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Sample records for cns relapse prediction

  1. Bortezomib-related neuropathy may mask CNS relapse in multiple myeloma: A call for diligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Tan, Kong Bing; Chng, Wee Joo

    2016-07-02

    Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of bortezomib. Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse in MM remains exceedingly rare and carries a dismal prognosis. We present an unusual case of bortezomib related neuropathy masking a CNS relapse of MM. A 57-year-old female was diagnosed with standard-risk MM with clinical and cytogenetic features not typically associated with CNS involvement. She was treated with 4 cycles of bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone (VCD) and achieved a VGPR, after which she underwent an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) followed by bortezomib maintenance. Six months after ASCT she developed symptoms suggestive of peripheral neuropathy which was attributed to bortezomib. However the symptoms persisted despite discontinuation of bortezomib. Imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis subsequently confirmed a CNS relapse. CNS involvement in MM (CNS-MM) is uncommon and is considered an aggressive disease. Recently published literature has reported biomarkers with prognostic potential. However, isolated CNS relapse is even less common; an event which carries a very poor prognosis. Given the heterogeneous neurologic manifestations associated with MM, clinical suspicion may be masked by confounding factors such as bortezomib-based therapy. The disease may further remain incognito if the patient does not exhibit any of the high risk features and biomarkers associated with CNS involvement. In the era of proteasome inhibitor (PtdIns)/immunomodulator (IMID)-based therapy for MM which carries neurologic adverse effects, it is prudent to consider CNS relapse early. This case further highlights the need for more robust biomarkers to predict CNS relapse and use of newer novel agents which demonstrate potential for CNS penetration.

  2. LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT: Early relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found after CNS-symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Chr. G.; Laursen, Christian B.; Jeppesen, Stefan S.

    2016-01-01

    whether the introduction in 2010 of follow-up by CT of thorax and upper abdomen every three months has reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms.Results: All 827 NSCLC patients from Funen completing curative treatment from 2005 to 2013 were included. The total number of relapses found...... or III were found.Conclusion: CT-based follow-up has not reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms in stage II-IV, and therefore we suggest routine MR of the brain before curative treatment for this group of patients.Number, fractions(%), and [95%CI]Jan. 2005 - June 2010July 2010 - Dec...... after symptoms within 24 months decreased in the 3½ years after the introduction of CT-based follow-up, p < 0,001 (table), but the total fraction presenting with CNS-symptoms did not change, p = 0.296. Relapses after stage I cancer decreased (p = 0.025), while no differences or changes for stages II...

  3. Is risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapse related to adjuvant taxane treatment in node-positive breast cancer? Results of the CNS substudy in the intergroup Phase III BIG 02-98 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestalozzi, B.C.; Francis, P.; Quinaux, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer central nervous system (CNS) metastases are an increasingly important problem because of high CNS relapse rates in patients treated with trastuzumab and/or taxanes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated data from 2887 node-positive breast cancer patients randomised in the BIG...

  4. A classification framework for drug relapse prediction | Salleh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mining algorithms, Artificial Intelligence Neural Network (ANN) is one of the best algorithms to predict relapse among drug addicts. This may help the rehabilitation center to predict relapse individually and the prediction result is hoped to prevent drug addicts from relapse. Keywords: classification; artificial neural network; ...

  5. Predicting Relapse among Young Adults: Psychometric Validation of the Advanced Warning of Relapse (AWARE) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F.; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Urbanoski, Karen A.; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Objective Failure to maintain abstinence despite incurring severe harm is perhaps the key defining feature of addiction. Relapse prevention strategies have been developed to attenuate this propensity to relapse, but predicting who will, and who will not, relapse has stymied attempts to more efficiently tailor treatments according to relapse risk profile. Here we examine the psychometric properties of a promising relapse risk measure - the Advance WArning of RElapse scale (AWARE) scale (Miller and Harris, 2000) in an understudied but clinically important sample of young adults. Method Inpatient youth (N=303; Age 18-24; 26% female) completed the AWARE scale and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI) at the end of residential treatment, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months following discharge. Internal and convergent validity was tested for each of these four timepoints using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations (with BSI scores). Predictive validity was tested for relapse 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge, as was incremental utility, where AWARE scores were used as predictors of any substance use while controlling for treatment entry substance use severity and having spent time in a controlled environment following treatment. Results Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a single, internally consistent, 25-item factor that demonstrated convergent validity and predicted subsequent relapse alone and when controlling for other important relapse risk predictors. Conclusions The AWARE scale may be a useful and efficient clinical tool for assessing short-term relapse risk among young people and, thus, could serve to enhance the effectiveness of relapse prevention efforts. PMID:21700396

  6. Predicting relapse among young adults: psychometric validation of the Advanced WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Urbanoski, Karen A; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2011-10-01

    Failure to maintain abstinence despite incurring severe harm is perhaps the key defining feature of addiction. Relapse prevention strategies have been developed to attenuate this propensity to relapse, but predicting who will, and who will not, relapse has stymied attempts to more efficiently tailor treatments according to relapse risk profile. Here we examine the psychometric properties of a promising relapse risk measure-the Advance WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale (Miller & Harris, 2000) in an understudied but clinically important sample of young adults. Inpatient youth (N=303; Ages 18-24; 26% female) completed the AWARE scale and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI) at the end of residential treatment, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months following discharge. Internal and convergent validity was tested for each of these four timepoints using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations (with BSI scores). Predictive validity was tested for relapse 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge, as was incremental utility, where AWARE scores were used as predictors of any substance use while controlling for treatment entry substance use severity and having spent time in a controlled environment following treatment. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a single, internally consistent, 25-item factor that demonstrated convergent validity and predicted subsequent relapse alone and when controlling for other important relapse risk predictors. The AWARE scale may be a useful and efficient clinical tool for assessing short-term relapse risk among young people and, thus, could serve to enhance the effectiveness of relapse prevention efforts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Durable treatment response of relapsing CNS plasmacytoma using intrathecal chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and Daratumumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassadi, Ezzat; Murphy, Maurice; Hacking, Dayle; Farrell, Michael

    2018-04-01

    CNS myelomatous involvement is a rare complication of multiple myeloma with dismal outcome. This disease's optimal treatment is unclear. Combined approach of systemic therapy, radiotherapy, and intrathecal injections chemotherapy should be considered and autologous stem cell transplant consolidation is offered to eligible patients. The role of Daratumumab in this disease deserves further evaluation.

  8. Brain parenchyma involvement as isolated central nervous system relapse of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma: An International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Doolittle (Nancy); L.E. Abrey (Lauren); T.N. Shenkier (Tamara); T. Siegal (Tali); J.E.C. Bromberg (Jacolien); E.A. Neuwelt (Edward); C. Soussain (Carole); K. Jahnke (Kristoph); P. Johnston (Patrick); G. Illerhaus (Gerald); D. Schiff (David); T.T. Batchelor (Tracy); S. Montoto (Silvia); D.F. Kraemer (Dale); E. Zucca (Emanuele)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIsolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse involving the brain parenchyma is a rare complication of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We retrospectively analyzed patient characteristics, management, and outcomes of this complication. After complete response to initial non-Hodgkin

  9. Prediction of Central Nervous System Relapse of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Using Pretherapeutic [18F]2-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yoo Sung; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare complication, but has a poor prognosis with unknown pathophysiology. Recent trials of CNS prophylaxis have shown to be ineffective, despite patient's selection using several known clinical risk factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the value of pretreatment [F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in predicting CNS relapse in DLBCL patients.The authors analyzed 180 pathologically confirmed DLBCL patients, retrospectively. Patients underwent [F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography before first line rituximab to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone therapy. Clinical characteristics were evaluated and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) with a threshold margin of 50% was calculated.Among age, sex, Ann Arbor stage, International Prognostic Index, revised International Prognostic Index, high serum lactate dehydrogenase level, presence of B symptoms, bulky disease (≥10 cm), extranodal lesion involvement, bone marrow involvement, high metabolic tumor volume ( >450 mL), and high TLG50 (>2000), the high TLG50 was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting CNS relapse in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meir survival analysis between high TLG50 (>2000) and low TLG50 (≤2000) groups revealed significantly different mean progression free survival (PFS) of 1317.2 ± 134.3 days and 1968.6 ± 18.3 days, respectively (P positron emission tomography/computed tomography is the most significant predictor of CNS relapse in un-treated DLBCL patients.

  10. Decreased dopamine activity predicts relapse in methamphetamine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang G. J.; Wang, G.-J.; Smith, L.; Volkow, N.D.; Telang, F.; Logan, J.; Tomasi, D.; Wong, C.T.; Hoffman, W.; Jayne, M.; Alia-Klein, N.; Thanos, P.; Fowler, J.S.

    2011-01-20

    Studies in methamphetamine (METH) abusers showed that the decreases in brain dopamine (DA) function might recover with protracted detoxification. However, the extent to which striatal DA function in METH predicts recovery has not been evaluated. Here we assessed whether striatal DA activity in METH abusers is associated with clinical outcomes. Brain DA D2 receptor (D2R) availability was measured with positron emission tomography and [{sup 11}C]raclopride in 16 METH abusers, both after placebo and after challenge with 60 mg oral methylphenidate (MPH) (to measure DA release) to assess whether it predicted clinical outcomes. For this purpose, METH abusers were tested within 6 months of last METH use and then followed up for 9 months of abstinence. In parallel, 15 healthy controls were tested. METH abusers had lower D2R availability in caudate than in controls. Both METH abusers and controls showed decreased striatal D2R availability after MPH and these decreases were smaller in METH than in controls in left putamen. The six METH abusers who relapsed during the follow-up period had lower D2R availability in dorsal striatum than in controls, and had no D2R changes after MPH challenge. The 10 METH abusers who completed detoxification did not differ from controls neither in striatal D2R availability nor in MPH-induced striatal DA changes. These results provide preliminary evidence that low striatal DA function in METH abusers is associated with a greater likelihood of relapse during treatment. Detection of the extent of DA dysfunction may be helpful in predicting therapeutic outcomes.

  11. Decreased dopamine activity predicts relapse in methamphetamine abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.J.; Smith, L.; Volkow, N.D.; Telang, F.; Logan, J.; Tomasi, D.; Wong, C.T.; Hoffman, W.; Jayne, M.; Alia-Klein, N.; Thanos, P.; Fowler, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Studies in methamphetamine (METH) abusers showed that the decreases in brain dopamine (DA) function might recover with protracted detoxification. However, the extent to which striatal DA function in METH predicts recovery has not been evaluated. Here we assessed whether striatal DA activity in METH abusers is associated with clinical outcomes. Brain DA D2 receptor (D2R) availability was measured with positron emission tomography and ( 11 C)raclopride in 16 METH abusers, both after placebo and after challenge with 60 mg oral methylphenidate (MPH) (to measure DA release) to assess whether it predicted clinical outcomes. For this purpose, METH abusers were tested within 6 months of last METH use and then followed up for 9 months of abstinence. In parallel, 15 healthy controls were tested. METH abusers had lower D2R availability in caudate than in controls. Both METH abusers and controls showed decreased striatal D2R availability after MPH and these decreases were smaller in METH than in controls in left putamen. The six METH abusers who relapsed during the follow-up period had lower D2R availability in dorsal striatum than in controls, and had no D2R changes after MPH challenge. The 10 METH abusers who completed detoxification did not differ from controls neither in striatal D2R availability nor in MPH-induced striatal DA changes. These results provide preliminary evidence that low striatal DA function in METH abusers is associated with a greater likelihood of relapse during treatment. Detection of the extent of DA dysfunction may be helpful in predicting therapeutic outcomes.

  12. A simple risk scoring system for prediction of relapse after inpatient alcohol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads Uffe; Hesse, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Predicting relapse after alcoholism treatment can be useful in targeting patients for aftercare services. However, a valid and practical instrument for predicting relapse risk does not exist. Based on a prospective study of alcoholism treatment, we developed the Risk of Alcoholic Relapse Scale (RARS) using items taken from the Addiction Severity Index and some basic demographic information. The RARS was cross-validated using two non-overlapping samples, and tested for its ability to predict relapse across different models of treatment. The RARS predicted relapse to drinking within 6 months after alcoholism treatment in both the original and the validation sample, and in a second validation sample it predicted admission to new treatment 3 years after treatment. The RARS can identify patients at high risk of relapse who need extra aftercare and support after treatment.

  13. Anca associated vasculitis : occurrence, prediction, prevention, and outcome of relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Maarten Michiel

    2001-01-01

    During follow-up, relapses of disease activity occur in the majority of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis. The general objective brought together in this thesis was to further elucidate the characteristics and consequences of these relapses. Investigated items are the occurrence, the

  14. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. The value of nodal information in predicting lung cancer relapse using 4DPET/4DCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Heyse, E-mail: heyse.li@mail.utoronto.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Becker, Nathan; Raman, Srinivas [Radiation Oncology, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University of Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Chan, Timothy C. Y. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124 - 100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Radiation Oncology, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University of Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124 - 100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: There is evidence that computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging metrics are prognostic and predictive in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment outcomes. However, few studies have explored the use of standardized uptake value (SUV)-based image features of nodal regions as predictive features. The authors investigated and compared the use of tumor and node image features extracted from the radiotherapy target volumes to predict relapse in a cohort of NSCLC patients undergoing chemoradiation treatment. Methods: A prospective cohort of 25 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent 4DPET/4DCT imaging for radiation planning. Thirty-seven image features were derived from the CT-defined volumes and SUVs of the PET image from both the tumor and nodal target regions. The machine learning methods of logistic regression and repeated stratified five-fold cross-validation (CV) were used to predict local and overall relapses in 2 yr. The authors used well-known feature selection methods (Spearman’s rank correlation, recursive feature elimination) within each fold of CV. Classifiers were ranked on their Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC) after CV. Area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity values are also presented. Results: For predicting local relapse, the best classifier found had a mean MCC of 0.07 and was composed of eight tumor features. For predicting overall relapse, the best classifier found had a mean MCC of 0.29 and was composed of a single feature: the volume greater than 0.5 times the maximum SUV (N). Conclusions: The best classifier for predicting local relapse had only tumor features. In contrast, the best classifier for predicting overall relapse included a node feature. Overall, the methods showed that nodes add value in predicting overall relapse but not local relapse.

  16. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  17. Modeling radiation dosimetry to predict cognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors including medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Shukla, Hemant; Sengupta, Saikat; Xiong Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Model the effects of radiation dosimetry on IQ among pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors (n = 39) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before and after treatment with postoperative, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and conformal primary-site irradiation, followed by chemotherapy. Differential dose-volume data for 5 brain volumes (total brain, supratentorial brain, infratentorial brain, and left and right temporal lobes) were correlated with IQ after surgery and at follow-up by use of linear regression. Results: When the dose distribution was partitioned into 2 levels, both had a significantly negative effect on longitudinal IQ across all 5 brain volumes. When the dose distribution was partitioned into 3 levels (low, medium, and high), exposure to the supratentorial brain appeared to have the most significant impact. For most models, each Gy of exposure had a similar effect on IQ decline, regardless of dose level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that radiation dosimetry data from 5 brain volumes can be used to predict decline in longitudinal IQ. Despite measures to reduce radiation dose and treatment volume, the volume that receives the highest dose continues to have the greatest effect, which supports current volume-reduction efforts

  18. Exercise identity and attribution properties predict negative self-conscious emotions for exercise relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Parminder K; Strachan, Shaelyn M; Brawley, Lawrence R; Spink, Kevin S

    2012-10-01

    Research on exercise identity (EXID) indicates that it is related to negative affect when exercisers are inconsistent or relapse. Although identity theory suggests that causal attributions about this inconsistency elicit negative self-conscious emotions of shame and guilt, no EXID studies have examined this for exercise relapse. Weiner's attribution-based theory of interpersonal motivation (2010) offers a means of testing the attribution-emotion link. Using both frameworks, we examined whether EXID and attributional properties predicted negative emotions for exercise relapse. Participants (n = 224) read an exercise relapse vignette, and then completed EXID, attributions, and emotion measures. Hierarchical multiple regression models using EXID and the attributional property of controllability significantly predicted each of shame and guilt, R² adjusted = .09, ps ≤ .001. Results support identity theory suggestions and Weiner's specific attribution-emotion hypothesis. This first demonstration of an interlinking of EXID, controllability, and negative self-conscious emotions offers more predictive utility using complementary theories than either theory alone.

