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Sample records for co-mo sulfide catalysts

  1. EXAFS study on structure of sulfide K-Co-Mo catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jun; Bian Guozhu; Fu Yilu; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Hu Tiandou

    2002-01-01

    Recently, authors prepared a kind of K-Co-Mo ultrafine particles by sol-gel method and it shoes much small particle size but higher activity and selectivity toward alcohol formation than the one prepared by conventional method. The aim of the present work is to research the microstructures of the Mo and Co species in the K-Co-Mo samples prepared by different method

  2. Co-Processing of Jatropha-Derived Bio-Oil with Petroleum Distillates over Mesoporous CoMo and NiMo Sulfide Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yuan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The co-processing of an unconventional type of Jatropha bio-oil with petroleum distillates over mesoporous alumina-supported CoMo and NiMo sulfide catalysts (denoted CoMo/γ-Al2O3 and NiMo/γ-Al2O3 was studied. Either a stainless-steel high-pressure batch-type reactor or an up-flow fixed-bed reaction system was used under severe reaction conditions (330–350 °C and 5–7 MPa, similar to the conditions of the conventional diesel hydrodesulfurization (HDS process. To understand the catalytic performance of the mesoporous sulfide catalysts for co-processing, we prepared two series of oil feedstocks. First, model diesel oils, consisting of hydrocarbons and model molecules with various heteroatoms (sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen were used for the study of the reaction mechanisms. Secondly, low-grade oil feedstocks, which were prepared by dissolving of an unconventional type of Jatropha bio-oil (ca. 10 wt % in the petroleum distillates, were used to study the practical application of the catalysts. Surface characterization by gas sorption, spectroscopy, and electron microscopy indicated that the CoMo/γ-Al2O3 sulfide catalyst, which has a larger number of acidic sites and coordinatively unsaturated sites (CUS on the mesoporous alumina framework, was associated with small Co-incorporated MoS2-like slabs with high stacking numbers and many active sites at the edges and corners. In contrast, the NiMo/γ-Al2O3 sulfide catalyst, which had a lower number of acidic sites and CUS on mesoporous alumina framework, was associated with large Ni-incorporated MoS2-like slabs with smaller stacking numbers, yielding more active sites at the brims and corresponding to high hydrogenation (HYD activity. Concerning the catalytic performance, the mesoporous CoMo/γ-Al2O3 sulfide catalyst with large CUS number was highly active for the conventional diesel HDS process; unfortunately, it was deactivated when oxygen- and nitrogen-containing model molecules or Jatropha bio

  3. The Comparison of Co, Ni, Mo, CoMo and NiMo Sulfided Catalysts in Rapeseed Oil Hydrodeoxygenation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Kubička, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 1 (2017), s. 333-341 ISSN 1878-5190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-22490S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : triolein hydrodeoxygenation scheme * rapeseed oil * sulfide catalysts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.264, year: 2016

  4. Surface science models of CoMoS hydrodesulfurisation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, A.M.; De Beer, V.H.J.; Van Veen, J.A.R.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W. [Schuit Institute of Catalysis, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    Characterization of supported catalysts with surface spectroscopic techniques is often limited due to restraints imposed by the support material. The use of flat conducting substrates as a model support offers a way to apply these techniques to their full potential. Such surface science models of silica and alumina supported CoMoS catalysts have been made by impregnating thin SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films with a solution of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) complexes of cobalt and molybdenum. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicate that the order in which cobalt and molybdenum transfer to the sulfided state is reversed with respect to oxidic Co and Mo systems prepared by conventional methods, implying that NTA complexation retards the sulfidation of cobalt to temperatures where MoS{sub 2} is already formed. Catalytic tests show that the CoMoS model catalysts exhibit activities for thiophene desulfurisation and product distributions similar to those of their high surface area counterparts. 25 refs.

  5. Highly active sulfided CoMo catalysts supported on (ZrO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2})/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, José, E-mail: jeaguila@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Gustavo A. Madero, México, D.F. 07730 (Mexico); De Los Reyes, José A., E-mail: jarh@xanum.uam.mx [Area de Ing. Química, UAM – Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Ulín, Carlos A. [Area de Ing. Química, UAM – Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Barrera, María C., E-mail: mcbdgavilan@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad km. 7.5, Col. Santa Isabel, Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, México, D.F. 96538 (Mexico)

    2013-12-16

    (ZrO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2})/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary oxide at 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (80% ZrO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2}, in turn at 40–60 mol ratio) prepared by controlled co-precipitation (by urea thermal decomposition) of zirconium (ZrOCl{sub 2}·8H{sub 2}O) and titanium (TiCl{sub 4}) chlorides over a ground alumina substrate constitutes a promising material to be used as carrier of sulfided hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts. After calcining (at 500 °C), the ternary oxide presented textural properties (S{sub g} = 387 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, V{sub p} = 0.74 ml g{sup −1}, mean pore diameter = 7.6 nm) suitable to its utilization as carrier of catalysts applied in the oil-derived middle distillates HDS. As determined by temperature programmed-reduction and Raman and UV–vis spectroscopies ZrO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} deposition over alumina substrate resulted in decreased proportion of Mo{sup 6+} species in tetrahedral coordination on the oxidic impregnated material. As those species constitute hardly reducible precursors, their diminished concentration could be reflected in enhanced amount of Mo species susceptible of activation by sulfiding (H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} at 400 °C) over our ternary carrier. Limiting the concentration of zirconia-titania (at 40–60 mol ratio) to 20 mol% in the mixed oxides support allowed the preparation of highly active promoted (by cobalt, at Co/(Co + Mo) = 0.3) MoS{sub 2} phase (at 2.8 atoms/nm{sup 2}), that formulation showing excellent properties in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of both dibenzothiophene and highly-refractory 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene. Due to alike yields to various HDS products over CoMo/(ZrO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2})/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported formulation, presence of similar actives sites over those catalysts was strongly suggested. It seemed that enhanced concentration of octahedral Mo{sup 6+} over the oxidic impregnated precursor with (ZrO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2})/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3

  6. An EXAFS study of the structure of Co-Mo hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.S.; Topsoe, H.; Candia, R.; Villadsen, J.; Lengeler, B.

    1981-05-01

    By analysing the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the Mo absorption edge, structural information about both calcined and sulfided Mo/Al 2 O 3 and Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts has been obtained. The calcined catalysts show only one strong backscatterer peak in the radial distribution function, which indicates that molybdenum is present in a highly disordered structure. For the Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst the presence of cobalt seems to have some effect on the immediate surroundings of molybdenum. Upon sulfiding the catalysts, an ordering of the molybdenum-containing phase takes place as evidenced by the observation of a contribution from the second coordination shell. From a comparison with EXAFS data obtained on well-crystallized MoS 2 it is concluded that the molybdenum atoms in the catalysts are present in MoS 2 -like structures. Furthermore, from a comparison of the amplitude of the Mo-backscatterer peak it is found that these MoS 2 -like structures are ordered in very small domains. (orig.)

  7. PREPARATION AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY FOR ISOPROPYL BENZENE CRACKING OF Co, Mo AND Co/Mo-Al2O3-PILLARED MONTMORILLONITE CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanudin Hasanudin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been prepared Co, Mo and Co/Mo-Al2O3-pillared montmorillonite catalysts using montmorillonite clay  as raw material. The structure and porosity of the catalysts were determined using N2 adsorption-desorption and FT-IR spectroscopy analysis methods. Isopropyl benzene cracking using these catalysts were used to test the catalytic activity and performance of Co, Mo and Co/Mo-Al2O3-pillared montmorillonites.  Characterization results showed that pillarization resulted in the increase of the total pore volume and specific surface area of the clay. Meanwhile, transition metals (Co, Mo and Co/Mo loaded on Al2O3-pillared monmorillonites could increase the catalytic activity of the catalysts for isopropyl benzene cracking significantly.   Keywords: pillared monmorillonite, isopropyl benzene  and cracking catalyst

  8. Spectroscopy, microscopy and theoretical study of NO adsorption on MoS2 and Co-Mo-S hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Nan-Yu; Tuxen, Anders Kyrme; Hinnemann, Berit

    2011-01-01

    nfrared (IR) spectroscopy using NO as a probe molecule has been one of the important methods for characterizing hydrotreating catalysts, since this technique provides information on the nature and quantity of active edge sites of these catalysts. However, due to the strong adsorption of NO, which......) calculations, we present new atomic-scale insight into the nature of NO adsorption on MoS2 and Co-Mo-S nanoclusters. The DFT calculations and STM experiments show that NO does not adsorb at fully sulfided MoS2 edges not containing hydrogen. However, typical sulfided catalysts will have hydrogen present...... NO as a probe molecule to obtain detailed atomic-scale information on hydrotreating catalysts and the origins of activity differences. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Inc....

  9. Hydrodeoxygenation of Phenolic Compounds by Sulfided (CoMo/Al2O3 Catalysts, a Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study Hydrodésoxygénation de composés phénoliques en présence de catalyseurs sulfurés (CoMo/Al2O3 : une étude expérimentale et théorique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badawi M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodeoxygenation of model phenol compounds (phenol and 2-ethylphenol was carried over unpromoted Mo/Al2O3 and promoted CoMo/Al2O3 catalysts. Hydrodeoxygenation proceeds by two pathways: – hydrogenation of the aromatic ring followed by Csp3-O bond cleavage (HYD pathway, (hydrogenation of the aromatic ring followed by Csp3-O bond cleavage; – direct cleavage of the Csp2-O bond (DDO pathway. Both routes were favored by the presence of Co on the catalyst, while the presence of the alkyl substituent on the phenolic ring favors the DDO route but inhibits the HYD pathway. IR (InfraRed spectroscopy shows that while phenol mostly dissociates on these catalysts, a significant fraction of 2-ethylphenol remains non dissociated. The adsorption energies of both reactants and possible reaction intermediates on promoted and non-promoted sulfide phases as computed by DFT (Density-Functional Theory confirm these findings and allow rationalizing the catalytic activity trends observed experimentally. L’hydrodésoxygénation de deux composés phénoliques modèles (phénol et 2-éthylphénol a été étudiée sur deux catalyseurs Mo/Al2O3 et CoMo/Al2O3 sulfurés. La désoxygénation de ces molécules fait intervenir deux voies parallèles et indépendantes, à savoir : – l’hydrogénation du noyau aromatique suivie par la rupture de la liaison Csp3-O (voie HYD, (hydrogenation of the aromatic ring followed by Csp3-O bond cleavage; – la rupture directe de la liaison Csp2-O (voie de DésOxygénation Directe – DOD. Ces deux voies sont favorisées en présence du catalyseur promu par le cobalt (CoMo/Al2O3. La présence du groupe éthyle permet d’améliorer la voie DOD mais conduit à une diminution de la voie HYD. Les études menées par spectroscopie IR (InfraRouge montrent que le phénol est majoritairement dissocié sur ces catalyseurs alors que le 2-éthylphénol semble plutôt adsorbé de façon non-dissociative. Les énergies d’adsorption de

  10. The effect of passivation on the activity and structure of sulfided hydrotreating catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, S.P.A.; Crajé, M.W.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.; Geantet, C.; Prins, R.

    1993-01-01

    Air exposure (passivation) and subsequent resulfidation caused a substantial increase in the thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity of sulfided Co-Mo/Al2O3 catalysts. Since no effect was observed for Mo/Al2O3 and Co/Al2O3 catalysts, the passivation effect must be related to the Co---Mo---S

  11. Flame spray synthesis of CoMo/Al2O3 hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Martin; Linde, Kasper; Hansen, Thomas Klint

    2011-01-01

    containing 16wt.% Mo (atomic ratio Co/Mo=1/3), which did not contain crystalline MoO3 and only small amounts of CoAl2O4. The hydrotreating activity was approximately 75% of that of commercial cobalt molybdenum catalysts prepared by wet impregnation of pre-shaped alumina extrudates. Since the commercial...... obtained consisted mostly of γ-Al2O3 with some CoAl2O4, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Bulk MoO3 was not detected by XRD, except at the highest molybdenum content (32wt.%) and in the unsupported sample, indicating that molybdenum is well dispersed on the surface.......After activation by sulfidation the activity of the catalysts were measured for the three hydrotreating reactions hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation and hydrogenation using a model oil containing dibenzothiophene, indole and naphthalene in n-heptane solution. The best catalyst was the FSP-produced material...

  12. Edge termination of MoS2 and CoMoS catalyst particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Line Sjolte; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Clausen, B. S.

    2000-01-01

    The edge termination of MoS2 and CoMoS catalyst particles is studied by density functional calculations. We show that for structures without vacancies Mo-terminated edges have the lowest edge energies. Creation of vacancies, which are believed to be active sites in these catalyst systems, leads...

  13. Cross-Linked CoMoO4/rGO Nanosheets as Oxygen Reduction Catalyst

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    Jiaqi Fu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of inexpensive and robust electrocatalysts towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR is crucial for the cost-affordable manufacturing of metal-air batteries and fuel cells. Here we show that cross-linked CoMoO4 nanosheets and reduced graphene oxide (CoMoO4/rGO can be integrated in a hybrid material under one-pot hydrothermal conditions, yielding a composite material with promising catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV were used to investigate the efficiency of the fabricated CoMoO4/rGO catalyst towards ORR in alkaline conditions. The CoMoO4/rGO composite revealed the main reduction peak and onset potential centered at 0.78 and 0.89 V (vs. RHE, respectively. This study shows that the CoMoO4/rGO composite is a highly promising catalyst for the ORR under alkaline conditions, and potential noble metal replacement cathode in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  14. Transformation of Vegetable Oils into Hydrocarbons over Mesoporous-Alumina-Supported CoMo Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubička, D.; Šimáček, P.; Žilková, Naděžda

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1-2 (2009), s. 161-168 ISSN 1022-5528 Grant - others:GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA3/074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : organized mesoporous alumina * CoMo catalysts * hydrodeoxygenation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2009

  15. Microwave effects on NiMoS and CoMoS single-sheet catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, I; Silva, Alexander M; Modesto-Costa, Lucas

    2018-05-04

    Single-sheet nanoclusters of MoS 2 , NiMoS or CoMoS are widely used in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysis in the petroleum industry. In HDS reactions under microwave irradiation, experiments indirectly pointed out that for pristine MoS 2 reaction rates are accelerated because hot spots are generated on the catalyst bed. In this work, we investigated NiMoS and CoMoS isolated single-sheet substituted catalysts before and after thiophene adsorption focusing on quantifying the effect of microwave irradiation. For that purpose, density functional theory (DFT) molecular charge densities of each system were decomposed according to the distributed multipole analysis (DMA) of Stone. Site dipole values of each system were directly associated with a larger or smaller interaction with the microwave field according to a proposed general approach. We showed that microwave enhancement of HDS reaction rates can occur more efficiently in the CoMoS and NiMoS promoted clusters compared to pristine MoS 2 in the following order: CoMoS > NiMoS > MoS 2 . The atomic origin of the catalyst hot spots induced by microwaves was clearly established in the promoted clusters.

  16. Surface science models of CoMoS hydrodesulfurisation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Veen, van J.A.R.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Froment, G.F.; Delmon, B.; Grange, P.

    1997-01-01

    Characterization of supported catalysts with surface spectroscopic techniques is often limited due to restraints imposed by the support material. The use of flat conducting substrates as a model support offers a way to apply these techniques to their full potential. Such surface science models of

  17. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

    OpenAIRE

    Boukoberine, Yamina; Hamada, Boudjema

    2016-01-01

    CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in ca...

  18. Some problems of manufacturing and industrial application of CoMo-Al2O3 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walendziewski, J.

    1991-01-01

    The monograph presents results of studies of some selected problems relating to CoMo-Al 2 O 3 catalyst: method of production alumina support and catalyst; application of catalyst in the selected hydro refining processes; physicochemical properties of the used catalyst; reclamation of metal compounds from the spent catalyst. Results of investigations of catalyst preparation illustrate how the physicochemical properties of alumina support and catalyst, mainly porous structure could be controlled by the selection of raw materials and parameters of aluminum hydroxide precipitation, method of forming and calcination temperature of support. Application of the catalyst of modified porous structure has shown its high activity in hydro refining process of light cracking catalytic oil (over 95% hydrodesulphurization) and mild hydro cracking process of vacuum gas oil (sulphur content in product below 0.03% wt.). As an effect of studying of hydro refining process of aromatic hydrocarbon fraction it has been found that H 2 S concentration in reaction mixture is the main factor influencing process selectivity. Some effect on the selectivity exerts also other process parameters and chemical composition of the catalyst - cobalt molybdenum content ratio and promoters content. Long term exploitation of the domestic CoMo-Al 2 O 3 catalyst in hydrodesulphurization process indicates its satisfied thermal stability although results in deteriorating of mechanical resistance, lowering of specific surface area, increase in mean pore radius and decrease in acidity of catalyst. In the last chapter of the monograph the results of investigations of reclamation of metal compounds (molybdic acid, aluminum hydroxide, cobalt carbonate) from the spent catalyst as well as an original technology of manufacture of the fresh one using these compounds have been presented. (author). 338 refs, 31 figs, 32 tabs

  19. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY TEST OF CoMo/ZnO CATALYST ON ETHANOL CONVERSION USING STEAM REFORMING METHOD

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    Wega Trisunaryanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation, characterization and catalytic activity test of CoMo/ZnO catalyst for steam reforming of ethanol have been investigated. The catalysts preparation was carried out by impregnation of Co and/or Mo onto ZnO sample. Water excess was used in ethanol feed for steam reforming process under mol ratio of ethanol:water (1:10. Characterizations of catalysts were conducted by analysis of metal content using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS. Determination of catalysts acidity was conducted by gravimetric method of adsorption of pyridine base. Catalytic activity test on ethanol conversion using steam reforming method was conducted in a semi-flow reactor system, at a temperature of 400 oC, for 1.5 h under N2 flow rate of 10 mL/min. Gas product was analyzed by gas chromatograph with TCD system. The results of catalysts characterizations showed that the impregnation of Co and/or Mo metals on ZnO sample increased its acidity and specific surface area. The content of Co in Co/ZnO and CoMo/ZnO catalysts was 1.14 and 0.49 wt%. The Mo content in CoMo/ZnO catalyst was 0.36 wt%. The catalytic activity test result on ethanol conversion showed that the ZnO, Co/ZnO, and CoMo/ZnO catalysts produced gas fraction of 16.73, 28.53, and 35.53 wt%, respectively. The coke production of ZnO, Co/ZnO, and CoMo/ZnO catalysts was 0.86, 0.24, and 0.08 wt%, respectively. The gas products consisted mainly of hydrogen.   Keywords: CoMo/ZnO catalyst, steam reforming, ethanol

  20. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

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    Yamina Boukoberine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in catalyst results in a decrease of the thiophene HDS activity. This decrease is probably caused by the formation of heavy compounds and the deactivation of the zeolite at high temperatures.

  1. Sulfuric acid baking and leaching of spent Co-Mo/Al2O3 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-In; Park, Kyung-Ho; Mishra, Devabrata

    2009-07-30

    Dissolution of metals from a pre-oxidized refinery plant spent Co-Mo/Al(2)O(3) catalyst have been tried through low temperature (200-450 degrees C) sulfuric acid baking followed by mild leaching process. Direct sulfuric acid leaching of the same sample, resulted poor Al and Mo recoveries, whereas leaching after sulfuric acid baking significantly improved the recoveries of above two metals. The pre-oxidized spent catalyst, obtained from a Korean refinery plant found to contain 40% Al, 9.92% Mo, 2.28% Co, 2.5% C and trace amount of other elements such as Fe, Ni, S and P. XRD results indicated the host matrix to be poorly crystalline gamma- Al(2)O(3). The effect of various baking parameters such as catalyst-to-acid ratio, baking temperature and baking time on percentage dissolutions of metals has been studied. It was observed that, metals dissolution increases with increase in the baking temperature up to 300 degrees C, then decreases with further increase in the baking temperature. Under optimum baking condition more than 90% Co and Mo, and 93% Al could be dissolved from the spent catalyst with the following leaching condition: H(2)SO(4)=2% (v/v), temperature=95 degrees C, time=60 min and Pulp density=5%.

  2. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on the preparation of CoMo/Al2O3 hydrodesulphurization catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergwerff, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Supported catalysts form an important class of functional materials, since they are widely applied in oil refining and the manufacturing of both bulk and fine chemicals. In these systems, the active phase, consisting of a metal, metal-oxide or metal-sulfide is dispersed into the pore system of

  3. Coke formation during the hydrotreatment of bio-oil using NiMo and CoMo catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadarwati, Sri; Hu, Xun; Gunawan, Richard; Westerhof, Roel; Gholizadeh, Mortaza; Hasan, M. D.Mahmudul; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the coke formation during the hydrotreatment of bio-oil at low temperature. The catalytic hydrotreatment of bio-oil produced from the pyrolysis of mallee wood was carried out using pre-sulphided NiMo and CoMo catalysts at a temperature range of 150–300 °C. Our results

  4. Selective adsorption of refractory sulfur species on active carbons and carbon based CoMo catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Hamdy

    2007-03-01

    Adsorption technique could be a reliable alternative in removing to a certain remarkable extent the sulfur species from the feedstock of petroleum oil. The performance of various carbons on adsorption of model sulfur compounds in a simulated feed solution and the sulfur containing compounds in the real gas oil was evaluated. The adsorption experiments have been carried out in a batch scale at ambient temperature and under the atmospheric pressure. In general, the most refractory sulfur compounds in the hydrotreatment reactions were selectively removed and adsorbed. It was found that the adsorbents affinities to dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene were much more favored and pronounced than the aromatic matrices like fluorene, 1-methylnaphthalene and 9-methylanthracene. Among the sulfur species, 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was the highest to be removed in terms of both selectivity and capacity over all the present adsorbents. The studied adsorbents showed significant capacities for the polyaromatic thiophenes. The electronic characteristics seem to play a certain role in such behavior. Regeneration of the used adsorbent was successfully attained either by washing it with toluene or by the release of the adsorbates through heat treatment. A suggested adsorptive removal process of sulfur compounds from petroleum distillate over carbon supported CoMo catalyst was discussed.

  5. Preparation, Characterization, and Activation of Co-Mo/Y Zeolite Catalyst for Coal Tar Conversion to Liquid Fuel

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    Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One of many efforts to convert coal tar into alternative liquid fuel is by hydrocracking. This research aims to determine the impregnation of Co-Mo/Y zeolite, its characteristics, the effect of impregnation temperature and time, and also the best Co-Mo/Y zeolite impregnation condition for the conversion of coal tar. This research was conducted in several steps, impregnating Co from Co(NO32.6H2O and Mo from (NH46Mo7O24.4H2O into Zeolite Y in liquid media, drying at 100 °C for 24 hours, and calcination at 550 °C for 3 hours. Coal tar was then reacted with hydrogen gas (as a reactant, and Co-Mo/Zeolite Y (as a catalyst was conducted at 350 °C. Characteristic analysis showed that Co and Mo had impregnated into the Y zeolite, as well as it made no change of catalyst’s structure and increased the total acidity. The higher of impregnation temperature was increased the catalyst crystallinity, total acidity, and yield of gasoline. The longer impregnation time was reduced crystallinity value, but total acidity and yield were increased. GC analysis showed that products included into the gasoline product (C8, C9, and C10. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 13rd November 2016; Revised: 12nd February 2017; Accepted: 16th February 2017 How to Cite: Anggoro, D.D., Buchori, L., Silaen, G.C., Utami, R.N. (2017. Preparation, Characterization, and Activation of Co-Mo/Y Zeolite Catalyst for Coal Tar Conversion to Liquid Fuel. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 219-226 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.768.219-226 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.768.219-226

  6. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetalation reactions of residue oils over CoMo/aluminum borate catalysts in a trickle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, M.C.; Chen, Y.W.; Kang, B.C.; Wu, J.C.; Leu, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a series of aluminum borates (AB) with various Al/B mole ratios is prepared by the precipitation method. The results indicated that the exhibited properties are dependent on the Al/B ratio of the material. The monodisperse pore size distributions of these samples simply that it is a true microcomposite structure rather than a mixture of the individual materials. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetalation (HDM) of heavy Kuwait atmospheric residuum over CoMo/AB catalysts were carried out in a bench-scale trickle bed reactor at 663 K and 7582 kPa. The weight hourly space velocity of residue oils was 1.5, and the hydrogen flow rate was kept constant at 300 mL/min (STP). The results showed that these catalysts are much more active than the conventional CoMo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst in HDS and HDM reactions. The results of desulfurization activity are mainly interpreted on the basis of difference in dispersion and the interaction of Mo species with the support. The demetalation activity was strongly influenced by the intraparticle diffusion of metal porphyrins

  7. Behaviour of Co-Mo-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts in the hydrogenation of phenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigold, H.

    1982-10-01

    The activity of a number of ring alkyl-substituted phenols in the direct hydrodeoxygenation reaction (i.e. C-O bond scission without prior ring hydrogenation) in the presence of a commercial Co-Mo-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst has been investigated. The results indicate that the catalytically active site is stereochemically demanding. It is proposed that the phenol ring hydrogenation and the direct hydrodeoxygenation reaction proceed on the same catalytic site. The ease of the direct hydrodeoxygenation reaction is retarded mainly when transfer of the substrate hydroxyl group onto a co-ordinatively unsaturated metal site on the catalyst is inhibited. This occurs when the catalyst hydroxyl group receptor site is occupied by a co-ordinating ligand (poison) or when substituents on the substrate direct the phenolic hydroxyl group away from this metal site. The catalytic behaviour of Co-Mo-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ can be 'transformed' to resemble more closely that of Ni-Mo-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (high reductive capacity) when the reaction medium contains both excess H/sub 2/S and a co-ordinating ligand. It is proposed that this 'transformed' species is of importance in hydrodenitrogenation reactions in an H/sub 2/S-rich environment.

  8. EXAFS Determination of the Structure of Cobalt in Carbon-Supported Cobalt and Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Veen, J.A.R. van; Beer, V.H.J. de; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the cobalt present in carbon-supported Co and Co-Mo sulfide catalysts was studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Co K-edge and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities were used to measure the catalytic properties of

  9. Hydrogenation of toluene on Ni-Co-Mo supported zeolite catalysts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -a, HY-b and Mordenite were prepared and characterized using many techniques for use as hydrotreating catalysts. In a preliminary investigation, toluene was employed as model compound to test the catalysts in hydrogenation, as a major ...

  10. From biomass to fuels: hydrotreating of oxygen-containing feeds on a CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viljava, T.-R.

    2001-07-01

    Biomass is a renewable alternative to fossil raw materials in the production of liquid fuels and chemicals. Liquefied biomass contains an abundance of oxygen-containing molecules that need to be removed to improve the stability of the liquids. A hydrotreating process, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), is used for the purpose. Hydrodeoxygenation is similar to the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) process used in oil refining, relying upon a presulfided CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}; catalyst. The stability of the sulfided catalyst is critical in HDO because biocrudes usually do not contain the sulfur compounds needed to maintain the sulfidation of the catalyst. The aim of this work was to examine the role of sulfur in maintaining the activity of the HDO catalyst. Sulfur was introduced as an organic sulfur-containing co-reactant or as a sulfur substituent in an oxygen-containing reactant molecule as a way of simulating mixed feeds composed of biocrudes and conventional crudes, or it was introduced as a low molecular weight sulfiding agent. In addition, the stability of the sulfided catalyst against changes in the feed composition was studied to find out whether the activity of the catalyst could be maintained by carrying out HDO alternately with HDS. Simultaneous HDO and HDS was studied in a batch reactor with model compounds having a sulfur-containing (inercapto or inethylmercapto) and an oxygen-containing (hydroxyl or inethoxy) substituent in the same molecule, and with binary mixtures of mono-substituted benzene compounds. In both cases, the reactions of the oxygencontaining substituents were strongly suppressed as long as a sulfur-containing functionality was present. HDS reactions of inercapto and inethylinercapto groups were either enhanced or retarded in the presence of oxygen-containing functionality. HDS was enhanced when the oxygen-containing substituent was located in Para-position to the sulfur substituent thereby increasing the electronegativity of the sulfur atom and

  11. Processing of spent NiMo and CoMo/Al2O3 catalysts via fusion with KHSO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busnardo, Roberto Giovanini; Busnardo, Natalia Giovanini; Salvato, Gustavo Nascimento; Afonso, Julio Carlos

    2007-01-01

    This work describes a route for processing spent commercial hydrorefining (HDR) catalysts (CoMo and NiMo/Al 2 O 3 ), containing support additives, for recovering active phase and support components. Samples were used as catalysts in diesel hydrotreaters. They had neither been submitted to mechanical stresses nor overheating while under operation. The route is based on fusion of samples with KHSO 4 . Four experimental parameters were optimized: reaction time, sample/flux mass ratio, temperature, and sample physical characteristics (ground/non-ground). After fusion, the solid was dissolved in water (90-100 deg. C); the insoluble matter presented low crystallization. Several phases were identified: silicates, spinel-like compounds and aluminosilicates. Cobalt, nickel, molybdenum and aluminum were recovered by conventional precipitation techniques or selective solvent-extraction procedures, with at least 85 wt.% yield. Final liquid colorless effluents are obtained as neutral solutions of alkali sulfates or chlorides and a water insoluble solid after fusion, which can be either sent to industrial dumps or co-processed. Fusion with KHSO 4 was shown to be applicable to the catalysts of the present study, and the optimized experimental parameters are much less drastic than the conventional pyrometallurgical routes proposed in the literature

  12. Catalytic conversion of CO, NO and SO2 on supported sulfide catalysts. Part 2. Catalytic reduction of NO and SO2 by CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, S.-X.; Yamazaki, M.; Omata, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Yamada, M.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of simultaneous catalytic reduction of NO and SO 2 by CO, reactions of NO, NO-CO, and NO-SO 2 -CO were performed on γ-alumina-supported sulfides of transition metals including Co, Mo, CoMo and FeMo. NO was decomposed into N 2 O and N 2 accompanied with the formation of SO 2 ; this serious oxidation of lattice sulfur resulted in the deactivation of the catalysts. The addition of CO to the NO stream suppressed SO 2 formation and yielded COS instead. A stoichiometric conversion of NO and CO to N 2 and CO 2 was observed above 350C on the CoMo and the FeMo catalysts. Although the CO addition lengthened catalyst life, it was not enough to maintain activity. After the NO-CO reaction, an XPS analysis showed the growth of Mo 6+ and SO 4 2- peaks, especially for the sulfided FeMo/Al 2 O 3 ; the FeMo catalyst underwent strong oxidation in the NO-CO reaction. The NO and the NO-CO reactions proceeded non-catalytically, consuming catalyst lattice sulfur to yield SO 2 or COS. The addition of SO 2 in the NO-CO system enabled in situ regeneration of the catalysts; the catalysts oxidized through abstraction of lattice sulfur experienced anew reduction and sulfurization through the SO 2 -CO reaction at higher temperature. NO and SO 2 were completely and catalytically converted at 400C on the sulfided CoMo/Al 2 O 3 . By contrast, the sulfided FeMo/Al 2 O 3 was easily oxidized by NO and hardly re-sulfided under the test conditions. Oxidation states of the metals before and after the reactions were determined. Silica and titania-supported CoMo catalysts were also evaluated to study support effects

  13. Two-Nozzle Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) Synthesis of CoMo/Al2O3 Hydrotreating Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Martin; Pham, David K.; Brorson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    and the hydrodenitrogenation activity improved from 70 to 90 % relative activity. This suggests that better promotion of the active molybdenum sulfide phase was achieved when using two-nozzle FSP synthesis, probably due to less formation of the undesired phase CoAl2O4, which makes Co unavailable for promotion.......Two-nozzle frame spray analysis (FSP) synthesis of CoMo/Al2O3 where Co and Al are sprayed in separate flames was applied to minimize the formation of CoAl2O4 observed in one-nozzle flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthesis and the materials were characterized by N2-adsorption (BET), X-ray diffraction...... (XRD), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and catalytic performances in hydrotreating. By varying the flame mixing distances (81–175 mm) the amount of CoAl2O4 could be minimized. As evidenced by UV–vis spectroscopy, CoAl2O4 was detected only...

  14. Microstructural Properties and HDS Activity of CoMo Catalysts Supported on Activated Carbon, Al2O3, ZrO2 and TiO2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Procházka, Martin; Kaluža, Luděk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2015 (2015), s. 841-846 ISSN 1974-9791. [International Conference on Chemical and Process Engineering - ICheaP12 /12./. Milano, 19.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : CoMo catalysts * surface area * activated carbon Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Oil removal of spent hydrotreating catalyst CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via a facile method with enhanced metal recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yue [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Shengming, E-mail: smxu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Wastes Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jianlong [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Wastes Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhao, Zhongwei [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Xu, Zhenghe, E-mail: zhenghe.xu@ualberta.ca [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel approach for oil removal from spent hydrotreating catalysts has been developed. • Oil removal possibility is analyzed through surface characteristics. • Oil is successfully removed from spent catalysts via aqueous surfactant solution. • Over 98% Mo can be leached after oil removal and thermal treatment. • The proposed deoiling method helps to avoid detrimental impurity generation (CoMoO{sub 4}) and enhance metal recovery. - Abstract: Deoiling process is a key issue for recovering metal values from spent hydrotreating catalysts. The oils can be removed with organic solvents, but the industrialized application of this method is greatly hampered by the high cost and complex processes. Despite the roasting method is simple and low-cost, it generates hardest-to-recycle impurities (CoMoO{sub 4} or NiMoO{sub 4}) and enormous toxic gases. In this study, a novel and facile approach to remove oils from the spent hydrotreating catalysts is developed. Firstly, surface properties of spent catalysts are characterized to reveal the possibility of oil removal. And then, oils are removed with water solution under the conditions of 90 °C, 0.1 wt% SDS, 2.0 wt% NaOH and 10 ml/g L/S ratio for 4 h. Finally, thermal treatment and leaching tests are carried out to further explore the advantages of oil removal. The results show that no hardest-to-recycle impurity CoMoO{sub 4} is found in XPS spectra of thermally treated samples after deoiling and molybdenum is leached completely with sodium carbonate solution. It means that the proposed deoiling method can not only remove oils simply and without enormous harmful gases generating, but also avoid the generation of detrimental impurity and promote recycling of valuable metals from spent hydrotreating catalysts.

  16. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  17. Oil removal of spent hydrotreating catalyst CoMo/Al2O3 via a facile method with enhanced metal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; Li, Zhen; Wang, Jianlong; Zhao, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-11-15

    Deoiling process is a key issue for recovering metal values from spent hydrotreating catalysts. The oils can be removed with organic solvents, but the industrialized application of this method is greatly hampered by the high cost and complex processes. Despite the roasting method is simple and low-cost, it generates hardest-to-recycle impurities (CoMoO4 or NiMoO4) and enormous toxic gases. In this study, a novel and facile approach to remove oils from the spent hydrotreating catalysts is developed. Firstly, surface properties of spent catalysts are characterized to reveal the possibility of oil removal. And then, oils are removed with water solution under the conditions of 90°C, 0.1wt% SDS, 2.0wt% NaOH and 10ml/gL/S ratio for 4h. Finally, thermal treatment and leaching tests are carried out to further explore the advantages of oil removal. The results show that no hardest-to-recycle impurity CoMoO4 is found in XPS spectra of thermally treated samples after deoiling and molybdenum is leached completely with sodium carbonate solution. It means that the proposed deoiling method can not only remove oils simply and without enormous harmful gases generating, but also avoid the generation of detrimental impurity and promote recycling of valuable metals from spent hydrotreating catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biofuel Production from Jatropha Bio-Oil Derived Fast Pyrolysis: Effect and Mechanism of CoMoS Supported on Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodseanglung, T.; Ratana, T.; Phongaksorn, M.; Tungkamani, S.

    2018-03-01

    The aims of this research was to understand the CoMo/Al2O3 sulfide catalyst effect to remove oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing molecules from Jatropha bio-oil derived fast pyrolysis converted to biofuels via hydrotreating process. The activity and selectivity of CoMo/γ-Al2O3 sulfided catalysts in hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of Jatropha bio-oil derived fast pyrolysis was evaluated in a Parr batch reactor under 50 bar of H2 atmosphere for 2 h at 300 320 and 340 °C. It appeared that the CoMo/Al2O3 sulfide catalyst have high performance in activity for promoting the fatty acid, fatty ester, fatty amide and fatty nitrile compounds were converted to paraffin/olefin (Diesel range), this could be the CUS site on supported Al2O3 catalyst. The difference in selectivity products allowed us to propose a reaction scheme.

  19. Relative Activity of Niobia-Supported CoMo Hydrodesulphurization Catalyst Prepared with NTA: A Kinetic Approach.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 107 (2018), s. 62-67 ISSN 1566-7367 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-22490S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Niobia * hydrodesulphurization * CoMo Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.330, year: 2016

  20. High-activity MgO-supported CoMo Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts Prepared by Non-aqueous Impregnation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Gulková, Daniela; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 162, JAN 2015 (2015), s. 430-436 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : CoMo/MgO * benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization * non-aqueous impregnation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.328, year: 2015

  1. Influence of H2O and H2S on the Composition, Activity, and Stability of Sulfided Mo, CoMo, and NiMo Supported on MgAl2O4 for Hydrodeoxygenation of Ethylene Glycol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabros, Trine Marie Hartmann; Gaur, Abhijeet; Pintos, Delfina Garcia

    2018-01-01

    In this work, density functional theory (DFT), catalytic activity tests, and in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed to gain detailed insights into the activity and stability of MoS2, Ni-MoS2, and Co-MoS2 catalysts used for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of ethylene glycol upon...

  2. CoMo sulphide-catalyzed hydrodeoxygenation of lignin model compounds: An extended reaction network for the conversion of monomeric and dimeric substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, A.L.; Jastrzebski, R; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, extensive hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) studies with a commercial sulfided CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst were performed on a library of ligninmodel compounds at 50 bar hydrogen pressure and 300 °C in dodecane, using a batch autoclave system. The catalyst was activated under hydrogen atmosphere

  3. New sulfide catalysts for the hydroliquefaction of coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Oers, van E.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities for the preparation of new metal sulfide catalyst systems based on carbon carriers having favourable textural and surface properties have been explored, and attention has been given to the characterization (structure) and evaluation (hydrosulfurization activity) of these catalysts. Two

  4. Sulfidization of an aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst using the 35S radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagulyants, G.V.; Greish, A.A.; Kogan, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    It has been established that in aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst sulfidized with elemental sulfur there are two types of sulfur, free and bound. The maximum amount of bound sulfur in ACM catalyst is 6.6 wt. %, which corresponds to practically complete sulfidation of the ACM catalyst. In the presence of hydrogen an equilibrium distribution of bound sulfur is achieved in a granule of ACM catalyst irrespective of the temperature of sulfidation. In a nitrogen atmosphere it is primarily the surface layers of the catalyst that are sulfured

  5. Robust Mesoporous CoMo/γ-Al2O3 Catalysts from Cyclodextrin-Based Supramolecular Assemblies for Hydrothermal Processing of Microalgae: Effect of the Preparation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleta, Rudina; Schiavo, Benedetto; Corsaro, Natale; Costa, Paula; Giaconia, Alberto; Interrante, Leonardo; Monflier, Eric; Pipitone, Giuseppe; Ponchel, Anne; Sau, Salvatore; Scialdone, Onofrio; Tilloy, Sébastien; Galia, Alessandro

    2018-04-18

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a promising technology for the production of biocrude oil from microalgae. Although this catalyst-free technology is efficient under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, the biocrude yield and quality can be further improved by using heterogeneous catalysts. The design of robust catalysts that preserve their performance under hydrothermal conditions will be therefore very important in the development of biorefinery technologies. In this work, we describe two different synthetic routes (i.e., impregnation and cyclodextrin-assisted one-pot colloidal approach), for the preparation in aqueous phase of six high surface area CoMo/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts. Catalytic tests performed on the HTL of Nannochloropsis gaditana microalga indicate that solids prepared by the one-pot colloidal approach show higher hydrothermal stability and enhanced biocrude yield with respect to the catalyst-free test. The positive effect of the substitution of the block copolymer Tetronic T90R4 for Pluronic F127 in the preparation procedure was evidenced by diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, N 2 -adsorption-desorption, and H 2 -temperature-programmed reduction measurements and confirmed by the higher quality of the obtained biocrude, which exhibited lower oxygen content and higher-energy recovery equal to 62.5% of the initial biomass.

