provision for the child. Addressing participation is an important aspect and community-based strategies may be particularly beneficial, both as a preventative activity and as an

  7. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-01-01

    Dear TOJDE Readers, Welcome to the Volume 14 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 3 Notes for Editor, 2 Book Reviews and 21 articles of 40 authors from 14 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are arrived to the TOJDE from Argentina, Australia, Bosnia Hersek, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirate and USA. The 1st Notes for Editor is arrived from USA and written by Gail D. CARUTH,...

  8. The relationship between temperamental traits and the level of performance of an eye-hand co-ordination task in jet pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacki, Marcin; Tarnowski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    When assessing the psychological suitability for the profession of a pilot, it is important to consider personality traits and psychomotor abilities. Our study aimed at estimating the role of temperamental traits as components of pilots' personality in eye-hand co-ordination. The assumption was that differences in the escalation of the level of temperamental traits, as measured with the Formal Characteristic of Behaviour-Temperament Inventory (FCB-TI), will significantly influence eye-hand co-ordination. At the level of general scores, enhanced briskness proved to be the most important trait for eye-hand co-ordination. An analysis of partial scores additionally underlined the importance of sensory sensitivity, endurance and activity. The application of eye-hand co-ordination tasks, which involve energetic and temporal dimensions of performance, helped to disclose the role of biologically-based personality traits in psychomotor performance. The implication of these findings for selecting pilots is discussed.

  9. Twenty-Third Report of the Administrative Committee on Co-ordination to the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-09

    In accordance with Article XI of the Relationship Agreement between the Agency and the United Nations, the Agency is participating in the work of the Administrative Committee on Co-ordination (ACC) and of certain of its subsidiary bodies.

  10. In vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme from 1988 to 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document contains 9 final reports of the participants at the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme on 'In vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains'. A separate abstract was prepared for each report. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. In vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme from 1988 to 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This document contains 9 final reports of the participants at the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme on `In vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains`. A separate abstract was prepared for each report. Refs, figs and tabs.

  12. Acoustic signal processing for the detection of sodium boiling or sodium-water reaction in LMFRs. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1990-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed under a co-ordinated research programme entitled Acoustic Signal Processing for the Detection of Sodium Boiling or Sodium-Water Reaction in Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Reactors. The programme was organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1990 to 1995. It was the continuation of an earlier research co-ordination programme entitled Signal Processing Techniques for Sodium Boiling Noise Detection, which was carried out from 1984 to 1989. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. 3. IAEA research co-ordination meeting on atomic and plasma-wall interaction data for fusion reactor divertor modeling. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1999-04-01

    A brief description of the proceedings and the conclusions of the 3rd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Atomic and Plasma-Wall Interaction Data for Fusion Reactor Divertor Modeling', held on March 8-9, 1999, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, is provided. The reports on the activities within the individual projects pertinent to the IAEA Co-ordinated Research program with the same title are given as appendix to the present report. (author)

  14. Production of 99Tcm radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and kidney imaging. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The report contains highlights of the achievements of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research programme on Evaluation on the Use of Bulk Reagents for the Production of 99 Tc m Radiopharmaceutical and Kits, the participants' summary reports (Argentina, Chile, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Portugal, Russian Federation, Thailand, Uruguay, United States of America), recommended product protocols for five compounds and the participants' recommendations regarding continued support and further directions of co-ordinated research work. Refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs, 6 schemes

  15. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    and technical publications (TECDOCs). In certain cases the research results are directly relevant to implementation of projects in the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme. In terms of number of awards and degree of funding, CRPs constitute a significant activity within the Agency's programmes. 1003 contracts and agreements were awarded from the 1364 contract and agreement proposals received by the Agency during 2002. Annex I lists by country the number of proposals received and awards made. In 2002, $6 329 221 were awarded from the regular budget to institutes under contractual arrangements and to fund Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCMs). Additionally, $122 077 of extra-budgetary contributions was used to fund additional contracts and RCMs. Thus, total awards amounted to $6 451 298. Table 1 summarizes all awards by Programme in 2002. The average award per contract was $5 700

  16. Co-ordinated Interdisciplinary Efforts on Research in Animal Production and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houe Hans

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives are to review results and experiences from interdisciplinary research projects in Research Centre for the Management of Animal Production and Health (CEPROS concerning scientific content, organisation, and collaboration. The Centre has been founded as a result of an agreement between four institutions: the Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences (DIAS, the Danish Veterinary Laboratory (DVL, the Danish Veterinary Institute for Virus Research (DVIV and The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University (KVL. CEPROS is a "research centre without walls" and is physically located as an integrated part of the four institutions named above. The Centre has close collaboration with the industry. The superior goals of the Centre are to co-ordinate fundamental and applied research and simultaneously integrate the veterinary and the production oriented livestock research within animal health and welfare, taking into consideration the production economics and reduced use of medication. The assignment of the Centre is to initiate and carry out research, aiming to investigate the influence of breeding and production systems on animal health and welfare as well as on production and product quality. The Centre has since 1997 established 16 interdisciplinary research projects dealing with cattle, pigs, poultry, or mink. The scientific content can be divided into three research clusters: A. Management of animal production and health in production systems, B: Pathogenesis of production diseases, and C. Animal health economics. In Cluster A, the physical environments of production systems have been investigated, broader definitions of the concept health have been established and used in identification of risk factors. Cluster B has investigated physiological, immunological and genetic mechanisms behind development of production diseases and how to apply this knowledge in disease prevention. The cluster in animal health economics has developed decision

  17. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-15

    and technical publications (TECDOCs). In certain cases the research results are directly relevant to implementation of projects in the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme. In terms of number of awards and degree of funding, CRPs constitute a significant activity within the Agency's programmes. 1003 contracts and agreements were awarded from the 1364 contract and agreement proposals received by the Agency during 2002. Annex I lists by country the number of proposals received and awards made. In 2002, $6 329 221 were awarded from the regular budget to institutes under contractual arrangements and to fund Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCMs). Additionally, $122 077 of extra-budgetary contributions was used to fund additional contracts and RCMs. Thus, total awards amounted to $6 451 298. Table 1 summarizes all awards by Programme in 2002. The average award per contract was $5 700.

  18. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur DEmiray

    2011-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 12, Number: 1. In this issue it is published 4 notes for Editor, 13 articles, 2 book reviews. And this time, 34 authors from 11 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Cayman Islands, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.The first Notes for editor arrived from USA, written by Kevin YEE and Jace HARGIS. They focused on “SNAPP:Graphing Student Interactio...

  19. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur DEMIRAY

    2012-01-01

    Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education-TOJDE July 2012 ISSN 1302-6488 Volume: 13 Number: 3 from EditorDear TOJDE Readers,Welcome to the Volume 13 Number: 3 of TOJDE! In this issue, 2 Notes for Editor and 26 articles of 51 authors from 14 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are from, Algeria, Australia, Bengaldesh, Greece, India, Iran, Malaysia, Mariutius, Nigeria, Oman, Spain, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.First all, you should know that if a su...

  20. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2012-01-01

    Dear TOJDE Readers,Welcome to the Volume 13 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 7 notes for Editor and 22 articles one book review of 57 authors from 12 different countries have been published. These published articles are from, Barbados, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.In general, around 13 articles and 4 notes for editors have been published in TOJDE so far. I would like to explain, why this time 22 articles and 8 submission...

  1. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2010-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now again after 3 months as Volume 11, Number: 2. This is the second issue of the year 2010. In this issue it is published four Notes for Editor, fourteen articles and four book reviews. And this time, 37 authors from 8 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Greece, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, USA and Turkey.Again Kevin YEE & Jace HARGIS have sent a good and short note to editor ...

  2. Nuclear based technologies for estimating microbial protein supply in ruminant livestock. Proceedings of the second research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project (phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through its Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), has been assisting national agricultural research systems in Member States to develop and apply nuclear and related techniques for improving livestock productivity. The programmes have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The measurement of microbial protein supply to ruminant livestock has been an important area of research in ruminant nutrition. An estimate of microbial protein contribution to the intestinal protein flow is important for estimating the protein requirement of ruminant animals. Understanding the process of microbial protein synthesis has been difficult however, and due to the lack of simple and accurate methods for measuring microbial protein production in vivo, the methods used are based on complex microbial markers which require surgically prepared animals. As a result of a consultants meeting held in May 1995 to advise the Joint FAO/IAEA Division on the feasibility of using nuclear and related techniques for the development and validation of techniques for measuring microbial protein supply in ruminant animals, an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Development, Standardization and Validation of Nuclear Based Technologies for Measuring Microbial Protein Supply in Ruminant Livestock for Improving Productivity was initiated in 1996, with a view to validating and adapting this technology for use in developing countries. To assist scientists participating in the CRP, a laboratory manual containing experimental protocols and methodologies for standardization and validation of the urine purine derivative technique and the development of models to suit local conditions, was published as IAEA-TECDOC-945. The present publication contains the final reports from participants in Phase 1 of the project

  3. Nuclear based technologies for estimating microbial protein supply in ruminant livestock. Proceedings of the second research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project (phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through its Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), has been assisting national agricultural research systems in Member States to develop and apply nuclear and related techniques for improving livestock productivity. The programmes have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The measurement of microbial protein supply to ruminant livestock has been an important area of research in ruminant nutrition. An estimate of microbial protein contribution to the intestinal protein flow is important for estimating the protein requirement of ruminant animals. Understanding the process of microbial protein synthesis has been difficult however, and due to the lack of simple and accurate methods for measuring microbial protein production in vivo, the methods used are based on complex microbial markers which require surgically prepared animals. As a result of a consultants meeting held in May 1995 to advise the Joint FAO/IAEA Division on the feasibility of using nuclear and related techniques for the development and validation of techniques for measuring microbial protein supply in ruminant animals, an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Development, Standardization and Validation of Nuclear Based Technologies for Measuring Microbial Protein Supply in Ruminant Livestock for Improving Productivity was initiated in 1996, with a view to validating and adapting this technology for use in developing countries. To assist scientists participating in the CRP, a laboratory manual containing experimental protocols and methodologies for standardization and validation of the urine purine derivative technique and the development of models to suit local conditions, was published as IAEA-TECDOC-945. The present publication contains the final reports from participants in Phase 1 of the project

  4. Editor's Note

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On another note: the editor and the editorial team acknowledge the financial support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York through the University of Ghana Building A New Generation of Academics in Africa (BANGA-Africa) Project. We also use this platform to express our gratitude for the support of various stakeholders, ...

  5. Co-ordinate regulation of the cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance genes in cystic fibrosis knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezise, A E; Ratcliff, R; Hawkins, T E; Evans, M J; Freeman, T C; Romano, P R; Higgins, C F; Colledge, W H

    1997-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis (Cftr and multidrug resistance (Mdr1) genes encode structurally similar proteins which are members of the ABC transporter superfamily. These genes exhibit complementary patterns of expression in vivo, suggesting that the regulation of their expression may be co-ordinated. We have tested this hypothesis in vivo by examining Cftr and Mdr1 expression in cystic fibrosis knockout transgenic mice (Cftr(tm1CAM)). Cftr mRNA expression in Cftr(tm1CAM)/Cftr(tm1CAM) mice was 4-fold reduced in the intestine, as compared with littermate wild-type mice. All other Cftr(tm1CAM)/Cftr(tm1CAM) mouse tissues examined showed similar reductions in Cftr expression. In contrast, we observed a 4-fold increase in Mdr1 mRNA expression in the intestines of neonatal and 3- to 4-week-old Cftr(tm1CAM)/Cftr(tm1CAM) mice, as compared with age-matched +/+ mice, and an intermediate level of Mdr1 mRNA in heterozygous Cftr(tm1CAM) mice. In 10-week-old, Cftr(tm1CAM)/Cftr(tm1CAM) mice and in contrast to the younger mice, Mdr1 mRNA expression was reduced, by 3-fold. The expression of two control genes, Pgk-1 and Mdr2, was similar in all genotypes, suggesting that the changes in Mdr1 mRNA levels observed in the Cftr(tm1CAM)/Cftr(tm1CAM) mice are specific to the loss of Cftr expression and/or function. These data provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that the regulation Cftr and Mdr1 expression is co-ordinated in vivo, and that this co-ordinate regulation is influenced by temporal factors.

  6. Co-ordination of physiological and morphological responses of stomata to elevated [CO2] in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Matthew; Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata display a wide range of short-term behavioural and long-term morphological responses to atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]). The diversity of responses suggests that plants may have different strategies for controlling gas exchange, yet it is not known whether these strategies are co-ordinated in some way. Here, we test the hypothesis that there is co-ordination of physiological (via aperture change) and morphological (via stomatal density change) control of gas exchange by plants. We examined the response of stomatal conductance (G(s)) to instantaneous changes in external [CO(2)] (C(a)) in an evolutionary cross-section of vascular plants grown in atmospheres of elevated [CO(2)] (1,500 ppm) and sub-ambient [O(2)] (13.0 %) compared to control conditions (380 ppm CO(2), 20.9 % O(2)). We found that active control of stomatal aperture to [CO(2)] above current ambient levels was not restricted to angiosperms, occurring in the gymnosperms Lepidozamia peroffskyana and Nageia nagi. The angiosperm species analysed appeared to possess a greater respiratory demand for stomatal movement than gymnosperm species displaying active stomatal control. Those species with little or no control of stomatal aperture (termed passive) to C(a) were more likely to exhibit a reduction in stomatal density than species with active stomatal control when grown in atmospheres of elevated [CO(2)]. The relationship between the degree of stomatal aperture control to C(a) above ambient and the extent of any reduction in stomatal density may suggest the co-ordination of physiological and morphological responses of stomata to [CO(2)] in the optimisation of water use efficiency. This trade-off between stomatal control strategies may have developed due to selective pressures exerted by the costs associated with passive and active stomatal control.

  7. Management strategies to utilize salt affected soils. Isotopic and conventional research methods. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the results of a co-ordinated research programme on ``The Use of Nuclear Techniques for Improvement of Crop Production in Salt-affected Soils``. It aims at providing scientists experimental evidence of demonstrating technical feasibility of biological amelioration of salt affected soils as an alternative option of using expensive chemical amendments in soil reclamation complementing engineering structures of farm drainage systems or option of leaving the saline areas as barren lands in spite of the fact that arable agricultural lands have exhausted. 68 refs, 26 figs, 32 tabs.

  8. Management strategies to utilize salt affected soils. Isotopic and conventional research methods. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the results of a co-ordinated research programme on ''The Use of Nuclear Techniques for Improvement of Crop Production in Salt-affected Soils''. It aims at providing scientists experimental evidence of demonstrating technical feasibility of biological amelioration of salt affected soils as an alternative option of using expensive chemical amendments in soil reclamation complementing engineering structures of farm drainage systems or option of leaving the saline areas as barren lands in spite of the fact that arable agricultural lands have exhausted. 68 refs, 26 figs, 32 tabs

  9. Report on the IAEA technical meeting on co-ordination of the network of nuclear reaction data centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.

    2003-08-01

    Results of the IAEA Technical Meeting on the Co-ordination of the Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, 17 to 19 June 2003, are summarised in this report. The meeting was attended by 14 participants from 9 cooperating data centres of five member states and two International Organizations. A meeting summary, the conclusions and actions, progress and status reports of the participating data centres, and working papers considered at the meeting, are given in the relevant sections. (author)

  10. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes.

  11. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes

  12. Report on the consultants` meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Wienke, H [eds.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers. Refs, figs, tabs.

  13. Report on the consultants' meeting on co-ordination of the nuclear reaction data centers (technical aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Wienke, H.

    1997-10-01

    The report summarizes the co-ordination meeting of the network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres organized by the IAEA in 1997. The meeting was attended by technical staff from ten member centres of the network (representing USA, Russia, China, Japan, Hungary, OECD-NEA and IAEA) to discuss technical matters of the nuclear data compilation and exchange by means of the jointly operated computerized systems CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF and others. Observers from Belgium and Ukraine also attended the meeting. The document includes status reports of all centres and selected working papers

  14. Summary report of the 1. research co-ordination meeting on compilation and evaluation of photonuclear data for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The present report contains the summary of the first Research Co-ordination Meeting on ''Compilation and Evaluation of Photonuclear Data for Applications'', held in Obninsk, Russia, from 3 to 6 December 1996. The project aims to produce a Technical Document on Photonuclear Data Library for Applications and to develop an IAEA Photonuclear Data Library. Summarized are the conclusions and recommendations of the meeting together with a detailed list of actions. Attached is the information sheet on the project, the agenda of the meeting and the list of participants along with extended abstracts of their presentations. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Use of mutation techniques for improvement of cereals in Latin America. Final reports of a co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication presents the scientific results obtained under the FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Improvement of Cereals in Latin America through Mutation Breeding. Some of the selected mutants were already tested in multilocation trials and had higher yields and/or other advantages, in comparison with the leading local varieties. On the basis of these results it it expected that a few new mutant varieties of rice (Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala), wheat (Brazil, Chile) and barley (Peru) will be officially released within the next few years. Still more mutants, which are valuable for conventional breeding programmes as new sources of desired genes, were selected. Refs, figs and tabs.

  16. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  17. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  18. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analysed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Environmental protection and control is a matter of high priority in all developing countries' governmental policies in view of its implications for the welfare of the present and future populations. Therefore it is expected that regional and national organisations responsible for legislation and environmental policy, municipal organisations, which could use the data collected for establishing emission levels, organisations responsible for pollutant emission control and public health-related institutions will benefit from this proposed Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The CRP is expected to exploit possibilities of developing and validating tools for using appropriate biomonitors to map the distribution of air pollution over wide areas in developing countries. If successful, this would be a powerful way for developing countries to monitor air pollution.

  19. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analysed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Environmental protection and control is a matter of high priority in all developing countries' governmental policies in view of its implications for the welfare of the present and future populations. Therefore it is expected that regional and national organisations responsible for legislation and environmental policy, municipal organisations, which could use the data collected for establishing emission levels, organisations responsible for pollutant emission control and public health-related institutions will benefit from this proposed Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The CRP is expected to exploit possibilities of developing and validating tools for using appropriate biomonitors to map the distribution of air pollution over wide areas in developing countries. If successful, this would be a powerful way for developing countries to monitor air pollution

  20. Co-ordinated research programme on isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies of essential micronutrients (particularly of iron, but also of zinc and selenium) are known to affect hundreds of millions of people throughout the world, mainly in developing countries. Such deficiencies can lead to significant deficits in mental development, growth, work performance, immune competence and other biological parameters. In many of the population groups that are affected, the deficiencies are thought to be due not to an absolute lack of the element in the diet but rather to is poor bioavailability. Much work has already been done on this subject, particularly in some developed countries and particularly with respect to iron. However, there is still appears to be a need for more research on factors affecting bioavailability and the means to improve it by simple dietary modification and fortification using food products of the kind that may be locally available in developing countries. Isotope techniques potentially have a large role to play in studies of the bioavailability of iron and other trace elements. To support work in this area, the IAEA initiated a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) at the end of 1990 on ''Isotope-Aided Studies of the Bioavailability of Iron and Zinc from Human Diets''. The first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of participants in this CRP is the subject of the present report. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Effects of experimental muscle pain on muscle activity and co-ordination during static and dynamic motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1997-04-01

    The relation between muscle pain, muscle activity, and muscle co-ordination is still controversial. The present human study investigates the influence of experimental muscle pain on resting, static, and dynamic muscle activity. In the resting and static experiments, the electromyography (EMG) activity and the contraction force of m. tibialis anterior were assessed before and after injection of 0.5 ml hypertonic saline (5%) into the same muscle. In the dynamic experiment, injections of 0.5 ml hypertonic saline (5%) were performed into either m. tibialis anterior (TA) or m. gastrocnemius (GA) and the muscle activity and co-ordination were investigated during gait on a treadmill by EMG recordings from m. TA and m. GA. At rest no evidence of EMG hyperactivity was found during muscle pain. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during muscle pain was significantly lower than the control condition (P Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1993, pp. 311-327.) which predicts increased activity of antagonistic muscle and decreased activity of agonistic muscle during experimental and clinical muscle pain.

  2. Optimizing nitrogen fertilizer application to irrigated wheat. Results of a co-ordinated research project. 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This TECDOC summarizes the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Nuclear Techniques for Optimizing Fertilizer Application under Irrigated Wheat to Increase the Efficient Use of Nitrogen Fertilizer and Consequently Reduce Environmental Pollution. The project was carried out between 1994 and 1998 through the technical co-ordination of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Fourteen Member States of the IAEA and FAO carried out a series of field experiments aimed at improving irrigation water and fertilizer-N uptake efficiencies through integrated management of the complex Interactions involving inputs, soils, climate, and wheat cultivars. Its goals were: to investigate various aspects of fertilizer N uptake efficiency of wheat crops under irrigation through an interregional research network involving countries growing large areas of irrigated wheat; to use 15 N and the soil-moisture neutron probe to determine the fate of applied N, to follow water and nitrate movement in the soil, and to determine water balance and water-use efficiency in irrigated wheat cropping systems; to use the data generated to further develop and refine various relationships in the Ceres-Wheat computer simulation model; to use the knowledge generated to produce a N-rate-recommendation package to refine specific management strategies with respect to fertilizer applications and expected yields

  3. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which started in 1992, and is scheduled to run until early 1997. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XRF, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in air particulate matter. The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for research and monitoring studies on air pollution, ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural area). This document reports the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at ANSTO in Menai, Australia. (author)

  4. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which started in 1992, and is scheduled to run until early 1997. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XRF, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in air particulate matter. The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for research and monitoring studies on air pollution, ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural area). This document reports the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at ANSTO in Menai, Australia. (author)

  5. Co-ordinate transcriptional regulation of dopamine synthesis genes by alpha-synuclein in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Melisa J; O'Farrell, Casey; Daya, Sneha; Ahmad, Rili; Miller, David W; Hardy, John; Farrer, Matthew J; Cookson, Mark R

    2003-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies is a neuropathological hallmark of both sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Although mutations in alpha-synuclein have been identified in autosomal dominant PD, the mechanism by which dopaminergic cell death occurs remains unknown. We investigated transcriptional changes in neuroblastoma cell lines transfected with either normal or mutant (A30P or A53T) alpha-synuclein using microarrays, with confirmation of selected genes by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene products whose expression was found to be significantly altered included members of diverse functional groups such as stress response, transcription regulators, apoptosis-inducing molecules, transcription factors and membrane-bound proteins. We also found evidence of altered expression of dihydropteridine reductase, which indirectly regulates the synthesis of dopamine. Because of the importance of dopamine in PD, we investigated the expression of all the known genes in dopamine synthesis. We found co-ordinated downregulation of mRNA for GTP cyclohydrolase, sepiapterin reductase (SR), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic acid decarboxylase by wild-type but not mutant alpha-synuclein. These were confirmed at the protein level for SR and TH. Reduced expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 was also noted, suggesting that the co-ordinate regulation of dopamine synthesis is regulated through this transcription factor.

  6. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2009-01-01

    TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 10, Number: 1. This is the first issue of the year 2009 and 10th anniversary of TOJDE. In this issue it is published four article are in “Notes for Editor Sectio”, 13 articles, 2 reviews. And this time, 26 authors from twelwe different countries are placed. These published articles are from Australia, Botswana, Canada, Italy India, Jordan, Malaysia, Nigeria, Srilanka, USA and Turkey. “Service Learning In Distance Education: Foreign Language Lear...

  7. Fnom Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 7th year of TOJDE is appeared as Volume 7, Number: 1 on your screen now as. Very much thanks to all of you once more that we met 21st time, since January 2000. In this issue we published 15 articles, four book reviews, one notes for editor, news and announcements for our readers. And also, we give a place for the Call for Papers to the 4th Special Issue of The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education (TOJDE) ...

  8. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2008-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 9, Number: 4. This is the fourth and the last issue of the year 2008. In this issue it is published two notes for Editor, 13 articles, 2 reviews. And this time, 23 authors from seven different countries are placed. These published articles are from Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, USA and Turkey. “Ubiquitous, Free, And Efficient Online Collaboration Tools For Teaching And Learning” has sent to e...

  9. Development of feed supplementation strategies for improving the productivity of dairy cattle on smallholder farms in Africa. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through co-ordinated research projects (CRP) supports studies aimed at improving livestock productivity in developing countries through the application of nuclear and related techniques. These studies have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The primary aim of this CRP was to identify approaches for improving the productivity of dairy cattle maintained on smallholder farms in peri-urban areas. Central to the approach was to first obtain baseline information on productivity and reproductive efficiency and thereby identify nutritional and management constraints. Subsequently, corrective measures were developed and tested, keeping in mind the need for maximising the efficiency of current production systems and sustaining the nutrient supply through practical and economically feasible feed supplementation strategies developed using locally available feed resources. In addition the project envisaged contributing to enhancing the level of expertise within the national animal production research institutes in the region, to encourage close contact and interaction between scientists and institutions in Africa and to promote scientific information exchange on a regional basis. Through the project substantial progress was made in understanding the relationship between nutrient supply and productive and reproductive functions in dairy cattle on smallholder farming systems. Most of the participating countries were able to develop and test cost-effective feed supplementation strategies which improved both milk production and/or reproductive efficiency. The present publication contains the reports from participants of the project presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 7 to 11 September 1998 Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Report of the second research co-ordination meeting on the co-ordinated research programme: rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this Second Research Co-ordinated Meeting (12-16 August 1991) on Rapid Instrumental and Separation Methods for Monitoring Radionuclides in Food and Environmental Samples is to discuss the progress of the programmes since the First Research Co-ordination Meeting, discuss how to validate the methodologies developed (e.g. reference samples, intercomparisons), and outline a schedule for CRP completion by the end of 1992. Radioactive contamination of the environment after a nuclear accident, such as had occurred at Chernobyl, is of serious concern to government officials and members of the general public. In 1990/1991 the Agency was asked to organize the International Chernobyl Project to assess the situation in the USSR. A network of laboratories was organized to carry out the environmental assessment needed for this project. The following recommendations are based on the experience gained by many of the laboratories involved in this project. 1. Maintain a network of analytical laboratories with special skills and experience to provide assessments of radionuclide contamination in the environment in case of a radiological emergency. 2. Methodologies for assessment of contamination in the environment should take into consideration potential trajectories, radioecology, and food chain parameters. 3. Focus on areas of representative sample collection, is situ instrumental and chemical analysis, as well as advanced streamlined laboratory analyses which will facilitate the timeline of an assessment. 4. Conduct intercomparison and testing of technologies, employing standard reference materials and procedures, and field measurements at significantly contaminated area. 5. Conduct training of Member State laboratory personnel through fellowships, special courses, and workshops. 5 refs

  11. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting on the co-ordinated research programme: Development and selection of analytical techniques for measuring accidentally released radionuclides in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The participants at the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (Vienna, 12-16 August 1991) of the CRP on 'Rapid Instrumental and Separation Methods for Monitoring Radionuclides in Food and Environmental Samples', recommended that a new CRP be established. The current CRP on 'Development and Selection of Analytical Techniques and Procedures for Measuring Accidentally Released Radionuclides in Environment' was established based on this recommendation. The objectives of this CRP are to conduct research and development on applicable methodologies for response to accidental releases, and to improve and maintain the capabilities of the network of laboratories and provide training of individuals within member states. Thus, the CRP serves as a vehicle to maintain contact within the network of laboratories, while developing and transferring analytical techniques and procedures for measuring accidentally released radioactivity. The purpose of the Research Co-ordination Meeting is to discuss the proposed research programs, the status to date and the work planned for the duration of the CRP. The meeting also provides the opportunity for the CRP participants to exchange ideas and possibly develop collaborations in their research. The members of the CRP also need to discuss issues related to the previous CRP on Rapid methods. These include: the preparation of the final report of the previous CRP, the preparation of an addendum to TRS-295 and the ultimate revision or updating of TRS-295. Finally, it is intended that the members of the CRP should discuss the mandate and scope of work of the network of analytical laboratories and the steps needed to firmly establish this network

  12. Development of feed supplementation strategies for improving the productivity of dairy cattle on smallholder farms in Africa. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through co-ordinated research projects (CRP) supports studies aimed at improving livestock productivity in developing countries through the application of nuclear and related techniques. These studies have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The primary aim of this CRP was to identify approaches for improving the productivity of dairy cattle maintained on smallholder farms in peri-urban areas. Central to the approach was to first obtain baseline information on productivity and reproductive efficiency and thereby identify nutritional and management constraints. Subsequently, corrective measures were developed and tested, keeping in mind the need for maximising the efficiency of current production systems and sustaining the nutrient supply through practical and economically feasible feed supplementation strategies developed using locally available feed resources. In addition the project envisaged contributing to enhancing the level of expertise within the national animal production research institutes in the region, to encourage close contact and interaction between scientists and institutions in Africa and to promote scientific information exchange on a regional basis. Through the project substantial progress was made in understanding the relationship between nutrient supply and productive and reproductive functions in dairy cattle on smallholder farming systems. Most of the participating countries were able to develop and test cost-effective feed supplementation strategies which improved both milk production and/or reproductive efficiency. The present publication contains the reports from participants of the project presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 7 to 11 September 1998

  13. Lipid binding to cytoglobin leads to a change in haem co-ordination: a role for cytoglobin in lipid signalling of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Brandon J; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Wilson, Michael T

    2011-03-15

    Cytoglobin is a recently discovered hexa-co-ordinate haemoglobin that does not appear to function as a classical oxygen-binding protein. Its function is unknown and studies on the effects of changes in its expression have not decisively determined its role within the cell. In the present paper, we report that the protein is transformed from hexa-co-ordinate to penta-co-ordinate on binding a lipid molecule. This transformation occurs with the ferric oxidation state of the protein, but not the ferrous state, indicating that this process only occurs under an oxidative environment and may thus be related to redox-linked cell signalling mechanisms. Oleate binds to the protein in a 1:1 stoichiometry and with high affinity (K(d)=0.7 μM); however, stopped-flow kinetic measurements yield a K(d) value of 110 μM. The discrepancy between these K(d) values may be rationalized by recognizing that cytoglobin is a disulfide-linked dimer and invoking co-operativity in oleate binding. The lipid-induced transformation of cytoglobin from hexa-co-ordinate to penta-co-ordinate does not occur with similar hexa-co-ordinate haemoglobins such as neuroglobin, and therefore appears to be a unique property of cytoglobin among the haemoglobin superfamily. The lipid-derived transformation may explain why cytoglobin has enhanced peroxidatic activity, converting lipids into various oxidized products, a property virtually absent from neuroglobin and much decreased in myoglobin. We propose that the binding of ferric cytoglobin to lipids and their subsequent transformation may be integral to the physiological function of cytoglobin, generating cell signalling lipid molecules under an oxidative environment.

  14. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'charge exchange cross section data for fusion plasma studies'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Charge Exchange Cross Section Data for Fusion Plasma Studies', held on September 25 and 26, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  15. Research co-ordination meeting on labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9-13 September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy'' arose from the deliberations at an IAEA Consultants' Meeting (CM) on ''Radiolabelling techniques of monoclonal antibodies'' held in Vienna on 22-24 August 1988. The following is a brief description of the relevant recommendations arising from said meeting. A more detailed description of the proceedings may be found in the summary report issued on 8 December 1989. This report incorporates the results of the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of subject CRP held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on 9-13 September 1991. 9 refs

  16. Production of {sup 99}Tc{sup m} radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and kidney imaging. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The report contains highlights of the achievements of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research programme on Evaluation on the Use of Bulk Reagents for the Production of {sup 99}Tc{sub m} Radiopharmaceutical and Kits, the participants` summary reports (Argentina, Chile, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Portugal, Russian Federation, Thailand, Uruguay, United States of America), recommended product protocols for five compounds and the participants` recommendations regarding continued support and further directions of co-ordinated research work. Refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs, 6 schemes.

  17. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Longhurst, G.

    1998-12-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 1st IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on December 19 and 20, 1998 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by meeting participants, a review of the data availability and data needs in the areas from the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the subject of the meeting, and recommendations regarding the future work within this CRP. (author)

  18. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on October 16 and 17, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  19. Characterization of ceramics and semiconductors using nuclear techniques. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    With the aim of promoting research and facilitating more extensive application of nuclear techniques for material development, the IAEA established in 1994 a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Characterization of Ceramics and Semiconductors using Nuclear Techniques. This publication reviews and summarizes recent developments in this field and includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in characterization of inorganic materials of technological importance. The TECDOC presents new achievements on ceramic superconductor behaviour under neutron induced defects, optimization of structure of mineral gels,m low temperature preparation of fine particles of ferrites, crystal luminescence of ceramic composites with improved plastic properties, thin film defects and detoxification of asbestos. The investigation of chemical composition, phase transitions and magnetic properties of ferrites by Moessbauer spectroscopy is largely developed. The document includes 18 individual contributions, each of them has been indexed and provided with an abstract Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Characterization of ceramics and semiconductors using nuclear techniques. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    With the aim of promoting research and facilitating more extensive application of nuclear techniques for material development, the IAEA established in 1994 a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Characterization of Ceramics and Semiconductors using Nuclear Techniques. This publication reviews and summarizes recent developments in this field and includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in characterization of inorganic materials of technological importance. The TECDOC presents new achievements on ceramic superconductor behaviour under neutron induced defects, optimization of structure of mineral gels,m low temperature preparation of fine particles of ferrites, crystal luminescence of ceramic composites with improved plastic properties, thin film defects and detoxification of asbestos. The investigation of chemical composition, phase transitions and magnetic properties of ferrites by Moessbauer spectroscopy is largely developed. The document includes 18 individual contributions, each of them has been indexed and provided with an abstract

  1. CO-Ordinated Action Design of Rheostatic and Air Brakes on the Electric Railcar Series 6 111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Zavada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the solution for the modification of thebrakes on the electric railcar series 6111 used in suburban traffic.It also gives the results of the performed measurements aswell as their analysis.The mentioned electric railcar is fitted with air and rheostaticbrakes whose activation is mutually independent. Sincesuburban traffic means frequent slopping, and since the enginedriver does not use the rheostatic brake regularly, but only theair brake, the wear of the brake lining and wheels is higher, andthe heat load on the brake elements is substantial. By regularapplication of rheostatic brake, the air brake could be LLSed lessthus contributing to a lower wear of the friction elements.The presented solution for the modification of the brakeconsists of co-ordinated and automatic action of the rheostaticand air brake with every braking

  2. Co-ordinate expression of Th1/Th2 phenotypes in maternal and fetal blood: evidence for a transplacental nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Doris B; Young, Bruce K

    2012-01-06

    If maternal atopy and environmental exposure affect prenatal Th cell development, the maternal and fetal immune systems should display common Th1/Th2 phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we studied maternal and neonatal blood samples from mothers with total serum IgE ordinate IFN-γ production from paired maternal and fetal mononuclear cells, accompanied by co-ordinate increases in activated CD4+CD69+ cells that display the CCR4+Th2 and CXCR3+ Th1 phenotypes. Maternal and fetal CD4+CXCR3+ T cells were subsequently identified as the major producers of IFN-γ. The data established that a transplacental nexus exists during normal pregnancy and that fetal Th cell responses may be biased by the maternal immune system.

  3. Editor's Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Shanahan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available CORPUS studies have increasingly been of interest to music theorists, musicologists, and music psychology researchers, as is evident in the sheer number of excellent submissions to this special issue. The breadth and depth of these articles, as well as the insightful commentaries, make it seem only fitting to publish over two issues. The current issue contains five articles, eight commentaries, and one research report, and covers folk music, post-tonal music, jazz, Western art music, and the popular music found on Youtube. Eerola presents a model of melodic entropy that provides a nice framework for future information-theoretic work, while Roger Dean and Marcus Pearce present a new approach to modelling pitch-structure in post-tonal music. Frieler, Pfleiderer, Abeßer, and Zaddach give an analysis of jazz solos that demonstrates the role of a narrative arcs in improvisation. White and Quinn present a new corpus that makes use of vast compilations of web-based MIDI data, and demonstrates how such a corpus might be facilitate future musicological and music-theoretic research. Plazak focuses on Youtube as a corpus, and argues that the mutability of such a corpus facilitates our understanding of musical communication, as well as the important role of the listener in defining and re-defining such a dataset. It's encouraging to me both as an editor and practitioner of corpus methods that so many of those heavily involved with the field contributed to these two issues as either an author or a commentator. This issue also brings a number of changes on other fronts. Firstly, Nicola Dibben and Renee Timmers, who served as the journal's editors since Volume 7, have completed their editorial terms. They oversaw the transformation of the journal into a new Open Journal Systems platform, and were able to consistently produce issues that set a very high standard. Under their leadership, the journal both increased its accessibility (we now average more than 1

  4. Research and development on procedures to stabilize acaricides in livestock dips. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Ticks and mites are serious ectoparasites of livestock in many countries. As vectors of animal diseases they pose a threat to livestock production. Traditionally, different types of acaricides are used to control them. One of the most commonly used tick control techniques is to force animals to walk through an acaricide suspension in a trough or Cattle Dip. Dipping is quite effective as the entire body of the animal gets treated with the acaricide. However, with increased usage the concentration of the acaricide in the 'dip' declines due to removal by the animal and degradation by biological and chemicals processes. The dissipation of the acaricide results in loss of efficacy of the 'dip', and may also enhance the development of resistance by the ectoparasites to the acaricides. Maintenance of an effective concentration, by periodic recharge or stabilization of the acaricide, is essential to assure efficient and cost-effective control and to minimize chances of resistance to develop. In 1990, the FAO/IAEA Joint Division, recognizing the need for co-ordinated research on studying the dissipation of acaricides in cattle dips and developing procedures to stabilize them, established a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme on Development of Procedures to Stabilize Acaricides in Livestock Dips and of Simplified Methods to Measure Their Concentration, Using Nuclear Techniques. In initiating this programme, the Joint Division recognized that major gaps exist in the knowledge in this area which, if filled, would greatly aid developing countries in their effort to more effectively use acaricides to protect animal health. This TECDOC reports the accomplishments of this programme

  5. Importance of intersectoral co-ordination in the control of communicable diseases, with special reference to plague in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilonzo, B S

    1994-07-01

    Human health, agriculture, including livestock, energy, education, wildlife, construction, forestry and trade sectors are inter-related and their co-ordination is an important pre-requisite for successful control of most communicable diseases including plague. Similar linkage between research, policy, training and extension activities in each sector are essential for any successful control strategy. Inadequate agricultural produce, inaccessibility of people to the available food and ignorance on proper preparation and usage of available food materials are responsible for malnutrition, and malnourished people are very vulnerable to disease. Irrigation schemes facilitate breeding of various disease vectors and transmission of some communicable diseases. Forests are ecologically favourable for some disease vectors and reservoirs for tsetse flies and rodents, while deforestation leads to soil erosion, lack of rainfall and consequently reduced productivity in agriculture which may result in poor nutrition of the population. Wildlife and livestock serve as reservoirs and/or carriers of various zoonoses including plague, trypanosomiasis and rabies. Lack of proper co-ordination of these sectors in communicable disease control programmes can result in serious and undesirable consequences. Indiscriminate killing of rodents in order to minimize food damage by these vermin forces their flea ectoparasites to seek alternative hosts, including man, a development which may result in transmission of plague from rodents to man. Similarly, avoidance of proper quarantine during plague epidemics, an undertaking which is usually aimed at maintaining economic and social links with places outside the affected focus, can result in the disease becoming widespread and consequently make any control strategies more difficult and expensive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Safety cases for the co-ordinated research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, M.W.; Torres-Vidal, C.; Kelly, E.; Guskov, A.; Blerk, J. van

    2002-01-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has recently been completed on the Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities (ISAM). A major aspect of the project was the use of safety cases for the practical application of safety assessment. An overview of the ISAM safety cases is given in this paper. (author)

  7. Case of cholera preparedness, response and prevention in the SADC region: A need for proactive and multi-level communication and co-ordination

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Said, MD

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors seek to identify the most appropriate model for a regional co-ordination mechanism for cholera preparedness, response and prevention. The qualitative mixed-method data collection approach that was followed revealed the need...