  19. Novel CNS drug discovery and development approach: model-based integration to predict neuro-pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Elizabeth C M; van den Brink, Willem; Yamamoto, Yumi; de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Wong, Yin Cheong

    2017-12-01

    CNS drug development has been hampered by inadequate consideration of CNS pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and disease complexity (reductionist approach). Improvement is required via integrative model-based approaches. Areas covered: The authors summarize factors that have played a role in the high attrition rate of CNS compounds. Recent advances in CNS research and drug discovery are presented, especially with regard to assessment of relevant neuro-PK parameters. Suggestions for further improvements are also discussed. Expert opinion: Understanding time- and condition dependent interrelationships between neuro-PK and neuro-PD processes is key to predictions in different conditions. As a first screen, it is suggested to use in silico/in vitro derived molecular properties of candidate compounds and predict concentration-time profiles of compounds in multiple compartments of the human CNS, using time-course based physiology-based (PB) PK models. Then, for selected compounds, one can include in vitro drug-target binding kinetics to predict target occupancy (TO)-time profiles in humans. This will improve neuro-PD prediction. Furthermore, a pharmaco-omics approach is suggested, providing multilevel and paralleled data on systems processes from individuals in a systems-wide manner. Thus, clinical trials will be better informed, using fewer animals, while also, needing fewer individuals and samples per individual for proof of concept in humans.

  20. The number of extranodal sites assessed by PET/CT scan is a powerful predictor of CNS relapse for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Villa, Diego; Michaelsen, Thomas Yssing

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Development of secondary central nervous system involvement (SCNS) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with poor outcomes. The CNS International Prognostic Index (CNS-IPI) has been proposed for identifying patients at greatest risk, but the optimal model is unknow...

  1. The Role of Family Expressed Emotion and Perceived Social Support in Predicting Addiction Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Atadokht, Akbar; Hajloo, Nader; Karimi, Masoud; Narimani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emotional conditions governing the family and patients? perceived social support play important roles in the treatment or relapse process of the chronic disease. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of family expressed emotion and perceived social support in prediction of addiction relapse. Patients and Methods: The descriptive-correlation method was used in the current study. The study population consisted of the individuals referred to the addiction treatm...

  2. The Value of Fecal Markers in Predicting Relapse in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca J. Galgut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are lifelong chronic illnesses that place an immense burden on patients. The primary aim of therapy is to reduce disease burden and prevent relapse. However, the occurrence of relapses is often unpredictable. Current disease monitoring is primarily by way of clinical indices, with relapses often only recognized once the inflammatory episode is established with subsequent symptoms and gut damage. The window between initial upregulation of the inflammatory response and the recognition of symptoms may provide an opportunity to prevent the relapse and associated morbidity. This review will describe the existing literature surrounding predictive indicators of relapse of IBD with a specific focus on fecal biomarkers. Fecal biomarkers offer promise as a convenient, non-invasive, low cost option for disease monitoring that is predictive of subsequent relapse. To exploit the potential of fecal biomarkers in this role, further research is now required. This research needs to assess multiple fecal markers in context with demographics, disease phenotype, genetics, and intestinal microbiome composition, to build disease behavior models that can provide the clinician with sufficient confidence to intervene and change the long-term disease course.

  3. Impulsive suicide attempts predict post-treatment relapse in alcohol-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Wnorowska, Anna; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Brower, Kirk J

    2008-10-01

    The present study was designed to examine the influence of suicidality on relapse in alcohol-dependent patients. Specifically, a lifetime suicide attempt at baseline was used to predict relapse in the year after treatment. Also, the unique contribution of impulsive suicide attempts was examined. A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence, consecutively admitted to four addiction treatment facilities in Warsaw, Poland participated in the study. Of the 154 eligible patients, 118 (76.6%) completed a standardized follow-up assessment at 12 months. Previous suicide attempts were common in adults treated for alcohol dependence with 43% patients in the present sample reporting an attempt at some point during their lifetime. Additionally, more than 62% of those with a lifetime suicide attempt reported making an impulsive attempt. Lifetime suicide attempts were not associated with post-treatment relapse (chi-square=2.37, d.f.=1, p=0.124). However, impulsive suicide attempts strongly predicted relapse (OR=2.81, 95% CI=1.13-6.95, p=0.026) and time to relapse (OR=2.10, 95% CI=1.18-3.74, p=0.012) even after adjusting for other measures of baseline psychopathology, depression, impulsivity, hopelessness and alcohol use severity. This study is the first to document the relationship between pre-treatment impulsive suicide attempts and higher likelihood of post-treatment relapse in alcohol-dependent patents. Clinicians should routinely conduct an assessment for previous suicide attempts in patients with alcohol use disorders, and when impulsive suicidality is reported, they should recognize the increased risk for relapse and formulate their patients' treatment plans accordingly with the goals of reducing both alcoholic relapse and suicide rates.

  4. PREDICTION OF RELAPSE FROM HYPERTHYROIDISM FOLLOWING ANTITHYROID MEDICATION WITHDRAWAL USING TECHNETIUM THYROID UPTAKE SCANNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Abdollahi, Soraya; Farzanefar, Saeed; Abousaidi, Mohammadtagi; Esteghamati, Alireza; Naseri, Maryam; Eftekhari, Mohamad; Abbasi, Mehrshad

    2017-04-02

    Technetium thyroid uptake (TTU) is not inhibited by antithyroid drugs (ATD) and reflects the degree of thyroid stimulation. We intended to predict the relapse rate from hyperthyroidism based on TTU measurement. Out of 44 initially enrolled subjects, 38 patients aged 41.6 ± 14.6 with Graves disease (duration: 84 ± 78 months) completed the study. TTU was performed with 40-second imaging of the neck and mediastinum 20 minutes after injection of 1 mCi technetium-99m pertechnetate. TTU was measured as the percentage of the count of activity accumulated in the thyroidal region minus the mediastinal background uptake to the count of 1 mCi technetium-99m under the same acquisition conditions. Then methimazole was stopped and patients were followed. The optimal TTU cutoff value for Graves relapse prediction was calculated using Youden's J statistic. Hyperthyroidism relapsed in 11 (28.9%) patients 122 ± 96 (range: 15-290) days post-ATD withdrawal. The subjects in remission were followed for 209 ± 81 days (range: 88-390). TTU was significantly higher in patients with forthcoming relapse (12.0 ± 8.0 vs. 3.9 ± 2.0, P = .007). The difference was significant after adjustment for age, sex, history of previous relapse, disease duration, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels before withdrawal. The area under the receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.87. The optimal TTU cutoff value for classification of subjects with relapse and remission was 8.7 with sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 73%, 100%, 100%, and 90%, respectively (odds ratio [OR] = 10.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.4-29.3). TTU evaluation in hyperthyroid patients receiving antithyroid medication is an accurate and practical method for predicting relapse after ATD withdrawal. ATD = antithyroid drugs RIU = radio-iodine uptake TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone TSI = thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin TTU = technetium thyroid uptake.

  5. [Application of Competing Risks Model in Predicting Smoking Relapse Following Ischemic Stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Sha; Li, Ji-Jie; Du, Xu-Dong; Yan, Pei-Jing; Zhu, Cai-Rong

    2017-07-01

    To determine factors associated with smoking relapse in men who survived from their first stroke. Data were collected through face to face interviews with stroke patients in the hospital, and then repeated every three months via telephone over the period from 2010 to 2014. Kaplan-Meier method and competing risk model were adopted to estimate and predict smoking relapse rates. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated a higher relapse rate than the competing risk model. The four-year relapse rate was 43.1% after adjustment of competing risk. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoking outside of home and workplace (such as bars and restaurants) ( P =0.01), single ( P <0.01), and prior history of smoking at least 20 cigarettes per day ( P =0.02) were significant predictors of smoking relapse. When competing risks exist, competing risks model should be used in data analyses. Smoking interventions should give priorities to those without a spouse and those with a heavy smoking history. Smoking ban in public settings can reduce smoking relapse in stroke patients.

  6. Stressful Life Events Predict Eating Disorder Relapse Following Remission: Six-Year Prospective Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Pagano, Maria E.; Stout, Robert L.; Markowitz, John C.; Ansell, Emily B.; Pinto, Anthony; Zanarini, Mary C.; Yen, Shirley; Skodol, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine prospectively the natural course of bulimia nervosa (BN) and eating disorder not-otherwise-specified (EDNOS) and test for the effects of stressful life events (SLE) on relapse after remission from these eating disorders. Method 117 female patients with BN (N = 35) or EDNOS (N = 82) were prospectively followed for 72 months using structured interviews performed at baseline, 6- and 12-months, and then yearly thereafter. ED were assessed with the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, and monitored over time with the longitudinal interval follow-up evaluation. Personality disorders were assessed with the diagnostic interview for DSM-IV-personality-disorders, and monitored over time with the follow-along-version. The occurrence and specific timing of SLE were assessed with the life events assessment interview. Cox proportional-hazard-regression-analyses tested associations between time-varying levels of SLE and ED relapse, controlling for comorbid psychiatric disorders, ED duration, and time-varying personality-disorder status. Results ED relapse probability was 43%; BN and EDNOS did not differ in time to relapse. Negative SLE significantly predicted ED relapse; elevated work and social stressors were significant predictors. Psychiatric comorbidity, ED duration, and time-varying personality-disorder status were not significant predictors. Discussion Higher work and social stress represent significant warning signs for triggering relapse for women with remitted BN and EDNOS. PMID:21448971

  7. The Alcohol Relapse Risk Assessment: a scoring system to predict the risk of relapse to any alcohol use after liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, James R; Hanto, Douglas W; Curry, Michael P

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol relapse after liver transplant heightens concern about recurrent disease, nonadherence to the immunosuppression regimen, and death. To develop a scoring system to stratify risk of alcohol relapse after liver transplant. Retrospective medical record review. All adult liver transplants performed from May 2002 to February 2011 at a single center in the United States. The incidence of return to any alcohol consumption after liver transplant. Thirty-four percent (40/118) of patients with a history of alcohol abuse/dependency relapsed to use of any alcohol after liver transplant. Nine of 25 hypothesized risk factors were predictive of alcohol relapse after liver transplant: absence of hepatocellular carcinoma, tobacco dependence, continued alcohol use after liver disease diagnosis, low motivation for alcohol treatment, poor stress management skills, no rehabilitation relationship, limited social support, lack of nonmedical behavioral consequences, and continued engagement in social activities with alcohol present. Each independent predictor was assigned an Alcohol Relapse Risk Assessment (ARRA) risk value of 1 point, and patients were classified into 1 of 4 groups by ARRA score: ARRA I = 0, ARRA II = 1 to 3, ARRA III = 4 to 6, and ARRA IV = 7 to 9. Patients in the 2 higher ARRA classifications had significantly higher rates of alcohol relapse and were more likely to return to pretransplant levels of drinking. Alcohol relapse rates are moderately high after liver transplant. The ARRA is a valid and practical tool for identifying pretransplant patients with alcohol abuse or dependency at elevated risk of any alcohol use after liver transplant.

  8. Predicting relapse of Graves' disease following treatment with antithyroid drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, LIN; LU, HONGWEN; LIU, YANG; LIU, CHANGSHAN; XUN, CHU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to monitor long term antithyroid drug treatments and to identify prognostic factors for Graves' disease (GD). A total of 306 patients with GD who were referred to the Endocrinology Clinic at Weifang People's Hospital (Weifang, China) between August 2005 and June 2009 and treated with methimazole were included in the present study. Following treatment, patients were divided into non-remission, including recurrence and constant treatment subgroups, and remission groups. Various prognosis factors were analyzed and compared, including: Patient age, gender, size of thyroid prior to and following treatment, thyroid hormone levels, disease relapse, hypothyroidism and drug side-effects, and states of thyrotropin suppression were observed at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Sixty-five patients (21.2%) were male, and 241 patients (78.8%) were female. The mean age was 42±11 years, and the follow-up was 31.5±6.8 months. Following long-term treatment, 141 patients (46%) demonstrated remission of hyperthyroidism with a mean duration of 18.7±1.9 months. The average age at diagnosis was 45.6±10.3 years in the remission group, as compared with 36.4±8.8 years in the non-remission group (t=3.152; P=0.002). Free thyroxine (FT)3 levels were demonstrated to be 25.2±8.9 and 18.7±9.4 pmol/l in the non-remission and remission groups, respectively (t=3.326, P=0.001). The FT3/FT4 ratio and thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) levels were both significantly higher in the non-remission group (t=3.331, 3.389, P=0.001), as compared with the remission group. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated thyroid size, FT3/FT4 ratio and TRAb at diagnosis were associated with poor outcomes. The ratio of continued thyrotropin suppression in the recurrent subgroup was significantly increased, as compared with the remission group (P=0.001), as thyroid function reached euthyroid state at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Patients with GD exhibiting

  9. Implicit attitudes towards smoking predict long-term relapse in abstinent smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruyt, A.; Lemaigre, V.; Salhi, B.; van Gucht, D.; Tibboel, H.; van Bockstaele, B.; de Houwer, J.; van Meerbeeck, J.; Nackaerts, K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: It has previously been argued that implicit attitudes toward substance-related cues drive addictive behavior. Nevertheless, it remains an open question whether behavioral markers of implicit attitude activation can be used to predict long-term relapse. Objectives: The main objective of

  10. Prediction of immunophenotype, treatment response, and relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia using DNA microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Juncker, Agnieszka; Schmiegelow, K.

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression profiling is a promising tool for classification of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia ( ALL). We analyzed the gene expression at the time of diagnosis for 45 Danish children with ALL. The prediction of 5-year event-free survival or relapse after treatment by NOPHO-ALL92 or 2000...

  11. The intestinal stem cell signature identifies colorectal cancer stem cells and predicts disease relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Jung, P.; Iglesias, M.; Cespedes, M.V.; Rossell, D.; Sevillano, M.; Hernando-Momblona, X.; da Silva-Diz, V.; Munoz, P.; Clevers, H.; Sancho, E.; Mangues, R.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    A frequent complication in colorectal cancer (CRC) is regeneration of the tumor after therapy. Here, we report that a gene signature specific for adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) predicts disease relapse in CRC patients. ISCs are marked by high expression of the EphB2 receptor, which becomes

  12. SOX9 Expression Predicts Relapse of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of Sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9) in primary tumors could predict relapse of stage II colon cancer patients.144 patients with stage II primary colon cancer were retrospectively enrolledin the study. SOX9 expression...