  6. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  7. Upgrading of bio-oil derived from tobacco using ferrierite, ZSM-5 and Co-Mo/Al2 O3 catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawitree Mulika

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate bio-oil yield of tobacco leave by pyrolysis at 450-550o C. The bio-oil was upgraded by ferrierite, ZSM-5, Al2 O3 , Co-Mo/Al2 O3 and Mo2 C catalysts. Pyrolysis was carried out in a semi-batch reactor with a space velocity of 1.7 h-1 under nitrogen atmosphere. The highest liquid yield of 47.1% was observed at 500o C with the high heating value of 36.3 MJ/kg oil (organic phase. Furthermore, char and gas yields were 36.7 and 16.2%, respectively. As a result, the high heating values of the bio-oils catalyzed at 500o C by ferrierite, ZSM-5, Al2 O3 , Mo2 C and Co-Mo/Al2 O3 were 22.5, 24.7, 26.1, 35.8 and 36.8 MJ/kg oil (organic phase, respectively.

  8. Production of carbon nanotubes: Chemical vapor deposition synthesis from liquefied petroleum gas over Fe-Co-Mo tri-metallic catalyst supported on MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyopratomo, P., E-mail: puguh-sptm@yahoo.com; Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K., E-mail: wulanmakmur@gmail.com; Sudibandriyo, M., E-mail: msudib@che.ui.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, Depok 16424 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-03

    Carbon nanotubes were produced by chemical vapor deposition method to meet the specifications for hydrogen storage. So far, the various catalyst had been studied outlining their activities, performances, and efficiencies. In this work, tri-metallic catalyst consist of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used. The catalyst was prepared by wet-impregnation method. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) was used as carbon source. The synthesis was conducted in atmospheric fixed bed reactor at reaction temperature range 750 – 850 °C for 30 minutes. The impregnation method applied in this study successfully deposed metal component on the MgO support surface. It found that the deposited metal components might partially replace Mg(OH){sub 2} or MgO molecules in their crystal lattice. Compare to the original MgO powder; it was significant increases in pore volume and surface area has occurred during catalyst preparation stages. The size of obtained carbon nanotubes is ranging from about 10.83 nm OD/4.09 nm ID up to 21.84 nm OD/6.51 nm ID, which means that multiwall carbon nanotubes were formed during the synthesis. Yield as much as 2.35 g.CNT/g.catalyst was obtained during 30 minutes synthesis and correspond to carbon nanotubes growth rate of 0.2 μm/min. The BET surface area of the obtained carbon nanotubes is 181.13 m{sup 2}/g and around 50 % of which is contributed by mesopores. Micropore with half pore width less than 1 nm contribute about 10% volume of total micro and mesopores volume of the carbon nanotubes. The existence of these micropores is very important to increase the hydrogen storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes.

  9. Sulfidation of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Crajé, M.W.J.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum catalysts from the oxidic precursor to the sulfided catalysts was systematically studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. This enabled the adjudgement of various sulfidic phases in the sulfided catalysts. The

  10. Carbon-supported iron and iron-molybdenum sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective was to describe the relations between the characteristics (composition and dispersion) of the actual sulfide phase and the catalytic activity. Attention was also paid to the influence of preparational aspects on these characteristics. The catalysts were characterized using in-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy down to 2.0 K. 254 refs.; 47 figs.; 22 tabs

  11. Iridium Sulfide and Ir Promoted Mo Based Catalysts.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vít, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 322, - (2007), s. 142-151 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/06/0870 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : iridium sulfide * IrMo catalyst * hydrodesulfurization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2007

  12. Coupling of Alcohols over Alkali-Promoted Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Schiødt, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Double or nothing: Higher alcohols are produced by the hydrogenation of CO with a K-promoted Co-MoS2/C catalyst. Ethanol, which is passed over the sulfide catalyst along with CO and H2, is mainly converted into 1-butanol, which indicates that alcohol condensation contributes to the build-up of hi...

  13. Hydrodeoxygenation of methyl esters on sulphided NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senol, O.I; Viljava, T.R.; Krause, A.O.I. [Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 6100, FIN-02015 Hut (Finland)

    2005-02-28

    Wood-derived bio-oil contains high amounts of compounds with different oxygen-containing functional groups that must be removed to improve the fuel characteristics. Elimination of oxygen from carboxylic groups was studied with model compounds, methyl heptanoate and methyl hexanoate, on sulphided NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in a flow reactor. Catalyst performances and reaction schemes were addressed. Aliphatic methyl esters produced hydrocarbons via three main paths: The first path gave alcohols followed by dehydration to hydrocarbons. Deesterification yielded an alcohol and a carboxylic acid in the second path. Carboxylic acid was further converted to hydrocarbons either directly or with an alcohol intermediate. Decarboxylation of the esters led to hydrocarbons in the third path. No oxygen-containing compounds were detected at complete conversions. However, the product distributions changed with time, even at complete conversions, indicating that both catalysts deactivated under the studied conditions.

  14. Comparison of Nitrogen Tolerance of PdMo/Al2O3 and CoMo/Al2O3 Catalysts in Hydrodesulfurization of Model Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vít, Zdeněk; Kaluža, Luděk; Gulková, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 120, MAR (2014), s. 86-90 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0751; GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hydrodesulfurization * nitrogen inhibition * PdMo catalyst Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.520, year: 2014

  15. Nano Transition Metal Sulfide Catalyst for Solvolysis Liquefaction of Soda Lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei-Ling, P.; Chin-Hua, C.; Sarani Zakaria; Soon-Keong, N.; Tze-Khong, L.

    2011-01-01

    Solvolysis liquefaction of soda lignin in the presence of various transition metal sulfide catalysts was studied to investigate the catalyst effects on the oil and gas yields, conversion rate and higher heating value (HHV) of oil. Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method under reaction temperature 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The addition of transition metal sulfide based catalysts (CuS, MoS 2 and FeS 2 ) enhanced both production of the oils and gas and the higher heating value (HHV) of oil products. A high oil and gas yields of 82.1 % and 2890 cm 3 was obtained with MoS 2 at 250 degree Celsius for 60 min. Elemental analyses for the oils revealed that the liquid products have much higher heating values than the crude soda lignin powder. (author)

  16. Hydrotreatment of heavy oil from coal liquefaction on Sulfide Ni - W Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi-ping Lei; Li-juan Gao; Heng-fu Shui; Shi-biao, Ren; Zhi-cai Wang; Kang-shi Gang, E-mail: shhf@ahut.edu.c [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Anhui Key Lab. of Coal Clean Conversion and Utilization

    2011-07-01

    Heavy oil (distillation temperature: 320-340 deg C) derived from the direct coal liquefaction process using Shengli coal were hydrotreated using sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Ni-W/SiO{sub 2} catalysts respectively. The sulfided catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, H{sub 2}-TPR and NH{sub 3}-TPD respectively. The evaluations of the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) properties of heavy oil on the three catalysts were carried out at 400 deg C and 5.0 MPa initial H2 pressure. The W-based catalysts displayed better performances than Mo-based catalysts for the HDN and HDA reactions. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts were found to have higher catalytic activities than on SiO{sub 2} supported ones. The activities of sulfided catalysts were associated mainly with the nature of active sites, acidity, metal sulfide crystallite size and the amount of the reducible sulfur species of metal sulfide. (author)

  17. Hydrotreatment of heavy oil from coal liquefaction on Sulfide Ni - W Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-ping Lei; Li-juan Gao; Heng-fu Shui; Shi-biao, Ren; Zhi-cai Wang; Kang-shi Gang

    2011-01-01

    Heavy oil (distillation temperature: 320-340 deg C) derived from the direct coal liquefaction process using Shengli coal were hydrotreated using sulfided Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 , Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 , and Ni-W/SiO 2 catalysts respectively. The sulfided catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, H 2 -TPR and NH 3 -TPD respectively. The evaluations of the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) properties of heavy oil on the three catalysts were carried out at 400 deg C and 5.0 MPa initial H2 pressure. The W-based catalysts displayed better performances than Mo-based catalysts for the HDN and HDA reactions. Al 2 O 3 supported catalysts were found to have higher catalytic activities than on SiO 2 supported ones. The activities of sulfided catalysts were associated mainly with the nature of active sites, acidity, metal sulfide crystallite size and the amount of the reducible sulfur species of metal sulfide. (author)

  18. The role of Ni in sulfided carbon-supported Ni-Mo hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Barthe-Zahir, N.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities of Ni and Ni---Mo sulfide catalysts supported on activated carbon were measured at atmospheric pressure and the catalyst structures were studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, dynamic oxygen chemisorption, and chemical sulfur analysis. The

  19. Phosphorus poisoning of molybdenum sulfide hydrodesulfurization catalysts supported on carbon and alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Vissers, J.P.R.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing Mo sulfide catalysts supported on ¿-Al2O3 and activated carbon were evaluated for their thiophene HDS activities. Phosphorus was added as phosphoric acid to the carrier material prior to the molybdenum component. The thiophene HDS activity of the carbon-supported catalysts was

  20. {gamma} alumina- and HY zeolite-supported molybdenum catalysts: characterisation of the oxidic and sulfided phases; Catalyseurs a base de molybdene supporte sur alumine {gamma} et zeolithe HY: caracterisation des phases oxydes et sulfures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plazenet, G

    2001-10-01

    Oxidic precursors of hydro-treatment catalysts (Co)Mo/alumina or zeolite were characterised by Raman spectroscopy, NMR and EXAFS at the Mo and Co K-edges. The formation of an Anderson-type alumino-molybdate compound upon impregnation of the support with an ammonium hepta-molybdate solution was confirmed for alumina, and also observed for the HY zeolitic support, with consumption of the amorphous alumina of the zeolite. In absence of the latter, ammonium hepta-molybdate precipitates. The species are conserved upon drying; upon calcination, the alumino-molybdate evolves into a surface aluminium molybdate type phase, whereas the hepta-molybdate transforms into MoO{sub 3}. The species formed upon impregnation are located in the inter-granular porosity whereas MoO{sub 3} vapor-condensation leads to formation of dimers located inside the zeolitic structure. The study of the cobalt-promoted precursors showed that the evolution of the molybdenum is the same in the case of co-impregnation preparation. Impregnation with cobalt-molybdate prevents the formation of the alumino-molybdate anion and thus enables the preservation of the Mo-Co interaction but, whatever the precursor, the leveling effect of the calcination-re-hydration steps was demonstrated. An EXAFS study at different sulfur coverages of the MoS{sub 2} platelets in the alumina-supported sulfided catalysts showed the limitations of EXAFS for size determination of MoS{sub 2} crystallites, a parameter that can be reached by AWAXS, which also conveys information about sheet-stacking. The EXAFS study of sulfided (Co)Mo/HY systems revealed incomplete sulfidation of the samples and the very high dispersion of the active phase. The absence of an observable Mo-Co interaction whatever the preparation of the promoted catalysts is consistent with the absence of promoting effect in toluene hydrogenation. (author)

  1. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremerey, Peter; Jess, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2015-10-23

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H₂S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  2. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fremerey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  3. Preparation of Mo/Al2O3 Sulfide Catalysts Modified by Ir Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cinibulk, Josef; Vít, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 143, - (2002), s. 443-451 ISSN 0167-2991. [International Symposium Scientific Bases for the Preparation of Heterogeneous Catalysts /8./. Louvain-la-Neuve, 09.09.2002-12.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072103 Keywords : catalysts modified * sulfide catalysts * Mo/Al2O3 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.468, year: 2002

  4. Hydrogenation active sites of unsupported molybdenum sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Y.; Araki, Y.; Honna, K. [Tsukuba-branch, Advanced Catalyst Research Laboratory, Petroleum Energy Center, 1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, 305-8565 Ibaraki (Japan); Miki, Y.; Sato, K.; Shimada, H. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, 1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, 305-8565 Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-02-20

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the nature of the hydrogenation active sites on unsupported molybdenum sulfide catalysts, aimed at the improvement of the catalysts for the slurry processes. The number of hydrogenation active sites was found to relate to the 'inflection' on the basal plane of the catalyst particles. The comparison of the catalytic activity to that of an oil-soluble catalyst in the hydroprocessing of heavy oils suggests that the performance of the oil-soluble catalyst was near the maximum, unless another component such as Ni or Co was incorporated.

  5. Electron Tomography Reveals the Active Phase–Support Interaction in Sulfidic Hydroprocessing Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsbouts, Sonja; Li, Xuang; Juan-Alcaniz, Jana; van den Oetelaar, Leon C A; Bergwerff, Jaap; Loos, Joachim; Carlsson, Anna; Vogt, E.T.C.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional two-dimensional (2D) transmission electron microscopy of sulfidic hydroprocessing catalysts can be deceiving and give the impression that parts of the support are overloaded with active phase. High-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography reveals

  6. An XPS [x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy] study of the sulfidation-regeneration cycle of a hydroprocessing catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, D.Y.; Adnot, A.; Kaliaguine, S. (Laval Univ., Ste-Foy, PQ (Canada)); Chmielowiec, J. (Petro Canada Products Co., Mississauga, ON (Canada))

    1993-10-01

    The formation of sulfates in an industrial Ni-W hydroprocessing (HP) catalyst was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A small fluidized bed test unit with on-line sampling device was constructed to simulate industrial sulfidation and oxyregeneration processes of HP catalysts. The results obtained show that the sulfates observed on the surface of sulfided catalysts are not formed during the sulfidation process. Two oxidation processes seem to be responsible for the formation of sulfates: one happens when the catalyst is exposed to air before it is properly cooled and the other is a slow conversion at ambient temperature. The two different processes might be associated to different sulfidic species formed during the sulfidation processes, with the sulfides in the bulk of catalyst particles being more easily oxidized than the ones on the external surface of the catalyst particles. The sulfate formed during the air oxidation of sulfided catalysts, as well as that after oxyregeneration, is not aluminum sulfate but nickel sulfate in both cases. XPS results also indicate that oxygenates in the feedstock are not directly involved in the sulfate formation. 18 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Supported chromium-molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chianelli, R.R.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the process for preparing a supported hydroprocessing catalyst. The process comprising compositing a quantity of a particulate, porous catalyst support material comprising one or more refactory oxides with one or more catalyst precursor salts and heating the composite at elevated temperature of at least about 200/sup 0/C up to about 600/sup 0/, in the presence of a sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur bearing compound is present in excess of that contained in the catalyst precursor and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The catalyst precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture therof and a cation comprising trivalent chromium or a mixture of trivalent chromium with one or more divalent promoter metals selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Co, Mn, Cu and a mixture thereof wherein the trivalent chromium and divalent promoter metals are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand, L

  8. High pressure flow reactor for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of catalysts in gas-liquid mixtures—A case study on gas and liquid phase activation of a Co-Mo/Al2O3 hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haandel, L.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Weber, Th.

    2017-01-01

    An in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts under industrial operating conditions may involve high pressure and reactants in both the gas and the liquid phase. In this paper, we describe an in situ XAS flow reactor, which is suitable to operate under such conditions (pmax 20 bar, Tmax 350

  9. Hydroprocessing with self-promoted molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Candish, L.E.; Ho, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    A hydroprocessing process is described comprising contacting a hydrocarbon feed at elevated temperature of at least about 100 0 C and in the presence of hydrogen with a supported, self-promoted catalyst obtained by compositioning one or more catalyst precursors of the formula (ML) (Mo/sub y/W/sub 1-y/O/sub 4/) with an inorganic refractory oxide support and heating the composition in a non-oxidizing atmosphere in the presence of sulfur at elevated temperature for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. M comprises one or more divalent promoter metals, y is any value ranging from 0 to 1, and wherein L is one or more, neutral, nitrogen-containing ligands at least one of which is a chelating polydentate ligand. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to convert at least a portion of the feed

  10. Catalytic oxidation of sulfide in drinking water treatment: activated carbon as catalyst; Katalytische Oxidation von Sulfid bei der Trinkwasseraufbereitung: Aktivkohle als Katalysator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultsch, V; Grischek, T; Wolff, D; Worch, E [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasserchemie; Gun, J [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Div. of Environmental Sciences, Fredy and Nadine Herrmann School of Applied Science

    2001-07-01

    In regions with warm climate and limited water resources high sulfide concentrations in groundwater can cause problems during drinking water treatment. Aeration of the raw water is not always sufficient to ensure the hydrogen sulfide concentration below the odour threshold value for hydrogen sulfide. As an alternative, activated carbon can be used as a catalyst for sulfide oxidation of raw water. The use of different types of activated carbon was investigated in kinetic experiments. Both Catalytic Carbon from Calgon Carbon and granulated activated carbon from Norit showed high catalytic activities. The results of the experiments are discussed with regard to the practical use of activated carbon for the elimination of hydrogen sulfide during drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  11. Transition metal sulfide promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfide catalysts and their uses for hydroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.J.; Chianelli, R.R.; Pecoraro, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for hydrorefining a hydrocarbon feed which comprises contacting the feed at a temperature of at least about 150 0 C and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst obtained by heating one or more precursor salts at elevated temperature of at least about 150 0 C, in the presence of sulfur or one or more sulfur-bearing compounds and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture thereof and a cation comprising one or more divalent promoter metals which are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand. The divalent promoter metal is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Zn, Cu and mixture thereof. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to hydrorefine at least a portion of the feed

  12. Supported transition metal sulfide promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfide catalysts and their uses for hydroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, T.C.; Chianelli, R.R.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for hydrotreating a hydrocarbon feed which comprises contacting the feed at a temperature of at least about 150 0 C and heating the composite at elevated temperature of at least about 150 0 C, in the presence of sulfur and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture thereof and a cation comprising one or more divalent promoter metals which are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand L. The divalent promoter metal is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Zn, Cu and mixture thereof. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to hydrotreat at least a portion of the feed

  13. Characterization of catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy: An application to the study of Fischer-Tropsch, hydrotreating and super Claus catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der; Boellaard, E.; Craje, M.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is an excellent in-situ technique for the identification of phases present in catalysts. Applied to metallic iron catalysts used in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction it reveals a detailed picture of the carburization process and provides insight into the relation between the properties of the catalytic material and its activity. The influence of a support and the effect of alloying iron with an (in)active metal on the catalytic performance is discussed for Fe, Cu-Fe and Ni-Fe systems. In addition, Moessbauer spectroscopy is used for the identification of 'Co-sulfide' species present in sulfided Co and CoMo catalysts applied in one of the largest chemical processes in the world, the hydrotreatment of crude oil. A structural model is proposed. Finally, the contribution of Moessbauer spectroscopic studies to the development of a new catalyst for cleaning of Claus tail gas via selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Carbon supported Pd-Co-Mo alloy as an alternative to Pt for oxygen reduction in direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Ch. Venkateswara [National Centre for Catalysis Research, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, TN (India); Viswanathan, B., E-mail: bvnathan@acer.iitm.ernet.i [National Centre for Catalysis Research, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, TN (India)

    2010-03-01

    Carbon black (CDX975) supported Pd and Pd-Co-Mo alloy nanoparticles are prepared by the reduction of metal precursors with hydrazine in reverse microemulsion of water/Triton-X-100/propanol-2/cyclohexane. The as-synthesized Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 is heat treated at 973, 1073 and 1173 K to promote alloy formation. The prepared materials are characterized by powder XRD and EDX. Face-centred cubic structure of Pd is evident from XRD. The chemical composition of the respective elements in the catalysts is evaluated from the EDX analysis and observed that it is in good agreement with initial metal precursor concentrations. Oxygen reduction measurements performed by linear sweep voltammetry indicate the good catalytic activity of Pd-Co-Mo alloys compared to Pd. This is due to the suppression of (hydr)oxy species on Pd surface by the presence of alloying elements, Co and Mo. Among the investigated catalysts, heat-treated Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 at 973 K exhibited good ORR activity compared to the catalysts heat treated at 1073 and 1173 K. This is due to the small crystallite size and high surface area. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements indicated the comparable ORR activity of heat-treated Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 at 973 K with that of commercial Pt/C. Kinetic analysis reveals that the ORR on Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 follows the four-electron pathway leading to water. Moreover, Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 exhibited substantially higher ethanol tolerance during the ORR than Pt/C. Good dispersion of metallic nanoparticles on the carbon support is observed from HRTEM images. Single-cell direct ethanol fuel cell tests indicated the comparable performance of Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 with that of commercial Pt/C. Stability under DEFC operating conditions for 50 h indicated the good stability of Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 compared with that of Pt/C.

  15. Hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.; Stohl, F.V.; Richardson, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Catalysts were prepared on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) supports by ion exchange of an active metal for Na + ions incorporated in the HTO support during preparation by reaction with the parent Ti alkoxide. Strong active metal-HTO interactions as a result of the ion exchange reaction can require significantly different conditions for activation as compared to catalysts prepared by more widely used incipient wetness methods. The latter catalysts typically involve conversion or while the HTO catalysts require the alteration of electrostatic bonds between the metal and support with subsequent alteration of the support itself. In this paper, the authors discuss the activation, via sulfidation or reduction, of catalysts consisting of Co, Mo, or Ni-Mo dispersed on HTO supports by ion exchange. Correlations between the activation process and the hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation, and hydrodesulfurization activities of the catalysts are presented

  16. One-Pot Catalyst-Free Synthesis of β- and γ-Hydroxy Sulfides using Diaryliodonium Salts and Microwave Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A facile one-pot high-yield protocol is described for the preparation of β- and γ-hydroxy sulfides directly from diaryliodonium salts, potassium thiocyanate, and ethane-1,2-diol (ethylene glycol)/propane-1,3-diol (β-propylene glycol) without the need for any additional catalyst o...

  17. High-energy asymmetric supercapacitors based on free-standing hierarchical Co-Mo-S nanosheets with enhanced cycling stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Jayaraman; Li, Chao; Peera, Shaik Gouse; Kim, Nam Hoon; Lee, Joong Hee

    2017-09-21

    Layered transition metal sulfides (TMS) are emerging as advanced materials for energy storage and conversion applications. In this work, we report a facile and cost-effective anion exchange technique to fabricate a layered, multifaceted, free standing, ultra-thin ternary cobalt molybdenum sulfide nanosheet (Co-Mo-S NS) architecture grown on a 3D porous Ni foam substrate. The unique Co-Mo layered double hydroxides are first synthesized as precursors and consequently transformed into ultra-thin Co-Mo-S NS. When employed as an electrode for supercapacitors, the Co-Mo-S NS delivered an ultra-high specific capacitance of 2343 F g -1 at a current density of 1 mA cm -2 with tremendous rate capability and extraordinary cycling performance (96.6% capacitance retention after 20 000 cycles). Furthermore, assembled Co-Mo-S/nitrogen doped graphene nanosheets (NGNS) in an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) device delivered an excellent energy density of 89.6 Wh kg -1 , an amazing power density of 20.07 kW kg -1 , and superior cycling performance (86.8% capacitance retention after 50 000 cycles). Such exceptional electrochemical performance of Co-Mo-S NS is ascribed to the good electrical contact with the 3D Ni foam, ultra-high contact area with the electrolyte, and enhanced architectural softening during the charging/discharging process. It is expected that the fabricated, unique, ultra-thin Co-Mo-S NS have great potential for future energy storage devices.

  18. Hydrophilic cobalt sulfide nanosheets as a bifunctional catalyst for oxygen and hydrogen evolution in electrolysis of alkaline aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingchao; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lixue; Wang, Shicai

    2018-01-01

    Hydrophilic medium and precursors were used to synthesize a hydrophilic electro-catalyst for overall water splitting. The cobalt sulfide (Co 3 S 4 ) catalyst exhibits a layered nanosheet structure with a hydrophilic surface, which can facilitate the diffusion of aqueous substrates into the electrode pores and towards the active sites. The Co 3 S 4 catalyst shows excellent bifunctional catalytic activity for both the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution. The assembled water electrolyzer based on Co 3 S 4 exhibits better performance and stability than that of Pt/C-RuO 2 catalyst. Thereforce the hydrophilic Co 3 S 4 is a highly promising bifunctional catalyst for the overall water splitting reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  20. Investigation and development of heavy oil upgrading catalysts. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.K.; Lee, I.C.; Yoon, W.L.; Lee, H.T.; Chung, H.; Hwang, Y.J.; Park, S.H. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This study aimed at the domestic development of HDS catalysts which are most fundamental and wide-used in the petroleum refinery. In this year, some experimental works were conducted for developing the effective utilization technology of the novel dispersed-catalysts in the hydro-desulfurization of heavy oils, and improving the reaction performance of alumina-supported Mo-based hydro-treating catalysts conventionally used in most of refineries. First, it was experimentally proved that the dispersed catalysts of Co-Mo could be employed for the hydro-desulfurization of a heavy atmospheric residual oil excluding the catalyst deactivation. The utilization of a carbon-expanded reactor in combination with this dispersed catalyst system exhibited an enhanced reaction performance and provided an efficient way for the separation and recovery of the dispersed catalytic component from oils. Second, the tungsten-incorporated WCoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst revealed the improved catalytic performance in the various hydro-treating reactions and in the initial deactivation rates for the high pressure hydro-treatment of a heavy oil as compared with the commercial CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. This new experimental finding for the promoting role of the monomeric WO{sub 3} species in CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst may be generally applicable to the Mo-based alumina-sulfide phase, higher catalytic activity, and more extended service life. (author). 101 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. A real support effect on the hydrodeoxygenation of methyl oleate by sulfided NiMo catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumans, A.E.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the support on the catalytic performance of sulfided NiMo in the hydrodeoxygenation of methyl oleate as a model compound for triglyceride upgrading to green diesel was investigated. NiMo sulfides were prepared by impregnation and sulfidation on activated carbon, silica, γ-alumina and

  3. Upgrading pyrolysis bio-oil through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) using non-sulfided Fe-Co/SiO2 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Shouyun; Wei, Lin; Julson, James; Rabnawaz, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalyst with medium acidity was more effective for bio-oil upgrading. • Co-loading of Fe and Co on SiO 2 support improved catalyst performance. • Catalyst showing the best catalytic activity had a Fe/Co mole ratio of 1. • Biofuel produced by Fe-Co(1)/SiO 2 had the higher hydrocarbons content at 22.44%. • The mechanism of bio-oil HDO on Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalysts is proposed. - Abstract: Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an effective route to upgrade bio-oil to hydrocarbon bio-oil, but the development of efficient catalysts for bio-oil HDO still remains a challenge. In this study, non-sulfided Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalysts were used to upgrade bio-oil using HDO. A series of Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalysts with different Fe/Co mole ratios were prepared, characterized and evaluated. The Fe and/or Co loading did not change SiO 2 crystalline structure. The Fe and/or Co metals increased the amount and strength of Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalyst acidity. Physicochemical properties of upgraded bio-oils produced using Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalysts such as water content, total acid number, viscosity and higher heating values improved in comparison to raw bio-oil. Bimetallic Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalysts resulted in better HDO performance than monometallic Fe/SiO 2 or Co/SiO 2 catalysts. This was due to the synergistic effect of Fe and Co occurring on the SiO 2 support. Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalyst having medium amount of acidity was more effective for bio-oil upgrading. The highest hydrocarbons content produced using Fe-Co(1)/SiO 2 catalyst was 22.44%. The mechanism of bio-oil HDO on Fe-Co/SiO 2 catalysts is proposed.

  4. Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration Processes in Biogas Tri-Reforming Process. The Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urko Izquierdo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work studies Ni-based catalyst deactivation and regeneration processes in the presence of H2S under a biogas tri-reforming process for hydrogen production, which is an energy vector of great interest. 25 ppm of hydrogen sulfide were continuously added to the system in order to provoke an observable catalyst deactivation, and once fully deactivated two different regeneration processes were studied: a self-regeneration and a regeneration by low temperature oxidation. For that purpose, several Ni-based catalysts and a bimetallic Rh-Ni catalyst supported on alumina modified with CeO2 and ZrO2 were used as well as a commercial Katalco 57-5 for comparison purposes. Ni/Ce-Al2O3 and Ni/Ce-Zr-Al2O3 catalysts almost recovered their initial activity. For these catalysts, after the regeneration under oxidative conditions at low temperature, the CO2 conversions achieved—79.5% and 86.9%, respectively—were significantly higher than the ones obtained before sulfur poisoning—66.7% and 45.2%, respectively. This effect could be attributed to the support modification with CeO2 and the higher selectivity achieved for the Reverse Water-Gas-Shift (rWGS reaction after catalysts deactivation. As expected, the bimetallic Rh-Ni/Ce-Al2O3 catalyst showed higher resistance to deactivation and its sulfur poisoning seems to be reversible. In the case of the commercial and Ni/Zr-Al2O3 catalysts, they did not recover their activity.

  5. Anomalous hydrocracking of triglycerides over CoMo-catalyst ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 473–480. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Anomalous hydrocracking of ... to minimize condensation reaction during this process. Keywords. Coupling reactions ... normal and/or iso-alkanes.5–7 The first step in plant- oil hydroprocessing for the production of hydrocarbon fuels is saturation of ...

  6. Influence of the sulfidation procedure on the performance and the selectivity of hydro-treating catalysts; Influence de la procedure de sulfuration sur la performance et la selectivite des catalyseurs d'hydrotraitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texier, S

    2004-10-15

    This work is part of a general effort to reduce the sulfur content of fuels to satisfy new European regulations. The objective was to determine the influence of several activating agents during sulfidation on the activity of hydro-desulfurization (HDS) catalysts. Indeed, sulfidation is a critical step to achieve a good level of HDS activity on sulfide catalysts. Under industrial conditions, the activation by organo-sulfide compounds would be more beneficial to obtain active catalysts than the use of hydrogen sulfide. A systematic study of the various operational parameters of the activation process was thus carried out by comparing precisely activation by H{sub 2}S or by organo-sulfides. This study reveals that the recognized advantage of organo-sulfides compounds has not a 'purely chemical origin' but would be more probably related to a heating and/or thermodynamic effect which depends on the processes and on the implementation of sulfidation under the industrial conditions. (author)

  7. Study on supported binary sulfide catalysts for secondary hydrogenation of coal-derived liquids; Sekitan ekikayu niji suisoka shokubai no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, H.; Matsubayashi, N.; Sato, T.; Imamura, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nishijima, A. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1995-07-28

    To utilize the high performance of supported catalysts in coal liquefaction processes, one of the promising ways is to apply hydroprocessing sulfide catalysts to the secondary hydrogenation of coal-derived liquids which have undergone the solid separation unit. However, when the product yield from the first-stage liquefaction is maximized, the feed stocks in the secondary hydrogenation contain large amounts of residual fractions with preasphaltenes and metallic components. In this case, the development of a long-life catalyst is essential to establish the two-stage process as a practical one. From this viewpoint, the authors have investigated the deactivation causes of supported Ni-Mo sulfide catalysts through the analysis of the used catalysts in the secondary hydrogenation of coal-derived liquids for long periods. The major cause of the catalyst deactivation has been found to be metallic and carbonaceous deposition on the catalyst, which results thin layer which covers the catalyst particles. The catalysts located at the reactor inlet are more rapidly deactivated than those at the rector exit because of larger amounts of metallic foul ants and the above described shell-like layer. Hydrocracking active sites are much heavily deactivated compared with hydrogenation active sites. It is inferred that the basic or polar compounds contained in coal liquids are permanency adsorbed on the hydrocracking active sites. Spectroscopic analysis of the used catalysts clarified the destruction of the active phase of the binary sulfides, through the segregation and crystal growth. The structural changes of the catalysts are very likely caused by heteroatom compounds in the preasphaltenes. Thus, the primary cause of the catalyst deactivation is the preasphaltenes in the coal liquids. Hydroaromatic compounds in the coal liquids suppress the change of the deposited carbonaceous materials into inert coke which permanently deactivate the catalyst.

  8. Hydroprocessing of Jatropha Oil for Production of Green Diesel over Non-sulfided Ni-PTA/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lei, Jiandu; He, Jing; Deng, Lihong; Wang, Luying; Fan, Kai; Rong, Long

    2015-01-01

    The non-sulfided Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst was developed to produce green diesel from the hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil. The Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by one-pot synthesis of Ni/Al2O3 with the co-precipitation method and then impregnanting Ni/Al2O3 with PTA solution. The catalysts were characterized with BET, SEM-EDX, TEM, XRD, XPS, TGA and NH3-TPD. The Ni and W species of the Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst were much more homogeneously distributed on the surface than that of commercial Al2O3. Catalytic performance in the hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil was evaluated by GC. The maximum conversion of Jatropha oil (98.5 wt%) and selectivity of the C15-C18 alkanes fraction (84.5 wt %) occurred at 360 °C, 3.0 MPa, 0.8 h−1. The non-sulfided Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalyst is more environmentally friendly than the conventional sulfided hydroprocessing catalyst, and it exhibited the highest catalytic activity than the Ni-PTA catalyst supported with commercial Al2O3 grain and Al2O3 powder. PMID:26162092

  9. The role of reaction pathways and support interactions in the development of high activity hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Henrik; Hinnemann, Berit; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    structures may be present as single sulfide sheets. Thus, stacking is not an essential feature of Type II catalysts. The article illustrates how the new scientific insight has aided the introduction of the new high activity BRIM (TM) type catalysts for FCC pre-treatment and production of ultra low sulfur...... exhibiting a metallic character are observed to be involved in adsorption, hydrogenation and C-S bond cleavage. The insight is seen to provide a new framework for understanding the DDS and HYD pathways and the role of steric hindrance and poisons. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have illustrated...... how support interactions may influence the activity of sulfided catalysts. The brim sites and the tendency to form vacancies are seen to differ in types I and II Co-Mo-S. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) studies show that the high activity Type II...

  10. One-step liquid phase chemical method to prepare carbon-based amorphous molybdenum sulfides: As the effective hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Mengmeng; Wu, Qikang; Yu, Miaomiao; Wang, Yinling; Li, Maoguo

    2017-01-01

    Two different kinds of carbon-based amorphous molybdenum sulfide composite catalysts (activated carbon supported amorphous molybdenum sulfide and acetylene black supported amorphous molybdenum sulfide) had been prepared in a facile and scalable one-step liquid phase chemical method. The morphological and structural information of catalysts was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and it’s electro-catalytic HER activity were evaluated by linear sweep voltammetry(LSV), amperometric i-t technology and AC impedance technology. The as-prepared carbon-based amorphous molybdenum sulfides showed greatly enhanced electro-catalytic activity for HER compared with pure amorphous molybdenum sulfides. Especially, the nano-sized acetylene black supported molybdenum sulfide exhibited excellent electro-catalytic HER performances with a low onset potential of −116 mV versus reverse hydrogen electrode (RHE) and a small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade.

  11. Effect of Co Mo/HSO3-functionalized MCM-41 over heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacht, P.; Ramirez G, M.; Ramirez, S.; Aguilar P, J.; Norena F, L.; Abu, I.

    2010-01-01

    The potential of Co-Mo metals supported on functionalized MCM-41 as catalyst to hydrodesulfurization of heavy oil has been explored in this work. The MCM-41 functionalized sample was synthesized according to method previously reported into the support by simultaneous impregnation. The catalyst was characterized by specific surface area and X-ray diffraction. The pore channel of MCM-41 was confirmed by transmission electronic microscopy and infra red spectroscopy. Catalytic activity tests were carried out using heavy oil from Gulf of Mexico. The API gravity was increased from 12.5 to 20.2, the kinematics viscosity was decreased from 18,700 to 110 c St at 298 K, the contents of asphaltene and sulfur were also reduced. (Author)

  12. Effect of Co Mo/HSO{sub 3}-functionalized MCM-41 over heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schacht, P.; Ramirez G, M.; Ramirez, S. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Aguilar P, J.; Norena F, L. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, 02200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Abu, I., E-mail: pschacha@imp.m [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The potential of Co-Mo metals supported on functionalized MCM-41 as catalyst to hydrodesulfurization of heavy oil has been explored in this work. The MCM-41 functionalized sample was synthesized according to method previously reported into the support by simultaneous impregnation. The catalyst was characterized by specific surface area and X-ray diffraction. The pore channel of MCM-41 was confirmed by transmission electronic microscopy and infra red spectroscopy. Catalytic activity tests were carried out using heavy oil from Gulf of Mexico. The API gravity was increased from 12.5 to 20.2, the kinematics viscosity was decreased from 18,700 to 110 c St at 298 K, the contents of asphaltene and sulfur were also reduced. (Author)

  13. Hydrogen sulfide-powered solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man

    2004-12-01

    The potential utilization of hydrogen sulfide as fuel in solid oxide fuel cells has been investigated using an oxide-ion conducting YSZ electrolyte and different kinds of anode catalysts at operating temperatures in the range of 700--900°C and at atmospheric pressure. This technology offers an economically attractive alternative to present methods for removing toxic and corrosive H2S gas from sour gas streams and a promising approach for cogenerating electrical energy and useful chemicals. The primary objective of the present research was to find active and stable anode materials. Fuel cell experimental results showed that platinum was a good electrocatalyst for the conversion of H2S, but the Pt/YSZ interface was physically unstable due to the reversible formation and decomposition of PtS in H 2S streams at elevated temperatures. Moreover, instability of the Pt/YSZ interface was accelerated significantly by electrochemical reactions, and ultimately led to the detachment of the Pt anode from the electrolyte. It has been shown that an interlayer of TiO2 stabilized the Pt anode on YSZ electrolyte, thereby prolonging cell lifetime. However, the current output for a fuel cell using Pt/TiO2 as anode was not improved compared to using Pt alone. It was therefore necessary to investigate novel anode systems for H 2S-air SOFCs. New anode catalysts comprising composite metal sulfides were developed. These catalysts exhibited good electrical conductivity and better catalytic activity than Pt. In contrast to MoS2 alone, composite catalysts (M-Mo-S, M = Fe, Co, Ni) were not volatile and had superior stability. However, when used for extended periods of time, detachment of Pt current collecting film from anodes comprising metal sulfides alone resulted in a large increase in contact resistance and reduction in cell performance. Consequently, a systematic investigation was conducted to identify alternative electronic conductors for use with M-Mo-S catalysts. Anode catalysts

  14. Probing topological electronic effects in catalysis: thiophene adsorption on NiMoS and CoMoS clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges Junior, Itamar; Silva, Alexander M., E-mail: itamar@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia de Defesa

    2012-10-15

    A general two-step theoretical approach to study electronic redistributions in catalytic processes is presented. In the first step, density functional theory (DFT) is used to fully optimize two geometries: the cluster representing the catalyst and the cluster plus adsorbed molecule system. In the second step, the converged electron density is divided into multipoles centered on atomic sites according to a distributed multipole analysis which provides detailed topological information on the charge redistribution of catalyst and molecule before and after adsorption. This approach is applied to thiophene adsorption on the 10{sup -}10 metal edge of Ni(Co)MoS catalysts and compared to the same reaction on bare MoS{sub 2}. Calculated adsorption energies, geometries and multipole analysis indicate weak thiophene chemisorption on both cases. A Coulombic bond model showed that surface metal-sulfur bond strengths in Ni(Co)MoS promoted catalysts are considerably smaller than in bare MoS{sub 2}, thus confirming the origin of the enhancement of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity in these catalysts. (author)

  15. Mössbauer emission study on 57Co doped carbon-supported Ni and Ni-Mo sulfide hydrotreating catalysts : the influence of phosphorus on the structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crajé, M.W.J.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study it is demonstrated that Mössbauer emission spectroscopy (MES) can generate information on the various Ni phases present in sulfided Ni containing catalysts when a small amount of 57Co is used as a probe for Ni.Application of MES to 57Co:Ni(4.5)Mo(8.0)/C and 57Co:Ni(5.6)/C

  16. A Non-sulfided flower-like Ni-PTA Catalyst that Enhances the Hydrotreatment Efficiency of Plant Oil to Produce Green Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Pan; Deng, Lihong; He, Jing; Wang, Luying; Rong, Long; Lei, Jiandu

    2015-01-01

    The development of a novel non-sulfided catalyst with high activity for the hydrotreatment processing of plant oils, is of high interest as a way to improve the efficient production of renewable diesel. To attempt to develop such a catalyst, we first synthesized a high activity flower-like Ni-PTA catalyst used in the hydrotreatment processes of plant oils. The obtained catalyst was characterized with SEM, EDX, HRTEM, BET, XRD, H2-TPR, XPS and TGA. A probable formation mechanism of flower-like Ni(OH)2 is proposed on the basis of a range of contrasting experiments. The results of GC showed that the conversion yield of Jatropha oil was 98.95%, and the selectivity of C11-C18 alkanes was 70.93% at 360 °C, 3 MPa, and 15 h−1. The activity of this flower-like Ni-PTA catalyst was more than 15 times higher than those of the conventional Ni-PTA/Al2O3 catalysts. Additionally, the flower-like Ni-PTA catalyst exhibited good stability during the process of plant oil hydrotreatment. PMID:26503896

  17. Formation of nitrogen compounds from nitrogen-containing rings during oxidative regeneration of spent hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Nielsen, M.; Jurasek, P. [CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Laboratories

    1995-05-01

    Commercial CoMo and NiMo catalysts in an oxidic and sulfided form and a {gamma}-alumina were deposited with pyrrole, pyridine, and quinoline. The deposited catalysts and two spent hydroprocessing catalysts were pyrolyzed and oxidized under conditions typical of regeneration of hydroprocessing catalysts. The formation of NH{sub 3} and HCN, as well as selected cases of N{sub 2}O and NO, was monitored during the experiments. NH{sub 3} and HCN were formed during pyrolysis of pyrrole-deposited catalysts whereas only NH{sub 3} was formed during that of pyridine-and quinoline-deposited catalysts. For all deposited catalysts, both NH{sub 3} and HCN were formed during temperature programmed oxidation in 2% O{sub 2}. For spent catalysts, a small amount of N{sub 2}O was formed in 2 and 4% O{sub 2}. For pyrrole-deposited catalysts, large yields of N{sub 2}O were formed in 4% O{sub 2}. Under the same conditions, N{sub 2}O yields for pyridine- and quinoline-deposited catalysts were very small. 13 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Influence of the sulfidation procedure on the performance and the selectivity of hydro-treating catalysts; Influence de la procedure de sulfuration sur la performance et la selectivite des catalyseurs d'hydrotraitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texier, S.