  8. Ideology Influencing Action: Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinator and Learning Support Assistant Role Conceptualisations and Experiences of Special Needs Education in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Anthony John; Vickerman, Philip

    2018-01-01

    One outcome of England's Code of Practice' (DfE, 1994) was an increase, first, in the number of learning support assistants (LSAs) working in mainstream schools and, second, the establishment of the role of special educational needs co-ordinator (SENCO). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with SENCOs and LSAs to explore: (i) why they chose…

  9. Update of X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. Summary report of the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Nichols, A.

    1999-07-01

    The discussions and conclusions of the First Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and γ-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration are described in this summary report. The agreed list of radionuclides to be evaluated is given, along with the evaluation procedures and assignment of tasks among participants of the CRP. 14 presentations given at the meeting were indexed separately

  10. Spherical polar co-ordinate calculations of induced fields in the retina and head for applied magnetic fields at 50 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2011-07-21

    This paper sets out to explore the effects of voxel resolution, from 2 mm down to 0.1 mm for Cartesian co-ordinates and the differences between Cartesian and spherical polar co-ordinates for a standardized test-bed model of the eye. This model was taken from the work of Yoriyaz et al (2005 Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 115 316-9) who have developed a detailed geometric description of the eye including choroid, retina, sclera, lens, cornea, anterior chamber, vitreous humour and optic nerve for ophthalmic brachytherapy. The spherical co-ordinate model has radial and angular steplengths of 0.1 mm and 0.25°, respectively. The current density averaged over 1 cm(2) and the 99th percentile value of the induced electric field have been calculated in the retina and central nervous system for uniform magnetic fields. The Cartesian co-ordinate calculations proceed in a sequence of grids at 2, 1, 0.5, 0.2 and 0.1 mm resolution with the potentials from the previous calculation at a coarser grid providing the boundary conditions on the finer grid. The 0.2 mm grid provides the boundary conditions for the spherical polar calculations. Comparisons are made with the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference levels.

  11. Spherical polar co-ordinate calculations of induced fields in the retina and head for applied magnetic fields at 50 Hz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper sets out to explore the effects of voxel resolution, from 2 mm down to 0.1 mm for Cartesian co-ordinates and the differences between Cartesian and spherical polar co-ordinates for a standardized test-bed model of the eye. This model was taken from the work of Yoriyaz et al (2005 Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 115 316-9) who have developed a detailed geometric description of the eye including choroid, retina, sclera, lens, cornea, anterior chamber, vitreous humour and optic nerve for ophthalmic brachytherapy. The spherical co-ordinate model has radial and angular steplengths of 0.1 mm and 0.25 0 , respectively. The current density averaged over 1 cm 2 and the 99th percentile value of the induced electric field have been calculated in the retina and central nervous system for uniform magnetic fields. The Cartesian co-ordinate calculations proceed in a sequence of grids at 2, 1, 0.5, 0.2 and 0.1 mm resolution with the potentials from the previous calculation at a coarser grid providing the boundary conditions on the finer grid. The 0.2 mm grid provides the boundary conditions for the spherical polar calculations. Comparisons are made with the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference levels.

  12. Co-ordination properties of diglycol-amide (DGA) to trivalent curium and lanthanides studied by XAS, XRD and XPS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaita, T.; Hirata, M.; Narita, H.; Tachimori, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Edelstein, N.M.; Bucher, J.J.; Shuh, D.K.; Rao, L.

    2001-01-01

    Co-ordination properties of diglycol-amide (DGA) to trivalent curium and to the trivalent lanthanides were studied by the EXAFS, the XRD and the XPS methods. The structural determinations by both the crystal XRD and the solution EXAFS methods showed that the DGA co-ordinated to the trivalent lanthanide ion in a tridentate fashion: co-ordination of three oxygen atoms of each ligand to the metal ion. The bond distances of Er-O (carbonyl) and Er-O (ether) in the Er-DGA complex were 2.35 Angstrom, and 2.46 Angstrom, respectively, while the atom distances of Cm-O (carbonyl) and Cm-O (ether) in the Cm-DGA complex were 2.42 Angstrom and 3.94 Angstrom, respectively from the EXAFS data for the Cm-DGA complex. Accordingly, the DGA would behave only as a semi-tridentate in the co-ordination to trivalent curium in solution. We determined the valence band structures of the Er-DGA complex by the XPS in order to clarify the bond properties of the complex, and assigned the XPS spectrum by using the DV-DS molecular orbital calculation method. (authors)

  13. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  14. A systematic review of instruments for assessment of capacity in activities of daily living in children with developmental co-ordination disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, B W; van Netten, J J; Otten, E; Postema, K; Geuze, R H; Schoemaker, M M

    Children with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) face evident motor difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL). Assessment of their capacity in ADL is essential for diagnosis and intervention, in order to limit the daily consequences of the disorder. The aim of this study is to

  15. Guest editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-07-15

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982.

  16. Guest editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982

  17. from editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear Readers of TOJDE, First of all, please accept my excuse for the reason that the first time TOJDE is a few days delayed to reach its readers in its publication life. I am the most responsibility person for this delaying July 2007 issue of TOJDE is on your screen now again. This is a special issue on the theme on “Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education”, as being Vol. 8, No. 3. Preparing of this special issue took nearly eight months, from the beginning to the arrival to your screen. A short story of this special issue is here if you are interested in. First idea and suggestion came from me to my dear colleagues, Dr. Mark J. W. LEE who is from Charles Sturt University, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA and Dr. Hakan G. SENEL from Turkey, who is Director at the Computer Research and Development Center (BAUM of Anadolu University. After, we agreed on the topic all together we started to announcing as a call for paper at many medium, institutions, governmental or non- governmental organizations, experts, and so on. The seven articles and one study (at “notes for Editor” section published in this special issue were written by twenty authors, from 7 different countries include Australia, Italy, The United Kingdom, Turkey and USA. In addition, two book reviews is also published. I would like to express my sincere thanks that goes to each of them, and valuable panelists for this special issue, in the name of my university and TOJDE. I strongly believe that experience gained on this special issue would encourage us and other interested colleagues in the field for the near future. Below you will find short biodata on my valuable guest editors. Mark J. W. LEE is an Adjunct Lecturer with the School of Education, Charles Sturt University, and an Honorary Research Fellow with the School of Information Technology and Mathematical Sciences, University of Ballarat. He was previously a Lecturer in Information Technology in the School of

  18. Co-ordinated research programme on operator support systems in nuclear power plants. Working material. Report of a research co-ordinated meeting held in Rome, 10-14 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In September 1991, the IAEA Committee for Contractual Scientific Services approved the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Operator Support Systems (OPS) in Nuclear Power Plants'' in the framework of the Project ''Man-Machine Interface Studies''. The main objective of the programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer in the development and implementation of OSSs, including the experience with man-machine interface and closely related issues such as instrumentation and control, the use of computers, and operator qualification. The third meeting of the CRP participants was held in Rome/Italy, from 10 to 14 October 1994 and was sponsored by the ANPA. The meeting reviewed the progress of the CRP tasks, considered the reports of national activities in the subject area and agreed on the time scheduled for the preparation of the final report. The present volume contains: materials prepared by the CRP meeting; list of the CRP participants; and reports presented by the national delegates. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Co-ordinated research programme on operator support systems in nuclear power plants. Working material. Report of a research co-ordinated meeting held in Rome, 10-14 October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In September 1991, the IAEA Committee for Contractual Scientific Services approved the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ``Operator Support Systems (OSS) in Nuclear Power Plants`` in the framework of the Project ``Man-Machine Interface Studies``. The main objective of the programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer in the development and implementation of OSSs, including the experience with man-machine interface and closely related issues such as instrumentation and control, the use of computers, and operator qualification. The third meeting of the CRP participants was held in Rome/Italy, from 10 to 14 October 1994 and was sponsored by the ANPA. The meeting reviewed the progress of the CRP tasks, considered the reports of national activities in the subject area and agreed on the time scheduled for the preparation of the final report. The present volume contains: materials prepared by the CRP meeting; list of the CRP participants; and reports presented by the national delegates. Refs, figs and tabs.

  20. Development of female medfly attractant systems for trapping and sterility assessment. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Practical application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against major insect pests will continue to increase as the repeated use of insecticides is recognized as an environmental problem. In the case of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), which attacks over 300 species of fruits and vegetables in tropical, subtropical, and temperate climates on all five continents, control is still largely based on frequent insecticide spraying, often more than 10 sprays per fruiting season. Methods for population estimation, which accurately reflect changes due to movement, mortality or reproduction, are a prerequisite for effective pest management and in particular for use of SIT. With better monitoring tools medfly populations can be estimated more accurately and compared under different conditions, to guide decisions on alternative (i.e. more effective and more environment-friendly) control strategies. In support of this need in the application of SIT field programmes against medfly, an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project (CRP) was carried out which resulted in a TECDOC published in 1996 on Standardization of Medfly Trapping for Use in sterile insect technique Programmes. Following the development of male only genetic sexing strains at the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratories in Seibersdorf, Austria, it was recognized that the development of a female medfly targeted trapping system, in conjunction with only male sterile releases, would improve the efficacy of the SIT, reduce costs, and more effectively utilize sterile males. As a result, a new FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Development of Female Medfly Attractant Systems for Trapping and Sterility Assessment was initiated in 1994 with the objective to develop new synthetic female medfly attractants and to determine their efficacy compared to proteinaceous baits under different weather, host-tree and population density conditions. Findings obtained during the course of this 5-year CRP are

  1. Development of female medfly attractant systems for trapping and sterility assessment. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    Practical application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against major insect pests will continue to increase as the repeated use of insecticides is recognized as an environmental problem. In the case of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), which attacks over 300 species of fruits and vegetables in tropical, subtropical, and temperate climates on all five continents, control is still largely based on frequent insecticide spraying, often more than 10 sprays per fruiting season. Methods for population estimation, which accurately reflect changes due to movement, mortality or reproduction, are a prerequisite for effective pest management and in particular for use of SIT. With better monitoring tools medfly populations can be estimated more accurately and compared under different conditions, to guide decisions on alternative (i.e. more effective and more environment-friendly) control strategies. In support of this need in the application of SIT field programmes against medfly, an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project (CRP) was carried out which resulted in a TECDOC published in 1996 on Standardization of Medfly Trapping for Use in sterile insect technique Programmes. Following the development of male only genetic sexing strains at the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratories in Seibersdorf, Austria, it was recognized that the development of a female medfly targeted trapping system, in conjunction with only male sterile releases, would improve the efficacy of the SIT, reduce costs, and more effectively utilize sterile males. As a result, a new FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Development of Female Medfly Attractant Systems for Trapping and Sterility Assessment was initiated in 1994 with the objective to develop new synthetic female medfly attractants and to determine their efficacy compared to proteinaceous baits under different weather, host-tree and population density conditions. Findings obtained during the course of this 5-year CRP are

  2. Tuning facial-meridional isomerisation in monometallic nine-co-ordinate lanthanide complexes with unsymmetrical tridentate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, Thierry; Altmann, Peter; André, Nicolas; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G; Bernardinelli, Gérald; Morgantini, Pierre-Yves; Weber, Jacques; Piguet, Claude

    2004-03-07

    The unsymmetrical tridentate benzimidazole-pyridine-carboxamide units in ligands L1-L4 react with trivalent lanthanides, Ln(III), to give the nine-co-ordinate triple-helical complexes [Ln(Li)3]3+ (i = 1-4) existing as mixtures of C3-symmetrical facial and C1-symmetrical meridional isomers. Although the beta13 formation constants are 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller for these complexes than those found for the D3-symmetrical analogues [Ln(Li)3]3+ (i = 5-6) with symmetrical ligands, their formation at the millimolar scale is quantitative and the emission quantum yield of [Eu(L2)3]3+ is significantly larger. The fac-[Ln(Li)3]3+ mer-[Ln(Li)3]3+ (i = 1-4) isomerisation process in acetonitrile is slow enough for Ln = Lu(III) to be quantified by 1H NMR below room temperature. The separation of enthalpic and entropic contributions shows that the distribution of the facial and meridional isomers can be tuned by the judicious peripheral substitution of the ligands affecting the interstrand interactions. Molecular mechanics (MM) calculations suggest that one supplementary interstrand pi-stacking interaction stabilises the meridional isomers, while the facial isomers benefit from more favourable electrostatic contributions. As a result of the mixture of facial and meridional isomers in solution, we were unable to obtain single crystals of 1:3 complexes, but the X-ray crystal structures of their nine-co-ordinate precursors [Eu(L1)2(CF3SO3)2(H2O)](CF3SO3)(C3H5N)2(H2O) (6, C45H54EuF9N10O13S3, monoclinic, P2(1)/c, Z = 4) and [Eu(L4)2(CF3SO3)2(H2O)](CF3SO3)(C4H4O)(1.5) (7, C51H66EuF9N8O(15.5)S3, triclinic, P1, Z = 2) provide crucial structural information on the binding mode of the unsymmetrical tridentate ligands.

  3. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dear TOJDE Readers,Welcome to the Volume 13 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 7 notes for Editor and 22 articles one book review of 57 authors from 12 different countries have been published. These published articles are from, Barbados, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.In general, around 13 articles and 4 notes for editors have been published in TOJDE so far. I would like to explain, why this time 22 articles and 8 submissions published in the articles and in notes for Editor Section respectively. First all, you should know that if a submission picks up from 3 TOJDE editors between 4.5 and 9 over all 9 credits, it means that this submission can be published in TOJDE in the coming issue. However, since the publishing priority of the accepted papers belongs to the highest scored ones, submissions which receive a score between 4.5 and 5 or 6 may wait and be archived for publishing later on. TOJDE administration respected this publishing rule up to now. Therefore, some accepted submissions which obtained over 4.5 have not been published up to now. These submissions were waiting for publishing in TOJDE in the future. In this issue, we decided to give them a chance to be published. For this reason, the current issue includes more papers than the previous issues. The 1st Notes for editor arrived from Russia written by Galina ARTYUSHINA and Olga SHEYPAK on Impacting Motivation In The Virtual Classroom. They mentioned that teachers, educational managers and learners must realize that new opportunities are offered by modern on-line communication. A person with basic Internet and Web skills is open to a new world of knowledge, from free Web surfing and self-organized education - through on-line resources and familiarization with Internet culture, its places, sites, search engines etc. - up to a more structured approach. The 2nd notes for editor is titled as “Use Of Libraries In Open And

  4. Editor's preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    2001-01-01

    -energy heavy ion collisions. This symposium was meant as a token of appreciation for his life, his work and his personality by his friends and colleagues. Mike certainly would have enjoyed the fine talks, the lively discussions, the excursion to the Oelberg, and the hospitable setting at the DPG conference center. My special thanks go to the Wilhelm und Else Heraeus Stiftung for its generous support, which made this symposium possible. I want to express my gratitude to Johann Rafelski, Tucson, for his advice. Thanks are also due to Mathias Brandstetter for his assistance in organizing the conference and to Joachim Reinhardt for his help in preparing the proceedings. Finally, I acknowledge the agreeable collaboration with Istvan Lovas, editor-in-chief of Heavy Ion Physics. (author)

  5. Stable isotopes in human nutrition research. Final report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme, Vienna, Austria, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Applications of Stable Isotope Tracers in Human Nutrition Research was established by the Agency in October 1988 and was completed in 1992. At various times during this period the CRP encompassed 16 participants in 16 countries. Its general objective was to help establish competence in the use of stable isotope techniques, particularly in developing countries, and particularly with reference to applications of 2 H, 13 C, 15 N, and 18 O in human nutrition research. Thereby it was hoped that it would be possible (i) to identify centres and scientists throughout the developing world who could use stable isotopes in human nutrition research, (ii) to assess the need for methodological adaptations for isotope-based methods in developing countries, and (iii) to advance the competence of the participants in using stable isotopes as tracers of human metabolism. In addition it was expected that the CRP would make a study of some major questions which have been identified by international groups of nutrition experts, particularly in areas relating to energy and protein metabolism. This document comprises copies of the working papers submitted by all CRP participants who contributed a final report on their project. These reports include details of the rationale, methods, results and interpretations from each of the respective studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Alternative technologies for 99Tcm generators. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1990-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    99 Tc m is the workhorse of nuclear medicine and currently accounts for over 80% of all in vivo diagnostic procedures. This radionuclide is made available to nuclear medicine centers in the form of a generator wherein the parent 99 Mo (generally produced by the fission of 235 U) is retained on a column of alumina and the daughter 99 Tc m produced by the decay of 99 Mo is separated out by elution of the column with saline solution. Fission 99 Mo is now routinely produced only in a few large production centers in the world and the short half-life of 99 Mo poses transportation problems. Recognizing the need to develop alternative technologies for the production of 99 Tc m generators in developing Member States operating medium neutron flux research reactors, the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme (CRP) in 1983. As a result of the work carried out under the auspices of this CRP (1983-1989), it became apparent that technologies based on low temperature sublimation processes and polymolybade gels showed excellent potential for the preparation of reliable and economical 99 Tc m generators. Generators based on elution of polymolybade gels have since been developed and evaluated. Further, based on their own research work and publication from other sources, the experts who participated in this CRP have made a detailed evaluation of other possible alternative technologies for the production of 99 Tc m generators using 99 Mo produced by the non-fission route. 24 refs, 16 figs

  7. Sesame improvement by induced mutations: Results of the co-ordinated research project and recommendation for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanten, L. van

    2001-01-01

    The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project has brought together sesame breeders from 11 countries. They, together with pathologists, agronomists and physiologists, have made considerable effort to advance the genetic improvement in sesame. The results and conclusions from this project cover the mutation techniques used for the genetic improvement of various aspects of sesame. These recommendations do not only deal with the application of mutation induction, but also with the wider plant breeding related objectives and methods to be considered for this semi-domesticated crop. It is clear that more advanced techniques can and should be incorporated in the process which would enhance the genetic improvement. Although five years is a relatively limited time in a plant breeding programme, the participants have been able to produce and make available a considerable pool of agronomically interesting mutant sesame germplasm. The participants in the CRP considered that, together with other specialists, plant breeders can gain fuller benefit from the mutations induced by radiation or chemicals. Work on these mutants must continue in co-operation/consultation with plant physiologists and pathologists, and with biotechnologists who may in the future be able to provide in the future methods for introducing beneficial traits from other crops into sesame. The sesame programme should include scientists from the Member States where sesame grows and scientists from developed countries who may have greater access to physiological and molecular research facilities. (author)

  8. Genetic engineering technology for the improvement of the sterile insect technique. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of the joint FAO/IAEA programme on the research and development of insect pest control methodology, emphasis has been placed on the basic and applied aspects of implementing the sterile insect technique (SIT). Special emphasis has always been directed at the assembly of technological progress into workable systems that can be implemented in developing countries. The general intention is to solve problems associated with insect pests that have an adverse impact on production of food and fibre. For several insect species SIT has proven to be a powerful method for control. This includes the New World screwworm fly (Cochliomyia hominivorox), the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae), the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni) and one tsetse fly species (Glossina austeni). Improvements of the SIT are possible, especially through the use of molecular techniques. The final report of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on ``Genetic Engineering Technology for the Improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique`` highlights the progress made towards the development of transformation systems for non-drosophilid insects and the research aimed at the identification and engineering of potential target genes or traits. Refs, figs, tabs.

  9. Comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Poor bone health is a major public health problem of worldwide concern. It affects all segments of the population, but is particularly important in older people (and, most of all, in post-menopausal women). In view of the fat that the numbers of older people, both in absolute terms and as a fraction of the total population, are increasing practically everywhere, there is little doubt that poor bone health will become a much more widespread and severe problem in coming decades. Earlier in 1994 the International Atomic Energy Agency (henceforth ``the Agency``) started a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) held in 1992. This CRP currently addresses on particular measure of bone health -bone mineral density (BMD). The main concept underpinning this CRP is the ideal that a major determinant of bone health in later years is peak bone mass. The objective of the Agency`s CRP is to determine the age of peak bone mass in various different study groups and countries, and to investigate how BMD varies with age, sex, ethnicity and geographical origin of the subjects. Information on individual participant`s plans for implementation of the CRP, and progress achieved so far on this and related topics, was presented in each country`s report. Refs, figs, tabs.

  10. IAEA co-ordinated research program. 'Round Robin' on measuring the velocity of delayed hydride cracking (DHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, V.; Jakobsson, R.

    1999-09-01

    The International Atomic Agency (IAEA) has initiated a new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Hydrogen and hydride induced degradation of the mechanical and physical properties of Zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase of this CRP the methodology for measuring the velocity of Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) should be established and participating laboratories from about nine countries around the world carry out identical tests in 'round robin'. The objective of the present work is to establish at Studsvik laboratory the method of a constant load cracking test on unirradiated Zr-2.5Nb and attain a comparison of results between laboratories. Constant load tests are performed on specimens cut from unirradiated CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and the rate of crack propagation is determined in each test. Pre-hydrided specimens for testing are supplied from the host laboratory. Six specimens have been tested for delayed hydride cracking (DHC) at 250 deg C. The axial crack growth velocities measured in the tests are within the interval of 8.62x10 -8 - 1.06x10 -7 m/s. The results obtained agree well with the earlier published data for similar materials and test conditions

  11. Genetic engineering technology for the improvement of the sterile insect technique. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of the joint FAO/IAEA programme on the research and development of insect pest control methodology, emphasis has been placed on the basic and applied aspects of implementing the sterile insect technique (SIT). Special emphasis has always been directed at the assembly of technological progress into workable systems that can be implemented in developing countries. The general intention is to solve problems associated with insect pests that have an adverse impact on production of food and fibre. For several insect species SIT has proven to be a powerful method for control. This includes the New World screwworm fly (Cochliomyia hominivorox), the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae), the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni) and one tsetse fly species (Glossina austeni). Improvements of the SIT are possible, especially through the use of molecular techniques. The final report of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Genetic Engineering Technology for the Improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique'' highlights the progress made towards the development of transformation systems for non-drosophilid insects and the research aimed at the identification and engineering of potential target genes or traits

  12. Co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins define the surface structure of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Ayana; Fukuyo, Ayumi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetosomes comprised of membrane-enveloped single crystalline magnetite (Fe3 O4 ). The size and morphology of the nano-sized magnetite crystals (Mms (Mms5, Mms6, Mms7, and Mms13), was previously isolated from the surface of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Analysis of an mms6 gene deletion mutant suggested that the Mms6 protein plays a major role in the regulation of magnetite crystal size and morphology. In this study, we constructed various mms gene deletion mutants and characterized the magnetite crystals formed by the mutant strains. Comparative analysis showed that all mms genes were involved in the promotion of crystal growth in different manners. The phenotypic characterization of magnetites also suggested that these proteins are involved in controlling the geometries of the crystal surface structures. Thus, the co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins regulate the morphology of the cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Co-ordinate regulation of sterol biosynthesis enzyme activity during accumulation of sterols in developing rape and tobacco seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Mark; Hellyer, Amanda; Clayton, John C; Duvoix, Annelyse; Lanot, Alexandra; Safford, Richard

    2003-02-01

    The activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, sterol methyl transferase 1 and sterol acyltransferase, key enzymes involved in phytosterol biosynthesis were shown to be co-ordinately regulated during oilseed rape ( Brassica napus L.) and tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) seed development. In both plants, enzyme activities were low during the initial stages of seed development, increasing towards mid-maturation where they remained stable for a time, before declining rapidly as the oilseeds reached maturity. During seed development, the level of total sterols increased 12-fold in tobacco and 9-fold in rape, primarily due to an increase in steryl ester production. In both seed tissues, stages of maximum enzyme activity coincided with periods of high rates of sterol production, indicating developmental regulation of the enzymes to be responsible for the increases in the sterol content observed during seed development. Consistent with previous studies the data presented suggest that sterol biosynthesis is regulated by two key steps, although there may be others. The first is the regulation of carbon flux into the isoprenoid pathway to cycloartenol. The second is the flux from cycloartenol to Delta(5)-end-product sterols. The implications of the results in terms of enhancing seed sterol levels by genetic modification are also discussed.

  14. Isotope based assessment of groundwater renewal in water scarce regions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    The isotopic composition and chemical constituents of water infiltrating through the soil zone (unsaturated zone, or zone of aeration) into groundwater can be employed to determine the moisture transport in the unsaturated zone, thus enabling estimation of the water infiltration rate to the underlying aquifer. This was the basis on which this CRP was initiated in 1996. The overall results obtained from three years of applied field research related to study of moisture transport dynamics and estimation of natural recharge through use of isotope/hydrochemical depth profiles of the soil moisture in the unsaturated zone were presented and discussed at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 18 to 21 October 1999. A total of 44 sites were involved in the project on which detailed information on physiography, lithology, rainfall, unsaturated moisture content and a variety of chemical and isotopic determinants is now available. This publication contains 11 individual reports presented by CRP participants at the Meeting. Each of the reports have been indexed separately

  15. Radiotracer technology as applied to industry. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Radiotracer Technology for Engineering Unit Operation Studies and Unit Process Optimization was carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from December 1997 until December 2000. The project developed and validated procedures and protocols for investigation of major industrial processes, including fluidized beds, sugar crystallizers, trickle bed reactors, cement rotary kilns, flotation cells, grinding mills, incinerators, wastewater treatment units and interwell communications in oil fields. This publication is the output of the above mentioned CRP. It provides the principles and state of the art of radiotracer methodology and technology as applied to industry and environment. It is expected to provide wider interest for further development of skills and confidence prior to carrying out field work. It facilitates transfer of technology from developed to developing countries and from nuclear research institutions to industrial end users. The publication could be a suitable guide for radiotracer applications in almost all types of process investigations. The case studies described in this publication deal with typical problems in industry and environment common to all countries. It is intended for radiotracer groups as well as for end engineers and managers from chemical and petrochemical industries, mineral ore and raw material processing, wastewater treatment plants, and other industrial sectors

  16. Comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Poor bone health is a major public health problem of worldwide concern. It affects all segments of the population, but is particularly important in older people (and, most of all, in post-menopausal women). In view of the fat that the numbers of older people, both in absolute terms and as a fraction of the total population, are increasing practically everywhere, there is little doubt that poor bone health will become a much more widespread and severe problem in coming decades. Earlier in 1994 the International Atomic Energy Agency (henceforth ''the Agency'') started a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) held in 1992. This CRP currently addresses on particular measure of bone health -bone mineral density (BMD). The main concept underpinning this CRP is the ideal that a major determinant of bone health in later years is peak bone mass. The objective of the Agency's CRP is to determine the age of peak bone mass in various different study groups and countries, and to investigate how BMD varies with age, sex, ethnicity and geographical origin of the subjects. Information on individual participant's plans for implementation of the CRP, and progress achieved so far on this and related topics, was presented in each country's report

  17. Specialized software utilities for gamma ray spectrometry. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Software Utilities for Gamma Ray Spectrometry was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1996 for a three year period. In the CRP several basic applications of nuclear data handling were assayed which also dealt with the development of PC computer codes for various spectrometric purposes. The CRP produced several software packages: for the analysis of low level NaI spectra; user controlled analysis of gamma ray spectra from HPGe detectors; a set of routines for the definition of the detector resolution function and for the unfolding of experimental annihilation spectra; a program for the generation of gamma ray libraries for specific applications; a program to calculate true coincidence corrections; a program to calculate full-energy peak efficiency calibration curve for homogenous cylindrical sample geometries including self-attenuation correction; and a program for the library driven analysis of gamma ray spectra and for the quantification of radionuclide content in samples. In addition, the CRP addressed problems of the analysis of naturally occurring radioactive soil material gamma ray spectra, questions of quality assurance and quality control in gamma ray spectrometry, and verification of the expert system SHAMAN for the analysis of air filter spectra obtained within the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This TECDOC contains 10 presentations delivered at the meeting with the description of the software developed. Each of the papers has been indexed separately

  18. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur DEMIRAY

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education-TOJDE July 2012 ISSN 1302-6488 Volume: 13 Number: 3 from EditorDear TOJDE Readers,Welcome to the Volume 13 Number: 3 of TOJDE! In this issue, 2 Notes for Editor and 26 articles of 51 authors from 14 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are from, Algeria, Australia, Bengaldesh, Greece, India, Iran, Malaysia, Mariutius, Nigeria, Oman, Spain, Turkey, USA and Zimbabwe.First all, you should know that if a submission picks up from 3 TOJDE editors between 4.5 and 9 over all 9 credits, it means that this submission can be published in TOJDE in the coming issues. However, since the publishing priority of the accepted papers belongs to the highest scored ones, submissions which receive a score between 4.5 and 5 or 6 should wait and be archived for publishing later on. TOJDE administration respected this publishing rule up to now. Therefore, some accepted submissions which obtained over 4.5 have not been published yet up to now. These submissions were waiting for publishing in TOJDE in the future. In this issue, we decided to give them a chance to be published. For this reason, the current issue includes more papers than the previous issues. The 1st Notes for editor arrived from USA and written by Steve McCREA on Transforming Teachers, Transforming Schools: Turning "Sages" Into "Guides on The Side". He mentioned that teachers, educational managers and learners must realize that new opportunities are offered by modern communication. When a teacher becomes a "guide on the side," there is a change in the school's culture that can be measured. This presentation is extracted from a newly published book, Let's Lecture Less, edited by Steve McCrea (Visualandactive.com and Mario Joel Llorente Leyva. The 2nd notes for editor is titled as “Challenges Encountered By A Distance Learning Organisation” which is written by Dr. Sangeeta MALIK, from Education, Humanities and

  19. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic techniques to examine the significance of infection and other insults in early childhood to diarrhoea morbidity, mal-assimilation and failure to thrive. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) addresses an important public health issue in many developing areas, which is the existence of high rates of infection and diarrhoea disease and its deleterious effects on the health and nutritional status of infants and children around the world. Persistent diarrhoea with associated malnutrition remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. There are established relations between diarrhoea disease and Helicobacter pylori infection and the latter may also additionally specifically impair nutrient absorption. Helicobacter pylori infection is likely to be the most common world wide bacterial infection, and it is estimated that approximately 50% of the general population is affected. The World Health Organisation has classified H. pylori as a Group 1 carcinogen. Young children in developing countries are the main targets of infection, with a substantial risk of developing gastric carcinoma during adulthood. High infection rates of H. pylori among new-borns and young children in developing nations appear to be a major cause for chronic under-nutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This bacterium can survive in the acidic interior of the human stomach due to its capacity to secrete an enzyme called urease, which decomposes the urea contained in the stomach's interior into ammonia and carbon dioxide increasing the pH move underneath the protective mucous membrane in the stomach where it is protected from the caustic stomach acid. This transitory drop in stomach acidity, explained by a diminished gastric secretion and an increase in ammonia production during infection, promotes the transit of lower bowel pathogens leading to repeated gastrointestinal infections, causing diarrhoea and adverse consequences on nutrition and growth. This CRP seeks to identify and assist research groups in developing countries, which plan to conduct studies on the area of H. pylori infection and its

  20. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic techniques to examine the significance of infection and other insults in early childhood to diarrhoea morbidity, mal-assimilation and failure to thrive. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) addresses an important public health issue in many developing areas, which is the existence of high rates of infection and diarrhoea disease and its deleterious effects on the health and nutritional status of infants and children around the world. Persistent diarrhoea with associated malnutrition remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. There are established relations between diarrhoea disease and Helicobacter pylori infection and the latter may also additionally specifically impair nutrient absorption. Helicobacter pylori infection is likely to be the most common world wide bacterial infection, and it is estimated that approximately 50% of the general population is affected. The World Health Organisation has classified H. pylori as a Group 1 carcinogen. Young children in developing countries are the main targets of infection, with a substantial risk of developing gastric carcinoma during adulthood. High infection rates of H. pylori among new-borns and young children in developing nations appear to be a major cause for chronic under-nutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This bacterium can survive in the acidic interior of the human stomach due to its capacity to secrete an enzyme called urease, which decomposes the urea contained in the stomach's interior into ammonia and carbon dioxide increasing the pH move underneath the protective mucous membrane in the stomach where it is protected from the caustic stomach acid. This transitory drop in stomach acidity, explained by a diminished gastric secretion and an increase in ammonia production during infection, promotes the transit of lower bowel pathogens leading to repeated gastrointestinal infections, causing diarrhoea and adverse consequences on nutrition and growth. This CRP seeks to identify and assist research groups in developing countries, which plan to conduct studies on the area of H. pylori infection and its

  1. Report on the 1st research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research project on standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Radioisotopes produced with a cyclotron and their corresponding radiopharmaceuticals have already been shown to be extremely valuable in basic medical research, disease diagnosis and radiotherapy treatment. There are more than 200 cyclotron facilities worldwide and the number is growing every year. A number of the Member States have acquired cyclotrons for the purpose of producing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine and a number of others have expressed an interest in acquiring such facilities. This report is concerned with the production of four radiotracers: Iodine-123, Iodine-124, Thallium-201 and Palladium-103. Iodine-123 is already widely used in SPECT studies, I-124 has shown great promise and can be used for PET studies as well as in radiotherapy. Tl-201 is widely used throughout the world as 201 Tl + for measuring cardiac blood flow. It is a routine tool that is needed for the Nuclear Medicine communities and can be made available by those countries possessing a cyclotron facility with 30 MeV protons. Moreover, as preliminary results dealing with the labelling of chelated polypeptides with trivalent cationic Tl-201 are very promising; the nuclide can also be tried as a potential substitute for Indium tracers in SPECT diagnosis involving polypeptides. Palladium-103, an Auger electron emitter, has become an extremely important radionuclide for therapy. The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) focuses on the optimisation and standardisation of solid phase cyclotron target technology for the production of I-123, I-124, Tl-201 and Pd-103. In particular, as originally proposed and further discussed and agreed upon during the 1st Research Co-ordination Meeting, the main technical goals of the CRP are described as follows: (i) to investigate the possibility of using electrodeposited tellurium and melted tellurium oxide as target material for the production of I-123 and I-124. For the oxide target, the following parameters and techniques will be explored: 1) methods

  2. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 10, Number: 1. This is the first issue of the year 2009 and 10th anniversary of TOJDE. In this issue it is published four article are in “Notes for Editor Sectio”, 13 articles, 2 reviews. And this time, 26 authors from twelwe different countries are placed. These published articles are from Australia, Botswana, Canada, Italy India, Jordan, Malaysia, Nigeria, Srilanka, USA and Turkey. “Service Learning In Distance Education: Foreign Language Learning Environments” has sent to editor of TOJDE from Turkey and written by Muhlise Coşgun OGEYIK from Trakya University, Faculty of Education Edirne, TURKEY and Emre GUVENDIR from University of California. Their paper provides an overview in general education, in particular foreign language education, can be acknowledged as a lifelong learning process which can be transformed beyond the borders in global sense. Learning a foreign language requires proficiency in four basic skills which are reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Of these skills, speaking and listening are the most daunting tasks for learners and create obstacles when learners of target language do not get the chance of meeting native speakers. Such obstacles can be overwhelmed by integrating certain applications into education process. Service-learning through the internet as a teaching method can be considered one of the most striking one of those applications for foreign language learners. Paper focuses on the benefits of service-learning are discussed and some suggestions are offered for introducing this method in foreign language settings. The second notes for editor is titled as Students’ Opinions On Blended Learning which is written by Meric BALCI and Haluk SORAN from Hacettepe University, Education Faculty, Ankara,Turkey. They mentioned that E-learning was acknowledged by most educators and researchers as a savior, even an only alternative in education field, especially in

  3. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dear TOJDE Readers, Welcome to the Volume 14 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 3 Notes for Editor, 2 Book Reviews and 21 articles of 40 authors from 14 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are arrived to the TOJDE from Argentina, Australia, Bosnia Hersek, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirate and USA. The 1st Notes for Editor is arrived from USA and written by Gail D. CARUTH, Department of Educational Leadership Texas A&M University and Donald L. CARUTH Texas USA, from Independent Management Consultant, on “Understanding Resistance To Change: A Challenge For Universities”. This paper explores organizational change and the challenge it poses for universities. Because universities are slow to change due to maintaining a balance of tradition and change successful implementation of change will continue to be a challenge both now and in the future. The challenge of change is real but the task is not impossible. Historically, universities have met the challenges that faced them, they must be prepared to confront this challenge too. The 2nd Notes for Editor is arrived from UAE, in the context of “iPAD LEARNING ECOSYSTEM: Developing Challenge-Based Learning using Design Thinking” which iritten by Catalina MARIN, Jace HARGIS and Cathy CAVANAUGH,HCT ADWC, Abu Dhabi, UAE. This article describes the course design, which was grounded in design thinking, and provides an overview of the pilot implementation of the course. The course achieved its goals to a great extent in that learners felt that they were beginning to help build a better college community by sharing stories of their learning experience and their insights about the essential question they chose with other students and with other teachers. Third Notes for Editor titled as “ Use of Distance Education By Chritian religion to Train Edify and Educate Adherents” and written by Dr. P

  4. Co-ordinated research project on use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studying human health impacts of toxic elements consumed through foodstuffs contaminated by industrial activities. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The overall objective of the Co-ordinated research project is to provide a scientific basis for better assessment of selected pollutants in the food chain with a view to elucidating their impacts on human health and nutrition. Results of this study will enhance the existing body of knowledge and can be used to develop preventive strategies. Specific objectve: To determine the extent to which toxic element levels in food are affected by surrounding industrial activities and to assess potential human exposure from the consumption of such foodstuffs. EXPECTED RESEARCH OUTPUTS (RESULTS): Harmonized protocols and procedures for sampling and analyses; ? Compiled results for toxic element levels and their average daily dietary intake (ADDI) / dietary intake; Evaluated toxic element exposure levels based on biological indicators (where applicable); Publications of the study results in an IAEA TECDOC, and in peer-reviewed journals by participants. ACTION PLAN (ACTIVITIES) a. Core research activities: 1 Identification of the study areas and population groups. 2 Collection of information on food consumption patterns of the population groups under study (e.g. through questionnaires). 3 Development of harmonized protocols and validation of analytical methodologies in compliance with ISO/IEC 17025. 4 Collection and analysis of food samples, and estimation of the dietary intake. 5 Collection and analysis of biological indicators where applicable. 6 Evaluation of possible relationships between human exposures and biological indicators for the pollutants studied. 4b. Supplementary activities: ? Speciation studies of pollutants. ? Comparison of present and previous data on relevant parameters. ? Possible production and distribution of laboratory intercomparison samples. 7. Recommendations for nuclear analytical techniques ? Nuclear analytical technique (NAT) such as INAA, PIXE, PIGE, XRF should be the primary technique of analysis; Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA

  5. Fnom Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 7th year of TOJDE is appeared as Volume 7, Number: 1 on your screen now as. Very much thanks to all of you once more that we met 21st time, since January 2000. In this issue we published 15 articles, four book reviews, one notes for editor, news and announcements for our readers. And also, we give a place for the Call for Papers to the 4th Special Issue of The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education (TOJDE (Volume: 7, Number: 2 To be delivered in April 2006. The first article is coming from The Robert Gordon University, Scotland, United Kingdom which is written by Geoff GOOLNIK. He is tutor at Centre for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT. His article titled as “Effective Change Management Strategies for Embedding Online Learning within Higher Education and Enabling the Effective Continuing Professional Development of its Academic Staff”. According to Goolnik, “Previous research studies show that those universities wishing to successfully engage in online learning will have to adopt and implement tactics that have the capacity to overcome existing social and cultural constraints. An inclusive, consultative framework needs to be established, and Continuing Professional Development (CPD has been recognized as a key concern that should be addressed here. Second article is dealt with some problems of DE in Nigeria by Dr. Mudasiru Olalere YUSUF in his study which entitled as “Problems and Prospects of Open And Distance Education in Nigeria” He is from Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology, Faculty of Education University of Ilorin, Nigeria. His article explores that the major terms inherent in open and distance education, its potentials, possible factors that may inhibit successful implementation of the programme, and the use of low and high technological tools for its implementation, by adding of his recommendations. And than

  6. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now again after 3 months as Volume 11, Number: 2. This is the second issue of the year 2010. In this issue it is published four Notes for Editor, fourteen articles and four book reviews. And this time, 37 authors from 8 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Greece, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, USA and Turkey.Again Kevin YEE & Jace HARGIS have sent a good and short note to editor of TOJDE from USA. Their paper involve on YouTube and Video Quizzes. They mentioned YouTube videos can be employed to introduce a subject, such as framing the context, or simply to pique curiosity. Or, they may be shown after a principle has been taught, and now needs to be applied in a case study and defense the advantages of this type of formative assessment include both increasing the stimuli and subsequent attention of the student, as well as requiring continual engagement, which produces critical information, and allows students to more fully self-regulate their own conceptual understanding, so they can move forward in their learning with an increased level of awareness of what they know and do not know.The second notes for editor is titled as “COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE USE OF ICT IN ENGLISH TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESSES” which is written by Abbas ZARE-EEand Abbas SHEKAREY, from rhe Universİty of Kashan, Kashan, Iran. They mentioned in their paper to compare the amount and quality of ICT use in English teaching-learning processes among the faculty members of Medical and Non-medical Universities in Kashan, Iran and to explore the dimensions in which the two groups can benefit from one another and from ICT training in this respect. The results of the analyses showed that there was a significant difference in the amount of ICT use among the faculty members of medical and non-medical universities. Results also indicated that there was a significant

  7. Editors page

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Barretto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Entregamos o segundo número da Revista Brasileira de Pesquisa em Turismo- RBTur, inaugurada oficialmente com o primeiro número no dia 25 de agosto de 2007, que coincide com importantes datas no relacionamento das pessoas com as viagens e o turismo. Neste dia, em 1768, o Capitão James Cook, empreende sua primeira viagem transoceânica na sua nave Endeavour. No transporte terrestre, em 1910, funda-se a companhia Yellow Cab nos Estados Unidos. No ar, em 1919, inaugura-se a aviação comercial, quando um avião civil (Havilland transporta passageiros de Londres a Paris. É uma data também importante para as mulheres aviadoras; em 1920 Adrienne Bolland será a primeira figura feminina a atravessar de avião o Canal da Mancha e, em 1932, Amélia Earhart realizará o primeiro vôo sem paradas através do território dos Estados Unidos. Finalmente, no espaço, no dia 25 de agosto de 1989, a sonda Voyager 2 chega a Netuno. Também para os novos paradigmas do turismo, como a preservação da natureza, a data é importante, pois marca a criação do Serviço de Parques Nacionais, nos Estados Unidos, em 1916, que servirá de modelo aos demais países do mundo. Precedida de tantas efemérides transcendentes, a nossa revista tem a responsabilidade de deixar para o futuro uma marca de qualidade acadêmica e inovação científica, que pretendemos cumprir apoiados nos excelentes pesquisadores que há no Brasil e nos países vizinhos, assim como aqueles consagrados no primeiro mundo que nos prestigiam com intercâmbios culturais há tantos anos. O primeiro número teve impressionante acolhida, tendo os editores recebido mails elogiosos de todo o país, assim como da Nova Zelândia, do México, da Espanha, da Argentina, entre outros, de cientistas provenientes das mais diversas áreas, refletindo o sucesso da nossa abordagem multidisciplinar sobre o turismo. Neste segundo número, apresentamos estudos inovadores referentes a aspectos simbólicos do turismo

  8. Radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and methods for dose reduction. Report of a co-ordinated research programme (1991-1993)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    It is well recognized that diagnostic radiology is the largest contributor to the collective dose from all man-made sources of radiation. Large differences in radiation doses from the same procedures among different X ray rooms have led to the conclusion that there is a potential for dose reduction. A Co-ordinated Research Programme on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction, involving Member States with different degrees of development, was launched by the IAEA in co-operation with the CEC. This report summarizes the results of the second and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 4 to 8 October 1993. 22 refs, 6 figs and tabs.