  13. Fecal Calprotectin Predicts Relapse and Histological Mucosal Healing in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Holck, Susanne; Ibsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    . Fecal calprotectin (FC) was measured 2 to 3 days before the sigmoidoscopy. The tissue samples were evaluated for neutrophilic inflammation. We aimed at testing the predictive performance of FC and histological inflammatory activity on disease relapse. RESULTS: A baseline FC level of more than 321 mg...

  14. Cognitive reactivity to sad mood provocation and the prediction of depressive relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Zindel V; Kennedy, Sidney; Gemar, Michael; Hood, Karyn; Pedersen, Rebecca; Buis, Tom

    2006-07-01

    Episode remission in unipolar major depression, while distinguished by minimal symptom burden, can also be a period of marked sensitivity to emotional stress as well as an increased risk of relapse. To examine whether mood-linked changes in dysfunctional thinking predict relapse in recovered patients who were depressed. In phase 1 of this study, patients with major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to receive either antidepressant medication or cognitive behavior therapy. In phase 2, patients who achieved clinical remission underwent sad mood provocation and were then observed with regular clinical assessments for 18 months. Outpatient psychiatric clinics at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario. A total of 301 outpatients with major depressive disorder, aged 18 to 65 years, participated in phase 1 of this study and 99 outpatients with major depressive disorder in remission, aged 18 to 65 years, participated in phase 2. Occurrence of a relapse meeting DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode as assessed by the longitudinal interval follow-up evaluation and a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score of 16 or greater. Patients who recovered through antidepressant medication showed greater cognitive reactivity following the mood provocation than those who received cognitive behavior therapy. Regardless of type of prior treatment, the magnitude of mood-linked cognitive reactivity was a significant predictor of relapse over the subsequent 18 months. Patients whose mood-linked endorsement of dysfunctional attitudes increased by a minimum of 8 points had a significantly shorter time to relapse than those whose scores were not as elevated. The vulnerability of remitted depressed patients for illness relapse may be related to the (re)activation of depressive thinking styles triggered by temporary dysphoric states. This is the first study to link such differences to prognosis following successful treatment for depression. Further

  15. Implicit attitudes towards smoking predict long-term relapse in abstinent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruyt, Adriaan; Lemaigre, Valentine; Salhi, Bihiyga; Van Gucht, Dinska; Tibboel, Helen; Van Bockstaele, Bram; De Houwer, Jan; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; Nackaerts, Kristiaan

    2015-07-01

    It has previously been argued that implicit attitudes toward substance-related cues drive addictive behavior. Nevertheless, it remains an open question whether behavioral markers of implicit attitude activation can be used to predict long-term relapse. The main objective of this study was to examine the relationship between implicit attitudes toward smoking-related cues and long-term relapse in abstaining smokers. Implicit attitudes toward smoking-related cues were assessed by means of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and the evaluative priming task (EPT). Both measures were completed by a group of smokers who volunteered to quit smoking (patient group) and a group of nonsmokers (control group). Participants in the patient group completed these measures twice: once prior to smoking cessation and once after smoking cessation. Relapse was assessed by means of short telephone survey, 6 months after completion of the second test session. EPT scores obtained prior to smoking cessation were related to long-term relapse and correlated with self-reported nicotine dependence as well as daily cigarette consumption. In contrast, none of the behavioral outcome measures were found to correlate with the IAT scores. These findings corroborate the idea that implicit attitudes toward substance-related cues are critically involved in long-term relapse. A potential explanation for the divergent findings obtained with the IAT and EPT is provided.

  16. The role of family expressed emotion and perceived social support in predicting addiction relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atadokht, Akbar; Hajloo, Nader; Karimi, Masoud; Narimani, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Emotional conditions governing the family and patients' perceived social support play important roles in the treatment or relapse process of the chronic disease. The current study aimed to investigate the role of family expressed emotion and perceived social support in prediction of addiction relapse. The descriptive-correlation method was used in the current study. The study population consisted of the individuals referred to the addiction treatment centers in Ardabil from October 2013 to January 2014. The subjects (n = 80) were randomly selected using cluster sampling method. To collect data, expressed emotion test by Cole and Kazaryan, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used, and the obtained data was analyzed using the Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses. Results showed a positive relationship between family expressed emotions and the frequency of relapse (r = 0.26, P = 0.011) and a significant negative relationship between perceived social support and the frequency of relapse (r = -0.34, P = 0.001). Multiple regression analysis also showed that perceived social support from family and the family expressed emotions significantly explained 12% of the total variance of relapse frequency. These results have implications for addicted people, their families and professionals working in addiction centers to use the emotional potential of families especially their expressed emotions and the perceived social support of addicts to increase the success rate of addiction treatment.

  17. Expression changes in the stroma of prostate cancer predict subsequent relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Jia

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are needed to address overtreatment that occurs for the majority of prostate cancer patients that would not die of the disease but receive radical treatment. A possible barrier to biomarker discovery may be the polyclonal/multifocal nature of prostate tumors as well as cell-type heterogeneity between patient samples. Tumor-adjacent stroma (tumor microenvironment is less affected by genetic alteration and might therefore yield more consistent biomarkers in response to tumor aggressiveness. To this end we compared Affymetrix gene expression profiles in stroma near tumor and identified a set of 115 probe sets for which the expression levels were significantly correlated with time-to-relapse. We also compared patients that chemically relapsed shortly after prostatectomy (<1 year, and patients that did not relapse in the first four years after prostatectomy. We identified 131 differentially expressed microarray probe sets between these two categories. 19 probe sets (15 genes overlapped between the two gene lists with p<0.0001. We developed a PAM-based classifier by training on samples containing stroma near tumor: 9 rapid relapse patient samples and 9 indolent patient samples. We then tested the classifier on 47 different samples, containing 90% or more stroma. The classifier predicted the risk status of patients with an average accuracy of 87%. This is the first general tumor microenvironment-based prognostic classifier. These results indicate that the prostate cancer microenvironment exhibits reproducible changes useful for predicting outcomes for patients.

  18. Immunologic prediction of relapse in patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) in clinical remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Zafarmand Sedigh, Vahid; Balighi, Kamran; Hosseini, S Hamed; Ramezani, Ali; Kalantari, Mohammad-Sadegh; Ghandi, Narges; Ghiasi, Maryam; Nikoo, Azita; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2016-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is characterized by multiple relapses, occurring especially in patients on minimal therapy or off therapy. To identify immunologic predictors (anti-desmoglein [Dsg] 1 and 3 antibodies; direct immunofluorescence [DIF]) for relapse in PV patients. Eighty-nine patients in complete clinical remission for at least 6 months and receiving less than or equal to 10 mg prednisolone daily and no immunosuppressive drugs were evaluated using DIF (n=89) and Dsg ELISA (n=46). They were followed until relapse or for at least 18 months. DIF was positive in 44 of 89 patients (49.5%); anti-Dsg 3 antibodies were detected in 18 of 46 patients (39.1%) and anti-Dsg 1 antibodies were detected in 4 of 46 patients (8.7%). Relapse occurred in 38 patients (42.7%). Mean relapse-free time was significantly shorter in anti-Dsg 3-positive patients compared to anti-Dsg 3- negative patients (P = .015) and in DIF-positive patients compared to DIF-negative patients (P = .047), but not in anti-Dsg 1- positive patients compared to anti-Dsg 1-negative patients (P = .501). Sensitivity and predictive values of neither of these tests were high. Small number of anti-Dsg 1-positive patients and use of conventional ELISA. Positive anti-Dsg 3 ELISA and, to a lesser degree, positive DIF are predictors of relapse in PV patients in clinical remission. Decision on discontinuing treatment should be based on the results of these tests as well as on clinical findings. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Usefulness of a rapid faecal calprotectin test to predict relapse in Crohn's disease patients on maintenance treatment with adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Iglesias, Rocio; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Lorenzo-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Dominguez-Muñoz, Juan Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Predicting relapse in Crohn's disease (CD) patients by measuring non-invasive biomarkers could allow for early changes of treatment. Data are scarce regarding the utility of monitoring calprotectin to predict relapse. The aim of the study was to evaluate the predictive value of a rapid test of faecal calprotectin (FC) to predict for flares in CD patients on maintenance treatment with adalimumab (ADA). A prospective, observational cohort study was designed. Inclusion criteria were CD patients in clinical remission on a standard dose of ADA therapy. Fresh FC was measured using a rapid test. Thirty patients were included (median age 38 years, 56.7% female). After the 4 months follow-up, 70.0% patients remained in clinical remission and 30.0% had a relapse. FC concentration at inclusion was significantly higher in those patients who relapsed during the follow-up (625 μg/g) compared to those who stayed in remission (45 μg/g). The optimal cut-off for FC to predict relapse was 204 μg/g. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.968. Sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive value of FC to predict relapse were 100%, 85.7%, 74.1%, and 100%, respectively. In CD patients on ADA maintenance therapy, FC levels measured with a rapid test allow relapse over the following months to be predicted with high accuracy. Low FC levels exclude relapse within at least 4 months after testing, whereas high levels are associated with relapse in three out of every four patients.

  20. Usefulness of Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Antibody at the Time of Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal for Predicting Relapse of Graves Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Kwon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHyperthyroidism relapse in Graves disease after antithyroid drug (ATD withdrawal is common; however, measuring the thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb at ATD withdrawal in order to predict outcomes is controversial. This study compared measurement of thyroid stimulatory antibody (TSAb and thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII at ATD withdrawal to predict relapse.MethodsThis retrospective study enrolled patients with Graves disease who were treated with ATDs and whose serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were normal after receiving low-dose ATDs. ATD therapy was stopped irrespective of TRAb positivity after an additional 6 months of receiving the minimum dose of ATD therapy. Patients were followed using thyroid function tests and TSAb (TSAb group; n=35 or TBII (TBII group; n=39 every 3 to 6 months for 2 years after ATD withdrawal.ResultsTwenty-eight patients (38% relapsed for a median follow-up of 21 months, and there were no differences in baseline clinical characteristics between groups. In the TSAb group, relapse was more common in patients with positive TSAb at ATD withdrawal (67% than patients with negative TSAb (17%; P=0.007. Relapse-free survival was shorter in TSAb-positive patients. In the TBII group, there were no differences in the relapse rate and relapse-free survivals according to TBII positivity. For predicting Graves disease relapse, the sensitivity and specificity of TSAb were 63% and 83%, respectively, whereas those of TBII were 28% and 65%.ConclusionTSAb at ATD withdrawal can predict the relapse of Graves hyperthyroidism, but TBII cannot. Measuring TSAb at ATD withdrawal can assist with clinical decisions making for patients with Graves disease.

  1. Usefulness of Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Antibody at the Time of Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal for Predicting Relapse of Graves Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyemi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kim, Mijin; Park, Suyeon; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Tae Yong; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism relapse in Graves disease after antithyroid drug (ATD) withdrawal is common; however, measuring the thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) at ATD withdrawal in order to predict outcomes is controversial. This study compared measurement of thyroid stimulatory antibody (TSAb) and thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) at ATD withdrawal to predict relapse. Methods This retrospective study enrolled patients with Graves disease who were treated with ATDs and whose serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were normal after receiving low-dose ATDs. ATD therapy was stopped irrespective of TRAb positivity after an additional 6 months of receiving the minimum dose of ATD therapy. Patients were followed using thyroid function tests and TSAb (TSAb group; n=35) or TBII (TBII group; n=39) every 3 to 6 months for 2 years after ATD withdrawal. Results Twenty-eight patients (38%) relapsed for a median follow-up of 21 months, and there were no differences in baseline clinical characteristics between groups. In the TSAb group, relapse was more common in patients with positive TSAb at ATD withdrawal (67%) than patients with negative TSAb (17%; P=0.007). Relapse-free survival was shorter in TSAb-positive patients. In the TBII group, there were no differences in the relapse rate and relapse-free survivals according to TBII positivity. For predicting Graves disease relapse, the sensitivity and specificity of TSAb were 63% and 83%, respectively, whereas those of TBII were 28% and 65%. Conclusion TSAb at ATD withdrawal can predict the relapse of Graves hyperthyroidism, but TBII cannot. Measuring TSAb at ATD withdrawal can assist with clinical decisions making for patients with Graves disease. PMID:27118279

  2. The mastermind approach to CNS drug therapy: translational prediction of human brain distribution, target site kinetics, and therapeutic effects

    OpenAIRE

    de Lange, Elizabeth CM

    2013-01-01

    Despite enormous advances in CNS research, CNS disorders remain the world?s leading cause of disability. This accounts for more hospitalizations and prolonged care than almost all other diseases combined, and indicates a high unmet need for good CNS drugs and drug therapies. Following dosing, not only the chemical properties of the drug and blood?brain barrier (BBB) transport, but also many other processes will ultimately determine brain target site kinetics and consequently the CNS effects. ...

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... attacks of inflammation (relapses) in the CNS, progressive forms of MS involve much less of this type ... and memory or information processing). People with progressive forms of MS are more likely to experience gradually ...

  4. Targeted intervention: Computational approaches to elucidate and predict relapse in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N; Beck, Anne; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) and addiction in general is characterized by failures of choice resulting in repeated drug intake despite severe negative consequences. Behavioral change is hard to accomplish and relapse after detoxification is common and can be promoted by consumption of small amounts of alcohol as well as exposure to alcohol-associated cues or stress. While those environmental factors contributing to relapse have long been identified, the underlying psychological and neurobiological mechanism on which those factors act are to date incompletely understood. Based on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, animal experiments showed that drug, cue and stress exposure affect Pavlovian and instrumental learning processes, which can increase salience of drug cues and promote habitual drug intake. In humans, computational approaches can help to quantify changes in key learning mechanisms during the development and maintenance of alcohol dependence, e.g. by using sequential decision making in combination with computational modeling to elucidate individual differences in model-free versus more complex, model-based learning strategies and their neurobiological correlates such as prediction error signaling in fronto-striatal circuits. Computational models can also help to explain how alcohol-associated cues trigger relapse: mechanisms such as Pavlovian-to-Instrumental Transfer can quantify to which degree Pavlovian conditioned stimuli can facilitate approach behavior including alcohol seeking and intake. By using generative models of behavioral and neural data, computational approaches can help to quantify individual differences in psychophysiological mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of AUD and thus promote targeted intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanrieder, Jørg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    . Complementary proteomic experiments revealed the identity of these signature proteins that were predominantly expressed in the different glial cell types, including histone H4 for oligodendrocytes and S100-A10 for astrocytes. MALDI imaging MS was performed, and signature masses were employed as molecular...... tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination...