    2004-10-15

    This work is part of a general effort to reduce the sulfur content of fuels to satisfy new European regulations. The objective was to determine the influence of several activating agents during sulfidation on the activity of hydro-desulfurization (HDS) catalysts. Indeed, sulfidation is a critical step to achieve a good level of HDS activity on sulfide catalysts. Under industrial conditions, the activation by organo-sulfide compounds would be more beneficial to obtain active catalysts than the use of hydrogen sulfide. A systematic study of the various operational parameters of the activation process was thus carried out by comparing precisely activation by H{sub 2}S or by organo-sulfides. This study reveals that the recognized advantage of organo-sulfides compounds has not a 'purely chemical origin' but would be more probably related to a heating and/or thermodynamic effect which depends on the processes and on the implementation of sulfidation under the industrial conditions. (author)

  19. Controllable Synthesis of Lindqvist Alkoxopolyoxovanadate Clusters as Heterogeneous Catalysts for Sulfoxidation of Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Kun; Dong, Jing; Wei, Chuan-Ping; Yang, Song; Chi, Ying-Nan; Xu, Yan-Qing; Hu, Chang-Wen

    2017-05-15

    Six alkoxohexavanadate-based Cu- or Co-POVs [Cu(dpa)(acac)(H 2 O)] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ] (1), [Cu(phen)(acac)(MeOH)] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ] (2), [Co(dpa)(acac) 2 ] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ]·2MeOH (3), [Co(phen)(acac) 2 ] 2 [V 6 O 13 (OMe) 6 ] (4), [Cu(dpa)(acac)] 2 [V IV 2 V V 4 O 12 (OMe) 7 ] (5), and [Cu(dpa)(acac)(MeOH)] 2 [V IV 2 V V 4 O 11 (OMe) 8 ] (6) (POV = polyoxovanadate; dpa = 2,2'-dipyridine amine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; acac = acetylacetone anion) have been synthesized by controlling the reaction conditions and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, element analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In compounds 1-4 and 6, Cu or Co complexes and alkoxohexavanadate anions are assembled through electrostatic interactions. Differently, in compound 5, seven-methoxo-substituted Lindqvist-type [V 6 O 12 (OMe) 7 ] 2- are bridged to Cu complex via terminal O atoms by coordination bonds. All compounds 1-6 exhibit excellent heterogeneous catalytic performance in oxidative desulfurization and CEES ((2-chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant) abatement with H 2 O 2 as oxidant. Among them, the catalytic activity of 6 [conv. of DBT (dibenzothiophene) up to 100% in 6 h; conv. of CEES reached 100% and selectivity of CEESO ((2-chloroethyl) ethyl sulfoxide) up to 85% after 4 h] outperforms others and can be reused without losing its activity.

  20. Comparison of P-containing {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Ni-Mo bimetallic carbide, nitride and sulfide catalysts for HDN and HDS of gas oils derived from Athabasca bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaramurthy, V.; Dalai, A.K. [Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adjaye, J. [Syncrude Edmonton Research Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2006-09-01

    Phosphorus containing {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported bimetallic Ni-Mo carbide, nitride and sulfide catalysts have been synthesized from an oxide precursor containing 12.73wt.% Mo, 2.54wt.% Ni and 2.38wt.% P and characterized by elemental analysis, pulsed CO chemisorption, surface area measurements, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction and DRIFT spectroscopy of CO adsorption. DRIFT spectroscopy of adsorbed CO on activated catalysts showed that carbide and nitride catalysts have surface exposed sites of Mo{sup o+} (0sulfidation with H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixture at 370{sup o}C. The hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activities of the bimetallic Ni-Mo carbide, nitride and sulfide catalysts were compared against commercial Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in a trickle bed reactor using light gas oil and heavy gas oil derived from Athabasca bitumen in the temperature range 340-370 and 375-400{sup o}C respectively at 8.8MPa. The gradual transformation of Ni-Mo carbide and nitride phases into Ni-Mo sulfide phases was observed during precoking period, and the formed Ni-Mo sulfide phases enhanced the HDN and HDS activities of carbide and nitride catalysts. The {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Ni-Mo bimetallic sulfide catalyst was found to be more active for HDN and HDS of light gas oil and heavy gas oil than the corresponding carbide and nitride catalysts on the basis of unit weight. (author)

  1. Microwave-assisted synthesis of graphene/CoMoO4 nanocomposites with enhanced supercapacitor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Shen, Jianfeng; Li, Na; Ye, Mingxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RGO/CoMoO 4 nanocomposites are prepared by microwave irradiation for the first time. • RGO/CoMoO 4 nanocomposites show a high specific capacitance of 322.5 F g −1 . • Enhanced electrical conductivity leads to superior electrochemical performance. • Low crystallinity of CoMoO 4 is favorable to improve the electrochemical performance. - Abstract: A facile and efficient strategy for preparing reduced graphene oxide–cobalt molybdate (RGO/CoMoO 4 ) nanocomposites assisted by microwave irradiation for the first time is demonstrated. The resulting nanocomposites are comprised of CoMoO 4 nanoparticles that are well-anchored on graphene sheets by in situ reducing. The prepared RGO/CoMoO 4 nanocomposites have been thoroughly characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Importantly, the prepared nanocomposites exhibit excellent electrochemical performance for supercapacitors. Results show that RGO/CoMoO 4 nanocomposites exhibited much better electrochemical capability than pure-CoMoO 4 and RGO/CoMoO 4 for annealing. RGO/CoMoO 4 nanocomposites with 37.4 wt% CoMoO 4 content achieved a specific capacitance about 322.5 F g −1 calculated from the CV plots at 5 mV s −1 , which was higher than that of pure-CoMoO 4 (95.0 F g −1 ) and RGO/CoMoO 4 for annealing (102.5 F g −1 ). The good electrochemical performance can be attributed to the synergistic effects of the individual components

  2. High hydrogen desorption properties of Mg-based nanocomposite at moderate temperatures: The effects of multiple catalysts in situ formed by adding nickel sulfides/graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiubo; Chen, Ming; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Liu, Tong

    2017-12-01

    Nickel sulfides decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been produced by co-reducing Ni2+ and graphene oxide (GO), and is subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) produced by hydrogen plasma metal reaction (HPMR). The nickel sulfides of about 800 nm completely in situ change to MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni multiple catalysts after first hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process at 673 K. The Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite shows the highest hydrogen desorption kinetics and capacity properties, and the catalytic effect order of the additives is NiS/rGO, NiS and rGO. At 573 K, the Mg-NiS/rGO nanocomposite can quickly desorb 3.7 wt% H2 in 10 min and 4.5 wt% H2 in 60 min. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite are decreased to 44.47 and 63.02 kJ mol-1, smaller than those of the Mg-5wt%rGO and Mg-5wt%NiS samples. The best hydrogen desorption properties of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite can be explained by the synergistic catalytic effects of the highly dispersed MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni catalysts on the rGO sheets, and the more nucleation sites between the catalysts, rGO sheets and Mg matrix.

  3. Biogas reforming over multi walled carbon nanotubes with Co-Mo/MgO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2017-12-01

    The utilization of biogas for the production of valuable chemicals is among the very important processes in the energy research field. The most suitable process for biogas reforming is dry reforming of methane. An obvious drawback is the variable composition of biogas rather than the stoichiometrically equimolar quantities of methane and carbon dioxide. Moreover, activating the methane and carbon dioxide molecules in the reforming reaction provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts. In the present work, the catalytic activity behavior of Co-Mo-MgO/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposite in dry reforming was investigated with different CO2/CH4 feed ratio to evaluate the performance of this catalyst for biogas reforming reaction. It was found that conversions of methane and carbon dioxide were greatly influenced by the feed gas ratio. The CH4 and CO2 conversions are 83 % and 87 % at the reaction temperature of 825 °C, GHSV of 175 L/h.gcat and CO2/CH4 feed ratio of unity. The minimum carbon deposition rate is observed at the CO2/CH4 feed ratio of 0.6 which is 0.080 gc/gcat-h.

  4. Basic study of catalyst aging in the H-coal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cable, T.L.; Massoth, F.E.; Thomas, M.G.

    1985-04-01

    Samples of CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts used in an H-coal process demonstration run were studied to determine causes of catalyst deactivation. Physical and surface properties of the aged and regenerated catalysts were examined. Model compounds were used to assess four catalyst activity functions, viz., hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrogenation, cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Other tests were performed to study the effects of coke and metals separately on the four catalyst activity functions. Catalyst coke content and metal deposits first increased rapidly, then more gradually with exposure time in the process run. Surface area and pore volume markedly decreased with exposure time. Catalyst activities of aged catalysts showed a rapid decline with exposure time. One-day exposure to coal resulted in significant losses in HDS and hydrogenation activities and nearly complete loss in cracking and HDO activities. Although metal deposits caused some permanent catalyst deactivation, coke had a much greater effect. Regenerated catalysts showed less recovery of catalytic activity as processing time increased. These results agreed well with product inspections from the process run. Oxygen chemisorption on aged-regenerated catalysts decreased with catalyst exposure time, indicating a significant loss of active sites. However, ESCA results showed no evidence of extensive sintering of the active MoS/sub 2/ phase. Permanent deactivation of the longer-time exposed catalysts can be ascribed, at least partly, to lateral growth of the active molybdenum sulfide phase. In addition, some loss in cobalt promotion occurred early in the process, which may account for the rapid loss in HDS and HDO activity in regenerated catalysts. 24 references.

  5. Core-shell rhodium sulfide catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction / hydrogen oxidation reaction in hydrogen-bromine reversible fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nguyen, Trung Van

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) core-shell RhxSy catalysts for hydrogen evolution oxidation (HER)/hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in H2-Br2 fuel cell are discussed. Catalysts with RhxSy as shell and different percentages (5%, 10%, and 20%) of platinum on carbon as core materials are synthesized. Cyclic voltammetry is used to evaluate the Pt-equivalent mass specific ECSA and durability of these catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques are utilized to characterize the bulk and surface compositions and to confirm the core-shell structure of the catalysts, respectively. Cycling test and polarization curve measurements in the H2-Br2 fuel cell are used to assess the catalyst stability and performance in a fuel cell. The results show that the catalysts with core-shell structure have higher mass specific ECSA (50 m2 gm-Rh-1) compared to a commercial catalyst (RhxSy/C catalyst from BASF, 6.9 m2 gm-Rh-1). It also shows better HOR/HER performance in the fuel cell. Compared to the platinum catalyst, the core-shell catalysts show more stable performance in the fuel cell cycling test.

  6. New insides in the characterization of HDS industrial catalysts by HAADF-STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Angel, Paz; Ponce, Arturo; Arellano, Josefina; Yacaman, Miguel J.; Hernandez-Pichardo, Martha; Montoya, J. Ascencion; Escobar, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts are of great importance in the petroleum industry. Transition metal sulphides catalysts of Ni(Co)Mo(W)/Al2O3 are widely used for hydrotreating reactions, like hydrodenitrogenation and HDS. One of the main issue in these catalysts is to understand the mechanism of the reaction, where MoS2 plays the most important role in the catalytic activity. We studied an industrial NiMo/Alumina sulfide catalyst highly active by using aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM techniques. The used catalysts was a state-of- the art commercial nickel-molybdenum alumina-supported formulation, including organic agent modifier. This type of material belongs to a novel family of catalysts specially designed for ultra-low sulfur production from straight-run gas oil (SRGO), cycle oil, coker gas oil, or their combinations at operating conditions of commercial interest in hydrotreating units at industrial scale. Aberration corrected HAADF-STEM allowed to observe the nanostructure and location of MoS2 and his interaction with the alumina. The results indicate that the MoS2 is highly dispersed on the alumina, however the location of Ni is one of the task of this kind of catalyst.

  7. Hydrogen Production Using a Molybdenum Sulfide Catalyst on a Titanium-Protected n+p-Silicon Photocathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Laursen, Anders Bo; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost substitute: A titanium protection layer on silicon made it possible to use silicon under highly oxidizing conditions without oxidation of the silicon. Molybdenum sulfide was electrodeposited on the Ti-protected n+p-silicon electrode. This electrode was applied as a photocathode for wat...

  8. HYDROGENATION OF TOLUENE ON Ni-Co-Mo SUPPORTED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    The XRD patterns for all the catalytic samples showed that the framework of the ... Print ISSN: 0331-8443, Electronic ISSN: 2467-8821 ... catalyst based on mixed oxides of nickel, cobalt and ...... molybdenum oxide in propylene oxidation,".

  9. HYDROGENATION OF TOLUENE ON Ni-Co-Mo SUPPORTED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Keywords: Hydro treating catalysts; Hydrogenation; Toluene conversion; Surface area; Pore diameter. 1. ... decades in refineries to upgrade heavy oil fractions and residue. Metals often ...... "Hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum feeds: Tutorial ...

  10. Second row transition metal sulfides for the hydrotreatment of coal-derived naphtha. 1. Catalyst preparation, characterization and comparison of rate of simultaneous removal of total sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raje, A.P.; Liaw, S.-J.; Srinivasan, R.; Davis, B.H. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-03-13

    Naphtha derived from an Illinois No. 6 coal contains appreciable quantities of sulfur-, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds. The hydrotreatment of this naphtha was evaluated over unsupported transition metal sulfide catalysts (Ru, Rh, Mo, Pd, Zr, Mb). The catalysts were prepared by a room temperature precipitation reaction. Surface areas, crystalline phase and particle size distributions were determined by Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. A comparison of average particle sizes calculated from these three techniques has enable the understanding of the morphology of the transition metal sulfides. The catalysts exhibit a so-called volcano plot for the HDS of dibenzothiophene. Similar so-called volcano plots are also exhibited for the simultaneous hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the coal-derived naphtha containing a mixture of heteroatoms. The order of reactivity of the transition metal catalysts is the same for all three of the processes. Ruthenium sulfide is the most active catalyst for HDS, HDN and HDO of the coal-derived naphtha. 22 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A peroxotungstate-ionic liquid brush assembly: an efficient and reusable catalyst for selectively oxidizing sulfides with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution in neat water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xianying; Ma, Wenjuan; Ou, Hui; Han, Xiaoyan; Lu, Congmin; Chen, Yan; Wei, Junfa, E-mail: shixy@snnu.edu.cn, E-mail: weijf@snnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University and Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Xian (China)

    2012-08-15

    An efficient and reusable heterogeneous catalytic assembly of peroxotungstate held in a ionic liquid (IL) brush was synthesized and an environmentally-friendly procedure was developed for selective oxidation of sulfides at room temperature using 30 wt.% hydrogen peroxide as the terminal oxidant and water as a sole solvent. No organic co-solvent or other additive was needed. A 1.5-2.0 mol% (based on W atom) loading catalyst was found to be sufficient for a smooth and clean reaction. Both aliphatic and aromatic sulfides were efficiently and selectively transformed into their respective sulfoxides or sulfones by simply controlling of equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the high catalytic activity, the catalyst exhibits excellent chemoselectivity. Sensitive functional groups, such as double bond and hydroxyl, remained under the oxidation conditions the reaction even with an excess hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst was easily recovered (via simple filtration) and reused at least eight times without a noticeable loss of activity. (author)

  12. Transmission electron microscopy on live catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, G.M.

    2017-01-01

    The dissertation describes TEM experiments on heterogeneous catalysts. Starting with characterization of (Ni/Co)MoS2 on Alumina and the effect of oxidation, and sequential resulfidation. After that, Co-based catalysts are used for high-resolution (S)TEM/EDX caracterization studies, and in situ

  13. Iron sulphide containing hydrodesulfurization catalysts : Mössbauer study of the sulfidibility of alpha-iron(III) oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1988-01-01

    As a first step in the study of the sulphidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst systems the sulphiding of a well-characterized, unsupported model compound, viz. a-Fe2O3(mean particle diameter ca. 50 nm) was investigated using in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy and the temperature-programmed

  14. Comparison of Tungsten and Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Oleic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Es, van D.S.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Group 6 (W, Mo) metal carbide catalysts are promising alternatives to hydrodesulfurization (NiMo, CoMo) catalysts and group 10 (Pd) type catalysts in the deoxygenation of vegetable fats/oils. Herein, we report a comparison of carbon nanofiber-supported W2C and Mo2C catalysts on activity,

  15. Preparation of Mesoporous Silica-Supported Palladium Catalysts for Biofuel Upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Fei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the preparation of two hydrocracking catalysts Pd/CoMoO4/silica and Pd/CNTs/CoMoO4/silica (CNTs, carbon nanotubes. The structure, morphologies, composition, and thermal stability of catalysts were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The catalyst activity was measured in a Parr reactor with camelina fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs as the feed. The analysis shows that the palladium nanoparticles have been incorporated onto mesoporous silica in Pd/CoMoO4/silica or on the CNTs surface in Pd/CNTs/CoMoO4/silica catalysts. The different combinations of metals and supports have selective control cracking on heavy hydrocarbons.

  16. Facile construction of novel CoMoO4 microplates@CoMoO4 microprisms structures for well-stable supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewen Geng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple and controllable strategy has been developed to fabricate CoMoO4 microplates/CoMoO4 microprisms (CMCMs structures on Ni foam via a facile, cost-effective, two-step hydrothermal route. The as-grown 3D architecture exhibited excellent areal capacitance of 4.33 F cm−2 at a galvanostatic charge-discharge current density of 50 mA cm−2 (6 A g−1 and outstanding cycle performance with only 2.8% degradation over 6500 cycles in the 3 M KOH solution. The asymmetric all-solid-state supercapacitors based on activated carbon (AC and CMCMs exhibited much better electrochemical performance than the symmetric counterpart, showing an areal capacitance of 95.22 mF cm−2 at the current density of 12 mA cm−2 and excellent cycling stability with 92.27% of the initial capacitance after 5000 cycles. These results may provide useful guidelines for materials selection and configuration designs for the novel energy storage devices based on CoMoO4 components and substrates.

  17. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2001-01-01

    This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO(sub 2). During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO(sub 2) partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO(sub 2) partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO(sub 2). Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al(sub 2)O(sub 3) catalysts under conditions of high CO(sub 2) partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H(sub 2)S that is required in the feed

  18. A Polyoxovanadate-Resorcin[4]arene-Based Porous Metal-Organic Framework as an Efficient Multifunctional Catalyst for the Cycloaddition of CO2 with Epoxides and the Selective Oxidation of Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bing-Bing; Yang, Jin; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2017-10-02

    In this work, we report a new polyoxovanadate-resorcin[4]arene-based metal-organic framework (PMOF), [Co 2 L 0.5 V 4 O 12 ]·3DMF·5H 2 O (1), assembled with a newly functionalized wheel-like resorcin[4]arene ligand (L). 1 features an elegant porous motif and represents a rare example of PMOFs composed of both a resorcin[4]arene ligand and polyoxovanadate. Remarkably, 1 shows open V sites in the channel, which makes 1 an efficient heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst for the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide to epoxides with high conversion and selectivity. Strikingly, 1 also exhibits high catalytic activity for the heterogeneous oxidative desulfurization of sulfides. Particularly, the heterogeneous catalyst 1 can be easily separated and reused with good catalytic activity.

  19. Selenium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  20. The combined removal of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide via an electro-reactor process using a low concentration of continuously regenerable Ag(II) active catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuraman, Govindan; Chung, Sang Joon; Moon, Il Shik

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Simultaneous removal of H 2 S and CH 3 SH was achieved at electro-reactor. → Active catalyst Ag(II) perpetually regenerated in HNO 3 medium by electrochemical cell. → CH 3 SH destruction follows two reaction pathways. → H 2 S induced destruction of CH 3 SH has identified. → Low concentration of active Ag(II) (12.5 x 10 -4 mol L -1 ) is enough for complete destruction. - Abstract: In this study, an electrocatalytic wet scrubbing process was developed for the simultaneous removal of synthetic odorous gases namely, methyl mercaptan (CH 3 SH) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). The initial process consists of the absorption of CH 3 SH and H 2 S gases by an absorbing solution, followed by their mediated electrochemical oxidation using a low concentration of active Ag(II) in 6 M HNO 3 . Experiments were conducted under different reaction conditions, such as CH 3 SH and H 2 S loadings, active Ag(II) concentrations and molar flow rates. The cyclic voltammetry for the oxidation of CH 3 SH corroborated the electro-reactor results, in that the silver in the 6 M HNO 3 reaction solution significantly influences the oxidation of CH 3 SH. At a low active Ag(II) concentration of 0.0012 M, the CH 3 SH removal experiments demonstrated that the CH 3 SH degradation was steady, with 100% removal at a CH 3 SH loading of 5 g m -3 h -1 . The electro-reactor and cyclic voltammetry results indicated that the removal of H 2 S (100%) follows a mediated electrocatalytic oxidation reaction. The simultaneous removal of 100% of the CH 3 SH and H 2 S was achieved, even with a very low active Ag(II) concentration (0.0012 M), as a result of the high efficiency of the Ag(II). The parallel cyclic voltammetry results demonstrated that a process of simultaneous destruction of both CH 3 SH and H 2 S follows an H 2 S influenced mediated electrocatalytic oxidation. The use of a very low concentration of the Ag(II) mediator during the electro-reactor process is promising for the complete

  1. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  2. Recent STM, DFT and HAADF-STEM studies of sulfide-based hydrotreating catalysts: Insight into mechanistic, structural and particle size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, Flemming; Brorson, M.; Clausen, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The present article will highlight some recent experimental and theoretical studies of both unpromoted MoS2 and promoted Co-Mo-S and NiMo-S nanostructures. Particular emphasis will be given to discussion of our scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (I)FT), and high...... and support effects which play an important role in practical HDS. Recent STM studies have shown that MoS2 clusters below 2-3 nm may exhibit new structural and electronic properties, and a large variety of size-dependent structures have been identified. In view of the large structure sensitivity......-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) studies which have provided insight into the detailed atomic structure. In accordance with earlier theoretical studies, the experimental studies show that the Ni-Mo-S structures may in some instances differ from the Co...

  3. Hydroprocessing catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.

    1992-08-01

    Co-Mo and Ni-Mo hydroprocessing catalysts were examined for their activity in removal of sulfur from thiophene in model compounds, and in the cracking and hydrocracking of cumene. Three types of support materials were examined: carbon, modified carbon, and carbon covered alumina. The objective of the study was to examine the correlation between catalyst activity in the hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds, and the resistance of the catalyst to nitrogen poisoning during use in the hydroprocessing of gas oils. The use of model compound testing provided information on the individual catalytic reactions promoted by those materials. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study surface species on the catalysts and to explain many of the trends in activity observed, revealing the role of fluoride and phosphorus as a secondary promoter. Testing of the catalysts in hydrotreating of gas oils allowed comparison of model compound results with those from a real feedstock. The gas oil was also spiked with a model nitrogen compound and the results from catalytic hydrotreating of this material were compared with those from unspiked material. A key finding was that the carbon supported catalysts were the most effective in treating high-nitrogen feeds. The very favorable deactivation properties of carbon and carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts make these promising from an industrial point of view where catalyst deactivation is a limiting factor. 171 refs., 25 figs., 43 tabs.

  4. Effect of H2S on Pyridine HDN over Ir, Mo and Ir-Mo/Al2O3 Sulfide Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vít, Zdeněk; Cinibulk, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 1 (2002), s. 43-49 ISSN 0133-1736 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072103 Keywords : HDN * Mo sulfide * iridium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.398, year: 2002

  5. Phase transformation in rapidly quenched Fe-Cr-Co-Mo-Ti-Si-B alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, D. G.; Shubakov, V. S.; Zhukova, E. Kh; Gorshenkov, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The research results of phase transformations in Fe-24Cr-16Co-3Mo-0.2Ti-1Si-B alloys (with a boron content of 1 to 3% by mass) obtained by rapid quenching are presented. The structure formation regularities during the melt spinning and during the subsequent crystallization annealing in rapidly quenched bands of the Fe-Cr-Co-Mo-Ti-Si-B system alloys were studied. The changes in the phase composition of the rapidly quenched Fe-Cr-Co-Mo-Ti- Si-B system alloys after quenching at various quench rates and at different boron concentrations in the alloys are studied. It is shown that during crystallization from an amorphous state, at temperatures above 570 °C, in addition to the α-phase, the σ-phase appears first, followed by the γ-phase. Heat treatment of rapidly quenched bands to high-coercive state was carried out. A qualitative assessment of magnetic properties in a high-coercivity state was carried out. An evaluation of the level of magnetic properties in a high-coercivity state allows us to conclude that the application of a magnetic field during crystallization from an amorphous state leads to anisotropy of the magnetic properties, that is, an anisotropic effect of thermo-magnetic treatment is detected.

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesized of CoMoO4 Microspheres as Excellent Electrode Material for Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weixia; Wang, Xianwei; Hu, Yanchun; Sun, Lingyun; Gao, Chang; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Han; Duan, Meng

    2018-04-01

    The single-phase CoMoO4 was prepared via a facile hydrothermal method coupled with calcination treatment at 400 °C. The structures, morphologies, and electrochemical properties of samples with different hydrothermal reaction times were investigated. The microsphere structure, which consisted of nanoflakes, was observed in samples. The specific capacitances at 1 A g-1 are 151, 182, 243, 384, and 186 F g-1 for samples with the hydrothermal times of 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h, respectively. In addition, the sample with the hydrothermal time of 12 h shows a good rate capability, and there is 45% retention of initial capacitance when the current density increases from 1 to 8 A g-1. The high retain capacitances of samples show the fine long-cycle stability after 1000 charge-discharge cycles at current density of 8 A g-1. The results indicate that CoMoO4 samples could be a choice of excellent electrode materials for supercapacitor.

  7. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H2 evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu2MoS4 nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu2MoS4nanosheets. These layered Cu2MoS4 nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H2 production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H2 production rates by using Cu2MoS4 loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  8. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Developed Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} nanosheets as co-catalysts. • Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} as active replacements for precious noble metal. • Controlled charge recombination for use in photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution. • Obtained superior rate of H{sub 2} production by using Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} loaded CdS nanorods. - Abstract: Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H{sub 2}) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4}nanosheets. These layered Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H{sub 2} production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H{sub 2} production rates by using Cu{sub 2}MoS{sub 4} loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  9. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor Model Compounds over Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts: Influence of Support, H2S and Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Pintos, Delfina Garcia

    value, acidity and stability [1,2]. Upgrading ofcondensed pyrolysis oil is challenged by severe polymerization and coking upon heating. Instead, it is proposed toperform pyrolysis in the presence of hydrogen and an HDO catalyst for immediate stabilization and upgrading ofreactive pyrolysis products...

  10. Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, C.F.; Hanshaw, M.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Malik, T.; Kooiman, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed

  11. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR: a useful tool for evaluating bovine leukemia virus infection status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimba Mayuko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infects cattle worldwide, imposing a severe economic impact on the dairy cattle industry. Recently, we developed a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR method using Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo primers to measure the proviral load of known and novel BLV variants in BLV-infected animals. Indeed, the assay was highly effective in detecting BLV in cattle from a range of international locations. This assay enabled us to demonstrate that proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection capacity as assessed by syncytium formation, but also with BLV disease progression. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of our BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR method for detecting BLV proviruses with the sensitivities of two real-time PCR systems, and also determined the differences of proviral load with serotests. Results BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR was found to be highly sensitive when compared with the real-time PCR-based TaqMan MGB assay developed by Lew et al. and the commercial TaKaRa cycleave PCR system. The BLV copy number determined by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR was only partially correlated with the positive rate for anti-BLV antibody as determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, passive hemagglutination reaction, or agar gel immunodiffusion. This result indicates that, although serotests are widely used for the diagnosis of BLV infection, it is difficult to detect BLV infection with confidence by using serological tests alone. Two cattle were experimentally infected with BLV. The kinetics of the provirus did not precisely correlate with the change in anti-BLV antibody production. Moreover, both reactions were different in cattle that carried different bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3 genotypes. Conclusions Our results suggest that the quantitative measurement of proviral load by BLV-CoCoMo

  12. Improved electrochemical performances of binder-free CoMoO4 nanoplate arrays@Ni foam electrode using redox additive electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerasubramani, Ganesh Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sang Jae

    2016-02-01

    Herein, we are successfully prepared cobalt molybdate (CoMoO4) grown on nickel foam as a binder free electrode by hydrothermal approach for supercapacitors and improved their electrochemical performances using potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) as redox additive. The formation of CoMoO4 on Ni foam with high crystallinity is confirmed using XRD, Raman, and XPS measurements. The nanoplate arrays (NPAs) of CoMoO4 are uniformly grown on Ni foam which is confirmed by FE-SEM analysis. The prepared binder-free CoMoO4 NPAs achieved maximum areal capacity of 227 μAh cm-2 with KOH electrolyte at 2.5 mA cm-2. This achieved areal capacity is further improved about three times using the addition of K3Fe(CN)6 as redox additive. The increased electrochemical performances of CoMoO4 NPAs on Ni foam electrode via redox additive are discussed in detail and the mechanism has been explored. Moreover, the assembled CoMoO4 NPAs on Ni foam//activated carbon asymmetric supercapacitor device with an extended operating voltage window of 1.5 V exhibits an excellent performances such as high energy density and cyclic stability. The overall performances of binder-free CoMoO4 NPAs on Ni foam with redox additives suggesting their potential use as positive electrode material for high performance supercapacitors.

  13. In situ electropolymerization of polyaniline/cobalt sulfide decorated carbon nanotube composite catalyst toward triiodide reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yaoming; Wang, Wei-Yan; Chou, Shu-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Wu; Lin, Jeng-Yu

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we report a composite film composed of the cobalt sulfide (CoS1.097) nanoclusters/multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposites (MWCNT@CoS1.097) embedded polyaniline (PANI) film (denoted as PANI/MWCNT@CoS1.097) by an in situ electropolymerization onto a fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate as a counter electrode (CE) for Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) for the first time. The extensive cyclic voltammograms (CVs) and electrochemical impedance measurements show the PANI/MWCNT@CoS1.097 CE with an enhanced electrocatalytic activity for I3- reduction compared to PANI and MWCNT@CoS1.097 CEs. Moreover, the peak current densities of the PANI/MWCNT@CoS1.097 CE show no sign of degradation after consecutive 200 CV tests, suggesting its great chemical and electrochemical stability. Furthermore, the DSC based on the in situ electropolymerized PANI/MWCNT@CoS1.097 CE achieves an improved photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 7.02%, which is higher than those of the DSCs with PANI CE (6.06%) and with MWCNT@CoS1.097 CE (5.54%), and is even comparable to that of the DSC using the Pt CE (7.16%). Therefore, the PANI/MWCNT@CoS1.097 CE can be regarded as a promising alternative CE for Pt-free DSCs.

  14. Ternary CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}/RGO electrocatalyst with CoMoS phase for efficient hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan-Ru; Shang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Gao, Wen-Kun [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Dong, Bin, E-mail: dongbin@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Chi, Jing-Qi; Li, Xiao; Yan, Kai-Li; Chai, Yong-Ming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liu, Yun-Qi, E-mail: liuyq@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liu, Chen-Guang [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Ternary CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}/RGO with CoMoS phase as electrocatalyst for HER was prepared. • CoMoS phase have the metallic nature and highly intrinsic activity for HER. • RGO support ensures good distribution of CoMoS phase and enhances the conductivity. • The introduction of CoMoS and RGO may be a novel strategy for efficient HER of MoS{sub 2}. - Abstract: CoMoS phase with metallic character plays crucial role on enhancing the activity of MoS{sub 2} electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, only Co atoms located in the edges of MoS{sub 2} can create CoMoS phase, so it is a challenge to obtain CoMoS phase with homogeneous distribution limited by the layered MoS{sub 2} and doping method of Co. Herein, we reported a simple one-pot hydrothermal method to prepare novel ternary CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}/RGO with CoMoS phase for HER using reduced graphene oxide (RGO) as support. XPS proves the formation of CoMoS phase, implying the enhanced activity for HER. RGO support ensures the well distribution of CoMoS phase and enhances the conductivity of CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}/RGO. Compared to CoS{sub 2}/RGO, MoS{sub 2}/RGO and CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}, the obtained CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}/RGO shows superior activity for HER with an onset overpotential of −80 mV (vs. RHE), small Tafel slope of 56 mV dec{sup −1}, high exchange current density of 11.4 μA cm{sup −2} and rigid electrochemical durability. The enhanced performances for HER may be ascribed to the formation of CoMoS phase with high activity and the existence of RGO support with good electrical conductivitys in ternary CoS{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2}/RGO. Therefore, the introduction of CoMoS phase and RGO into MoS{sub 2} could effectively enhance electrocatalytic properties for HER.

  15. Catalytic hydrotreatment of coal-derived naphtha using commercial catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, S.-J.; Keogh, R.A.; Thomas, G.A.; Davis, B.H. (University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research)

    Naphtha samples derived from the liquefaction of a bituminous Illinois No. 6 and a subbituminous Black Thunder coal were hydrotreated using commercial Co-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], and Ni-W/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts. It was easier to remove the N, O and S heteroatoms from Illinois No. 6 naphtha than from the Black Thunder naphtha. Nitrogen and oxygen were more difficult to remove than sulfur in the temperature range 200-400[degree]C. Considerable differences in catalyst activity for the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reactions were observed. The Ni-Mo catalyst was found to be the most active catalyst for the HDN and HDO reactions and the least active catalyst for the HDS. The Co-Mo catalyst was the most active catalyst for the sulfur removal. For the Illinois No. 6 naphtha, a first-order reaction applies for the HDN and HDO reactions for all three catalysts. However, for the Black Thunder naphtha, the first-order reaction applies only at the lower space velocities; a large deviation is observed at higher space velocities. 11 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Sulfur bonding in MoS2 and Co-Mo-S structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Line Sjolte; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure and bonding in small MoS2 structures with and without Co is studied theoretically using self-consistent density functional theory with a non-local exchange-correlation energy. The structures model the catalysts used extensively in hydrotreating. We study in detail the structure...... study the energy required to form sulfur vacancies, which are believed to be the active sites for many hydrotreating reactions. The presence of Co atoms at the edges is shown to lead to a significant lowering of the metal-sulfur binding energy. This imposes an increase in the concentration of active...

  17. Hydrodeoxygenation of coal using organometallic catalyst precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephen R.

    2002-04-01

    coals. Trends within the data were similar to those reported by other authors. Based on the conclusions from both the model compound studies and the coal analysis, predictions were made of the catalyst precursors' performance in the HDO of the three selected coals. It was concluded that CoMo-T2 is a desirable catalyst precursor for the HDO of coals (particularly low-rank coals), but that an optimum set of conditions must be determined to take full advantage of its HDO ability. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. Pt-based Bi-metallic Monolith Catalysts for Partial Upgrading of Microalgae Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, Adeniyi [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States); Manganaro, James [Anasyn LLC, Princeton, NJ (United States); Goodall, Brian [Valicor Renewables LLC, Dexter, MI (United States); Farrauto, Robert [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-03-24

    catalysts, and consumes less hydrogen, if methanation can be mitigated. Our methanation data on Pt and Rh indicate effective suppression of methanation. Our data also show that our catalysts are less susceptible to coking; and unlike NiMo and CoMo, precious metal catalysts are not deactivated by water, a by-product of HDO of algae oil. Finally, our catalysts do not need to be sulfided to be active. A rigorous techno-economic analysis of our process for commercial scale production of 10,000 barrels per day of hydrotreated algae oil, with nutraceuticals co-product claiming only 0.05% of the raw algae oil, indicates an estimated plant gate price of ~$10/gal. Sensitivity analysis shows that critical parameters affecting sale price include (1) algae doubling time (2) biomass oil content (3) CAPEX, and (4) moisture content of post extracted algae residue. Modest improvements in these areas will result in enhanced and competitive economics. Based on a life cycle assessment for greenhouse gas emission, we found that if algae oil replaced 10% of the US consumption, this would result in a CO2e reduction of 210,000 tons per day. Improving the drying process for animal feed by 50% would result in further significant reduction in CO2e.

  19. Sulfur deactivation of fatty ester hydrogenolysis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brands, D.S.; U-A-Sai, G.; Poels, E.K.; Bliek, A. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-08-15

    Trace organosulfur compounds present as natural impurities in oleochemical feedstocks may lead to activation of copper-containing catalysts applied for hydrogenolysis of esters toward fatty alcohols. In this paper, the sulfur deactivation of Cu/SiO{sub 2} and Cu/ZnO/SiO{sub 2} catalysts was studied in the liquid-phase hydrogenolysis of methyl palmitate. The rate of deactivation is fast and increases as a function of the sulfur-containing compound present: octadecanethiol {approx} dihexadecyl disulfide < benzyl isothiocyanate < methyl p-toluene sulfonate < dihexadecyl sulfide < dibenzothiophene. The rapid deactivation is caused by the fact that sulfur is quantitatively removed from the reaction mixture and because mainly surface sulfides are formed under hydrogenolysis conditions. The life time of a zinc-promoted catalyst is up to two times higher than that of the Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, most likely due to zinc surface sulfide formation. The maximum sulfur coverage obtained after full catalyst deactivation with dibenzothiophene and dihexadecyl sulfide--the sulfur compounds that cause the fastest deactivation--may be as low as 0.07. This is due to the fact that decomposition of these compounds as well as the hydrogenolysis reaction itself proceeds on ensembles of copper atoms. Catalyst regeneration studies reveal that activity cannot be regained by reduction or combined oxidation/reduction treatments. XRD, TPR, and TPO results confirm that no distinct bulk copper or zinc sulfide or sulfate phases are present.