  9. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Improvement of Basic Food Crops in Africa Through Plant Breeding, Including the Use of Induced Mutations, funded by the Italian Government, was initiated in 1989 in the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of stable food crops of Africa with the main emphasis on the indigenous species and their local cultivars. The fourth and final Research Co-ordination meeting under the CRP was held in Naples, Italy from 30 October - 3 November 1995. This publication includes the reports, conclusions and recommendations made by the participants. We hope that it will be of value to researchers, students and policy makers alike in their endeavour to promote plant breeding and increase food productions in Africa. Refs, figs, tabs.

  10. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Improvement of Basic Food Crops in Africa Through Plant Breeding, Including the Use of Induced Mutations, funded by the Italian Government, was initiated in 1989 in the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of stable food crops of Africa with the main emphasis on the indigenous species and their local cultivars. The fourth and final Research Co-ordination meeting under the CRP was held in Naples, Italy from 30 October - 3 November 1995. This publication includes the reports, conclusions and recommendations made by the participants. We hope that it will be of value to researchers, students and policy makers alike in their endeavour to promote plant breeding and increase food productions in Africa. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Co-ordinated research programme on the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques in the study of environmental pollution associated with solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme on the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques in the study of environmental pollution associated with solid wastes was started by the IAEA in December 1987 and now comprises twenty-three participants from twenty-one countries. Topics of interest in this programme include studies of atmospheric aerosols, coal fly ash, incinerator ash, sewage sludge and a variety of other environmental specimens contaminated with solid wastes. The analytical techniques used include neutron activation analysis, particle-induced X-ray emission and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence. This report summarizes the discussions that took place during the second research co-ordination meeting. Working papers presented by the participants are included as annexes and have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and methods for dose reduction. Report of a co-ordinated research programme (1991-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    It is well recognized that diagnostic radiology is the largest contributor to the collective dose from all man-made sources of radiation. Large differences in radiation doses from the same procedures among different X ray rooms have led to the conclusion that there is a potential for dose reduction. A Co-ordinated Research Programme on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction, involving Member States with different degrees of development, was launched by the IAEA in co-operation with the CEC. This report summarizes the results of the second and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 4 to 8 October 1993. 22 refs, 6 figs and tabs

  13. Co-ordinated research programme on the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques in the study of environmental pollution associated with solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme on the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques in the study of environmental pollution associated with solid wastes was started by the IAEA in December 1987 and now comprises nineteen participants from seventeen countries. Topics of interest in this programme include studies of atmospheric aerosols, coal fly ash, incinerator ash, sewage sludge and a variety of other environmental specimens contaminated with solid wastes. The analytical techniques used include neutron activation analysis, particle-induced X-ray emission and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence. This report summarizes the discussions that took place during the third research co-ordination meeting. Working papers presented by the participants are included as annexes and have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Co-ordinated research project: ingestion and organ content of trace elements of importance in radiological protection. Reference Asian man project, phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This First Research Co-ordination Meeting on Ingestion and Organ Content of Trace Elements was held at the Hotel Rembrandt,Quezon City, the Philippines. Information on individual participant's plans for participation in the CRP, and the progress achieved so far on this and related topics is presented in each country's report. The major themes covered include sampling of diets and tissues, analytical techniques used, analytical quality assurance and data reporting of results

  15. Mathematical models and their applications to isotope studies in groundwater hydrology. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 1-4 June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Tracer Techniques have proved to be useful tool for assessing, developing and water management of water resources. IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme (CRP) to improve quantitative evaluation of isotope data collected in groundwater hydrology. This publication compiles papers summarizing the results and findings of the work undertaken by participating institutes. Both mathematical modelling and their applications to isotope data on actual field results are covered. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Summary report of the 3. research co-ordination meeting on development of reference input parameter library for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data (Phase 1: Starter File)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1997-09-01

    The report contains the summary of the third and the last Research Co-ordination Meeting on ''Development of Reference Input Parameter Library for Nuclear Model Calculations of Nuclear Data (Phase I: Starter File)'', held at the ICTP, Trieste, Italy, from 26 to 29 May 1997. Details are given on the status of the Handbook and the Starter File - two major results of the project. (author)

  17. Update of X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Nichols, A.L.

    2000-09-01

    The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and γ-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration was held at PTB Braunschweig from 10 to 12 May 2000. A primary aim of this meeting was to review progress in the evaluation and recommendation of data under the auspices of the CRP. All CRP activities were reviewed, and actions agreed for the remaining 18 months of the programme. Separate indexing was provided for 13 contributions to the meeting

  18. The use of nuclear techniques in the management of nitrogen fixation by trees to enhance fertility of fragile tropical soils. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated in 1990 a Co-ordinated Research Project on The Use of Nuclear or Related Techniques in Management of Nitrogen Fixation by Trees for Enhancing Soil Fertility and Soil Conservation in Fragile Tropical Soils. This document contains nine papers referring to the results of the project. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper Refs, figs, tabs

  19. The use of nuclear techniques in the management of nitrogen fixation by trees to enhance fertility of fragile tropical soils. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated in 1990 a Co-ordinated Research Project on The Use of Nuclear or Related Techniques in Management of Nitrogen Fixation by Trees for Enhancing Soil Fertility and Soil Conservation in Fragile Tropical Soils. This document contains nine papers referring to the results of the project. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  20. Outline of the 1996-1998 IAEA co-ordinated research project on intercomparison for individual monitoring of external exposure from photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.; Gustafsson, M.; Ouvrard, R.

    1999-01-01

    The outline of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project 1996-1998 on intercomparison for individual monitoring is described. The intercomparison focused on IAEA Member States in Eastern Europe and was based on the operational quantity personal dose equivalent, H p (10). The three phases of the intercomparison were: the preparatory phase including a workshop, the 'type-test' intercomparison, and the 'simulated workplace field' intercomparison. Details of the phases are given. (author)

  1. Update of X- and {gamma}-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A L [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    2000-09-01

    The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and {gamma}-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration was held at PTB Braunschweig from 10 to 12 May 2000. A primary aim of this meeting was to review progress in the evaluation and recommendation of data under the auspices of the CRP. All CRP activities were reviewed, and actions agreed for the remaining 18 months of the programme. Separate indexing was provided for 13 contributions to the meeting.

  2. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 8th year of TOJDE are appeared on your screen now as Volume 8, Number: 4. Ti is the last issue of the year 2007. As you volume ( Number 3 was the special issue of TOJDE on “Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education” subject. I received many congrulation for this special issue from the subject expert and TOJDE readers. During 6 months I received more than 45 submissions. Some of them rejected by me for the reason that their subjects were not fit for TOJDE’s publishing content strategy, and some of them rejected by TOJDE’s editors. And others can be publish next year’s issues In this issue we published one notes for Editor, 13 articles, already one review (maybe I can update for one or two reviews in due course which I am waiting from my book reviewers, news and announcements for our readers. This time 24 authors from eighth different countries are placed in this issue. These published articles are from Australia, Gana, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Turkey, and UK. The first article of this issue is coming from Faculty of Education, Monash University, Victoria, AUSTRALIA. Article is entitled as “Globalization, Distance Education And Hegemonic Futures” and written by Dr. Glenn RUSSELL. He says in his paper that “Available options for distance educators can be understood in terms of instrumental and interpersonal axes that can potentially indicate the relative consideration that can be given to these factors. This approach is suggested as one way to understand available options at a time when there has been an apparent increase in instrumental approaches to distance education at the expense of interpersonal approaches and issues of social justice. While this problem is of concern, it is more appropriate to reflect on the unintended consequences of distance education for society and identify them than it is to uncritically oppose globalisation

  3. IAEA co-ordinated research programme on the transport of low specific activity materials and surface contaminated objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) prepares regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material, and periodically revised editions of these are published. These regulations are adopted by individual countries across the world and by international organisations concerned with transport. Whilst it is desirable to have a stable framework of regulatory requirements, there is also a need to take account of technical advances and operational experience and revise the regulations. From time to time Co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRP) are established to investigate particular areas of the regulations that are giving concern. In 1996 the IAEA Standing Advisory Group on the Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM) concluded that the requirements for classification, packaging and transport of low specific activity (LSA) material and surface contaminated objects (SCO) did not always have a strong radiation protection basis. Accordingly SAGSTRAM established a CRP with an overall objective to develop a dose-based approach for establishing LSA/SCO requirements. Six countries are participating in this CRP. Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom and United States. Each country is carrying out work that is outlined in agreements with the IAEA, with the work aimed at meeting the specific objective of the agreement and also contributing to achieving the overall objective of the CRP. Completion of the CRP usually involves the preparation of an IAEA TECDOC by a Consultant Services Meeting (CSM), and this TECDOC will summarise the work performed under the CRP and include any recommendations made by the CRP. Following the establishment of the CRP in 1997, the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was held in December 1997. The second RCM was held in March 1999, with the final RCM planned for the end of 2000. The work being carried out by Brazil and Canada is focused upon the transport of uranium and thorium ores, and is a mixture of theoretical and

  4. Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown in the 1990s and were candidates for prompt decommissioning. With the progressive ageing of research reactors, many more of these units will soon become redundant worldwide and require decommissioning. Within this context, a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001 in order to prepare for eventual decommissioning. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Kendal, United Kingdom, 14-18 May 2001, and are collected

  5. Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown in the 1990s and were candidates for prompt decommissioning. With the progressive ageing of research reactors, many more of these units will soon become redundant worldwide and require decommissioning. Within this context, a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001 in order to prepare for eventual decommissioning. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Kendal, United Kingdom, 14-18 May 2001, and are collected

  6. Treatment technologies for low and intermediate level waste from nuclear applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in industrial applications, research and medicine. The waste management programmes and activities in many developing Member States have been reviewed through a Waste Management Advisory Programme (WAMAP) implemented by the IAEA in 1987-1995. One of the WAMAP objectives was to assist in practical development and implementation of safe and efficient waste treatment methods. In this context the IAEA has initiated a co-ordinated research programme on treatment technologies for institutional wastes covering the most important recurring problems in developing Member States. The programme was intended to cover the research and development required for reliable waste treatment operations, including the likely variations in institutional waste inputs using simple low cost processes. This co-ordinated research programme was initiated in 1991 and brought together 14 participants from 13 countries. The results of the studies were discussed at three research co-ordination meetings. This report summarizes the salient features and results obtained during five year investigations and provides recommendations for future work in this area. Refs, figs, tabs.

  7. Treatment technologies for low and intermediate level waste from nuclear applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in industrial applications, research and medicine. The waste management programmes and activities in many developing Member States have been reviewed through a Waste Management Advisory Programme (WAMAP) implemented by the IAEA in 1987-1995. One of the WAMAP objectives was to assist in practical development and implementation of safe and efficient waste treatment methods. In this context the IAEA has initiated a co-ordinated research programme on treatment technologies for institutional wastes covering the most important recurring problems in developing Member States. The programme was intended to cover the research and development required for reliable waste treatment operations, including the likely variations in institutional waste inputs using simple low cost processes. This co-ordinated research programme was initiated in 1991 and brought together 14 participants from 13 countries. The results of the studies were discussed at three research co-ordination meetings. This report summarizes the salient features and results obtained during five year investigations and provides recommendations for future work in this area. Refs, figs, tabs

  8. Improving yield and nitrogen fixation of grain legumes in the tropics and sub-tropics of Asia. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated a Co-ordinated Research Project on The Use of Isotopes in Studies to Improve Yield and N 2 Fixation of Grain Legumes with the Aim of Increasing Food Production and Saving N-fertilizer in the Tropics and Sub-Tropics of Asia that was operational from 1990 to 1995. This Project was underpinned by extensive experience in the use of 15 N-labelled fertilizer in quantifying N 2 fixation by food and pasture legumes; the isotope-dilution technique, recognized as the most accurate mode of quantifying fixation, was developed at the IAEA and has been used profitably for over 20 years in co-ordinated research projects that were focused on aspects relevant to the sustainability of agriculture in developing countries in which food security is most under threat. This effort to improve N 2 fixation by food legumes in Asia, and in so doing to increase productivity of cereal-based farming systems as a whole, was timely in terms of regional needs. It was complemented by an overlapping Co-ordinated Research Project entitled ''The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques in Management of Nitrogen Fixation by trees for Enhancing Soil Fertility and Soil Conservation in Fragile Tropical Soils''. The project involved scientists from Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Malaysia, Pakistan the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam

  9. Co-ordinate regulation of Salmonella typhimurium invasion genes by environmental and regulatory factors is mediated by control of hilA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, V; Lucas, R L; Hwang, C; Lee, C A

    1996-11-01

    During infection of their hosts, salmonellae enter intestinal epithelial cells. It has been proposed that when Salmonella typhimurium is present in the intestinal lumen, several environmental and regulatory conditions modulate the expression of invasion factors required for bacterial entry into host cells. We report here that the expression of six different S. typhimurium invasion genes encoded on SPI1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1) is co-ordinately regulated by oxygen, osmolarity, pH, PhoPQ, and HilA. HilA is a transcriptional activator of the OmpR/ToxR family that is also encoded on SPI1. We have found that HilA plays a central role in the co-ordinated regulation of invasion genes by environmental and regulatory conditions. HilA can activate the expression of two invasion gene-lacZY fusions on reporter plasmids in Escherichia coll, suggesting that HilA acts directly at invasion-gene promoters in S. typhimurium. We have found that the regulation of invasion genes by oxygen, osmolarity, pH, and PhoPQ is indirect and is mediated by regulation of hilA expression by these environmental and regulatory factors. We hypothesize that the complex and co-ordinate regulation of Invasion genes by HilA is an important feature of salmonella pathogenesis and allows salmonellae to enter intestinal epithelial cells.

  10. Lack of co-ordinate expression of the alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) procollagen genes in fibroblast clonal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Y; Crane, S; Zhou, L; Ochoa, S M; Falanga, V

    2000-12-01

    Several extracellular matrix genes, most notably alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) procollagen, are reported to be co-ordinately expressed in cultures of dermal fibroblasts. However, it remains unclear whether the expression of these genes is truly co-ordinate or whether it may be the result of averaging the phenotypic expression of different fibroblast subpopulations present within each culture. Objectives To determine by Northern analysis the correlation between alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) procollagen mRNA levels in clonal populations of human dermal fibroblasts. As previously described, clonal cultures were derived from parent strains of human dermal fibroblasts by a microscopically controlled dilution technique and by stimulation of single cells with low oxygen tension in the early phases of clonal growth. In agreement with previous reports, we found that baseline steady-state levels of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA were co-ordinately regulated with the alpha1(III) procollagen mRNA in 26 parent strains (r = 0. 9003; P ordinate regulation observed in non-clonal cultures, suggesting that these two genes operate under different sets of regulatory controls. This clonal heterogeneity may provide additional flexibility to the process of tissue repair and fibroblast clonal expansion.

  11. Radiographic evaluation of corrosion and deposits in pipelines: results of an IAEA co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.; Infanzon, S.; Rastkhan, N.; Vaidya, P.R.; Einav, I.; Ekinci, S.

    2006-01-01

    The principle of wall thickness measurement and monitoring of corrosion and deposits by means of film-based tangential projection radiography is known since decades. Nevertheless, there are no international standards and guidelines available. The International Atomic Energy Agency has organized a co-ordinated research programme bringing together participants from twelve member states to study the state of the art. The general scope of the project covered radiographic inspection of corrosion and deposits in steel pipes (diameter >150mm) corroded on the outer or inner surfaces with or without insulation. Two inspection methods have been investigated: 1. tangential radiographic projection technique (TRT) and 2. double wall inspection technique (DWT). The application ranges of both methods were studied depending on pipe diameter, wall thickness, radiation source (X-ray, Ir-192 and Co-60 were used) and screen/film combination. Diagrams for application limits using TRT have been designed and verified by the participating countries. All measurements have been performed on special designed test pieces and also industrial pipes. Corrosion measurements based on DWT are more sophisticated and use effective attenuation coefficients to calculate wall thickness changes from density differences shown on the film. The values of effective attenuation coefficients, established for Ir-192 and Co-60, are stable and independent in a wide range on pipe diameter and insulation. Guidelines were developed and tested in the twelve different countries to determine the reliability of this technology. A testing procedure approved by the project partners has been released and shall be submitted as standard proposal. (orig.)

  12. Stability and stabilization of polymers under irradiation. Final report of a co-ordinated research project, 1994-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions presented in this technical publication describe progress in understanding and controlling the degradation of polymeric materials induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. This subject area is of widespread importance to industrial use of radiation for two classes of applications: (1) the processing and production of polymeric materials by means of irradiation facilities, and (2) the use of polymeric materials in applications for which they must withstand irradiation throughout the course of their useful lifetimes. Due to extensive and still-growing use of polymeric materials for technological applications of immense variety, and the fact that radiation-processing has the potential to play an expanding role in polymer manufacturing (current uses include crosslinking, curing, sterilization, surface modification, lithography, etc.), the ability to inhibit unwanted material property changes which often occur when materials are irradiated, and to predict useful lifetimes, remains a limiting factor in a number of existing radiation technologies. Additionally, the ability to control unwanted degradation will be necessary for successful implementation of future, more advanced, radiation processing schemes. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) was established for the purpose of focusing the attention of appropriate technical experts on the complex task of establishing a better fundamental basis for understanding and attacking problems or radiation degradation of materials. The group dynamics have been designed to achieve a synergistic interaction among worldwide research facilities for the purposes of identifying degradation problems, exchanging ideas and results on the solution of these problems, and making the emerging information available in an organized and accessible format. From this meeting, it is clear that much remains to be learnt in terms of understanding degradation mechanisms and phenomena. It also appears that important new

  13. On demand manufacturing of patient-specific liquid capsules via co-ordinated 3D printing and liquid dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Soares, Cindy; Gollwitzer, Verena; Habashy, Rober; Timmins, Peter; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2018-06-15

    A method for the production of liquid capsules with the potential of modifying drug dose and release is presented. For the first time, the co-ordinated use of fused deposition modelling (FDM), 3D printing and liquid dispensing to fabricate individualised dosage form on demand in a fully automated fashion has been demonstrated. Polymethacrylate shells (Eudragit EPO and RL) for immediate and extended release were fabricated using FDM 3D printing and simultaneously filled using a computer-controlled liquid dispenser loaded with model drug solution (theophylline) or suspension (dipyridamole). The impact of printing modes: simultaneous shell printing and filling (single-phase) or sequential 3D printing of shell bottom, filling and shell cap (multi-phase), nozzle size, syringe volume, and shell structure has been reported. The use of shell thickness of 1.6 mm, and concentric architecture allowed successful containment of liquid core whilst maintaining the release properties of the 3D printed liquid capsule. The linear relationship between the theoretical and the actual volumes from the dispenser reflected its potential for accurate dosing (R 2  = 0.9985). Modifying the shell thickness of Eudragit RL capsule allowed a controlled extended drug release without the need for formulation change. Owing to its low cost and versatility, this approach can be adapted to wide spectrum of liquid formulations such as small and large molecule solutions and obviate the need for compatibility with the high temperature of FDM 3D printing process. In a clinical setting, health care staff will be able to instantly manufacture in small volumes liquid capsules with individualised dose contents and release pattern in response to specific patient's needs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Co-ordinate regulation of distinct host cell signalling pathways by multifunctional enteropathogenic Escherichia coli effector molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Brendan; Ellis, Sarah; Leard, Alan D; Warawa, Jonathan; Mellor, Harry; Jepson, Mark A

    2002-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of paediatric diarrhoea and a model for the family of attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. A/E pathogens encode a type III secretion system to transfer effector proteins into host cells. The EPEC Tir effector protein acts as a receptor for the bacterial surface protein intimin and is involved in the formation of Cdc42-independent, actin-rich pedestal structures beneath the adhered bacteria. In this paper, we demonstrate that EPEC binding to HeLa cells also induces Tir-independent, cytoskeletal rearrangement evidenced by the early, transient formation of filopodia-like structures at sites of infection. Filopodia formation is dependent on expression of the EPEC Map effector molecule - a protein that targets mitochondria and induces their dysfunction. We show that Map-induced filopodia formation is independent of mitochondrial targeting and is abolished by cellular expression of the Cdc42 inhibitory WASP-CRIB domain, demonstrating that Map has at least two distinct functions in host cells. The transient nature of the filopodia is related to an ability of EPEC to downregulate Map-induced cell signalling that, like pedestal formation, was dependent on both Tir and intimin proteins. The ability of Tir to downregulate filopodia was impaired by disrupting a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) motif, suggesting that Tir may possess such a function, with its interaction with intimin triggering this activity. Furthermore, we also found that Map-induced cell signalling inhibits pedestal formation, revealing that the cellular effects of Tir and Map must be co-ordinately regulated during infection. Possible implications of the multifunctional nature of EPEC effector molecules in pathogenesis are discussed.

  15. Hfq-dependent, co-ordinate control of cyclic diguanylate synthesis and catabolism in the plague pathogen Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Lauren E; Koestler, Benjamin J; Karaba, Sara M; Waters, Christopher M; Lathem, Wyndham W

    2012-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the cause of the disease plague, forms biofilms to enhance flea-to-mammal transmission. Biofilm formation is dependent on exopolysaccharide synthesis and is controlled by the intracellular levels of the second messenger molecule cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), but the mechanisms by which Y. pestis regulates c-di-GMP synthesis and turnover are not fully understood. Here we show that the small RNA chaperone Hfq contributes to the regulation of c-di-GMP levels and biofilm formation by modulating the abundance of both the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase HmsP and the diguanylate cyclase HmsT. To do so, Hfq co-ordinately promotes hmsP mRNA accumulation while simultaneously decreasing the stability of the hmsT transcript. Hfq-dependent regulation of HmsP occurs at the transcriptional level while the regulation of HmsT is post-transcriptional and is localized to the 5' untranslated region/proximal coding sequence of the hmsT transcript. Decoupling HmsP from Hfq-based regulation is sufficient to overcome the effects of Δhfq on c-di-GMP and biofilm formation. We propose that Y. pestis utilizes Hfq to link c-di-GMP levels to environmental conditions and that the disregulation of c-di-GMP turnover in the absence of Hfq may contribute to the severe attenuation of Y. pestis lacking this RNA chaperone in animal models of plague. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Modular co-ordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blach, K.

    Notatet er på engelsk, idet det er lavet som et oplæg til den internationale standardiseringsorganisations (ISO) arbejde med målkoordinering i byggeriet. Materialet har også været forelagt ekspertgrupperne i CIB W24 og i International Modular Group. Det i notatet præsenterede materiale er blevet...

  17. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-07-01

    interviews. Frequencies and percentages were used to analyze the categorical data. Moreover, the qualitative data was analyzed via content analysis. According to the findings of the study, students needed to get support about education directives, career guidance, technical equipment, and personal problems. In this issue we published two book reviews. The first issue on “UNIVERSITY TEACHING IN FOCUS:A Learning-centred Approach” which is edited by Lynne HUNT and Denise CHALMERS and reviewed by S. K. PULIST from india. He empasises about the book that The book as the name depicts, focuses on different aspects of university teaching from learner-centred point of view. A wise range of issues has been highlighted and properly addressed by the authors in a very diligent manner. It will help the teachers in constructively engaging the students in effective learning. It is a step forward towards empowering the upcoming teachers with necessary strategies and stand point so that they are able to help the students in enhancing their quality learning. The book would be helpful not only to the novice teachers who have just stepped in the teaching profession but also other stakeholders of higher education system. 2nd book review is on “TRENDS AND ISSUES IN DISTANCE EDUCATION: International Perspectives, Second Edition”, edited by Lya Visser, Yusra Visser, Ray Amirault & Michael Simonson and Reviewed by Dr. Dilek ALTUNAY from Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay, TURKEY. She mentioned about the book that this book makes a contribution to the field of distance education by offering a comprehensive overview and analysis of the current trends and issues in distance education. In addition, the book is well-organized and coherent in terms of presentation. The reader is guided by section editors who provides introduction to the section and an overview of the chapters in the section, which makes the book reader-friendly. To receive further information and to send your recommendations and

  18. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2014-04-01

    University, Bayburt, TURKEY. The aim of the study is to reveal the students’ views who are studying in different departments of distant education programs provided by Anadolu University in TURKEY. Qualitative research method was used in the study and purposeful sampling was followed. The research was conducted with 10 students who were working in different jobs and taking distance education courses in different departments. The findings obtained as a result of data analysis were examined, the students taking distance education courses in different departments stated that this education method was a great opportunity and chance for them. To receive further information and to send your recommendations and remarks, or to submit articles for consideration, please contact tojde secretariat at the below address or e-mail us to tojde@Anadolu.Edu.Tr Hope to stay in touch and meet in our next issue, on 1st of July 2014. Cordially, Prof. Dr. Ugur Demiray, Editor-In-Chief of TOJDE Anadolu University, Yunusemre Campus 26470 Eskisehir TURKEY Tel: +90 222 335 0581 Ext. 5262 GSM: +90 542 23 22 167 Fax: +90 222 320 4520 Emails: udemiray@anadolu.edu.tr or udemiray33@gmail.com URL: Http://www.ugurdemiray.com.tr Http://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr

  19. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-10-01

    investigated attitudes toward using the Internet as a learning tool among students at Bangkok University; students’ expectation of social networks and search engines in learning English, as well as their perceived usefulness. It also examined their use of the Internet for learning English. The samples were 198 undergraduate students enrolled in Fundamental English course at Bangkok University. The instrument in this study was a questionnaire. Results from the study indicated that the levels of attitudes toward using the Internet as a learning tool and Internet use for learning English in general were moderate. To receive further information and to send your recommendations and remarks, or to submit articles for consideration, please contact TOJDE Secretariat at the below address or e-mail us to tojde@anadolu.edu.tr Hope to stay in touch and meet in our next Issue, on 1st of January 2014 Cordially, Prof. Dr. Ugur Demiray Editor-in-Chief Anadolu University Yunusemre Campus 26470 Eskisehir TURKEY Tel: +90 222 335 0581 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting +90 222 335 0581 ÜCRETSİZ end_of_the_skype_highlighting ext. 5262 GSM: +90 542 23 22 167 or Fax: +90 222 320 4520 or Emails: udemiray@anadolu.edu.tr or udemiray33@gmail.com URL: http://home.anadolu.edu.tr/~udemiray URL: http://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr

  20. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of arthropod pests. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    at the final FAO/IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting hosted by the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Department of Agriculture, State of Hawaii, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, from 3 to 7 November 1997 Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Evaluation of Lepidoptera population suppression by radiation induced sterility. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This publication results from the second FAO/IAEA Research Co-ordination Project (CRP) on Inherited Sterility in Lepidoptera (caterpillars of moths). The present CRP and a previous one entitled 'Radiation Induced F{sub 1} Sterility in Lepidoptera for Area-Wide Control' were initiated in response to requests from Member States for the development of environment friendly alternatives to current control of moth pests. The first five-year CRP (1987-1991) dealt primarily with aspects such as determining the effects of various radiation dose levels on the resulting sterility in the treated parents and their F{sub 1} progeny in different Lepidoptera species. In addition, models were developed on the suppressive effects of F{sub 1} sterility on field populations, and some studies were conducted in laboratory or field cages to assess the impact of inherited sterility on pest suppression. The research results were published in 1993 in the IAEA Panel Proceedings Series. This follow-up CRP (1994-1998) has built on the results of the first CRP and has focused on addressing a more challenging phase, consisting of rearing key pest moths and evaluating their application for pest control purposes. The specific objective of the CRP was therefore to assess the potential of suppressing populations of caterpillar pests in the field by inherited sterility methods, i.e. by rearing and releasing irradiated moths and/or their progeny in combination with other biological control methods. The ultimate goal is to have alternative environment-friendly control methods available to be able to reduce the vast quantities of insecticide that are used in agriculture to combat Lepidoptera pests and that adversely affect the trade balance of developing countries because they must use hard currency to import them. The two FAO/IAEA sponsored Lepidoptera CRPs have resulted in expanded research and implementation programmes on F{sub 1} sterility in combination with natural enemies. Such programmes are

  2. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of arthropod pests. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    at the final FAO/IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting hosted by the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Department of Agriculture, State of Hawaii, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, from 3 to 7 November 1997

  3. Evaluation of Lepidoptera population suppression by radiation induced sterility. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    This publication results from the second FAO/IAEA Research Co-ordination Project (CRP) on Inherited Sterility in Lepidoptera (caterpillars of moths). The present CRP and a previous one entitled 'Radiation Induced F 1 Sterility in Lepidoptera for Area-Wide Control' were initiated in response to requests from Member States for the development of environment friendly alternatives to current control of moth pests. The first five-year CRP (1987-1991) dealt primarily with aspects such as determining the effects of various radiation dose levels on the resulting sterility in the treated parents and their F 1 progeny in different Lepidoptera species. In addition, models were developed on the suppressive effects of F 1 sterility on field populations, and some studies were conducted in laboratory or field cages to assess the impact of inherited sterility on pest suppression. The research results were published in 1993 in the IAEA Panel Proceedings Series. This follow-up CRP (1994-1998) has built on the results of the first CRP and has focused on addressing a more challenging phase, consisting of rearing key pest moths and evaluating their application for pest control purposes. The specific objective of the CRP was therefore to assess the potential of suppressing populations of caterpillar pests in the field by inherited sterility methods, i.e. by rearing and releasing irradiated moths and/or their progeny in combination with other biological control methods. The ultimate goal is to have alternative environment-friendly control methods available to be able to reduce the vast quantities of insecticide that are used in agriculture to combat Lepidoptera pests and that adversely affect the trade balance of developing countries because they must use hard currency to import them. The two FAO/IAEA sponsored Lepidoptera CRPs have resulted in expanded research and implementation programmes on F 1 sterility in combination with natural enemies. Such programmes are under way in Tunisia

  4. Sesame improvement by induced mutations. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project. 1993-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient oil crop considered to be still at an early stage in breeding. The fact that sesame is a crop of mainly developing countries with limited available research funds for long term breeding programmes, resulted in very few breeding efforts in research stations. Furthermore, sesame is not a mandate crop of any of the international agriculture research centers. Until recently most of the released sesame varieties in countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea were the product of selection and pedigree breeding. A major constraint in this approach was the lack of sufficient genetic variation within the existing germplasm collections, especially for traits such as resistance to various diseases and seed retention. This is where mutation techniques could offer a possible solution. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) organized some expert consultations on sesame breeding between 1981 and 1987, which all recommended the use of mutation induction for the enhancement of genetic variability with a focus on the following traits: modified plant architecture, seed retention, and resistance to diseases and pests. As a result, most of these recommendations have been included in this five year co-ordinated research project (CRP) that started in 1993, organized by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. This CRP focused on the induction of the above mentioned characters in different sesame improvement programmes, and on the enhancement of co-operation between sesame breeders in developed and developing countries. Each participant covered a number of traits important for their specific breeding needs. During regular meetings under this project the participants had the opportunity to jointly appraise and evaluate sesame mutants and varieties in demonstration fields, thus strengthening the mutual effort for the genetic improvement of sesame through mutation techniques. The success

  5. Sesame improvement by induced mutations. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project. 1993-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient oil crop considered to be still at an early stage in breeding. The fact that sesame is a crop of mainly developing countries with limited available research funds for long term breeding programmes, resulted in very few breeding efforts in research stations. Furthermore, sesame is not a mandate crop of any of the international agriculture research centers. Until recently most of the released sesame varieties in countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea were the product of selection and pedigree breeding. A major constraint in this approach was the lack of sufficient genetic variation within the existing germplasm collections, especially for traits such as resistance to various diseases and seed retention. This is where mutation techniques could offer a possible solution. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) organized some expert consultations on sesame breeding between 1981 and 1987, which all recommended the use of mutation induction for the enhancement of genetic variability with a focus on the following traits: modified plant architecture, seed retention, and resistance to diseases and pests. As a result, most of these recommendations have been included in this five year co-ordinated research project (CRP) that started in 1993, organized by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. This CRP focused on the induction of the above mentioned characters in different sesame improvement programmes, and on the enhancement of co-operation between sesame breeders in developed and developing countries. Each participant covered a number of traits important for their specific breeding needs. During regular meetings under this project the participants had the opportunity to jointly appraise and evaluate sesame mutants and varieties in demonstration fields, thus strengthening the mutual effort for the genetic improvement of sesame through mutation techniques. The success

  6. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  7. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  8. Compilation and evaluation of fission yield nuclear data. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    Fission product yields are required at several stages of the nuclear fuel cycle and are therefore included in all large international data files for reactor calculations and related applications. Such files are maintained and disseminated by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA as a member of an international data centres network. Users of these data are from the fields of reactor design and operation, waste management and nuclear materials safeguards, all of which are essential parts of the IAEA programme. In the 1980s, the number of measured fission yields increased so drastically that the manpower available for evaluating them to meet specific user needs was insufficient. To cope with this task, it was concluded in several meetings on fission product nuclear data, some of them convened by the IAEA, that international co-operation was required, and an IAEA co-ordinated research project (CRP) was recommended. This recommendation was endorsed by the International Nuclear Data Committee, an advisory body for the nuclear data programme of the IAEA. As a consequence, the CRP on the Compilation and Evaluation of Fission Yield Nuclear Data was initiated in 1991, after its scope, objectives and tasks had been defined by a preparatory meeting. The different tasks, such as special evaluations and development of improved methods, were distributed among participants. The results of the research work were discussed and approved by all participants in research co-ordination meetings. For a successful development of theoretical and empirical models, experiments had to be recommended and their results to be awaited, which made necessary an extension of the CRP by two years. This TECDOC is the result of a joint effort of all participants in this CRP. The individual sections represent CRP tasks and were prepared by the participants responsible for doing the research, some of which comprise significant new scientific developments. The appendices to this book contain voluminous

  9. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analyzed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Biomonitoring is an appropriate tool for assessing the levels of air pollution. In several developed countries biomonitoring is used on a regular basis for such surveys. Application of biomonitors has several advantages compared to the use of direct measurements of contaminants, related primarily to the permanent and common occurrence in the field, the ease of sampling and trace element accumulation. Furthermore, biomonitors provide a measure of integrated exposure over an extended period of time, are present in remote areas and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Suitably chosen biomonitors accumulate contaminants over certain periods of time, concentrate them, thus allowing more reliable analytical measurements. Simple and cheap sampling procedures (in contrast to direct measurements) allow a very large number of sites to be included in the same survey, permitting detailed geographical patterns to be drawn. In combination with the specimen banking (long-term storage) of selected samples, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. By application of appropriate statistical tools, information can also be obtained on the type and location of pollution sources as well as on the short, medium and long range trans-boundary transport of environmental pollutants. In Europe, nuclear and related analytical techniques have been shown to be

  10. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analyzed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Biomonitoring is an appropriate tool for assessing the levels of air pollution. In several developed countries biomonitoring is used on a regular basis for such surveys. Application of biomonitors has several advantages compared to the use of direct measurements of contaminants, related primarily to the permanent and common occurrence in the field, the ease of sampling and trace element accumulation. Furthermore, biomonitors provide a measure of integrated exposure over an extended period of time, are present in remote areas and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Suitably chosen biomonitors accumulate contaminants over certain periods of time, concentrate them, thus allowing more reliable analytical measurements. Simple and cheap sampling procedures (in contrast to direct measurements) allow a very large number of sites to be included in the same survey, permitting detailed geographical patterns to be drawn. In combination with the specimen banking (long-term storage) of selected samples, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. By application of appropriate statistical tools, information can also be obtained on the type and location of pollution sources as well as on the short, medium and long range trans-boundary transport of environmental pollutants. In Europe, nuclear and related analytical techniques have been shown to be

  11. Standardized methods to verify absorbed dose in irradiated food for insect control. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    Irradiation to control insect infestation of food is increasingly accepted and applied, especially as a phytosanitary treatment of food as an alternative to fumigation. However, unlike other processes for insect control, irradiation does not always result in immediate insect death. Thus, it is conceivable that fresh and dried fruits and tree nuts, which have been correctly irradiated to meet insect disinfestation/quarantine requirements, may still contain live insects at the time of importation. There is, however, a movement by plant quarantine authorities away from inspecting to ensure the absence of live insects in imported consignments towards examining through administrative procedures that a treatment required by law has been given. Nevertheless, there is a need to provide plant quarantine inspectors with a reliable objective method to verify that a minimum absorbed dose of radiation was given to supplement administrative procedures. Such an objective method is expected to bolster the confidence of the inspectors in clearing the consignment without delay and to facilitate trade in irradiated commodities. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) in 1994 to generate data on the verification of absorbed dose of irradiation in fresh, dried fruits and tree nuts for insect disinfestation/quarantine purposes. A standardized label dose indicator available commercially was used to verify the minimum/maximum absorbed dose of the irradiated commodities for these purposes as required by regulations in certain countries. It appears that such a label dose indicator with certain modifications could be made available to assist national authorities and the food industry to verify the absorbed dose of irradiation to facilitate trade in such irradiated commodities. This TECDOC reports on the accomplishments of this co-ordinated research project and includes the papers presented by the participants

  12. Safety cases for radioactive waste disposal facilities: guidance on confidence building and regulatory review IAEA-ASAM co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Belfadhel, M.; Bennett, D.G.; Metcalf, P.; Nys, V.; Goldammer, W.