  6. Neuroscience of inhibition for addiction medicine: from prediction of initiation to prediction of relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Scott J; Bederson, Lucia; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2016-01-01

    A core deficit in drug addiction is the inability to inhibit maladaptive drug-seeking behavior. Consistent with this deficit, drug-addicted individuals show reliable cross-sectional differences from healthy nonaddicted controls during tasks of response inhibition accompanied by brain activation abnormalities as revealed by functional neuroimaging. However, it is less clear whether inhibition-related deficits predate the transition to problematic use, and, in turn, whether these deficits predict the transition out of problematic substance use. Here, we review longitudinal studies of response inhibition in children/adolescents with little substance experience and longitudinal studies of already addicted individuals attempting to sustain abstinence. Results show that response inhibition and its underlying neural correlates predict both substance use outcomes (onset and abstinence). Neurally, key roles were observed for multiple regions of the frontal cortex (e.g., inferior frontal gyrus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). In general, less activation of these regions during response inhibition predicted not only the onset of substance use, but interestingly also better abstinence-related outcomes among individuals already addicted. The role of subcortical areas, although potentially important, is less clear because of inconsistent results and because these regions are less classically reported in studies of healthy response inhibition. Overall, this review indicates that response inhibition is not simply a manifestation of current drug addiction, but rather a core neurocognitive dimension that predicts key substance use outcomes. Early intervention in inhibitory deficits could have high clinical and public health relevance. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition predict relapse in detoxified alcoholic patients: some preliminary evidence from event-related potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petit G

    2014-06-01

    response-inhibition skills that demand greater neural resources. We propose that event-related potentials can be used in conjunction with behavioral data to predict relapse; this would identify patients that need a higher level of neural resources when suppressing a response is requested.Keywords: alcoholism, relapse, response inhibition, go/no-go task, ERPs, P3d 

  8. Relapse in pathological gamblers: A pilot study on the predictive value of different impulsivity measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, Bieke; Goudriaan, Anneke; Sabbe, Bernard; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dom, Geert

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims: Pathological gambling, a common psychiatric disorder, has many similarities with substance use disorders. Relapse, an important element in addictive disorders, however, has seldom been studied in pathological gambling. Hence, in analogy with previous research studies examining

  9. Fecal Calprotectin is an Accurate Tool and Correlated to Seo Index in Prediction of Relapse in Iranian Patients With Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Jafari, Peyman; Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Safarpour, Ali Reza; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Moini, Maryam; Mehrabi, Manoosh

    2015-02-01

    The natural clinical course of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is characterized by episodes of relapse and remission. Fecal Calprotectin (FC) is a relatively new marker of intestinal inflammation and is an available, non-expensive tool for predicting relapse of quiescent UC. The Seo colitis activity index is a clinical index for assessment of the severity of UC. The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of FC and the Seo colitis activity index and their correlation in prediction of UC exacerbation. In this prospective cohort study, 157 patients with clinical and endoscopic diagnosis of UC selected randomly from 1273 registered patients in Fars province's IBD registry center in Shiraz, Iran, were followed from October 2012 to October 2013 for 12 months or shorter, if they had a relapse. Two patients left the study before completion and one patient had relapse because of discontinuation of drugs. The participants' clinical and serum factors were evaluated every three months. Furthermore, stool samples were collected at the beginning of study and every three months and FC concentration (commercially available enzyme linked immunoassay) and the Seo Index were assessed. Then univariate analysis, multiple variable logistic regression, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and Pearson's correlation test (r) were used for statistical analysis of data. According to the results, 74 patients (48.1%) relapsed during the follow-up (33 men and 41 women). Mean ± SD of FC was 862.82 ± 655.97 μg/g and 163.19 ± 215.85 μg/g in relapsing and non-relapsing patients, respectively (P Seo index were significant predictors of relapse. ROC curve analysis of FC level and Seo activity index for prediction of relapse demonstrated area under the curve of 0.882 (P Seo index was significant in prediction of relapse (r = 0.63, P Seo activity index in prediction of relapse in the course of quiescent UC in Iranian patients.

  10. Cingulate cortex functional connectivity predicts future relapse in alcohol dependent individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Zakiniaeiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol dependence is a chronic relapsing illness. Alcohol and stress cues have consistently been shown to increase craving and relapse risk in recovering alcohol dependent (AUD patients. However, differences in functional connectivity in response to these cues have not been studied using data-driven approaches. Here, voxel-wise connectivity is used in a whole-brain investigation of functional connectivity differences associated with alcohol and stress cues and to examine whether these differences are related to subsequent relapse. In Study 1, 45, 4- to 8-week abstinent, recovering AUD patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during individualized imagery of alcohol, stress, and neutral cues. Relapse measures were collected prospectively for 90 days post-discharge from inpatient treatment. AUD patients showed blunted anterior (ACC, mid (MCC and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, voxel-wise connectivity responses to stress compared to neutral cues and blunted PCC response to alcohol compared to neutral cues. Using Cox proportional hazard regression, weaker connectivity in ACC and MCC during neutral exposure was associated with longer time to relapse (better recovery outcome. Similarly, greater connectivity in PCC during alcohol-cue compared to stress cue was associated with longer time to relapse. In Study 2, a sub-group of 30 AUD patients were demographically-matched to 30 healthy control (HC participants for group comparisons. AUD compared to HC participants showed reduced cingulate connectivity during alcohol and stress cues. Using novel data-driven approaches, the cingulate cortex emerged as a key region in the disruption of functional connectivity during alcohol and stress-cue processing in AUD patients and as a marker of subsequent alcohol relapse.

  11. Psychosocial characteristics of drunk drivers assessed by the Addiction Severity Index, prediction of relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubicka, Beata; Laurell, Hans; Bergman, Hans

    2010-02-01

    To investigate psychosocial characteristics and problems of a representative sample of Swedish drunk drivers with special consideration of the gender of the driver; analyze criminal records of the drivers before and after enrollment in the study; identify psychosocial predictors of relapse to drunk driving. Psychosocial characteristics were assessed by the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). Alcohol problems were additionally assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Criminal records were collected for the five year period before the enrollment, and for the subsequent two years, from Sweden's official crime statistics. About half of the investigated drivers had other psychosocial problems besides the drink driving offence. Female drivers had more alcohol, drug, psychiatric and relational problems, including with parents when growing up, than male drivers, but less previous and subsequent criminality. Heavily drunk drivers (blood alcohol concentration > or = 0.1%) had more problems with alcohol, legal status and employment and support than the other drunk drivers. Problems with legal status, family and social relations and alcohol use increased the risk of relapse in drunk driving, while medical problems seemed to be a protective factor. Different ASI risk factors were identified for relapse in either traffic offences or other crimes. As well as the drunk driving offence, drunk drivers often have other psychosocial problems, female drivers in particular. Already the blood alcohol concentration per se gives some indication of the psychosocial problem profile of a drunk driver and the ASI profile has some prognostic value for relapse in drunk driving.

  12. Therapy of CNS leukemia with intraventricular chemotherapy and low-dose neuraxis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinherz, P.; Jereb, B.; Galicich, J.

    1985-01-01

    Successful treatment of CNS leukemic relapse has been frustrated by frequent local recurrence and eventual marrow relapse. The authors describe the treatment of meningeal leukemia in 39 children with intrathecal remission induction followed by the placement of an Ommaya reservoir to facilitate the administration and distribution of chemotherapeutic agents into the CSF. Six hundred or 900 rad of craniospinal radiation and maintenance intraventricular and intrathecal chemotherapy was then administered. Systemic reinduction therapy was added in the later cases. Sixteen children (41%) experienced no further events, with 17+ months to 13+ years (median, 25 months) follow-up . Eleven patients (28%) had CNS recurrence, nine (23%) bone marrow (BM) relapse, and two (5%) testicular relapse as the next adverse event. The course of patients with first isolated CNS relapse differed from that of the others. Eleven (69%) of 16 patients treated for first isolated CNS relapse are alive and 9 are event free, while only 35% of patients whose CNS relapse occurred simultaneously or after recurrent disease at other sites are alive (P = .04). Seven of 23 in the later group are event free. The difference is due to the increased incidence of BM relapse in the later group (30% v 6%; P = .04). For patients with first isolated CNS relapse, the life-table median CNS remission duration is 42 months. The projected CNS relapse-free survival and event-free survival 8 to 10 years after CNS relapse are 40% and 32%, respectively. Headache, nausea, and emesis of short duration were frequent during therapy. In three patients, the reservoir had to be removed for infection. No patient suffered neurologic deficit related to the reservoir. The therapy described can reduce the CNS relapse rate with manageable toxicity

  13. Accuracy of Consecutive Fecal Calprotectin Measurements to Predict Relapse in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Under Maintenance With Anti-TNF Therapy: A Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Iglesias, Rocio; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Lorenzo-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Dominguez-Muñoz, Juan E

    2018-03-01

    Predicting relapse in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients could allow early changes in therapy. We aimed at evaluating the accuracy of consecutive fecal calprotectin (FC) measurements to predict flares in IBD patients under maintenance treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs. A prospective longitudinal cohort study with 16-month follow-up period was designed. IBD patients in clinical remission for at least 6 months under anti-TNF therapy were included. FC was quantified at 4-month intervals for 1 year, and patients were clinically evaluated for relapse at 2-month intervals. Diagnostic accuracy of FC for predicting relapse was evaluated by receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. In total, 95 of 106 included patients finalized the study and were analyzed (median age 44 y, 50.5% female, 75% with Crohn's disease). A total of 30 patients (31.6%) had a relapse over follow-up. FC concentration was significantly higher in patients who relapsed (477 μg/g) than in patients who maintained in remission (65 μg/g) (Ppredict remission was 130 μg/g (negative predictive value of 100%), and 300 μg/g to predict relapse (positive predictive value of 78.3%). FC is a good predictor of clinical relapse and a particularly good predictor of remission over the following 4 months in patients with IBD on maintenance therapy with anti-TNF drugs. FC levels 300 μg/g allow predicting relapse with a high probability at any time over the following 4 months.

  14. The Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER Score for relapse prediction in patients with surgically resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Fan Ang

    Full Text Available Surgery is the primary curative option in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Current prognostic models for HCC are developed on datasets of primarily patients with advanced cancer, and may be less relevant to resectable HCC. We developed a postoperative nomogram, the Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER Score, to predict outcomes of HCC patients who have undergone surgical resection.Records for 544 consecutive patients undergoing first-line curative surgery for HCC in one institution from 1992-2007 were reviewed, with 405 local patients selected for analysis. Freedom from relapse (FFR was the primary outcome measure. An outcome-blinded modeling strategy including clustering, data reduction and transformation was used. We compared the performance of SLICER in estimating FFR with other HCC prognostic models using concordance-indices and likelihood analysis.A nomogram predicting FFR was developed, incorporating non-neoplastic liver cirrhosis, multifocality, preoperative alpha-fetoprotein level, Child-Pugh score, vascular invasion, tumor size, surgical margin and symptoms at presentation. Our nomogram outperformed other HCC prognostic models in predicting FFR by means of log-likelihood ratio statistics with good calibration demonstrated at 3 and 5 years post-resection and a concordance index of 0.69. Using decision curve analysis, SLICER also demonstrated superior net benefit at higher threshold probabilities.The SLICER score enables well-calibrated individualized predictions of relapse following curative HCC resection, and may represent a novel tool for biomarker research and individual counseling.

  15. The role of self-reported impulsivity and reward sensitivity versus neurocognitive measures of disinhibition and decision-making in the prediction of relapse in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudriaan, A E; Oosterlaan, J; De Beurs, E; Van Den Brink, W

    2008-01-01

    Disinhibition and decision-making skills play an important role in theories on the cause and outcome of addictive behaviors such as substance use disorders and pathological gambling. In recent studies, both disinhibition and disadvantageous decision-making strategies, as measured by neurocognitive tests, have been found to influence the course of substance use disorders. Research on factors affecting relapse in pathological gambling is scarce. This study investigated the effect of both self-reported impulsivity and reward sensitivity, and neurocognitively assessed disinhibition and decision-making under conflicting contingencies, on relapse in a group of 46 pathological gamblers. Logistic regression analysis indicated that longer duration of the disorder and neurocognitive indicators of disinhibition (Stop Signal Reaction Time) and decision-making (Card Playing Task) were significant predictors of relapse (explaining 53% of the variance in relapse), whereas self-reported impulsivity and reward sensitivity did not significantly predict relapse. Overall classification accuracy was 76%, with a positive classification accuracy of 76% and a negative classification accuracy of 75%. Duration of the disorder and neurocognitive measures of disinhibition and decision-making are powerful predictors of relapse in pathological gambling. The results suggest that endophenotypical neurocognitive characteristics are more promising in the prediction of relapse in pathological gambling than phenotypical personality characteristics. Neurocognitive predictors may be useful to guide treatment planning of follow-up contacts and booster sessions.

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor predicts prolonged relapse-free period in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Iezzi, Ennio; Marfia, Girolama A; Simonelli, Ilaria; Musella, Alessandra; Mandolesi, Georgia; Fresegna, Diego; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Furlan, Roberto; Finardi, Annamaria; Mataluni, Giorgia; Landi, Doriana; Gilio, Luana; Centonze, Diego; Buttari, Fabio

    2018-04-14

    In the early phases of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), a clear correlation between brain lesion load and clinical disability is often lacking, originating the so-called clinico-radiological paradox. Different factors may contribute to such discrepancy. In particular, synaptic plasticity may reduce the clinical expression of brain damage producing enduring enhancement of synaptic strength largely dependent on neurotrophin-induced protein synthesis. Cytokines released by the immune cells during acute inflammation can alter synaptic transmission and plasticity possibly influencing the clinical course of MS. In addition, immune cells may promote brain repair during the post-acute phases, by secreting different growth factors involved in neuronal and oligodendroglial cell survival. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a neurotrophic factor that could be particularly involved in clinical recovery. Indeed, PDGF promotes long-term potentiation of synaptic activity in vitro and in MS and could therefore represent a key factor improving the clinical compensation of new brain lesions. The aim of the present study is to explore whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) PDGF concentrations at the time of diagnosis may influence the clinical course of RR-MS. At the time of diagnosis, we measured in 100 consecutive early MS patients the CSF concentrations of PDGF, of the main pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and of reliable markers of neuronal damage. Clinical and radiological parameters of disease activity were prospectively collected during follow-up. CSF PDGF levels were positively correlated with prolonged relapse-free survival. Radiological markers of disease activity, biochemical markers of neuronal damage, and clinical parameters of disease progression were instead not influenced by PDGF concentrations. Higher CSF PDGF levels were associated with an anti-inflammatory milieu within the central nervous system. Our results suggest that PDGF could promote a

  17. PET/CT before autologous stem cell transplantation predicts outcome in refractory/relapsed follicular lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara, Marion; Tilly, Herve [Universite de Rouen, Service d' Hematologie, Centre Henri Becquerel, Rouen (France); Dupuis, Jehan; Haioun, Corinne [CHU Henri Mondor et Universite Paris-Est, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Unite Hemopathies Lymphoides, Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny (France); Mareschal, Sylvain; Dubois, Sydney [Centre Henri Becquerel, IRIB, Unite Inserm U918, Rouen (France); Julian, Anne [CHU Purpan, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Toulouse (France); Cottereau, Anne Segolene; Becker, Stephanie [Centre Henri Becquerel, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rouen (France); Oberic, Lucie; Huynh, Anne; Laurent, Guy; Ysebaert, Loic [IUCT-Oncopole, Departement d' Hematologie, Toulouse (France); Meignan, Michel [CHU Henri-Mondor, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France)

    2014-09-20

    Salvage of young patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) after R-CHOP includes salvage immunochemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Previous studies dealing with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma have shown the prognostic value of PET/CT prior to ASCT. We retrospectively analysed 59 patients with refractory/relapsed FL after first-line R-CHOP who were chemosensitive (as evaluated by CT) to the salvage treatment and who proceeded to ASCT. The role of PET/CT in this setting to define chemosensitivity is not definitely established. So we focused on the prognostic value of PET/CT performed after salvage treatment, before ASCT. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 63.1 % (50.9-78.3 %) and 90.5 % (82.8 - 98.8 %), respectively, and did not differ significantly according to their Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index at relapse, conditioning regimen, or type of salvage. PFS was significantly lower in PET/CT-positive patients, according to the International Harmonization Project revised response criteria, with a 3-year PFS of 45.5 % (26.6 - 77.8 %) versus 72.6 % (58.5 - 90.0 %; p = 0.039). To better refine prognosis, we applied two types of thresholds: a Deauville five-point scale positive threshold of ≥3 (3-year PFS of 74.9 %, range 61.0 - 92.1 % %, versus 42.8 %, range 24.7 - 74.4 %; p = 0.02), and a ≥70 % ∇SUV{sub max} threshold between presalvage and pre-ASCT PET/CT (3-year PFS of 72.4 %, range 57.5 - 91.3 % versus 13.3 %, 2.2 - 81.7 %; p < 10{sup -3}). The PET/CT findings before ASCT were independently correlated with PFS in our series. PET/CT negativity before ASCT is a desirable and achievable goal in the management of chemosensitive FL relapsing after first-line R-CHOP. (orig.)