  20. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  1. Coaxial CoMoO4 nanowire arrays with chemically integrated conductive coating for high-performance flexible all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaping; Liu, Borui; Liu, Qi; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhanshuang; Jing, Xiaoyan; Liu, Lianhe

    2015-09-01

    Flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors have offered promising applications as novel energy storage devices based on their merits, such as small size, low cost, light weight and high wearability for high-performance portable electronics. However, one major challenge to make flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors depends on the improvement of electrode materials with higher electrical conductivity properties and longer cycling stability. In this article, we put forward a simple strategy to in situ synthesize 1D CoMoO4 nanowires (NWs), using highly conductive CC and an electrically conductive PPy wrapping layer on CoMoO4 NW arrays for high performance electrode materials. The results show that the CoMoO4/PPy hybrid NW electrode exhibits a high areal specific capacitance of ca. 1.34 F cm-2 at a current density of 2 mA cm-2, which is remarkably better than the corresponding values for a pure CoMoO4 NW electrode of 0.7 F cm-2. An excellent cycling performance of nanocomposites of up to 95.2% (ca. 1.12 F cm-2) is achieved after 2000 cycles compared to pristine CoMoO4 NWs. In addition, we fabricate flexible all-solid-state ASC which can be cycled reversibly in the voltage range of 0-1.7 V, and exhibits a maximum energy density of 104.7 W h kg-1 (3.522 mW h cm-3), demonstrating great potential for practical applications in flexible energy storage electronics.Flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors have offered promising applications as novel energy storage devices based on their merits, such as small size, low cost, light weight and high wearability for high-performance portable electronics. However, one major challenge to make flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors depends on the improvement of electrode materials with higher electrical conductivity properties and longer cycling stability. In this article, we put forward a simple strategy to in situ synthesize 1D CoMoO4 nanowires (NWs), using highly conductive CC and an electrically conductive PPy wrapping layer on

  2. Enhanced electrochemical performance of CoMoO4 nanorods/reduced graphene oxide as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ting; Zhang, Haonan; Luo, Yazi; Mei, Lin; Guo, Di; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Facile, green and large scale synthesis method. • CoMoO 4 nanorods possess small diameter (about 40∼60 nm in width and 1.5∼2 μm in length) and uniformly distributed on reduced graphene oxide. • CoMoO 4 nanorods/reduced graphene oxide composite delivered high initial discharge capacity (1496 mA h g −1 at a current density of 100 mA g −1 ), and good cycling (628 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles) and rate performance (a reversible capacity of 372 mA h g −1 at the rate of 5 A g −1 ). - Abstract: CoMoO 4 nanorods with small diameter (about 40∼60 nm in width and 1.5∼2 μm in length) uniformly distributed on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets were synthesized via a facile, green wet chemical method. The as-prepared CoMoO 4 /rGO composite was studied as anode material for lithium-ion batteries. It delivered an initial discharge capacity of 1496 mA h g −1 at a current density of 100 mA g −1 , and good cycling (628 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles) and rate performance (a reversible capacity of 372 mA h g −1 at the rate of 5 A g −1 ). The excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to the small diameter of the synthesized CoMoO 4 nanorods and the presence of rGO nanosheets, making it a promising candidate for next generation anode material of rechargeable lithium ion batteries

  3. Influences of species of metals and supports on the hydrogenation activity of carbon-supported metal sulfides catalysts; Tanso biryushi tanji shokubai no suisoka kassei ni taisuru kassei kinzoku oyobi tantaishu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakanishi, K.; Hasuo, H.; Taniguchi, H.; Nagamatsu, T.; Mochida, I. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study

    1996-10-28

    In order to design catalysts suitable for primary liquefaction stage and secondary upgrading stage respectively in the multi-stage liquefaction process, various carbon-supported catalysts were prepared. Catalytic activities of them were investigated for the hydrogenation of 1-methylnaphthalene, to discuss the influences of metals and carbon species on the catalytic activity. Various water soluble and oil soluble Mo and Ni salts were used for NiMo supported catalysts. Among various carbon supports, Ketjen Black (KB) was effective for preparing the catalyst showing the most excellent hydrogenation activity. The KB and Black Pearl 2000 (BP2000) showing high hydrogenation activity were fine particles having high specific surface area more than 1000 m{sup 2}/g and primary particle diameter around 30 nm. This was inferred to contribute to the high dispersion support of active metals. Since such fine particles of carbon exhibited hydrophobic surface, they were suitable for preparing catalysts from the methanol-soluble metals. Although Ni and Mo added iron-based catalysts provided lower aromatic hydrogenation activity, they exhibited liquefaction activity competing with the NiMo/KB catalyst. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. NO formation during burnoff of spent hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Zaitlin, L.; Laugher, R. (CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Laboratories)

    1993-11-01

    Temperature-programmed oxidation (from room temperature to 600[degree]C) was performed on operating forms of aged CoMo (extrudate) and NiMo (chestnut bur-like) as well as powder forms, with continuous on-line analysis for NO, CO, CO[sub 2] and SO[sub 2]. For all catalysts, NO formation was delayed by that of CO and CO[sub 2], indicating either a strong interaction of nitrogen-containing compounds with the catalyst surface or a lower reactivity of nitrogen during burnoff compared with that of carbon. The existence of diffusion effects during burnoff was quite evident. These effects were influenced by the catalyst structure and the level of catalyst deactivation. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Hydrotreating catalyst deactivation by coke from SRC-II oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kumata, F.; Massoth, F.E.

    1988-10-01

    Samples of a CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst were partially deactivated with SRC-II feed in an autoclave reactor to give coked samples of 5 to 18% C. The coked catalysts were analyzed for surface area, pore volume, coronene adsorption and diffusivity, and their catalytic activity determined for hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and C-N hydrogenolysis (CNH) using model compounds. All of the above measurements decreased with increase in coke content. Property data indicate that some pores are blocked by coke and diffusivity results show narrowing of pore mouths with increasing coke content. Catalyst deactivation versus coke level was identical for HDS and HDO, but less for CNH. A simple model of coke deactivation was developed to relate activity to coke content. Coke is envisioned as forming wedge-like deposits in the catalyst pores. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Mild Hydroprocessing with Dispersed Catalyst of Highly Asphaltenic Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isquierdo, Fernanda

    Asphaltene are known to have diverse negative impacts on heavy oil extraction and hydroprocessing. This research then, explores the optimal conditions to convert asphaltenes into lighter material using mild conditions of pressure and temperature, and investigates changes in asphaltene structure during hydroprocessing. Feedstock and products were characterized by Simulated Distillation, Microdeasphalting, Sulfur content, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Solid catalysts were analyzed by Themogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and Dynamic light scattering. Based on the results obtained from X-ray diffraction and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis a mechanism for the asphaltene hydroprocessing at mild conditions is proposed in which the alky peripheric portion from the original asphaltenes is partially removed during the reaction. The consequence of that process being an increase in the stacking of the aromatics sheets in the remaining asphaltenes. Also, this study investigates different for ultradispersed catalyst compositions, where CoWS, CoMoS, NiWS, FeWS, NiMo/NaHFeSi 2O6 and NaHFeSi2O6 showed a high asphaltene conversion as determined by asphaltene microdeasphalting, FeMoS and NaHFeSi 2O6 presented a high Vacuum Residue as determined by distillation (SIMDIST) analysis conversion, and in terms of sulfur removal CoMoS gave the higher conversion. In addition, all the catalyst tested showed a coke production lower than 1%. Finally, a kinetic study for the pitch hydroprocessing using CoMoS as catalysts gave a global activation energy of 97.3 kJ/mol.

  7. Enhancement of thermoelectric power factor of Sr2CoMoO6 double perovskite by annealing in reducing atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Khagesh; Saxena, Mandvi; Maiti, Tanmoy

    2017-10-01

    In general, n-type thermoelectric materials are rather difficult to design. This study particularly pivoted on designing potential environmentally benign oxides based n-type thermoelectric material. We synthesized Sr2CoMoO6 (SCMO) polycrystalline ceramics via the solid-state synthesis route. XRD, SEM, and thermoelectric measurements were carried out for phase constitution, microstructure analysis, and to determine its potential for thermoelectric applications. As-sintered SCMO sample showed an insulator like behavior till 640 °C after which it exhibited an n-type non-degenerate semiconductor behavior followed by a p-n type conduction switching. To stabilize a high temperature n-type behavior, annealing of SCMO in reducing atmosphere (H2) at 1000 °C was carried out. After annealing, the SCMO demonstrated an n-type semiconductor behavior throughout the temperature range of measurement. The electrical conductivity (σ) and the power factor (S2σ) were found to be increased manifold in the annealed SCMO double perovskite.

  8. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  9. Catalytic hydrotreatment of Illinois No. 6 coal-derived naphtha: comparison of molybdenum nitride and molybdenum sulfide for heteroatom removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raje, A.; Liaw, S.J.; Chary, K.V.R.; Davis, B.H. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1995-03-16

    The hydrotreatment of naphtha derived from Illinois No. 6 coal was investigated using molybdenum sulfide and nitride catalysts. The two catalysts are compared on the basis of total catalyst weight. Molybdenum sulfide is more active than molybdenum nitride for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of a coal-derived naphtha. The rate of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the naphtha over both catalysts are comparable. For hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), the sulfide is more active than the nitride only at higher temperatures ({gt}325{degree}C). Based upon conversion data, the naphtha can be lumped into a reactive and a less reactive fraction with each following first-order kinetics for heteroatom removal. The HDS and HDN rates and activation energies of the less reactive lump are smaller for the nitride than for the sulfide catalyst.

  10. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  11. Sr{sub 2}CoMoO{sub 6} anode for solid oxide fuel cell running on H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [Engineering Research Center of Nano-GEO Materials of Education Ministry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Texas Materials Institute, ETC 9.102, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Huang, Yun-Hui [Texas Materials Institute, ETC 9.102, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Jin-Guang; Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, ETC 9.102, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Mao, Zong-Qiang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The double perovskite Sr{sub 2}CoMoO{sub 6-{delta}} was investigated as a candidate anode for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the cation array is retained to 800 C in H{sub 2} atmosphere with the introduction of a limited concentration of oxide-ion vacancies. Stoichiometric Sr{sub 2}CoMoO{sub 6} has an antiferromagnetic Neel temperature T{sub N} {approx} 37 K, but after reduction in H{sub 2} at 800 C for 10 h, long-range magnetic order appears to set in above 300 K. In H{sub 2}, the electronic conductivity increases sharply with temperature in the interval 400 C < T < 500 C due to the onset of a loss of oxygen to make Sr{sub 2}CoMoO{sub 6-{delta}} a good mixed oxide-ion/electronic conductor (MIEC). With a 300-{mu}m-thick La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.83}Mg{sub 0.17}O{sub 2.815} (LSGM) as oxide-ion electrolyte and SrCo{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} as the cathode, the Sr{sub 2}CoMoO{sub 6-{delta}} anode gave a maximum power density of 1017 mW cm{sup -2} in H{sub 2} and 634 mW cm{sup -2} in wet CH{sub 4}. A degradation of power in CH{sub 4} was observed, which could be attributed to coke build up observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). (author)

  12. Structure and properties of porous TiNi(Co, Mo)-based alloy produced by the reaction sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhova, Nadezda; Yasenchuk, Yuriy; Chekalkin, Timofey; Gunther, Victor; Kim, Ji-Soon; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2016-10-01

    Modern medical technologies have developed many new devices that can be implanted into humans to repair, assist or take the place of diseased or defective bones, arteries and even organs. The materials, especially porous ones, used for these devices have evolved steadily over the past twenty years with TiNi-based alloys replacing stainless steels and titanium. The aim of the paper is to presents results for examination of porous TiNi(Co,Mo)-based alloys intended further to be used in clinical practice. The structure and properties of porous TiNi-based alloys obtained by reaction sintering of Ti and Ni powders with additions of Co and Mo have been studied. It has been shown that alloying additions both Co and Mo inhibit the compaction of nickel powders in the initial stage of sintering. The maximum irreversible strain of porous samples under loading in the austenitic state is fixed with the Co addition, and the minimum one is fixed with the Mo addition. The Co addition leads to the fact that the martensite transformation in the TiNi phase becomes close to a one-step, and the Mo addition leads to the fact that the martensite transformation becomes more uniform. Both Co and Mo lead to an increase in the maximum accumulated strain as a result of the formation of temperature martensite. The additional increase in the maximum accumulated strain of the Ti50Ni49Co1 alloy is caused by decreased resistance of the porous Ni γ -based mass during the load.

  13. Hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using a novel organometallic catalyst-precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, S.R.; Song, C.S.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-09-05

    Compounds containing oxygen functional groups, especially phenols, are undesirable components of coal-derived liquids. Removal of these compounds from the products of coal liquefaction is required. A beneficial alternative would be the removal of these compounds, or the prevention of their formation, during the liquefaction reaction itself, rather than as a separate processing step. A novel organometallic catalyst precursor containing Co and Mo has been studied as a potential hydrogenation catalyst for coal liquefaction. To ascertain the hydrodeoxygenation activity of this catalyst under liquefaction conditions, model compounds were investigated. Anthrone, 2,6-di-r-btuyl-4-methyl-phenol, dinaphthyl ether and xanthene were reacted in the presence of the Co-Mo catalyst precursor and a precursor containing only Mo over a range of temperatures, providing a comparison of conversions to deoxygenated products. These conversions give an indication of the hydrodeoxygenating abilities of organometallic catalyst precursors within a coal liquefaction system. For example, at 400{degree}C dinaphthyl ether was converted 100% (4.5% O-containing products) in the presence of the Co-Mo organometallic precursor, compared to 76.5% conversion (7.4% O-products) in the presence of the Mo catalyst.

  14. Understanding hydrodenitrogenation on novel unsupported sulfide Mo-W-Ni catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, J.; Hrabar, A.; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2011-07-01

    WNi, NiMo and Mo-W-Ni unsupported catalysts were synthesized, characterized and tested with respect to their hydrodenitrogenation properties using o-propylaniline as test reactant. The bimetallic oxide precursors are crystalline metallates, whereas the trimetallic materials are amorphous. In the sulfide form, the catalysts are mixtures of agglomerated Mo(W)S{sub 2} and Ni sulfides. The performance of all catalysts is similar, suggesting the same nature of active sites regardless the composition. Due to the lack of correlation between activity and density of coordinatively unsaturated sites of the catalysts, two kinds of active sites are proposed, i.e. coordinatively unsaturated sites and electron rich sites at the edges of the sulfides. (orig.)

  15. Dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization over Ru promoted alumina based catalysts using in situ generated hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Yaseen; Lu Yingzhou; Shen Chong; Li Chunxi

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out in a temperature range of 320-400 o C using in situ generated hydrogen coupled with the effect of selected organic additives for the first time. Four kinds of alumina based catalysts i.e. Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 , Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 , Ru-Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 and Ru-Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 were used for the desulfurization process, which were prepared following incipient impregnation method with fixed metal loadings (wt.%) of Co, Ni, Mo and Ru. The surface area, average pore diameter and pore volume distribution of the fresh and used catalysts were measured by N 2 adsorption using BET method. Catalytic activity was investigated in a batch autoclave reactor in the complete absence of external hydrogen gas. Addition and mutual reaction of specific quantities of water and ethanol provided the necessary in situ hydrogen for the desulfurization reaction. Organic additives like diethylene glycol (DEG), phenol, naphthalene, anthracene, o-xylene, tetralin, decalin and pyridine did impinge the HDS activity of the catalysts in different ways. Liquid samples from reaction products were quantitatively analyzed by HPLC technique while qualitative analyses were made using GC-MS. Both of these techniques showed that Ni-based catalysts were more active than Co-based ones at all conditions. Moreover, incorporation of Ru to both Co and Ni-based catalysts greatly promoted desulfurization activity of these catalysts. DBT conversion of up to 84% was achieved with Ru-Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst at 380 o C temperature for 11 h. Catalyst systems followed the HDS activity order as: Ru-Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 > Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 > Ru-Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 > Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 at all conditions. Cost effectiveness, mild operating conditions and reasonably high catalytic activity using in situ generated hydrogen mechanism proved our process to be useful for HDS of DBT.

  16. Dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization over Ru promoted alumina based catalysts using in situ generated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Yaseen; Shen, Chong; Li, Chunxi [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Lu, Yingzhou [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Catalytic hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out in a temperature range of 320-400 C using in situ generated hydrogen coupled with the effect of selected organic additives for the first time. Four kinds of alumina based catalysts i.e. Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ru-Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for the desulfurization process, which were prepared following incipient impregnation method with fixed metal loadings (wt.%) of Co, Ni, Mo and Ru. The surface area, average pore diameter and pore volume distribution of the fresh and used catalysts were measured by N{sub 2} adsorption using BET method. Catalytic activity was investigated in a batch autoclave reactor in the complete absence of external hydrogen gas. Addition and mutual reaction of specific quantities of water and ethanol provided the necessary in situ hydrogen for the desulfurization reaction. Organic additives like diethylene glycol (DEG), phenol, naphthalene, anthracene, o-xylene, tetralin, decalin and pyridine did impinge the HDS activity of the catalysts in different ways. Liquid samples from reaction products were quantitatively analyzed by HPLC technique while qualitative analyses were made using GC-MS. Both of these techniques showed that Ni-based catalysts were more active than Co-based ones at all conditions. Moreover, incorporation of Ru to both Co and Ni-based catalysts greatly promoted desulfurization activity of these catalysts. DBT conversion of up to 84% was achieved with Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at 380 C temperature for 11 h. Catalyst systems followed the HDS activity order as: Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Ru-Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at all conditions. Cost effectiveness, mild operating conditions and reasonably high catalytic activity using in situ generated hydrogen mechanism proved our process to be useful for HDS of DBT. (author)

  17. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  18. Recycling of spent hydroprocessing catalysts: EURECAT technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrebi, G.; Dufresne, P.; Jacquier, Y. (EURECAT-European Reprocessing Catalysts, La Voulte sur Rhone (France))

    1994-04-01

    Disposal of spent catalyst is a growing concern for all refiners. Environmental regulations are becoming stricter and stricter and there are State recommendations to develop disposal routes which would emphasize recycling as much as possible, and processing the wastes as near as possible to the production center. In this context, EURECAT has developed a recycling process for the hydroprocessing catalysts used in the oil refineries (NiMo, CoMo, NiW on alumina or mixed alumina silica). The process starts with a regeneration of the catalyst to eliminate hydrocarbons, carbon and sulfur. After a caustic roasting, the material is leached to obtain a solution containing mainly molybdenum (or tungsten) and vanadium, and a solid containing essentially alumina, cobalt and/or nickel. Molybdenum and vanadium are separated by an ion exchange resin technique. The solid is processed in an arc furnace to separate the alumina. Nickel and cobalt are separated by conventional solvent extraction to obtain pure metal. Alumina is disposed of as an inert slag. The strength of the process lies in the combination of proven technologies applied by companies whose reliability in their respective field is well known. The aspects concerning spent catalyst handling, packaging and transport are also discussed. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. On the role of acidity in amorphous silica-alumina based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poduval, D.G.

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silica-alumina (ASA) is widely used as a solid acid catalyst or as a carrier for well-dispersed metal sulfide or metal catalysts. They are often involved in hydrocracking catalyst formulations, especially so when the aim is to produce middle distillates from heavy oil fractions. With

  20. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    -earth exchanged Y zeolite in a silica-alumina matrix. X-ray fluorescence analyses showed that the rare earths used in preparing the catalysts were a mixture of lanthanum and cerium. Antimony found in the spent catalyst was added during operation of the FCC unit as a way to suppress the adverse effects of deposited nickel. The fresh HDS samples consisted of sulfided nickel and molybdenum on an alumina support. The spent catalyst showed nearly 10% vanadium on the catalyst and a modest increase in nickel and sulfur on the catalyst as a result of operations. Hydrocracking catalysts were not available for this study.

  1. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  2. Hierarchical honeycomb-like Co3O4 pores coating on CoMoO4 nanosheets as bifunctional efficient electrocatalysts for overall water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhihao; Xu, Li; Xu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Efficient electrocatalytic water splitting is one of the most effective ways to solve the global energy crisis. In this paper, we report on a novel self-assembled hierarchical structure of Co3O4/CoMoO4 grown in situ on a bare nickel foam. The unique, three-dimensional honeycomb-like Co3O4 pores were constructed from one-dimensional nanowires and coated on two-dimensional CoMoO4 nanosheets structures grown on nickel foam. The synthesis involved a step-wise solvothermal method followed by an annealing treatment. Benefiting from the synergistic effect of the hierarchical nanostructures, the materials had more reaction active sites and a smaller electron transfer impedance, and they exhibited excellent electrocatalytic performances for the HER and OER of 143 and 244 mV, respectively, at 10 mA cm-2 in an alkaline solution. Furthermore, the materials remained stable during the long electrolysis period, over 10 h, presenting promising application prospects in the field of electrocatalytic water splitting.

  3. Rational Synthesis of Branched CoMoO4@CoNiO2 Core/Shell Nanowire Arrays for All-Solid-State Supercapacitors with Improved Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuanfei; Geng, Xuewen; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Zhiming M; Shen, Guozhen

    2015-11-04

    Effectively composite materials with optimized structures exhibited promising potential in continuing improving the electrochemical performances of supercapacitors in the past few years. Here, we proposed a rational design of branched CoMoO4@CoNiO2 core/shell nanowire arrays on Ni foam by two steps of hydrothermal processing. Owing to the high activity of the scaffold-like CoMoO4 nanowires and the well-defined CoNiO2 nanoneedles, the three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures achieved remarkable electrochemical performances with high areal specific capacitance (5.31 F/cm(2) at 5 mA/cm(2)) and superior cycling stability(159% of the original specific capacitance, i.e., 95.7% of the maximum retained after 5000 cycles at 30 mA/cm(2)). The all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors composed of such electrode and activated carbon (AC) exhibited an areal specific capacitance of 1.54 F/cm(2) at 10 mA/cm(2) and a rate capability (59.75 Wh/kg at a 1464 W/kg) comparable with Li-ion batteries. It also showed an excellent cycling stability with no capacitance attenuation after 50000 cycles at 100 mA/cm(2). After rapid charging (1 s), such supercapacitors in series could lighten a red LED for a long time and drive a mini motor effectively, demonstrating advances in energy storage, scalable integrated applications, and promising commercial potential.

  4. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  5. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  6. Elucidating the Origin of Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Activity in Mono- and Bimetallic Metal- and Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Catalysts (Me-N-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraei, Ali; Moradabadi, Ashkan; Martinaiou, Ioanna; Lauterbach, Stefan; Klemenz, Sebastian; Dolique, Stephanie; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Kaghazchi, Payam; Kramm, Ulrike I

    2017-08-02

    In this work, we present a comprehensive study on the role of metal species in MOF-based Me-N-C (mono- and bimetallic) catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The catalysts are investigated with respect to HER activity and stability in alkaline electrolyte. On the basis of the structural analysis by X-ray diffraction, X-ray-induced photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, it is concluded that MeN 4 sites seem to dominate the HER activity of these catalysts. There is a strong relation between the amount of MeN 4 sites that are formed and the energy of formation related to these sites integrated at the edge of a graphene layer, as obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our results show, for the first time, that the combination of two metals (Co and Mo) in a bimetallic (Co,Mo)-N-C catalyst allows hydrogen production with a significantly improved overpotential in comparison to its monometallic counterparts and other Me-N-C catalysts. By the combination of experimental results with DFT calculations, we show that the origin of the enhanced performance of our (Co,Mo)-N-C catalyst seems to be provided by an improved hydrogen binding energy on one MeN 4 site because of the presence of a second MeN 4 site in its close vicinity, as investigated in detail for our most active (Co,Mo)-N-C catalyst. The outstanding stability and good activity make especially the bimetallic Me-N-C catalysts interesting candidates for solar fuel applications.

  7. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.324, year: 2016

  8. Electron transfer to sulfides:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Ana Belen; Antonello, Sabrina; Arevalo, Maria Carmen; Maran, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of characterizing the steps associated with the dissociative reduction of sulfides has been addressed. The electrochemical reduction of diphenylmethyl para-methoxyphenyl sulfide in N,N-dimethylformamide, on both glassy carbon and mercury electrodes, was chosen as a test system. The electrode process involves the slow heterogeneous outer-sphere electron transfer to the sulfide, the fast cleavage of the C-S bond, the reduction of the ensuing carbon radical, and the self-protonation triggered by the generation of the strong base Ph 2 CH - . The latter reaction is rather slow, in agreement with the large intrinsic barriers characterizing proton transfers between CH-acids and carbon bases. The dissociative reduction was studied in the presence of an exogenous acid. The results, obtained by convolution analysis, point to a stepwise DET mechanism in which the ET step is accompanied by rather large reorganization energy. Similar results were obtained on both electrode materials. Analysis of the heterogeneous electron transfer and associated C-S bond cleavage indicate that the reduction of this and other sulfides lies between the stepwise dissociative electron transfers leading to the formation of stiff π* radical anions and those going through the intermediacy of loose σ* radical anions

  9. Sythesis of metal sulfide nanomaerials via thermal decomposition of single-source percursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Zeid, Tahani W.; Yang, Peidong; Mokari, Taleb

    2010-06-03

    In this report, we present a synthetic method for the formation of cuprous sulfide (Cu2S) and lead sulfide (PbS) nanomaterials directly on substrates from the thermolysis of single-source precursors. We find that the final morphology and arrangement of the nanomaterials may be controlled through the concentration of the dissolved precursors and choice of solvent. One-dimensional (1-D) morphologies may also be grown onto substrates with the addition of a metal catalyst layer through solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. These synthetic techniques may be expanded to other metal sulfide materials.

  10. Structural, electrical and magnetic studies of Co:SnO{sub 2} and (Co,Mo):SnO{sub 2} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalui, S., E-mail: ssdalui@fc.ul.pt [University of Lisbon, Physics Dept. and ICEMS, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and ICEMS, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Rout, S. [University of Lisbon, Physics Dept. and ICEMS, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Silvestre, A.J. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa and ICEMS, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Lavareda, G. [New University of Lisbon, Mater. Sci. Dept. and CTS, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pereira, L.C.J. [Instituto Superior Técnico, ITN and CFMCUL, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Brogueira, P. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Physics Dept. and ICEMS, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Conde, O. [University of Lisbon, Physics Dept. and ICEMS, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-08-01

    Here we report on the structural, optical, electrical and magnetic properties of Co-doped and (Co,Mo)-codoped SnO{sub 2} thin films deposited on r-cut sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Substrate temperature during deposition was kept at 500 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the undoped and doped films are crystalline with predominant orientation along the [1 0 1] direction regardless of the doping concentration and doping element. Optical studies revealed that the presence of Mo reverts the blue shift trend observed for the Co-doped films. For the Co and Mo doping concentrations studied, the incorporation of Mo did not contribute to increase the conductivity of the films or to enhance the ferromagnetic order of the Co-doped films.

  11. The structure of well defined SiO2 supported MoO3 clusters during sulfidation : an in situ EXAFS-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de M.; Dillen, van A.J.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Geus, J.W.; Kuroda, H.; Ohta, T.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfidation of a well defined MoO3/SiO2 catalyst has been examd. by means of TPS, EXAFS, and TEM. The oxidic clusters in a 5.6 wt% MoO3/SiO2 catalyst are transformed into almost completely sulfided particles (MoOxSy) by O-S exchange at RT. A molybdenum-sulfido particle that resembles the MoS3

  12. The Effect of gamma-Al2O3, TiO2, and ZrO2 Supports on Hydrodesulfurization Activity of Transition-Metal Sulfides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, 8-9 (2008), s. 945-955 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP104/06/P034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrodesulfurization * transition metal sulfides * sulfide catalysts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2008

  13. Spent catalyst waste management. A review. Part 1. Developments in hydroprocessing catalyst waste reduction and use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, M.; Stanislaus, A. [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109-Safat (Kuwait)

    2008-04-15

    Solid catalysts containing metals, metal oxides or sulfides, which play a key role in the refining of petroleum to clean fuels and many other valuable products, become solid wastes after use. In many refineries, the spent catalysts discarded from hydroprocessing units form a major part of these solid wastes. Disposal of spent hydroprocessing catalysts requires compliance with stringent environmental regulations because of their hazardous nature and toxic chemicals content. Various options such as minimizing spent catalyst waste generation by regeneration and reuse, metals recovery, utilization to produce useful materials and treatment for safe disposal, could be considered to deal with the spent catalyst environmental problem. In this paper, information available in the literature on spent hydroprocessing catalyst waste reduction at source by using improved more active and more stable catalysts, regeneration, rejuvenation and reuse of deactivated catalysts in many cycles, and reusing in other processes are reviewed in detail with focus on recent developments. Available methods for recycling of spent hydroprocessing catalysts by using them as raw materials for the preparation of active new catalysts and many other valuable products are also reviewed. (author)

  14. Communicating catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-06-01

    The beauty and activity of enzymes inspire chemists to tailor new and better non-biological catalysts. Now, a study reveals that the active sites within heterogeneous catalysts actively cooperate in a fashion phenomenologically similar to, but mechanistically distinct, from enzymes.

  15. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation on phosphides and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S Ted; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2005-02-17

    The mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of 2-methylpiperidine was studied over a silica-supported nickel phosphide catalyst (Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/P = 1/2) and a commercial Ni-Mo-S/Al2O3 catalyst in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 450-600 K. Analysis of the product distribution as a function of contact time indicated that the reaction proceeded in both cases predominantly by a substitution mechanism, with a smaller contribution of an elimination mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the 2-methylpiperidine indicated that at reaction conditions a piperidinium ion intermediate was formed on both the sulfide and the phosphide. It is concluded that the mechanism of HDN on nickel phosphide is very similar to that on sulfides. The mechanism on the nickel phosphide was also probed by comparing the reactivity of piperidine and several of its derivatives in the presence of 3000 ppm S. The relative elimination rates depended on the structure of the molecules, and followed the sequence: 4-methylpiperidine approximately piperidine > 3-methylpiperidine > 2,6-dimethylpiperidine > 2-methylpiperidine. [Chemical structure: see text] This order of reactivity was not dependent on the number of alpha-H or beta-H atoms in the molecules, ruling out their reaction through a single, simple mechanism. It is likely that the unhindered piperidine molecules reacted by an S(N)2 substitution process and the more hindered 2,6-dimethylpiperidine reacted by an E2 elimination process.

  16. PGAA method for control of the technologically important elements at processing of sulfide ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, B.I.; Aripov, G.A.; Allamuratova, G.; Umaraliev, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Many precious elements (Au, Re, Pt, Pd, Ag, Cu, Ni, Co, Mo) in ores mainly exist in the form of sulfide minerals and the flotation method is often used for processing of such kind of ores. To enhance the efficiency of the process it is very important to carry out the operative control of the elements of interest at various stages of ore processing. In this work the results of studies for developing methods for control of technologically important elements at processing and enrichment sulfide ores, which content the gold, copper, nickel, molybdenum in the ore-processing plants of Uzbekistan. The design of transportable experimental PGAA device on the basis of low-power radionuclide neutron source ( 252 Cf) with neutrons of 2x10 7 neutr/sec allowing to determine element content of the above named ores and their processing products is offered. It is shown that the use of the thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectrometry in real samples and technological products allows prompt determination of such elements as S, Cu, Ti and others, which are important for flotation of sulfide ores. Efficiency control of the flotation processing of sulfide ores is based on quick determination of the content of sulfur and some other important elements at different stages of the process. It was found that to determine elements the following gamma lines are the most suitable - 840.3 keV for sulfur, 609 keV and 7307 keV for copper and 1381.5 keV, 1498.3 keV and 1585.3 keV for titanium. Based on the measurements of original ores, concentrates of various stages of flotation and flotation slime the possibility for prompt determination of S, Cu and Ti content and thus to get necessary information on the efficiency of the flotation process was shown. (author)

  17. Lunar CATALYST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  18. Reactivity of non conventional supported mixed sulfides for hydro-treatment reactions; Reactivite de sulfures mixtes supportes non conventionnels pour les reactions d`hydrotraitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quartararo, J

    1996-11-07

    The properties of non conventional NiM sulfides (M: Mn, Fe, Cu,Zn, Re, Ru) was evaluated for two hydro treating reactions: hydro desulfurization (HDS) of dibenzo thiophene and benzo thiophene and hydrogenation (HYD) of cyclohexyl. The reactions were t first studied on Ni, Mo and NiMo sulfide catalysts. The influence of the nature of the molecule on the magnitude of promoting effect was demonstrated. The non conventional mono-metallic and bimetallic catalysts studied in this work were characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Ni exhibits a negative effect on the activity of Mn, Cu, Zn and Re sulfide catalysts. This effect could be related to the formation of two separated sulfide phases: base metal sulfide and nickel sulfide. Nevertheless, a promoting effect was found in NiRu catalyst. In this catalyst, the Ru and the Ni are in a mixed phase. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of the type of metal associated to the nickel for the promoting effect and relate this effect to the formation of a mixed phase. (author)

  19. Detection of the BLV provirus from nasal secretion and saliva samples using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2: Comparison with blood samples from the same cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Kitamura-Muramatsu, Yuri; Saito, Susumu; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Nakano, Miwa; Haga, Satoshi; Matoba, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Ayumu; Murakami, Hironobu; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-02

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induces enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease in cattle. Sero-epidemiological studies show that BLV infection occurs worldwide. Direct contact between infected and uninfected cattle is thought to be one of the risk factors for BLV transmission. Contact transmission occurs via a mixture of natural sources, blood, and exudates. To confirm that BLV provirus is detectable in these samples, matched blood, nasal secretion, and saliva samples were collected from 50 cattle, and genomic DNA was extracted. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2, an assay developed for the highly sensitive detection of BLV, was then used to measure the proviral load in blood (n=50), nasal secretions (n=48), and saliva (n=47) samples. The results showed that 35 blood samples, 14 nasal secretion samples, and 6 saliva samples were positive for the BLV provirus. Matched blood samples from cattle that were positive for the BLV provirus (either in nasal secretion or saliva samples) were also positive in their blood. The proviral load in the positive blood samples was >14,000 (copies/1×10(5) cells). Thus, even though the proviral load in the nasal secretion and saliva samples was much lower (blood, prolonged direct contact between infected and healthy cattle may be considered as a risk factor for BLV transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MAGNETO-CHEMICAL CHARACTER STUDIES OF NOVEL Fe CATALYSTS FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty A. Akundi; Jian H. Zhang; A.N. Murty; S.V. Naidu

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are: (1) To synthesize iron catalysts: Fe/MoO{sub 3}, and Fe/Co/MoO{sub 3} employing two distinct techniques: Pyrolysis with organic precursors and Co-precipitation of metal nitrates; (2) To investigate the magnetic character of the catalysts before and after exposure to CO and CO+H{sub 2} by (a) Mossbauer study of Iron (b) Zerofield Nuclear Magnetic Resonance study of Cobalt, and (c) Magnetic character of the catalyst composite; (3) To study the IR active surface species of the catalyst while stimulating (CO--Metal, (CO+H{sub 2})--Metal) interactions, by FTIR Spectroscopy; and (4) To analyze the catalytic character (conversion efficiency and product distribution) in both direct and indirect liquefaction Process and (5) To examine the correlations between the magnetic and chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of our investigation on (a) the effect of metal loading (b) the effect of intermetallic ratio and (c) the effect of catalyst preparation procedure on (i) the magnetic character of the catalyst composite (ii) the IR active surface species of the catalyst and (iii) the catalytic yields for three different metal loadings: 5%, 15%, and 25% (nominal) for three distinct intermetallic ratios (Fe/Co = 0.3, 1.5, 3.0).

  1. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  2. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  3. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  4. Process for the regeneration of metallic catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzer, James R.; Windawi, Hassan

    1981-01-01

    A method for the regeneration of metallic hydrogenation catalysts from the class consisting of Ni, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Ru poisoned with sulfur, with or without accompanying carbon deposition, comprising subjecting the catalyst to exposure to oxygen gas in a concentration of about 1-10 ppm. intermixed with an inert gas of the group consisting of He, A, Xe, Kr, N.sub.2 and air substantially free of oxygen to an extent such that the total oxygen molecule throughout is in the range of about 10 to 20 times that of the hydrogen sulfide molecular exposure producing the catalyst poisoning while maintaining the temperature in the range of about 300.degree. to 500.degree. C.

  5. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  6. Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1983-01-14

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

    1983-01-01

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

  8. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  9. Sputtered catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyerman, W.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for preparing a supported catalyst by a sputtering process. A material that is catalytic, or which is a component of a catalytic system, is sputtered on to the surface of refractory oxide particles that are compatible with the sputtered material and the sputtered particles are consolidated into aggregate form. The oxide particles before sputtering should have a diameter in the range 1000A to 50μ and a porosity less than 0.4 ml/g, and may comprise MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 or mixtures of these oxides, including hydraulic cement. The particles may possess catalytic activity by themselves or in combination with the catalytic material deposited on them. Sputtering may be effected epitaxially and consolidation may be effected by compaction pelleting, extrusion or spray drying of a slurry. Examples of the use of such catalysts are given. (U.K.)

  10. Report of liquefaction catalyst study meeting (March 1996); Ekika shokubai kentokai hokoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Studied in the research are four iron-based catalysts, which are natural pyrite, synthetic iron sulfide, synthetic iron hydroxide, and catalyst-attached carbon. Tanito Harum coal is treated in a 0.01t/d-capable continuous operation furnace (once-through) under conditions of 450 degrees C and 170kgf/cm{sup 2} with catalyst addition of 1.0, 3.0wt% (catalyst-attached carbon 0.6, 1.0wt%), and a liquid yield of 41.5-48.6wt%-daf coal is achieved. A higher yield results when more catalyst is added. The same yield as achieved by the addition of 3wt% natural pyrite is obtained by the addition of 1.9wt% synthetic iron sulfide, 1.5wt% of synthetic iron hydroxide, or 0.7wt% catalyst-attached coal. The catalyst cost for treating a ton of coal is 4-9 hundred yen, which is far more expensive than the cost set forth as the target. Catalysts whose production process embodiment is now under study are natural pyrite and synthetic iron sulfide, and studies for others are just preliminary. Provided that the practical application of the liquefaction technology realizes in about 2000, then the petroleum price is predicted to be 23 dollars per barrel. Coal liquefaction products will have to be produced at a cost which will enable competition with the said petroleum price. (NEDO)

  11. Effect of Ni on the characteristics and hydrogenation activity of sulfide Mo/γ-Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachtl, E.; Wuttke, E.; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogenation of phenanthrene was explored on sulfide Mo/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts promoted with increasing concentrations of Ni. The characterization of the materials was done by N 2 -physisorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, temperature programmed sulfidation and NO adsorption experiments. Increasing loading of Ni improves the dispersion of MoS 2 species; however, at Ni/(Mo+Ni) molar ratio higher than 0.5, segregation of Ni-sulfides is observed. The presence of Ni also facilitates the sulfidation of oxidic catalyst precursors by lowering the reduction temperature of Mo species. In the sulfide catalysts, Ni changes the structure of MoS 2 leading to shorter slabs with higher stacking degree than on Mo/γ-Al 2 O 3 , and increases the concentration of coordinatively unsaturated sites. The kinetic results (increased hydrogenation rate and changed reaction network in the presence of Ni) suggest that a highly active kind of active site is created by Ni promotion. (orig.)