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA has been conducting two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) projects to develop and apply improved safety assessment methodologies for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities. The more recent of these projects, ASAM (application of safety assessment methodologies), included a Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) which has been working to develop guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides an overview of the ASAM project, focusing on the safety case and regulatory review. (authors)

  13. Improvement of measurements, theoretical computations and evaluations of neutron induced helium production cross sections. Summary report on the third and final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1996-09-01

    The present report contains the Summary of the Third and Final IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) on ''Improvement of Measurements, Theoretical Computations and Evaluations of Neutron Induced Helium Production Cross Sections'' which was hosted by the Tohoku University and held in Sendai, Japan, from 25 to 29 September 1995. This RCM was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS), with the co-operation and assistance of local organizers from Tohoku University. Summarized are the proceedings and results of the meeting. The List of Participants and meeting Agenda are included. (author)

  14. A new high accuracy non-polynomial tension spline method for the solution of one dimensional wave equation in polar co-ordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu Gopal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new three-level implicit nine point compact finite difference formulation of O(k2 + h4 based on non-polynomial tension spline approximation in r-direction and finite difference approximation in t-direction for the numerical solution of one dimensional wave equation in polar co-ordinates. We describe the mathematical formulation procedure in details and also discuss the stability of the method. Numerical results are provided to justify the usefulness of the proposed method.

  15. Surface modification of materials by ion implantations for industrial and medical applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project on Modification of Materials by Ion Treatment for Industrial Applications were to develop economically acceptable surface modification techniques leading to thick treated layers, to predict ion beam mixing and impurity atom migration during and after implantation, and to evaluate the tribological post-implantation properties and performance of treated components. This TECDOC summarises the current status and prospects in surface modification by ion implantation methodology and technology, providing new information in basic and applied research

  16. Surface modification of materials by ion implantations for industrial and medical applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project on Modification of Materials by Ion Treatment for Industrial Applications were to develop economically acceptable surface modification techniques leading to thick treated layers, to predict ion beam mixing and impurity atom migration during and after implantation, and to evaluate the tribological post-implantation properties and performance of treated components. This TECDOC summarises the current status and prospects in surface modification by ion implantation methodology and technology, providing new information in basic and applied research.

  17. The influence of boundary conditions on resonant frequencies of cavities in 3-D FDTD algorithm using non-orthogonal co-ordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.; Tong, L.S. [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). Research Inst. of Electronics; Carter, R.G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Engineering Dept.

    1994-09-01

    The 3-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method in non-orthogonal co-ordinates (non-standard FDTD) is used to calculate the frequencies of resonators. The numerical boundary conditions of the method are presented. The Influences of boundary conditions and discrete meshes on the numerical accuracy are investigated. The authors present the nonstandard FDTD method using the boundary-orthogonal mesh and equivalent dielectric constant so that the error is reduced from 8.66% to 3.0% for the cylindrical cavity loaded by a dielectric button.

  18. Use of irradiation for chemical and microbial decontamination of water, wastewater and sludge. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The co-ordinated research project (CRP) was established in order to focus the attention of appropriate technical experts in integrating the effects of ionizing radiation on refractory organic pollutants and pathogenic microorganisms and parasites in the treatment of water, waste water and sewage sludge. This publication describes the findings of the CRP in three subject areas: ground water remediation, decontamination of industrial and municipal waste water and sewage sludge hygienization. This publication contains 11 individual papers from participants; each of the papers was indexed separately

  19. Nuclear model parameter testing for nuclear data evaluation (Reference Input Parameter Library: Phase II). Summary report of the third research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.

    2002-04-01

    This report summarises the results and recommendations of the third Research Co-ordination Meeting on improving and testing the Reference Input Parameter Library: Phase II. A primary aim of the meeting was to review the achievements of the CRP, to assess the testing of the library and to approve the final contents. Actions were approved that will result in completion of the file and a draft report by the end of February 2002. Full release of the library is scheduled for July 2002. (author)

  20. Management of crop residues for sustainable crop production. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    -wheat cropping systems co-ordinated by the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Section, where management of crop residues and fertilizer plays a major role in increasing crop yields

  1. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting on the co-ordinated research programme: Rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples, Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, Warsaw, Poland 4-8 September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    Concern about the release of radionuclides to the environment, especially to the foodchain, has been heightened by recent nuclear incidents. The assessment of any release of radioactivity demands rapid, reliable and practical techniques. In the intermediate and late post-accident period, where the interest is in food control rather then evacuation and sheltering, rapid methods would be useful for screening purposes as well as providing timely information and easing sample workload minimizing sample overloads. In the first research co-ordination meeting on the co-ordinated research program ''Rapid.... samples'', the specifications for the time required for sample preparation, separation, and analysis and the accuracy desired were outlined. Considerable attention was given to the need to develop rapid method for sample preparation and dissolution. Emphasis was placed on achieving the development of rapid methods with the minimum sacrifice in reliability, practicality and economy

  2. Associations of motor co-ordination and attention with motor-perceptual development in 3-year-old preterm and full-term children who needed neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemgren, E; Persson, K

    2007-01-01

    Children who have needed neonatal intensive care (NIC) are considered to be at risk for deficits such as developmental co-ordination disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. By assessing motor-perceptual development, motor co-ordination and attention already at 3 years of age, it might be possible to identify such deficits earlier than they are today. To investigate the motor-perceptual development in a group of 202 NIC children but had no major impairments, to describe associations of deficits in co-ordination and attention with motor-perceptual delays, and to estimate the prevalence of NIC children with combined deficits together with a motor-perceptual delay. Co-ordination and attention in children born very preterm (n = 57), moderately preterm (n = 75) and full-term (n = 70) were observed according to a model for Combined Assessment of Motor Performance and Behaviour while they were assessed using a developmental scale, Motor-Perceptual Development, 0-7 years, MPU. In two out of 14 MPU areas, a larger proportion of very preterm than of moderately preterm and full-term children had marked developmental delay. Overall, the proportion of NIC children having a motor-perceptual delay increased with increasing incoordination and especially increasing lack of attention. Twenty-one (11%) of the NIC children had different motor-perceptual delays combined with pronounced incoordination and pronounced lack of attention. Deficits in co-ordination and attention were associated with motor-perceptual delays in areas important for daily living and development of academic skills. Therefore, to find children at risk for developmental co-ordination disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, assessments of co-ordination and attention should be added to assessments of motor-perceptual development in 3-year-old NIC children.

  3. New methods and techniques for decontamination in maintenance or decommissioning operations. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is a subject of increasing importance as the nuclear community considers the issues related to the decommissioning of surplus or obsolete facilities and making modifications to operational facilities, or conducts the necessary inspections and maintenance to permit continued efficient and safe operation of existing facilities. Previous co-ordinated research programmes (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, highlighted the role of decontamination within the overall domain of decommissioning. Having recognized technological progress in decontamination and the large potential for optimization, the CRP on New Methods and Techniques for Optimization of Decontamination for Maintenance or Decommissioning was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1994 to 1998. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) held in Mol, Belgium, 12-16 January 1998 and are collected in this Technical Document. Operating experience in real-scale applications, lessons learned, key results in laboratory scale or pilot scale research, and validation of mathematical models, are among the most significant achievements of the CRP and have been highlighted

  4. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes) in ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations. This first meeting was held in the Agency's headquarters in Vienna, with participation of contract and agreement holders, experts, observer, and in-house staff.

  5. A report on the IAEA co-ordinated research programme on the Application of Isotopic Correlation Techniques to international safeguards 1975-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanatani, S.

    1983-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme on the Application of Isotopic Correlation Techniques (ICT) to International Safeguards has just ended in the Agency. During the continuation of the programme, scientists from Belgium, Japan, France, United Kingdom, United States and Euratom, engaged in the development of ICT, met periodically to discuss the results obtained by them from both theoretical and experimental investigations. The paper describes the main features of the alternative approaches developed at participating laboratories as well as procedures developed at the IAEA. At the conclusion of the programme, there was an unanimous recommendation from the participants that ICT is a useful tool for verification of input analysis at a chemical reprocessing plant. After the closure of the co-ordinated research programme, the IAEA is now applying data evaluation procedures developed at the Agency and keeping in contact with the progress of work on ICT carried on in laboratories such as JAERI (Japan), CEA (France) and Euratom, through support programmes and through participation in the ESARDA working group dealing with ICT

  6. Isotope and geochemical techniques applied to geothermal investigations. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting held in Dumaguete City, Philippines, 12-15 October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    In the last ten years, geothermal energy has emerged as an alternative source of energy for electrical and non-electrical uses. In some of these countries geothermal energy contributed up to 40% of the national power requirement. In others, it is being widely used in agriculture, aquaculture, air conditioning, kiln and fruit drying, pulp and paper industry, greenhouses and food processing. The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Application of Isotope and Geochemical Techniques to Geothermal Exploration in the Middle East, Asia, the Pacific and Africa aimed at integrating isotope techniques with traditional geochemical and hydrological methods in understanding the characteristics of geothermal systems. It involved isotopic and chemical surveys of hot to cold springs, wells and rivers in exploration areas as well as in exploited reservoirs where problems such as return of injected wastewaters are experienced. This publication is a compilation of the scientific papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting, held in Dumaguete City, Philippines, from 12 to 15 October 1993. Refs, figs and tabs.

  7. Co-ordinated research programme on the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques in the study of environmental pollution associated with solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme on the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques in the study of environmental pollution associated with solid wastes was started by the Agency in December 1987 and now comprises nineteen participants from seventeen countries. Topics of interest in this programme include studies of atmospheric aerosols, coal fly ash, incinerator ash, sewage sludge and a variety of other environmental specimens contaminated with solid wastes. The analytical techniques being used in this programme include neutron activation analysis (NAA), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF). This report summarizes the discussions that took place during the first research co-ordination meeting. Working papers presented by the participants are included as annexes. The main outcome of the meeting was agreement to include a ''core'' programme comprising studies of (1) aerosols collected from areas of low and high pollution, (2) coal fly ash composition, and (3) leaching of toxic elements from coal fly ash

  8. Review of methodologies for analysis of safety incidents at NPPs. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world and the prevention of incidents in these installations remain key concerns for the nuclear community. In this connection, the feedback of operating experience plays a major role: every nuclear power plant or nuclear utility needs to have a system in place for collecting information on unusual events, whether these are incidents or merely deviations from normal operation. Reporting to the regulatory body of important events and lessons learned is normally carried out through the national reporting schemes based on regulatory reporting requirements. The most important lessons learned are further shared internationally, through, for example, the Joint IAEA/NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) or the event information exchange of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). In order to properly assess the event, an adequate event investigation methodology has to be applied, which leads to the identification of correct root causes. Once these root causes have been ascertained, appropriate corrective actions can be established and corresponding lessons can be drawn. The overall goal of root cause analysis is the prevention of events or their recurrence and thus the overall improvement in plant safety. In 1998, the IAEA established a co-ordinated research project with the objective of exploring root cause methodologies and techniques currently in use in Member States, evaluating their strengths and limitations and developing criteria for appropriate event investigation methodologies. This report is the outcome of four years of co-ordinated research which involved 15 national and international research organizations

  9. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes) in ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations. This first meeting was held in the Agency's headquarters in Vienna, with participation of contract and agreement holders, experts, observer, and in-house staff

  10. Rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples. Final report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Rapid Instrumental and Separation Methods for Monitoring Radionuclides in Food and Environmental Samples was established by the Agency following a Consultants' Meeting on the same topic, which was held 5-9 September 1988 in Vienna. It was completed in 1992. At various times during its course it encompassed 15 participants from 14 countries. The scope of work and objectives of the CRP were established at the Consultants' Meeting. It was agreed that the CRP should focus on the development of rapid methods for the determination of radionuclides in food and environmental samples during the intermediate and late post-accident phases. The rapid methods developed during the course of the CRP were intended to permit a timely and accurate determination of radionuclides at concentrations at least one order of magnitude below those specified for Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) for food by the WHO/FAO and the IAEA. Research Co-ordination meetings were held in Warsaw, Poland in September 1989 and in Vienna, Austria in 1991. Reports of the meetings are available from the Agency on Request. This document comprises copies of final reports from the participants and selected contributions presented by the participants at the meetings. The contributions were selected on the basis of being able to stand alone, without further explanation. Where there was an overlap in the information presented by a participant at both meetings, the most complete contribution was selected

  11. Co-ordinate decrease in the expression of the mitochondrial genome and nuclear genes for mitochondrial proteins in the lactation-induced mitochondrial hypotrophy of rat brown fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, I; Giralt, M; Viñas, O; Iglesias, R; Mampel, T; Villarroya, F

    1995-01-01

    The relative abundance of the mitochondrial-encoded mRNAs for cytochrome c oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I was lower in brown adipose tissue (BAT) from lactating rats than in virgin controls. This decrease was in parallel with a significant decrease in mitochondrial 16 S rRNA levels and in the relative content of mitochondrial DNA in the tissue. BAT from lactating rats showed lowered mRNA expression of the nuclear-encoded genes for the mitochondrial uncoupling protein, subunit IV of cytochrome c oxidase and the adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms ANT1 and ANT2, whereas mRNA levels for the ATP synthase beta-subunit were unchanged. However, the relative content of this last protein was lower in BAT mitochondria from lactating rats than in virgin controls. It is concluded that lactation-induced mitochondrial hypotrophy in BAT is associated with a co-ordinate decrease in the expression of the mitochondrial genome and nuclear genes for mitochondrial proteins. This decrease is caused by regulatory events acting at different levels, including pre- and post-transcriptional regulation. BAT appears to be a useful model with which to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the co-ordination of the expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes during mitochondrial biogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8948428

  12. Changes in the oligomerization potential of the division inhibitor UgtP co-ordinate Bacillus subtilis cell size with nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, An-Chun; Zareh, Shannon Kian Gharabiklou; Wang, Yan Mei; Levin, Petra Anne

    2012-11-01

    How cells co-ordinate size with growth and development is a major, unresolved question in cell biology. In previous work we identified the glucosyltransferase UgtP as a division inhibitor responsible for increasing the size of Bacillus subtilis cells under nutrient-rich conditions. In nutrient-rich medium, UgtP is distributed more or less uniformly throughout the cytoplasm and concentrated at the cell poles and/or the cytokinetic ring. Under these conditions, UgtP interacts directly with FtsZ to inhibit division and increase cell size. Conversely, under nutrient-poor conditions, UgtP is sequestered away from FtsZ in punctate foci, and division proceeds unimpeded resulting in a reduction in average cell size. Here we report that nutrient-dependent changes in UgtP's oligomerization potential serve as a molecular rheostat to precisely co-ordinate B. subtilis cell size with nutrient availability. Our data indicate UgtP interacts with itself and the essential cell division protein FtsZ in a high-affinity manner influenced in part by UDP glucose, an intracellular proxy for nutrient availability. These findings support a model in which UDP-glc-dependent changes in UgtP's oligomerization potential shift the equilibrium between UgtP•UgtP and UgtP•FtsZ, fine-tuning the amount of FtsZ available for assembly into the cytokinetic ring and with it cell size. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The application of isotope techniques to the assessment of aquifer systems in major urban areas. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    Aquifer systems in most urban areas have been impacted to varying degrees by sustained exploitation and the future availability of water is being threatened by depleting aquifers or water quality degradation. Improved methods for the assessment and management of groundwater resources in major urban areas, therefore, are issues of high priority for most countries. The IAEA has, over last four decades, co-ordinated the development, adaptation, and testing of isotope techniques for hydrological applications. A number of techniques and methodologies that are now established for water resources management are potentially useful for characterizing the short and long term changes resulting from the extensive use of aquifers in and near urban areas. The application of isotope techniques in urban hydrology was the focus of this co-ordinated research project (CRP). This report provides the final results of the CRP, and is expected to be of interest to scientists, managers and planners involved in water resources assessment in urban areas. This publication contains seven individual reports, each of them was indexed separately

  14. Use of isotopic tracers in studies of herbicides performance on grasses and sedges. Report of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    Herbicide products as sold to the user are a mixture or formulation of active ingredient, surfactants and other adjuvants, plus a carrier, which will be a liquid if the formulation is to be applied as a spray. The adjuvants affect the characteristics of the spray, including the retention of the droplets by plant surfaces and the penetration of active ingredient into the plant. Thus they play a critical part in determining the phototoxicity and selectivity of the product. The IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme in 1992 to explore the possibility of improving the performance of the herbicide glyphosate on Cyperus rotundus (purple nutsedge), commonly regarded as the ``world`s worst weed``, by modifying the commercial formulation using penetration studies with {sup 14}C labelled glyphosate as the initial screening procedure. This TECDOC summarizes the outcome of the programme and includes the papers presented at the research co-ordination meeting held in Los Banos, Philippines, 17-21 February 1997. The co-operation of the Monsanto Company, the manufacturer of the glyphosate herbicide, is gratefully acknowledged. Refs, figs, tabs.

  15. Use of isotopic tracers in studies of herbicides performance on grasses and sedges. Report of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    Herbicide products as sold to the user are a mixture or formulation of active ingredient, surfactants and other adjuvants, plus a carrier, which will be a liquid if the formulation is to be applied as a spray. The adjuvants affect the characteristics of the spray, including the retention of the droplets by plant surfaces and the penetration of active ingredient into the plant. Thus they play a critical part in determining the phototoxicity and selectivity of the product. The IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme in 1992 to explore the possibility of improving the performance of the herbicide glyphosate on Cyperus rotundus (purple nutsedge), commonly regarded as the ''world's worst weed'', by modifying the commercial formulation using penetration studies with 14 C labelled glyphosate as the initial screening procedure. This TECDOC summarizes the outcome of the programme and includes the papers presented at the research co-ordination meeting held in Los Banos, Philippines, 17-21 February 1997. The co-operation of the Monsanto Company, the manufacturer of the glyphosate herbicide, is gratefully acknowledged

  16. Rapid instrumental and separation methods for monitoring radionuclides in food and environmental samples. Final report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Rapid Instrumental and Separation Methods for Monitoring Radionuclides in Food and Environmental Samples was established by the Agency following a Consultants' Meeting on the same topic, which was held 5-9 September 1988 in Vienna. It was completed in 1992. At various times during its course it encompassed 15 participants from 14 countries. The scope of work and objectives of the CRP were established at the Consultants' Meeting. It was agreed that the CRP should focus on the development of rapid methods for the determination of radionuclides in food and environmental samples during the intermediate and late post-accident phases. The rapid methods developed during the course of the CRP were intended to permit a timely and accurate determination of radionuclides at concentrations at least one order of magnitude below those specified for Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) for food by the WHO/FAO and the IAEA. Research Co-ordination meetings were held in Warsaw, Poland in September 1989 and in Vienna, Austria in 1991. Reports of the meetings are available from the Agency on Request. This document comprises copies of final reports from the participants and selected contributions presented by the participants at the meetings. The contributions were selected on the basis of being able to stand alone, without further explanation. Where there was an overlap in the information presented by a participant at both meetings, the most complete contribution was selected.

  17. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guill Katherine E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism.

  18. The role of cell cycle in retinal development: cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors co-ordinate cell-cycle inhibition, cell-fate determination and differentiation in the developing retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitou, Aikaterini; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-01

    The mature retina is formed through multi-step developmental processes, including eye field specification, optic vesicle evagination, and cell-fate determination. Co-ordination of these developmental events with cell-proliferative activity is essential to achieve formation of proper retinal structure and function. In particular, the molecular and cellular dynamics of the final cell cycle significantly influence the identity that a cell acquires, since cell fate is largely determined at the final cell cycle for the production of postmitotic cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the cellular mechanisms that underlie the co-ordination of cell-cycle and cell-fate determination, and also describes a molecular role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) as co-ordinators of cell-cycle arrest, cell-fate determination and differentiation. Copyright (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. In vitro techniques for selection of radiation induced mutations adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The ever increasing human population and dwindling land and water resources worldwide make it essential to produce more food, fibre and fodder from less and less land. During the last century, plant breeding contributed remarkably to increasing food by producing varieties which give higher yield, have improved quality and nutrition, and resist diseases and pests. Nearly 50% of the increase in food production in Asia during the last fifty years can be attributed to the high yielding, short height varieties of rice and wheat, the remaining to the improved agronomic inputs and management. Many crops, such as cassava, potato, pineapple, sweet potato, sugarcane, banana and plantain are major food crops, and others such as sugarcane and pineapple are important to the economies of many developing countries. One of the solutions to have a sustainable and secure food production is to breed varieties which are tolerant of stress conditions during their growth and development. Hence a Co-ordinated Research Project on In vitro Techniques for Selection of Radiation Induced Mutations Adapted to Adverse Environmental Conditions was initiated and focused primarily on the improvement of vegetatively propagated plants. Since the inception of this project, several participating scientists established the optimal dose requirement for in vitro cultured material. Investigations were carried out on the effect of radiation to alter traits which affect survival under stress conditions and high temperature stress in potato, pineapple, sweet potato and garlic. The possibility to change traits such as tolerance to saline and water logged soils in sugarcane and gene regulation for salinity tolerance were studied. The limited number of available reports suggest that callus cultures are much more sensitive to radiation treatment and require much lower doses (2 to 5 Gy) than stem cuttings or seeds, and that relatively higher doses (15 to 20 Gy) cause necrosis or loss of regenerative capacity. The

  20. In vitro techniques for selection of radiation induced mutations adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The ever increasing human population and dwindling land and water resources worldwide make it essential to produce more food, fibre and fodder from less and less land. During the last century, plant breeding contributed remarkably to increasing food by producing varieties which give higher yield, have improved quality and nutrition, and resist diseases and pests. Nearly 50% of the increase in food production in Asia during the last fifty years can be attributed to the high yielding, short height varieties of rice and wheat, the remaining to the improved agronomic inputs and management. Many crops, such as cassava, potato, pineapple, sweet potato, sugarcane, banana and plantain are major food crops, and others such as sugarcane and pineapple are important to the economies of many developing countries. One of the solutions to have a sustainable and secure food production is to breed varieties which are tolerant of stress conditions during their growth and development. Hence a Co-ordinated Research Project on In vitro Techniques for Selection of Radiation Induced Mutations Adapted to Adverse Environmental Conditions was initiated and focused primarily on the improvement of vegetatively propagated plants. Since the inception of this project, several participating scientists established the optimal dose requirement for in vitro cultured material. Investigations were carried out on the effect of radiation to alter traits which affect survival under stress conditions and high temperature stress in potato, pineapple, sweet potato and garlic. The possibility to change traits such as tolerance to saline and water logged soils in sugarcane and gene regulation for salinity tolerance were studied. The limited number of available reports suggest that callus cultures are much more sensitive to radiation treatment and require much lower doses (2 to 5 Gy) than stem cuttings or seeds, and that relatively higher doses (15 to 20 Gy) cause necrosis or loss of regenerative capacity. The

  1. Use of immunoassay technologies for the diagnosis and control of foot-and-mouth disease in Southeast Asia. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The IAEA and FAO, through the activities of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture and their technical co-operation programmes, support the introduction of nuclear and related techniques to improve animal disease diagnosis and surveillance in developing countries. At a workshop hosted by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) and the Department of Livestock Development (DLD) of Thailand, in Lampang, Thailand, in September 1993, an analysis of the results of an ACIAR project on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) as well as national reports from twelve other Asian countries clearly demonstrated that the control and eradication of FMD in Asia is both a national and regional problem (vaccination alone costs in the region US $380 million annually). It was concluded that a co-ordinated regional approach was the only realistic way forward for controlling and eventually eradicating FMD from the region. It was agreed that the OIE would lead this co-ordinated regional programme in close co-operation with FAO, ACIAR, other relevant international organizations and national governments. Results of the ACIAR Project also clearly demonstrated the immense value of ELISA based systems for the diagnosis and control of FMD within Thailand. The meeting, therefore, recommended that an essential component of a regional strategy was to have, as a minimum, ELISA tests for the detection of FMD virus and for assessing the antibody status of livestock population in each country in the region. In support of this concept, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture established a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the primary aim of establishing and documenting appropriate mechanisms for introducing and using ELISA based technologies for FMD diagnosis and surveillance in participating countries. At the completion of this Project, the region is left with a national ELISA based diagnostic facility in

  2. Use of immunoassay technologies for the diagnosis and control of foot-and-mouth disease in Southeast Asia. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    The IAEA and FAO, through the activities of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture and their technical co-operation programmes, support the introduction of nuclear and related techniques to improve animal disease diagnosis and surveillance in developing countries. At a workshop hosted by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) and the Department of Livestock Development (DLD) of Thailand, in Lampang, Thailand, in September 1993, an analysis of the results of an ACIAR project on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) as well as national reports from twelve other Asian countries clearly demonstrated that the control and eradication of FMD in Asia is both a national and regional problem (vaccination alone costs in the region US $380 million annually). It was concluded that a co-ordinated regional approach was the only realistic way forward for controlling and eventually eradicating FMD from the region. It was agreed that the OIE would lead this co-ordinated regional programme in close co-operation with FAO, ACIAR, other relevant international organizations and national governments. Results of the ACIAR Project also clearly demonstrated the immense value of ELISA based systems for the diagnosis and control of FMD within Thailand. The meeting, therefore, recommended that an essential component of a regional strategy was to have, as a minimum, ELISA tests for the detection of FMD virus and for assessing the antibody status of livestock population in each country in the region. In support of this concept, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture established a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the primary aim of establishing and documenting appropriate mechanisms for introducing and using ELISA based technologies for FMD diagnosis and surveillance in participating countries. At the completion of this Project, the region is left with a national ELISA based diagnostic facility in

  3. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2011-01-01

    Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education-TOJDE April 2011 ISSN 1302-6488 Volume: 12 Number: 2 from EditorGreetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 12, Number: 2. In this issue it is published 4 notes for Editor, 14 articles, 1 book review. And this time, 43 authors from 10 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Austrlia, Bangldesh, India, lndonasia, Iran, Malaysia. Pakistan, Serbia, Turkey and USA.The first Notes for editor a...

  4. Input data for quantifying risks associated with the transport of radioactive material. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The final outcome of the work done for the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) by ten countries, which was co-ordinated by the IAEA, is presented. Described are the modalities for the collection, analysis and processing of relevant input data and the selection of databases. These data cover such items as package characteristics, accident environments and package behaviour under accident load conditions. Advice is given as to how to present the risk assessment results and how to quantify the uncertainty inherent in the predicted consequences and risks. INTERTRAN2 computer code system as a risk assessment tool is described. Information is also given on various accident scenarios, event trees and severity frequencies, transport accident severity and frequency assessment methods as well as on dose assessment techniques

  5. First research co-ordination meeting on development of reference charged particle cross section data base for medical radioisotope production. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1996-03-01

    The present report contains the summary of the First Research Co-ordination Meeting on ''Development of Reference Charged Particle Cross Section Data Base for Medical Radioisotope Production'', held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 15 to 17 November 1995. The project focuses on monitor reactions and production reactions for gamma emitters and positron emitters induced with light charged particles of incident energies up to about 100 MeV. Summarized are technical discussions and the resulting work plan of the Coordinated Research Programme, including actions and deadlines. Attached are an information sheet on the project, the agenda and a list of participants of the meeting. Also attached is brief information on the adjacent Consultant's Meeting on ''Automated Synthesis Systems for the Cyclotron Production of 18 F and 123 I and their Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals''. (author)

  6. Irradiation of fuels and materials in the Jules Horowitz reactor: The 6th European Union JHR co-ordination action (JHR-CA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iracane, Daniel; Parrat, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Fermine thematic network in the 5th FP pointed out the need for a new MTR facility in Europe to answer the continuous need of irradiation capabilities for fission power reactors and fusion facilities and to face the ageing of present MTRs. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) Project in Cadarache copes with this context, as an international service-oriented user-facility. In the field of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation experiments, a 6th FP co-ordination action, called JHR-CA, has started at the beginning of 2004 for 2 years. The main objective is to network existing expertise on development of a new generation of experimental devices, through definition of conceptual designs, instrumentation and related in-reactor services. This paper presents the outline of the JHR project, the organization of the JHR-CA programme, and a choice of irradiation device conceptual design results. (author)

  7. Extrapolation of short term observations to time periods relevant to the isolation of long lived radioactive waste. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1995-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    This report addresses safety analysis of the whole repository life-cycle that may require long term performance assessment of its components and evaluation of potential impacts of the facility on the environment. Generic consideration of procedures for the development of predictive tools are completed by detailed characterization of selected principles and methods that were applied and presented within the co-ordinated research project (CRP). The project focused on different approaches to extrapolation, considering radionuclide migration/sorption, physical, geochemical and geotechnical characteristics of engineered barriers, irradiated rock and backfill performance, and on corrosion of metallic and vitreous materials. This document contains a comprehensive discussion of the overall problem and the practical results of the individual projects preformed within the CRP. Each of the papers on the individual projects has been indexed separately

  8. The IAEA co-ordinated research programme on activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    The present report summarizes the final results of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Activation Cross Section for the Generator of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology''. The goal of the CRP was to obtain reliable information (experimental and evaluated) for 16 long-lived activation reactions of special importance to fusion reactor technology. By limiting the scope of the CRP to just 16 reactions it was possible to establish a very effective focus to the joint effort of many laboratories that has led to the generation of a set of valuable new data which provide satisfactory answers to several questions of technological concern to fusion. (author). 11 refs, 5 tabs

  9. Severity, probability and risk of accidents during maritime transport of radioactive material. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The primary purpose of this CRP was to provide a co-ordinated international effort to assemble and evaluate relevant data using sound technical judgement concerning the effects that fires, explosions or breaches of hulls of ships might have on the integrity of radioactive material packages. The probability and expected consequences of such events could thereby be assessed. If it were shown that the proportion of maritime accidents with severity in excess of the IAEA regulatory requirements was expected to be higher than that for land transport, then pertinent proposals could be submitted to the forthcoming Revision Panels to amend the IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and their supporting documents. Four main areas of research were included in the CRP. These consisted of studying the probability of ship accidents; fire; collision; and radiological consequences

  10. Severity, probability and risk of accidents during maritime transport of radioactive material. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The primary purpose of this CRP was to provide a co-ordinated international effort to assemble and evaluate relevant data using sound technical judgement concerning the effects that fires, explosions or breaches of hulls of ships might have on the integrity of radioactive material packages. The probability and expected consequences of such events could thereby be assessed. If it were shown that the proportion of maritime accidents with severity in excess of the IAEA regulatory requirements was expected to be higher than that for land transport, then pertinent proposals could be submitted to the forthcoming Revision Panels to amend the IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and their supporting documents. Four main areas of research were included in the CRP. These consisted of studying the probability of ship accidents; fire; collision; and radiological consequences.

  11. Co-ordination of federal and provincial environmental assessment processes for the Point Lepreau Generating Station Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, C.; Thompson, P.D. [Point Lepreau Generating Station, Point Lepreau Refurbishment Project, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada); Barnes, J. [Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd., Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Modification of the Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility at Point Lepreau Generating Station is required to accommodate waste generated during and after an 18-month maintenance outage during which the station would be Refurbished. The modification of the facility triggered both federal and provincial environmental assessment requirements, and these assessments were conducted in a 'coordinated' and cooperative fashion. In this project, the coordinated approach worked well, and provided some significant advantages to the proponent, the public and the regulators. However, there are opportunities for further improvement in future projects, and this paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of this 'co-ordinated' approach. As part of this exploration, there is a discussion of administrative and regulatory changes that the province is considering for the environmental assessment process, and a discussion of the need for a formal 'harmonization' agreement. (author)

  12. Co-ordination of federal and provincial environmental assessment processes for the Point Lepreau Generating Station Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, C.; Thompson, P.D.; Barnes, J.

    2006-01-01

    Modification of the Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility at Point Lepreau Generating Station is required to accommodate waste generated during and after an 18-month maintenance outage during which the station would be Refurbished. The modification of the facility triggered both federal and provincial environmental assessment requirements, and these assessments were conducted in a 'coordinated' and cooperative fashion. In this project, the coordinated approach worked well, and provided some significant advantages to the proponent, the public and the regulators. However, there are opportunities for further improvement in future projects, and this paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of this 'co-ordinated' approach. As part of this exploration, there is a discussion of administrative and regulatory changes that the province is considering for the environmental assessment process, and a discussion of the need for a formal 'harmonization' agreement. (author)

  13. Co-ordinate changes in enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, activation and esterification in rabbit mammary gland druing pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, V J; Brindley, D N; Dils, R

    1977-01-01

    1. The activities of fatty acid synthetase, acyl-CoA synthetase, glycerol phosphate acyltransferase and phosphatidate phosphatase were measured in the mammary glands of rabbits from day 16 of pregnancy to day 15 of post partum. 2. There were significant correlations between the increases in activities of these enzymes during this period. This was the case whether the activities were expressed per mg of homogenate protein, per g wet wt. of tissue or per total wet weight of the whole glands. The only exception was the lack of correlation between the activities of fatty acid synthetase and of phosphatidate phosphatase per g wet wt. of tissue. 3. These co-ordinate increases are discussed in relation to the changes which occur in fatty acid metabolism in the mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:192226

  14. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical a...

  15. Radiation processing for safe, shelf-stable and ready-to-eat food. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The increasingly busy lifestyles of populations in many countries have driven the demand for safe, convenient and ready-to-eat food. Traditional food processes such as drying, canning or refrigeration offer a partial solution to this demand as the sensory quality of such food may be significantly affected or the products may be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria during preparation. For developing countries, safe shelf-stable food without the need for refrigeration would offer advantages. In addition, the increasing number of immuno-compromised populations in many countries requires a new approach to food safety to meet their needs. Irradiation offers a potential to enhance microbiological safety and quality of food through shelf-life extension. The benefits of irradiation as a sanitary treatment of many types of food are well known, some of which are applied commercially in several countries. Little data were available, however, on the effect of irradiation on minimally processed food and composite food including prepared meals. A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Development of Safe, Shelf-Stable and Ready-to-Eat Food through Radiation Processing therefore was implemented by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture in 1996 to evaluate the role of irradiation for such food. The results were encouraging as irradiation offers promise as a sanitary treatment to ensure microbiological safety and shelf-life extension of several types of food products including pre-cut vegetables and some sous-vide meals, chilled ready-prepared meals, chilled ready-to-eat meat products, food for immuno-compromised patients/populations, sterile meals, ready-to-eat-food of intermediate moisture content. This publication presents the research results reported at the final Research Co-ordination meeting on this CRP held in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, 10-14 July 2000

  16. Consumer acceptance and market development of irradiated food in Asia and the Pacific. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    This publication covers the activities and accomplishments of eight countries that participated in a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Public Acceptance and Market Development of Irradiated Food in Asia and the Pacific, as presented at a final Research Coordination Meeting held in Bangkok, 20-25 September 1998. The CRP was implemented through research agreements with Bangladesh, China (one each for Shanghai and Beijing), the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam, from 1994 to 1998. The technical work undertaken to bring food irradiation technology to the marketplace to address food security, public health and trade needs, is described. This covered the establishment of quality assurance procedures, the determination of irradiation doses for nontraditional as well as traditional foods, the conduct of techno-economic feasibility, and the identification of industry and consumer needs. In the majority of cases, R and D activities were undertaken in partnership with industry. Developments in the establishment and harmonization of regulations on food irradiation were also monitored. The participants made commendable progress in the marketing of irradiated food and in the understanding and promotion of consumer acceptance of the technology. This was demonstrated in the marketing of close to 179,000 tons of different food and related products through normal trading channels. While the volume of food irradiated varied with the capacity of irradiation plants in participating countries, the work showed that consumers would accept irradiated foods and that trade benefits would ensue from the application of the technology. Information dissemination was found to be a critical factor in public acceptance. The discussions at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting, which are also summarized in this publication, focused on key issues and recommendations to bring about the wider commercialization of food irradiation for the

  17. Radiation processing for safe, shelf-stable and ready-to-eat food. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    The increasingly busy lifestyles of populations in many countries have driven the demand for safe, convenient and ready-to-eat food. Traditional food processes such as drying, canning or refrigeration offer a partial solution to this demand as the sensory quality of such food may be significantly affected or the products may be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria during preparation. For developing countries, safe shelf-stable food without the need for refrigeration would offer advantages. In addition, the increasing number of immuno-compromised populations in many countries requires a new approach to food safety to meet their needs. Irradiation offers a potential to enhance microbiological safety and quality of food through shelf-life extension. The benefits of irradiation as a sanitary treatment of many types of food are well known, some of which are applied commercially in several countries. Little data were available, however, on the effect of irradiation on minimally processed food and composite food including prepared meals. A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Development of Safe, Shelf-Stable and Ready-to-Eat Food through Radiation Processing therefore was implemented by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture in 1996 to evaluate the role of irradiation for such food. The results were encouraging as irradiation offers promise as a sanitary treatment to ensure microbiological safety and shelf-life extension of several types of food products including pre-cut vegetables and some sous-vide meals, chilled ready-prepared meals, chilled ready-to-eat meat products, food for immuno-compromised patients/populations, sterile meals, ready-to-eat-food of intermediate moisture content. This publication presents the research results reported at the final Research Co-ordination meeting on this CRP held in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, 10-14 July 2000.