  18. Central diabetes insipidus as a very late relapse limited to the pituitary stalk in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Hazeki, Daisuke; Imamura, Mari; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and relapse are frequently seen in multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We present two females with multifocal LCH who developed CDI 9 and 5 years after the initial diagnosis, respectively, as a relapse limited to the pituitary stalk. Combination chemotherapy with cytarabine reduced the mass in the pituitary stalk. Although CDI did not improve, there has been no anterior pituitary hormone deficiency (APHD), neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system (ND-CNS) or additional relapse for 2 years after therapy. It was difficult to predict the development of CDI in these cases. CDI might develop very late in patients with multifocal LCH, and therefore strict follow-up is necessary, especially with regard to symptoms of CDI such as polydipsia and polyuria. For new-onset CDI with LCH, chemotherapy with cytarabine might be useful for preventing APHD and ND-CNS.

  19. microRNAs in CNS disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocerha, Jannet; Kauppinen, Sakari; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2009-01-01

    RNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and are reported to mediate pivotal roles in many aspects of neuronal functions. Disruption of miRNA-based post-transcriptional regulation has been implicated in a range of CNS disorders as one miRNA is predicted to impact...

  20. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1 hi TIM-3 + cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1 hi TIM-3 + T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing T N and T EMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1 hi TIM-3 + cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation

  1. Quantifying risk of early relapse in patients with first demyelinating events: Prediction in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelman, Tim; Meyniel, Claire; Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, Francois; Boz, Cavit; Alroughani, Raed; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Iuliano, Gerardo; Duquette, Pierre; Terzi, Murat; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Pucci, Eugenio; Verheul, Freek; Fiol, Marcela; Van Pesch, Vincent; Cristiano, Edgardo; Petersen, Thor; Moore, Fraser; Kalincik, Tomas; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Trojano, Maria; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2017-09-01

    Characteristics at clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) examination assist in identification of patient at highest risk of early second attack and could benefit the most from early disease-modifying drugs (DMDs). To examine determinants of second attack and validate a prognostic nomogram for individualised risk assessment of clinical conversion. Patients with CIS were prospectively followed up in the MSBase Incident Study. Predictors of clinical conversion were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Prognostic nomograms were derived to calculate conversion probability and validated using concordance indices. A total of 3296 patients from 50 clinics in 22 countries were followed up for a median (inter-quartile range (IQR)) of 1.92 years (0.90, 3.71). In all, 1953 (59.3%) patients recorded a second attack. Higher Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) at baseline, first symptom location, oligoclonal bands and various brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics were all predictors of conversion. Conversely, older age and DMD exposure post-CIS were associated with reduced rates. Prognostic nomograms demonstrated high concordance between estimated and observed conversion probabilities. This multinational study shows that age at CIS onset, DMD exposure, EDSS, multiple brain and spinal MRI criteria and oligoclonal bands are associated with shorter time to relapse. Nomogram assessment may be useful in clinical practice for estimating future clinical conversion.

  2. Seeing the signs: Using the course of residual depressive symptomatology to predict patterns of relapse and recurrence of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Floor E A; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Ruhé, Henricus G Eric; Conradi, Henk Jan; de Jonge, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by high relapse/recurrence rates. Predicting individual patients' relapse/recurrence risk has proven hard, possibly due to course heterogeneity among patients. This study aimed to (1) identify homogeneous data-driven subgroups with different patterns of relapse/recurrence and (2) identify associated predictors. For a year, we collected weekly depressive symptom ratings in 213 primary care MDD patients. Latent class growth analyses (LCGA), based on symptom-severity during the 24 weeks after no longer fulfilling criteria for the initial major depressive episode (MDE), were used to identify groups with different patterns of relapse/recurrence. Associations of baseline predictors with these groups were investigated, as were the groups' associations with 3- and 11-year follow-up depression outcomes. LCGA showed that heterogeneity in relapse/recurrence after no longer fulfilling criteria for the initial MDE was best described by four classes: "quick symptom decline" (14.0%), "slow symptom decline" (23.3%), "steady residual symptoms" (38.7%), and "high residual symptoms" (24.1%). The latter two classes showed lower self-esteem at baseline, and more recurrences and higher severity at 3-year follow-up than the first two classes. Moreover, the high residual symptom class scored higher on neuroticism and lower on extraversion and self-esteem at baseline. Interestingly, the steady residual symptoms and high residual symptoms classes still showed higher severity of depressive symptoms after 11 years. Some measures were associated with specific patterns of relapse/recurrence. Moreover, the data-driven relapse/recurrence groups were predictive of long-term outcomes, suggesting that patterns of residual symptoms could be of prognostic value in clinical practice. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Generic Multi-Compartmental CNS Distribution Model Structure for 9 Drugs Allows Prediction of Human Brain Target Site Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; van den Berg, Dirk-Jan; Hartman, Robin; van den Brink, Willem; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Bakshi, Suruchi; Aranzana-Climent, Vincent; Marchand, Sandrine; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Couet, William; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    Purpose Predicting target site drug concentration in the brain is of key importance for the successful development of drugs acting on the central nervous system. We propose a generic mathematical model to describe the pharmacokinetics in brain compartments, and apply this model to predict human

  4. Mood reactivity rather than cognitive reactivity is predictive of depressive relapse : a randomized study with 5.5-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D; Bockting, Claudi L H; Burger, Huibert; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W J; Ruhe, Eric; Hollon, Steven D; Schene, Aart H

    OBJECTIVE: The current study examined whether cognitive reactivity, cognitive extremity reactivity, and mood reactivity following mood provocation predicted relapse in depression over 5.5 years. Additionally, this study was the 1st to examine whether changes in cognitive reactivity and mood

  5. Mood reactivity rather than cognitive reactivity is predictive of depressive relapse: a randomized study with 5.5-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Burger, Huibert; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Ruhé, Henricus G.; Hollon, Steven D.; Schene, Aart H.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined whether cognitive reactivity, cognitive extremity reactivity, and mood reactivity following mood provocation predicted relapse in depression over 5.5 years. Additionally, this study was the 1st to examine whether changes in cognitive reactivity and mood reactivity

  6. Individualized prediction of seizure relapse and outcomes following antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberink, Herm J; Boshuisen, Kim; Otte, Willem M; Geleijns, Karin; Braun, Kees P J

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to create a clinically useful tool for individualized prediction of seizure outcomes following antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery. We used data from the European retrospective TimeToStop study, which included 766 children from 15 centers, to perform a proportional hazard regression analysis. The 2 outcome measures were seizure recurrence and seizure freedom in the last year of follow-up. Prognostic factors were identified through systematic review of the literature. The strongest predictors for each outcome were selected through backward selection, after which nomograms were created. The final models included 3 to 5 factors per model. Discrimination in terms of adjusted concordance statistic was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.69) for predicting seizure recurrence and 0.73 (95% CI 0.72-0.75) for predicting eventual seizure freedom. An online prediction tool is provided on www.epilepsypredictiontools.info/ttswithdrawal. The presented models can improve counseling of patients and parents regarding postoperative antiepileptic drug policies, by estimating individualized risks of seizure recurrence and eventual outcome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional failures predict earlier relapse to smoking in young adults: A pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepis, Ty S; Tapscott, Brian E; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2016-04-01

    Substantial evidence links greater impulsivity and stress exposure to poorer smoking cessation outcomes. Results from adolescents also indicate that stress-related change in risk taking can impede cessation attempts. We investigated the effects of stress-related change in impulsivity, risk taking, attention and nicotine withdrawal, and craving in young adult smokers on time to smoking relapse in a relapse analogue paradigm. Twenty-six young adult smokers (50% women; mean age: 20.9 ± 1.8) were exposed to a stress imagery session followed by a contingency management-based relapse analogue paradigm. Participants smoked at least 5 cigarettes daily, with a mean baseline carbon monoxide (CO) level of 13.7 (± 5.1) ppm. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t tests examined stress induction validity and Cox regressions of proportional hazards examined the effects of stress-related changes in nicotine withdrawal, nicotine craving, attention, impulsivity, and risk taking on time to relapse. While stress-related change in impulsivity, nicotine craving and withdrawal did not predict time to relapse (all ps > .10), greater stress-related increases in reaction time (RT) variability (p = .02) were predictive of shorter time to relapse, with trend-level findings for inattention and risk taking. Furthermore, changes in stress-related risk taking affected outcome in women more than in men, with a significant relationship between stress-related change in risk taking only in women (p = .026). Smoking cessation attempts in young adults may be adversely impacted by stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional disruption. Clinicians working with young adults attempting cessation may need to target these stress-related impairments by fostering more adaptive coping and resilience. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Temporal changes in incidence and pattern of central nervous system relapses in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated on four consecutive Medical Research Council Trials, 1985–2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shekhar; Wade, Rachel; Moorman, Anthony V; Mitchell, Chris; Kinsey, Sally E; Eden, TOB; Parker, Catriona; Vora, Ajay; Richards, Sue; Saha, Vaskar

    2009-01-01

    Despite the success of contemporary treatment protocols in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), relapse within the central nervous system (CNS) remains a challenge. To better understand this phenomenon, we have analysed the changes in incidence and pattern of CNS relapses in 5564 children enrolled on four successive MRC-ALL trials between 1985 and 2001. Changes in the incidence and pattern of CNS relapses were examined and the relationship with patient characteristics assessed. Factors affecting post-relapse outcome were determined. Overall, relapses declined by 49%. Decreases occurred primarily in non-CNS and combined relapses with a progressive shift towards later (≥30 months from diagnosis) relapses (p<0·0001). Although isolated CNS relapses declined, the proportional incidence and timing of relapse remained unchanged. Age and presenting white cell count were risk factors for CNS relapse. On multivariate analysis, the time to relapse and the trial period influenced post-relapse outcomes. Relapse trends differed within biological subtypes. In ETV6-RUNX1 ALL, relapse patterns mirrored overall trends while in High Hyperdiploidy ALL, these appear to have plateaued over the latter two trial periods. Intensive systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy have decreased the overall CNS relapse rates and changed the patterns of recurrence. The heterogeneity of therapeutic response in the biological subtypes suggests room for further optimisation using currently available chemotherapy. PMID:20016529

  9. Predictive factors and outcomes for ibrutinib therapy in relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma-a "real world" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperla, Narendranath; Hamadani, Mehdi; Cashen, Amanda F; Ahn, Kwang W; Oak, Eunhye; Kanate, Abraham S; Calzada, Oscar; Cohen, Jonathon B; Farmer, Luke; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Tallarico, Michael; Nabhan, Chadi; Costa, Luciano J; Kenkre, Vaishalee P; Hari, Parameswaran N; Fenske, Timothy S

    2017-12-01

    Ibrutinib has demonstrated significant activity in relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in clinical trials. However, the impact of hematopoietic cell transplantation on the outcomes of ibrutinib and the predictive factors for ibrutinib response has not been well studied. Hence, we conducted a multicenter retrospective study of MCL patients who received ibrutinib to (1) determine the overall response rate (ORR), duration of response (DOR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) of ibrutinib in routine clinical practice, (2) examine characteristics predictive of response to ibrutinib therapy, and (3) describe the outcomes of patients failing ibrutinib. Ninety-seven patients met the eligibility criteria. Overall response rate and median DOR to ibrutinib were 65% and 17 months, respectively. Only lack of primary refractory disease was predictive of ibrutinib response on multivariate analysis. Twenty-nine patients received postibrutinib therapies, with an ORR of 48% and a median DOR of 3 months. The median OS and PFS for the entire group (n = 97) was 22 and 15 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, ibrutinib response, low MCL international prognostic index, and absence of primary refractory disease were predictors of better PFS, while ibrutinib response and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≤1 were predictors of better OS. The median OS postibrutinib failure was 2.5 months. Our results confirm the high ORR and DOR of ibrutinib in MCL and that prior hematopoietic cell transplantation does not negatively influence ibrutinib outcomes. Survival following ibrutinib failure is poor with no specific subsequent therapy showing superior activity in this setting. As a result, for select (transplant eligible) patients, allogeneic transplant should be strongly considered soon after ibrutinib response is documented to provide durable responses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Leishmania Antigenuria to Predict Initial Treatment Failure and Relapse in Visceral Leishmaniasis/HIV Coinfected Patients: An Exploratory Study Nested Within a Clinical Trial in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, Johan; Mengesha, Bewketu; Mekonnen, Tigist; Fikre, Helina; Takele, Yegnasew; Adem, Emebet; Mohammed, Rezika; Ritmeijer, Koert; Vogt, Florian; Adriaensen, Wim; Diro, Ermias

    2018-01-01

    Background: Biomarkers predicting the risk of VL treatment failure and relapse in VL/HIV coinfected patients are needed. Nested within a two-site clinical trial in Ethiopia (2011-2015), we conducted an exploratory study to assess whether (1) levels of Leishmania antigenuria measured at VL diagnosis were associated with initial treatment failure and (2) levels of Leishmania antigenuria at the end of treatment (parasitologically-confirmed cure) were associated with subsequent relapse. Methods: Leishmania antigenuria at VL diagnosis and cure was determined using KAtex urine antigen test and graded as negative (0), weak/moderate (grade 1+/2+) or strongly-positive (3+). Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to assess the association between antigenuria and (1) initial treatment failure, and (2) relapse over the 12 months after cure, respectively. Results: The analysis to predict initial treatment failure included sixty-three coinfected adults [median age: 30 years interquartile range (IQR) 27-35], median CD4 count: 56 cells/μL (IQR 38-113). KAtex results at VL diagnosis were negative in 11 (17%), weak/moderate in 17 (27%) and strongly-positive in 35 (36%). Twenty (32%) patients had parasitologically-confirmed treatment failure, with a risk of failure of 9% (1/11) with KAtex-negative results, 0% (0/17) for KAtex 1+/2+ and 54% (19/35) for KAtex 3+ results. Compared to KAtex-negative patients, KAtex 3+ patients were at increased risk of treatment failure [odds ratio 11.9 (95% CI 1.4-103.0); P : 0.025]. Forty-four patients were included in the analysis to predict relapse [median age: 31 years (IQR 28-35), median CD4 count: 116 cells/μL (IQR 95-181)]. When achieving VL cure, KAtex results were negative in 19 (43%), weak/moderate (1+/2+) in 10 (23%), and strongly positive (3+) in 15 patients (34%). Over the subsequent 12 months, eight out of 44 patients (18%) relapsed. The predicted 1-year relapse risk was 6% for KAtex-negative results, 14% for KAtex 1