  12. A model compound (methyl oleate, oleic acid, triolein) study of triglycerides hydrodeoxygenation over alumina-supported NiMo sulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumans, A.E.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    We studied hydrodeoxygenation of model compounds for vegetable oil into diesel-range hydrocarbons on a sulfided NiMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst under trickle-flow conditions. Methyl oleate (methyl ester of oleic acid, a C18 fatty acid with one unsaturated bond in the chain) represented the C18 alkyl esters in

  13. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  14. Sulfide-conducting solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, L.A.; Shirokova, G.I.; Murin, I.V.; Ushakova, Yu.N.; Fominykh, E.G.; Lyalina, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Feasibility of sulfide transfer in phases on the basis of BaZrS 3 and MLn 2 S 4 ( M = Ca, Ba; Ln = La, Y, Tm, Nd, Sm, Pr) is considered. Solid solution regions on the basis of ternary compounds are determined. Systematic study of the phases is carried out making use of the methods of conductometry, emf in chemical concentration chains without/with transfer, potentiostatic chronoamperometry. Possible mechanism of defect formation during successive alloying of ternary sulfides by binary ones in suggested [ru

  15. An introduction to catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  16. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  17. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  18. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  19. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  20. Transition-Metal-Free Highly Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfoxides under Mild Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient transition-metal-free catalytic system Br2/NaNO2/H2O has been developed for a robust and economic acid-free aerobic oxidation of sulfides. It is noteworthy that the sulfide function reacts under mild conditions without over-oxidation to sulfone. The role of NaNO2as an efficient NO equivalent for the activation of molecular oxygen was identified. Under the optimal conditions, a broad range of sulfide substrates were converted into their corresponding sulfoxides in high yields by molecular oxygen. The present catalytic system utilizes cheap and readily available agents as the catalysts, exhibits high selectivity for sulfoxide products and releases only innocuous water as the by-products.

  1. A review of metal recovery from spent petroleum catalysts and ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcil, Ata; Vegliò, Francesco; Ferella, Francesco; Okudan, Mediha Demet; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2015-11-01

    With the increase in environmental awareness, the disposal of any form of hazardous waste has become a great concern for the industrial sector. Spent catalysts contribute to a significant amount of the solid waste generated by the petrochemical and petroleum refining industry. Hydro-cracking and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts are extensively used in the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. The catalysts used in the refining processes lose their effectiveness over time. When the activity of catalysts decline below the acceptable level, they are usually regenerated and reused but regeneration is not possible every time. Recycling of some industrial waste containing base metals (such as V, Ni, Co, Mo) is estimated as an economical opportunity in the exploitation of these wastes. Alkali roasted catalysts can be leached in water to get the Mo and V in solution (in which temperature plays an important role during leaching). Several techniques are possible to separate the different metals, among those selective precipitation and solvent extraction are the most used. Pyrometallurgical treatment and bio-hydrometallurgical leaching were also proposed in the scientific literature but up to now they did not have any industrial application. An overview on patented and commercial processes was also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Organic-inorganic hybrid polyionic liquid based polyoxometalate as nano porous material for selective oxidation of sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Ezzat; Shahebrahimi, Shabnam

    2017-07-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid nano porous materials based on poly(ionic liquid)-polyoxometalate (PIL-POM) were reported. These hybrid materials were synthesized by the reaction of 4-vinyl pyridine with 1,3-propanesultone, followed by the polymerization and also sulfonate-functionalized cross-linked poly(4-vinylpyridine) and combining these polymers with H5PMo10V2O40 (PMo10V2). Activity of prepared PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids were investigated as catalysts for oxidation of sulfides with H2O2 as oxidant. For understanding catalytic activities of the PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids in oxidation of sulfides, effect of catalyst composition, substrate, and reaction conditions were studied. The results show that the PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids are active as selective heterogeneous catalysts for oxidation of sulfides and can be recovered and reused. The catalyst was characterized by FT-IR, TGA-DSC, XRD, SEM/EDX, BET, CV and zeta potential measurement. Also, average molecular weight of prepared catalysts were measured.

  3. Report on the research achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1992. Studies on a direct gasification catalyst; 1992 nendo chokusetsu ekika shokubai ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the research achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1992 in studies on a direct gasification catalyst. The paper summarizes the points where the catalyst research has reached to date. The catalyst surface effective for hydrogenation is the metal surface that can dissociate hydrogen. However, metals having large adsorption heat against hydrogen do not show the activity greatly because these metals are difficult of desorbing hydrogen having high dissociating activity. The coal liquefaction system has the surface oxidized by water content, wherein hydrogen dissociation cannot be expected, and sulfides are suitable. When a sulfide catalyst contacts hydrogen, the catalyst itself is desulfurized, producing H{sub 2}S and becomes a low-order sulfide. When atmospheric H{sub 2}S contacts this sulfide, it dissociates into HS and H, and this H behaves as active hydrogen. However, the liquefaction activity can be recognized even in a sulfuric acid type catalyst containing no sulfide whatsoever, wherein the H{sub 2}S partial pressure in the reaction system becomes extremely low. This fact means that the active hydrogen is not necessarily generated by the dissociation of H{sub 2}S. There is no other way but to think that hydrogen is dissociated directly without going through H{sub 2}S. If this is true, it provides a new guideline in developing and designing the future catalysts. (NEDO)

  4. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Diaz-Garcia, L.; Cortez de la Paz, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS x catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts

  5. Novel Metal Sulfides to Achieve Effective Capture and Durable Consolidation of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-30

    This report documents the work done under NEUP grant to examine the capability of novel chalcogels and some binary metal chalcogenides as a host matrix for the capture of gaseous iodine and the feasibility of their iodine-laden materials to be converted into a permanent waste form. The presented work was conducted over last two years. A number of novel chalcogels Zn2Sn2S6, Sb4Sn4S12, NiMoS4, CoMoS4, antimony sulfide (SbSx) chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogels and binary metal sulfides (Sb2S3) were developed and studies for their iodine absorption efficacies. A new and simple route was devised for the large scale preparation of antimony sulfide chalcogel. The chalcogel was obtained by treating Sb2S3 with Na2S in the presence of water followed by addition of formamide. The obtained gels have a low-density sponge like network of meso porous nature having BET surface area of 125 m2/g. The chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogel and the binary metal sulfides were exposed to iodine vapors in a closed container. Silver-functionalized chalcogels and Sb2S3 powders showed iodine uptake up to 100 wt%, the highest iodine uptake of 200 wt% was observed for the SbS-III chalcogel. The PXRD patterns of iodine-laden specimens revealed that iodine shows spontaneous chemisorption to the matrix used. The iodine loaded chalcogels and the binary chalcogenides were sealed under vacuum in fused silica ampoules and heated in a temperature controlled furnace. The consolidated products were analyzed by PXRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The final products were found to be amorphous in most of the cases with high amount (~4-35 wt%) of iodine and aapproximately ~60- 90 % of the absorbed iodine could be consolidated into the final waste form. Alginate

  6. Novel Metal Sulfides to Achieve Effective Capture and Durable Consolidation of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri; Riley, Brian; Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the work done under NEUP grant to examine the capability of novel chalcogels and some binary metal chalcogenides as a host matrix for the capture of gaseous iodine and the feasibility of their iodine-laden materials to be converted into a permanent waste form. The presented work was conducted over last two years. A number of novel chalcogels Zn 2 Sn 2 S 6 , Sb 4 Sn 4 S 12 , NiMoS 4 , CoMoS 4 , antimony sulfide (SbS x ) chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogels and binary metal sulfides (Sb 2 S 3 ) were developed and studied for their iodine absorption efficacies. A new and simple route was devised for the large scale preparation of antimony sulfide chalcogel. The chalcogel was obtained by treating Sb 2 S 3 with Na 2 S in the presence of water followed by addition of formamide. The obtained gels have a low-density sponge-like network of meso-porous nature having BET surface area of 125 m 2 /g. The chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogel and the binary metal sulfides were exposed to iodine vapors in a closed container. Silver-functionalized chalcogels and Sb 2 S 3 powders showed iodine uptake up to 100 wt%, the highest iodine uptake of 200 wt% was observed for the SbS-III chalcogel. The PXRD patterns of iodine-laden specimens revealed that iodine shows spontaneous chemisorption to the matrix used. The iodine loaded chalcogels and the binary chalcogenides were sealed under vacuum in fused silica ampoules and heated in a temperature controlled furnace. The consolidated products were analyzed by PXRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The final products were found to be amorphous in most of the cases with high amount (∼4-35 wt%) of iodine and approximately ∼60- 90 % of the absorbed iodine could be consolidated into the final waste form. Alginate reinforced composite scaffolds with SbS/SnS chalcogels and Sb 2 S 3 bulk powder were also fabricated aiming to study their efficacy as host matrices in

  7. Mineral catalysis of oil producing reactions in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shridharani, K.G.

    1983-01-01

    This work was concerned primarily with the development of a relatively inexpensive, readily available, high activity catalyst that can be used as a disposable catalyst in coal liquefaction processes. For a fair evaluation of the developmental mineral catalyst (presulfided iron oxide), it was necessary to determine at different stages of this work, whether catalyst inhibition, deactivation or activity was the limiting factor in coal liquefaction catalysis. First, different routes were explored to prepare a high hydrogenation activity, iron-based catalyst. Naphthalene hydrogenation was used as a model reaction to rate the hydrogenation activities of different additives. Presulfiding of iron oxide with H/sub 2/S, under controlled conditions, rendered the highest hydrogenation activity mineral catalyst, which had a hydrogenation activity even greater than that of commercial CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst sulfided with creosote oil and hydrogen. Sulfiding of CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst with H/sub 2/S remarkably improved its initial hydrogenation activity. Second, the catalyst inhibition and deactivation during liquefaction were studied. Liquefaction-process solvents contain a number of compounds that can either deactivate or inhibit the hydrogenation activity of a catalyst. Finally, the hydrocracking activity of the presulfided iron oxide catalyst was compared with that of commercial catalysts, CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and low alumina FCC catalyst.

  8. MORE ACTIVE AND SULFUR RESISTANT BIMETALLIC Pd-Ni CATALYSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Betti, Carolina; Carrara, Nicolás; Badano, Juan; Lederhos, Cecilia; Vera, Carlos; Quiroga, Mónica

    2018-01-01

    The influence of the kind of metal precursor and the sequence of impregnation on the properties of Pd-Ni catalysts was evaluated during the test reaction of selective hydrogenation of styrene to ethylbenzene by means of physicochemical characterization. The focus was put on the final hydrogenating activity and the resistance to deactivation by sulfided compounds (thiophene). The used techniques of characterization were ICP, XPS, XDR, TPR, CO chemisorption and TEM. XPS results indicated the pr...

  9. Catalytic effects of various catalysts in hydroprocessing of Cold Lake vacuum bottom. Cold Lake zansayu no hydroprocessing ni okeru kakushu shokubai no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Maekawa, Y.; Kotanigawa, T. (Government Industrial Development Laboratory, Hokkaido, Sapporo (Japan))

    1991-11-07

    The effects of various types of catalysts were studied on hydroprocessing of Cold Lake vacuum bottom (CLVB). FeS2 [Py] of an analytical reagent grade was used as sulfide catalyst, Fe2O3(SO4)[sup 2[minus

  10. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchi Nenkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

  11. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  12. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... catalyst. The results from the screening were experimentally verified for CO hydrogenation, CO2 hydrogenation, and simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation by bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active and selective. The Co-Ni and Co-Fe systems were investigated for CO...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  13. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  14. Neutron diffraction investigations of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altorfer, F.

    1990-03-01

    Statics and dynamics of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide were investigated using the following experimental methods: elastic scattering on sodium sulfide powder in the temperature range 20 - 1000 C, elastic scattering on a lithium sulfide single crystal in the temperature range 20 - 700 C, inelastic scattering on a 7 Li 2 S single crystal at 10 K. 34 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  15. Hydrogenation of fructose to 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran using a sulfur poisoned Pt/C catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to expand the number of biobased chemicals available, fructose has been hydrogenated to 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran using a sulfided Pt/C catalyst. The reaction was carried out in a stirred reactor at 10.3 MPa H2 and 175°C which allowed a 10% fructose solution to be converted in about 2 h. ...

  16. Sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, Marina Fuser

    2001-01-01

    Alloys for use in high temperature environments rely on the formation of an oxide layer for their protection. Normally, these protective oxides are Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and, some times, SiO 2 . Many industrial gaseous environments contain sulfur. Sulfides, formed in the presence of sulfur are thermodynamically less stable, have lower melting points and deviate much more stoichiometrically, compared to the corresponding oxides. The mechanism of sulfidation of various metals is as yet not clear, in spite of the concerted efforts during the last decade. To help address this situation, the sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr has been studied as a function of compositional modifications and surface state of the alloy. The alloys Fe20Cr, Fe20Cr0.7Y, Fe20Cr5Al and Fe20Cr5Al0.6Y were prepared and three sets of sulfidation tests were carried out. In the first set, the alloys were sulfidized at 700 deg C and 800 deg C for 10h. In the second set, the alloys were pre-oxidized at 1000 deg C and then sulfidized at 800 deg C for up to 45h. In the third set of tests, the initial stages of sulfidation of the alloys was studied. All the tests were carried out in a thermobalance, in flowing H 2 /2%H 2 S, and the sulfidation behavior determined as mass change per unit area. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the reaction products. The addition of Y and Al increased sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr. The addition of Y altered the species that diffused predominantly during sulfide growth. It changed from predominant cationic diffusion to predominant anionic diffusion. The addition of Al caused an even greater increase in sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr, with the parabolic rate constant decreasing by three orders of magnitude. Y addition to the FeCrAl alloy did not cause any appreciable alteration in sulfidation resistance. Pre-oxidation of the FeCrAl and FeCrAlY alloys resulted in an extended

  17. Hydrodeoxygenation of aliphatic and aromatic oxygenates on sulphided catalysts for production of second generation biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senol, O.I.

    2007-07-01

    Environmental concerns and diminishing petroleum reserves have increased the importance of biofuels for traffic fuel applications. Second generation biofuels produced from wood, vegetable oils and animal fats have been considered promising for delivering biofuels in large amount with low production cost. The abundance of oxygen in the form of various aliphatic and aromatic oxygenates decreases the quality of biofuels, however, and therefore the oxygen content of biofuels must be reduced. Upgrading of biofuels can be achieved by hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), which is similar to hydrodesulphurisation in oil refining. In HDO, oxygen-containing compounds are converted to hydrocarbons by eliminating oxygen in the form of water in the presence of hydrogen and a sulphided catalyst. Due to the low sulphur content of biofuels, a sulphiding agent is typically added to the HDO feed to maintain activity and stability of the catalyst. The aim of this work was to investigate HDO using aliphatic and aromatic oxygenates as model compounds on sulphided NiMo/gamma-Al{sub 2}O3 and CoMo/gamma-Al{sub 2}O3 catalysts. The effects of side product, water, and of sulphiding agents, H{sub 2}S and CS{sub 2}, on HDO were determined. The primary focus was on the HDO of aliphatic oxygenates, because a reasonable amount of data regarding the HDO of aromatic oxygenates already exists. The HDO of aliphatic esters produced hydrocarbons from intermediate alcohol, carboxylic acid, aldehyde and ether compounds. A few sulphur-containing compounds were also detected in trace amounts, and their formation caused desulphurisation of the catalysts. Hydrogenation reactions and acid-catalysed reactions (dehydration, hydrolysis, esterification, E{sub 2} elimination and SN{sub 2} nucleophilic substitution) played a major role in the HDO of aliphatic oxygenates. The NiMo catalyst showed a higher activity for HDO and hydrogenation reactions than the CoMo catalyst, but both catalysts became deactivated because of

  18. Modeling of Syngas Reactions and Hydrogen Generation Over Sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamil Klier; Jeffery A. Spirko; Michael L. Neiman

    2002-09-17

    The objective of the research is to analyze pathways of reactions of hydrogen with oxides of carbon over sulfides, and to predict which characteristics of the sulfide catalyst (nature of metal, defect structure) give rise to the lowest barriers toward oxygenated hydrocarbon product. Reversal of these pathways entails the generation of hydrogen, which is also proposed for study. In this first year of study, adsorption reactions of H atoms and H{sub 2} molecules with MoS{sub 2}, both in molecular and solid form, have been modeled using high-level density functional theory. The geometries and strengths of the adsorption sites are described and the methods used in the study are described. An exposed MO{sup IV} species modeled as a bent MoS{sub 2} molecule is capable of homopolar dissociative chemisorption of H{sub 2} into a dihydride S{sub 2}MoH{sub 2}. Among the periodic edge structures of hexagonal MoS{sub 2}, the (1{bar 2}11) edge is most stable but still capable of dissociating H{sub 2}, while the basal plane (0001) is not. A challenging task of theoretically accounting for weak bonding of MoS{sub 2} sheets across the Van der Waals gap has been addressed, resulting in a weak attraction of 0.028 eV/MoS{sub 2} unit, compared to the experimental value of 0.013 eV/MoS{sub 2} unit.

  19. Effect of Ni on the characteristics and hydrogenation activity of sulfide Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schachtl, E.; Wuttke, E.; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center

    2012-07-01

    The hydrogenation of phenanthrene was explored on sulfide Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts promoted with increasing concentrations of Ni. The characterization of the materials was done by N{sub 2}-physisorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, temperature programmed sulfidation and NO adsorption experiments. Increasing loading of Ni improves the dispersion of MoS{sub 2} species; however, at Ni/(Mo+Ni) molar ratio higher than 0.5, segregation of Ni-sulfides is observed. The presence of Ni also facilitates the sulfidation of oxidic catalyst precursors by lowering the reduction temperature of Mo species. In the sulfide catalysts, Ni changes the structure of MoS{sub 2} leading to shorter slabs with higher stacking degree than on Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and increases the concentration of coordinatively unsaturated sites. The kinetic results (increased hydrogenation rate and changed reaction network in the presence of Ni) suggest that a highly active kind of active site is created by Ni promotion. (orig.)

  20. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  1. More active and sulfur resistant bimetallic Pd-Ni catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betti, Carolina; Carrara, Nicolás; Badano, Juan; Lederhos, Cecilia; Vera, Carlos; Quiroga, Mónica, E-mail: mquiroga@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catálisis y Petroquímica, INCAPE (FIQ-UNL, CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2018-02-15

    The influence of the kind of metal precursor and the sequence of impregnation on the properties of Pd-Ni catalysts was evaluated during the test reaction of selective hydrogenation of styrene to ethylbenzene by means of physicochemical characterization. The focus was put on the final hydrogenating activity and the resistance to deactivation by sulfide compounds (thiophene). The used techniques of characterization were ICP, XPS, XDR, TPR, CO chemisorption and TEM. XPS results indicated the presence of different Pd species: Pd{sup δ-}, Pd{sup 0} and Pd{sup δ+}. In the case of the Ni containing catalysts, Ni{sup 0} and NiO species were also detected. These palladium and nickel species would be responsible of the variation of activity and sulfur resistance of the catalysts. NiClPd catalysts had a higher resistance to deactivation by sulfur poisoning. This was associated to a higher concentration of Pd{sup η+}Cl{sub x}O{sub y} species that would prevent the adsorption of thiophene by both steric and electronic effects. It could also be due to the lower concentration of Pd{sup 0} and Ni{sup 0} on these catalysts, as compared to those shown by the PdNiCl catalysts. Both the Pd{sup 0} and Ni{sup 0} species are more prone to poisoning because of their higher electronic availability. (author)

  2. Controllable synthesis of hierarchical nickel cobalt sulfide with enhanced electrochemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Jinjin; Han, Jiaxi; Diao, Guiqiang; Liu, Jiwen; Xie, Zhuopeng; Cheng, Gao; Sun, Ming; Yu, Lin

    2018-03-01

    The composition of nickel cobalt sulfide has great influence on its electrochemical performance. Herein, the nickel cobalt sulfide with different composition and mixed phase were synthesized by one-step solvothermal method through changing the molar ratio of Ni to Co in the reaction system. The electrochemical measurements showed that the nickel cobalt sulfide with a theoretical molar ratio of Ni/Co to be 1.5:1.5 (NCS-2) demonstrates the superior pseudocapacitive performance with a high specific capacitance (6.47 F cm-2 at 10 mA cm-2) and a favorable Coulombic efficiency (∼99%). Whereas, when applied as the catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction in 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, the nickel cobalt sulfide with a theoretical molar ratio of Ni/Co is 1:2 (NCS-1) displays better catalytic activity, and it requires a relatively lower overpotential of 282 mV to deliver the current density of 10 mA cm-2.

  3. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  4. Ni-Based Catalysts for Low Temperature Methane Steam Reforming: Recent Results on Ni-Au and Comparison with Other Bi-Metallic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Venezia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Steam reforming of light hydrocarbons provides a promising method for hydrogen production. Ni-based catalysts are so far the best and the most commonly used catalysts for steam reforming because of their acceptably high activity and significantly lower cost in comparison with alternative precious metal-based catalysts. However, nickel catalysts are susceptible to deactivation from the deposition of carbon, even when operating at steam-to-carbon ratios predicted to be thermodynamically outside of the carbon-forming regime. Reactivity and deactivation by carbon formation can be tuned by modifying Ni surfaces with a second metal, such as Au through alloy formation. In the present review, we summarize the very recent progress in the design, synthesis, and characterization of supported bimetallic Ni-based catalysts for steam reforming. The progress in the modification of Ni with noble metals (such as Au and Ag is discussed in terms of preparation, characterization and pretreatment methods. Moreover, the comparison with the effects of other metals (such as Sn, Cu, Co, Mo, Fe, Gd and B is addressed. The differences of catalytic activity, thermal stability and carbon species between bimetallic and monometallic Ni-based catalysts are also briefly shown.

  5. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 degrees F. (1093 degrees C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 degrees F. (990:0083 degrees C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel

  6. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......: (1) impact of low viscous droplets of iron sulfide; and (2) sulfur diffusion. Previous research on the influence of pyrite on slagging focused on the decomposition of pyrite into pyrrhotite and especially on the oxidation stage of this product during impact on the heat transfer surfaces...

  7. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  8. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments....

  9. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  10. The functionalities of Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in simultaneous HDS and HDA reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.G. Baldovino-Medrano; Sonia A. Giraldo; Aristobulo Centeno [Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), Bucaramanga (Colombia). Centro de Investigaciones en Catalisis (CICAT)

    2008-08-15

    A Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was tested in simultaneous hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene and hydrodearomatization (HDA) of naphthalene reactions. Samples of it were subjected to different pretreatments: reduction, reduction-sulfidation, sulfidation with pure H{sub 2}S and non-activation. The reduced catalyst presented the best performance, even comparable to that of Co(Ni)Mo catalysts. All catalyst samples were selective to the HDS reaction over HDA, and to the direct desulfurization pathway of dibenzothiophene HDS over the hydrogenation reaction pathway of HDS. The effect of H{sub 2}S partial pressure on the functionalities of the reduced Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied. The results showed that an increase in H{sub 2}S partial pressure does not cause poisoning, but an inhibition effect, without changing the catalyst selectivity. Accordingly, the activity trends were ascribed to adsorption differences between the different reactive molecules over the same catalytic active site. TPR characterization along with a thermodynamics analysis showed that the active phase of reduced Pt/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is constituted by Pt{sup 0} particles. However, presulfidation of the catalyst leads to a mixture of PtS and Pt{sup 0}which has a negative effect on the catalytic performance without changing catalyst functionalities. 61 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  12. Metal catalysts fight back

    OpenAIRE

    George Marsh

    1998-01-01

    In recent years organometallic catalysts, especially metallocenes, have been a major focus of attention in terms of polymerisation chemistry. But the news earlier this year of a family of iron-based catalysts able to rival the effectiveness of both conventional and metallocene catalysts in the polymerisation of ethylene has excited the plastics industry. Because of the impact of this discovery and its potential as a route to lower-priced commodity plastics in the future, it may be useful at t...

  13. Permanganate oxidation of sulfur compounds to prevent poisoning of Pd catalysts in water treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Wedler, Dalia; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2008-08-01

    The practical application of Pd-catalyzed water treatment processes is impeded by catalyst poisoning by reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs). In this study, the potential of permanganate as a selective oxidant for the removal of microbially generated RSCs in water and as a regeneration agent for S-poisoned catalysts was evaluated. Hydrodechlorination using Pd/Al2O3 was carried out as a probe reaction in permanganate-pretreated water. The activity of the Pd catalysts in the successfully pretreated reaction medium was similar to that in deionized water. The catalyst showed no deactivation behavior in the presence of permanganate at a concentration level or = 0.08 mM, a significant but temporary inhibition of the catalytic dechlorination was observed. Unprotected Pd/Al2O3, which had been completely poisoned by sulfide, was reactivated by a combined treatment with permanganate and hydrazine. However, the anthropogenic water pollutants thiophene and carbon disulfide were resistant against permanganate. Together with the preoxidation of catalyst poisons, hydrophobic protection of the catalysts was studied. Pd/zeolite and various hydrophobically coated catalysts showed a higher stability against ionic poisons and permanganate than the uncoated catalyst. By means of a combination of oxidative water pretreatment and hydrophobic catalyst protection, we provide a new tool to harness the potential of Pd-catalyzed hydrodehalogenation for the treatment of real waters.

  14. Crossett Hydrogen Sulfide Air Sampling Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the EPA’s hydrogen sulfide air monitoring conducted along Georgia Pacific’s wastewater treatment system and in surrounding Crossett, AR, neighborhoods in 2017.

  15. Hydrogen production through microheterogeneous photocatalysis of hydrogen sulfide cleavage. The thiosulfate cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgarello, E; Serpone, N; Graetzel, M; Pelizzetti, E

    1985-01-01

    Cleavage of hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur occurs in alkaline aqueous CdS dispersions under visible light illumination. Small quantities of a noble metal catalyst (RuO/sub 2/) loaded onto 'naked' CdS particles markedly improve the yield of hydrogen formation. The effect of RuO/sub 2/ is ascribed to catalysis of electron transfer to proton. Simultaneous and efficient photogeneration of hydrogen and thiosulfate occurs in CdS dispersions containing both sulfite and bisulfide (or sulfide) ions. Electron transfer from the conduction band of CdS to that of TiO/sub 2/ particles occurs in alkaline suspensions containing these HS/sup -/ ions and has been exploited to improve the performance of a system achieving decomposition of H/sub 2/S by visible light. Equally important is a recent finding that the performance of a system containing 'naked' CdS in combination with RuO/sub 2/-loaded TiO/sub 2/ particles is far better than that of CdS/RuO/sub 2/ alone. Additionally, conduction band electrons produced by bandgap excitation of TiO/sub 2/ particles efficiently reduce thiosulfate to sulfide and sulfite. The valence band process in alklaine TiO/sub 2/ dispersions is thought to involve oxidation of S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/ to tetrathionate, S/sub 4/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/, which quantitatively dismutates into sulfite and thiosulfate. The photodriven disproportionation of thiosulfate into sulfide and sulfate is of great interest in systems that photochemically cleave hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur. (author).

  16. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  17. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  18. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  19. Locus-specific microemulsion catalysts for sulfur mustard (HD) chemical warfare agent decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallis, Ian A; Griffiths, Peter C; Cosgrove, Terence; Dreiss, Cecile A; Govan, Norman; Heenan, Richard K; Holden, Ian; Jenkins, Robert L; Mitchell, Stephen J; Notman, Stuart; Platts, Jamie A; Riches, James; Tatchell, Thomas

    2009-07-22

    The rates of catalytic oxidative decontamination of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chlororethyl) sulfide) and a range (chloroethyl) sulfide simulants of variable lipophilicity have been examined using a hydrogen peroxide-based microemulsion system. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), PGSE-NMR (pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR), fluorescence quenching, and electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) were implemented to examine the distribution of HD, its simulants, and their oxidation/hydrolysis products in a model oil-in-water microemulsion. These measurements not only present a means of interpreting decontamination rates but also a rationale for the design of oxidation catalysts for these toxic materials. Here we show that by localizing manganese-Schiff base catalysts at the oil droplet-water interface or within the droplet core, a range of (chloroethyl) sulfides, including HD, spanning some 7 orders of octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)), may be oxidized with equal efficacy using dilute (5 wt. % of aqueous phase) hydrogen peroxide as a noncorrosive, environmentally benign oxidant (e.g., t(1/2) (HD) approximately 18 s, (2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide, C(6)H(5)SCH(2)CH(2)Cl) approximately 15 s, (thiodiglycol, S(CH(2)CH(2)OH)(2)) approximately 19 s {20 degrees C}). Our observations demonstrate that by programming catalyst lipophilicity to colocalize catalyst and substrate, the inherent compartmentalization of the microemulsion can be exploited to achieve enhanced rates of reaction or to exert control over product selectivity. A combination of SANS, ESI-MS and fluorescence quenching measurements indicate that the enhanced catalytic activity is due to the locus of the catalyst and not a result of partial hydrolysis of the substrate.

  20. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  1. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  2. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  3. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  4. The use of mixed pyrrhotite/pyrite catalysts for co-liquefaction of coal and waste rubber tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadyburjor, D.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Sharma, R.K. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this research program is to determine the optimum processing conditions for tire/coal co-liquefaction. The catalysts used will be a ferric-sulfide-based materials, as well as promising catalysts from other consortium laboratories. The intent here is to achieve the maximum coal+tire conversion at the mildest conditions of temperature and pressure. Specific objectives include an investigation of the effects of time, temperature, pressure, catalyst and co-solvent on the conversion and product slate of the co-liquefaction. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  5. Recovery of Cobalt from leach solution of spent oil Hydrodesulphurization catalyst using a synergistic system consisting of VersaticTM10 and Cyanex®272

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Ramadhan, I. T.; Huda, M.

    2018-03-01

    Catalyst are often used in the petroleum refinery industry, especially cobalt-based catalyst such as CoMoX. Every year, Indonesia’s oil industry produces around 1350 tons of spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in which cobalt makes up for 7%wt. of them. Cobalt is a non-renewable and highly valuable resource. Taking into account the aforementioned reasons, this research was made to recover cobalt from spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst so that it can be reused by industries needing them. The methods used in the recovery of cobalt from the waste catalyst leach solution are liquid-liquid extraction using a synergistic system of VersaticTM 10 and Cyanex®272. Based on the experiments done using the aforementioned methods and materials, the optimum condition for the extraction process: concentration of VersaticTM 10 of 0.35 M, Cyanex®272 of 0.25 M, temperature of 23-25°C (room temperature), and pH of 6 with an extraction percentage of 98.80% and co-extraction of Ni at 93.51%.

  6. Effects of H2S and process conditions in the synthesis of mixed alcohols from syngas over alkali promoted cobalt-molybdenum sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Trane, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    pressures of H2 and CO are also investigated. With or without H2S in the feed the pre-sulfided catalyst requires an initiation period to reach a stabilized behavior, but the duration of this period depends upon the H2S level. Operation with a feed containing more than 103 ppmv H2S leads to a fairly rapid...... coverage and low hydrogen coverage. Hydrogen sulfide in the syngas feed generally promotes chain growth for both alcohols and hydrocarbons, but lowers the alcohol selectivity by enhancing the hydrocarbon formation. The highest alcohol productivity reached in these investigations was 0.276 g/g cat...

  7. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  8. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  9. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  10. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  12. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia; El Eter, Mohamad; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  13. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  14. A novel process for heavy residue hydroconversion using a recoverable pseudo-homogenous catalyst PHC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romocki, S.M.; Rhodey, W.G. [Mobis Energy Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a pseudo-homogenous catalyst (PHC) designed to refine heavy hydrocarbon residues containing sulfur, nitrogen, metals, and asphaltene impurities known to clog pores and deactivate traditional hydrocrackers. The heavy residue hydroconversion (HRH) process incorporated a single particle, chemically generated PHC uniformly distributed in the feed. Thermal decomposition within the reaction system of a water-in-oil emulsion containing ammonium paramolybdate was used to form molybdenum oxide, which was then sulfided within the feed in order to create an ultra-dispersed suspension of catalytically active molybdenum disulfide particles measuring between 2 and 9 nm. A proprietary online catalyst recovery and regeneration step was used to maintain high catalyst activity. The molybdenum was then recovered from a purge stream and then reintroduced to the catalyst preparation area as a catalyst precursor. After being conditioned, the feed was combined with hydrogen and a water-oil catalyst emulsion and introduced into a furnace. Heavy components were cracked, hydrogenated and converted to lighter products. The high performance catalyst system was able to convert 95 per cent of residues at pressures below 7.3 Mpa and at reaction temperatures ranging between 400 and 460 degrees C. The catalyst was tested at a pilot plant using Athabasca vacuum bottoms. It was concluded that the HRH process is now being successfully used to produce 200 barrels of heavy oil per day. Designs for commercial installations are now being prepared. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  16. Sulfide Precipitation in Wastewater at Short Timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Bruno; van de Ven, Wilbert; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2017-01-01

    Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows that this i......Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows...... that this is not the case for sulfide precipitation by ferric iron. Instead, the reaction time was found to be on a timescale where it must be considered when performing end-of-pipe treatment. For real wastewaters at pH 7, a stoichiometric ratio around 14 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 was obtained after 1.5 s, while the ratio...

  17. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  18. MoS2 monolayer catalyst doped with isolated Co atoms for the hydrodeoxygenation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoliang; Robertson, Alex W.; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Darby, Matthew T.; Muhieddine, Mohamad H.; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Stamatakis, Michail; Warner, Jamie H.; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2017-08-01

    The conversion of oxygen-rich biomass into hydrocarbon fuels requires efficient hydrodeoxygenation catalysts during the upgrading process. However, traditionally prepared CoMoS2 catalysts, although efficient for hydrodesulfurization, are not appropriate due to their poor activity, sulfur loss and rapid deactivation at elevated temperature. Here, we report the synthesis of MoS2 monolayer sheets decorated with isolated Co atoms that bond covalently to sulfur vacancies on the basal planes that, when compared with conventionally prepared samples, exhibit superior activity, selectivity and stability for the hydrodeoxygenation of 4-methylphenol to toluene. This higher activity allows the reaction temperature to be reduced from the typically used 300 °C to 180 °C and thus allows the catalysis to proceed without sulfur loss and deactivation. Experimental analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal a large number of sites at the interface between the Co and Mo atoms on the MoS2 basal surface and we ascribe the higher activity to the presence of sulfur vacancies that are created local to the observed Co-S-Mo interfacial sites.

  19. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  20. Production and Preservation of Sulfide Layering in Mercury's Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukare, C.-E.; Parman, S. W.; Parmentier, E. M.; Anzures, B. A.

    2018-05-01

    Mercury's magma ocean (MMO) would have been sulfur-rich. At some point during MMO solidification, it likely became sulfide saturated. Here we present physiochemical models exploring sulfide layer formation and stability.

  1. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  2. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  3. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  4. Girdler-sulfide process physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburg, H.J.; Atherley, J.F.; Walker, L.G.

    1977-05-01

    Physical properties of pure hydrogen sulfide and of gaseous and liquid solutions of the H 2 S-H 2 O system have been formulated. Tables for forty-nine different properties in the pressure and temperature range of interest to the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) process for heavy water production are given. All properties are presented in SI units. A computer program capable of calculating properties of the pure components as well as gaseous mixtures and liquid solutions at saturated and non-saturated conditions is included. (author)

  5. Novel Microbial Assemblages Dominate Weathered Sulfide-Bearing Rock from Copper-Nickel Deposits in the Duluth Complex, Minnesota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel S; Lapakko, Kim A; Wenz, Zachary J; Olson, Michael C; Roepke, Elizabeth W; Sadowsky, Michael J; Novak, Paige J; Bailey, Jake V

    2017-08-15

    The Duluth Complex in northeastern Minnesota hosts economically significant deposits of copper, nickel, and platinum group elements (PGEs). The primary sulfide mineralogy of these deposits includes the minerals pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and cubanite, and weathering experiments show that most sulfide-bearing rock from the Duluth Complex generates moderately acidic leachate (pH 4 to 6). Microorganisms are important catalysts for metal sulfide oxidation and could influence the quality of water from mines in the Duluth Complex. Nevertheless, compared with that of extremely acidic environments, much less is known about the microbial ecology of moderately acidic sulfide-bearing mine waste, and so existing information may have little relevance to those microorganisms catalyzing oxidation reactions in the Duluth Complex. Here, we characterized the microbial communities in decade-long weathering experiments (kinetic tests) conducted on crushed rock and tailings from the Duluth Complex. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts showed that differences among microbial communities correspond to pH, rock type, and experimental treatment. Moreover, microbial communities from the weathered Duluth Complex rock were dominated by taxa that are not typically associated with acidic mine waste. The most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were from the genera Meiothermus and Sulfuriferula , as well as from diverse clades of uncultivated Chloroflexi , Acidobacteria , and Betaproteobacteria Specific taxa, including putative sulfur-oxidizing Sulfuriferula spp., appeared to be primarily associated with Duluth Complex rock, but not pyrite-bearing rocks subjected to the same experimental treatment. We discuss the implications of these results for the microbial ecology of moderately acidic mine waste with low sulfide content, as well as for kinetic testing of mine waste. IMPORTANCE Economic sulfide mineral deposits in the Duluth Complex may represent the largest

  6. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    -quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Comparison between the Co monometallic catalyst system and the Co/Mo bimetallic catalyst system, the effect of CVD temperature on the G/D ratio, the effect of ethanol partial pressure on the morphology, diameter and quality of SWNT films, and Raman spectra of the Si/SiO2 substrate. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06007a

  7. Design of hydroprocessing catalyst for the production of ultra clean fuels. Super clean nenryo wo mezashita jushitsu tanka suiso seisei shokubai no kokinoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hiromichi (National Chemical Lab. for Industry,Tsukuba, (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    In order to develop high function catalyst for the ultra clean fuel refining and other purposes, the catalyst was studied in correlation between the function and structure. Hydrogenation power of aromatic ring and hydrogenolysis power of carbon-carbon bonding, which are principal functions of catalyst in the hydrogenation refining, were evaluated with model material. 30 kinds of catalyst were figure shown in classification result of evaluation. As for the mutual operation of molybdenum and carrier, it is necessary for molybdenum sulfide to be highly dispersed on carrier in order to heighten the hydrogenation activity. While the hydrogenolysis activity, as necessitating electrically negative molybdenum type to be formed on carrier, is manifested by the formation of Bronsted acidity point with hydrogen sulfide, adhering thereto. As for the molybdenum sulfide catalyst, mainly hydrogenation activity point, in case that structure, similar to molybdenum disulfide, is dispersed as a single layer on carrier, and hydrogenolysis activity point, in case that it forms a multi-layer structure thereon, are formed in edge part of respective crystal. The lowering in activity under a long time sevre condition, which mainly are carbonic material deposition, matallic adhesion, etc., is also influenced by the structural change in catalyst. 10 refs., 5 figs. 2 tabs.

  8. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  9. Ionic Liquids in Selective Oxidation: Catalysts and Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chengna; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Chongpin; Lei, Zhigang

    2017-05-24

    Selective oxidation has an important role in environmental and green chemistry (e.g., oxidative desulfurization of fuels and oxidative removal of mercury) as well as chemicals and intermediates chemistry to obtain high-value-added special products (e.g., organic sulfoxides and sulfones, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, epoxides, esters, and lactones). Due to their unique physical properties such as the nonvolatility, thermal stability, nonexplosion, high polarity, and temperature-dependent miscibility with water, ionic liquids (ILs) have attracted considerable attention as reaction solvents and media for selective oxidations and are considered as green alternatives to volatile organic solvents. Moreover, for easy separation and recyclable utilization, IL catalysts have attracted unprecedented attention as "biphasic catalyst" or "immobilized catalyst" by immobilizing metal- or nonmetal-containing ILs onto mineral or polymer supports to combine the unique properties of ILs (chemical and thermal stability, capacity for extraction of polar substrates and reaction products) with the extended surface of the supports. This review highlights the most recent outcomes on ILs in several important typical oxidation reactions. The contents are arranged in the series of oxidation of sulfides, oxidation of alcohols, epoxidation of alkenes, Baeyer-Villiger oxidation reaction, oxidation of alkanes, and oxidation of other compounds step by step involving ILs as solvents, catalysts, reagents, or their combinations.