  18. Irradiation to control Vibrio infection from consumption of raw seafood and fresh produce. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    Vibrio spp. comprises an important group of pathogenic bacteria in food that often causes human illness and even death when the contaminated food is consumed raw or improperly cooked. The most dangerous member of this group, the El Tor strain of V. cholerae, was responsible for the cholera pandemic which started in Peru in 1991 and spread to nearby countries, resulting in hundreds of thousands of cases and thousands of deaths. Recognizing the role of irradiation to ensure the microbiological safety of food, the Pan American Health Organization of the World Health Organization and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture jointly sponsored a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Irradiation as a Public Health Intervention Measure to Control Foodborne Diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean, to assess the efficacy of this technology for food protection. The CRP was initiated in 1993 and concluded in 1998. The results of this CRP demonstrated that irradiation is effective for ensuring the microbiological safety of food naturally contaminated by Vibrio spp. This process offers unique benefits for decontamination of seafood, often contaminated with this group of aquatic bacteria at the source, and fresh vegetables that may be contaminated during production and handling, especially when these products are consumed raw or not thoroughly cooked. Because of the sensitivity of this group of bacteria to radiation, the dose required to ensure microbiological safety of food against them is not more than 1 kGy. The CRP also generated data on the effectiveness of irradiation to control infection by pork tapeworm (Taenia solium metacestode). However, the results of these studies were not conclusive enough for publication. This publication presents the research results reported at the final Research Co-ordination meeting on this CRP held in Havana, Cuba, 16-20 November 1998

  19. Irradiation to control Vibrio infection from consumption of raw seafood and fresh produce. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    Vibrio spp. comprises an important group of pathogenic bacteria in food that often causes human illness and even death when the contaminated food is consumed raw or improperly cooked. The most dangerous member of this group, the El Tor strain of V. cholerae, was responsible for the cholera pandemic which started in Peru in 1991 and spread to nearby countries, resulting in hundreds of thousands of cases and thousands of deaths. Recognizing the role of irradiation to ensure the microbiological safety of food, the Pan American Health Organization of the World Health Organization and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture jointly sponsored a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Irradiation as a Public Health Intervention Measure to Control Foodborne Diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean, to assess the efficacy of this technology for food protection. The CRP was initiated in 1993 and concluded in 1998. The results of this CRP demonstrated that irradiation is effective for ensuring the microbiological safety of food naturally contaminated by Vibrio spp. This process offers unique benefits for decontamination of seafood, often contaminated with this group of aquatic bacteria at the source, and fresh vegetables that may be contaminated during production and handling, especially when these products are consumed raw or not thoroughly cooked. Because of the sensitivity of this group of bacteria to radiation, the dose required to ensure microbiological safety of food against them is not more than 1 kGy. The CRP also generated data on the effectiveness of irradiation to control infection by pork tapeworm (Taenia solium metacestode). However, the results of these studies were not conclusive enough for publication. This publication presents the research results reported at the final Research Co-ordination meeting on this CRP held in Havana, Cuba, 16-20 November 1998.

  20. Consumer acceptance and market development of irradiated food in Asia and the Pacific. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This publication covers the activities and accomplishments of eight countries that participated in a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Public Acceptance and Market Development of Irradiated Food in Asia and the Pacific, as presented at a final Research Coordination Meeting held in Bangkok, 20-25 September 1998. The CRP was implemented through research agreements with Bangladesh, China (one each for Shanghai and Beijing), the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam, from 1994 to 1998. The technical work undertaken to bring food irradiation technology to the marketplace to address food security, public health and trade needs, is described. This covered the establishment of quality assurance procedures, the determination of irradiation doses for nontraditional as well as traditional foods, the conduct of techno-economic feasibility, and the identification of industry and consumer needs. In the majority of cases, R and D activities were undertaken in partnership with industry. Developments in the establishment and harmonization of regulations on food irradiation were also monitored. The participants made commendable progress in the marketing of irradiated food and in the understanding and promotion of consumer acceptance of the technology. This was demonstrated in the marketing of close to 179,000 tons of different food and related products through normal trading channels. While the volume of food irradiated varied with the capacity of irradiation plants in participating countries, the work showed that consumers would accept irradiated foods and that trade benefits would ensue from the application of the technology. Information dissemination was found to be a critical factor in public acceptance. The discussions at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting, which are also summarized in this publication, focused on key issues and recommendations to bring about the wider commercialization of food irradiation for the

  1. The fourth research co-ordination meeting (RCM) on 'Updated codes and methods to reduce the calculational uncertainties of liquid metal fast reactors reactivity effects'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The fourth Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effect' was held during 19-23 May, 2003 in Obninsk, Russian Federation. The general objective of the CRP is to validate, verify and improve methodologies and computer codes used for the calculation of reactivity coefficients in fast reactors aiming at enhancing the utilization of plutonium and minor actinides. The first RCM took place in Vienna on 24 - 26 November 1999. The meeting was attended by 19 participants from 7 Member States and one from an international organization (France, Germany, India, Japan, Rep. of Korea, Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and IAEA). The participants from two Member States (China and the U.S.A.) provided their results and presentation materials even though being absent at the meeting. The results for several relevant reactivity parameters obtained by the participants with their own state-of-the-art basic data and codes, were compared in terms of calculational uncertainty, and their effects on the ULOF transient behavior of the hybrid BN- 600 core were evaluated. Contributions of the participants in the benchmark analyses is shown. This report first addresses the benchmark definitions and specifications given for each Phase and briefly introduces the basic data, computer codes, and methodologies applied to the benchmark analyses by various participants. Then, the results obtained by the participants in terms of calculational uncertainty and their effect on the core transient behavior are intercompared. Finally it addresses some conclusions drawn in the benchmarks

  2. Application of DNA based marker mutations for improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop plants. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and Other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants represents the first of three CRPs dealing with the application of molecular markers to mutations and plant breeding and was implemented between 1992 and 1996. A second companion CRP entitled Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops devoted to the application of molecular markers in vegetatively propagated crops species was implemented between 1993 and 1997. One positive consequence of these two CRPs has been the implementation of a third CRP entitled Radioactively Labeled DNA Probes for Crop Improvement, which began in 1995 and aims to provide enabling technologies, in the form of probes and primers, to laboratories in developing countries. The rapid development of molecular marker technologies has also resulted in a dramatic increase in request from developing Member States for technical co-operation projects utilizing molecular markers to improve local varieties for biotic and abiotic stresses and other traits of relevance. With the intensified use of induced mutations in genetic studies, it will be important to continue the important work of understanding induced mutations at the molecular level. Evidence of the progress made in implementing molecular marker technologies in laboratories around the world is presented in this publication, which contains the results presented by the participants at the fourth and final Research Co-ordination Meeting of the CRP held in Vienna, 4-8 November 1996. The FAO and IAEA wish to express their sincere appreciation to the participants of the meeting for their work during the project period resulting in the summary and scientific reports presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs.

  3. Application of DNA based marker mutations for improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop plants. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and Other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants represents the first of three CRPs dealing with the application of molecular markers to mutations and plant breeding and was implemented between 1992 and 1996. A second companion CRP entitled Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops devoted to the application of molecular markers in vegetatively propagated crops species was implemented between 1993 and 1997. One positive consequence of these two CRPs has been the implementation of a third CRP entitled Radioactively Labeled DNA Probes for Crop Improvement, which began in 1995 and aims to provide enabling technologies, in the form of probes and primers, to laboratories in developing countries. The rapid development of molecular marker technologies has also resulted in a dramatic increase in request from developing Member States for technical co-operation projects utilizing molecular markers to improve local varieties for biotic and abiotic stresses and other traits of relevance. With the intensified use of induced mutations in genetic studies, it will be important to continue the important work of understanding induced mutations at the molecular level. Evidence of the progress made in implementing molecular marker technologies in laboratories around the world is presented in this publication, which contains the results presented by the participants at the fourth and final Research Co-ordination Meeting of the CRP held in Vienna, 4-8 November 1996. The FAO and IAEA wish to express their sincere appreciation to the participants of the meeting for their work during the project period resulting in the summary and scientific reports presented in this publication

  4. Fourth and final research co-ordination meeting for the coordinated research project on 'Comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotopic techniques'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, G.V.; Mokhtar, N.

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency started the five-year Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Comparative International Studies of Osteoporosis Using Isotope Techniques. The objectives of this study were: To harmonize the techniques of measuring BMD within the participating countries and to obtain data that can be compared between the different study groups (countries); To determine whether early adult PBM varies between populations over the age range from 15 to 50 years. In other words, to determine the age of peak bone mass in selected populations from developing countries; To explore environmental and nutritional contributions to any determined differences. Further information about the purpose and scope of the CRP may be found in the report of the Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) held in 19921 and other reports of this CRP. Since the last RCM held in 1998, the CRP participants have gathered up more data on BMD. Indeed 3488 subjects 15-50 years) have been recruited for the purpose of this project and have been stratified equally by sex and age into six -year age bands. Most of the participants have also completed collecting data on dietary intake, medical history, physical exercise, and lifestyle, as suggested in the VrHO questionnaire. Some participants have analyzed trace elements in a number of bone samples as well. One of the most important purposes of this CRP is to obtain harmonized data on BMD that is comparable from one study group to another. To ensure this quality insurance, the densitometers in each center were cross calibrated using a European Spine Phantom (ESP). Further-more, day-to-day control of DEXA machines was managed by each individual center. The fourth Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants of the CRP, which is the subject of the present report, was held at the University of Sheffield Medical School; WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases in Sheffield, UK from 28 Feb. to 3 March 2000

  5. The test-retest reliability of anatomical co-ordinate axes definition for the quantification of lower extremity kinematics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul John; Greenhalgh, Andrew; Edmundson, Christopher James; Brooks, Darrell; Hobbs, Sarah Jane

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) kinematic analyses are used widely in both sport and clinical examinations. However, this procedure depends on reliable palpation of anatomical landmarks and mal-positioning of markers between sessions may result in improperly defined segment co-ordinate system axes which will produce in-consistent joint rotations. This had led some to question the efficacy of this technique. The aim of the current investigation was to assess the reliability of the anatomical frame definition when quantifying 3-D kinematics of the lower extremities during running. Ten participants completed five successful running trials at 4.0 m·s(-1) ± 5%. 3-D angular joint kinematics parameters from the hip, knee and ankle were collected using an eight camera motion analysis system. Two static calibration trials were captured. The first (test) was conducted prior to the running trials following which anatomical landmarks were removed. The second was obtained following completion of the running trials where anatomical landmarks were re-positioned (retest). Paired samples t-tests were used to compare 3-D kinematic parameters quantified using the two static trials, and intraclass correlations were employed to examine the similarities between the sagittal, coronal and transverse plane waveforms. The results indicate that no significant (p>0.05) differences were found between test and retest 3-D kinematic parameters and strong (R(2)≥0.87) correlations were observed between test and retest waveforms. Based on the results obtained from this investigation, it appears that the anatomical co-ordinate axes of the lower extremities can be defined reliably thus confirming the efficacy of studies using this technique.

  6. The development of the natural gas transportation network in Brazil: Recent changes to the gas law and its role in co-ordinating new investments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomer Ferraro, Marcelo; Hallack, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, the consensus that natural gas regulation has failed to attract investments, especially from private companies, culminated in a new law for the natural gas sector, passed in March 2009 (Law No. 11,909). The most significant change this new law introduced was the new governmental role in co-ordinating investments in the transportation sector. The Brazilian government has had to plan pipeline networks, estimate the size of demand for transportation and organise bidding to select investors for new pipeline projects. Although the law has established a clear regulatory framework for the midstream sector, providing stability and the legal certainty necessary for long-term investments in assets with high specificity, it has not been able to fill all of the gaps that remain under Law 9,478. In this sense, besides the challenges related to effective implementation of the regulatory attributes defined in Law 11,909, the absence of certain issues prevents the modified legal structure from encouraging the entry of new players in the transportation sector. This paper has identified, according to the neo-institutional view, the mechanisms of co-ordination introduced by the new law and the limitations of the new regulatory framework. - Highlights: ► Natural gas transportation investment requires some coordination mechanisms. ► The 9,478 Act was not capable to incentive the new player entrance. ► Brazilian natural gas industry is strongly concentrated in Petrobras hands. ► The new Brazilian legal framework aims to reduce transaction costs in gas industry. ► The industrial structure of the gas sector discourages the entrance of new investors.

  7. Intercomparison for individual monitoring of external exposure from photon radiation. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of External Exposure from photon radiation. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) have endorsed the use of the operational quantities for monitoring purposes. Specifically, personal dose equivalent, H p (d), is to be used for individual dosimetry to demonstrate compliance with the exposure limit recommendations, while for workplace area monitoring the ambient dose equivalent and the directional dose equivalent are recommended. In view of the technical difficulties associated with the introduction of these operational quantities the IAEA decided to assist Member States in their provision of appropriate dosimetry for occupational protection. In this respect, intercomparisons have proven to be a cost effective method of providing such support. A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) was started in 1997 on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of External Exposure from photon radiation, involving more than twenty laboratories from eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union, and focusing on personnel dosimetry services for nuclear power plants. This CRP was part of the activities of the IAEA Occupational Protection Programme, the objective4s of which are to promote and internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques, and the promotion of the application of these guidelines. The preparatory phase included, in May 1997, a workshop aimed at familiarizing the participants with the new operational quantities

  8. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  9. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2009-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 10, Number: 2. This is the second issue of the year 2009 and 10th anniversary of TOJDE. In this issue it is published four notes for Editor, 13 articles, 2 reviews. And this time, 28 authors from 8 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Canada, Gana, India, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, United Kingdom and Turkey. “Reflective Approach In Teaching Pre-Degree Chemistry” has sent to editor of TOJ...

  10. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2012-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 13 Number: 1 In this issue it is published 5 notes for Editor, 16articles, 2 books reviews a nd this time, 53 authors from 12 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Greece, Iran, Malaysia, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Turkey, UAE and USA.The first Notes for editor arrived from USA, written by Kevin YEE and Jace HARGIS. They focused on Simply including a narrative co...

  11. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2011-01-01

    Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE appears on your screen now as Volume 12, Number: 4. In this issue it publishes 5 notes for Editor, 10 articles, 2 book reviews. And this time, 33 authors from 10 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE and USA. The first Notes for editor arrived from USA, written by Kevin YEE and Jace HARGIS. They focused on Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follo...

  12. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation protection dose limits, the assurance that these limits will not be exceeded cannot be guaranteed, thus providing new challenges for development of accurate methods of individual dose assessment. To meet some of these challenges, in 1998 the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the objective to review the available methods, current research and development in EPR biodosimetry technology, which may be of practical use. The major goal of this CRP was to investigate the use of EPR biodosimetry for reconstruction of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with the aim of providing Member States with up-to-date, and generally agreed upon advice regarding the most suitable procedures and the best focus for their research. The co-ordinated research project was conducted over four years and this publication presents the results and findings by a group of investigators from different countries. The available cytogenetic methods for radiation dose assessment were

  13. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation protection dose limits, the assurance that these limits will not be exceeded cannot be guaranteed, thus providing new challenges for development of accurate methods of individual dose assessment. To meet some of these challenges, in 1998 the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the objective to review the available methods, current research and development in EPR biodosimetry technology, which may be of practical use. The major goal of this CRP was to investigate the use of EPR biodosimetry for reconstruction of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with the aim of providing Member States with up-to-date, and generally agreed upon advice regarding the most suitable procedures and the best focus for their research. The co-ordinated research project was conducted over four years and this publication presents the results and findings by a group of investigators from different countries. The available cytogenetic methods for radiation dose assessment were

  14. Report of the second research co-ordination meeting of the CRP on development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Development of Kits for Immunoradiometric Assays for tumour markers' was started towards the end of 1997. Ten laboratories from different parts of the world with experience in development of immunoassays are participating in this project and the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was held at the Agency Head Quarters in Vienna during 3-7 December, 1997. Based on the discussions and recommendations made during this meeting, the participants have carried out the project work at their laboratories during the past 18 months. During this period two consignments (November 98 and March 99) of some of the essential reagents, namely the capture Mab (Mab 66; 5 mg), tracer Mabs (Mab 10; 0.5 mg for total PSA and Mab 30; 0.5 mg for free PSA assay) and PSA antigen (1.3 mg, 80% pure) were shipped to each participant to enable them to develop the assays and to assess their own in-house reagents. The second RCM was held at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, to review the results obtained thus far and to discuss the actions to be taken in the next phase of the project. All the participants presented the work done at their respective laboratories and discussed the results obtained. On the whole, it was observed that significant progress has been achieved by all the participants. In the area of production of monoclonal antibodies, significant accomplishment was achieved by Cuba, China and India. All the three laboratories had produced monoclonal antibodies against PSA and had been successful to various extents. Cuba could identify specific antibodies that could be used as capture antibody as well as tracer antibodies for free and total PSA assays. Small aliquots of these were brought and distributed to the participants for individual evaluation. China has also identified the monoclonals for an IRMA for total PSA while India had identified a monoclonal that could be used for coating. The selected antibodies have compared very

  15. Variations in CT determination of target volume with active breath co-ordinate in radiotherapy for post-operative gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui-Chao; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Xue-Jun; Yu, Xiao-Li; Hu, Wei-Gang; Wang, Jia-Zhou; Li, Qi-Wen; Liang, Li-Ping; Shen, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate interobserver and inter-CT variations in using the active breath co-ordinate technique in the determination of clinical tumour volume (CTV) and normal organs in post-operative gastric cancer radiotherapy. Ten gastric cancer patients were enrolled in our study, and four radiation oncologists independently determined the CTVs and organs at risk based on the CT simulation data. To determine interobserver and inter-CT variation, we evaluated the maximum dimensions, derived volume and distance between the centres of mass (CMs) of the CTVs. We assessed the reliability in CTV determination among the observers by conformity index (CI). The average volumes ± standard deviation (cm(3)) of the CTV, liver, left kidney and right kidney were 674 ± 138 (range, 332-969), 1000 ± 138 (range, 714-1320), 149 ± 13 (range, 104-183) and 141 ± 21 (range, 110-186) cm(3), respectively. The average inter-CT distances between the CMs of the CTV, liver, left kidney and right kidney were 0.40, 0.56, 0.65 and 0.6 cm, respectively; the interobserver values were 0.98, 0.53, 0.16 and 0.15 cm, respectively. In the volume size of CTV for post-operative gastric cancer, there were significant variations among multiple observers, whereas there was no variation between different CTs. The slices in which variations more likely occur were the slices of the lower verge of the hilum of the spleen and porta hepatis, then the paraoesophageal lymph nodes region and abdominal aorta, and the inferior vena cava, and the variation in the craniocaudal orientation from the interobserver was more predominant than that from inter-CT. First, this is the first study to evaluate the interobserver and inter-CT variations in the determination of the CTV and normal organs in gastric cancer with the use of the active breath co-ordinate technique. Second, we analysed the region where variations most likely occur. Third, we investigated the influence of interobserver variation on

  16. From the editors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    2001-01-01

    Hofstadter’s Law: Things always take longer than you think, even when you take into account Hofstadter’s Law. [D. Hofstadter, Gödel, Escher, Bach: an eternal golden braid (1980) 152]. This certainly applies to the forthcoming issues of the Flora Malesiana. According to its editors the bottleneck

  17. Letters to the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents The imaginary Sun? Harold Aspden Energy Science Ltd, PO Box 35, Southampton SO16 7RB, UK Difficult physics? Tim Akrill Chief Examiner, A-level Physics, Edexcel Foundation Was it a dream? Bill Jarvis 6 Peggy's Mill Road, Edinburgh EH4 6JY

  18. From the editor's desk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ever since the Indian Academy of Sciences inherited the publication of the Journal of Genetics from J. B. S. Haldane, successive Editors-in-Chief, Profs H. Sharat Chandra, K. VijayRaghavan, Amitabh Joshi and Rajiva Raman, with the support of members of the editorial board, have not only sustained but also expanded the ...

  19. Letter to the editors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-19

    Oct 19, 2012 ... (interleukin 10 (IL10), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were done. ... 2. To the editors of the Pan African Medical Journal. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a devastating squeal of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in Africa. .... Gorgulu S, Eren M, Bagirtan B et al.

  20. Letter from the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Boshears

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available With grateful hearts we offer this, the second issue of our second volume. The result of months of back-breaking thinking, emailing, looking, clicking, watching, writing and reading, our summer issue is here. The editors could not have done this without your support. We welcome your materials for our future issues as well as your continued contributions.

  1. Letter from the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With grateful hearts we offer this, the first issue of our third volume. The result of months of back-breaking thinking, emailing, looking, clicking, watching, writing and reading, our new issue is here. The editors could not have done this without your support. We welcome your materials for our future issues as well as your continued contributions.

  2. Letter from the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Boshears

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available With grateful hearts we offer this, the third issue of our second volume. The result of months of back-breaking thinking, emailing, looking, clicking, watching, writing and reading, our fall issue is here. The editors could not have done this without your support. We welcome your materials for our future issues as well as your continued contributions.

  3. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 2: Country reports. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Funding for the RCM by the Government of Japan is gratefully acknowledged. The IAEA wishes to thank S. Kobayashi for his efforts in support of the CRP. The IAEA extends its appreciation to the Japanese National Institute of Radiological Sciences for acting as the technical secretariat to co-ordinate the work of data compilation. Specifically, the IAEA acknowledges the contributions of H. Kawamura, G. Tanaka and T. Koyanagi. Appreciation is also extended to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences for the valuable contribution they made to the CRP as hosts for the RCMS. The IAEA officers responsible for this publication were A. Moiseev and R.V. Griffith of the Division of Radiation and Waste Safety. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries

  4. Standardization of medfly trapping for use in sterile insect technique programmes. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1986-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    As different trapping systems are often applied in different countries or regions, it becomes difficult to compare population data from these regions. Also, population measurements taken with the same trap but in different climates are again difficult to compare. Given the cosmopolitan nature of the medfly and the area-wide control programmes developed against it, it is necessary to be able to estimate or compare fly population levels even when measured with different traps and in different environments. In view of the above, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, which has long been involved in medfly eradication and/or control activities in different regions, organized a co-ordinated research programme with the objective to compare and to standardize several of the most common medfly traps under different weather, host-tree and population density conditions. Tests were carried out in eight different countries and climates in northern Africa, southern Europe and Central America. Production of fruits preferred by the medfly is important in all eight countries. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Dosimetry for radiation processing. Final report of the co-ordinated research project on characterization and evaluation of high dose dosimetry techniques for quality assurance in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    In many Member States the use of large cobalt-60 gamma ray facilities and electron beam accelerators with beam energies from about 0.1 to 10 MeV for industrial processing continues to increase. For these processes, quality assurance relies on the application of well established dosimetry systems and procedures. This is especially the case for health regulated processes, such as the radiation sterilization of health care products, and the irradiation of food to eliminate pathogenic organisms or to control insect pests. A co-ordinated research project (CRP) was initiated by the IAEA in June 1995. Research contracts and research agreements in areas of high dose dosimetry were initiated to meet these challenges. The major goals of this CRP were to investigate the parameters that influence the response of dosimeters and to develop reference and transfer dosimetry techniques, especially for electron beams of energy less than 4 MeV and for high energy X ray sources (up to 5 MV). These will help to unify the radiation measurements performed by different radiation processing facilities and other high dose dosimetry users in Member States and encourage efforts to obtain traceability to primary and secondary standards laboratories. It will also aim to strengthen and expand the present International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) provided by the IAEA

  6. The theorization of social co-ordinations in differentiated societies: the theory of generalized symbolic media in Parsons, Luhmann and Habermas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernilo, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    The problem of the differentiation of societies is at the core of the sociological imagination about the rise of modernity. In postwar sociology, T. Parsons developed the theory of generalized symbolic media in the mid-1960s to tackle, theoretically and historically, the issue of differentiation. According to him, the interchange media are defined as resources oriented to exchange processes between the subsystems of the social system. Starting with money, Parsons argues that the remaining media (power, influence, and value-commitments) have a set of characteristics defined as common properties for all media. After this first formulation, contemporary theorists such as Niklas Luhmann and Jürgen Habermas have developed and modified the Parsonian theory: Luhmann rejects the idea of interchange and proposes the use of communication; Habermas distinguishes between steering and communication media. In all three cases, the focus of the theory is on the characterization of the strongest dynamics of social co-ordination present in differentiated societies. A major result of these developments is the inclusion of new dimensions on which to conceive the properties of media, not only those of money but also language. Beyond differences, then, it is proposed that there is only one theory of generalized symbolic media which can be understood as a progressive research programme, in Lakatos' terms. Finally, the hand-in-hand evolution between the theory of media and Habermas' and Luhmann's re-conceptualizations on societal differentiation in contemporary societies will also be revealed.

  7. Dual-task study of cognitive and postural interference: a preliminary investigation of the automatization deficit hypothesis of developmental co-ordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C-L; Pan, C-Y; Cherng, R-J; Wu, S-K

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether children with developmental co-ordination disorder and balance problem (DCD-BP) had greater problems than controls in performing a primary balance task while concurrently completing different cognitive tasks varying in oral or listening cognitive complexity, as well as to investigate the automatization deficit hypothesis of DCD-BP. Children with DCD-BP (n= 39), along with age-matched control counterparts (n= 39), were placed on automatic processing situation under dual-task conditions. All children were required to perform a primary task, five dual-task paradigms (oral counting task, auditory-verbal reaction task, auditory-choice reaction task, auditory-memory task and articulation alone) and an eyes-closed balancing task. In the primary task condition, the differences were not statistically significant (P= 0.393) between children with and without DCD-BP. However, children with DCD-BP were significantly more impaired on three of five dual-task conditions (oral counting task: P= 0.003; auditory-verbal reaction task: P= 0.011; auditory-memory task: P= 0.041) compared with the single-task situation, with the exception of the auditory-choice reaction task (P= 0.471) and articulation alone (P= 0.067). These results suggest that children with DCD-BP were more cognitively dependant and may have an automatization deficit.

  8. Application of personal computers to enhance operation and management of research reactors. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The on-line of personal computers (PCs) can be valuable to guide the research reactor operator in analysing both normal and abnormal situations. PCs can effectively be used for data acquisition and data processing, and providing information to the operator. Typical areas of on-line applications of PCs in nuclear research reactors include: Acquisition and display of data on process parameters; performance evaluation of major equipment and safety related components; fuel management; computation of reactor physics parameters; failed fuel detection and location; inventory of system fluids; training using computer aided simulation; operator advice. All these applications require the development of computer programmes and interface hardware. In recognizing this need, the IAEA initiated in 1990 a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Application of Personal Computers to Enhance Operation and Management of Research Reactors''. The final meeting of the CRP was held from 30 October to 3 November 1995 in Dalata Viet Nam. This report was written by contributors from Bangladesh, Germany, India, the Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam. The IAEA staff members responsible for the publication were K. Akhtar and V. Dimic of the Physics Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences

  9. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 5B. Experience data. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on the effects of Armenia earthquakes on selected power, industry and commercial facilities and seismic functional qualification of active mechanical and electrical components tested on shaking table

  10. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical and biotechnological applications, and modification of surfaces to achieve a specific functionality and/or to immobilize bioactive materials. This publication contains 10 reports of participants; each of the reports has been indexed separately.

  11. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical and biotechnological applications, and modification of surfaces to achieve a specific functionality and/or to immobilize bioactive materials. This publication contains 10 reports of participants; each of the reports has been indexed separately

  12. Co-ordinated research and environmental surveillance programme related to sea disposal of radioactive waste CRESP activity report 1986-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research and Environmental Surveillance Programme relevant to sea disposal of radioactive waste (CRESP) was created in 1981 in the framework of the 1977 Decision of the OECD Council establishing a Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Waste. The main task of CRESP was to set up a site-specific scientific research programme to increase current knowledge of the processes controlling the transfer of radionuclides in the marine environment, so that impact of past dumping could be monitored and future assessments could be based on more accurate and comprehensive scientific data. The CRESP mandate was extended in 1987 to respond to a request from the Paris Commission to include consideration of radioactive discharges in the maritime area covered by the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution from Land-Based Sources. This report summarizes the CRESP activities carried out during the 1986-1990 five year phase. Concerning the review of deep sea results, the report relates progress achieved above the level of knowledge which was available when the present phase of the CRESP programme was decided and which has been taken into account in the 1985 Site Suitability Review. With respect to coastal discharges, it presents a summary of R and D work undertaken by member countries, including those carried out in other programmes such as MARINA. Finally, it makes proposals for future work within CRESP

  13. IAEA co-ordinated research program. 'Round Robin' on measuring the velocity of delayed hydride cracking (DHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, V.; Jakobsson, R. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    The International Atomic Agency (IAEA) has initiated a new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Hydrogen and hydride induced degradation of the mechanical and physical properties of Zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase of this CRP the methodology for measuring the velocity of Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) should be established and participating laboratories from about nine countries around the world carry out identical tests in 'round robin'. The objective of the present work is to establish at Studsvik laboratory the method of a constant load cracking test on unirradiated Zr-2.5Nb and attain a comparison of results between laboratories. Constant load tests are performed on specimens cut from unirradiated CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and the rate of crack propagation is determined in each test. Pre-hydrided specimens for testing are supplied from the host laboratory. Six specimens have been tested for delayed hydride cracking (DHC) at 250 deg C. The axial crack growth velocities measured in the tests are within the interval of 8.62x10{sup -8} - 1.06x10{sup -7} m/s. The results obtained agree well with the earlier published data for similar materials and test conditions.

  14. Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Realizing the potential of labelled monoclonal antibodies for in vivo diagnosis and therapy and the interest in many developing Member States for acquiring expertise in this field the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme in 1991 focusing on {sup 99}Tc{sup m} labelling of antibodies, their quality control and scintigraphic evaluation. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Latin America, Europe and North America participated in this programme which was concluded in 1996. During this programme the participants investigated the {sup 99}Tc{sup m} labelling of a murine anti-CEA antibody using the method of chelating {sup 99}Tc{sup m} with the free sulfhydryl groups generated by reaction with reducing agents such as mercapto ethanol. During the later part of the programme this method was also extended to {sup 99}Tc{sup m} labelling of hIgG. All the participating laboratories could gain valuable experience in {sup 99}Tc{sup m} antibody labelling techniques and formulation of kits. Many of them have been use in patients by collaborating nuclear medicine specialists with satisfactory results. This report is a compilation of the detailed results obtained by the participating laboratories and includes a summary and assessment of the achievement of the CRP. Refs, figs, tabs.

  15. Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    Realizing the potential of labelled monoclonal antibodies for in vivo diagnosis and therapy and the interest in many developing Member States for acquiring expertise in this field the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme in 1991 focusing on 99 Tc m labelling of antibodies, their quality control and scintigraphic evaluation. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Latin America, Europe and North America participated in this programme which was concluded in 1996. During this programme the participants investigated the 99 Tc m labelling of a murine anti-CEA antibody using the method of chelating 99 Tc m with the free sulfhydryl groups generated by reaction with reducing agents such as mercapto ethanol. During the later part of the programme this method was also extended to 99 Tc m labelling of hIgG. All the participating laboratories could gain valuable experience in 99 Tc m antibody labelling techniques and formulation of kits. Many of them have been use in patients by collaborating nuclear medicine specialists with satisfactory results. This report is a compilation of the detailed results obtained by the participating laboratories and includes a summary and assessment of the achievement of the CRP

  16. Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra, assignment, ab initio, DFT and normal co-ordinate analysis of 2-chloro-4-methylaniline and 2-chloro-6-methylaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Mohan, S

    2009-03-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT-Raman spectra of 2-chloro-4-methylaniline and 2-chloro-6-methylaniline have been measured in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100cm(-1), respectively. Utilising the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compounds were carried out. The vibrational frequency which were determined experimentally are compared with those obtained theoretically from ab initio HF and DFT gradient calculations employing the HF/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) methods for optimised geometries. The geometries and normal modes of vibration obtained from the HF and DFT methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The normal co-ordinate analysis was also carried out on the basis of ab initio force fields utilising Wilson's FG matrix method. The manifestations of NH-pi interactions and the influence of bulky chlorine and methyl group on the vibrational modes of the amino group are investigated.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopic studies, normal co-ordinate analysis, first order hyperpolarizability, HOMO-LUMO of midodrine by using density functional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidha, R; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Muthu, S

    2015-01-05

    The FTIR (4000-400 cm(-1)), FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) and UV-Visible (400-200 nm) spectra of midodrine were recorded in the condensed state. The complete vibrational frequencies, optimized geometry, intensity of vibrational bands and atomic charges were obtained by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the help of 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) and related properties (μ, α and Δα) of this molecular system were calculated by using DFT/6-311++G(d,p) method based on the finite-field approach. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Co-ordinate Analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force methodology. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. From the recorded UV-Visible spectrum, the electronic properties such as excitation energies, oscillator strength and wavelength are calculated by DFT in water and gas methods using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies confirm that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Besides MEP, NLO and thermodynamic properties were also calculated and interpreted. The electron density-based local reactivity descriptor such as Fukui functions was calculated to explain the chemical selectivity or reactivity site in midodrine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of changes in gingival contour from three-dimensional co-ordinate data in subjects with drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, J M; Ellis, J S; Jovanovski, V; Corson, M; Lynch, E; Seymour, R A

    2005-10-01

    This aim of this study was to develop and assess a technique that could be used to assess accurately the gingival volume changes seen in drug-induced gingival overgrowth by the analysis of data obtained from an entire gingival surface by means of three-dimensional imaging. Stone dental models of patients before and after gingivectomy procedures were digitized with a laser scanner and then regenerated as computer models constructed from the acquired three-dimensional co-ordinate data. A comparison of superposed "before" and "after" surfaces was undertaken to assess and accurately quantify changes in gingival contour. The mean vertical tissue reduction varied from 1.58 to 2.56 mm in the four study subjects and individual differences are shown. The maximum thickness of removed buccal gingival overgrowth was found to range between 1.20 and 3.40 mm. The volume of tissue removed from each inter-dental papilla ranged from 4.2 to 46.1 mm3 and the mean volume of the papilla removed from each subject+/-SD values was 24.8+/-13.1 mm3. This method will measure changes in gingival tissues to within 60 microm in one plane, making it ideal for the assessment of longitudinal changes in gingival contour as seen in the development of gingival overgrowth, its recurrence after surgery or the changes in volume brought about by surgery.

  19. The production of lymphokines by primary alloreactive T-cell clones: a co-ordinate analysis of 233 clones in seven lymphokine assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, C J; Strath, M; Warren, D J; O'Garra, A; Kirkwood, T B

    1985-01-01

    A total of 233 primary alloreactive T-cell clones have been tested for the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-3 (IL-3), immune(gamma) interferon (IFN) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-2), B-cell growth factor I and II (BCGFI, BCGFII), and eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF). EDF was assayed by means of the eosinophil differentiation assay (EDA). Two principal correlations were observed: IL-3 was shown to be the major lymphokine detected in the bone marrow proliferation assay (BMPA) used to detect CSF-2, and there was a high correlation between the EDA and BCGFII. Subsequent work has suggested that this latter correlation is because a single factor is responsible for both activities. Apart from these two exceptions, and low level correlations probably due to the fact that different assays detect more than one lymphokine, there was no evidence for co-ordinate expression of lymphokines. There was a large variation in amounts of individual lymphokines produced. More clones produced multiple lymphokines than would be expected from independent control. Taken together, this pattern of regulation is consistent with the hypothesis that antigen stimulation of T cells results in the activation of all the lymphokine genes, but the amount of each produced is determined by secondary controlling mechanisms. PMID:3935571

  20. β-catenin at the centrosome: discrete pools of β-catenin communicate during mitosis and may co-ordinate centrosome functions and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbom, Bertrade C; Nelson, W James; Barth, Angela

    2013-09-01

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein with critical roles in cell-cell adhesion, Wnt-signaling and the centrosome cycle. Whereas the roles of β-catenin in cell-cell adhesion and Wnt-signaling have been studied extensively, the mechanism(s) involving β-catenin in centrosome functions are poorly understood. β-Catenin localizes to centrosomes and promotes mitotic progression. NIMA-related protein kinase 2 (Nek2), which stimulates centrosome separation, binds to and phosphorylates β-catenin. β-Catenin interacting proteins involved in Wnt signaling such as adenomatous polyposis coli, Axin, and GSK3β, are also localized at centrosomes and play roles in promoting mitotic progression. Additionally, proteins associated with cell-cell adhesion sites, such as dynein, regulate mitotic spindle positioning. These roles of proteins at the cell cortex and Wnt signaling that involve β-catenin indicate a cross-talk between different sub-cellular sites in the cell at mitosis, and that different pools of β-catenin may co-ordinate centrosome functions and cell cycle progression. © 2013 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Antibodies immobilized on magnetic particles for radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay of hormones. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme (CRP) in 1991 for studying the properties of a few most promising magnetizable immunoadsorbents and standardizing some important radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay procedures using them with the ultimate aim of expanding the application of these assays in developing countries using indigenously prepared reagents. Ten laboratories from nine countries of Asia, Latin America and Europe participated in this CRP which was concluded in 1995. Three different magnetizable particles prepared and investigated by the participants, namely magnetite, magnetite coated with silane and magnetite coated with polyacrolein, have emerged suitable for use in radioimmunometric assays from this CRP. Methods have been developed for coupling antibodies to these particles and using the resultant immunoadsorbents for assaying several important hormones and proteins including T 3 , T 4 , fT 3 , fT 4 , reverse T 3 , TSH, thyroglobuling(Tg), Tg-antibodies, HCG, LH, cortisol, FSH and prolacting. All the participating laboratories could develop in house methodology for solid phase assays based on magnetizable particles during the course of the CRP and benefit from the exchange of materials, information and experience amongst them. This report includes detailed results obtained by the participating laboratories as well as a summary and assessment of the achievements of the CRP. It also includes suggestions for areas of investigation for pursuing in the future. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Co-ordinated research programme on assessment of environmental exposure to mercury in selected human populations as studied by nuclear and other techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 24-28 August 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on assessment of environmental exposure to mercury in selected human populations as studied by nuclear and other techniques was initiated by the IAEA in 1990 in collaboration with WHO. The purpose of this CRP is to promote national and regional studies to evaluate the exposure of selected population groups to mercury and methylmercury and to estimate potential health risks in these groups. The programme is focused on the analysis of human head hair for the determination of mercury and methylmercury. This CRP has two main components: (i) identifying population groups that are at risk, and (ii) studying health effects in the exposed persons, particularly pregnant women and the babies born to them. This report contains the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, under the sponsorship of the University Kebangsaan Malaysia and papers presented at this meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research project: 'The development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries' (D3.20.22)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'the development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries' was held in the Vienna International Centre from 2 to 6 September 2002. Twelve Research Contracts (RCs) and 3 Research Agreements (RAs) have been awarded under this CRP and all awardees, the Project Officer and a guest speaker from the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AAHFS) participated in the RCM. The objective of the RCM was to plan the first phase of the CRP, initiation of the development and validation of methods. Specific objectives were to: Agree upon a small number of veterinary drugs upon which to focus the research; Agree upon analytical methodologies to be employed; formulate individual work plans for each research contract holder within the framework of the overall work plan. Each RC holder presented an overview of residues monitoring from the perspective of their respective countries. Emphasis was placed on problems encountered and future requirements. The participants visited the Austrian National Reference Laboratory for veterinary drug residues at Moedling and discussed the activities there with Mr. Kuhn and laboratory staff. An overall framework for phase of the CRP, focusing upon the compounds and analytical techniques of major importance to the majority of participants, was formulated. Each RC holder discussed and revised their individual work plan with the RA holders and the PO. The overall framework was then reviewed and a summary of the individual work plans presented. Conclusions and recommendations were drafted

  4. Letter from the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Allen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With grateful hearts we offer this, the fourth issue of our second volume. The result of months of back-breaking thinking, emailing, looking, clicking, watching, writing and reading, our winter issue is here. The editors could not have done this without your support. We welcome your materials for our future issues as well as your continued contributions. Purchase your copy of our first book from Punctum Books.