  12. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Predictive Value for the Site of Postradiotherapy Relapse in a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laprie, Anne; Catalaa, Isabelle; Cassol, Emmanuelle; McKnight, Tracy R.; Berchery, Delphine; Marre, Delphine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Berry, Isabelle; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)-defined, metabolically abnormal tumor regions and subsequent sites of relapse in data from patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three examinations were performed prospectively for 9 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme studied in a Phase I trial combining Tipifarnib and RT. The patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI before treatment and every 2 months until relapse. The MRSI data were categorized by the choline (Cho)/N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (CNR) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. CNRs corresponding to T1 and T2 MRI for 1,207 voxels were evaluated before RT and at recurrence. Results: Before treatment, areas of CNR2 (CNR ≥2) represented 25% of the contrast-enhancing (T1CE) regions and 10% of abnormal T2 regions outside T1CE (HyperT2). The presence of CNR2 was often an early indicator of the site of relapse after therapy. In fact, 75% of the voxels within the T1CE+CNR2 before therapy continued to exhibit CNR2 at relapse, compared with 22% of the voxels within the T1CE with normal CNR (p < 0.05). The location of new contrast enhancement with CNR2 corresponded in 80% of the initial HyperT2+CNR2 vs. 20.7% of the HyperT2 voxels with normal CNR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Metabolically active regions represented a small percentage of pretreatment MRI abnormalities and were predictive for the site of post-RT relapse. The incorporation of MRSI data in the definition of RT target volumes for selective boosting may be a promising avenue leading to increased local control of glioblastomas

  13. Technetium uptake predicts remission and relapse in Grave's disease patients on antithyroid drugs for at least 1 year in South Indian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Singhal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Most of the information on remission related factors in Grave's disease are derived from Western literature. It is likely that there may be additional prognostic factors and differences in the postdrug treatment course of Grave's disease in India. Aim: To study factors which predict remission/relapse in Grave's disease patients from South India. Also to establish if technetium (Tc uptake has a role in predicting remission. Subjects and Methods: Records of 174 patients with clinical, biochemical, and scintigraphic criteria consistent with Grave's disease, seen in our Institution between January 2006 and 2014 were analyzed. Patient factors, drug-related factors, Tc-99m uptake and other clinical factors were compared between the remission and nonremission groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann–Whitney U-test and Chi-square tests were used when appropriate to compare the groups. Results: Fifty-seven (32.7% patients attained remission after at least 1 year of thionamide therapy. Of these, 11 (19.2% patients relapsed within 1 year. Age, gender, goiter, and presence of extrathyroidal manifestations were not associated with remission. Higher values of Tc uptake were positively associated with remission (P- 0.02. Time to achievement of normal thyroid function and composite dose: Time scores were significantly associated with remission (P - 0.05 and P - 0.01, respectively. Patients with lower FT4 at presentation had a higher chance of remission (P - 0.01. The relapse rates were lower than previously reported in the literature. A higher Tc uptake was found to be significantly associated with relapse also (P - 0.009. Conclusion: The prognostic factors associated with remission in Graves's disease in this South Indian study are not the same as that reported in Western literature. Tc scintigraphy may have an additional role in identifying people who are likely to undergo remission and thus predict the outcome of Grave's disease.

  14. Technetium uptake predicts remission and relapse in Grave's disease patients on antithyroid drugs for at least 1 year in South Indian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Neha; Praveen, V P; Bhavani, Nisha; Menon, Arun S; Menon, Usha; Abraham, Nithya; Kumar, Harish; JayKumar, R V; Nair, Vasantha; Sundaram, Shanmugha; Sundaram, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Most of the information on remission related factors in Grave's disease are derived from Western literature. It is likely that there may be additional prognostic factors and differences in the postdrug treatment course of Grave's disease in India. To study factors which predict remission/relapse in Grave's disease patients from South India. Also to establish if technetium (Tc) uptake has a role in predicting remission. Records of 174 patients with clinical, biochemical, and scintigraphic criteria consistent with Grave's disease, seen in our Institution between January 2006 and 2014 were analyzed. Patient factors, drug-related factors, Tc-99m uptake and other clinical factors were compared between the remission and nonremission groups. Mann-Whitney U-test and Chi-square tests were used when appropriate to compare the groups. Fifty-seven (32.7%) patients attained remission after at least 1 year of thionamide therapy. Of these, 11 (19.2%) patients relapsed within 1 year. Age, gender, goiter, and presence of extrathyroidal manifestations were not associated with remission. Higher values of Tc uptake were positively associated with remission (P- 0.02). Time to achievement of normal thyroid function and composite dose: Time scores were significantly associated with remission (P - 0.05 and P - 0.01, respectively). Patients with lower FT4 at presentation had a higher chance of remission (P - 0.01). The relapse rates were lower than previously reported in the literature. A higher Tc uptake was found to be significantly associated with relapse also (P - 0.009). The prognostic factors associated with remission in Graves's disease in this South Indian study are not the same as that reported in Western literature. Tc scintigraphy may have an additional role in identifying people who are likely to undergo remission and thus predict the outcome of Grave's disease.

  15. CNS embryonal tumours: WHO 2016 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, J C; Hawkins, C; Pietsch, T; Jacques, T S

    2018-02-01

    Embryonal tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) present a significant clinical challenge. Many of these neoplasms affect young children, have a very high mortality and therapeutic strategies are often aggressive with poor long-term outcomes. There is a great need to accurately diagnose embryonal tumours, predict their outcome and adapt therapy to the individual patient's risk. For the first time in 2016, the WHO classification took into account molecular characteristics for the diagnosis of CNS tumours. This integration of histological features with genetic information has significantly changed the diagnostic work-up and reporting of tumours of the CNS. However, this remains challenging in embryonal tumours due to their previously unaccounted tumour heterogeneity. We describe the recent revisions made to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours and review the main changes, while highlighting some of the more common diagnostic testing strategies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  16. Short-term stress, but not mucosal healing nor depression was predictive for the risk of relapse in patients with ulcerative colitis: a prospective 12-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Jost; Hofstetter, Anna; Wolfe, Fred; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological factors such as depression and stress are under debate to contribute to the risk of relapse. The impact of mucosal healing to reduce the risk of relapse had not been studied prospectively. The aim of this study was to identify whether depression and stress increase and mucosal healing reduces the risk of clinical relapse in patients with UC in clinical remission. Patients in clinical remission were followed prospectively for 1 year, or less if they relapsed. Endoscopy and histology score and long-term perceived stress (Perceived Stress Questionnaire) were measured at baseline. Mucosal healing was defined by a Mayo Endoscopy score of 0-1. Depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and acute perceived stress (Cohen Perceived Stress Scale) were measured at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. A time-dependent multivariate Cox regression model determined the predictors of time to relapse. Seventy-five patients were included into final analysis, of which 28 (37.3%) relapsed. Short-term stress at the last visit before relapse (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.10) and male gender (HR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.01-5.61), but not baseline mucosal healing (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.35-2.11), baseline long-term stress (HR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.01-3.31), and depression at the last visit before relapse (HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.95-1.22) were predictive for a relapse. Short-term stress but not depression nor mucosal healing was predictive for the risk of relapse in patients with UC in clinical remission. Larger multicentre studies are necessary to confirm our findings.

  17. CNS role evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J L; Baumgartner, R G

    1996-01-01

    THE CNS ROLE has been actualized in a variety of ways. Flexibility-inherent in the role-and the revolution in health care consciousness tend to place the CNS at risk for criticism regarding value to the organization. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a CNS task force evaluated the current reality of CNS practice and recommended role changes to include the financial analysis of patient care. After incorporating a financial perspective into our present practice, we have embarked on an interesting journey of post-Master's degree study, that of the tertiary care nurse practitioner. This practice option could elevated the clinical and financial aspects of providing cost-effective health care to a more autonomous role form; however, the transition has been challenging. Since 1990, the American Nurses Association has recommended that nursing school curricula change to meet the needs of the health care environment and provide increased career flexibility through creating one advanced degree incorporating both CNS and NP functions. Swiftly moving past differences and toward similarities will bridge the gap for advanced practice nurses in the future.

  18. Impact of Social Cognition on Alcohol Dependence Treatment Outcome: Poorer Facial Emotion Recognition Predicts Relapse/Dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Claudia I; Derntl, Birgit; Osthaus, Friederike; Kemmler, Georg; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Despite growing evidence for neurobehavioral deficits in social cognition in alcohol use disorder (AUD), the clinical relevance remains unclear, and little is known about its impact on treatment outcome. This study prospectively investigated the impact of neurocognitive social abilities at treatment onset on treatment completion. Fifty-nine alcohol-dependent patients were assessed with measures of social cognition including 3 core components of empathy via paradigms measuring: (i) emotion recognition (the ability to recognize emotions via facial expression), (ii) emotional perspective taking, and (iii) affective responsiveness at the beginning of inpatient treatment for alcohol dependence. Subjective measures were also obtained, including estimates of task performance and a self-report measure of empathic abilities (Interpersonal Reactivity Index). According to treatment outcomes, patients were divided into a patient group with a regular treatment course (e.g., with planned discharge and without relapse during treatment) or an irregular treatment course (e.g., relapse and/or premature and unplanned termination of treatment, "dropout"). Compared with patients completing treatment in a regular fashion, patients with relapse and/or dropout of treatment had significantly poorer facial emotion recognition ability at treatment onset. Additional logistic regression analyses confirmed these results and identified poor emotion recognition performance as a significant predictor for relapse/dropout. Self-report (subjective) measures did not correspond with neurobehavioral social cognition measures, respectively objective task performance. Analyses of individual subtypes of facial emotions revealed poorer recognition particularly of disgust, anger, and no (neutral faces) emotion in patients with relapse/dropout. Social cognition in AUD is clinically relevant. Less successful treatment outcome was associated with poorer facial emotion recognition ability at the beginning of

  19. Predicting relapse in major depressive disorder using patient-reported outcomes of depressive symptom severity, functioning, and quality of life in the Individual Burden of Illness Index for Depression (IBI-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Waguih William; Greenberg, Jared M; Cohen, Robert M

    2013-10-01

    Patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) often experience unexpected relapses, despite achieving remission. This study examines the utility of a single multidimensional measure that captures variance in patient-reported Depressive Symptom Severity, Functioning, and Quality of Life (QOL), in predicting MDD relapse. Complete data from remitted patients at the completion of 12 weeks of citalopram in the STAR*D study were used to calculate the Individual Burden of Illness index for Depression (IBI-D), and predict subsequent relapse at six (n=956), nine (n=778), and twelve months (n=479) using generalized linear models. Depressive Symptom Severity, Functioning, and QOL were all predictors of subsequent relapse. Using Akaike information criteria (AIC), the IBI-D provided a good model for relapse even when Depressive Symptom Severity, Functioning, and QOL were combined in a single model. Specifically, an increase of one in the IBI-D increased the odds ratio of relapse by 2.5 at 6 months (β=0.921 ± 0.194, z=4.76, pDepressive Symptom Severity in the IBI-D is useful in assessing the full burden of illness and in adequately predicting relapse, in MDD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre- and post-transplant minimal residual disease predicts relapse occurrence in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovisa, Federica; Zecca, Marco; Rossi, Bartolomeo; Campeggio, Mimma; Magrin, Elisa; Giarin, Emanuela; Buldini, Barbara; Songia, Simona; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Mina, Tommaso; Acquafredda, Gloria; Quarello, Paola; Locatelli, Franco; Fagioli, Franca; Basso, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    Relapse remains the leading cause of treatment failure in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We retrospectively investigated the prognostic role of minimal residual disease (MRD) before and after HSCT in 119 children transplanted in complete remission (CR). MRD was measured by polymerase chain reaction in bone marrow samples collected pre-HSCT and during the first and third trimesters after HSCT (post-HSCT1 and post-HSCT3). The overall event-free survival (EFS) was 50%. The cumulative incidence of relapse and non-relapse mortality was 41% and 9%. Any degree of detectable pre-HSCT MRD was associated with poor outcome: EFS was 39% and 18% in patients with MRD positivity <1 × 10 -3 and ≥1 × 10 -3 , respectively, versus 73% in MRD-negative patients (P < 0·001). This effect was maintained in different disease remissions, but low-level MRD had a very strong negative impact only in patients transplanted in second or further CR. Also, MRD after HSCT enabled patients to be stratified, with increasing MRD between post-HSCT1 and post-HSCT3 clearly defining cohorts with a different outcome. MRD is an important prognostic factor both before and after transplantation. Given that MRD persistence after HSCT is associated with dismal outcome, these patients could benefit from early discontinuation of immunosuppression, or pre-emptive immuno-therapy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon D. Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/ to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patients were stratified according to ERα status, histological grade, and hormonal therapy. Luciferase reporter assays and flow cytometry were implemented to determine the impact of CK2 inhibition on ERE-mediated gene expression and expression of ERα protein. CK2α expression is associated with shorter relapse free survival among ERα (+ patients with grade 1 or 2 tumors, as well as among those patients receiving hormonal therapy. Biochemical inhibition of CK2 activity results in increased ER-transactivation as well as increased expression among ERα (+ and ERα (− breast cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that CK2 may contribute to estrogen-independent cell proliferation and breast tumor progression, and may potentially serve as a biomarker and pharmacological target in breast cancer.

  2. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients

  3. Supratentorial CNS malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Clinical suspicion of a developmental anomaly of the central nervous system (CNS) is a frequent indication for performing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the brain. Classification systems for malformation of the CNS are constantly revised according to newer scientific research. Developmental abnormalities can be classified in two main types. The first category consists of disorders of organogenesis in which genetic defects or any ischemic, metabolic, toxic or infectious insult to the developing brain can cause malformation. These malformations result from abnormal neuronal and glial proliferation and from anomalies of neuronal migration and or cortical organization. They are divided into supra- and infratentorial and may involve grey or white matter or both. The second category of congenital brain abnormalities is disorders of histogenesis which result from abnormal cell differentiation with a relatively normal brain appearance. Supratentorial CNS malformations could be divided into anomalies in telencephalic commissure, holoprosencephalies and malformations in cortical development. There are three main telencephalic commissures: the anterior commissure, the hippocampal commissure and the corpus callosum. Their morphology (hypoplasia, hyperplasia, agenesis, dysgenesis, even atrophy) reflects the development of the brain. Their agenesis, complete or partial, is one of the most commonly observed features in the malformations of the brain and is a part of many syndromes. Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are heterogeneous group of disease which result from disruption of 3 main stages of cortical development. The common clinical presentation is refractory epilepsy and or developmental delay. The most common MCD are heterotopias, focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, pachygyria and lizencephaly. The exact knowledge of the brain anatomy and embryology is mandatory to provide a better apprehension of the

  4. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  5. Flavonoids and the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna Katharina; Saaby, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are present in almost all terrestrial plants, where they provide UV-protection and colour. Flavonoids have a fused ring system consisting of an aromatic ring and a benzopyran ring with a phenyl substituent. The flavonoids can be divided into several classes depending on their structure....... Flavonoids are present in food and medicinal plants and are thus consumed by humans. They are found in plants as glycosides. Before oral absorption, flavonoids undergo deglycosylation either by lactase phloridzin hydrolase or cytosolic ß-glucocidase. The absorbed aglycone is then conjugated by methylation......, sulphatation or glucuronidation. Both the aglycones and the conjugates can pass the blood-brain barrier. In the CNS several flavones bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABA(A)-receptor resulting in sedation, anxiolytic or anti-convulsive effects. Flavonoids of several classes are inhibitors of monoamine...