  10. Preface to CoMoL 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Stefan; Kaschek, Roland; Thalheim, Bernhard

    Conceptual modelling has changed over years. Database applications form an integral part of most computational infrastructures. Applications are developed, changed and integrated by specialists in conceptual modelling, by computer engineers, or by people who do not have sufficient related background knowledge. Conceptual databases models are everywhere in applications and are likely to interfere with other models such as functionality models, distribution and collaboration models, and user-interface models. Models also depend on the cultural and educational background of their developers and users. Models typically follow applications, infrastructures, currently existing systems, theoretical and technological insight, and reference models provided by successful applications or literature. This basis of conceptual models is constantly changing and therefore models are constantly evolving or quickly become outdated. Applications are starting in a separated form and are later integrated into new applications. The coherence and consistency of the many coexisting models at best is partially addressed. Furthermore, models not necessarily share their targeted level of abstraction. Recently modelling is challenged by liberation of data from structure and the integration of derived or aggregated data, e.g. in streaming databases, data warehouses and scientific applications. Typically models for applications start at an intermediate level and size. Later they evolve, grow, and tend to become incomprehensible. Nowadays conceptual modelling in the small has become state of the art for specialists and educated application engineers. Conceptual modelling in the large has been mainly developed within companies that handle large and complex applications. It covers a large variety of aspects such as models of structures, of business processes, of interaction among applications and with users, of components of systems, and of abstractions or of derived models such as data warehouses and OLAP applications.

  11. Characterization of upgraded fast pyrolysis oak oil distillate fractions from sulfided and non-sulfided catalytic hydrotreating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olarte, Mariefel V.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Ferrell, Jack R.; Christensen, Earl D.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lucke, Richard B.; Burton, Sarah D.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Swita, Marie S.; Fioroni, Gina; Elliott, Douglas C.; Drennan, Corinne

    2017-08-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing of pyrolysis oils from biomass produces hydrocarbons that can be considered for liquid fuel production. This process requires removal of oxygen and cracking of the heavier molecular weight bio-oil constituents into smaller fragments at high temperatures and pressures under hydrogen. A comprehensive understanding of product oils is useful to optimize cost versus degree of deoxygenation. Additionally, a better understanding of the chemical composition of the distillate fractions can open up other uses of upgraded oils for potentially higher-value chemical streams. We present in this paper the characterization data for five well-defined distillate fractions of two hydroprocessed oils with different oxygen levels: a low oxygen content (LOC, 1.8% O, wet basis) oil and a medium oxygen content (MOC, 6.4% O, wet basis) oil. Elemental analysis and 13C NMR results suggest that the distillate fractions become more aromatic/unsaturated as they become heavier. Our results also show that the use of sulfided catalysts directly affects the S content of the lightest distillate fraction. Carbonyl and carboxylic groups were found in the MOC light fractions, while phenols were present in the heavier fractions for both MOC and LOC. PIONA analysis of the light LOC fraction shows a predominance of paraffins with a minor amount of olefins. These results can be used to direct future research on refinery integration and production of value-added product from specific upgraded oil streams.

  12. Amorphous nickel/cobalt tungsten sulfide electrocatalysts for high-efficiency hydrogen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Institute of Acoustics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Xinglong, E-mail: hkxlwu@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Institute of Acoustics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, NingBo University, NingBo 315001 (China); Zhu, Xiaoshu [Center for Analysis and Testing, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210093 (China); He, Chengyu; Meng, Ming; Gan, Zhixing [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Institute of Acoustics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous nickel/cobalt tungsten sulfides were synthesized by a thermolytic process. • Amorphous NiWS and CoWS could realize hydrogen evolution efficiently. • Ni/Co promotion and annealing alter the porous structure and chemical bonding states. • Active sites on the surface of amorphous WS{sub x} are increased with Ni or Co doping. • Amorphous NiWS and CoWS have immense potentials in water splitting devices. - Abstract: The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), an appealing solution for future energy supply, requires efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts with abundant active surface sites. Although crystalline MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} are promising candidates, their activity is dominated by edge sites. Amorphous tungsten sulfide prepared so far lacks the required active sites and its application has thus been hampered. In this work, nickel and cobalt incorporated amorphous tungsten sulfide synthesized by a thermolytic process is demonstrated to enhance the HER efficiency dramatically. The amorphous nickel tungsten sulfide (amorphous NiWS) annealed at 210 °C delivers the best HER performance in this system boasting a Tafel slope of 55 mV per decade and current density of 8.6 mA cm{sup −2} at 250 mV overpotential in a sustained test for 24 h. The introduction of Ni or Co into the catalyst and subsequent thermal treatment alters the porous structure and chemical bonding states thereby increasing the density of active sites on the surface.

  13. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  14. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  15. Microaeration reduces hydrogen sulfide in biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there are a variety of biological and chemical treatments for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas, all require some level of chemical or water inputs and maintenance. In practice, managing biogas H2S remains a significant challenge for agricultural digesters where labor and opera...

  16. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  17. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  18. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  19. Rational geometrical engineering of palladium sulfide multi-arm nanostructures as a superior bi-functional electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandan, R; Nanda, K K

    2017-08-31

    Geometrical tunability offers sharp edges and an open-armed structure accompanied with a high electrochemical active surface area to ensure the efficient and effective utilization of materials by exposing the electrochemical active sites for facile accessibility of reactant species. Herein, we report a one-step, single-pot, surfactant-free, electroless, and economic route to synthesize palladium sulfide nanostructures with different geometries at mild temperatures and their catalytic properties towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol electro-oxidation (MOR). For ORR, the positive on-set, half wave potentials, smaller Tafel slope, high electrochemical active surface area, large roughness factor, and better cyclic stability of the proposed nanostructures as compared to those of the commercial state-of-the-art Pt-C/PdS catalysts suggest their superiority in an alkaline medium. In addition, high mass activity (J f ∼ 715 mA mg -1 ), in comparison with that of the commercial state-of-the-art Pt-C/PdS catalysts (J f ∼ 138/41 mA mg -1 , respectively), and high J f /J b (1.52) along with the superior operational stability of the multi-arm palladium sulfide nanostructures towards MOR advocates the bi-functional behavior of the catalyst and its potential as a promising Pt-free anode/cathode electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  20. TiO2 nanotubes supported NiW hydrodesulphurization catalysts: Characterization and activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcheva, R.; Dimitrov, L.; Tyuliev, G.; Spojakina, A.; Jiratova, K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► NiW catalysts supported on TiO 2 nanotubes, titania and alumina. ► The best results are obtained with NiW/TiO 2 nanotubes in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of thiophene. ► Active phase is Ni-WO x S y . ► Electronic promotion of W by Ti. - Abstract: High surface area TiO 2 nanotubes (Ti-NT) synthesized by alkali hydrothermal method were used as a support for NiW hydrodesulphurization catalyst. Nickel salt of 12-tungstophosphoric acid – Ni 3/2 PW 12 O 40 was applied as oxide precursor of the active components. The catalyst was characterized by S BET , XRD, UV–vis DRS, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, TPR and HRTEM. The results obtained were compared with those for the NiW catalysts prepared over high surface area titania and alumina supports. A polytungstate phase evidenced by Raman spectroscopy was observed indicating the destruction of the initial heteropolyanion. The catalytic experiments revealed two times higher thiophene conversion on NiW catalyst supported on Ti-NT than those of catalysts supported on alumina and titania. Increased HDS activity of the NiW catalyst supported on Ti-NT could be related to a higher amount of W oxysulfide entities interacting with Ni sulfide particles as consequence of the electronic effects of the Ti-NT observed with XPS analysis.

  1. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH IEP of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C S in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH IEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C S in the solution declined from 1000 × 10 −6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10 −6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S 2− and CO 3 2− ions

  2. Mechanism of pyrrhotite formation from ferric oxyhydroxide catalyst; Kokoritsu sekitan ekika shokubai no kaihatsu (Okishi suisankatetsu shokubai karano pyrrhotite seisei kyodo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazawa, K.; Koyama, T.; Kaneko, T.; Shimasaki, K. [Nippon Brown Coal Liquefaction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It is thought that iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction exercise their catalytic activity by forming pyrrhotite (Fe(1-x)S). However, there are still a lot of unknown problems remained concerning the formation and agglomeration behaviors of pyrrhotite. These make a difficulty for improving the activity of iron-based catalysts. In this study, sulfiding behaviors of {alpha}-iron oxyhydroxide ({alpha}-FeOOH) and {gamma}-iron oxyhydroxide ({gamma}-FeOOH) were investigated to reveal the formation and agglomeration behaviors of pyrrhotite. It was found that pyrrhotite was easily converted from ferric oxyhydroxide catalysts having large specific surface areas at the sulfiding temperature below 250{degree}C, and fine crystallites of pyrrhotite were formed at the initial stage of sulfiding. Crystal growth of pyrrhotite at the sulfiding temperature over 350{degree}C depended on the catalyst forms. It was also found that smaller crystallites of pyrrhotite were formed from {gamma}-FeOOH than from {alpha}-FeOOH and amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  4. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...

  5. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  6. NiMo-sulfide supported on activated carbon to produce renewable diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Y Acelas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to their weak polarity and large surface area, activated carbon supports have the potential to enhance the dispersion of metal-sulfides. It is expected that the absence of a strong metal-support interaction can result in the formation of a very active and stable Ni-Mo-S phase. In this study, catalysts with different amounts of nickel and molybdenum supported on a commercial activated carbon were prepared by a co-impregnation method and characterized by BET, XRF, and SEM techniques. The catalytic activity for hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil was evaluated in a batch reactor, and the composition of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. Results showed that gaseous products are mainly composed of high amounts of propane and small amounts of other light hydrocarbons (C1 to C5. Liquid hydrocarbon products consisted of a mixture containing mainly n-paraffins of C15-C18 and some oxygenated compounds. The catalysts with a mass fraction of 3 % Ni, 15 % Mo (Ni3Mo15/AC presented the highest selectivity toward C17-C18 hydrocarbons, with a product distribution similar to a commercial alumina-supported Ni-Mo-S catalyst.

  7. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  8. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  9. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  10. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  11. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  12. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  13. Hydrogen sulfide concentration in Beaver Dam Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Concentration-time profiles calculated with LODIPS for various hypothetical releases of hydrogen sulfide from the heavy water extraction facility predict lethal conditions for swamp fish from releases as small as 568 kg discharged over a period of 30 minutes or from releases of 1818 kg discharged over a period of 6 hours or less. The necessary volatilization and oxidation coefficients for LODIPS were derived from field measurements following planned releases of H 2 S. Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) heavy water extraction facility in D Area have released significant amounts of dissolved H 2 S to Beaver Dam Creek. Because H 2 S is toxic to fish in concentrations as low as 1 mg/liter, the downstream environmental impact of H 2 S releases from D Area was evaluated

  14. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  16. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  17. Preparation, characterization of Mo catalysts supported on Ni- containing calcium deficient hydroxyapatite and reactivity for the thiophene HDS reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ni-containing Calcium Hydroxyapatite (NiCaHAp; 3.31 wt.% Ni was synthesized by coprecipitation and used as catalyst support. Molybdenum was supported on NiCaHAp by impregnation using ammonium heptamolybdate. The prepared catalysts Mo(x/NiCaHAp (x: 2 to 8 wt % in Mo were characterized by elemental analysis, XRD, FT-IR, N2 adsorption-desorption and TEM-EDX. The catalysts were sulfided in-situ at 673 K under flowing H2S/H2 (15 Vol.% H2S and tested in hydrodesulfurization (HDS of thiophene at 673 K. The main XRD peaks of hydroxyapatite CaHAp phase were observed in all samples and a peak due probably to crystalline MoO3 phase was also identified from the results. However, no crystalline phase of NiO was found for the catalysts, which showed its Ni species were highly dispersed. The sulfided catalysts Mo(x/NiCaHAp presented are active in HDS of thiophene, despite the presence of some large MoO3 crystallites and incomplete sulfidation. This activity may be due to interaction of NiO and MoO3 on CaHAp resulting in the formation of Ni-Mo-S phase under flowing H2S/H2. When the molybdenum content increased the HDS activity increasead slightly, which was caused by the agglomeration of MoO3. The Mo(8/NiCaHAp catalyst is about two times less active for thiophene HDS than the commercial NiMoP/Al2O3.

  18. Polymer nanocomposite membranes with hierarchically structured catalysts for high throughput dehalogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, Christopher A.

    Halogenated organics are categorized as primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trichloroethylene (TCE), which had broad industrial use in the past, shows persistence in the environment because of its chemical stability. The large scale use and poor control of TCE resulted in its prolonged release into the environment before the carcinogenic risk associated with TCE was fully understood. TCE pollution stemmed from industrial effluents and improper disposal of solvent waste. Membrane reactors are promising technology for treating TCE polluted groundwater because of the high throughput, relatively low cost of membrane fabrication and facile retrofitting of existing membrane based water treatment facilities with catalytic membrane reactors. Compared to catalytic fluidized or fixed bed reactors, catalytic membrane reactors feature minimal diffusional limitation. Additionally, embedding catalyst within the membrane avoids the need for catalyst recovery and can prevent aggregation of catalytic nanoparticles. In this work, Pd/xGnP, Pd-Au/xGnP, and commercial Pd/Al2O3 nanoparticles were employed in batch and flow-through membrane reactors to catalyze the dehalogenation of TCE in the presence of dissolved H2. Bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts were shown to be more active than monometallic Pd/xGnP or commercial Pd/Al 2O3 catalysts. In addition to synthesizing nanocomposite membranes for high-throughput TCE dehalogenation, the membrane based dehalogenation process was designed to minimize the detrimental impact of common catalyst poisons (S2-, HS-, and H2S -) by concurrent oxidation of sulfide species to gypsum in the presence of Ca2+ and removal of gypsum through membrane filtration. The engineered membrane dehalogenation process demonstrated that bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts resisted deactivation by residual sulfide species after oxidation, and showed complete removal of gypsum during membrane filtration.

  19. Syntheses, Characterization and Kinetics of Nickel-Tungsten Nitride Catalysts for Hydrotreating of Gas Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchwey, Christian

    This thesis summarizes the methods and major findings of Ni-W(P)/gamma-Al 2O3 nitride catalyst synthesis, characterization, hydrotreating activity, kinetic analysis and correlation of the catalysts' activities to their synthesis parameters and properties. The range of parameters for catalyst synthesis were W (15-40 wt%), Ni (0-8 wt%), P (0-5 wt%) and nitriding temperature (TN) (500-900 °C). Characterization techniques used included: N2 sorption studies, chemisorption, elemental analysis, temperature programmed studies, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) were performed at: temperature (340-380 °C), pressure (6.2-9.0 MPa), liquid hourly space velocity (1-3 h-1) and hydrogen to oil ratio (600 ml/ml, STP). The predominant species on the catalyst surface were Ni3N, W2N and bimetallic Ni2W3N. The bimetallic Ni-W nitride species was more active than the individual activities of the Ni3N and W2N. P increased weak acid sites while nitriding temperature decreased amount of strong acid sites. Low nitriding temperature enhanced dispersion of metal particles. P interacted with Al 2O3 which increased the dispersion of metal nitrides on the catalyst surface. HDN activity increased with Ni and P loading but decreased with increase in nitriding temperature (optimum conversion; 60 wt%). HDS and HDA activities went through a maximum with increase in the synthesis parameters (optimum conversions; 88. wt% for HDS and 47 wt% for HDA). Increase in W loading led to increase in catalyst activity. The catalysts were stable to deactivation and had the nitride structure conserved during hydrotreating in the presence of hydrogen sulfide. The results showed good correlation between hydrotreating activities (HDS and HDN) and the catalyst nitrogen content, number of exposed

  20. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  1. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Aijie; Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun; Lee Duujong

    2010-01-01

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S 0 ), N 2 , and CO 2 , or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  2. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  4. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com; Deng, Jiushuai, E-mail: dengshuai689@163.com; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C{sub S} in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C{sub S} in the solution declined from 1000 × 10{sup −6} mol/L to 1.4 × 10{sup −6} mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S{sup 2−} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions.

  5. Efficient Air Desulfurization Catalysts Derived from Pig Manure Liquefaction Char

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Wallace

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Biochar from the liquefaction of pig manure was used as a precursor of H2S desulfurization adsorbents. In its inorganic matter, it contains marked quantities of calcium, magnesium and iron, which are known as hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalysts. The char was used either as-received or mixed with 10% nanographite. The latter was added to increase both the content of the carbon phase and conductivity. ZnCl2 in two different ratios of char to an activation agent (1:1 and 1:2 was used to create the porosity in the carbon phase. The content of the later was between 18–45%. The activated samples adsorbed 144 mg/g H2S. Sulfur was the predominant product of reactive adsorption. Its deposition in the pore system and blockage of the most active pores ceased the materials’ activity. The presence of the catalytic phase was necessary but not sufficient to guarantee good performance. The developed porosity, which can store oxidation products in the resulting composite, is essential for the good performance of the desulfurization process. The surface of the composite with nanographite showed the highest catalytic activity, similar to that of the commercial Midas® carbon catalyst. The results obtained indicate that a high quality reactive adsorbent/catalyst for H2S removal can be obtained from pig manure liquefaction wastes.

  6. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean-burn engine exhaust over a Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jong Yeol; Kim, Hee Young; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2003-01-01

    The activities of Pt supported on various metal-substituted MCM-41 (V-, Ti-, Fe-, Al-, Ga-, La-, Co-, Mo-, Ce-, and Zr-MCM-41) and V-impregnated MCM-41 were investigated for the reduction of NO by C 3 H 6 . Among these catalysts, Pt supported on V-impregnated MCM-41 showed the best activity. The maximum conversion of NO into N 2 +N 2 O over this Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst (Pt=1wt.%, V=3.8wt.%) was 73%, and this maximum conversion was sustained over a temperature range of 70C from 270 to 340C. The high activity of Pt/V/MCM-41 over a broad temperature range resulted from two additional reactions besides the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, the reaction of NO with surface carbonaceous materials, and the reaction of NO occurring on support V-impregnated MCM-41. The former additional reaction showed an oscillation characteristic, a phenomenon in which the concentrations of parts of reactant and product gases oscillate continuously. At low temperature, some water vapor injected into the reactant gas mixture promoted the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, whereas at high temperature, it suppressed the additional reaction related to carbonaceous materials. Five-hundred parts per million of SO 2 added to the reactant gas mixture only slightly decreased the NO conversion of Pt/V/MCM-41

  7. Vibration measurements of automobile catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatola, Seppo

    1994-09-01

    Vibration of catalyst cell, which is inside the casing of the catalyst, is difficult to measure with usual measuring instrumentation. When catalyst is in use, there is hot exhaust gas flow though the catalyst cell and temperature of the cell is approximately +900 degree(s)C. Therefore non-contact Laser- Doppler-Vibrometer was used to measure vibration velocity of the catalyst cell. The laser beam was directed towards the cell through pipe which was put through and welded to the casing of the catalyst. The outer end of the pipe was screw down with a tempered class to prevent exhaust gas flow from the pipe. The inner end of the pipe was open and few millimeters away from the measuring point. Catalyst was attached to the engine with two ways, rigidly close to the engine and flexible under the engine. The engine was running in test bench under controlled conditions. Vibration measurements were carried out during constant running speeds of the engine. Vibration signals were captured and analyzed with FFT-analyzer. Vibration of catalyst cell was strongest at running speed of 5000 rpm, from 10 to 20 g (1 g equals 9.81 ms-2), when catalyst was attached rigidly close to the engine. At running speed of 3000 rpm, vibration of catalyst cell was from 2 to 3 g in most cases, when catalyst was attached either rigidly or flexible to the engine. It is estimated that in real life, i.e. when catalyst is attached to car with same engine, vibration of catalyst cell at running speed of 5000 rpm is somewhere between 1 and 10 g. At running speed of 3000 rpm, which may be more often used when driving car (car speed approximately 100 kmh-1), vibration of catalyst cell is probably few g's.

  8. Nanostructured silver sulfide: synthesis of various forms and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Rempel, A. A.; Gusev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental studies on nanostructured silver sulfide are analyzed and generalized. The influence of small particle size on nonstoichiometry of silver sulfide is discussed. Methods for the synthesis of various forms of nanostructured Ag2S including nanopowders, stable colloidal solutions, quantum dots, core–shell nanoparticles and heteronanostructures are described. The advantages and drawbacks of different synthetic procedures are analyzed. Main fields of application of nanostructured silver sulfide are considered. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  9. Air oxidation of aqueous sodium sulfide solutions with coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, D; Chaudhuri, S K [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1999-02-01

    The paper investigated the potential of coal fly ash as a catalyst in the air oxidation of aqueous sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) solutions in the temperature range of 303-333 K. The rate of oxidation was found to be independent of the initial concentration of Na{sub 2}S in the range of 5.80 x 10{sup -2} - 28.45 x 10{sup -2} kmol/m{sup 3}. The effects of fly ash loading, source of fly ash, speed of agitation, air flow rate, fly ash particle size were also studied. Experimental results suggested a film-diffusion controlled reaction mechanism. The deactivation of the catalytic effect of fly ash was found to be less than 31% even after five repeated uses.

  10. Room temperature synthesis of ReS2 through aqueous perrhenate sulfidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Joanna; Gillin, William P.; Willis, Maureen A. C.; Boi, Filippo S.; He, Y.; Wen, J. Q.; Wang, S. L.; Schulz, Leander

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a direct sulfidation reaction of ammonium perrhenate (NH4ReO4) leading to a synthesis of rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is demonstrated. These findings reveal the first example of a simplistic bottom-up approach to the chemical synthesis of crystalline ReS2. The reaction presented here takes place at room temperature, in an ambient and solvent-free environment and without the necessity of a catalyst. The atomic composition and structure of the as-synthesized product were characterized using several analysis techniques including energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicated the formation of a lower symmetry (1Tʹ) ReS2 with a low degree of layer stacking.

  11. A Catalyst for Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This case study of a team in an international workplace investigates processes of language socialization in a transient multilingual setting. Using interview and observational data, the analysis shows how social and linguistic norms are negotiated, with the newcomer positioned as a catalyst...... for changing language practices toward more English, with the ultimate aim of creating a 'global mindset' in the organization. Language socialization in a transient multilingual setting is shown to focus on and assign positive value to new linguistic norms that experienced members are socialized...... into in a process that hinges on new members functioning as tools for management to bring about the desired change. The article shows that while the newcomer is used as a catalyst for increased use of English and for the creation of a 'global mindset,' she is at the same time socialized into the existing Danish...

  12. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  13. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  14. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author) [es

  15. Improving the catalytic activity of amorphous molybdenum sulfide for hydrogen evolution reaction using polydihydroxyphenylalanine modified MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoguo; Yu, Muping; Li, Xiang

    2018-05-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are promising electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid medium due to their unique properties. In order to improve their HER activity, different strategies have been developed. In this study, amorphous molybdenum sulfide was prepared by a simple wet chemical method and its HER activity was further improved by using polydihydroxyphenylalanine (PDOPA) modified MWCNTs as supports. It was found that the PDOPA can effectively improve the hydrophilic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amorphous MoSx can uniformly grow on the surface of PDOPA@MWCNTs. Compared with MoSx and MoSx/MWCNTs, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs show obviously enhanced HER activities due to the superior electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites. In addition, the effect of the ratio of MoSx and PDOPA@MWCNTs and the loading amount of catalysts on the electrodes are also investigated in detail. At the optimum conditions, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs display an overpotential of 198 mV at 10 mA/cm2, a Tafel slope of 53 mV/dec and a good long-term stability in 0.5 M H2SO4, which make them promising candidates for HER application.

  16. Catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohol over solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiguchi, Satoshi, E-mail: kamigu@riken.jp [Advanced Catalysis Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Organometallic Chemistry Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okumura, Kazu [School of Advanced Engineering, Kogakuin University, Nakano-machi, Hachioji City, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Nagashima, Sayoko; Chihara, Teiji [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters catalyzed the dehydrogenation of alcohol. • The dehydrogenation proceeded without the addition of any oxidants. • The catalytic activity developed when the cluster was activated at 300–500 °C in H{sub 2}. • The Lewis-acidic molybdenum atom and basic sulfur ligand were catalytically active. • The clusters function as bifunctional acid–base catalysts. - Abstract: Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework, the superconducting Chevrel phases, are applied to catalysis. A copper salt of a nonstoichiometric sulfur-deficient cluster, Cu{sub x}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8–δ} (x = 2.94 and δ ≈ 0.3), is stored in air for more than 90 days. When the oxygenated cluster is thermally activated in a hydrogen stream above 300 °C, catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and secondary alcohols to ketones develops. The addition of pyridine or benzoic acid decreases the dehydrogenation activity, indicating that both a Lewis-acidic coordinatively unsaturated molybdenum atom and a basic sulfur ligand synergistically act as the catalytic active sites.

  17. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  18. VAPOR PHASE OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE OVER V2O5/TIO2 CATALYST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Removal of volatile and odorous compounds emissions from the pulp and paper industry usually creates secondary pollution for scrubbing and adsorption processes or sulfur poising for catalytic incineration. Product studies performed in a flow reactor packed with 10 % V2O5/TiO2 cat...

  19. Deoxygenation of Vegetable Oils over Sulfided Ni, Mo and NiMo Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubička, D.; Kaluža, Luděk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 372, č. 2 (2010), s. 199-208 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA3/074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : deoxygenation * hydrodeoxygenation * biofuels Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.383, year: 2010

  20. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  1. Iron sulfide crystal growth: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, E.J.

    1977-04-01

    Iron pyrite (FeS 2 ) is often found on trays and in heat exchangers in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) plants used to extract D 2 O from fresh water. A critical review of the literature was made to find: (i) what is known about FeS 2 crystal growth; (ii) which techniques could be used to study FeS 2 crystal growth experimentally; (iii) potential chemical additives that could be used in trace amounts to poison FeS 2 crystals and reduce their growth rate in G.S. plants. (author)

  2. Sulfide geochronlogy along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Liang, J.; Liao, S.

    2017-12-01

    Dragon Flag and Duanqiao hydrothermal field is located between the Indomed and Gallieni fracture zones in the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Ten subsamples from active and inactive vents of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field and twenty-eight subsamples from Duanqiao hydrothermal field were dated using the 230Th/238U method. Four main episodes of hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao were determined according to the restricted results: 68.9-84.3, 43.9-48.4, 25.3-34.8, and 0.7-17.3 kyrs. Hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao probably started about 84.3 (±0.5) kyrs ago and ceased about 0.737 (±0.023) kyrs ago. And sulfide samples from the nearby Dragon Flag filed at the same time and the results show that the ages of most sulfides from Dragon Flag field range from 1.496(±0.176) to 5.416 (±0.116) kyrs with the oldest age estimated at 15.997 (±0.155) kyrs Münch et al. (2001) reconstructed the evolution history of Mt. Jourdanne hydrothermal field. The age dating results indicate activity in two episodes, at 70-40 and 27-13 kyrs. The hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. The massive sulfides are younger than the sulfides from other hydrothermal fields such as Rainbow, Sonne and Ashadze-2. All these results suggest that hydrothermal activity of Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. Mt. Jourdanne is situated on an axial volcanic ridge which has both volcanic and tectonic activity. This is necessary to develop the heat source and pathways for the fluid convection, which enables the hydrothermal circulation. Hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag Field is located next to the detachment fault termination. The detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection. Such style of heat source can contribute to continuous hydrothermal activity for over 1000 years. Duanqiao field is located near the central volcano and there is a hot

  3. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  4. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S [Worthington, OH; Holmgreen, Erik M [Columbus, OH; Yung, Matthew M [Columbus, OH

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  5. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  6. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.M.; Menoufy, M.F.; Amhed, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  7. FY 1990 Study Meeting of Catalyst (Iron system). Data; 1990 nendo shokubai kento kai (Tetsu kei) shiryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    The FY 1990 Study Meeting of Iron-system Catalyst was held at NEDO on March 12, 1991, and the data were arranged. In the study meeting, papers titled as follows were made public: About the behavior of H{sub 2}S on iron-system catalyst by Muroran Institute of Technology; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst in the BCL project by Research Institute, Mitsubishi Kasei Corp.; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst by 2.4 t/d PDU by NKK; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst by 0.1 t/d BSU by Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co.; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst by 1 t/d PSU by Nippon Steel Corp.; Results of the research at Government Industrial Development Laboratory, Hokkaido, and the study; Results of the research at National Chemical Laboratory for Industry and the study; Results of the research at the University of Tokyo and the study; Details of the development of synthetic iron sulfide and the attainment up to now by Asahi Chemical Industry Co. Moreover, the plenary session was held on research items for the development of iron-system catalyst in future. (NEDO)

  8. Controllable synthesis in a continuous mode of unsupported molybdenum catalysts with micro/nano size for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Hill, J.M.; Pereira Almao, P.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Heavy oils contain significant amounts of impurities compared to conventional oils, thereby posing a challenge for hydroprocessing operations at refineries. Hydrodesulfurization is one of the important reactions involved in hydroprocessing. Transition metal sulfides have excellent properties in terms of sulphur removal. Molybdenum based catalysts have been used extensively in the petroleum industry for hydrotreating heavy oil fractions. Supported molybdenum based catalysts suffer strong deactivation in the traditional hydrotreating process due to the deposition of carbonaceous components on the surface of the catalyst when they are used in conventional fixed bed reactors. Unsupported catalysts have higher catalytic activity with better metal dispersion. Laboratory experiments were conducted in which micro/nano size unsupported molybdenum catalysts were synthesized from a water/oil emulsion. The catalysts were prepared in a continuous mode for online application to hydroprocessing or in situ upgrading. Dispersed molybdenum catalysts are more suitable for processing heavier feeds because they are less prone to deactivation. Also, their submicron size ensure high activities due to a large specific surface area. They are also sufficiently small to be readily dispersed in the residual oil. 4 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  9. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  10. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  11. Technetium behavior in sulfide and ferrous iron solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pertechnetate oxyanion ( 99 TcO 4- ), a potentially mobile species in leachate from a breached radioactive waste repository, was removed from a brine solution by precipitation with sulfide, iron, and ferrous sulfide at environmental pH's. Maghemite (ν-Fe 2 O 3 ) and geothite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant minerals in the precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -ferrous iron reaction. The observation of small particle size and poor crystallinity of the minerals formed in the presence of Tc suggested that the Tc was incorporated into the mineral structure after reduction to a lower valence state. Amorphous ferrous sulfide, an initial phase precipitating in the TcO 4- -ferrous iron-sulfide reaction, was transformed to goethite and hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) on aging. The black precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -sulfide reaction was poorly crystallized technetium sulfide (Tc 2 S 7 ) which was insoluble in both acid and alkaline solution in the absence of strong oxidents. The results suggested that ferrous- and/or sulfide-bearing groundwaters and minerals in host rocks or backfill barriers could reduce the mobility of Tc through the formation of less-soluble Tc-bearing iron and/or sulfide minerals

  12. Elucidation of hydrodesulfurization mechanism using 35S radioisotope pulse tracer methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabe, Toshiaki; Qian, Weihua; Ishihara, Atsushi

    1997-01-01

    Molybdenum-based catalysts as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts are among the most important industrial catalysts. One of the new approaches characterizing the structure of such catalysts and the behavior of sulfur over the 'working' catalyst is a 35S radioisotope pulse tracer method (RPTM). By tracing the behavior of sulfur in the HDS reaction and sulfur exchange reaction over the sulfided Mo/Al 2 O 3 and Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts under practical reaction conditions, it becomes possible for us to observe the catalytic behavior of the catalyst in situ. The formation process of active sites, the important role that H 2 S plays in this process, and the promotion by cobalt for Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst have become better understood

  13. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  14. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  15. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    risks and corrosion of concrete and metals. Most of the problems relate to the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere of sewer networks. In this respect, the processes of the sulfur cycle are of fundamental importance in ultimately determining the extent of such problems. This study focused...... calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... to the sewer atmosphere, potentially resulting in concrete corrosion. The extended WATS model represents a major improvement over previously developed models for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks. Compared to such models, the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks...

  16. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzegar, Mohsen [Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, Ali [K. N. Toosi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Majid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples.

  17. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, Mohsen; Jabbari, Ali; Esmaeili, Majid

    2003-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples

  18. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  19. Catalysts for petroleum desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.; Diemann, E.; Baumann, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain marketable products from low-quality oils, efficient hydrogenation processes are required for removing sulfur (hydrodesulfurization, HDS), nitrogen (hydrodenitrification, HDN), and oxygen (hydrodeoxygenation, HDO), which would poison the noble metal catalysts of the downstream petrochemical processes. Hydrogenation will produce low-sulfur, low-nitrogen fuels and thus contribute to the reduction of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions which is long overdue from the ecological point of view (forest decline, acidification of surface bodies of water, etc.).

  20. Anoxic sulfide biooxidation using nitrite as electron acceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng Ping; Cai Jing; Wu Donglei; Hu, Baolan; Li Jinye

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology can be used to assess the well being of ecosystems, transform pollutants into benign substances, generate biodegradable materials from renewable sources, and develop environmentally safe manufacturing and disposal processes. Simultaneous elimination of sulfide and nitrite from synthetic wastewaters was investigated using a bioreactor. A laboratory scale anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor was operated for 135 days to evaluate the potential for volumetric loading rates, effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and substrate concentration on the process performance. The maximal sulfide and nitrite removal rates were achieved to be 13.82 and 16.311 kg/(m 3 day), respectively, at 0.10 day HRT. The process can endure high sulfide concentrations, as the sulfide removal percentage always remained higher than 88.97% with influent concentration up to 1920 mg/L. Incomplete sulfide oxidation took place due to lower consumed nitrite to sulfide ratios of 0.93. It also tolerated high nitrite concentration up to 2265.25 mg/L. The potential achieved by decreasing HRT at fixed substrate concentration is higher than that by increasing substrate concentration at fixed HRT. The process can bear short HRT of 0.10 day but careful operation is needed. Nitrite conversion was more sensitive to HRT than sulfide conversion when HRT was decreased from 1.50 to 0.08 day. Stoichiometric analyses and results of batch experiments show that major part of sulfide (89-90%) was reduced by nitrite while some autooxidation (10-11%) was resulted from presence of small quantities of dissolved oxygen in the influent wastewater. There was ammonia amassing in considerably high amounts in the bioreactor when the influent nitrite concentration reached above 2265.25 mg/L. High ammonia concentrations (200-550 mg/L) in the bioreactor contributed towards the overall inhibition of the process. Present biotechnology exhibits practical value with a high potential for simultaneous removal of nitrite

  1. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  2. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Lires, O.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author) [es

  3. Activating catalysts with mechanical force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piermattei, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneously catalysed reactions can be ‘switched on’ by activating latent catalysts. Usually, activation is brought about by heat or an external chemical agent. However, activation of homogeneous catalysts with a mechanical trigger has not been demonstrated. Here, we introduce a general method to

  4. HDO of guaiacol over NiMo catalyst supported on activated carbon derived from castor de-oiled cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Ospina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical activation methods were used to prepare two different activated carbons (ACs from castor de-oiled cake. H2O/CO2 mixture was used as the physical activating agent, and for chemical activation potassium carbonate (K2CO3 was used. For both materials, textural and chemical properties were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, thermal programmed reduction (TPR, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The ACs were used as supports for NiMo sulfide catalysts, which were prepared by wetness impregnation and in-situ sulfided for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol (GUA as a model compound of bio-oil. The HDO reaction was carried out in a typical batch reactor at 5 MPa of H2 and 350 °C. Under the same test conditions, commercial catalysts were also tested in the reaction. Although the commercial catalysts displayed higher GUA conversion, the prepared catalysts showed higher activity and non-oxygenated and saturated products yield.

  5. Cooperative properties of single phases of complex oxide catalyst for oxidation of propylene to acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orel, L.I.; Udalova, O.V.; Korchak, V.N.; Isaev, O.V.; Krylov, O.V.; Gershenzon, Yu.M.; Aptekar', E.L.

    1992-01-01

    Synergetic effect of increase of acrolein yield during propylene oxidation on mechanical mixture of (α + β)CoMoO 4 and MoO 3 , as well as CO and CO 2 yield on mixture of CoMoO 4 and Bi 2 O 3 ·2MoO 3 was revealed. It is shown that CoMoO 4 generates allyl radicals, desorption of these radicals to gaseous phase is not practically observed with MoO 3 , bismuth molybdates and Fe 2 O 3 · Fe 2 O 3 ·3MoO 3

  6. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide: management of hydrogen sulfide exposure victims (Preprint No. SA-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1989-04-01

    National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, U.S.A. has listed 73 industries with potential exposure to hydrogen sulphide. Though the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide is known to mankind since the beginning of seventeenth century the exact mode of its toxicity and effective therapeutic regimen remains unclear as yet. This paper presents current thoughts on the toxicity of this substance and a discussion on the role of various antidotes used in H 2 S poisoning. (autho r)

  7. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  8. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Aijie, E-mail: waj0578@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Lee Duujong [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-15

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S{sup 0}), N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 < C/S < 3.0 with influent sulfide concentration of 400-1000 mg/L. At >1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  9. New Catalyst for HER and CO2 Hydrogenation for Solar Fuel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    sulfides mimics nature’s enzymes for hydrogen evolution when deposited on various supports [1, 2]. When these catalysts are deposited on p-type Si they can harvest the red part of the solar spectrum and potentially be coupled to CO2 hydrogenation [3-5]. Such a system could constitute the cathode part...... of a tandem dream device where the red part of the spectrum is utilized for solar fuel evolution, while the blue part is reserved for the more difficult oxygen evolution. Recently we have found that this system can be improved considerably using a np-Si systems [6] as recently described by the Nate Lewis...

  10. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  11. Eelgrass fairy rings: sulfide as inhibiting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borum, Jens; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    specifically, for the apparent die- off of eelgrass shoots on the inner side of the rings. The fairy rings were up to 15 m in diameter consisting of 0.3- to 1-m-wide zones of sea grass shoots at densities of up to 1,200 shoots m−2 and rooted in an up to 10-cm-thick sediment layer. On the outer side, shoots...... expanded over the bare chalk plates. On the inner side, shoots were smaller, had lower absolute and specific leaf growth, shoot density was lower and the sediment eroded leaving the bare chalk with scattered boulders behind. Sediment organic matter and nutrients and tissue nutrient contents were...... substantial invasion of sulfide from the sediment. neither the clonal growth pattern of eelgrass, sediment burial of shoots, hydrodynamic forcing nor nutrient limitation could explain the ring-shaped pattern. We conclude that the most likely explanation must be found in invasion of eelgrass shoots by toxic...

  12. On the pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palant, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Investigation results are discussed on the process of pelletizing with the use of various binders (water, syrup, sulfite-alcoholic residue and bentonite) for flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (∼84 % MoS 2 ) of the Mongolian deposit. It is established that with the use of syrup rather strong pellets (>300 g/p) of desired size (2-3 mm) can be obtained at a binder flowrate of 1 kg per 100 kg of concentrate. The main advantage of using syrup instead of bentonite lies in the fact that in this instance no depletion of a molybdenum calcine obtained by oxidizing roasting of raw ore takes place due to syrup complete burning out. This affects positively subsequent hydrometallurgical conversion because of decreasing molybdenum losses with waste cakes [ru

  13. Modulated structure calculated for superconducting hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Tse, John S.; Yao, Yansun [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2017-09-11

    Compression of hydrogen sulfide using first principles metadynamics and molecular dynamics calculations revealed a modulated structure with high proton mobility which exhibits a diffraction pattern matching well with experiment. The structure consists of a sublattice of rectangular meandering SH{sup -} chains and molecular-like H{sub 3}S{sup +} stacked alternately in tetragonal and cubic slabs forming a long-period modulation. The novel structure offers a new perspective on the possible origin of the superconductivity at very high temperatures in which the conducting electrons in the SH chains are perturbed by the fluxional motions of the H{sub 3}S resulting in strong electron-phonon coupling. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. New cyclic sulfides, garlicnins I2, M, N, and O, from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2018-01-01

    One atypical thiolane-type sulfide, garlicnin I 2 (1), two 3,4-dimethylthiolane-type sulfides, garlicnins M (2) and N (3), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin O (4), were isolated from the acetone extracts of Chinese garlic bulbs, Allium sativum and their structures were characterized. Hypothetical pathways for the production of the respective sulfides were discussed.