  5. DOSSIER: Intelectuales y Editores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Sorá

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El intelectual abre ideas, el editor las cierra. El escritor produce textos, el editor impresos. El intelectualescribe pero es el editor quien publica. No por nada, afirman algunos psicólogos, el pensamientoculmina con su publicación. Entre el escritor y el editor se moviliza una energía simbólica y socialsublimada bajo las líneas impresas que llegan al lector. Ese entre-lugar de producción de sentidos, decosmologías, de sociedad que marcó la formación de gran parte de las culturas desde la aparición de laexpresión gráfica de las ideas, permanece como un problema esquivo para la investigación, al menospara la antropología practicada en estas latitudes. Parece una cuestión obturada por el dominanteacúmulo de historias de las ideas, de la literatura, del pensamiento que reactualizan la oposición entreespíritu y materia, estética y sociedad, texto y contexto. Evidencia de ello es la clausura sufrida por lasociología de la literatura, una sub-disciplina tan incómoda para los guardianes del aura del genioliterario nacional.Este dossier busca iluminar esa relación con la certeza de que modela uno de los terrenos másfértiles para repensar el legado de la historia de la cultura en occidente y para generar un basto programade problemas de investigación escasamente explorados por las ciencias sociales y humanas en AméricaLatina, y aplicables al estudio de toda cultura, con o sin escritura.

  6. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available I am pleased to inform you that in the 8th year of TOJDE are appeared on your screen now as Volume 8, Number: 2. In this issue we published one notes for Editor, 14 articles, two reviews, news and announcements for our readers. 27 authors from ten different countries are placed in this issue. These published articles are from Australia, Bahrain, Bangladesh; Canada Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Turkey, UK and USA.

  7. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education-TOJDE April 2004 ISSN 1302-6488 Volume:5 Number:2 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From the Editor I am pleased to inform you that Vol.:5, Number:2 issue of The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education-TOJDE has been issued on the web site http://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr now. TOJDE is meeting with its readers for the 14th time, since 2000 January.First of all I would like to inform you once more that Volume 5 Number:3 will publish as a special theme issue of TOJDE. This issue will be prepare by Patrick Alan DANAHER, Fons NOUWENS, from Learning, Evaluation, Innovation and Development (LEID Centre, within the Division of Teaching and Learning Services, at Central Queensland University (CQU in Australia and Zeynep ERDINC from Anadolu University as a guest co-editors. Call for papers for taht issue finished at 15th March. Now, the selected articles are in reviewing and evaluation phase in process. In this issue, has been given place to two note for editor, eight articles, three book reviews, 9 news, and as being before three links deal with Anadolu University take place in the literature and introducing a journal dealt with DE application. This issue's articles came from Canada, Greece, Turkey and USA (according to alphabetical order.

  8. The use of 18O enrichment to determine the mode of co-ordination in MXO3 species via infrared frequency and intensity patterns: the shape of matrix-isolated KNO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beattie, I.R.; Ogden, J.S.; Price, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a new experimental approach to the problem of determining the mode of co-ordination of [XO 3 ]sup(n-) ions (e.g. [NO 3 ] - , [CO 3 ] 2- ). Using the nitrate ion as an example, it is shown, via line diagrams, that a qualitative distinction between monodentate and bidentate binding should be possible simply by noting the number and relative intensities of isotope bands associated with the highest frequency N-O stretching mode in the i.r. spectrum of the 18 O-enriched material. The method is illustrated by reference to the matrix i.r. spectrum of molecular KNO 3 , where the initial qualitative conclusion of bidentate co-ordination is confirmed by subsequent force-constant analysis. (author)

  9. Second research co-ordination meeting for the coordinated research project on 'Application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diseases) in ageing'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, G.V.; Mokhtar, N.

    2002-01-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations

  10. Establishment of an international reference data library of nuclear activation cross sections. Summary report of the first research co-ordination meeting held in Debrecen, Hungary, from 4 to 7 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1995-02-01

    The report contains the Summary of the First IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Establishment of an International Reference Data Library of Nuclear Activation Cross Sections''. The meeting was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section with co-operation and assistance of local organizers from the Institute of Experimental Physics and held in Debrecen, Hungary, from 4 to 7 October 1994. The purpose of the RCM was to discuss the scope and goals of the CRP, to report and evaluate the first results of the research carried out by each participating laboratory, to review the current tasks, identify further actions of participants and agree on the coordination of work under this CRP. The detailed agenda, the list of participants, conclusions and recommendations of the meeting are presented in the summary report. (author)

  11. Case studies to assess and compare different energy sources in sustainable energy and electricity supply strategies. Final report of a co-ordinated project 1997-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    easy integration into other energy planning or analysis tools. DECADES was thus organized as a data management system rather than as an overall or long range energy planning tool. In 1997, the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) on Case Studies to Assess and Compare Different Sources in Sustainable Energy and Electricity Supply Strategies under the aegis of the DECADES project to conduct a series of national studies using the DECADES package (DECPAC). Under this CRP, experts from more than twenty countries utilized databases and methodologies developed and reviewed under the DECADES project to carry out national comparative assessment studies. At a final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM), held from 14 to 16 December 1999, meeting participants agreed on the format of executive summaries to be prepared for each of the national case studies. This publication summarizes the results obtained and the lessons learned from national case studies carried out under the CRP. The report is intended primarily for managers and senior experts in governmental organizations, research institutes and power utilities who are involved in energy and environmental analysis, interpretation of model results and translation into decision and policy making

  12. Dose determination with plane-parallel ionization chambers in therapeutic electron and photon beams. Report of the 2nd research co-ordinated meeting (326-E2-RC-641.2), March 30 - April 3, 1998, Barcelona, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    1999-01-01

    In 1987, the IAEA published a report entitled 'Absorbed Dose Determination in Photon and Electron Beams: An International Code of Practice' (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 277) to advise users how to obtain the absorbed dose in water from the measurements made with an ionization chamber, calibrated in terms of air kerma. For high-energy photons (energies above 1 MeV) the chamber calibration was at a single photon quality (Cobalt-60 gamma rays). The scientific scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project is to investigate the accuracy of the new data and procedures included in the Code of Practice IAEA TRS-381. Differences with existing recommendations, published by national organizations, are to be evaluated to analyze the possible impact on patient dosimetry. The second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was organized to revise the activities in the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) and the status of the various projects. The status of the on-going work under the frame of the CRP was presented by the participants in the RCM during the first two days and each contribution discussed in detail. During the following days, plans were made on the work left for each participant to complete the project and the feasibility of preparing a report describing in detail the work done in the project

  13. Further analysis of extended storage of spent fuel. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme on the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies during extended storage (BEFAST-III) 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    Considerable quantities of spent fuel continue to be produced and to accumulate in a number of countries. Although some new reprocessing facilities have been constructed, many countries are investigating the option of extended spent fuel storage prior to reprocessing or fuel disposal. Wet storage continues to predominate as an established technology. However, dry storage is becoming increasingly used with many countries considering dry storage for the longer term. This Technical Document is the final report of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Spent Fuel Assemblies During Extended Storage (BEFAST-III, 1991-1996). It contains analyses of wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 16 organizations representing 13 countries (Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, the Republic of Korea, Japan, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the USA) which participated in the co-ordinated research programme as participants or observers. The report contains information presented during the three Research Co-ordination meetings and also data which were submitted by the participants in response to request by the Scientific Secretary. 48 refs, 4 tabs

  14. Homologous regions of Fen1 and p21Cip1 compete for binding to the same site on PCNA: a potential mechanism to co-ordinate DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warbrick, E; Lane, D P; Glover, D M; Cox, L S

    1997-05-15

    Following genomic damage, the cessation of DNA replication is co-ordinated with onset of DNA repair; this co-ordination is essential to avoid mutation and genomic instability. To investigate these phenomena, we have analysed proteins that interact with PCNA, which is required for both DNA replication and repair. One such protein is p21Cip1, which inhibits DNA replication through its interaction with PCNA, while allowing repair to continue. We have identified an interaction between PCNA and the structure specific nuclease, Fen1, which is involved in DNA replication. Deletion analysis suggests that p21Cip1 and Fen1 bind to the same region of PCNA. Within Fen1 and its homologues a small region (10 amino acids) is sufficient for PCNA binding, which contains an 8 amino acid conserved PCNA-binding motif. This motif shares critical residues with the PCNA-binding region of p21Cip1. A PCNA binding peptide from p21Cip1 competes with Fen1 peptides for binding to PCNA, disrupts the Fen1-PCNA complex in replicating cell extracts, and concomitantly inhibits DNA synthesis. Competition between homologous regions of Fen1 and p21Cip1 for binding to the same site on PCNA may provide a mechanism to co-ordinate the functions of PCNA in DNA replication and repair.

  15. Evaluating agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rocks using nuclear and related techniques: Results from an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    2000-01-01

    An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project, 'The use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphatic fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates', was in operation during the period 1993-98. The research network comprised twenty-three scientists, of whom seventeen were in developing countries, with six in industrialized nations. Conventional and 32 P-isotope techniques were utilized to assess the bioavailability of P in soils amended with phosphate rock (PR) and water-soluble fertilisers, and to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of PR products. No single chemical extraction method was found to be suitable for all soils and fertilisers. The Pi strip method showed promising results, but more testing is needed with tropical acid soils. The 32 P-phosphate-exchange kinetics method allowed a complete characterization of P dynamics, and provided basic information for estimating the kinetic pools of soil P. The agronomic effectiveness (AE) of PRs depends on their solubility (reactivity), which is related to the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure. Rock phosphates of low reactivity were unsuitable for direct application to annual crops. Research in Venezuela, China, Cuba, Brazil, and Thailand demonstrated that AE can be increased by partial acidulation, or by mixing with organic materials or a water-soluble source. The AE can be enhanced also through inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria. The AE, which depends on species, is particularly high in crops such as canola and lupin that exude organic acids from the roots. Agronomic effectiveness of PR is higher on soils with low pH, low available P, low exchangeable Ca, high cation exchange capacity and high organic-matter content. The 32 P-techniques are powerful tools for studying the factors that affect AE. Information from field trials was used to create a database for validating a model for providing recommendations for PR

  16. Evaluating agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rocks using nuclear and related techniques: Results from an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, F [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-06-01

    An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project, 'The use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphatic fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates', was in operation during the period 1993-98. The research network comprised twenty-three scientists, of whom seventeen were in developing countries, with six in industrialized nations. Conventional and {sup 32}P-isotope techniques were utilized to assess the bioavailability of P in soils amended with phosphate rock (PR) and water-soluble fertilisers, and to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of PR products. No single chemical extraction method was found to be suitable for all soils and fertilisers. The Pi strip method showed promising results, but more testing is needed with tropical acid soils. The {sup 32}P-phosphate-exchange kinetics method allowed a complete characterization of P dynamics, and provided basic information for estimating the kinetic pools of soil P. The agronomic effectiveness (AE) of PRs depends on their solubility (reactivity), which is related to the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure. Rock phosphates of low reactivity were unsuitable for direct application to annual crops. Research in Venezuela, China, Cuba, Brazil, and Thailand demonstrated that AE can be increased by partial acidulation, or by mixing with organic materials or a water-soluble source. The AE can be enhanced also through inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria. The AE, which depends on species, is particularly high in crops such as canola and lupin that exude organic acids from the roots. Agronomic effectiveness of PR is higher on soils with low pH, low available P, low exchangeable Ca, high cation exchange capacity and high organic-matter content. The {sup 32}P-techniques are powerful tools for studying the factors that affect AE. Information from field trials was used to create a database for validating a model for providing recommendations

  17. Verification of analysis methods for predicting the behaviour of seismically isolated nuclear structures. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed under a co-ordinated research project (CRP) entitled Verification of Analysis Methods for Predicting the Behaviour of Seismically isolated Nuclear Structures. The project was organized by the IAEA on the recommendation of the IAEA's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) and carried out from 1996 to 1999. One of the primary requirements for nuclear power plants and facilities is to ensure safety and the absence of damage under strong external dynamic loading from, for example, earthquakes. The designs of liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) include systems which operate at low pressure and include components which are thin-walled and flexible. These systems and components could be considerably affected by earthquakes in seismic zones. Therefore, the IAEA through its advanced reactor technology development programme supports the activities of Member States to apply seismic isolation technology to LMFRs. The application of this technology to LMFRs and other nuclear plants and related facilities would offer the advantage that standard designs may be safely used in areas with a seismic risk. The technology may also provide a means of seismically upgrading nuclear facilities. Design analyses applied to such critical structures need to be firmly established, and the CRP provided a valuable tool in assessing their reliability. Ten organizations from India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the European Commission co-operated in this CRP. This report documents the CRP activities, provides the main results and recommendations and includes the work carried out by the research groups at the participating institutes within the CRP on verification of their analysis methods for predicting the behaviour of seismically isolated nuclear structures

  18. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4) co-ordinates calcium and nitric oxide signaling in regulating murine sperm functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olli, Kristine E; Li, Kun; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2018-01-01

    Reduced sperm motility (asthenospermia) and resulting infertility arise from deletion of the Plasma Membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase 4 (Pmca4) gene which encodes the highly conserved Ca 2+ efflux pump, PMCA4. This is the major Ca 2+ clearance protein in murine sperm. Since the mechanism underlying asthenospermia in PMCA4's absence or reduced activity is unknown, we investigated if sperm PMCA4 negatively regulates nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) and when absent NO, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress levels are increased. Using co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we show an association of PMCA4 with the NOSs in elevated cytosolic [Ca 2+ ] in capacitated and Ca 2+ ionophore-treated sperm and with neuronal (nNOS) at basal [Ca 2+ ] (ucapacitated sperm). FRET efficiencies for PMCA4-eNOS were 35% and 23% in capacitated and uncapacitated sperm, significantly (p < 0.01) different, with the molecules being <10 nm apart. For PMCA4-nNOS, this interaction was seen only for capacitated sperm where FRET efficiency was 24%, significantly (p < 0.05) higher than in uncapacitated sperm (6%). PMCA4 and the NOSs were identified as interacting partners in a quaternary complex that includes Caveolin1, which co-immunoprecipitated with eNOS in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. In Pmca4 -/- sperm NOS activity was elevated twofold in capacitated/uncapacitated sperm (vs. wild-type), accompanied by a twofold increase in peroxynitrite levels and significantly (p < 0.001) increased numbers of apoptotic germ cells. The data support a quaternary complex model in which PMCA4 co-ordinates Ca 2+ and NO signaling to maintain motility, with increased NO levels resulting in asthenospermia in Pmca4 -/- males. They suggest the involvement of PMCA4 mutations in human asthenospermia, with diagnostic relevance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Studies on the distribution of platinum in tumour-bearing rats after the administration of platinum co-ordination complexes used in cancer chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Lux, F.; Beck, W.

    1979-01-01

    Platinum co-ordination complexes like dichlorodiamineplatinum(II) (DDP) feature broad spectrum antitumour activity which, however, is marred by a certain toxicity related especially to renal tubular damage. The activity of such drugs depends on the chemical structure of the complexes, with changes in the ligands resulting in changes in their antitumour activity and toxicity. Assessments of the biological and toxicological effects of recently synthesized complexes must include distribution studies of platinum in the body. It is demonstrated that instrumental neutron activation analysis can be used for these studies because of its accuracy, precision and the low detection limit for platinum (approximately equal to 2 ng), when a standardized method is used. The time-dependent retention of platinum was determined in blood, liver, kidneys and cells of ascitic Walker 256 carcinosarcoma in tumour-bearing rats and controls after the administration of the cis-Pt(Gly-Gly-0Et) 2 Cl 2 complex. Two series of experiments, one with the therapeutic amount of the drug (80 mg/kg body weight) and one low-dose experiment with 1/100 of this amount, were carried out. The results of both experiments are discussed with regard to changes in the platinum concentration with time (0-48 h) in the different samples. From the data a selective uptake of the drug by the tumour cells, causing their destruction, is deduced. Because this drug has shown excellent antitumour activity, this observed selectivity suggests promise for its application in cancer chemotherapy, although platinum retention is still found in the kidneys, which might cause renal tubular damage. This latter aspect requires further clinical research to evaluate fully its effects. (author)

  20. Co-ordinate loss of protein kinase C and multidrug resistance gene expression in revertant MCF-7/Adr breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budworth, J; Gant, T W; Gescher, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the link between protein kinase C (PKC) and multidrug resistance (mdr) phenotype. The expression of both was studied in doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7/Adr cells as they reverted to the wild-type phenotype when cultured in the absence of drug. The following parameters were measured in cells 4, 10, 15, 20 and 24 weeks after removal of doxorubicin; (1) sensitivity of the cells towards doxorubicin; (2) levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR1 mRNA; (3) levels and cellular localization of PKC isoenzyme proteins alpha, theta and epsilon; and (4) gene copy number of PKC-alpha and MDR1 genes. Cells lost their resistance gradually with time, so that by week 24 they had almost completely regained the drug sensitivity seen in wild-type MCF-7 cells. P-gp levels measured by Western blot mirrored the change in doxorubicin sensitivity. By week 20, P-gp had decreased to 18% of P-gp protein levels at the outset, and P-gp was not detectable at week 24. Similarly, MDR1 mRNA levels had disappeared by week 24. MCF-7/Adr cells expressed more PKCs-alpha and -theta than wild-type cells and possessed a different cellular localization of PKC-epsilon. The expression and distribution pattern of these PKCs did not change for up to 20 weeks, but reverted back to that seen in wild-type cells by week 24. MDR1 gene amplification remained unchanged until week 20, but then was lost precipitously between weeks 20 and 24. The PKC-alpha gene was not amplified in MCF-7/Adr cells. The results suggest that MCF-7/Adr cells lose MDR1 gene expression and PKC activity in a co-ordinate fashion, consistent with the existence of a mechanistic link between MDR1 and certain PKC isoenzymes.

  1. Microbial pathogenesis in cystic fibrosis: co-ordinate regulation of heat-shock response and conversion to mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, M J; Deretic, V

    1997-04-01

    Conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the mucoid phenotype plays a major role in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). One mechanism responsible for mucoidy is based on mutations that inactivate the anti-sigma factor, MucA, which normally inhibits the alternative sigma factor, AIgU. The loss of MucA allows AIgU to freely direct transcription of the genes responsible for the production of the exopolysaccharide alginate resulting in mucoid colony morphology. In Escherichia coli, a close homologue of AIgU, sigma(E), directs transcription of several genes under conditions of extreme heat shock. Here we examined whether AIgU, besides its role in controlling alginate production, affects the heat-shock response in P. aeruginosa. The P. aeruginosa rpoH gene encoding a homologue of the major heat-shock sigma factor, sigma32, was found to be transcribed by AIgU containing RNA polymerase from one of its promoters (P3) identified in this study. Transcription of rpoH from P3 was elevated upon exposure to extreme heat shock in an aIgU-dependent manner. Importantly, the AIgU-dependent promoter of rpoH was found to be activated in mucoid mucA mutants. In keeping with this observation, introduction of a wild-type mucA gene abrogated AIgU-dependent rpoH transcription in mucoid P. aeruginosa laboratory isolates and CF isolates. These results suggest that conversion to mucoidy and the heat-shock response are co-ordinately regulated in P. aeruginosa. The simultaneous activation of both systems in mucA mutants, selected in the lungs of CF patients, may have significance for the inflammatory processes characteristic of the establishment of chronic infection and ensuing clinical deterioration in CF.

  2. Co-ordinate single-cell expression of LEE4- and LEE5-encoded proteins of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Andrew J; Naylor, Stuart W; Spears, Kevin J; Yull, Helen M; Dransfield, Tracy A; Oxford, Matthew; McKendrick, Iain J; Porter, Megan; Woodward, Martin J; Smith, David G E; Gally, David L

    2004-10-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a zoonotic pathogen that can express a type III secretion system (TTSS) considered important for colonization and persistence in ruminants. E. coli O157:H7 strains have been shown to vary markedly in levels of protein secreted using the TTSS and this study has confirmed that a high secretion phenotype is more prevalent among isolates associated with human disease than isolates shed by healthy cattle. The variation in secretion levels is a consequence of heterogeneous expression, being dependent on the proportion of bacteria in a population that are actively engaged in protein secretion. This was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and eGFP fusions that examined the expression of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-encoded factors in individual bacteria. In liquid media, the expression of EspA, tir::egfp, intimin, but not map::egfp were co-ordinated in a subpopulation of bacteria. In contrast to E. coli O157:H7, expression of tir::egfp in EPEC E2348/69 was equivalent in all bacteria although the same fusion exhibited variable expression when transformed into an E. coli O157:H7 background. An E. coli O157:H7 strain deleted for the LEE demonstrated weak but variable expression of tir::egfp indicating that the elements controlling the heterogeneous expression lie outside the LEE. The research also demonstrated the rapid induction of tir::egfp and map::egfp on contact with bovine epithelial cells. This control in E. coli O157:H7 may be required to limit exposure of key surface antigens, EspA, Tir and intimin during colonization of cattle but allow their rapid production on contact with bovine gastrointestinal epithelium at the terminal rectum.

  3. Co-ordinate expression of the pre-T-cell receptor complex and a novel immature thymocyte-specific antigen, IMT-1, during thymocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, J J; Kishi, H; Nagata, T; Muraguchi, A

    1999-01-01

    Previously we described a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that reacted with a cell-surface antigen, immature thymocyte antigen-1 (IMT-1), which is expressed on thymocytes of late CD4- CD8- (double negative) to early CD4+ CD8+ (double positive) differentiation stages. In this study, we investigated the expression of IMT-1 on various cell lineages in thymus as well as in peripheral lymphoid organs. We found that IMT-1 is expressed on T-cell receptor (TCR)-betalo and TCR-deltalo thymocytes, but not on TCR-betahi, TCR-deltahi or natural killer (NK)1.1+ thymocytes, or on peripheral alpha beta or gamma delta T cells. We also investigated the kinetics of expression of IMT-1 during fetal thymocyte development and compared it with the expression of the pre-TCR complex, comprising CD3, pre-TCR-alpha (pTalpha) and TCR-beta. We found that expression of both was similar, starting at day 14.5 of gestation, peaking on day 16.5 and gradually decreasing thereafter. Furthermore, the expression of both IMT-1 and pTalpha was drastically reduced when DN thymocytes in recombination activating gene (RAG)-2-/- mice were challenged in vivo with anti-CD3 mAb. These results indicate that IMT-1 is expressed on not only immature thymocytes of alpha beta T-cell lineage but also on those of gamma delta T-cell lineage, and that the expression of IMT-1 and the pre-TCR complex is co-ordinately regulated during the alpha beta lineage thymocyte development.

  4. Divalent cations and the protein surface co-ordinate the intensity of human platelet adhesion and P-selectin surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiss, P A; Andersson, R G G

    2002-07-01

    At sites of blood vessel injury, platelets adhere to exposed vessel components, such as collagen, or immobilized fibrinogen derived from plasma or activated platelets. The divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) are essential for platelet adhesion and activation, but Mg(2+) can also inhibit platelet activation. The present study evaluates, by an enzymatic method, the effects of various divalent cations on the adhesion of isolated human platelets to collagen, fibrinogen, albumin or plastic in vitro. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, platelet surface expression of P-selectin was measured to estimate the state of activation on adherence. Mg(2+) increased platelet adhesion exclusively to collagen and fibrinogen at physiologically relevant concentrations. At higher concentrations, the adhesion declined. Ca(2+) induced a weak adhesion only to fibrinogen at physiological doses and a peak of increased adhesion to all protein-coated surfaces at 10 mmol/l. Mn(2+) elicited dose-dependent adhesion only to collagen and fibrinogen. Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) increased the adhesion of platelets independently of the surface. Ca(2+) dose-dependently inhibited adhesion elicited by Mg(2+) to collagen and fibrinogen. No other combination of divalent cations elicited such an effect. Mg(2+)-dependent platelet adhesion to collagen and Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion to fibrinogen increased P-selectin expression. Thus, the present study shows that the outcome of the platelet adhesion depends on the surface and the access of divalent cations, which co-ordinate the intensity of platelet adhesion and P-selectin surface expression.

  5. Co-ordinate expression of activin A and its type I receptor mRNAs during phorbol ester-induced differentiation of human K562 erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildén, K; Tuuri, T; Erämaa, M; Ritvos, O

    1999-07-20

    Activins were originally isolated based on their ability to stimulate follicle-stimulating hormone secretion but later they have been shown to regulate a number of different cellular functions such as nerve cell survival, mesoderm induction during early embryogenesis as well as hematopoiesis. We studied the regulation of activin A, a homodimer of betaA-subunits, mRNA and protein in K562 erythroleukemia cells, which are known to be induced toward the erythroid lineage in response to activin or TGF-beta or toward the megakaryocytic lineage by the phorbol ester protein kinase C activator 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Here we show by Northern blot analysis as well as by Western and ligand blotting that TPA strongly promotes activin betaA-subunit mRNA and activin A protein expression in K562 cells in time- and concentration dependent manner. In contrast, neither activin A nor TGF-beta induced betaA-subunit mRNA expression during erythroid differentiation in K562 cells. Interestingly, whereas activin type II receptors are not regulated during K562 cell differentiation (Hilden et al. (1994) Blood 83, 2163-2170), we now show that the activin type I and IB receptor mRNAs are clearly induced by TPA but not by activin or TGF-beta. We also show that the inducing effect of TPA on expression of activin betaA-subunit mRNA is potentiated by the protein kinase A activator 8-bromo-cAMP. We conclude that activin A and its type I receptors appear to be co-ordinately up-regulated during megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 cells.

  6. Use of novel DNA fingerprinting techniques for the detection and characterization of genetic variation in vegetatively propagated crops. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    Vegetative propagated crops, such as banana and platain, sweet potato, yam, sugarcane and cassava, represent important sources of food in the developing countries. Although some of these crops may produce seeds, they must for practical purposes be propagated vegetatively. As normal plant breeding strategies based on genetic hybridization are of limited value or not applicable to such crops, it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity already existing in these crops and to design breeding strategies accordingly. If the existing genetic variation is shown to be too narrow for breeding purposes, one promising possibility for the introduction of genetic variability is the use of mutations induced by radiation or chemical mutagens. This CRP focused on: the detection of genetic diversity induced by mutagenic treatment or in vitro culture; the development of crop-specific markers; and increasing co-operation between molecular biologists in advanced laboratories and plant breeders and molecular biologists in the developing countries. The success of this CRP is evidenced by the introduction and application of new molecular methods by laboratories in developing countries, specially for the analysis of local crop genetic diversity. These exciting preliminary results show the potential for applications in crop improvement but much work remains to be done. Many of the vegetatively propagated species are ''orphan crops'', under-investigated on the international level. The development of new uses of transgenesis for the development of edible vaccines should not be overlooked. The challenge that remains is in the application of these new tools for practical end-user oriented improvements in vegetatively propagated crops. The present publication summarizes the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting on the Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops

  7. Use of novel DNA fingerprinting techniques for the detection and characterization of genetic variation in vegetatively propagated crops. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    Vegetative propagated crops, such as banana and platain, sweet potato, yam, sugarcane and cassava, represent important sources of food in the developing countries. Although some of these crops may produce seeds, they must for practical purposes be propagated vegetatively. As normal plant breeding strategies based on genetic hybridization are of limited value or not applicable to such crops, it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity already existing in these crops and to design breeding strategies accordingly. If the existing genetic variation is shown to be too narrow for breeding purposes, one promising possibility for the introduction of genetic variability is the use of mutations induced by radiation or chemical mutagens. This CRP focused on: the detection of genetic diversity induced by mutagenic treatment or in vitro culture; the development of crop-specific markers; and increasing co-operation between molecular biologists in advanced laboratories and plant breeders and molecular biologists in the developing countries. The success of this CRP is evidenced by the introduction and application of new molecular methods by laboratories in developing countries, specially for the analysis of local crop genetic diversity. These exciting preliminary results show the potential for applications in crop improvement but much work remains to be done. Many of the vegetatively propagated species are ``orphan crops``, under-investigated on the international level. The development of new uses of transgenesis for the development of edible vaccines should not be overlooked. The challenge that remains is in the application of these new tools for practical end-user oriented improvements in vegetatively propagated crops. The present publication summarizes the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting on the Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops Refs, figs, tabs

  8. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  9. EDITORIAL: Editor's Farewell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of Volume 26, 1989, marked the end of my tenure as Editor of Metrologia. My association with the journal, its parent body the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, its host organization the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the publishers Springer-Verlag and last (but by no means least) the Editorial Board, has been a pleasant one and I trust that the subscribers will have found the product to be generally satisfactory. There have been, it is true, some disappointments along the way and I shall mention two of these while expressing the hope that the new Editor will enjoy a greater success in their regard. First is the question of circulation, which has stayed dangerously low, although the shrinkage has tapered off in the most recent years. Because of the narrow public support, the costs of production are relatively high and this, through a consequently high subscription rate, tends to enshrine the unsatisfactory state of affairs. Modest schemes to broaden the journal's appeal and bring in a wider readership have foundered upon the first step, namely, that of procuring from staff members of the national standards laboratories the hoped-for articles which would discuss the state of the art in delivering the highest-quality measurement services to the public. However, some very interesting and bolder schemes are presently under discussion. I had also hoped to leaven the journal's content a little by regularly appearing articles on the latest developments within the great national laboratories. But, as with technical review articles, it has proven very difficult to find the right authors who can also spare the time, and only a few laboratories have found it possible to collaborate. In taking my leave, it remains for me to thank all the contributors, referees and readers for their support, to express the hope of an ever brighter future for Metrologia and to wish to the new Editor, Dr D A Blackburn, a happy and successful tenure.

  10. From the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Sakarya Yucel Demiral

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Ray W. Guillery, English Editor of our Journal has passed away… Prof. Guillery (Greifswald-Germany; 1929 is a British physiologist and neuroanatomist. He began his education as a medical student at University College London (UCL. He obtained his BSc and his PhD in Anatomy. Guillery taught at UCL for 11 years. He helped to start the new graduate program in neuroscience in several Universities. In 1989, Guillery was the founding editor-in-chief of the European Journal of Neuroscience. He was Honorary Emeritus Research Fellow at the Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit at Oxford since 2010.Prof R Guillery joined Turkish Journal of Public Health family with the second issue of 2008 and since then he worked with us for English edition of 24 issues voluntarily;  always in time and with a unique care. He would not only correct English grammar mistakes in manuscripts; but provide significant contribution by indicating unclear points as an interested reader; despite public health was not his area. During time, he developed interest to several public health issues and discussed with us. Ray was not only good in words but numbers; he would detect calculation mistakes in the manuscripts which were missed by reviewers and/or editors. Prof Ray Guillery conducted a course on Scientific Writing in English during National Public Health Congress which was held in Bursa. He has been always keen and generous in sharing his knowledge and experience. He never stopped his works in neuroscience and anatomy and completed his last book a few weeks before passing away.A big loss for scientific world and for our Journal. We express our appreciation for his contribution to our Journal and to all of us. Sibel Sakarya, Yücel Demiral 

  11. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 7th year of TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 7, Number: 3. Very much thanks to all of you once more that we met with you 23rd time, since January 2000. In this issue we published one notes for Editor 15 articles like in this issue, three book reviews, news and announcements for our readers. 25 authors from eight different countries are pleaced in this issue. These published articles are from...

  12. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 7th year of TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 7, Number: 4. Very much thanks to all of you and TOJDE editorial members once more that we managed to publish TOJDE 25th time, since January 2000. In this issue we published one notes for Editor, 13 articles, two reviews, news and announcements for our readers. 20 authors from seven different countries are placed in this issue. These published articles are from Ba...

  13. From The Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-01-01

    Dear TOJDE Readers, Welcome to the Volume 14 Number: 1 of TOJDE! In this issue, 31 articles of 65 authors from 12 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are arrived to the TOJDE from Australia, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Russia, Taiwan, Turkey, USA and Zimba bwe. First all, you should know that if a submission picks up from three TOJDE editors between 4.5 and 9 over all 9 credits, it means that this submission can be publish...

  14. From the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2009-01-01

    Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 10, Number: 4. This is the last issue of the year 2009 and 10th anniversary of TOJDE. In this issue it is published 3 notes for Editor, 13 articles, 4 book reviews. And this time, 33 authors from 13 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Iran, KKTC, Lesotho, Lithuania, Malaysia, Pakistan, Romania, United Kingdom, USA and Turkey.“iPhones and Smartphones” has sent ...

  15. A CDL written intercom editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, D.S.; Shirikov, V.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report contains the formalized description of the program EDITOR which is the most important part of the teleprocessing system INTERCOM driving terminals for CDC series 6000 and CYBER computers. CDL (Compiler Description language) is used for this description. EDITOR is a tool for the text file acquisition and modifications. It also gives the possibility to execute some commands to the computer software. The EDITOR independent description may be used for the implementation of EDITOR-like programmes for different types of computers (is particular, small computers)

  16. From the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Sakarya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available From the Editors Dear readers,We are happy to greet you with the August 2017 issue of our Journal. This issue contains two reports and five original articles. The title of the first report is “Roma Health in Edirne: Social Determinants of Health and Health Status”. In their report, Eskiocak et al. investigate the social determinants of health and their health related outcomes among the Roma communities living in Edirne. The second report deals with gender related issues. Doğan et al. investigate the effects of gender inequality on women's lives through a comparison of countries that do and do not implement policies based on gender equality.Original articles in this issue cover many important public health issues. The first, conducted by Koçak et al., investigates the type 2 diabetes risk of primary school teachers and their lifestyle behaviors. Results of the study show that 5.7% out of 975 primary school teachers have a high risk of type 2 diabetes.The second original article entitled “Unintended pregnancies, induced abortions and risk factors in women admitted to hospitals due to birth or abortion in Hatay” was based on a study of 635 women. The results of this study, done by Savaş et al., show an unintended pregnancy rate of 15%. It is further estimated that almost half of all induced abortions are reported as spontaneous abortions. The third article, which was written by Çam et al., is about the frequency of eating disorders in adolescents. This descriptive study, with the participation of 338 high school students, found the frequency of eating disorder attitudes to be 18.3% among the participants. In a descriptive study conducted by Emerce et al., the knowledge and practice of laboratory safety by laboratory analysts and technicians was investigated. It was found that all 93 laboratory workers who participated in the study have failed in some safety practices throughout their careers, and have been eager to get regular

  17. High temperature on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion control in water cooled power reactors. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the results of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on High Temperature On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion in Water Cooled Power Reactors (1995-1999). This report attempts to provide both an overview of the state of the art with regard to on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion in operating reactors, and technical details of the important contributions made by programme participants to the development and qualification of new monitoring techniques. The WACOL CRP is a follow-up to the WACOLIN (Investigations on Water Chemistry Control and Coolant Interaction with Fuel and Primary Circuit Materials in Water Cooled Power Reactors) CRP conducted by the IAEA from 1986 to 1991. The WACOLIN CRP, which described chemistry, corrosion and activity-transport aspects, clearly showed the influence of water chemistry on corrosion of both fuel and reactor primary-circuit components, as well as on radiation fields. It was concluded that there was a fundamental need to monitor water-chemistry parameters in real time, reliably and accurately. The objectives of the WACOL CRP were to establish recommendations for the development, qualification and plant implementation of methods and equipment for on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion. Chief investigators from 18 organizations representing 15 countries provided a variety of contributions aimed at introducing proven monitoring techniques into plants on a regular basis and filling the gaps between plant operator needs and available monitoring techniques. The CRP firmly demonstrated that in situ monitoring is able to provide additional and valuable information to plant operators, e.g. ECP, high temperature pH and conductivity. Such data can be obtained promptly, i.e. in real time and with a high degree of accuracy. Reliable techniques and sensor devices are available which enable plant operators to obtain additional information on the response of structural materials in

  18. Development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    Many tumour marker assays have been reported over the years and their role is well recognized and acknowledged in the follow-up of known cancer cases. However, their true potential for use in primary diagnosis or screening of high risk groups is still to be fully realized due to the need to achieve better specificity. Among the various tumour markers, the one for prostate cancer - prostate specific antigen (PSA) - appears to have better specificity, coming close to a tumour specific antigen. Prostate cancer is a commonly encountered cancer in men, and can be effectively treated if detected early. PSA levels in serum appear to provide good correlation with tumour burden. Estimation of free PSA in serum is reported to further improve the diagnosis. In several developed countries routine screening of men above 50 years of age for prostate cancer using serum PSA as marker is recommended. Radioimmunometric assay techniques offer themselves as attractive candidates for measurement of tumour markers. They are robust, economical and didactic, thus eminently suitable for technology transfer, training and teaching. Preparation of primary reagents is relatively easy. The methodology is flexible. As a result of co-operation projects of the IAEA, many developing Member States have built up indigenous capabilities to perform radioimmunometric assays, which can be extended to development of kits for tumour marker assays. Considering the need for indigenous development of capabilities to produce reliable kits for radioimmunometric assays for PSA, in 1997 the IAEA initiated a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Kits for Radioimmunometric Assays for Tumour Markers. Even though the focus of the project was PSA, it was expected that the expertise to be gained by the participants would also help them undertake development of kits for other tumour markers, essentially using the same methodology. Ten laboratories from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas participated

  19. Radioimmunoassay and related techniques to improve artificial insemination programmes for cattle reared under tropical and sub-tropical conditions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) is widely used for improvement of cattle production in developed countries. Its use in developing countries is less widespread and the results obtained are far from satisfactory. Under tropical small-farm conditions, a number of socio-economic, organizational, biological and technical factors make the service more difficult to provide and also less efficient. If the major constraints can be identified and overcome, this technology would become more widely adopted and contribute to an increased production of milk and meat, leading to better food security and poverty alleviation. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture therefore convened a consultants meeting in May 1994 to advise on the applicability of radioimmunoassay (RIA) for measuring progesterone in milk of dairy cattle to identify the major causes of conception failure and reproductive wastage when AI is used under the conditions prevailing in developing countries. The consultants recommended the initiation of a co-ordinated research project (CRP) on this topic, and developed a comprehensive technical document including the sampling protocol and the range of information that needs to be recorded in order to obtain conclusive results. A five year CRP on the ''Use of RIA and Related Techniques to Identify Ways of Improving Artificial Insemination Programmes for Cattle Reared Under Tropical and Sub-Tropical Conditions'' was initiated in early 1995. The CRP resulted in the development and standardization of methodologies and protocols, including the computer software program termed AIDA (Artificial Insemination Database Application), to determine current status and identify constraints. These methodologies and protocols are now being applied on a wider scale in Member States through regional TC projects in Asia and Africa and country TC projects in Latin America. Contributing to the wider application of progesterone RIA for field level problem solving

  20. The FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme on ''Evaluation of Methods of Analysis for Determining Mycotoxin Contamination of Food and Feed''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doko, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    The present Co-ordinated Research Programme is to complement the FAO/IAEA Training and Reference Centre (TRC) for Food and Pesticide Control under the Centre's mission ''to assist Member States and their institutions to fulfill requirements to support the implementation of international safeguards/agreements relevant to food safety and control, the safe use of pesticides and sanitary and phytosanitary measures, by providing training, quality assurance services and technology transfer''. Based on the Global Environment Monitoring System - Food Contamination Monitoring and Assessment Programme (GEMS/Food) data and other national data on mycotoxin contamination, mycotoxins are a widespread problem of the food supplies in most countries. As a result, many countries have enacted regulations to control the level of mycotoxins in the national food supply as well as in food moving in international trade. At the international level, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, through its Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants and relevant commodity committees is considering the establishment of international guideline levels for various mycotoxins based on risk assessments performed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. Codex activities are of particular importance in view of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS) Agreement specifically refers to Codex standards, guidelines and recommendations as representing the international consensus on health and safety requirements for food based on sound scientific risk assessment. This will require national authorities to give greater attention to the development of consistent and standardised approaches to regulations and their enforcement, including sampling and methods of analysis. Consequently, it is essential that the analytical capabilities of laboratories in developing countries are strengthened in order to enable them to effectively monitor the mycotoxin content of food in

  1. Long term behaviour of low and intermediate level waste packages under repository conditions. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The development and application of approaches and technologies that provide long term safety is an essential issue in the disposal of radioactive waste. For low and intermediate level radioactive waste, engineered barriers play an important role in the overall safety and performance of near surface repositories. Thus, developing a strong technical basis for understanding the behaviour and performance of engineered barriers is an important consideration in the development and establishment of near surface repositories for radioactive waste. In 1993, a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Performance of Engineered Barrier Materials in Near Surface Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste was initiated by the IAEA with the twin goals of addressing some of the gaps in the database on radionuclide isolation and long term performance of a wide variety of materials and components that constitute the engineered barriers system (IAEA-TECDOC-1255 (2001)). However, during the course of the CRP, it was realized that that the scope of the CRP did not include studies of the behaviour of waste packages over time. Given that a waste package represents an important component of the overall near surface disposal system and the fact that many Member States have active R and D programmes related to waste package testing and evaluation, a new CRP was launched, in 1997, on Long Term Behaviour of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages Under Repository Conditions. The CRP was intended to promote research activities on the subject area in Member States, share information on the topic among the participating countries, and contribute to advancing technologies for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. Thus, this CRP complements the afore mentioned CRP on studies of engineered barriers. With the active participation and valuable contributions from twenty scientists and engineers from Argentina, Canada, Czech Republic, Egypt, Finland, India, Republic of Korea, Norway, Romania

  2. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The `renaissance` of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr and {sup 131}I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as {sup 153}Sm, {sup 166} Ho, {sup 165}Dy and {sup 186-188}Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of {sup 153}Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling

  3. Summary of the co-ordinated research project on development of feed supplementation strategies for improving the productivity of dairy cattle on smallholder farms in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasuriya, M.C.N.