  6. Diagnosis of central nervous system relapse of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Impact of routine cytological CSF analysis at the time of intrathecal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassas, Adam; Krueger, Joerg; Alvi, Saima; Sung, Lillian; Hitzler, Johanne; Lieberman, Lani

    2014-12-01

    Despite the success of central nervous system (CNS) directed therapy in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapse involving the CNS continues to be observed in 5-10% of children when utilizing standard intrathecal prophylactic chemotherapy. While most pediatric ALL treatment protocols mandate regular lumbar punctures (LP) for the intrathecal injection of chemotherapy, the value of routine cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during therapy is unknown. Our objective was to assess the diagnostic value of routine CSF analysis during ALL therapy. To allow for at least 10 years of follow up from ALL diagnosis, children (0-18 years) with ALL diagnosed and treated at SickKids, Toronto, Canada between 1994-2004 were studied. Medical records of patients with CNS relapse were examined to determine whether CNS relapse was diagnosed based on cytology of a routinely obtained CSF sample, a CSF sample obtained because of signs and symptoms or a CSF sample obtained after the diagnosis of a bone marrow relapse. Of 494 children treated for ALL, 31 (6.6%) developed a relapse of ALL involving the CNS. Twenty-two had an isolated CNS relapse and nine had a combined bone marrow and CNS relapse. Among patients with isolated CNS relapse, 73% (16/22) were diagnosed based on routine CSF samples obtained from asymptomatic children. Conversely, 89% (8/9) of children with combined bone marrow and CNS relapse presented with symptoms and signs that prompted CSF examination. Routine CSF examination at the time of LP for intrathecal chemotherapy is useful in detecting CNS relapse. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Isolated vasculitis of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, F.; Reith, W.

    2000-01-01

    Vasculitis is a rare cause for disease of the CNS. The isolated vasculitis of the CNS is restricted to the CNS whereas other forms of vasculitis affect various organs including the CNS. Headache, encephalopathy, focal deficits and epileptic seizures are the major symptoms suggestive for vasculitis. One major criterion of the isolated vasculitis of the CNS is the lack of evidence for other vasculitis forms or for pathology of other organs. Angiography displays multifocal segmental stenosis of intracranial vessels. MRI demonstrates multiple lesions which in part show enhancement after gadolinium. A definite diagnosis can only be made on the grounds of biopsy from leptomeninges and parenchyma. Therapy consists of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid. (orig.) [de

  8. Increases in IgE, Eosinophils, and Mast Cells Can be Used in Diagnosis and to Predict Relapse of IgG4-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Emma L; Sadler, Ross; Bateman, Adrian C; Makuch, Mateusz; Cargill, Tamsin; Ferry, Berne; Aalberse, Rob; Barnes, Eleanor; Rispens, Theo

    2017-09-01

    IU/L identified patients with disease relapse with 88% specificity, 64% sensitivity, and a likelihood ratio of 5.4. IgE-positive mast cells and eosinophilia were observed in lymphoid, biliary, and pancreatic tissue samples from 50% and 86% of patients with IgG4-RD, respectively. In a prospective study, we associated IgG4-RD with allergy, atopy, eosinophilia, increased serum levels of IgE, and IgE-positive mast cells in lymphoid, biliary, and pancreatic tissue. An IgE-mediated allergic response therefore seems to develop in most patients with IgG4-RD; levels of IgE might be used in diagnosis and predicting relapse. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Flavonoids and the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Jäger

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are present in almost all terrestrial plants, where they provide UV-protection and colour. Flavonoids have a fused ring system consisting of an aromatic ring and a benzopyran ring with a phenyl substituent. The flavonoids can be divided into several classes depending on their structure. Flavonoids are present in food and medicinal plants and are thus consumed by humans. They are found in plants as glycosides. Before oral absorption, flavonoids undergo deglycosylation either by lactase phloridzin hydrolase or cytosolic β-glucocidase. The absorbed aglycone is then conjugated by methylation, sulphatation or glucuronidation. Both the aglycones and the conjugates can pass the blood-brain barrier. In the CNS several flavones bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in sedation, anxiolytic or anti-convulsive effects. Flavonoids of several classes are inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A or B, thereby working as anti-depressants or to improve the conditions of Parkinson’s patients. Flavanols, flavanones and anthocyanidins have protective effects preventing inflammatory processes leading to nerve injury. Flavonoids seem capable of influencing health and mood.

  10. Depression relapse and ethological measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, WWH; Jansen, JHC; Bouhuys, AL; vandenHoofdakker, RH

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of interactional theories on depression, the question is raised whether depression relapse can be predicted by observable behavior of remitted patients and their interviewer during an interaction (i.e. discharge interview). Thirty-four patients were interviewed at hospital

  11. Are Fusion Transcripts in Relapsed/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Patients Predictive of Response to Anti-EGFR Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bossi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of benefit from combined chemotherapy and the antiepidermal growth factor receptor cetuximab is a not yet solved question in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. In a selected series of 14 long progression-free survival (PFS and 26 short PFS patients by whole gene and microRNA expression analysis, we developed a model potentially predictive of cetuximab sensitivity. To better decipher the “omics” profile of our patients, we detected transcript fusions by RNA-seq through a Pan-Cancer panel targeting 1385 cancer genes. Twenty-seven different fusion transcripts, involving mRNA and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, were identified. The majority of fusions (81% were intrachromosomal, and 24 patients (60% harbor at least one of them. The presence/absence of fusions and the presence of more than one fusion were not related to outcome, while the lncRNA-containing fusions resulted enriched in long PFS patients (P=0.0027. The CD274-PDCD1LG2 fusion was present in 7/14 short PFS patients harboring fusions and was absent in long PFS patients (P=0.0188. Among the short PFS patients, those harboring this fusion had the worst outcome (P=0.0172 and increased K-RAS activation (P=0.00147. The associations between HNSCC patient’s outcome following cetuximab treatment and lncRNA-containing fusions or the CD274-PDCD1LG2 fusion deserve validation in prospective clinical trials.

  12. CNS infections in immunocompetent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, K.M.; Zimmer, A.; Reith, W.

    2008-01-01

    This article gives a review of the most frequent infective agents reasonable for CNS infections in immunocompetent patients as well as their localisation and imaging specifications. MRI scanning is the gold standard to detect inflammatory conditions in the CNS. Imaging can be normal or nonspecifically altered although the infection is culturally or bioptically proven. There are no pathognomonic, pathogen-specific imaging criteria. The localization and dimension of the inflammation depends on the infection pathway. (orig.) [de

  13. Usefulness of desmopressin testing to predict relapse during long-term follow-up in patients in remission from Cushing’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Giacinto Ambrogio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrence of Cushing’s disease after successful transsphenoidal surgery occurs in some 30% of the patients and the response to desmopressin shortly after surgery has been proposed as a marker for disease recurrence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the response to desmopressin over time after surgery. We tested 56 patients with Cushing’s disease in remission after transsphenoidal surgery with desmopressin for up to 20 years after surgery. The ACTH and cortisol response to desmopressin over time was evaluated in patients on long-term remission or undergoing relapse; an increase by at least 27 pg/mL in ACTH levels identified responders. The vast majority of patients who underwent successful adenomectomy failed to respond to desmopressin after surgery and this response pattern was maintained over time in patients on long-term remission. Conversely, a response to desmopressin reappeared in patients who subsequently developed a recurrence of Cushing’s disease, even years prior to frank hypercortisolism. It appears therefore that a change in the response pattern to desmopressin proves predictive of recurrence of Cushing’s disease and may indicate which patients require close monitoring.

  14. Levels of Neural Progenitors in the Hippocampus Predict Memory Impairment and Relapse to Drug Seeking as a Function of Excessive Methamphetamine Self-Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recinto, Patrick; Samant, Anjali Rose H; Chavez, Gustavo; Kim, Airee; Yuan, Clara J; Soleiman, Matthew; Grant, Yanabel; Edwards, Scott; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F; George, Olivier; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine affects the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for learning and memory, as well as relapse to drug seeking. Rats self-administered methamphetamine for 1 h twice weekly (intermittent-short-I-ShA), 1 h daily (limited-short-ShA), or 6 h daily (extended-long-LgA) for 22 sessions. After 22 sessions, rats from each access group were withdrawn from self-administration and underwent spatial memory (Y-maze) and working memory (T-maze) tests followed by extinction and reinstatement to methamphetamine seeking or received one intraperitoneal injection of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label progenitors in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) during the synthesis phase. Two-hour-old and 28-day-old surviving BrdU-immunoreactive cells were quantified. I-ShA rats performed better on the Y-maze and had a greater number of 2-h-old SGZ BrdU cells than nondrug controls. LgA rats, but not ShA rats, performed worse on the Y- and T-maze and had a fewer number of 2-h-old SGZ BrdU cells than nondrug and I-ShA rats, suggesting that new hippocampal progenitors, decreased by methamphetamine, were correlated with impairment in the acquisition of new spatial cues. Analyses of addiction-related behaviors after withdrawal and extinction training revealed methamphetamine-primed reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior in all three groups (I-ShA, ShA, and LgA), and this effect was enhanced in LgA rats compared with I-ShA and ShA rats. Protracted withdrawal from self-administration enhanced the survival of SGZ BrdU cells, and methamphetamine seeking during protracted withdrawal enhanced Fos expression in the dentate gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex in LgA rats to a greater extent than in ShA and I-ShA rats. These results indicate that changes in the levels of the proliferation and survival of hippocampal neural progenitors and neuronal activation of hippocampal granule cells predict the effects of methamphetamine self-administration (limited vs extended

  15. Problems of prophylactic CNS radiotherapy in acute children's leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Pribylova, O.; Abrahamova, J.; Hynieova, H.; Hrodek, O.

    1980-01-01

    The prophylactic treatment of the CNS was conducted by cobalt teletherapy of the cranium and by intrathecal application of MTX after the induction of primary remission in 70 children with acute leukemia throughout 5 years up to the end of 1978. The method of the combined radio- and chemoprophylaxis of the CNS was being changed during the years, especially as far as the radiation dose for the cranium was concerned. A detailed analysis made in a group of 59 children with the minimum interval of 18 months from the beginning of the treatment showed the best results after the application of a dose of 24 Gy/3 weeks. Following this procedure the relapse of leukemia in the CNS occurred in 9% only, whereas on the application of doses of 20 Gy and lower it occurred in 35 to 40%. On the whole 24 out of 59 children, i.e. 41%, are surviving, 35 children, i.e. 59%, died. Mostly complete, but only temporary, epilation was an invariable consequence of the irradiation of the cranium. The somnolence syndrome was only sporadically observed. It cannot be excluded, however, that some of its forms in patients discharged from hospital escaped attention. No case was recorded of serious impairment of the CNS of the leukoencephalopathic type. Up to now the psychomotor, intellectual and emotional development of the surviving children has been normal. (author)

  16. Gender differences in alcohol and substance use relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitzer, Kimberly S; Dearing, Ronda L

    2006-03-01

    This review explores gender differences in relapse and characteristics of relapse events in alcohol and substance use. For alcohol, relapse rates were similar across gender. Although negative mood, childhood sexual abuse, alcohol-related self-efficacy, and poorer coping strategies predicted alcohol relapse, gender did not moderate these effects. Gender did moderate the association between marriage and alcohol relapse. For women, marriage and marital stress were risk factors for alcohol relapse; among men, marriage lowered relapse risk. This gender difference in the role of marriage in relapse may be a result of partner differences in problem drinking. Alcoholic women are more likely to be married to heavy drinking partners than are alcoholic men; thus, alcoholic women may be put at risk of relapse by marriage and alcoholic men may be protected by marriage. There are fewer studies documenting gender differences in substance abuse relapse so conclusions are limited and tentative. In contrast to the lack of gender differences in alcohol relapse rates, women appear less likely to experience relapse to substance use, relative to men. Women relapsing to substance use appear to be more sensitive to negative affect and interpersonal problems. Men, in contrast, may be more likely to have positive experiences prior to relapse.

  17. Ability of the rhTSH stimulation test to predict relapse in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, after long-term follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARCELINO, MAFALDA; LOPES, ANA FILIPA; MADUREIRA, DEOLINDA; FERREIRA, TERESA C.; LIMBERT, EDWARD; LEITE, VALERIANO

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) following thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (sTg) has been recommended in the follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients, however, its routine use remains controversial. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of sTg testing following recombinant human (rh) TSH stimulation in DTC patients, with a follow-up of 12.4 years. Retrospective studies were conducted of 125 DTC patients, who underwent rhTSH stimulation testing between 1999 and 2002. The exclusion criteria were: Patients with anti-Tg antibodies, Tg levels >1 ng/ml under TSH suppression and the absence of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation therapy following surgery. In total, 49 patients were included in the study and all had been previously treated with total or near total thyroidectomy (with or without central neck dissection) and RAI, postoperatively. The Tg functional sensitivity was 1.0 ng/ml. The follow-up for patients was performed annually. During the median follow-up of 12.4 years after the rhTSH stimulation test, nine patients exhibited recurrence (18.4%). Of the nine patients, six exhibited sTg levels >2 ng/ml (positive result) and three exhibited levels <2 ng/ml (negative result). Relapse occurred at a mean of 5.9 years following the rhTSH stimulation test. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value (NPV) of positive sTg were 50 and 91.9%, respectively, with a sensitivity of 66.6% and a specificity of 85.0%. The rhTSH-stimulated Tg levels have a high NPV, allowing the identification of the patients who are free of the tumour. These results are consistent with the previously published data; however, to the best of our knowledge, this is the study with the longest follow-up duration after rhTSH stimulation. PMID:25663898

  18. Application of empowerment theory for CNS practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Catalano, J M

    1993-11-01

    Power is necessary for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) to successfully conduct objectives of practice in bureaucratic hospital settings. To obtain power, the CNS could use strategies of an empowerment theory to fully operationalize roles in hospitals. This article will discuss how the CNS may be empowered utilizing strategies in four empowering categories. In addition, the many benefits of empowering the CNS are reviewed.

  19. Triggers of Substance Abuse Slip and Relapse During Outpatient Treatment in Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Clinics: A Predictive Model with Emphasis on Treatment-Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Komasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Most addicts relapse in the first year of treatment especially in the first 3 - 6 months, which is the most vulnerable period. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the predictors of substance abuse slip and relapse among addicts in the first 6 months of treatment with an emphasis on treatment related factors. Methods The data of this cross-sectional study collected through assessment of 148 patients who were referred to the Methadone/Buprenorphine maintenance therapy clinics of Kermanshah city during April to September of 2015. Demographic, history, treatment checklist, comorbidity index, and medical records were used for collecting data. Data was analyzed through chi-square, t-test, and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results The mean age of total participants was 42.4 ± 11.3 years and 98% of them were male. 27% and 35.1% of the patients, respectively, had a slip and relapse during the first 6 months of treatment. After adjustment for all demographic data, it was indicated that self-employment (P = 0.037, more treatment costs (P = 0.049, previous treatment history (P = 0.027, not satisfied dose of medication (P = 0.012, and lack of medical therapy history under physicians supervision (P = 0.046 can increase the possibility of a slip significantly. Conclusions Despite the fact that prevention of re-abuse and relapse of disease includes multi-factorial approach, it seems that the treatment-related factors are as the most major factors in relapse and slip during the first 6 months of treatment. Health practitioners’ special attention to treatment related factors in addiction, especially previous treatment history as the most important predictor of relapse, are probably effective in the control and decrease of a slip and relapse.