  15. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH3 phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH2, are calculated for the pressure interval 100-225 GPa. It is found that the I4/ mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH3 phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH2 phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH2 and SH3) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  16. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-01

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe 2 O 3 containing a crystalline phase of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected

  17. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO

    1991-01-01

    per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the sulfide zone....

  18. Thermoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The lanthanum sulfides are promising candidate materials for high-efficiency thermoelectric applications at temperatures up to 1300 0 C. The nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides (LaS /SUB x/ , where 1.33 2 //rho/ can be chosen. The thermal conductivity remains approximately constant with stoichiometry, so a material with an optimum value of α 2 //rho/ should possess the optimum figure-of-merit. Data for the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides is presented, together with structural properties of these materials

  19. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Chaocheng; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Yadong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-08-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide, and acetate into nitrogen gas, elemental sulfur (S(0)), and carbon dioxide, respectively. Sulfide- and nitrate-laden wastewaters at 2-35 g/L NaCl were treated by DSR process. A C/N ratio of 3:1 was proposed to maintain high S(0) conversion rate. The granular sludge with a compact structure and smooth outer surface was formed. The microbial communities of DSR consortium via high-throughput sequencing method suggested that salinity shifts the predominating heterotrophic denitrifiers at 10 g/L NaCl.

  20. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  1. Remediation of Sulfidic Wastewater by Aeration in the Presence of Ultrasonic Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ahmad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the aerial oxidation of sodium sulfide in the presence of ultrasonic vibration is investigated. Sulfide analysis was carried out by the methylene blue method. Sodium sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur in the presence of ultrasonic vibration. The influence of air flow rate, initial sodium sulfide concentration and ultrasonic vibration intensity on the oxidation of sodium sulfide was investigated. The rate law equation regarding the oxidation of sulfide was determined from the experimental data. The order of reaction with respect to sulfide and oxygen was found to be 0.36 and 0.67 respectively. The overall reaction followed nearly first order kinetics.

  2. Commercial application of titania-supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts in the production of hydrogen using full-range FCC off-gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaohu [SINOPEC Wuhan Branch, Qingshan, Wuhan 430082 (China); Shen, Binglong; Qu, Lianglong [Beijing Haishunde Titanium Catalyst Co. Ltd., A-1 North East-Ring Road, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China)

    2004-11-24

    This paper provides an alternative for low-cost feed used for on-purpose hydrogen production. Full-range FCC off-gas was applied to steam-reforming process as feed after treating with hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization catalysts. Commercial run results were reported with novel TiO{sub 2}-supported Mo-based catalysts, T205A-1 and T205. The processes of catalysts loading, sulfidation, start-up and long-term run were described in details. Long-term run showed that TiO{sub 2}-supported Mo catalysts have good low-temperature hydrogenation activity, excellent HDS activity, and outstanding stability. Use of FCC off-gas as feed for hydrogen production is quite promising and will increase margins for refiners today.

  3. Study to improve the quality of a Mexican straight run gasoil over NiMo/γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A.; Diaz-Garcia, L.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Cortez de la Paz, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Four NiMo catalyst supported on Al 2 O 3 with different textural properties have been studied in the hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) of a Mexican straight run gasoil (SRGO). All reactions were carried out at three different temperatures 613, 633, and 653 K. Alumina supports were analysed by pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption in order to determine their surface acidity and textural properties, respectively. TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were analysed to correlate their hydrogenating properties. Metallic particles were characterized (after sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of NiMo catalysts. The importance of textural properties on coke deposition has been emphasized. The results of catalytic activity of these materials varied depending on dispersed MoS particles and pore distribution in final catalysts. The optimum pore diameter was found around 80 A for HDS and HDN

  4. Study to improve the quality of a Mexican straight run gasoil over NiMo/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Crespo, M. A.; Díaz-García, L.; Arce-Estrada, E. M.; Torres-Huerta, A. M.; Cortéz-De la Paz, M. T.

    2006-11-01

    Four NiMo catalyst supported on Al 2O 3 with different textural properties have been studied in the hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) of a Mexican straight run gasoil (SRGO). All reactions were carried out at three different temperatures 613, 633, and 653 K. Alumina supports were analysed by pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption in order to determine their surface acidity and textural properties, respectively. TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were analysed to correlate their hydrogenating properties. Metallic particles were characterized (after sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of NiMo catalysts. The importance of textural properties on coke deposition has been emphasized. The results of catalytic activity of these materials varied depending on dispersed MoS particles and pore distribution in final catalysts. The optimum pore diameter was found around 80 Å for HDS and HDN.

  5. Hydrotreatment of bio-oil over Ni-based catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Zhang, Qi; Jiang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Inexpensive non-sulfided Ni-based catalysts were evaluated for hydrotreatments using phenol as model compound. HZSM-5, a zeolite with different ratio of Si/Al and γ-Al(2)O(3) were impregnated with Ni(NO(3))(2) · 6H(2)O and calcined at 450 °C. Conversion rates and product distribution for treatment of phenol at 160-240 °C in the presence of catalysts with nickel loads of 6, 10, 14 and 17 wt.% were determined. Phenol conversion was highest (91.8%) at 240 °C in the presence of HZSM-5(Si/Al = 38) loaded with 10% Ni. When hydrotreatment was carried out with bio-oil obtained from pyrolysis of pine sawdust under the optimal conditions determined for phenol, the pH of bio-oil increased from 2.27 to 4.07, and the hydrogen content increased from 6.28 to 7.01 wt.%. The decrease in acidity is desirable for the use of upgraded bio-oil. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  7. Enhanced sulfidation xanthate flotation of malachite using ammonium ions as activator

    OpenAIRE

    Dandan Wu; Wenhui Ma; Yingbo Mao; Jiushuai Deng; Shuming Wen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, ammonium ion was used to enhance the sulfidation flotation of malachite. The effect of ammonium ion on the sulfidation flotation of malachite was investigated using microflotation test, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, zeta potential measurements, and scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM). The results of microflotation test show that the addition of sodium sulfide and ammonium sulfate resulted in better sulfidation than the addition of sodium sulfide alone. The ...

  8. Deactivation and regeneration of refinery catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1979-08-01

    A discussion covers the mechanisms of catalyst aging, poisoning, coke deposition, and metals deposition; feedstock pretreatment to extend catalyst life; the effects of operating conditions; the effects of catalyst composition and structure on its stability; nonchemical deactivation processes; and methods of catalyst regeneration, including coke burn-off and solvent extraction.

  9. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  10. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  11. Mo-Co catalyst nanoparticles: Comparative study between TiN and Si surfaces for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morant, C., E-mail: c.morant@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Campo, T. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Marquez, F. [School of Science and Technology, University of Turabo, 00778-PR (United States); Domingo, C. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Highly pure single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were synthesized by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates partially covered by a thin layer of TiN. The TiN coating selectively prevented the growth of carbon nanotubes. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of high purity vertically aligned SWNT in the Si region. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy indicated that Co nanoparticles are present on the Si regions, and not on the TiN regions. This clearly explains the obtained experimental results: the SWNT only grow where the Co is presented as nanoparticles, i.e. on the Si regions. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) ontained by catalytic chemical vapor-deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substrate/Co-Mo catalyst behaviour plays a key role in the SWNT growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co nanoparticles (the effective catalyst) have been only observed on the Si region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High purity SWNT were spatially confined in specific locations (Si regions). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiN-coated surfaces, adjacent to a Si oxide region, prevent the growth of SWNT.

  12. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust over a Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Yeol; Kim, Hee Young [Division of Advanced Chemical Technology, Korea Reasearch Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 107, Yusong, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Seong Ihl [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Center for Ultramicrochemical Process Systems, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Kusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Taejon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-08

    The activities of Pt supported on various metal-substituted MCM-41 (V-, Ti-, Fe-, Al-, Ga-, La-, Co-, Mo-, Ce-, and Zr-MCM-41) and V-impregnated MCM-41 were investigated for the reduction of NO by C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Among these catalysts, Pt supported on V-impregnated MCM-41 showed the best activity. The maximum conversion of NO into N{sub 2}+N{sub 2}O over this Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst (Pt=1wt.%, V=3.8wt.%) was 73%, and this maximum conversion was sustained over a temperature range of 70C from 270 to 340C. The high activity of Pt/V/MCM-41 over a broad temperature range resulted from two additional reactions besides the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, the reaction of NO with surface carbonaceous materials, and the reaction of NO occurring on support V-impregnated MCM-41. The former additional reaction showed an oscillation characteristic, a phenomenon in which the concentrations of parts of reactant and product gases oscillate continuously. At low temperature, some water vapor injected into the reactant gas mixture promoted the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, whereas at high temperature, it suppressed the additional reaction related to carbonaceous materials. Five-hundred parts per million of SO{sub 2} added to the reactant gas mixture only slightly decreased the NO conversion of Pt/V/MCM-41.

  13. Instrument for Airborne Measurement of Carbonyl Sulfide, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop small, low power instrumentation for the real-time direct measurement of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) in the atmosphere, especially...

  14. Formation of Copper Sulfide Precipitate in Solid Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    The growth rate of copper sulfide precipitates has been measured in low carbon steel samples such as Fe-0.3mass%Cu-0.03mass%S-0.1mass%C and Fe-0.1mass%Cu-0.01mass%S- 0.1mass%C. Heat-treatment of the samples was conducted at 1273, 1423 and 1573 K for 100 s - 14.4 ks for precipitation of copper sulfides and then the samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope to measure the diameter of copper sulfides precipitated in the samples. The growth rate of copper sulfide has been found to be well described by the Ostwald growth model, as follows: R\

  15. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  16. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  17. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  18. Recuperação de metais de catalisadores de hidrorrefino usados via fusão com KHSO4 Recovery of elements from spent hydrorefining catalysts after fusion with KHSO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Carlos Afonso

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a process for metal recovery from spent NiMo and CoMo/Al2O3 commercial hydrorefining catalysts. The samples were treated by fusion with potassium hydrogen sulfate (5 h, 600 ºC with a KHSO4/catalyst mass ratio of 10:1. After fusion the solid was solubilized in water (100 ºC, leaving silicon compounds as residue. Losses of nickel and cobalt may reach 16 wt% of the amount present in the sample, depending on the silicon content. Soluble metals were isolated by selective precipitation techniques (nickel, cobalt, aluminum or by solvent extraction with methyl-isobutyl ketone (molybdenum in a hydrochloric acid medium. All metals were recovered in very good yields except for nickel and cobalt in the presence of considerable amounts of silicon. Soluble wastes consist of potassium/sodium sulfates/chlorides. Solid wastes correspond to about 4 wt% of the catalyst and can be discarded in industrial dumps.

  19. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  20. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  1. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation without oxygen - oxidation products and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossing, H.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation was studied in anoxic marine sediments-both in undisturbed sediment cores and in sediment slurries. The turn over of hydrogen sulfide was followed using 35 S-radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide which was injected into the sediment. However, isotope exchange reactions between the reduced sulfur compounds, in particular between elemental sulfur and hydrogen sulfide, influenced on the specific radioactivity of these pools. It was, therefore, not possible to measure the turn over rates of the reduced sulfur pools by the radiotracer technique but merely to use the radioisotope to demonstrate some of the oxidation products. Thiosulfate was one important intermediate in the anoxic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and was continuously turned over by reduction, oxidation and disproportionation. The author discusses the importance of isotope exchange and also presents the results from experiments in which both 35 S-radiolabeled elemental sulfur, radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide and radiolabeled thiosulfate were used to study the intermediates in the oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle

  2. Bioavailability and stability of mercury sulfide in Armuchee (USA) soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Su, Yi; Monts, David L.; Waggoner, Charles A.; Matta, Frank B.

    2007-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate mercury-contaminated DOE sites. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the ecosystem. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide in an Armuchee (eastern US ) soil. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of mercury sulfide by various extractants. The results show that mercury sulfide in contaminated Armuchee soil was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. After planting, soil mercury sulfide is more easily dissolved by both 4 M and 12 M nitric acid than pure mercury sulfide reagent. Dissolution kinetics of soil mercury sulfide and pure chemical reagent by nitric acid are different. Mercury release by EDTA from HgS-contaminated soil increased with time of reaction and soil mercury level. Chelating chemicals increase the solubility and bioavailability of mercury in HgS-contaminated soil. (authors)

  3. Laser cleaning of sulfide scale on compressor impeller blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Q.H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y.L.; Liu, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of sulfide layers and fluence values on the mechanism of laser cleaning were experimentally established. • The specimen surface with sulfide scale becomes slightly smoother than that before laser cleaning. • The mechanism of laser cleaning the sulfide scale of stainless steel is spallation without oxidization. • It would avoid chemical waste and dust pollution using a fiber laser instead of using nitric acids or sandblasting. - Abstract: Sulfide scale on the surface of a compressor impeller blade can considerably reduce the impeller performance and its service life. To prepare for subsequent remanufacturing, such as plasma spraying, it needs to be removed completely. In the corrosion process on an FV(520)B stainless steel, sulfide scale is divided into two layers because of different outward diffusion rates of Cr, Ni and Fe. In this paper, the cleaning threshold values of the upper and inner layers and the damage threshold value of the substrate were investigated using a pulsed fiber laser. To obtain experimental evidence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D surface profilometry were employed to investigate the two kinds of sulfide layers on specimens before, during, and after laser cleaning.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3  7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiological behavior of hydrogen sulfide in rice plant. Part 5. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on respiration of rice roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, H; Takagi, S

    1955-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of hydrogen sulfide on the respiration of rice plant roots were investigated using Warburg's manometory technique. Hydrogen sulfide inhibited not only aerobic respiration but anaerobic respiration process of roots. Inhibitory action of hydrogen sulfide and potassium cyanide on the respiration were apparently reversible, but the style of recovery reaction from inhibition was somewhat different in each case. Oxygen consumption of roots was increased by addition of ammonium salts, but the same effects were not recognized by the addition of any other salt examined (except nitrate salts). There was close relationship between respiration of roots and assimilation of nitrogen by roots. The increased oxygen uptake by addition of ammonium salt was also inhibited by hydrogen sulfide. The reactivation of this reaction occurred with the recovery of endogenous respiration of roots. 19 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  6. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  7. Thiosulfate leaching of gold from sulfide wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block-Bolten, A.; Torma, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    The kinetics of gold extraction from lead-zinc sulfide flotation tailings by thiosulfate leachants has been investigated. The order of reaction as well as the overall reaction rate constant were, with respect to thiosulfate concentration, calculated to be n=0.75 and k=1.05 x 10/sup -6/ mol/sup 1/4/ dm/sup 5/4/ min/sup -1/. The apparent activation energy was found to be ..delta..E/sub a/=48.53 kJ and the frequency factor A=7.5 x 10/sup 2/ mol dm/sup -3/ min/sup -1/. This activation energy value suggests chemical control of the reaction mechanism. Optimum leach temperature of 50/sup 0/C was established. Gold extractions as high as 99% have been realized in two step countercurrent leachings. Change in pH throughout the leaching process was found to be an excellent indicator for the progress of the extraction. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process is given.

  8. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  9. HDS, HDN and HDA activities of nickel-molybdenum catalysts supported on alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya. Avenida Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No.152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (CICATA-Altamira, IPN) Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-puerto Industrial 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Ramirez-Meneses, E. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (CICATA-Altamira, IPN) Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-puerto Industrial 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Diaz-Garcia, L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya. Avenida Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No.152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Arce-Estrada, E.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Metalurgia y Materiales. A.P. 75-876, 07300 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    In this work, NiMo-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by using different alumina precursors. The supports were impregnated by means of the spray at incipient wetness technique in both basic and acid media. Both the supports and fresh catalysts were characterized by the adsorption-desorption isotherms, Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR), Thermal Pyridine Adsorption-Desorption (TPD) and X-Ray Diffraction analyses (XRD). After sulfidation, the NiMoS metallic particles were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The initial analyses were performed in a trickle-bed reactor by using a real feedstock (Mexican heavy gas oil) and performing hydrotreating reactions (HDS, HDN and HDA) at three different temperatures: 613, 633 and 653 K; and 54 kg cm{sup -} {sup 2}. The catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of the NiMo catalysts, alumina phase and pH of the impregnating solution. The catalytic results show an increase in the conversion profiles with temperature. The sulfur conversion was increased from 89 to 99.25%, 91-99%, 90.8-97%, 83-95% and 78-96% when the crystal size of the support varied from 3 to 20 nm, respectively. The nitrogen and aromatic conversions were also increased in the range of 23-45 wt.%. It was found that the {gamma} phase reached a higher catalytic performance than the {eta} phase. The NiMo catalysts synthesized in a basic medium showed a better catalytic performance than that obtained with those prepared in acid solutions. The significance of the kinetic data to compare the catalysts is discussed. The maximum value of the catalytic activity was reached with the catalysts with the smallest particle sizes. (author)

  10. Hydroprocessing catalysts utilization and regeneration schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    The catalyst reactor inventory represents an important part of the cost of hydroprocessing operation. The selection of a suitable catalyst and reactor is influenced by feedstock properties. Processes ensuring an uninterrupted operation during catalyst addition and withdrawal are preferred for processing high asphaltene and metal content feedstocks. The spent catalyst can be regenerated and returned to the operation if the extent of its deactivation is not high. The regeneration may be performed either in-situ or off-site. The former is suitable for fixed bed reactors whereas the catalyst from ebullated bed reactors must be regenerated off-site. The regeneration of spent catalysts heavily loaded with metals such as V, Ni and Fe may not be economic. Such catalysts may be suitable for metal reclamation. An environmentally safe method for catalyst disposal must be found if neither regeneration nor metal reclamation from spent catalysts can be performed.

  11. Report on the achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1991 on research and development of coal energy. Studies on coal liquefying catalysts and a method for analyzing liquefied oil; 1991 nendo sekitan ekikayo shokubai oyobi ekikayu bunseikiho no kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1991 on research of coal liquefying catalysts and a method for analyzing liquefied oil. Alkalis and alkali earth metals present during coal liquefied oil hydrogenation treatment deteriorate the activity remarkably as an effect of metal deposition from an Mo-based catalyst on the activity deterioration. Discussions were given on hydrogenating decomposition paths for bi-cyclic compounds by using reaction of model substances. Preliminary discussions were given jointly under the Japanese and Canadian technical cooperation on enhancing the quality of co-treated oil in the coal liquefaction, and on catalysts used therein. A 1-t/d PSU circulating solvent was studied to support the NEDO's bituminous coal liquefaction program. Analyses were carried out on acenaphthenes, biphenyls, phenanthrenes, and anthracenes in the oil liquefied from Wandoan coal. Discussions were given on CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the effects of catalyst concentrations and particle sizes in the coal liquefying reaction. In order to elucidate different non-covalently bonded high-order structures of coal polymer assemblies, chemical treatment was applied to coals under a relatively mild condition (room temperature to 150 degrees C). Chemical structures as a result of the non-covalent bond in the coals were investigated from change due to the treatment in the pyridine extraction characteristics. (NEDO)

  12. Report on the achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1991 on research and development of coal energy. Studies on coal liquefying catalysts and a method for analyzing liquefied oil; 1991 nendo sekitan ekikayo shokubai oyobi ekikayu bunseikiho no kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1991 on research of coal liquefying catalysts and a method for analyzing liquefied oil. Alkalis and alkali earth metals present during coal liquefied oil hydrogenation treatment deteriorate the activity remarkably as an effect of metal deposition from an Mo-based catalyst on the activity deterioration. Discussions were given on hydrogenating decomposition paths for bi-cyclic compounds by using reaction of model substances. Preliminary discussions were given jointly under the Japanese and Canadian technical cooperation on enhancing the quality of co-treated oil in the coal liquefaction, and on catalysts used therein. A 1-t/d PSU circulating solvent was studied to support the NEDO's bituminous coal liquefaction program. Analyses were carried out on acenaphthenes, biphenyls, phenanthrenes, and anthracenes in the oil liquefied from Wandoan coal. Discussions were given on CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the effects of catalyst concentrations and particle sizes in the coal liquefying reaction. In order to elucidate different non-covalently bonded high-order structures of coal polymer assemblies, chemical treatment was applied to coals under a relatively mild condition (room temperature to 150 degrees C). Chemical structures as a result of the non-covalent bond in the coals were investigated from change due to the treatment in the pyridine extraction characteristics. (NEDO)

  13. Adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Qicheng; Wen, Shuming; Zhao, Wenjuan; Deng, Jiushuai; Xian, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new discussion on the lead sulfide species is introduced. • The Na_2S concentration determines cerussite sulfidization. • The activity of lead sulfide species also determines cerussite sulfidization. • Disulfide and polysulfide in lead sulfide species affect its activity. - Abstract: The adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, micro-flotation tests, and surface adsorption experiments. The XPS analysis results indicated that lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface after treatment by Na_2S, and the increase in the Na_2S concentration was beneficial for sulfidization. In addition to the content of lead sulfide species, its activity, which was determined by the proportion of sulfide, disulfide and polysulfide, also played an important role in cerussite sulfidization. Micro-flotation tests results demonstrated that insufficient or excessive addition of Na_2S in pulp solutions has detrimental effects on flotation performance, which was attributed to the dosage of Na_2S and the activity of lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface. Surface adsorption experiments of sulfide ions determined the residual S concentrations in pulp solutions and provided a quantitative illustration for the inhibition of cerussite flotation by excessive sulfide ions. Moreover, it also revealed that sulfide ions in the pulp solution were transformed onto the mineral surface and formed lead sulfide species. These results showed that both of lead sulfide species and its activity acted as an important role in sulfidization flotation process of cerussite.

  14. Adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Qicheng [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Wen, Shuming, E-mail: fqckmust@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Wenjuan [Kunming Metallurgical Research Institute, Kunming 650031 (China); Deng, Jiushuai; Xian, Yongjun [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new discussion on the lead sulfide species is introduced. • The Na{sub 2}S concentration determines cerussite sulfidization. • The activity of lead sulfide species also determines cerussite sulfidization. • Disulfide and polysulfide in lead sulfide species affect its activity. - Abstract: The adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, micro-flotation tests, and surface adsorption experiments. The XPS analysis results indicated that lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface after treatment by Na{sub 2}S, and the increase in the Na{sub 2}S concentration was beneficial for sulfidization. In addition to the content of lead sulfide species, its activity, which was determined by the proportion of sulfide, disulfide and polysulfide, also played an important role in cerussite sulfidization. Micro-flotation tests results demonstrated that insufficient or excessive addition of Na{sub 2}S in pulp solutions has detrimental effects on flotation performance, which was attributed to the dosage of Na{sub 2}S and the activity of lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface. Surface adsorption experiments of sulfide ions determined the residual S concentrations in pulp solutions and provided a quantitative illustration for the inhibition of cerussite flotation by excessive sulfide ions. Moreover, it also revealed that sulfide ions in the pulp solution were transformed onto the mineral surface and formed lead sulfide species. These results showed that both of lead sulfide species and its activity acted as an important role in sulfidization flotation process of cerussite.

  15. Chemical and colloidal aspects of collectorless flotation behavior of sulfide and non-sulfide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Sajjad; Mousavinezhad, Seyed Kamal; Gharabaghi, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Flotation has been widely used for separation of valuable minerals from gangues based on their surface characterizations and differences in hydrophobicity on mineral surfaces. As hydrophobicity of minerals widely differs from each other, their separation by flotation will become easier. Collectors are chemical materials which are supposed to make selectively valuable minerals hydrophobic. In addition, there are some minerals which based on their surface and structural features are intrinsically hydrophobic. However, their hydrophobicities are not strong enough to be floatable in the flotation cell without collectors such as sulfide minerals, coal, stibnite, and so forth. To float these minerals in a flotation cell, their hydrophobicity should be increased in specific conditions. Various parameters including pH, Eh, size distribution, mill types, mineral types, ore characterization, and type of reaction in flotation cells affect the hydrophobicity of minerals. Surface analysis results show that when sulfide minerals experience specific flotation conditions, the reactions on the surface of these minerals increase the amount of sulfur on the surface. These phenomenons improve the hydrophobicity of these minerals due to strong hydrophobic feature of sulfurs. Collectorless flotation reduces chemical material consumption amount, increases flotation selectivity (grade increases), and affects the equipment quantities; however, it can also have negative effects. Some minerals with poor surface floatability can be increased by adding some ions to the flotation system. Depressing undesirable minerals in flotation is another application of collectorless flotation.

  16. Silver sulfide nanoparticle assembly obtained by reacting an assembled silver nanoparticle template with hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Nuhfer, Noel T; Moussa, Laura; Morris, Hannah R; Whitmore, Paul M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple procedure is described for obtaining an assembly of silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag(2)S NPs) on a glass substrate through reaction of a template of an assembled layer of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) gas. The Ag NP template was prepared by assembling a monolayer of spherical Ag NPs (mean diameter of 7.4 nm) on a polyethylenimine-treated glass substrate. Exposure to pure H(2)S for 10 min converted the Ag NPs of the template to Ag(2)S NPs. The resulting Ag(2)S NP assembly, which retains the template nanostructure and particle distribution, was characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning high resolution TEM, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ag(2)S NPs have a crystal structure of monoclinic acanthite, and while they retained the spherical shape of the original Ag NPs, their mean particle size increased to 8.4 nm due to changes to the crystal structure when the Ag NPs are converted into Ag(2)S NPs. The measured optical absorption edge of the Ag(2)S NP assembly indicated an indirect interband transition with a band gap energy of 1.71 eV. The Ag(2)S NP assembly absorbed light with wavelengths below 725 nm, and the absorbance increased monotonically toward the UV region.

  17. Study on the influence of nickel and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support on MoS{sub 2} as hydrodenitrogenation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, J.; Hrabar, A.; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2012-07-01

    Alumina-supported Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts as well as an unsupported NiMo catalyst were characterized and tested in the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline in the presence of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The supported catalysts had a well dispersed MoS{sub 2} phase with an average stacking degree around two and slabs length below 10 nm. The unsupported NiMo sulfide catalyst exhibited long, multistacked MoS{sub 2} slabs and contained segregated Ni{sub x}S{sub y} phases. The formation of the Ni-Mo-S phase in both Ni containing catalysts was verified by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, whereas the concentration of coordinatively unsaturated sites was higher for the supported Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts than for the unsupported one. All catalysts were active in the HDN of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization of DBT. The catalytic activity increased in the order Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} < NiMo/unsupported < Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Thus, the influence on the catalytic activity of the promoter metal Ni is more important than the presence of a support due to the formation of the Ni-Mo-S phase (more active than MoS{sub 2}). (orig.)

  18. Studies on recycling and utilization of spent catalysts. Preparation of active hydrodemetallization catalyst compositions from spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, Meena; Stanislaus, Antony [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, Safat (Kuwait)

    2007-02-15

    Spent catalysts form a major source of solid wastes in the petroleum refining industries. Due to environmental concerns, increasing emphasis has been placed on the development of recycling processes for the waste catalyst materials as much as possible. In the present study the potential reuse of spent catalysts in the preparation of active new catalysts for residual oil hydrotreating was examined. A series of catalysts were prepared by mixing and extruding spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts that contained C, V, Mo, Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with boehmite in different proportions. All prepared catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis and by surface area, pore volume, pore size and crushing strength measurements. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) activities of the catalysts were evaluated by testing in a high pressure fixed-bed microreactor unit using Kuwait atmospheric residue as feed. A commercial HDM catalyst was also tested under similar operating conditions and their HDS and HDM activities were compared with that of the prepared catalysts. The results revealed that catalyst prepared with addition of up to 40 wt% spent catalyst to boehmite had fairly high surface area and pore volume together with large pores. The catalyst prepared by mixing and extruding about 40 wt% spent catalyst with boehmite was relatively more active for promoting HDM and HDS reactions than a reference commercial HDM catalyst. The formation of some kind of new active sites from the metals (V, Mo and Ni) present in the spent catalyst is suggested to be responsible for the high HDM activity of the prepared catalyst. (author)

  19. Activation mechanism of ammonium ions on sulfidation of malachite (-201) surface by DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Mao, Yingbo; Deng, Jiushuai; Wen, Shuming

    2017-07-01

    The activation mechanism of ammonium ions on the sulfidation of malachite (-201) was determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Results of DFT calculations indicated that interlayer sulfidation occurs during the sulfidation process of malachite (-201). The absorption of both the ammonium ion and sulfide ion on the malachite (-201) surface is stronger than that of sulfur ion. After sulfidation was activated with ammonium ion, the Cu 3d orbital peak is closer to the Fermi level and characterized by a stronger peak value. Therefore, the addition of ammonium ions activated the sulfidation of malachite (-201), thereby improving the flotation performance.

  20. Cuprous sulfide as a film insulation for superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.R.; Uphoff, J.H.; Vecchio, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    The LCP test coil utilizes a conductor of forced-flow design having 486 strands of multifilametary Nb 3 Sn compacted in a stainless steel sheath. The impetus for the work reported here stemmed from the need for some form of insulation for those strands to prevent sintering during reaction and to reduce ac losses. The work reported here experimented with cuprous sulfide coatings at various coating rates and thicknesses. Two solenoids that were wound with cuprous sulfide-coated wires and heat-treated at 700 degrees C were found to demonstrate that the film is effective in providing turn-to-turn insulation for less than about 0.5V between turns. The sulfide layer provided a metal-semiconductor junction which became conducting at roughly 0.5V. Repeated cycling of the coil voltage in excess of that value produced no damage to the sulfide layer. The junction provided self-protection for the coil as long as the upper allowable current density in the sulfide was not exceeded. No training was apparent up to 6.4 T

  1. Sulfide Species Optical Monitoring by a Miniaturized Silicon Photomultiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Petralia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of water-soluble pollutants is receiving a growing interest from the scientific community. In this context, sulfide anion species S2− and HS− are particularly relevant since they can cause acute and chronic toxicity including neurological effects and at high concentrations, even death. In this study, a new strategy for fast and sensitive optical detection of sulfide species in water samples is described. The method uses an integrated silicon photomultiplier (SiPM device coupled with the appropriate analytical strategy applied in a plastic microchip with dried reagents on board. More specifically, all sulfide species (H2S, HS− and S2− in water samples are detected by the fluorescence signal emitted upon the reaction with N,N-dimethyl-phenylenediamine sulfate in the presence of Fe3+, leading to the formation of the fluorescent methylene blue (MB species. It has been proven that the system herein proposed is able to measure sulfide concentration in a linear range from 0–10 mg L−1 with a sensitivity value of about 6.7 µA mg−1 L and a detection limit of 0.5 mg L−1. A comparison with conventional UV-Vis detection method has been also carried out. Data show a very good linear correlation (R2 = 0.98093, proving the effectiveness of the method. Results pave the way toward the development of portable and low-cost device systems for water-soluble sulfide pollutants.

  2. Rota hidrometalúrgica de recuperação de molibdênio, cobalto, níquel e alumínio de catalisadores gastos de hidrotratamento em meio ácido Hydrometallurgical route to recover molybdenum, nickel, cobalt and aluminum from spent hydrotreating catalysts in acid medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivam Macedo Valverde Júnior

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a hydrometallurgical route for processing spent commercial catalysts (CoMo and NiMo/Al2O3. Samples were preoxidized (500 ºC, 5 h in order to eliminate coke and other volatile species present. The calcined solid was dissolved in concentrated H2SO4 and water (1:1 vol/vol at 90 ºC; the insoluble matter was separated from the solution. Molybdenum was recovered by solvent extraction using tertiary amines at pH around 1.8. Cobalt (or nickel was separated by addition of aqueous ammonium oxalate at the above pH. Phosphorus was removed by passing the liquid through a strong anion exchange column. Aluminum was recovered by neutralizing the solution with NaOH. The route presented in this work generates less final aqueous wastes because it is not necessary to use alkaline medium during the metal recovery steps.

  3. Modification of the properties of Pt-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts by hydrogen at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, P.G.; Froment, G.F.

    1979-08-01

    Pulse reactor studies were performed on the hydrogenolysis of n-pentane and n-hexane at 400/sup 0/C on two commercial reforming catalysts that contained 0.6 and 0.75% platinum on alumina, respectively, and which were calcined in air at 500/sup 0/C, followed by hydrogen-reduction at 400/sup 0/-600/sup 0/C. On catalysts reduced at 400/sup 0/C, hydrogenolysis was the main reaction; with increasing reducing temperature, hydrogenolysis was suppressed and isomerization selectivity increased; at 550/sup 0/C pretreatment temperature, hydrogenolysis was near zero. This selective catalyst deactivation was reversed by oxidizing the catalyst in air at 500/sup 0/C in a similar manner as previously found for sulfided and chlorided catalysts. Temperature-programed desorption of hydrogen adsorbed at 20/sup 0/-600/sup 0/C revealed that the higher the adsorption temperature, the higher the temperature of the hydrogen desorption peaks: the hydrogen adsorbed below 400/sup 0/C desorbed mainly at 50/sup 0/-300/sup 0/C, but the hydrogen adsorbed at higher temperatures desorbed at 300/sup 0/-500/sup 0/C. Apparently, two types of hydrogen adsorb in the two temperature regions, of which the more strongly adsorbed type inhibits hydrogenolysis but not isomerization.

  4. Reactive removal of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide vapors under visible light irradiation by cerium oxide modified highly porous zirconium (hydr) oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Joshua K.; Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A.; Bandosz, Teresa J., E-mail: tbandosz@ccny.cuny.edu

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Microporous zirconium-cerium (hydr) oxides were synthetized. • Ce presence narrowed the band gap of the materials. • The samples showed a high efficiency for removal of CEES vapors. • 1,2-Bis (ethyl thio) ethane and ethyl vinyl sulfide were the main reaction products. • 5% (Ce/Zr mol) addition of cerium oxide results in the best performing material. - Abstract: Highly porous cerium oxide modified Zr(OH){sub 4} samples were synthesized using a simple one stage urea precipitation method. The amorphicity level of zirconium hydroxide did not change upon addition of cerium oxide particles. A unique aspect of the cerium oxide-modified materials is the presence of both the oxide (CeO{sub 2}) and hydroxide (Zr(OH){sub 4}) phases resulting in a unique microporous structure of the final material. Extensive characterization using various chemical and physical methods revealed significant differences in the surface features. All synthesized materials were microporous and small additions of cerium oxide affected the surface chemistry. These samples were found as effective catalysts for a decontamination of mustard gas surrogate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Cerium oxide addition significantly decreased the band gap of zirconium hydroxide. Ethyl vinyl sulfide and 1,2-bis (Ethyl thio) ethane were identified as surface reaction products.

  5. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  6. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  7. exchanged Mg-Al hydrotalcite catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) catalysts, ... The catalyst can be easily separated by simple filtration ... surface area by the single-point N2 adsorption method ... concentration of carbonate anions (by treating the cat- .... hydrotalcite phase along with copper hydroxide and.

  8. Use of lanthanide catalysts in air electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Parente, L.T. de

    1982-01-01

    A review on the lanthanide catalysts suitable for the reduction catalysis of oxygen in air electrodes is presented. The kinds of lanthanide indicated to be used as catalysts of oxygen reduction are shown. (A.R.H.) [pt

  9. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  10. Polymer-bound rhodium hydroformylation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Tjeerd

    1992-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysts are superior in activity, selectivity as well as specificity, but heterogeneous catalyst are often preferred in industrial processes, because of their good recoverability and their applicability in continuous flow reactors. It would be of great environmental, commercial and

  11. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  12. A novel magnetically recyclable heterogeneous catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    propanesultone. 1. Introduction ... O. Scheme 2. The reaction of benzaldehyde with 1-phenyl-3- ... (2 mmol), catalyst (2 mol%, except for entries 7 and 9), room temperature. bCatalyst = 1 .... The electronic supporting information can be seen in.

  13. Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Kessler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc.

  14. Hydrothermal performance of catalyst supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Libera, Joseph A.; Dumesic, James A.; Pagan-Torres, Yomaira J.

    2018-04-10

    A high surface area catalyst with a mesoporous support structure and a thin conformal coating over the surface of the support structure. The high surface area catalyst support is adapted for carrying out a reaction in a reaction environment where the thin conformal coating protects the support structure within the reaction environment. In various embodiments, the support structure is a mesoporous silica catalytic support and the thin conformal coating comprises a layer of metal oxide resistant to the reaction environment which may be a hydrothermal environment.

  15. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  16. Preparation of inorganic hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi; Du, Yang

    2009-04-01

    In order to catalyse the oxidation of tritium gas, two inorganic hydrophobic catalysts are prepared. Under room temperature, the catalysed oxidation ratio of 0.3%-1% (V/V) hydrogen gas in air is higher than 95%. Pt-II inorganic hydrophobic catalysts has obviously better catalysing ability than Pt-PTFE and lower ability than Pt-SDB in H 2 -HTO isotopic exchange, because the pressure resistence of Pt-II is much higher than Pt-SDB, it can be used to the CECE cell of heavy water detritium system. (authors)

  17. Separation of platinum metals by theirs extraction as sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Ryabushko, O.P.; Ty Van Mak

    1978-01-01

    Separation of platinum metals by means of their sediment in the form of sulfides with subsequent extraction is studied. The optimum conditions of metal sulfide extraction are determined, the metal output dependence from acidness and aqueous phase composition and also the organic solvent nature are investigated. Ruthenium concentration was determined photometrically. Ruthenium sulfide is extracted by butyl spirit from 1-4 normal hydrochloric acid. The maximum extraction grade of 63% is reached in 3.2-normal acid. When the mixture of acetic and hydrochloric acids (2:1) is used for decomposition of ruthenium tiosalts, the grade of ruthenium extraction by amyl spirit or the mixture of anyl and butyl spirits (1:1) constitutes 100%

  18. Metal sulfide electrodes and energy storage devices thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Woodford, William Henry; Li, Zheng; Carter, W. Craig

    2017-02-28

    The present invention generally relates to energy storage devices, and to metal sulfide energy storage devices in particular. Some aspects of the invention relate to energy storage devices comprising at least one flowable electrode, wherein the flowable electrode comprises an electroactive metal sulfide material suspended and/or dissolved in a carrier fluid. In some embodiments, the flowable electrode further comprises a plurality of electronically conductive particles suspended and/or dissolved in the carrier fluid, wherein the electronically conductive particles form a percolating conductive network. An energy storage device comprising a flowable electrode comprising a metal sulfide electroactive material and a percolating conductive network may advantageously exhibit, upon reversible cycling, higher energy densities and specific capacities than conventional energy storage devices.

  19. Preparation of transition metal sulfide nanoparticles via hydrothermal route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei-Ling, P.; Chin-Hua, C.; Sarani Zakaria; Tze-Khong, L.; Mohd Ambar Yarmo; Nay-Ming, H.

    2010-01-01

    Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesised via a simple hydrothermal method. Sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na 2 S 2 O 3 ·5H 2 O) and hydroxylamine sulfate ((H 3 NO) 2 ·H 2 SO 4 ) were used as the starting materials and reacted with the transition metal source at 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Spherical shape CuS and FeS 2 nanoparticles with high crystallinity were successfully produced. The transmission electron micrographs revealed the well-dispersibility of the produced nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrograph showed the MoS 2 nanoparticles possessed a spherical shape with sheet-like structure covering on the outer surface of the particles. (author)

  20. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    , but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped (1.3- to 2.5- by 4- to 10-µm) cells that multiply by binary division and contain several spherical inclusions of poly......We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients......, forming a cohesive whitish veil at the oxic-anoxic interface. Bacteria attached to the veil kept rotating and adapted their stalk lengths dynamically to changing oxygen concentrations. The joint action of rotating bacteria on the veil induced a homogeneous water flow from the oxic water region toward...