    1999-01-01

    Livestock are an important and integral part of most farming systems in Africa. Recent nutritional research has demonstrated the possibility of substantial increases in the productivity of milk-producing animals fed poor quality roughages through small alterations to the feed base. In some cases, improvements have been demonstrated at the farm level: milk yield has increased, body condition of the animals has improved and age at puberty and the interval between calvings have been reduced. These advances have been brought about by the addition of critical nutrients to the diet, e.g. nitrogen or minerals for the rumen micro-organisms or rumen non-degradable protein or all of these. The introduction of improved feeding practices such as strategic supplementation using locally available feed resources (e.g. tree legume leaves, brewers waste, fish waste, multinutrient blocks, etc.) will not only enhance milk production but will also introduce a sustainable fanning practice that will ensure a continuous supply of milk and milk products to local populations. To introduce effective supplementation there is a need to identify the nutrient or combination of nutrients that are the limiting factors for achieving optimum rumen fermentative digestion of the basal diet or the efficiency of utilization of the major products of digestion. In many of the dairying systems operating in Africa this is far from easy, mainly because of the difficulties encountered in effectively measuring feed intake and selection and the efficiency with which the nutrients absorbed are used for productive purposes. In order to circumvent these difficulties it may be possible to measure biochemical indicators in the cows themselves that provide an assessment of nutrient status. The specific objectives of the co-ordinated research project (CRP) were to: - btain baseline information on production and reproductive parameters using a comprehensive survey, progesterone radioimmunoassay and clinical

  4. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The 'renaissance' of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as 32 P, 89 Sr and 131 I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 165 Dy and 186-188 Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of 153 Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 153 Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling techniques and quality control methods for

  5. DDX3 directly regulates TRAF3 ubiquitination and acts as a scaffold to co-ordinate assembly of signalling complexes downstream from MAVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lili; Fullam, Anthony; McCormack, Niamh; Höhn, Yvette; Schröder, Martina

    2017-02-15

    The human DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3) has been shown to contribute to type I interferon (IFN) induction downstream from antiviral pattern recognition receptors. It binds to TANK-binding kinase 1 and IκB-kinase-ε (IKKε), the two key kinases mediating activation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7. We previously demonstrated that DDX3 facilitates IKKε activation downstream from RIG-I and then links the activated kinase to IRF3. In the present study, we probed the interactions between DDX3 and other key signalling molecules in the RIG-I pathway and identified a novel direct interaction between DDX3 and TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) mediated by a TRAF-interaction motif in the N-terminus of DDX3, which was required for TRAF3 ubiquitination. Interestingly, we observed two waves of K63-linked TRAF3 ubiquitination following RIG-I activation by Sendai virus (SeV) infection, both of which were suppressed by DDX3 knockdown. We also investigated the spatiotemporal formation of endogenous downstream signalling complexes containing the mitochondrial antiviral signalling (MAVS) adaptor, DDX3, IκB-kinase-ε (IKKε), TRAF3 and IRF3. DDX3 was recruited to MAVS early after SeV infection, suggesting that it might mediate subsequent recruitment of other molecules. Indeed, knockdown of DDX3 prevented the formation of TRAF3-MAVS and TRAF3-IKKε complexes. Based on our data, we propose that early TRAF3 ubiquitination is required for the formation of a stable MAVS-TRAF3 complex, while the second wave of TRAF3 ubiquitination mediates IRF3 recruitment and activation. Our study characterises DDX3 as a multifunctional adaptor molecule that co-ordinates assembly of different TRAF3, IKKε and IRF3-containing signalling complexes downstream from MAVS. Additionally, it provides novel insights into the role of TRAF3 in RIG-I signalling. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Radioimmunoassay and related techniques to improve artificial insemination programmes for cattle reared under tropical and sub-tropical conditions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) is widely used for improvement of cattle production in developed countries. Its use in developing countries is less widespread and the results obtained are far from satisfactory. Under tropical small-farm conditions, a number of socio-economic, organizational, biological and technical factors make the service more difficult to provide and also less efficient. If the major constraints can be identified and overcome, this technology would become more widely adopted and contribute to an increased production of milk and meat, leading to better food security and poverty alleviation. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture therefore convened a consultants meeting in May 1994 to advise on the applicability of radioimmunoassay (RIA) for measuring progesterone in milk of dairy cattle to identify the major causes of conception failure and reproductive wastage when AI is used under the conditions prevailing in developing countries. The consultants recommended the initiation of a co-ordinated research project (CRP) on this topic, and developed a comprehensive technical document including the sampling protocol and the range of information that needs to be recorded in order to obtain conclusive results. A five year CRP on the ''Use of RIA and Related Techniques to Identify Ways of Improving Artificial Insemination Programmes for Cattle Reared Under Tropical and Sub-Tropical Conditions'' was initiated in early 1995. The CRP resulted in the development and standardization of methodologies and protocols, including the computer software program termed AIDA (Artificial Insemination Database Application), to determine current status and identify constraints. These methodologies and protocols are now being applied on a wider scale in Member States through regional TC projects in Asia and Africa and country TC projects in Latin America. Contributing to the wider application of progesterone RIA for field level problem solving

  7. Carta del Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Eladio Proaño

    2015-01-01

    Henos aquí con un nuevo número de RIESED. Después de casi un año de ver la luz, y como lo anticipábamos en la carta del editor que acompañaba al número fundacional, hacer una revista electrónica no ha sido una tarea sencilla. Un año más tarde no podemos sino confirmar esa opinión.Gracias al decidido trabajo de los autores, revisores y miembros del equipo editorial hemos podido hacerlo. El proceso de revisión de los artículos ha merecido un cuidado, dedicación y tiempo especiales, que hicieron...

  8. From the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Harshman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching about globalizations and our interconnectedness with people and places around the world is an essential component of K-12 and higher education, but knowledge about global issues and news is not enough. Increased mobility, digital communication, and cultural hybridity, along with oppression and social injustice require that educators and students not only be able to communicate and collaborate with people different from them, but regularly engage in critical self-reflection around perceived norms and values. In January 2016, the editors of this special issue distributed a call for theoretical, research-based, and practitioner oriented manuscripts on teaching and learning that bring social studies and global citizenship education together. Evidence by the transnational contributions published within this issue of the Journal of Social Studies Education Research, the place of global citizenship education within the social studies is evolving, multifaceted, and not without complications. In short: just how it should be.

  9. Letter from the editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán A. Prieto G.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available On September 2017, two large earthquakes struck México. Numerous casualties and at least 40 buildings collapsed in Mexico City.   The earthquakes are explained by the tectonic setting of Central America, the Cocos plate subducts underneath the North American Plate at about 7-8 cm a year, making Mexico a seismically active region. But the two earthquakes - with hypocenter depths between 50 and 60 km – did not occur in the contact between the two tectonic plates as is usually expected, but rather within the Cocos plate as it bends downward within the mantle. Both events showed a normal faulting mechanism, and although they were widely felt, their major impact was in densely populated Mexico City, where wave amplification is expected due to the geological features of the City's soil structure.   We know that we cannot predict earthquakes, and although this is the holy-grail in seismology, it seems like we are not close to accurately predict them. Nevertheless, early warning systems have been developed in various places, including Mexico, and they were successful in issuing an alarm, although with a few seconds before the strong shaking. These developments can save lives and continue to be relevant and are likely to be implemented in other regions, including the pacific coast of the US. Another aspect that can save lives is people’s awareness. The M7.1 earthquake occurred in the afternoon of the anniversary of the 1985 Michoacan earthquake, just a couple of hours after an earthquake drill in Mexico City, so people had just recently been remained of what to do.  This most likely saved lives.   We should ask ourselves, are we prepared? Is our city prepared?     Germán Prieto Editor in Chief   Carlos A. Vargas Former Editor

  10. Message from the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans

  11. 99mTc labelled peptides for imaging of peripheral receptors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project. 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals have remained the workhorse of diagnostic nuclear medicine over the last three decades ever since the introduction of the gamma camera as the main imaging instrument. Due to the near ideal nuclear properties such as gamma energy, half-life, lack of beta radiation and easy availability as a convenient generator system at an affordable cost of 99m Tc, it can be reasonably anticipated that 99m Tc will continue to retain this position in the foreseeable future. To a large extent this has been possible because of the successful development, over the years, of 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals as substitutes for other clinically well established agents. Examples of these success stories are 99m Tc substitutes for 131 I hippuran and rose bengal 201 Tl and 123 I brain perfusion agents, which have come to be known collectively as 'second generation 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals'. It should be acknowledged that each one of these developments was a result of innovative and sustained research and development efforts by scientists from different parts of the world. Concurrently these research efforts have made significant contributions to better understanding of the radiochemistry and co-ordination chemistry of 99m Tc. The radiopharmaceutical scientists are now in a much better position to design, prepare and evaluate 99m Tc complexes for specific applications. Building on this capability, the next step is development of 99m Tc substitutes for receptor specific radiopharmaceuticals, which have established clinical potential. Efforts in this direction are already ongoing and the work during the last decade on 99m Tc labelling of monoclonal antibodies can be considered the beginning of these 'third generation 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals'. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) had organized two co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) in the past covering 99m Tc second generation agents and 99m Tc monoclonal antibodies, and the results were published in

  12. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    . Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  13. Greetings from the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is my great honor announcing the promotion of the Archives of Bone and Joint Surgery (ABJS to the level of being available on the PubMed Central site. Being precise, one year ago in September 2013, we published the first issue of the ABJS. Diligently thereafter, we published four subsequent issues with the fifth being in front of you. We set this as our first goal to reach visibility on PubMed striving to raise the quality. We greatly hope that the orthopedics science may be exalted by this voluntary contribution. Hereby, I would like to specially thank to Sarah Post Calhoun and Wayne Jack Logue, from NLM/PMC, for their continuous support, giving direction, and cooperation. I am grateful to my colleagues, Dr Amir Reza Kachooei; the Managing Editor, Dr Ali Moradi; the Editorial Manager and Saeideh Erfani; the Administrative Staff  for their endeavor and being compassionate in this path. I also would like to thank Dr Farshid Bagheri, Dr Ali Birjandinejad, Dr Farzad Omidi-Kashani and Dr Mohsen Mardani-Kivi;  the Deputy Editors  whose continuous efforts from early 2013 has brought the journal to appreciation of scientific excellence.  My sincere thanks to all Editorial Board members and reviewers, who have contributed towards the excellence of the journal by putting efforts and expending their valuable time to evaluate the submitted manuscripts. I send my special thanks to Iranian Knee Surgery Arthroscopy & Sports Traumatology (ISKAST, Iranian Orthopedic Association (IOA, Iranian Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Deputy of Research at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences for their supports. I would like to thank the prime industry sponsers, Osveh Asia Medical Instrument Co. and Tehran Sutures Co. (Zimmer Distributer in Iran, for their financial support. Again I would like to appreciate all contributing authors particularly my outstanding colleagues who wrote an Editorial for us, Prof. Jupiter from Harvard University, Boston, MA

  14. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Vrček

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear authors, readers and future authors,it is my pleasure to present you the 1st number of the 38th volume of the Journal of Information and Organizational Sciences – JIOS.Please allow me one personal note. This is my last issue as an editor. I started in 2008. and it is time to make some changes. I’ll continue to act as a member of editorial board but I am handling over my editorial duty to new editor Alen Lovrenčić. It was pleasure to work with all authors, reviewers and collaborators and please continue partnership with JIOS because we have high aims which cannot be achieved without dedicated scientific community. I would also like to thank the publishing team of JIOS who helped with many operational issues especially: Bernarda Kos, Goran Hajdin and Darko Grabar. In this issue a selection of 3 original scientific papers, 1 survey paper and 1 preliminary communications has been included, all of which have undergone a rigorous double-blind review process in some cases in several rounds.The constant mission of JIOS is to cover scientific publications from broad area of information sciences and related disciplines and we continuously receive many articles in which authors strive to achieve scientific merit. Our review procedure is very strict but even when we decline papers we try to encourage authors in their future work and motivate them to give better results. That is why we maintain very good relations with our authors and we invite all of you to extend cooperation with JIOS.We hope that the variety of themes will draw the attention of researchers in different fields of information sciences and motivate potential authors to expand the Journal’s thematic scope by other themes that may be of interest to the wider ICT research community. These themes motivate us to continue our work of delivering research results to interested audience. The ICT field is changing rapidly and we are constantly searching for cutting edge articles that open

  15. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senar, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2001, the Natural History Museum of Barcelona remodelled its journal Miscel·lània Zoològica as Animal Biodiversity and Conservation. One of the aims of this change was to obtain an impact factor, the index that characterises the international ranking of journals. This milestone was reached some years later, in 2012, having published 291 articles that have been cited in impact journals 1,626 times. Two of these papers have been cited more than 100 times. We are now ready to take the next step forward. Our new challenge is to increase our impact factor so that Animal Biodiversity and Conservation is comparable with prestigious international journals in the field. To meet this objective we have assembled a team of editors with international recognition, and we will continue to expand this team over time. We have sought support from the most prestigious Spanish scientific societies and three have accepted the task: the Spanish Society of Ethology, the Spanish Association of Terrestrial Ecology, and the Spanish Society of Evolutionary Biology. These societies have named thematic editors who will help us strengthen their respective disciplines. This means that we will also expand the range of fields covered in the journal in future, interpreting the expression animal biodiversity in the journal´s title in its widest sense. Another front that we have opened to boost Animal Biodiversity and Conservation is the new webpage, remodelled for use as a medium to post our published papers. With this move we not only hope to improve our services to readers but also look towards open access, open access in its broadest conception, offering the journal to scientists, both readers and authors, free of charge. If we want science and the knowledge it generates —produced with public money— to belong to us all, we not only have to enable everyone to read it but we also have to help everyone publish, independently of their economic state. These are difficult

  16. Letter from the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán A. Prieto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Letter from the editor Our first issue of 2018 is available now. We have 9 articles in this issue, in topics ranging from soil characterization, petrophysical properties of rocks, signal processing of images and GNSS station to asteroid impact effects. Mechanical soil properties in sandy-pebble soil are studied as a function of grain size content in Lu et al. Satellite-derived soil moisture estimation is discussed in Thanabalan and Vidhya, based on a semi-empirical approach and backscattering images. Macroscopic mechanical characteristics of rocks depend on a number of factors, including microstructure damage. Under changing temperature conditions (freeze-thaw rock samples studied by Jiang show significant strength decrease, which has important consequences in engineering. Advanced signal processing methods are used in Zeng et al. for image retrieval applied to remote sensing data, using a Bayesian network approach. Similarly, Oktar and Erdogan use linear trend and wavelet analysis to continuous GNSS data showing both displacements due to tectonic as well as atmospheric and hydrologic effects. Debris flows can in some cases become serious hazards because they can block river flow as a debris flow dam. Chen et al. propose a method to identify the formation of such dams, with an example from the Er river in Taiwan. Mamaseni et al. study the petrophysical properties of three formations in the Duhok Basin, northern Iran, based on well-log data. Results suggest a significant thickness with good moveable hydrocarbons in the study area. Methane adsorption and gas content are strongly influenced by shale composition. Zhu et al. show that Total Organic Content has a stronger influence on methane adsorption and gas content than the mineral composition, studying samples from the southern Sichuan Basin. Our last contribution in this issue discussed a large asteroid impact in eastern Colombia. The impact would have affected the environment and landscape, but

  17. Co-ordinated stage-dependent enhancement of Plasmodium falciparum antioxidant enzymes and heat shock protein expression in parasites growing in oxidatively stressed or G6PD-deficient red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Sylke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (RBCs are equipped with protective antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs. The latter are only considered to protect against thermal stress. Important issues are poorly explored: first, it is insufficiently known how both systems are expressed in relation to the parasite developmental stage; secondly, it is unknown whether P. falciparum HSPs are redox-responsive, in view of redox sensitivity of HSP in eukaryotic cells; thirdly, it is poorly known how the antioxidant defense machinery would respond to increased oxidative stress or inhibited antioxidant defense. Those issues are interesting as several antimalarials increase the oxidative stress or block antioxidant defense in the parasitized RBC. In addition, numerous inhibitors of HSPs are currently developed for cancer therapy and might be tested as anti-malarials. Thus, the joint disruption of the parasite antioxidant enzymes/HSP system would interfere with parasite growth and open new perspectives for anti-malaria therapy. Methods Stage-dependent mRNA expression of ten representative P. falciparum antioxidant enzymes and hsp60/70–2/70–3/75/90 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in parasites growing in normal RBCs, in RBCs oxidatively-stressed by moderate H2O2 generation and in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Protein expression of antioxidant enzymes was assayed by Western blotting. The pentosephosphate-pathway flux was measured in isolated parasites after Sendai-virus lysis of RBC membrane. Results In parasites growing in normal RBCs, mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes and HSPs displayed co-ordinated stage-dependent modulation, being low at ring, highest at early trophozoite and again very low at schizont stage. Additional exogenous oxidative stress or growth in antioxidant blunted G6PD-deficient RBCs indicated remarkable flexibility of both systems, manifested by enhanced, co-ordinated mRNA expression of

  18. Co-ordinated stage-dependent enhancement of Plasmodium falciparum antioxidant enzymes and heat shock protein expression in parasites growing in oxidatively stressed or G6PD-deficient red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akide-Ndunge, Oscar Bate; Tambini, Elisa; Giribaldi, Giuliana; McMillan, Paul J; Müller, Sylke; Arese, Paolo; Turrini, Francesco

    2009-05-29

    Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (RBCs) are equipped with protective antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs). The latter are only considered to protect against thermal stress. Important issues are poorly explored: first, it is insufficiently known how both systems are expressed in relation to the parasite developmental stage; secondly, it is unknown whether P. falciparum HSPs are redox-responsive, in view of redox sensitivity of HSP in eukaryotic cells; thirdly, it is poorly known how the antioxidant defense machinery would respond to increased oxidative stress or inhibited antioxidant defense. Those issues are interesting as several antimalarials increase the oxidative stress or block antioxidant defense in the parasitized RBC. In addition, numerous inhibitors of HSPs are currently developed for cancer therapy and might be tested as anti-malarials. Thus, the joint disruption of the parasite antioxidant enzymes/HSP system would interfere with parasite growth and open new perspectives for anti-malaria therapy. Stage-dependent mRNA expression of ten representative P. falciparum antioxidant enzymes and hsp60/70-2/70-3/75/90 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in parasites growing in normal RBCs, in RBCs oxidatively-stressed by moderate H2O2 generation and in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Protein expression of antioxidant enzymes was assayed by Western blotting. The pentosephosphate-pathway flux was measured in isolated parasites after Sendai-virus lysis of RBC membrane. In parasites growing in normal RBCs, mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes and HSPs displayed co-ordinated stage-dependent modulation, being low at ring, highest at early trophozoite and again very low at schizont stage. Additional exogenous oxidative stress or growth in antioxidant blunted G6PD-deficient RBCs indicated remarkable flexibility of both systems, manifested by enhanced, co-ordinated mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes and HSPs. Protein expression of

  19. Co-ordinate variations in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase, and the cobalamin cofactors in human glioma cells during nitrous oxide exposure and the subsequent recovery phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, B; Fiskerstrand, T; Refsum, H; Ueland, P M

    1999-07-01

    We investigated the co-ordinate variations of the two cobalamin (Cbl)-dependent enzymes, methionine synthase (MS) and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM), and measured the levels of their respective cofactors, methylcobalamin (CH3Cbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) in cultured human glioma cells during nitrous oxide exposure and during a subsequent recovery period of culture in a nitrous oxide-free atmosphere (air). In agreement with published data, MS as the primary target of nitrous oxide was inactivated rapidly (initial rate of 0.06 h(-1)), followed by reduction of CH3Cbl (to ordinate distribution of Cbl cofactors during depletion and repletion.

  20. Letter from the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    As of 2007, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at 1,461, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased quality of the published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers with roughly the same number of citations. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average online publication time of just 4.5 months. We hope that the year 2008 will be comparably prosperous. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  1. Automation for tsetse mass rearing for use in sterile insect technique programmes. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    The rearing of tsetse flies for the sterile insect technique has been a laborious procedure in the past. The purpose of this co-ordinated research project (CRP) 'Automation for tsetse mass rearing for use in sterile insect technique programmes' was to develop appropriate semiautomated procedures to simplify the rearing, reduce the cost and standardize the product. Two main objectives were accomplished. The first was to simplify the handling of adults at emergence. This was achieved by allowing the adults to emerge directly into the production cages. Selection of the appropriate environmental conditions and timing allowed the manipulation of the emergence pattern to achieve the desired ratio of four females to one male with minimal un-emerged females remaining mixed with the male pupae. Tests demonstrated that putting the sexes together at emergence, leaving the males in the production cages, and using a ratio of 4:1 (3:1 for a few species) did not adversely affect pupal production. This has resulted in a standardized system for the self stocking of production cages. The second was to reduce the labour involved in feeding the flies. Three distinct systems were developed and tested in sequence. The first tsetse production unit (TPU 1) was a fully automated system, but the fly survival and fecundity were unacceptably low. From this a simpler TPU 2 was developed and tested, where 63 large cages were held on a frame that could be moved as a single unit to the feeding location. TPU 2 was tested in various locations, and found to satisfy the basic requirements, and the adoption of Plexiglas pupal collection slopes resolved much of the problem due to light distribution. However the cage holding frame was heavy and difficult to position on the feeding frame and the movement disturbed the flies. TPU 2 was superseded by TPU 3, in which the cages remain stationary at all times, and the blood is brought to the flies. The blood feeding system is mounted on rails to make it

  2. Facilitating a stakeholder-led approach to the development of Mediterranean climate services: co-ordinating the CLIM-RUN case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodess, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    The CLIM-RUN case studies provide a real-world context for bringing together experts on the demand and supply side of climate services. They are essential to the CLIM-RUN objective of using iterative and bottom-up (i.e., stakeholder led) approaches for optimizing the two-way information transfer between climate experts and stakeholders. The region of interest for CLIM-RUN is the Mediterranean, which is a recognised climate change hotspot (i.e., a region particularly sensitive and vulnerable to global warming) and which does not currently have developed climate service networks such as exist in a number of Central and Northern European countries. The case studies focus on the energy and tourism sectors, but also include a cross-cutting study on wild fires (an issue of increasing concern in the Mediterranean) as well as a cross-sectorial integrated case study for the Venice lagoon. They span coastal (e.g., Tunisia and Croatia), island (e.g., Cyprus) and mountain (e.g., Savoie) environments, the eastern (e.g., Greece) to western (e.g., Spain, Morocco) Mediterranean regions, and regional to local foci. Stakeholder involvement has been critical from the start of the project in March 2011, with a series of targeted workshops helping to define the framework for each case study. Two specific workshop objectives were to (i) better understand who are the climate services stakeholders and (ii) what they need/want from climate services (both in terms of data products and broader knowledge). Many of the workshops were held in local languages to maximise stakeholder participation, with expert knowledge provided by the CLIM-RUN climate and stakeholder expert teams (the CET and SET). Following the workshops, CET members are 'translating' the user needs into specific requirements from climate observations and models and identifying areas where additional modelling and analysis are required. As part of the central co-ordination of the case studies, a perception and data needs

  3. Development of kits for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging. Report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    establishment of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) by the IAEA. The CRP could investigate alternate biochemical pathways, promising recent advances in 99 mTc labelling methodologies and recent progress in evaluation methods. Based on recommendations of two consultants meetings, the IAEA initiated a CRP entitled Development of Kits for 99 mTc Radiopharmaceuticals for Infection Imaging in 2000. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Europe, North America, and South America participated in the CRP, which was concluded in 2003. Among the objectives of this CRP was the development of different 99 mTc labelling strategies in participating laboratories that would be useful in the development of 99 mTc labelled infection imaging agents. In addition, techniques were to be developed for the in vitro and in vivo testing of label stability. Finally, it was hoped that one or more of the identified agents would prove to localize in infection by a specific mechanism. The CRP may be said to be successful in all three measures. Finally, with the identification of 99 mTc ubiquicidine fragment (UBI 29-41) as a radiolabelled agent with potential clinical utility, this CRP can be considered to have made a major contribution by providing the first validated specific 99 mTc labelled infection imaging agent

  4. Induced mutations in connection with biotechnology for crop improvement in Latin America. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    This publication results from the second Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Plant Breeding and Genetics organized on a regional basis in Latin America. The present CRP and the previous one were initiated and implemented in response to the pressing need to enhance the productivity of economic plants, viz. food crops, fruits and ornamentals. Improvement of crop production has become the highest priority in most countries of Latin America, as in other regions. Breeding superior varieties is often the only feasible solution where inputs are limited; well adapted varieties are required to meet specific agro-environmental conditions. Such varieties provide yield stability on an economically required level. The most important and common factors limiting crop production are abiotic, e.g. cold, salinity, soil aluminium toxicity and drought; as well as biotic, e.g. diseases and pests. Modern biotechnology and induced mutations offer new means and significant potential to breed desired varieties in a relatively short time. Additionally, both approaches facilitate the breeding of some vegetatively propagated crops which until now were improved mainly through selection of rare spontaneous mutants in natural or cultivated populations. Using some of these techniques it recently became possible to produce, in some crops, true-to-type mutated lines or clones within a few months. Biotechnology can also facilitate selection, description and molecular characterization of promising mutants. Currently used DNA markers, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) as well as other polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques, were included in this CRP to benefit the important crops of this region. Also included in this CRP were doubled haploids (DH), which are obtained from anther or microspore cultures and are very suitable biotechnology methods. In connection with radiation-induced mutations, they can speed up conventional

  5. Induced mutations in connection with biotechnology for crop improvement in Latin America. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This publication results from the second Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Plant Breeding and Genetics organized on a regional basis in Latin America. The present CRP and the previous one were initiated and implemented in response to the pressing need to enhance the productivity of economic plants, viz. food crops, fruits and ornamentals. Improvement of crop production has become the highest priority in most countries of Latin America, as in other regions. Breeding superior varieties is often the only feasible solution where inputs are limited; well adapted varieties are required to meet specific agro-environmental conditions. Such varieties provide yield stability on an economically required level. The most important and common factors limiting crop production are abiotic, e.g. cold, salinity, soil aluminium toxicity and drought; as well as biotic, e.g. diseases and pests. Modern biotechnology and induced mutations offer new means and significant potential to breed desired varieties in a relatively short time. Additionally, both approaches facilitate the breeding of some vegetatively propagated crops which until now were improved mainly through selection of rare spontaneous mutants in natural or cultivated populations. Using some of these techniques it recently became possible to produce, in some crops, true-to-type mutated lines or clones within a few months. Biotechnology can also facilitate selection, description and molecular characterization of promising mutants. Currently used DNA markers, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) as well as other polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques, were included in this CRP to benefit the important crops of this region. Also included in this CRP were doubled haploids (DH), which are obtained from anther or microspore cultures and are very suitable biotechnology methods. In connection with radiation-induced mutations, they can speed up conventional

  6. Charged particle cross-section database for medical radioisotope production: diagnostic radioisotopes and monitor reactions. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    Medical applications of nuclear radiation are of considerable interest to the IAEA. Cyclotrons and accelerators, available in recent years in an increasing number of countries, are being used for the production of radioisotopes for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The physical basis of this production is described through interaction of charged particles, such as protons, deuterons and alphas, with matter. These processes have to be well understood in order to produce radioisotopes in an efficient and clean manner. In addition to medical radioisotope production, reactions with low energy charged particles are of primary importance for two major applications. Techniques of ion beam analysis use many specific reactions to identify material properties, and in nuclear astrophysics there is interest in numerous reaction rates to understand nucleosynthesis in the Universe. A large number of medically oriented cyclotrons have been running in North America, western Europe and Japan for more than two decades. In recent years, 30-40 MeV cyclotrons and smaller cyclotrons (E p < 20 MeV) have been installed in several countries. Although the production methods are well established, there are no evaluated and recommended nuclear data sets available. The need for standardization was thus imminent. This was pointed out at three IAEA meetings. Based on the recommendations made at these meetings, the IAEA decided to undertake and organize the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Reference Charged Particle Cross-Section Database for Medical Radioisotope Production. The project was initiated in 1995. It focused on radioisotopes for diagnostic purposes and on the related beam monitor reactions in order to meet current needs. It constituted the first major international effort dedicated to standardization of nuclear data for radioisotope production. It covered the following areas: Compilation of data on the most important reactions for monitoring light ion

  7. Application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspection to research reactors. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    -destructive testing (NDT), are generally called in-service inspections (ISI) and, together with the above specific techniques, are the subject of the present TECDOC. The main objectives of the TECDOC are to present a number of these special techniques and to give guidance for their application. The guidance and recommendations given in this publication form the basis for the conduct of ISI of research reactors with limited hazard potential to the public. This TECDOC is based on the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Application of Non-destructive Testing and In-service Inspection to Research Reactors that the IAEA organized in 1995 to supplement its activities on research reactor ageing within its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). Because of the importance of such in-service inspections within the programmes for the management of ageing in research reactors, this TECDOC will be useful to a large fraction of the currently operating research reactors that are over 30 years old

  8. Effect of root-extracts of Ficus benghalensis (Banyan) in memory, anxiety, muscle co-ordination and seizure in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Dipesh Raj; Rauniar, G P

    2016-11-03

    Ficus benghalensis L. (Banyan) is a commonly found tree in Eastern Nepal. Its different plant parts are used for various neurological ailments. This study was performed in mice to see its effects in various neuropharmacological parameters. Passive-avoidance (memory), Open-field (anxiety), Pentobarbital-induced Sleep potentiation (sleep), Rota-rod (muscle-co-ordination), Pentylenetetrazol-Induced and Maximal Electroshock Seizure Tests were performed. Sample size was calculated using G*Power 3.1.9.2. Aqueous root extracts (Soxhlet method) of Ficus benghalensis 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg with negative and positive controls were used. The experimental results were represented as Mean ± SD. P-value was set at test was appropriately used. Passive-avoidance test showed 200 mg/kg group spent significantly less. Time (0.00s + 0.00s) in shock-zone than Normal Saline-group (9.67 s + 14.36 s, P = 0.000) or Diazepam-group (41.07 s + 88.24 s, P = 0.000). Open-field test showed 200 mg/kg group spent significantly longer Time (24.77 s + 12.23 s) in central-square than either Normal Saline group (15.08 s + 6.81 s, P = 0.000) or Diazepam-group (15.32 s + 5.12 s, P = 0.000). In Rota-rod test, 200 mg/kg group fell off the rod significantly (P = 0.000) earlier (33.01 s + 43.61 s) than both Normal Saline (>120 s) and Diazepam (62.07 s + 43.83 s) PTZ model showed that 100 mg/kg significantly (P = 0.004) delayed seizure-onset (184.40s + 36.36 s) compared to Normal Saline (101.79 s + 22.81 s), however, in MES model 200 mg/kg significantly (P = 0.000) prolonged tonic hind-limb extension (17.57 s + 2.15 s) compared to Normal Saline (13.55 s + 2.75 s) or Phenytoin (00.00s + 00.00s). Aerial roots of Ficus benghalensis have memory-enhancing, anxiolytic, musclerelaxant, and seizure-modifying effect.

  9. Carta del editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Mauricio Covarrubias-Moreno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Henos aquí con un nuevo número de RIESED. Después de casi un año de ver la luz, y como lo anticipábamos en la carta del editor que acompañaba al número fundacional, hacer una revista electrónica no ha sido una tarea sencilla. Un año más tarde no podemos sino confirmar esa opinión.Gracias al decidido trabajo de los autores, revisores y miembros del equipo editorial hemos podido hacerlo. El proceso de revisión de los artículos ha merecido un cuidado, dedicación y tiempo especiales, que hicieron necesario demorar unos días la fecha de publicación de este tercer número. Asumimos un compromiso con la calidad y estamos convencidos que esa es la única posibilidad de éxito para una revista científica. El contenido y nivel de los artículos disponibles servirá sin duda como incentivo para que los investigadores deseen publicar sus aportes en RIESED.Agradezco especialmente a la Dra. Gloria Rosique Cedillo, Editora Invitada y Coordinadora de este tercer número, así como al investigador César Nicandro Cruz-Rubio, Editor Asociado, apreciados colegas con quienes he tenido el privilegio de trabajar a lo largo de estos meses, y cuya dedicación y esmero han hecho posible RIESED 3.Por otra parte, derivado de nuestro proyecto editorial informo a ustedes de la creación de la Cátedra RIESED. Educación y Sociedad. Esta Cátedra es una iniciativa que la Universidad del Desarrollo Empresarial y Pedagógico ha impulsado en estrecha colaboración con el Grupo de Investigación en Gobierno Administración y Políticas Públicas (GIGAPP del Instituto Universitario de Investigación Ortega y Gasset (IUIOG, Fundación Ortega – Marañón; así como, con la Academia Internacional de Ciencias Político Administrativas y Estudios de Futuro A.C.La Cátedra está concebida como un espacio de diálogo y reflexión interdisciplinario sobre las diferentes temáticas abordadas en RIESED. En el marco de esta iniciativa académica, se invita a los miembros

  10. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 1: data summary and conclusions. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region. The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Eleven RCA Member States participated in the CRP. Research co-ordination meetings (RCMs) for the CRP were held in Mito City, Japan, 17-21 October 1988 and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, 8-12 April 1991. The concluding meeting was held in Tianjin, China, 25-29 October 1993. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries

  11. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4B. Paks NPP: Analysis/testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on dynamic study of the main building of the Paks NPP; shake table investigation at Paks NPP and the Final report of the Co-ordinated Research Programme

  12. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 1: data summary and conclusions. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region. The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Eleven RCA Member States participated in the CRP. Research co-ordination meetings (RCMs) for the CRP were held in Mito City, Japan, 17-21 October 1988 and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, 8-12 April 1991. The concluding meeting was held in Tianjin, China, 25-29 October 1993. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries. Refs, figs, tabs.

  13. Editor's Comment and Announcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, Robert

    2017-12-17

    It is hard to believe but Clinical and Investigative Medicine (CIM), the official journal of Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation (CSCI), will soon celebrate its 40th birthday!  Over these past four decades, CIM has been the premier journal for Canadian clinician scientists; publishing over 1,000 articles on breakthroughs and major advances from Canada and around the world.  We are listed on Medline, PubMed and the Library of Science. We have been, and will continue to be, an independent journal. To celebrate this auspicious occasion, we have plans to become an even bigger showpiece for national and international clinical advances. We want to connect more closely with Canadian clinician scientists and trainees and we particularly want to encourage more Canadian publications. Changes will soon be coming to CIM with several new features: Newsletter with announcements and news on activities of interest to clinician scientists and trainees; Focused Reviews on specific areas of research; Reflections on work and life experiences of trainees and senior clinician scientists; Methods Papers describing novel methods anticipated to be useful for others; and  Guidelines or Recommendations on clinical care that are endorsed by a Canadian Medical or Surgical Society. Starting in 2018, we will be publishing on a quarterly basis. This will help to ensure we will focus on important breakthroughs and commentaries. However, we are also planning a special edition in the autumn to commemorate the 40th birthday. Stay tuned! Of course CIM will continue to publish original papers on discoveries in pathophysiology, prevention, management, treatment and outcome of clinical problems confronting clinicians in Canada and around the world.  Please join us as we embark on these changes and a new era for CIM, Robert Bortolussi Clinical and Investigative Medicine (CIM) Editor in Chief.

  14. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Hutinski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available All the papers in this issue of the JIOS Journal may fit into the Science as Usual categoryand are therefore not going to be dealt with in detail in the introduction. However, for oneof the papers included an exception has been provided, namely the paper Sigma-notationand the equivalence of P and NP classes by Miron Ivanovich Telpiz. The circumstancesleading to its publication in this issue of JIOS are presented by the editors in this preface.It is generally acknowledged that, ever since it was defined by S. Cook over thirty yearsago, P = NP has presented one of the major open problems in computing science andinformation science in general. Whereas, on one hand, this problem presents a formidablechallenge to any scientist dealing with it, its solution, especially in case it should turn out tobe a positive one considering that current technology tends to evolve in a practicaldirection and its overall functioning is conducted implicitly under the assumption of anegative solution would have a major impact on the development of informationtechnology as well as the wider context of human society as a whole. Apart from being putforward in conferences, both positive and negative “solutions” to P = NP problem can beoccasionally found in press, scientific and professional journals. The web page titled “Pversus-NP Page” (see http://www.win.tue.nl/~gwoegi/P-versus-NP.htm provides anexcellent source for this issue. It contains links to papers stating that P = NP, as well asthose contradicting the opposite, i.e., stating that P NP. Furthermore, references are givento Oded Goldreich's rationale behind his decision not to review papers proposing solutionsto P = NP problem and related difficult problems because, in his own words, they “alsoattract the attention of non-experts, and one annoying consequence is a flood of falseclaims of resolutions of these problems” (see http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~oded/faq.html. Dr. Goldreich a recognised

  15. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 10, Number: 2. This is the second issue of the year 2009 and 10th anniversary of TOJDE. In this issue it is published four notes for Editor, 13 articles, 2 reviews. And this time, 28 authors from 8 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Canada, Gana, India, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, United Kingdom and Turkey. “Reflective Approach In Teaching Pre-Degree Chemistry” has sent to editor of TOJDE from India and written by B. Venkateswara RAO and D. Samrajya LAKSHMI from Andhra Pradesh University, Their paper involve an investigation of a chemistry teacher in two years intermediate education in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India. The teacher was successful in his goal of teaching for understanding because he was effective classroom manager and he had strong science content knowledge that enabled him to focus on instructional strategies that facilitated student understanding. He asked appropriate questions, responded to student questions, and used effective cognitive monitoring strategies. The teacher was able to teach effectively because he had adequate content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. The second notes for editor is titled as Study Of Learning Styles And Their Roles In The Academic Achievement Of The Students Of Payame Noor University (PNU” which is written by Mahdi Moeni KIA, Ahmad ALIAPOUR and Esmaeil GHADERI, from Human college, Payame Noor University, Tehran, IRAN. Their paper mentioned that most of male students use verbal and solitary learning styles. Most of female student use aural and verbal learning styles. The academic achievement of female students is more than the academic achievement of male students. Among the students of Payame Noor University, those who use visual learning style have the greatest achievement. Students with social, aural, verbal, and solitary learning styles are in the following ranks

  16. FROM THE EDITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemil Ozturk

    2014-10-01

    ısı” (Social Studies Teachers’ Perceptions of Tolerance and Feryal Çubukçu “Values Education Through Literary Texts”. These valuable papers have potential to contribute the literature on social studies education. One of the main aims of ASSE was to establish a regular scientific event through which social studies educators from Turkey and abroad get together to share their academic works and ideas. In conjunction with the Faculty of Education of Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University we are organizing the Fourth International Symposium on Social Studies Education (ISSE in April 2015. The main theme of ISSE the 4th is “Peace Education”. The preference of this theme emphasizes on our hopes and determination for our envision for peace in the late Ottoman geography, in which guns have still been on fire and people have still been shedding tears. And this could be regarded as something similar to the action of Mustafa Kemal Pasha who thought of about the reconstruction of the country after the war and assembled an “Educational Congress” in Ankara to discuss educational issues, during the most difficult days of the War of Independence in 1921. Adopting this approach, we have been considering putting effort to institutionalize the values of democracy, human rights, justice, freedom of thought and freedom of conscience. As a final remark, I would like to thank everyone who contributed to the production of this issue and special thanks to Assoc. Prof. Dr. Erkan Dinç who acted as issue editor. Best regards and hope to meet you in ISSE the 4th…

  17. From the Guest Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milun Babić

    2010-01-01

    ordinary, but I would like to use this occasion to emphasize that for successful development and international appearance of the Serbian researchers in the area of thermal science, energy and energy efficiency science we owe a lot to Professor Simeon Oka, Ph. D. (chief and executive editor of the journal Thermal Science and professor Milan Radovanović, Ph. D. (president of the Society of Thermal Engineers of Serbia. Gratitude that we have is not only for their effort as researchers and creative and challenging education, but also for the founding and guidance of Thermal Science, today internationally known and appreciated science journal. This long term editing work that professor Oka and professor Radovanović nurse within the Society of Thermal Engineers of Serbia became window to world for Serbian researchers. Publishing the scientific article in the journal Thermal Science today is not only the major research event for domestic scientists but for the researchers all over the world. About excellent science and nurture characters of professor Oka and professor Radovanović is saying a lot the decision to dedicate this special issue of the journal Thermal Science to fifty anniversary of Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Kragujevac. This decision was greeted by the employees of MFKG as a special and dear acknowledgment for their effort during fifty years long research work.

  18. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE appears on your screen now as Volume 12, Number: 4. In this issue it publishes 5 notes for Editor, 10 articles, 2 book reviews. And this time, 33 authors from 10 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE and USA. The first Notes for editor arrived from USA, written by Kevin YEE and Jace HARGIS. They focused on Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user‘s posts. There is no direct ―friend‖ relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into ―lists‖ like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more ―circles,‖ the better to monitor (or control the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook. The second notes for editor is titled as ―Learning Community In Online Education‖ which is written by Ziad D. BAGHDADI, Faculty, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry & Pharmacy, Riyadh, SAUDI ARABIA, Faculty, Damascus University Dental Faculty, Damascus, SYRIA. This paper discusses establishing learning communities early in online education and their helps in bridging distances and differences between physical and virtual worlds of teaching and learning. This article sheds light on the importance of learning communities, and gives readers advices for creating communities that connect, engage, and inspire. Several tools for assessment of learning are provided to appraise online learning communities‘ benefits to learners at all levels. ―Investigating The Effect Of Asynchronous Discussions On Students‘ Learning And Understanding Of

  19. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education-TOJDE April 2011 ISSN 1302-6488 Volume: 12 Number: 2 from EditorGreetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 12, Number: 2. In this issue it is published 4 notes for Editor, 14 articles, 1 book review. And this time, 43 authors from 10 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Austrlia, Bangldesh, India, lndonasia, Iran, Malaysia. Pakistan, Serbia, Turkey and USA.The first Notes for editor arrived from USA, written by Kevin YEE and Jace HARGIS. They focused on Google Moderator and Other Clicker Alternatives. In their notes they mentioned that Students register the device on the company Web site, and the instructor synchronizes the database in order to know which students have registered devices, thus creating accountability for “quizzes” in class. During the lecture, students “vote” for multiple choice answers on screen, and real-time results are displayed (anonymously after the polling is finished, providing instant formative feedback. Another model is for a department or institution to purchase clickers and make available in the classroom. Students pick up the clicker as they enter the room each day and replace when exiting. Using this approach does not allow for direct accountability, unless students are registered to a specific number on the clicker, which is documented and tracked. The second notes for editor is titled as “The Effect Of Virtual Versus Traditional Learning In Achieving Competency-Based Skills” which is written by Leili MOSALANEJAD, Sakine SHAHSAVARI and Mehdi DASTPAK from IRAN. In this quasi-experimental study, 86 freshman nursing students were recruited. Nursing Fundamentals and Skills (including theoretical and practical credits was decided as the teaching course. The theory and practical contents were taught in one group by conventional method (face to face teaching, demonstration on moulage and for another

  20. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur demiray

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 9, Number: 2. This is the second issue of the year 2008. In this issue we published 5 notes for Editor, 12 articles, already … reviews and this time 27 authors from twelve different countries are placed. These published articles are from Canada, Bangladesh, Egypt, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, South Africa, The United Kingdom, USA and Turkey. “Reflections on screenagers, faculty development and net-supported learning” has been sent from Norway and written by Mike K. MOULTON for Notes for Editor section. He mentioned in his material that strategy for a faculty development program with respect to net-supported learning. Many universities and colleges are struggling with meeting the demands of a rapidly changing world. His reflections are based on experiences from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. The Second paper has been sent from South Africa, written by Professor Dele Braimoh which is titled as “lifelong learning through mentoring process and its operational dimensions in society”. His paper analyses the varying dimensions of mentoring phenomenon which may be characterized by flexibility of learning process among different groups of people in any given society. He conclude that mentoring is a useful informal and longlife educational process which is not only cost effective, but can also stimulate personal development, increase productivity and improve performance. The third paper on “Development and Validation Process Of A European Language Portfolio Model For Young Learners”, sent by Dr. Ismail Hakki MIRICI from Turkey. He gave a place that various models are being or will be developed and validated in Council of Europe member States depending on the age of learners and national contexts including ELPs for higher and adult education developed by a number of international NGOs. Similarly, every member state should organize

  1. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,I am pleased to inform you that Volume 6, Number: 4 are appearing on your screen now as which is addressed http://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr. Very much thanks to all of you once more that we met 19th time, since January 2000. As we announced in Volume: 6 Number: 3-4 issue, April 2006 issue of TOJDE would published on special issue is to indicate foresight, innovation, and strategy for the future direction of e-learning, more than web-oriented teaching and multipoint videoconferencing, for collaborative, distributed, experiential learning and creation of new knowledge, with youngsters around the world, which hence promote mutual understanding for global peace. Emphasis will be on knowledgeable and inspiring papers (but not limited on the use of GRID networking technology with distributed computer simulation for experiential (hands-on learning through broadband Internet, across national, continental and oceanic boundaries. Subjects are in any fields of e-learning and e-healthcare/telemedicine, in research, case studies, project descriptions, implementation, and reports from the field or book review. I would like to announce for all you, that Volume: 7 Number: 2 will publish as the 4th Special Theme Issue of TOJDE in April 2006. This issue will be prepare by Guest Editor Takeshi UTSUMI, Ph.D., P. E. (Founder and V. P. for Technology and Coordination of Global University System (GUS, USA and Guest Co-Editor Associate Professor Piet KOMMERS (from University of Twente, The Netherlands. In this issue we published 13 articles, three reviews, some news and announcements for our readers. The first article is coming from USA. Author is one of our recent authors; his name is Dr. Scott L. WALKER. This time he wrote on “Modifying Formative Evaluation Techniques For Distance Education Class Evaluation” subject. He indicates in his article that “Post-secondary classes are usually followed by mandatory summative evaluations, yet

  2. Modelling of the transfer of radiocaesium from deposition to lake ecosystems. Report of the VAMP aquatic working group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    The environmental impact of releases of radionuclides from nuclear installations can be predicted using assessment models. For such assessments information on their reliability must be provided. Ideally models should be developed and tested using actual data on the transfer of the nuclides which are site specific for the environment being modelled. In the past, generic data have often been taken from environmental contamination that resulted from the fallout from the nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s or from laboratory experiments. However, it has always been recognized that there may be differences in the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides from these sources as compared to those that could be released from nuclear installations. Furthermore, weapons fallout was spread over time; it did not provide a single pulse which is generally used in testing models that predict time dependence. On the other hand, the Chernobyl accident resulted in a single pulse, which was detected and measured in a variety of environments throughout Europe. The acquisition of these new data sets justified the establishment of an international programme aimed at collating data from different IAEA Member States and at co-ordinating work on new model testing studies. The IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Validation of Environmental Model Predictions' (VAMP). The principal objectives of the VAMP Co-ordinated Research Programme were: (a) To facilitate the validation of assessment models for radionuclide transfer in the terrestrial, aquatic and urban environments. It is envisaged that this will be achieved by acquiring suitable sets of environmental data from the results of the national research and monitoring programmes established following the Chernobyl release. (b) To guide, if necessary, environmental research and monitoring efforts to acquire data for the validation of models used to assess the most significant radiological exposure pathways

  3. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 10, Number: 4. This is the last issue of the year 2009 and 10th anniversary of TOJDE. In this issue it is published 3 notes for Editor, 13 articles, 4 book reviews. And this time, 33 authors from 13 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Iran, KKTC, Lesotho, Lithuania, Malaysia, Pakistan, Romania, United Kingdom, USA and Turkey.“iPhones and Smartphones” has sent to editor of TOJDE from, USA and written by Kevin YEE & Jace HARGIS from University of the Pacific, California. Their paper involve that the iPhone has become a juggernaut in the United States, with 13 million units sold in 2008 (a 245% increase over 2007 and a further 45 million units expected in 2009 (Elmer-DeWitt, 2009. While iPhone still lags Nokia and RIM internationally, the overall trend toward mobile computing becomes firmer by the day, and it behooves educators to become familiar with the cell phone tools that are relevant for teaching in tomorrow’s -and increasingly “today’s”- classroom.The second notes for editor is titled as “Indian School Teachers’ Perspective On Globalisation of Education A Case Study of Atomic Energy Education Society School Teachers ” which is written by Dr. M. RAJESH and SINDHU. P. NAIR, from Indira Gandhi National Open University. They mentioned in their paper that globalisation has become an enduring reality of our times and more so in the field of education. Teachers are the harbingers of change in the global economy and school teachers have a major role in shaping the attitude of the society towards all social and economic phenomena including that of globalisation. At the Regional Centre of IGNOU situated at Cochin, Kerala an unique training programme was conducted for a year to train school teachers of the Atomic Energy Education Society (AEES one of the elite educational organisations of the country

  4. Message from the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  5. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 7th year of TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 7, Number: 3. Very much thanks to all of you once more that we met with you 23rd time, since January 2000. In this issue we published one notes for Editor 15 articles like in this issue, three book reviews, news and announcements for our readers. 25 authors from eight different countries are pleaced in this issue. These published articles are from Bangaldesh, Canada, India, Moldova, Nigeria, Uganda, South Africa, Turkey and USA.The learning organization concept is getting more important in our life day by day at any fields of professionalism, especially for education institution. In this millennium its impotency is increasing in the name of virtual learning environments too. In this issue I gave a place one Notes for Editor from Turkey, Anadolu University. It is written by Assoc. Prof. Dr. Deniz TASCI on the subject that “Online Learning Programs as Learning Organizations: A Case Study of Information Management Programs at Anadolu University, Turkey”. She indicates in her notes that the results of a study in which facilitators’ attitudes toward effectiveness of various media used in the Information Management Associate Degree Program (IMP of Open Education Faculty at Anadolu University, Turkey. The study has shown that textbooks are not viewed as efficient as multimedia programs and web environments by facilitators although they indicate that textbooks should still be used in online courses. The participants also found multimedia programs distributed on CDs more effective than the web environments. The first article of this issue is coming from National Open University of Nigeria, which is written by Olugbenga David OJO and Felix Kayode OLAKULEIN. Their article titled as “The Place of Multiple Intelligence in Achieving the Objectives and Goals of Open and Distance Learning Institutions: a critical analysis

  6. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 8th year of TOJDE finished and TOJDEis appeared on your screen now as Volume 9, Number: 1. This the first issue of the year 2008. As you know the volume 8 Number 3 was the special issue of TOJDE on “Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education” subject. During 6 months I received more than 45 submissions. Some of them rejected by me for the reason that their subjects were not fit for TOJDE’s publishing content strategy and policy, and some of them rejected by TOJDE’s editors. And others can be publish this year’s issues In this issue we published one notes for Editor, 15 articles, already three reviews and this time 24 authors from ten different countries are placed in this issue. These published articles are from Austria, Bangladesh, Egypt, Greece, India, Iran, Jordan, Nigeria, Pakistan and Turkey. GET A SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION: Eradicate the Poverty Level of the Women Farmer in Bangladesh has been sent from Bangladesh Open University and written by Zobaida AKHTER, Ph.D. for Notes for Editor section. She mentioned in her material argues that efforts to promote women in farming are confronted by challenges including poverty, misconception regarding education, training, farming etc. The paper also states that the utilization and development of distance education would effectively address the problem of education and training aimed at rural women. The first article of this issue is coming from Vienna, AUSTRIA, Wegener Center for Climate and Global Change at Graz University, FH Joanneum Graz, and Federal Environment Agency written by Gilbert AHAMER on “Virtual Structures For Mutual Review Promote Understanding Of Opposed Standpoints” . Gilbert metion ih his paper that , in level 2 of SGC students write, review, assess and update standpoints while making use of a web based discussion forum. A statistical analysis of student activities is

  7. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE,TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 13 Number: 1 In this issue it is published 5 notes for Editor, 16articles, 2 books reviews a nd this time, 53 authors from 12 different countries are placed. These published articles are from Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Greece, Iran, Malaysia, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Turkey, UAE and USA.The first Notes for editor arrived from USA, written by Kevin YEE and Jace HARGIS. They focused on Simply including a narrative component may provide enough creative ammunition for students to feel that a particular assignment can be more interesting (Clark 2010, if their work is to be wrapped around a narrative format, such as a short story in favor of an essay or formal writing. But there are numerous free technology tools available today that take the process one step further, by injecting different editing options and high-end production values. Students do not merely assemble a story in words. They can now do it primarily with images, and many of the slideshow services online allow for text captions, dynamic transitions, special effects, and relevant animations. Students become videographers and directors as much as they function as storytellers. The slideshow builders thus do a better job than “old fashioned” essay/short story assignments at meeting the need of 21st century students, many of whom arrive at institutions of higher learning with at least an already-ingrained interest in such tools, if not explicit experience.The following note is that a review of existing literature pertaining to servant leadership and faculty development. Specifically, this work discussed delivering servant leadership to online faculty through the utilization of a faculty development program. The idea for this literature review stemmed from the author asking how an online academic administrator could utilize the practice of servant leadership in order to improve the overall online academic

  8. Frof Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    the role of universities as content producers for credentialed learning to be questioned, prompting many educators to explore new ways of supporting online learning. The sixth article from Palitha Edirisingha (UK, Chiara Rizzi (Italy, Ming Nie (UK and Libby Rothwell (UK report on a study involving the use of podcasting (Curry, 2004 to provide teaching and learning support for an undergraduate module on English Language and Communication. The findings led to development of a model for integrating podcasts in on-campus blended learning, and which can have potential applications in distance learning contexts. The model is based on three main features of podcasts identified as facilitating student learning: learner choice and flexibility offered by podcasts; tacit knowledge and experience of peers conveyed in discussions; and a sense of informality brought into formal learning. Also from the implementation perspective, Penny de Byl and Janet Taylor (Australia describe a Web 2.0/Web3D hybrid e-learning platform, called the AliveX3D platform, which involves the application of the Web 2.0 ethos to an online 3D virtual environment. The platform and accompanying tools are designed to enable the creation of authentic learning experiences with a large degree of learner control, and to promote collaborative dialogue between learners. The immersion in the 3D worlds enables learners to negotiate meaning based on their own personal cognitive, affective and kinaesthetic experiences rather than relying merely on descriptions of others’ experiences. Last but not least, the “Notes to the Editor” section contains a contribution from Yavuz Akbulut and Mübin Kiyici (Turkey, on the instructional uses of blogs. And two book reviews from the field. We hope you enjoy reading this contributions, and welcome your feedback, rejoinders and reflections on the various articles contained within this special issue. Mark J. W. LEE and Hakan G. SENELGuest Editors, July 2007 Acknowledgements

  9. From The Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear TOJDE Readers, Welcome to the Volume 14 Number: 1 of TOJDE! In this issue, 31 articles of 65 authors from 12 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are arrived to the TOJDE from Australia, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Russia, Taiwan, Turkey, USA and Zimba bwe. First all, you should know that if a submission picks up from three TOJDE editors between 4.5 and 9 over all 9 credits, it means that this submission can be published in TOJDE in the coming issue. However, since the publishing priority of the accepted papers belongs to the highest scored ones, submissions which receive a score between 4.5 and 5 or 6 may wait and be archived for publishing later on. TOJDE administration respected this publishing rule up to now. Therefore, some accepted submissions which obtained over 4.5 have not been published up to now. Some of these submissions were waiting for publishing in TOJDE in the future sice 2011. In this issue, we decided to give them a chance to be published. For this reason that becoming end of the year of 2012, more papers for this issue included me than the previous issues. The 1st article arrived from Nigeria and written by Sunday O. ADEGBESAN, from Training and Research Fellow, National Institute for Educational Planning and Administration (NIEPA, on “Effect Of Principals’ Leadership Style On Teachers’ Attitude To Work In Ogun State Secondary Schools, Nigeria ". The purpose of this study was to investigate why some principals prefer to embrace certain leadership styles and the effect of such styles on the teachers’ attitude to work. In the 2nd article is mentioned in their context, especially web-based learning comes forward. Web-based learning can be defined as an information technology-enabled and supported form of distance learning in which the traditional restrictions of classroom learning have disappeared. The Internet can be a useful aid in teaching

  10. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur DEMIRAY

    2006-04-01

    the program. Therefore, more research on gender, attitude, and experience in such programs is needed to understand how students work with mathematical software programs and use them as learning tool in the class environment. Next article is from Bangladesh Open University, BANGALDESH, which written by Md. Tofazzal ISLAM from School of Agriculture and Rural Development, Morshedur RAHMAN and K. M. Rezanur RAHMAN from School of Science and Technology, Bangladesh Open University, which is titled as Quality And Processes Of Bangladesh Open University Course Materials Development“. Their paper, attempt to describe the processes and quality of BOU course materials development taking into account the strengths and weaknesses as well as possible ways of improvement. It is mentioned in their article that as a new member of the mega-Universities, Bangladesh Open University (BOU introduced with an example a course team approach for developing effective course materials for distance students. BOU teaching media includes such as printed course books, study guides, radio and television broadcasts, audiocassettes and occasional face-to-face tutorials. Each course team comprises specialist course writer(s, editor, trained style editor, graphic designer, illustrator, audio-visual producer and anonymous referees. An editorial board or preview committee is responsible for the final approval for publishing or broadcasting materials for learners. This approach has been proved to be effective, but appeared to be complicated and time-consuming. This report focuses on the quality and processes of BOU course materials development taking into account the strengths and weaknesses of the current approach. The thirteenth one about is “Economic Thought About Private Sector Education: Policy Implications for Management of Universities in Africa”, written by Joel B. BABALOLA from University of Ibadan, Ademola S. TAYO from Babcock University, A. OKERDIRAN from University of Ibadan, A. O. AYENI

  11. Modelling the deposition of airborne radionuclides into the urban environment. First report of the VAMP Urban Working Group. Part of the IAEA/CEC co-ordinated research programme on the validation of environmental model predictions (VAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    A co-ordinated research programme was begun at the IAEA in 1988 with the short title of Validation of Environmental Model Predictions (VAMP). The VAMP Urban Working Group aims to examine, by means of expert review combined with formal validation exercises, modelling for the assessment of the radiation exposure of urban populations through the external irradiation and inhalation pathways. An aim of the studies is to evaluate the lessons learned and to document the improvements in modelling capability as a result of experience gained following the Chernobyl accident. This Technical Document, the first report of the Group, addresses the subject of the deposition of airborne radionuclides into the urban environment. It summarizes not only the present status of modelling in this field, but also the results of a limited validation exercise that was performed under the auspices of VAMP. 42 refs, figs and tabs

  12. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V.1: Validation of seismic analysis codes using reactor core experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993, was attended by participants from France, India, Italy, Japan and the Russian Federation. The meeting was held to discuss and compare the results obtained by various organizations for the analysis of Italian tests on PEC mock-up. The background paper by A. Martelli, et al., Italy, entitled Fluid-Structure Interaction Experiments of PEC Core Mock-ups and Numerical Analysis Performed by ENEA presented details on the Italian PEC (Prova Elementi di Combustibile, i.e. Fuel Element Test Facility) test data for the benchmark. Several papers were presented on the analytical investigations of the PEC reactor core experiments. The paper by M. Morishita, Japan, entitled Seismic Response Analysis of PEC Reactor Core Mock-up, gives a brief review of the Japanese data on the Monju mock-up core experiment which had been distributed to the participating countries through the IAEA. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Time-domain numerical computations of electromagnetic fields in cylindrical co-ordinates using the transmission line matrix: evaluation of radiaion losses from a charge bunch passing through a pill-box resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, J.; Robson, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    The two dimensional transmission line matrix (TLM) numerical method has been adapted to compute electromagnetic field distributions in cylindrical co-ordinates and it is applied to evaluate the radiation loss from a charge bunch passing through a 'pill-box' resonator. The computer program has been developed to calculate not only the total energy loss to the resonator but also that component of it which exists in the TM 010 mode. The numerically computed results are shown to agree very well with the analytically derived values as found in the literature which, therefore, established the degree of accuracy that is obtained with the TLM method. The particular features of computational simplicity, numerical stability and the inherently time-domain solutions produced by the TLM method are cited as additional, attractive reasons for using this numerical procedure in solving such problems. (Auth.)

  14. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 3A. Kozloduy NPP units 5/6: Analysis/testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. This volume of Working material contains reports related analyses and testing of Kozloduy nuclear power plant, units 5 and 6

  15. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 3B. Kozloduy NPP units 5/6: Analysis/testing. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. This volume of Working material contains reports related analyses and testing of Kozloduy nuclear power plant, units 5 and 6.

  16. The IAEA co-ordinated research programme on improvement of measurements, theoretical computations and evaluations of neutron induced helium production cross sections. Status report. Prepared at the final CRP meeting in Sendai, Japan 25-29 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1996-12-01

    The present report describes the results of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Improvements of Measurements, Theoretical Computation and Evaluations of Neutron Induced Helium Production Cross Sections''. Summarized is the progress achieved under the CRP in the following areas: measurements of α-production cross sections for structural materials, theoretical computations at (nα) cross sections; measurements of activation cross sections; and improvement of experimental methods for (n,α) investigations. The status report gives also short summaries on the work of each laboratory which contributed to the results of the CRP. Attached is the list of program members and participants of CRP meetings. (author). Refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  17. Use of nuclear and related techniques in studies of agroecological effects resulting from the use of persistent pesticides in Central America. Report of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The use of pesticides for the control of pests of agriculture and vectors of human and animal diseases in the countries of Central America is the highest per capita and one of the most intense in the world. There are reports of acute toxicity and chronic effects among farm workers. There are also reports that pesticide residues in food frequently exceed the Codex Alimentarius Commission's maximum residue levels (MRLs) and shipments of foodstuffs have been rejected by importing countries due to the presence of excessive residues of pesticides. Pesticides are also implicated in the contamination of continental and coastal waters. The indiscriminate use of pesticides would be expected to also aggravate pest problems by adversely affecting populations of beneficial arthropods and causing the development of resistance in pest populations. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated a co-ordinated research project in 1992 to generate information on residues of pesticides in the environment, their persistence under local conditions and effect on local species of beneficial arthropods in agricultural and adjacent areas in the countries of Central America. Such information could be used in the implementation of legislation to control the distribution and use of pesticides and the development and application of integrated pest management programmes. Scientists from Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and the United States of America participated in this project. This TECDOC reports on the accomplishments of the project and includes the papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Panama City, Panama, 20-24 April 1998

  18. Medical Editors Trial Amnesty (META)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may change jobs, with the result that important work remains unfinished; or investigators may discover a recently published trial on the same topic and conclude that their own results are now redundant. Editors must also take some responsibility. There is a limit to the number of reports we can publish and sometimes we are ...

  19. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur DEMIRAY

    2011-08-01

    , Bogazici University, Istanbul,TURKEY. This paper examines the emerging ideas to implement the usage of Second Life as an educational tool in a wide range of subject areas. The majority of the information used to create these 10 pedagogical approaches was derived from a series of participative inquiries, personal observations, formal and informal interviews, and documenting the perceptions of teachers and students using (and trying to use Second Life as an educational tool. Ten pedagogical approaches have emerged thus far. Each section briefing explains the concept, illustrates the idea with examples, and provides implementation suggestions. The sixth article from USA on “USE OF SECOND LIFE IN K-12 AND HIGHER EDUCATION: A Review of Research”, written by Chris INMAN, Vivian H. WRIGHT & Julia A. HARTMAN, from The University of Alabama, USA. This artile is published in Journal of Interactive Online Learning, Volume 9, Number 1, Spring, 2010 and republished by official permission of JIOL Editor-in-Chief’. This study reviewed empirical research conducted in Second Life by educators since Second Life’s launch in 2003. The study’s purpose was to identify how Second Life is being used in both K-12 and higher education. The methodology, findings, and recommendations of 27 research studies were analyzed. Researchers identified potential problems when using Second Life in education, including issues with the Second Life software and hardware requirements, a steep learning curve, and the possibility of students becoming exposed to distractions or inappropriate content. The seventh one is again from USA. On “GENOME ISLAND: A Virtual Science Environment in Second Life”, written by Mary ANNE CLARK, from Texas Wesleyan University, USA”. This article describes the organization and uses of Genome Island, a virtual laboratory complex constructed in Second Life. Genome Island was created for teaching genetics to university undergraduates but also provides a public space where

  20. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Greetings Dear readers of TOJDE, I am pleased to inform you that in the 7th year of TOJDE is appeared on your screen now as Volume 7, Number: 4. Very much thanks to all of you and TOJDE editorial members once more that we managed to publish TOJDE 25th time, since January 2000. In this issue we published one notes for Editor, 13 articles, two reviews, news and announcements for our readers. 20 authors from seven different countries are placed in this issue. These published articles are from Bangladesh, Germany, Greece, India, Nigeria, South Korea and Turkey.In the “Notes for Editor” section, Dr KURT’s excutive summary is placed via title “Comparative Analysis f Virtual Education Applications”. Dr. Mehmet KURT from Ankara University, Department of Educational Sciences Program of Curriculum and Instruction TURKEY. This summary is his doctorate thesis which is completed on March 2006 at Ankara University. He emphasizes that while in the teaching process they use both synchronous and asynchronous presentation technologies; in order to support course content they use e-mail, web, cd, and course book technologies to provide basic learning environment function; they prefer different environments to cover face to face education needs; they take self learning and collaboration as basis and they take projects and term paper evaluations serious; they mostly prefer multiple choice tests and they usually make virtual courses exams through the internet. Regarding the characteristics of their institutions’ applications, the study group have agreed on mostly to connection and being dependent on connection opportunities. A significant difference between their institutions’ characteristics and the model for developing computer labs, when they had started to provide virtual lessons and presentation technologies used has been found.The first article of this issue is coming from Hellenic Open University, GREECE which is written by Paraskevi VASSALA. In

  1. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-10-01

    toward using the Internet as a learning tool among students at Bangkok University; students’ expectation of social networks and search engines in learning English, as well as their perceived usefulness. It also examined their use of the Internet for learning English. The samples were 198 undergraduate students enrolled in Fundamental English course at Bangkok University. The instrument in this study was a questionnaire. Results from the study indicated that the levels of attitudes toward using the Internet as a learning tool and Internet use for learning English in general were moderate To receive further information and to send your recommendations and remarks, or to submit articles for consideration, please contact TOJDE Secretariat at the below address or e-mail us to tojde@anadolu.edu.tr Hope to stay in touch and meet in our next Issue, on 1st of January 2014. Cordially, Prof. Dr. Ugur Demiray Editor-in-Chief Anadolu University Yunusemre Campus 2647 Eskisehir TURKEY Tel: +90 222 335 0581 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting +90 222 335 0581 ÜCRETSİZ end_of_the_skype_highlighting ext. 5262 GSM: +90 542 23 22 167 or Fax: +90 222 320 4520 or Emails: udemiray@anadolu.edu.tr or udemiray33@gmail.com URL: http://home.anadolu.edu.tr/~udemiray URL: http://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr

  2. Editorial: Letter from the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Heitmeyer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue our guest editors are close to home. Wilhelm Heitmeyer and Steven F. Messner, both members of our own Board of Editors, have assembled a focus section examining the question of “Youth at Risk.” Their collection certainly lives up to our aspiration to be truly interdisciplinary and international. The methods applied in the reported research range from interview-based studies through empirical number-crunching to laboratory experiments (the latter a first for this journal; the geographical scope spans from Argentina through Central America and Europe to Africa. The youth at risk here are in conflict with the police, with each other, with societies that fear them, with societies that ignore their needs. Our systematically eclectic approach continues outside the focus section too, with contributions on the theory of violence, female fighters in Africa, and spousal violence in Pakistan.

  3. The graphics editor in ROOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antcheva, Ilka; Brun, Rene; Hof, Carsten; Rademakers, Fons

    2006-01-01

    A well-designed Graphical User Interface (GUI) has critical importance in any computer application. The user interface is where the end users and the complex system intersect. An effective interface design can make a powerful and complex system, such as ROOT, easy and intuitive to learn and operate. This paper describes the main goals we defined and the design solution we found developing the graphics editor in ROOT

  4. New Editors Appointed for Water Resources Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Praveen Kumar (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), the newly appointed editor in chief of Water Resources Research (WRR), heads the new team of editors for the journal. The other editors are Tom Torgersen (University of Connecticut, Groton), who continues his editorship; Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines, Golden); Graham Sander (Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK); and John Selker (Oregon State University, Corvallis). Hoshin Gupta (University of Arizona, Tucson) will join WRR at the end of 2009. The new editors will begin receiving submissions immediately. The incoming editorial board thanks outgoing editors Marc Parlange, Brian Berkowitz, Amilcare Porporato, and Scott Tyler, all of whom will assist during the transition.

  5. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion

  6. Editorial: Letter from the Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sidanius

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of the journal focuses on the question of bullying prevention, with a collection of articles put together by Manuel Eisner and Tina Malti. We are very grateful to them for the hard work they put in as focus section editors – and in their contributions to the section. The open section this time takes us to North America for a study of identity and in-group superiority and Africa for a review of the question of youth and violence.

  7. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4A. Paks NPP: Analysis/testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to seismic analyses of structures of Paks and Kozloduy reactor buildings and WWER-440/213 primary coolant loops with different antiseismic devices

  8. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 3E. Kozloduy NPP units 5/6: Analysis/testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to floor response spectra of Kozloduy NPP; calculational-experimental examination and ensuring of equipment and pipelines seismic resistance at starting and operating WWER-type NPPs; analysis of design floor response spectra and testing of the electrical systems; experimental investigations and seismic analysis Kozloduy NPP; testing of components on the shaking table facilities and contribution to full scale dynamic testing of Kozloduy NPP; seismic evaluation of the main steam line, piping systems, containment pre-stressing and steel ventilation chimney of Kozloduy NPP

  9. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 2. Generic material: Codes, standards, criteria. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports related to generic material, namely codes, standards and criteria for benchmark analysis.

  10. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4A. Paks NPP: Analysis/testing. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to seismic analyses of structures of Paks and Kozloduy reactor buildings and WWER-440/213 primary coolant loops with different antiseismic devices.

  11. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4C. Paks NPP: Analysis and testing. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material involves comparative analysis of the seismic analysis results of the reactor building for soft soil conditions, derivation of design response spectra for components and systems; and upper range design response spectra for soft soil site conditions at Paks NPP.

  12. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4C. Paks NPP: Analysis and testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material involves comparative analysis of the seismic analysis results of the reactor building for soft soil conditions, derivation of design response spectra for components and systems; and upper range design response spectra for soft soil site conditions at Paks NPP

  13. Spectroscopic studies (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible), normal co-ordinate analysis, first-order hyperpolarizability and HOMO, LUMO studies of 3,4-dichlorobenzophenone by using Density Functional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Prasad, K; Samatha, K; Jagadeeswara Rao, D; Santhamma, C; Muthu, S; Mark Heron, B

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of 3,4-dichlorobenzophenone (DCLBP) were obtained from the FT-IR and Raman spectral data, and evaluated based on the Density Functional Theory using the standard method B3LYP with 6-311+G(d,p) as the basis set. On the basis of potential energy distribution together with the normal-co-ordinate analysis and following the scaled quantum mechanical force methodology, the assignments for the various frequencies were described. The values of the electric dipole moment (μ) and the first-order hyperpolarizability (β) of the molecule were computed. The UV-absorption spectrum was also recorded to study the electronic transitions. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The NBO analysis, to study the intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions, was carried out. Mulliken's net charges were evaluated. The MEP and thermodynamic properties were also calculated. The electron density-based local reactivity descriptor, such as Fukui functions, was calculated to explain the chemical selectivity or reactivity site in 3,4-dichlorobenzophenone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 1. Data related to sites and plants: Paks NPP, Kozloduy NPP. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to sites and NPPs Paks and Kozloduy

  15. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 1. Data related to sites and plants: Paks NPP, Kozloduy NPP. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to sites and NPPs Paks and Kozloduy.

  16. Acute and long-term nutrient-led modifications of gene expression: potential role of SIRT1 as a central co-ordinator of short and longer-term programming of tissue function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, Mark J; Caton, Paul W; Sugden, Mary C

    2010-05-01

    Environmental factors can influence the acute and longer-term risks of developing diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Increasing evidence suggests that these effects can be achieved by modification of metabolic gene expression. These include acute changes in histone methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitination and longer-term DNA silencing elicited by DNA methylation. Thus, an increased risk of disease may reflect acute or chronic stable modification of genes that regulate nutrient handling, leading to altered nutrient utilization (increased lipid oxidation at the expense of glucose utilization) and/or changes in the balance between nutrient storage and energy production, thereby favoring the development of obesity. The review addresses the hypothesis that early-life epigenetic programming of gene expression could be mirrored by changes in acute function of nuclear receptors, in particular the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, achieved by enzymes that are more conventionally involved in regulating DNA methylation and post-transcriptional modification of histones. Emphasis is placed on the potential importance of the protein deacetylase sirtuin-1 as a central co-ordinator. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 2. Generic material: Codes, standards, criteria. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports related to generic material, namely codes, standards and criteria for benchmark analysis

  18. Analytical quality assessment and interpretation of the trace element data obtained in the frame of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the significance of hair mineral analysis as a means for assessing internal body burdens of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeij, J.J.M. de; Blaauw, M.; Zegers, C.

    1993-01-01

    At the request of the IAEA, the authors have performed an assessment of the analytical quality and the interpretation of the trace element data obtained within the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on The Significance of Hair Mineral Analysis as a Means of Assessing Internal Body Burdens of Environmental Pollutants. In this CRP research groups from various countries participated, using different analytical procedures, based on NAA, XRF and AAS. Data have been collected for Zn, CU, Pb, Cd, As, Hg, and Se in male human hair, liver, kidney, lung, brain, and bone. The samples analyzed originated from China, Hungary, Bulgaria, Japan, the former GDR, Sweden and Norway. The analytical quality of the data has been assessed on basis of the calculated limits of quantitation per trace element determined, per tissue analyzed and per participant, as well as from the trace element values found for reference materials and ''blind'' materials. The analytical quality of the data differs widely, from generally good to reasonable (Zn, Cu, and Se) to generally inadequate to strongly inadequate (Pb, Cd, As, and Hg). 15 refs, 29 tabs

  19. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4D. Paks NPP: Analysis and testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on seismic margin assessment and earthquake experience based methods for WWER-440/213 type NPPs; structural analysis and site inspection for site requalification; structural response of Paks NPP reactor building; analysis and testing of model worm type tanks on shaking table; vibration test of a worm tank model; evaluation of potential hazard for operating WWER control rods under seismic excitation

  20. Co-ordinate control of synthesis of mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial hemoproteins: a binding site for the HAP1 (CYP1) protein in the UAS region of the yeast catalase T gene (CTT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H; Adam, G; Mattes, E; Schanz, M; Hartig, A; Ruis, H

    1988-01-01

    Control of expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTT1 (catalase T) gene by the HAP1 (CYP1) gene, a mediator of heme control of mitochondrial cytochromes, was studied. Expression of a CTT1-lacZ fusion in a hap1 mutant showed that the CTT1 promoter is under HAP1 control. As demonstrated by a gel retardation assay, the HAP1 protein binds to a heme control region of the CTT1 gene. This binding in vitro is stimulated by hemin. The HAP1-binding sequence was localized by using DNA fragments spanning different regions, by DNase I footprinting and by methylation interference of DNA-protein binding. The binding site was compared to the HAP1-binding sequences previously characterized in detail (UAS1CYC1, UASCYC7). There is strikingly little similarity between the three sequences, which have only four of those 23 bp in common which are protected from DNase I digestion. However, the pattern of major and minor groove contacts in the complex is quite similar in all three cases. The results obtained show that there is true co-ordinate control of expression of mitochondrial cytochromes and at least some extra-mitochondrial hemoproteins. Heme acts as a metabolic signal in this coordination, which is mediated by the HAP1 protein. Images PMID:2844525