  1. Study of radiation synovectomy using 188Re-sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gang; Li Peiyong; Jiang Xufeng; Zhang Liying; Wang Xuefeng; Sun Zhenming; Zhang Huan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiation synovectomy with 188 Re-sulfide. Methods: Thirty cases were divided into 2 groups, the group with hemophilia and the group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with joint synovitis were injected different doses of 188 Re-sulfide, 222 - 444 MBq intra-articular. MRI was taken before and 3 - 6 months after the radiation synovectomy to evaluate the treatment efficacy, and the symptoms were also evaluated. Results: MRI study showed that after the treatment the synovium became thiner and the edema was reduced in the lesioned joint. The symptoms were improved with the pain relieved and duration of intra-articular hemorrhage reduced. Conclusions: Radiation synovectomy using 188 Re-sulfide has effects on synovitis. It can be used clinically to improve the symptoms of joint synovitis and reduce the duration of intra-articular hemorrhage

  2. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  3. Rare behaviour of a catalyst pellet catalyst dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Loonen, R.A.; Martens, A.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature overshoots and undershoots were found for a Pd on alumina catalyst pellet in its course towards a new steady state after a change in concentration of one of the reactants ethylene or hydrogen. When cooling the pellet, after heat-up by reaction, with pure hydrogen a sudden temperature

  4. Colloidal nanoparticles as catalysts and catalyst precursors for nitrite hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yingnan

    2015-01-01

    The most distinguished advantage to use colloidal methods for catalyst preparation is that the size and the shape of nanoparticles can be manipulated easily under good control, which is normally difficult to achieve by using traditional methods, such as impregnation and precipitation. This

  5. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT CARBON NANOTUBE MODIFIED ELECTRODES. (R830900)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibiting a strong and stable electrocatalytic response towards sulfide are described. A substantial (400 mV) decrease in the overvoltage of the sulfide oxidation reaction (compared to ordinary carbon electrodes) is...

  6. Oxidative desulfurization of diesel by potato based-carbon as green support for H5PMo10V2O40: Efficient composite nanorod catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat Rafiee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The C@POM (carbon@polyoxometalate containing H3PMo12O40 (PMo12, H5PMo10V2O40 (PMo10V2, H6PMo9V3O40 (PMo9V3, H7PMo8V4O40 (PMo8V4, H3PW12O40 (PW, and H4SiW12O40 (SiW were prepared from natural potato as green, and cheap catalyst support source. The C@PMo10V2 was found to be a unique, effective, and eco-friendly catalyst for selective oxidation of sulfides, using 30% aq. H2O2. C@PMo10V2 composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrophotometry, zeta sizer, and zeta potential. The XRD results show that during immobilization PMo10V2 on the carbon catalyst support (CCS, the crystallite structure of PMo10V2 and CCS was not changed. The SEM results show that PMo10V2 crystals deposited on the surface CCS rods as composite nanorod structure. A variety of sulfides, sulfur-containing model and real oil were oxidized with the C@PMo10V2/H2O2 at room temperature. Recovered catalyst show excellent activity for at least four repeating cycles.

  7. Tungsten-Based Mesoporous Silicates W-MMM-E as Heterogeneous Catalysts for Liquid-Phase Oxidations with Aqueous H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Maksimchuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous tungsten-silicates, W-MMM-E, have been prepared following evaporation-induced self-assembly methodology and characterized by elemental analysis, XRD, N2 adsorption, STEM-HAADF (high angle annular dark field in scanning-TEM mode, DRS UV-vis, and Raman techniques. DRS UV-vis showed the presence of two types of tungsten oxo-species in W-MMM-E samples: isolated tetrahedrally and oligomeric octahedrally coordinated ones, with the ratio depending on the content of tungsten in the catalyst. Materials with lower W loading have a higher contribution from isolated species, regardless of the preparation method. W-MMM-E catalyzes selectively oxidize of a range of alkenes and organic sulfides, including bulky terpene or thianthrene molecules, using green aqueous H2O2. The selectivity of corresponding epoxides reached 85–99% in up to 80% alkene conversions, while sulfoxides formed with 84–90% selectivity in almost complete sulfide conversions and a 90–100% H2O2 utilization efficiency. The true heterogeneity of catalysis over W-MMM-E was proved by hot filtration tests. Leaching of inactive W species depended on the reaction conditions and initial W loading in the catalyst. After optimization of the catalyst system, it did not exceed 20 ppm and 3 ppm for epoxidation and sulfoxidation reactions, respectively. Elaborated catalysts could be easily retrieved by filtration and reused several times with maintenance of the catalytic behavior.

  8. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrolase stabilization via entanglement in poly(propylene sulfide) nanoparticles: stability towards reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Brett L; Johnson, Jermaine D; Walker, Jeremy P

    2012-01-01

    In the advancement of green syntheses and sustainable reactions, enzymatic biocatalysis offers extremely high reaction rates and selectivity that goes far beyond the reach of chemical catalysts; however, these enzymes suffer from typical environmental constraints, e.g. operational temperature, pH and tolerance to oxidative environments. A common hydrolase enzyme, diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase, EC 3.1.8.2), has demonstrated a pronounced efficacy for the hydrolysis of a variety of substrates for potential toxin remediation, but suffers from the aforementioned limitations. As a means to enhance DFPase’s stability in oxidative environments, enzymatic covalent immobilization within the polymeric matrix of poly(propylene sulfide) (PPS) nanoparticles was performed. By modifying the enzyme’s exposed lysine residues via thiolation, DFPase is utilized as a comonomer/crosslinker in a mild emulsion polymerization. The resultant polymeric polysulfide shell acts as a ‘sacrificial barrier’ by first oxidizing to polysulfoxides and polysulfones, rendering DFPase in an active state. DFPase–PPS nanoparticles thus retain activity upon exposure to as high as 50 parts per million (ppm) of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), while native DFPase is observed as inactive at 500 parts per billion (ppb). This trend is also confirmed by enzyme-generated (chloroperoxidase (CPO), EC 1.11.1.10) reactive oxygen species (ROS) including both HOCl (3 ppm) and ClO 2 (100 ppm). (paper)

  10. Room temperature synthesis of ReS2 through aqueous perrhenate sulfidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Joanna; Gillin, William P; Willis, Maureen; Boi, Filippo; He, Yi; Wen, Jiqiu; Wang, Shanling; Schulz, Leander

    2017-12-29

    In this study, a direct sulfidation reaction of ammonium perrhenate (NH4ReO4) leading to a synthesis of rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is demonstrated. These finding reveal the first example of a simplistic bottom-up approach to the chemical synthesis of crystalline ReS2. The reaction presented here takes place at room temperature, in an ambient and solvent-free environment and without the necessity of a catalyst. The atomic composition and structure of the as-synthesized product were characterized using several analysis techniques including energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scannig calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated the formation of a lower symmetry (1Td) ReS2 with a low degree of layer stacking. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  12. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  13. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  14. The Stability of Supported Gold Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoud, Nazila

    2018-01-01

    Gold has supreme cultural and financial value and, in form of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm, is a unique catalyst for different industrially relevant reactions. Intriguing properties of the gold catalysts have spurred demand in the chemical industry for Au catalysts, the application of which

  15. Low platinum catalyst and method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Chong, Lina

    2017-11-21

    A low platinum catalyst and method for making same. The catalyst comprises platinum-transition metal bimetallic alloy microcrystallites over a transition metal-nitrogen-carbon composite. A method of making a catalyst comprises preparation of transition metal organic frameworks, infusion of platinum, thermal treatment, and reduction to form the microcrystallites and composite.

  16. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' yanova, Galina [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mikhlin, Yuri [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin, E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Siberian Physical–Technical Institute of Tomsk State University, 1, Novosobornaya, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Karmanov, Nick [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Seryotkin, Yurii [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au){sub wt} ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with

  17. A sulfidation-resistant nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.

    1989-01-01

    For applications in mildly to moderately sulfidizing environments, stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys (e.g., alloys 800 and 330), and more recently Fe-Ni-Cr-Co alloys (e.g., alloy 556) are frequently used for construction of process equipment. However, for many highly sulfidizing environments, few existing commercial alloys have adequate performance. Thus, a new nickel-based alloy containing 27 wt.% Co, 28 wt.% Cr, 4 wt.% Fe, 2.75 wt.% Si, 0.5 wt.% Mn and 0.05 wt.% C (Haynes alloy HR-160) was developed

  18. The solubility of iron sulfides and their role in mass transport in Girdler-Sulfide heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, P.H.; Wallace, G.; Campbell, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The solubilities of several iron sulfides, mackinawite FeSsub((1-x)), troilite FeS, pyrrhotite Fesub((1-x))S (monoclinic and hexagonal), and pyrite FeS 2 have been determined in aqueous H 2 S solution at 0.1 MPa and 1.8 MPa H 2 S pressures between 25 deg and 125 deg C. The dependence of solubility on the pH of the medium has also been studied. It is concluded that since mackinawite is the most soluble of the iron sulfides, and has the highest dissolution rate and the steepest decline in solubility with temperature, its prolonged formation during plant operation should be avoided to minimize iron transport from lower to higher temperature areas in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants. This can be achieved by a preconditioning of carbon steel surfaces to convert mackinawite to pyrrhotite and pyrite

  19. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  20. Is succession in wet calcareous dune slacks affected by free sulfide?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, EB; van Gemerden, H; Grootjans, AP; Adema, Erwin B.; Grootjans, Ab P.; Rapson, G.

    Consequences of sulfide toxicity on succession in wet calcareous dune slacks were investigated. Sulfide may exert an inhibitory effect on dune slack plants, but several pioneer species exhibit ROL (Radial Oxygen Loss) and thereby protect themselves against free sulfide. Under oxic conditions free

  1. Identifying the Prospective Area of Sulfide Groundwater within the Area of Palvantash Oil and Gas Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zhurayev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the methodology of prospecting for sulfide groundwater in the area of Palvantash oil fields. In result of study allowed determining the favorable conditions for the sulfide waters formation, and mapping the areas of different sulfide water concentration. The relatively permeable areas were established and the water borehole positions were recommended.

  2. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide; Correction. SUMMARY: The... Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register...

  3. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1,

  4. Red coloration by heat treatment of the coprecipitate of cadmium sulfide and mercury(II) sulfide prepared from the nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Fujiya

    1979-01-01

    The effects of starting salts on the color, particle size and crystal structure of mercury-cadmium-sulfide pigments were investigated. The coprecipitate (N-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was prepared by adding sodium sulfide solution to a mixed cadmium-mercury (II) nitrate solution. The coprecipitate (C-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was also prepared from the mixed solution of their chlorides by the same method as described above. The coprecipitated products were heat-treated (calcination or hydrothermal treatment) at 350 0 C for 2 hours and subsequent changes in powder properties of both products were compared from each other. The powder properties of N-S, C-S and their heat-treated products were investigated by spectral reflectance, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and specific surface area measurements. Sample (N-C) obtained by the calcination of N-S was brown, indicating no red coloration, but the calcined product (C-C) of C-S developed a red color. Cl - and hot water were found to be effective for the red color development of the pigment. The effectiveness was confirmed by calcining N-S in the presence of NaCl or by treating it hydrothermally. It was found that halides other than NaCl, (e.g., NH 4 Cl, KCl, KBr and KI), were also effective for the color development of the pigment. The red samples are solid solutions with a basically hexagonal CdS structure, and it appears that CdS takes up HgS without any apparent structural changes. The particle size of the red samples are larger than those of the non red samples. (author)

  5. Automotive Catalyst State Diagnosis Using Microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moos Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of catalysts plays a key role in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment. The soot or ash loading of Diesel particulate filters, the oxygen loading degree in three-way catalysts, the amount of stored ammonia in SCR catalysts, or the NOx loading degree in NOx storage catalysts are important parameters that are today determined indirectly and in a model-based manner with gas sensors installed upstream and/or downstream of the catalysts. This contribution gives an overview on a novel approach to determine the catalyst state directly by a microwave-based technique. The method exploits the fact that the catalyst housing acts as a microwave cavity resonator. As “sensing” elements, one or two simple antennas are mounted inside the catalyst canning. The electrical properties of the catalyst device (ceramic honeycomb plus coating and storage material can be measured. Preferably, the resonance characteristics, e.g., the resonance frequencies, of selected cavity modes are observed. The information on the catalyst interior obtained in such a contactless manner is very well correlated with the catalyst state as will be demonstrated for different exhaust gas aftertreatment systems.

  6. Rejuvenation of the SCR catalyst at Mehrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Y.; Inatsume, Y.; Morita, I.; Kato, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, K. [Babcock Hitachi K.K., Kure-shi, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Babcock Hitachi K.K. (BHK) received the contract of the rejuvenation of the SCR catalyst at the 750 MW coal-fired Mehrum Power Station (in Hohenhameln, Germany) in March 2003. The contractual coverage was 160 m{sup 3} of the entire catalyst layer. The catalyst, which had been in operation for 16 years since 1987, was originally supplied by BHK. The rejuvenation process developed for the Mehrum project consisted of two major steps: the first is to dust off the catalyst and remove the catalyst poison, and the second step is to add active material to enhance the catalyst activity. The catalyst must be dried after each washing. In order to minimize transportation cost and time, the rejuvenation work was done at the Mehrum station site. The scope of the rejuvenation work was shared between the owner and BHK. It took about one and a half months to complete the (total) on-site rejuvenation worked. The performance of the rejuvenated catalyst was superior to show the same level of activity as the unused catalyst and maintain the same SO{sub 2} conversion rate as the spent catalyst. This paper gives the details of the spent coal-fired SCR catalyst rejuvenation work. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Nanoporous Aluminum-Based Coordination Polymers as Catalysts for Selective Sulfoxidation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhan Vinu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of aluminum-based coordination polymers or metal–organic frameworks (Al–MOFs, i.e., DUT-4, DUT-5, MIL-53, NH2-MIL-53, and MIL-100, have been facile prepared by microwave (MW-assisted reactions and used as catalysts for selective sulfoxidation reactions. The MW-assisted synthesis drastically reduced the reaction time from few days to hours. The prepared MOFs have smaller and uniform particle sizes and better yield compared to conventional hydrothermal method. Furthermore, the Al–MOFs have been successfully demonstrated as catalysts in oxidation reaction of methyl phenyl sulfide with H2O2 as oxidant, even under mild conditions, with more than 95% conversion.

  8. Dual-Function Metal-Organic Framework as a Versatile Catalyst for Detoxifying Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Moon, Su-Young; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-12-22

    The nanocrystals of a porphyrin-based zirconium(IV) metal-organic framework (MOF) are used as a dual-function catalyst for the simultaneous detoxification of two chemical warfare agent simulants at room temperature. Simulants of nerve agent (such as GD, VX) and mustard gas, dimethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, have been hydrolyzed and oxidized, respectively, to nontoxic products via a pair of pathways catalyzed by the same MOF. Phosphotriesterase-like activity of the Zr6-containing node combined with photoactivity of the porphyrin linker gives rise to a versatile MOF catalyst. In addition, bringing the MOF crystals down to the nanoregime leads to acceleration of the catalysis.

  9. Hydroprocessing using regenerated spent heavy hydrocarbon catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, F.T.; Hensley, A.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for hydroprocessing a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: contacting the feedstock with hydrogen under hydroprocessing conditions with a hydroprocessing catalyst wherein the hydroprocessing catalyst contains a total contaminant metals build-up of greater than about 4 wt. % nickel plus vanadium, a hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of Group VIB metals and Group VIII metals and is regenerated spent hydroprocessing catalyst regenerated by a process comprising the steps: partially decoking the spent catalyst in an initial coke-burning step; impregnating the partially decoked catalyst with a Group IIA metal-containing impregnation solution; and decoking the impregnated catalyst in a final coke-burning step wherein the impregnated catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature of about 600 degrees F to about 1400 degrees F

  10. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpel, Michael [Naperville, IL; Liu, Di-Jia [Naperville, IL

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  11. Isotope exchange in oxide-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Hoyt, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of exchanging rare-isotope oxygen for common-isotope oxygen in the top several layers of an oxide-containing catalyst is disclosed. A sample of an oxide-containing catalyst is exposed to a flowing stream of reducing gas in an inert carrier gas at a temperature suitable for the removal of the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms from the surface layer or layers of the catalyst without damaging the catalyst structure. The reduction temperature must be higher than any at which the catalyst will subsequently operate. Sufficient reducing gas is used to allow removal of all the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms in the top several layers of the catalyst. The catalyst is then reoxidized with the desired rare-isotope oxygen in sufficient quantity to replace all of the common-isotope oxygen that was removed.

  12. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature.

  13. The Complex Resistivity Spectrum Characteristics About Stratabound Sulfide Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, P.; Sun, B.; Wang, L.; Chen, Z.; Dong, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Complex resistivity method has become the key technique of deep prospecting, and widely applied in stratabound sulfide deposits which often form massive ores. However, the complex resistivity spectrum characteristics of stratabound sulfide deposits remains unknown. Through studying variation problem of two-dimensional polarization medium, deducing the differential equations and calculating formula,we applied Cole-Cole model to deduce the spectrum of complex resistivity based on the model of three-node and four-node finite element method, and programmed homologous procedure. We utilized the Earth Model of Geological Layers which has accurate analytical solution to test rationality and accuracy of our modeling. We applied the layer structure provided by drilling results in Chenmenshan copper mine,which is typical strata-bound sulfide deposits in Jiangxi province,China, and calculated the spectra of complex resistivity, then made comparison between modeled and measured values. We find good corellation between them. Our studies may have imporved the interpretation of complex resistivity data, which help apply complex resistivity methods of propecting on stratabound sulfide deposites.

  14. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  15. Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using culture supernatants of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Lactobacillus ... The process of extracellular and fast biosynthesis may help in the development of an easy and eco-friendly route for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles.

  16. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene... coatings of articles intended for repeated use in contact with food, in accordance with the following... are available from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), Food and Drug...

  17. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards. 425.04 Section 425.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions...

  18. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. 425.03 Section 425.03 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions...

  19. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  20. Impact of Iron Sulfide Transformation on Trichloroethylene Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in enginee...

  1. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  2. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thioamides as collectors at flotation of sulfide minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, B.M.; Solozhenkin, P.M.; Rukhadze, E.G.; Lyubavina, L.L.

    1976-01-01

    The collective properties of thioamides at flotation of number of sulfide minerals are considered. It is defined that studied thioamides fix on the surface of minerals with formation of appropriate complexes. The spectres of copper thioamides are studied by means of electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Remediation of arsenic and lead with nanocrystalline zinc sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquette, Alan; Cannon, Cody; Apblett, Allen W

    2012-07-27

    Nanocrystalline (1.7 ± 0.3 nm) zinc sulfide with a specific surface area up to 360 m(2) g(-1) was prepared from the thermal decomposition of a single-source precursor, zinc ethylxanthate. Zinc ethylxanthate decomposes to cubic zinc sulfide upon exposure to temperatures greater than or equal to 125 °C. The resulting zinc sulfide was tested as a water impurity extractant. The target impurities used in this study were As(5+), As(3+), and Pb(2+). The reaction of the nanocrystalline ZnS with Pb(2+) proceeds as a replacement reaction where solid PbS is formed and Zn(2+) is released into the aqueous system. Removal of lead to a level of less than two parts per billion is achievable. The results of a detailed kinetics experiment between the ZnS and Pb(2+) are included in this study. Unlike the instance of lead, both As(5+) and As(3+) adsorb on the surface of the ZnS extractant as opposed to an ion-exchange process. An uptake capacity of > 25 mg g(-1) for the removal of As(5+) is possible. The uptake of As(3+) appears to proceed by a slower process than that of the As(5+) with a capacity of nearly 20 mg g(-1). The nanocrystalline zinc sulfide was extremely successful for the removal of arsenic and lead from simulated oil sand tailing pond water.

  5. Exploiting fields of gases containing hydrogen-sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevets, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The anthology is devoted to problems of geology, hydrogeology, drilling, industrial development, and processing of gas and condensate at the Orenburg Gas-Chemical Complex. Reviews ways to develop the technology for further processing of hydrogen sulfide gas, as well as handling corrosion.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  7. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  8. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  9. Formation of nanocolloidal metacinnabar in mercury-DOM-sulfide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbig, Chase A.; Kim, Christopher S.; Stegemeier, John P.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct determination of mercury (Hg) speciation in sulfide-containing environments is confounded by low mercury concentrations and poor analytical sensitivity. Here we report the results of experiments designed to assess mercury speciation at environmentally relevant ratios of mercury to dissolved organic matter (DOM) (i.e., structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Aqueous Hg(II) and a DOM isolate were equilibrated in the presence and absence of 100 μM total sulfide. In the absence of sulfide, mercury adsorption to the resin increased as the Hg:DOM ratio decreased and as the strength of Hg-DOM binding increased. EXAFS analysis indicated that in the absence of sulfide, mercury bonds with an average of 2.4 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms with a bond length typical of mercury-organic thiol ligands (2.35 Å). In the presence of sulfide, mercury showed greater affinity for the C18 resin, and its chromatographic behavior was independent of Hg:DOM ratio. EXAFS analysis showed mercury–sulfur bonds with a longer interatomic distance (2.51–2.53 Å) similar to the mercury–sulfur bond distance in metacinnabar (2.53 Å) regardless of the Hg:DOM ratio. For all samples containing sulfide, the sulfur coordination number was below the ideal four-coordinate structure of metacinnabar. At a low Hg:DOM ratio where strong binding DOM sites may control mercury speciation (1.9 nmol mg–1) mercury was coordinated by 2.3 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms, and the coordination number rose with increasing Hg:DOM ratio. The less-than-ideal coordination numbers indicate metacinnabar-like species on the nanometer scale, and the positive correlation between Hg:DOM ratio and sulfur coordination number suggests progressively increasing particle size or crystalline order with increasing abundance of mercury with respect to DOM. In DOM-containing sulfidic systems nanocolloidal metacinnabar-like species may form, and these species need to be considered when addressing mercury biogeochemistry.

  10. Removal of H2S from Biogas by Iron (Fe3+ Doped MgO on Ceramic Honeycomb Catalyst using Double Packed Columns System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntima Chungsiriporn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic and corrosive in nature, gas should be safely removed from the biogas streams before subjecting into the fuel cell. Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide was synthesized using sol-gel technique and dip coating process of Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb. XRD and SEM indicate that Fe3+ in Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb catalyst is finely dispersed in the MgO support. Performance of the synthesized Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide on the honeycomb catalyst was examined for hydrogen sulfide (H2S oxidation by double packed column scrubbers. The absorption column was used for H2S scrubbing from biogas by deionized water absorption and catalytic column was used as catalyst bed for degradation of absorbed H2S in scrubbing water. In the catalytic column, counter current flow of the scrubbing water and air through the catalyst pack was performed for H2S oxidation accompany with catalyst regeneration. System capacity for H2S removal from gas stream showed 98% constant along 3 hr testing time at room temperature.

  11. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, also known as volcanic-hosted massive sulfide, volcanic-associated massive sulfide, or seafloor massive sulfide deposits, are important sources of copper, zinc, lead, gold, and silver (Cu, Zn, Pb, Au, and Ag). These deposits form at or near the seafloor where circulating hydrothermal fluids driven by magmatic heat are quenched through mixing with bottom waters or porewaters in near-seafloor lithologies. Massive sulfide lenses vary widely in shape and size and may be podlike or sheetlike. They are generally stratiform and may occur as multiple lenses.

  12. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... oxygen atmosphere to avoid the risk of oxidation of sulfide minerals. The solution is kept in an equilibrium cell at constant temperature and pressure with continuous stirring. The concentration of Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+ and S2- are measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission spectrometry (ICP...

  13. Hydrogen sulfide waste treatment by microwave plasma-chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    A waste-treatment process that recovers both hydrogen and sulfur from industrial acid-gas waste streams is being developed to replace the Claus technology, which recovers only sulfur. The proposed process is derived from research reported in the Soviet technical literature and uses microwave (or radio-frequency) energy to initiate plasma-chemical reactions that dissociate hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. This process has several advantages over the current Claus-plus-tail-gas-cleanup technology, which burns the hydrogen to water. The primary advantage of the proposal process is its potential for recovering and recycling hydrogen more cheaply than the direct production of hydrogen. Since unconverted hydrogen sulfide is recycled to the plasma reactor, the plasma-chemical process has the potential for sulfur recoveries in excess of 99% without the additional complexity of the tail-gas-cleanup processes associated with the Claus technology. There may also be some environmental advantages to the plasma-chemical process, because the process purge stream would primarily be the carbon dioxide and water contained in the acid-gas waste stream. Laboratory experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide have demonstrated the ability of the process to operate at or above atmospheric pressure with an acceptable hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy. Experiments with a wide range of acid-gas compositions have demonstrated that carbon dioxide and water are compatible with the plasma-chemical dissociation process and that they do not appear to create new waste-treatment problems. However, carbon dioxide does have negative impacts on the overall process. First, it decreases the hydrogen production, and second, it increases the hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine and homocysteine by periodontal and oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshimura, Shigeru; Nagashima, Shiori; Takehara, Tadamichi; Nakayama, Koji

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the predominant volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral bacteria. This study developed and evaluated a system for detecting hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria. L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase (METase) and beta carbon-sulfur (beta C-S) lyase were used to degrade homocysteine and cysteine, respectively, to produce hydrogen sulfide. Enzymatic reactions resulting in hydrogen sulfide production were assayed by reaction with bismuth trichloride, which forms a black precipitate when mixed with hydrogen sulfide. The enzymatic activities of various oral bacteria that result in hydrogen sulfide production and the capacity of bacteria from periodontal sites to form hydrogen sulfide in reaction mixtures containing L-cysteine or DL-homocysteine were assayed. With L-cysteine as the substrate, Streptococcus anginosus FW73 produced the most hydrogen sulfide, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 33277 and W83 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 produced approximately 35% of the amount produced by the P. gingivalis strains. Finally, the hydrogen sulfide found in subgingival plaque was analyzed. Using bismuth trichloride, the hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria was visually detectable as a black precipitate. Hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria was easily analyzed using bismuth trichloride. However, further innovation is required for practical use.

  15. Adaptation of cyanobacteria to the sulfide-rich microenvironment of black band disease of coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jamie L; Richardson, Laurie L

    2009-02-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mat that migrates across living coral colonies lysing coral tissue and leaving behind exposed coral skeleton. The mat is sulfide-rich due to the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, integral members of the BBD microbial community, and the sulfide they produce is lethal to corals. The effect of sulfide, normally toxic to cyanobacteria, on the photosynthetic capabilities of five BBD cyanobacterial isolates of the genera Geitlerinema (3), Leptolyngbya (1), and Oscillatoria (1) and six non-BBD cyanobacteria of the genera Leptolyngbya (3), Pseudanabaena (2), and Phormidium (1) was examined. Photosynthetic experiments were performed by measuring the photoincorporation of [(14)C] NaHCO(3) under the following conditions: (1) aerobic (no sulfide), (2) anaerobic with 0.5 mM sulfide, and (3) anaerobic with 0.5 mM sulfide and 10 microM 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). All five BBD cyanobacterial isolates tolerated sulfide by conducting sulfide-resistant oxygenic photosynthesis. Five of the non-BBD cyanobacterial isolates did not tolerate sulfide, although one Pseudanabaena isolate continued to photosynthesize in the presence of sulfide at a considerably reduced rate. None of the isolates conducted anoxygenic photosynthesis with sulfide as an electron donor. This is the first report on the physiology of a culture of Oscillatoria sp. found globally in BBD.

  16. Enrichment and immobilization of sulfide removal microbiota applied for environmental biological remediation of aquaculture area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Zheng, Yu; Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Feng, Gong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-01-01

    To remove sulfide in the deteriorating aquaculture sediment and water, sulfide-oxidizing microbiota was enriched from Jiaozhou Bay, China, by using sulfide-rich medium. Composition and structure of microbial communities in the enrichments were investigated by 16S rDNA molecular biotechniques. Results showed that microbial community structure continuously shifted and the abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, i.e., Desulfobacterium, Desulfococcus and Desulfobacca apparently declined. Several halophile genera, Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, Prochlorococcus, Pediococcus and Thiobacillus predominated finally in the microbiota. The enriched microbiota was capable of removing a maximum of 1000 mg/L sulfide within 12 h with 10% inoculum at pH 7.0, 20–30 °C. After immobilized, the microbiota presented excellent resistance to impact and could completely remove 600 mg/L sulfide in 12 h. Moreover, the immobilized microbiota recovered well even recycled for five times. In conclusion, the immobilized sulfide-removing microbiota showed a quite promising application for biological restoring of sulfide-rich aquaculture environment. - Highlights: • A sulfide-oxidizing microbiota successfully enriched from aquaculture sediment. • Microbiota dominated by Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas and Thiobacillus spp. • Sulfide-oxidizing microbiota removed sulfide at an average rate of 100 mg/(L·h). • Immobilized microbiota removed over 85% of sulfide even recycled for five times.

  17. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  18. Pyrite formation and mineral transformation pathways upon sulfidation of ferric hydroxides depend on mineral type and sulfide concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Wan, Moli; Pollok, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of ferric (hydr)oxides with dissolved sulfide does not lead to the instantaneous production of thermodynamically stable products but can induce a variety of mineral transformations including the formation of metastable intermediates. The importance of the various transformation pathways

  19. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  20. Catalyst for Expanding Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    History supplies us with many models of how and how not to commercialize an industry. This presentation draws parallels between industries with government roots, like the railroad, air transport, communications and the internet, and NASAs Commercial Crew Program. In these examples, government served as a catalyst for what became a booming industry. The building block approach the Commercial Crew Program is taking is very simple -- establish a need, laying the groundwork, enabling industry and legal framework.

  1. Photosystem Inspired Peptide Hybrid Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    materials defined at the molecular level. We propose a novel way to make hybrid catalyst composed of inorganic nanomaterials and peptides. The...Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research Laboratory Air...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY SNUR&DB FOUNDATION RESEARCH PARK CENTER SEOUL, 151742 KR 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  2. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  3. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  4. Carbonaceous deposits on naptha reforming catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redwan, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    Carbonaceous deposits on naphtha reforming catalysts play a decisive role in limiting process performance. The deposits negatively after catalyst activity, selectivity and the production cycle of a semi regenerative reformer. The magnitude of negative effect of those deposits is directly proportional to their amounts and complexity. Investigations on used reforming catalysts samples reveal that the amount and type (complexity of the chemical nature) of carbonaceous deposits are directly proportional to the catalysts life on stream and the severity of operating conditions. In addition, the combustibility behavior of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst samples taken from different reformers are found to be different. Optimal carbon removal, for in situ catalyst regeneration, requires the specific conditions be developed, based on the results of well designed and properly performed investigations of the amount and type of carbonaceous deposits. (author)

  5. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  6. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  7. Modification of sulphide catalysts for hydro-treatment by addition of fluorine; Modification de catalyseurs sulfure pour l'hydrotraitement par ajout de fluor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, L.

    1999-12-15

    Ni, Mo and NiMo sulphide catalysts supported on alumina were modified with fluorine in the range of 0.8 to 17 weight % F and tested in ortho-xylene hydrogenation under 60 bar total pressure and in presence of 1 bar H{sub 2}S. A positive effect of fluorine on Ni and NiMo catalytic activity was found. The tested catalysts were characterised by electronic microscopy and X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed variations in dispersion and sulfidation degree of the active phase are not important enough to explain the good catalytic activity. The catalytic test was adapted in a way that allows a determination of electronic effects on sulphide catalysts under typical hydro-treating conditions. The product distribution in cis- and trans- 1,2-dimethyl-cyclohexane was found to be sensitive to the electronic state of the catalyst's active site. This was verified by addition of electron-donating NH{sub 3} as well as other evidences. According to this test, fluorine acts as an electron-donator on Ni and NiMo catalysts' active sites. A volcano curve of catalytic activity in function of electronic density is obtained for MoS{sub 2} based catalysts (Mo and NiMo), suggesting the existence of an optimum electronic density which would be achieved by introduction of about 6 weight % F into a NiMo catalyst. Characterization by infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO confirms the electron-donating effect of fluorine. Fluoridation tests of bulk catalysts permitted to exclude a bonding between fluorine and the active sulphide phase in absence of a support. It is suggested that electron-donating fluoride located on the surface of alumina, the interaction with nickel being of van-der-Waals type. (author)

  8. Modification of sulphide catalysts for hydro-treatment by addition of fluorine; Modification de catalyseurs sulfure pour l'hydrotraitement par ajout de fluor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, L

    1999-12-15

    Ni, Mo and NiMo sulphide catalysts supported on alumina were modified with fluorine in the range of 0.8 to 17 weight % F and tested in ortho-xylene hydrogenation under 60 bar total pressure and in presence of 1 bar H{sub 2}S. A positive effect of fluorine on Ni and NiMo catalytic activity was found. The tested catalysts were characterised by electronic microscopy and X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed variations in dispersion and sulfidation degree of the active phase are not important enough to explain the good catalytic activity. The catalytic test was adapted in a way that allows a determination of electronic effects on sulphide catalysts under typical hydro-treating conditions. The product distribution in cis- and trans- 1,2-dimethyl-cyclohexane was found to be sensitive to the electronic state of the catalyst's active site. This was verified by addition of electron-donating NH{sub 3} as well as other evidences. According to this test, fluorine acts as an electron-donator on Ni and NiMo catalysts' active sites. A volcano curve of catalytic activity in function of electronic density is obtained for MoS{sub 2} based catalysts (Mo and NiMo), suggesting the existence of an optimum electronic density which would be achieved by introduction of about 6 weight % F into a NiMo catalyst. Characterization by infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO confirms the electron-donating effect of fluorine. Fluoridation tests of bulk catalysts permitted to exclude a bonding between fluorine and the active sulphide phase in absence of a support. It is suggested that electron-donating fluoride located on the surface of alumina, the interaction with nickel being of van-der-Waals type. (author)

  9. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to

  10. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  11. Methanol absorption characteristics for the removal of H2S (hydrogen sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide) and CO2 (carbon dioxide) in a pilot-scale biomass-to-liquid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Myung Won; Yun, Young Min; Cho, Won Chul; Ra, Ho Won; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Goo; Kim, Yong Ku; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, See Hoon; Eom, Won Hyun; Lee, Uen Do; Lee, Sang Bong

    2014-01-01

    The BTL (biomass-to-liquid) process is an attractive process that produces liquid biofuels from biomass. The FT (Fisher–Tropsch) process is used to produce synfuels such as diesel and gasoline from gasified biomass. However, the H 2 S (hydrogen sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide) and CO 2 (carbon dioxide) in the syngas that are produced from the biomass gasifiers cause a decrease of the conversion efficiency and deactivates the catalyst that is used in the FT process. To remove the acid gases, a pilot-scale methanol absorption tower producing diesel at a rate of 1 BPD (barrel per day) was developed, and the removal characteristics of the acid gases were determined. A total operation time of 500 h was achieved after several campaigns. The average syngas flow rate at the inlet of methanol absorption tower ranged from 300 to 800 L/min. The methanol absorption tower efficiently removed H 2 S from 30 ppmV to less than 1 ppmV and COS from 2 ppmV to less than 1 ppmV with a removal of CO 2 from 20% to 5%. The outlet gas composition adhered to the guidelines for FT reactors. No remaining sulfurous components were found, and the tar component was analyzed in the spent methanol after long-term operations. - Highlights: • The gas cleaning system in a pilot-scale BTL (biomass-to-liquid) process is reported. • Although methanol absorption tower is conventional process, its application to BTL process is attempted. • The methanol absorption tower efficiently removed H 2 S, COS and CO 2 in the syngas. • The sulfurous and tar components in the methanol are analyzed

  12. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  13. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which...... the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...

  14. Bifunctional cobalt F-T catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.G.; Coughlin, P.K.; Yang, C.L.; Rabo, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results on the catalytic screening of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts containing shape selective components are reported. Catalysts consist of promoted cobalt intimately contacted with Union Carbide molecular sieves and were tested using a Berty type internally recycled reactor. Methods of preparation, promoters and shape selective components were varied and aimed at improving catalyst performance. Catalysts were developed demonstrating high C/sub 5/ + yields with high olefin content and low methane production while maintaining stability under both low and high H/sub 2/:CO ratio conditions.

  15. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  16. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com; Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com; Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com

    2016-06-15

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite). - Highlights: • This review article presents the synthesis and applications of copper sulfide. • CuS has been used over the years for different applications in nanoscience. • Different synthetic protocols are followed for their preparation which help in the possible modifications in the morphology of CuS.

  17. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  18. Preparation and characterization of NiW-nHA composite catalyst for hydrocracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Hou, Yongzhao; Liu, Lei; Liu, Hongru; Liu, Can; Liu, Jing; Qiao, Huiting; Liu, Wenyong; Fan, Yubo; Shen, Shituan; Rong, Long

    2012-11-01

    The synthesis, characterization and catalytic capability of the NiW-nano-hydroxyapatite (NiW-nHA) composite were investigated in this paper. The NiW-nHA catalyst was prepared by a co-precipitation method. Then Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to analyze this material. In addition, the catalytic capacity of the NiW-nHA composite was also examined by FT-IR and gas chromatography (GC). The results of FT-IR analysis indicated that Ni, W and nHA combined closely. TEM observation revealed that this catalyst was needle shaped and the crystal retained a nanometer size. XRD data also suggested that a new phase of CaWO4 appeared and the lattice parameters of nHA changed in this system. nHA was the carrier of metals. The rates of Ni/W-loading were 73.24% and 65.99% according to the EDX data, respectively. Furthermore, the conversion of 91.88% Jatropha oil was achieved at 360 °C and 3 MPa h-1 over NiW-nHA catalyst. The straight chain alkanes ranging from C15 to C18 were the main components in the production. The yield of C15-C18 alkanes was up to 83.56 wt%. The reaction pathway involved hydrocracking of the C&z.dbd;C bonds of these triglycerides from Jatropha oil. This paper developed a novel non-sulfided catalyst to obtain a ``green biofuel'' from vegetable oil.

  19. Analysis and removal of heteroatom containing species in coal liquid distillate over NiMo catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.D. Sumbogo Murtia; Ki-Hyouk Choi; Kinya Sakanishi; Osamu Okuma; Yozo Korai; Isao Mochida [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering

    2005-02-01

    Heteroatom containing molecules in South Banko coal liquid (SBCL) distillate were identified with a gas chromatograph equipped with an atomic emission detector (GC-AED). Thiophenes and benzothiophenes were found to be the major sulfur compounds. Pyridines, anilines, and phenols were the major nitrogen and oxygen compounds, respectively. Reactivities of heteroatom containing species in hydrotreatment over conventional NiMoS/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiMoS/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} catalysts were very different according to their cyclic structure as well as the kind of heteroatom in the species. The sulfur species were completely desulfurized over the catalysts examined in the present study by 60 min at 360{degree}C under initial hydrogen pressure of 5 MPa. However, hydrodenitrogenation was more difficult than hydrodesulfurization even at 450{degree}C. Anilines were found the most refractory ones among the nitrogen species. Hydrodeoxygenation of SBCL was also difficult in the hydrotreatment conditions examined in the present study. Dibenzofuran was the most refractory molecule among the oxygen species. A two-stage reaction configuration at 340 and 360{degree}C improved HDN and HDO reactivities, although the conversions were still insufficient. Increasing the acidity of the support as well as the loading of the metals on the NiMoS/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts improved very much the heteroatom reduction to achieve complete removal of nitrogen by two-stage reaction configuration at 340-360{degree}C and oxygen at 360{degree}C, respectively. The addition of H{sub 2}S in the reaction atmosphere inhibited the HDN reaction but increased markedly the HDO conversion. The acidic support increased the activity in hydrotreatment through enhancing the hydrogenation activity, while H{sub 2}S maintained the catalyst in a sufficiently sulfided state. 19 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Optical and structural characteristics of lead sulfides thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim Deraman; Bakar Ismail; Samsudi Sakrani; Gould, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tin sulfide films have been prepared by evaporation technique at 1x10 - 4 torr and at substrate temperatures between 100 to 300 0 C. The films thickness were 52 to 370 nm. From the absorption 1.47 eV and X-ray diffraction patent shows that the composition of films have changed from SnS 2 (at low temperature) to SnS (at higher temperature)