  20. Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Predict Relapse-Free Survival after One Month of Interferon-α but Not Observation in Intermediate Risk Melanoma Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A Tarhini

    Full Text Available E1697 was a phase III trial of adjuvant interferon (IFN-α2b for one month (Arm B versus observation (Arm A in patients with resected melanoma at intermediate risk. We evaluated the levels of candidate serum cytokines, the HLA genotype, polymorphisms of CTLA4 and FOXP3 genes and the development of autoantibodies for their association with relapse free survival (RFS in Arm A and Arm B among 268 patients with banked biospecimens.ELISA was used to test 5 autoantibodies. Luminex/One Lambda LABTypeRSSO was used for HLA Genotyping. Selected CTLA4 and FOXP3 Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and microsatellites were tested for by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Sixteen serum cytokines were tested at baseline and one month by Luminex xMAP multiplex technology. Cox Proportional Hazards model was applied and the Wald test was used to test the marginal association of each individual marker and RFS. We used the Lasso approach to select the markers to be included in a multi-marker Cox Proportional Hazards model. The ability of the resulting models to predict one year RFS was evaluated by the time-dependent ROC curve. The leave-one-out method of cross validation (LOOCV was used to avoid over-fitting of the data.In the multi-marker modeling analysis conducted in Arm B, one month serum IL2Rα, IL-12p40 and IFNα levels predicted one year RFS with LOOCV AUC = 82%. Among the three markers selected, IL2Rα and IFNα were the most stable (selected in all the cross validation cycles. The risk score (linear combination of the 3 markers separated the RFS curves of low and high risk groups well (p = 0.05. This model did not hold for Arm A, indicating a differential marker profile in Arm B linked to the intervention (adjuvant therapy.Early on-treatment proinflammatory serum markers (IL2Rα, IL-12p40, IFNα significantly predict RFS in our cohort of patients treated with adjuvant IFN-α2b and warrant further study.

  1. Innate Interferons Regulate CNS Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieu, Ruthe; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Mariboe, Anne

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) whose pathology is characterised by demyelination and axonal damage. This results from interplay between CNS-resident glia, infiltrating leukocytes and a plethora of cytokines and chemokines. Currently...... potential IFN-inducing receptor that signals through NF-kB. Receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK) belongs to the TNF-receptor superfamily and has been shown to induce IFN-beta in medullary thymic epithelial cells affecting autoimmune regulatory processes and osteoclast precursor cells in association to bone...

  2. Genomic profiling of thousands of candidate polymorphisms predicts risk of relapse in 778 Danish and German childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesolowska, Agata; Borst, L.; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survival approaches 90%. New strategies are needed to identify the 10–15% who evade cure. We applied targeted, sequencing-based genotyping of 25 000 to 34 000 preselected potentially clinically relevant singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify host...... associated with risk of relapse across protocols. SNP and biologic pathway level analyses associated relapse risk with leukemia aggressiveness, glucocorticosteroid pharmacology/response and drug transport/metabolism pathways. Classification and regression tree analysis identified three distinct risk groups...... defined by end of induction residual leukemia, white blood cell count and variants in myeloperoxidase (MPO), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), lamin B1 (LMNB1) and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) genes, ATP-binding cassette transporters and glucocorticosteroid transcription regulation pathways. Relapse rates...

  3. MRI patterns in recurrence of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Altedorneburg, Gernot; Heuser, Lothar; Pels, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PCNSL are rare but highly malignant brain tumors. ► PCNSL recur in different anatomic sites compared with initial presentation. ► Non-parenchymal contrast enhancement is a frequent finding at initialdiagnosis and at relapse. -- Abstract: Purpose: Primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSL) are highly malignant non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma restricted to the CNS. While MRI features of PCNSL at initial presentation have been comprehensively described, literature on MRI-characteristics at relapse is sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate anatomic location and contrast enhancement patterns at PCNSL recurrence by cranial MRI. Methods: Sixteen immunocompetent patients (9 men, 7 women, median age 65 years) with histologically proven PCNSL and initial response to a standardized polychemotherapy, but suffering from a relapse were consecutively recorded. Native and contrast-enhanced MRI examinations carried out at initial presentation and at time of relapse were compared. Anatomical site of parenchymal enhancement, frequency and presence of non-parenchymal contrast enhancement (i.e. ventricular, superficial, subependymal) patterns at initial presentation and at relapse were recorded and compared. Results: Local recurrence was found at the site of the initial tumor presentation in four of the 16 cases. Six of 11 patients presenting a unilateral PCNSL at initial presentation had a bilateral involvement at relapse. In two cases, recurrence appeared solely on the contralateral side without involvement of the hemisphere initially affected. At both dates, subependymal enhancement was the most often found non-parenchymal pattern (six at initial presentation, and five at relapse). The number of patients with a ventricular contrast enhancement increased from one at initial presentation to four at relapse. Conclusions: PCNSL tend to recur in different parenchymal anatomic sites as compared with the site of the initial tumor presentation. Contrast-enhancing non

  4. Genetic models for CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Wekerle, H; Antel, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of transgenic technology to over-express or prevent expression of genes encoding molecules related to inflammation has allowed direct examination of their role in experimental disease. This article reviews transgenic and knockout models of CNS demyelinating disease, focusing primarily on ...

  5. Basic Concepts of CNS Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this review are to: (1) provide a set of concepts to aid in the understanding of complex processes which occur during central nervous system (CNS) development; (2) illustrate how they contribute to our knowlege of adult brain anatomy; and (3) delineate how modifications of normal developmental processes may affect the structure and…

  6. CNS complications of rotavirus gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volosinova, D.

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus infection may be accompanied by serious complications, e.g. disabilities central nervous system (CNS). Theory rotavirus penetration across the blood-brain barrier and subsequent rota-associated convulsions by the 2-year case-history of the patient. Rotavirosis minor gastrointestinal symptoms may lead to erroneous diagnosis. (author)

  7. Prolonged Survival of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Intrathecal Treatments for Isolated Central Nervous System Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elan Gorshein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is commonly cured when diagnosed in the pediatric population. It portends a poorer prognosis if present in adult patients. Although adults frequently achieve complete remission, relapse rates are substantial, particularly among the elderly and high-risk populations. In the absence of prophylactic intrathecal chemotherapy, more than half of patients may develop CNS involvement or relapse, which is associated with significant risk for systemic illness. This report describes a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia with repeated isolated CNS relapses. This case should remind clinicians that isolated CNS disease in the absence of systemic recurrence could successfully respond to intrathecal therapy and offer patients a favorable quality of life.

  8. CNS tumors: postoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayanir, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Imaging assessment of brain tumors following surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including the location of the tumor, the surgical procedure and the disease process for which it was performed. Depending upon these factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities may be required to demonstrate any clinically relevant situation, to assist the surgeon in deciding if repeat surgery is necessary. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show the shape, size, signal intensity, and enhancement of a brain tumor. It has been widely used to diagnose and differentiate brain tumors and to assess the surgery outcomes. Longitudinal MRI scans have also been applied for the assessment of treatment and response to surgery. The newly developed MRI techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have the potential to provide the molecular, functional and metabolic information of preoperative and postoperative brain tumors. Postoperative diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging are especially useful in predicting early functional recovery from new deficits after brain tumor surgery.This lecture will stress the principles, applications, and pitfalls of conventional as well as newly developing functional imaging techniques following operation of brain tumors

  9. Absolute lymphocyte count predicts response to rituximab-containing salvage treatment for relapsed/refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with prior rituximab exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Hsin Hung

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Our study results show that for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell NHL, rituximab-containing salvage treatment is feasible and generally tolerable. A high ALC-R value was significantly associated with a better response to this treatment.

  10. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of self-reported impulsivity and reward sensitivity versus neurocognitive measures of disinhibition and decision making in the prediction of relapse in pathological gamblers

    OpenAIRE

    Goudriaan, A.E.; Oosterlaan, J.; de Beurs, E.; van den Brink, W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Disinhibition and decision-making skills play an important role in theories on the cause and outcome of addictive behaviors such as substance use disorders and pathological gambling. In recent studies, both disinhibition and disadvantageous decision-making strategies, as measured by neurocognitive tests, have been found to influence the course of substance use disorders. Research on factors affecting relapse in pathological gambling is scarce. Method: This study investigated the e...

  12. A cytogenetic model predicts relapse risk and survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in morphologic complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Armin; Cashen, Amanda F

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and abnormal cytogenetics have persistent cytogenetic abnormalities (pCytAbnl) at morphologic complete remission (mCR). We hypothesized that the prognostic significance of pCytAbnl in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in mCR varies with cytogenetic risk group. We analyzed the data on 118 patients with AML and abnormal cytogenetics who underwent HSCT in mCR, and developed a risk stratification model based on pCytAbnl and cytogenetic risk group. The model distinguished three groups of patients (Pcytogenetics (n=25) had the shortest median time to relapse (TTR; 5 months), relapse-free survival (RFS; 3 months), and overall survival (OS; 7 months). The group with favorable/intermediate risk cytogenetics and without pCytAbnl (n=43) had the longest median TTR (not reached), RFS (57 months), and OS (57 months). The group with pCytAbnl and favorable/intermediate risk cytogenetics, or, without pCytAbnl but with unfavorable risk cytogenetics (n=50) experienced intermediate TTR (18 months), RFS (9 months), and OS (18 months). In conclusion, a cytogenetic risk model identifies patients with AML in mCR with distinct rates of relapse and survival following HSCT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The degree of myelosuppression during maintenance therapy of adolescents with B-lineage intermediate risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia predicts risk of relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K; Donovan, Martin Heyman; Sherson, Maiken Gustafsson

    2010-01-01

    Drug doses, blood levels of drug metabolites and myelotoxicity during 6-mercaptopurine/methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy were registered for 59 adolescents (10 years) and 176 non-adolescents (leukemia (ALL) and a white blood cell count (WBC......) diagnosis. Event-free survival was lower for adolescents than non-adolescents (pEFS12y:0.71 vs 0.83, P=0.04). For adolescents staying in remission, the mean WBC during maintenance therapy (mWBC) was related to age (rS=0.36, P=0.02), which became nonsignificant for those who relapsed (r...

  14. Circulating Tyrosinase and MART-1 mRNA does not Independently Predict Relapse or Survival in Patients with AJCC Stage I–II Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Sørensen, Boe S; Sjoegren, Pia

    2006-01-01

    The detection of melanoma cells in peripheral blood has been proposed to select patients with a high risk of relapse. In this study, tyrosinase and melanoma antigen recognized by T cells 1 (MART-1) mRNA expression was evaluated in serial samples obtained before definitive surgery and during follow......-up in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I-II melanoma. Serial samples (n=2,262) were collected from 236 patients from 1997 to 2002. Analyses of the RNA samples were performed with a calibrated reverse transcriptase-PCR assay. Gender, age, primary tumor site, ulceration, thickness, Clark...

  15. Serum YKL-40 Predicts Relapse-Free and Overall Survival in Patients With American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage I and II Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Johansen, Julia S; Sjoegren, Pia

    2006-01-01

    level has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several cancer types. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Serum samples from 234 patients with stage I (n = 162) and II (n = 72) melanoma were analyzed for YKL-40 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serial samples were obtained before definitive primary...... surgery and during follow-up. RESULTS: After a median follow-up period of 66 months (range, 1 to 97 months), 41 relapses (18%) and 39 deaths (17%) were observed. Serum YKL-40 treated as an updated continuous covariate were analyzed together with the covariates sex, age, primary tumor site, ulceration...

  16. Nanomedicines for the Treatment of CNS Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahato, Ram I

    2017-03-01

    Targeting and delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) has been a major challenge. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Therefore, much effort has been channelled into improving transport of therapeutics across the BBB and into the CNS including the use of nanoparticles. In this thematic issue, several reviews and original research are presented that address "Nanomedicines for CNS Diseases." The articles in this issue are concentrated on either CNS-HIV disease or CNS tumors. In regards to CNS-HIV disease, there are two reviews that discuss the role of nanoparticles for improving the delivery of HIV therapeutics to the CNS. In addition, there are two original articles focusing on therapies for CNS-HIV, one of them uses nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA specific to a key protein in autophagy to microglia, and another discusses nanoparticle delivery of a soluble mediator to suppress neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a comprehensive review about gene therapy for CNS neurological diseases is also included. Finally, this issue also includes review articles on enhanced drug targeting to CNS tumors. These articles include a review on the use of nanoparticles for CNS tumors, a review on functionalization (ligands) of nanoparticles for drug targeting to the brain tumor by overcoming BBB, and the final review discusses the use of macrophages as a delivery vehicle to CNS tumors. This thematic issue provides a wealth of knowledge on using nanomedicines for CNS diseases.

  17. Limitations in predicting PAM50 intrinsic subtype and risk of relapse score with Ki67 in estrogen receptor-positive HER2-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernand ez-Martinez, Aranzazu; Pascual, Tomás; Perrone, Giuseppe; Morales, Serafin; de la Haba, Juan; González-Rivera, Milagros; Galván, Patricia; Zalfa, Francesca; Amato, Michela; Gonzalez, Lucia; Prats, Miquel; Rojo, Federico; Manso, Luis; Paré, Laia; Alonso, Immaculada; Albanell, Joan; Vivancos, Ana; González, Antonio; Matito, Judit; González, Sonia; Fernandez, Pedro; Adamo, Barbara; Muñoz, Montserrat; Viladot, Margarita; Font, Carme; Aya, Francisco; Vidal, Maria; Caballero, Rosalía; Carrasco, Eva; Altomare, Vittorio; Tonini, Giuseppe; Prat, Aleix; Martin, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    PAM50/Prosigna gene expression-based assay identifies three categorical risk of relapse groups (ROR-low, ROR-intermediate and ROR-high) in post-menopausal patients with estrogen receptor estrogen receptor-positive (ER+)/ HER2-negative (HER2-) early breast cancer. Low risk patients might not need adjuvant chemotherapy since their risk of distant relapse at 10-years is below 10% with endocrine therapy only. In this study, 517 consecutive patients with ER+/HER2- and node-negative disease were evaluated for Ki67 and Prosigna. Most of Luminal A tumors (65.6%) and ROR-low tumors (70.9%) had low Ki67 values (0-10%); however, the percentage of patients with ROR-medium or ROR-high disease within the Ki67 0-10% group was 42.7% (with tumor sizes ≤2 cm) and 33.9% (with tumor sizes > 2 cm). Finally, we found that the optimal Ki67 cutoff for identifying Luminal A or ROR-low tumors was 14%. Ki67 as a surrogate biomarker in identifying Prosigna low-risk outcome patients or Luminal A disease in the clinical setting is unreliable. In the absence of a well-validated prognostic gene expression-based assay, the optimal Ki67 cutoff for identifying low-risk outcome patients or Luminal A disease remains at 14%. PMID:28423537

  18. Evaluation of the Lactate-to-N-Acetyl-aspartate Ratio Defined With Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Before Radiation Therapy as a New Predictive Marker of the Site of Relapse in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviers, Alexandra [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); INP (Institut National Polytechnique), ENVT (Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse), Unité d' Anatomie-Imagerie-Embryologie, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Ken, Soléakhéna [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Bureau des Etudes Cliniques, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Rowland, Benjamin; Laruelo, Andrea [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Catalaa, Isabelle; Lubrano, Vincent [UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); Hôpital de Rangueil, CHU (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire) de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Celsis, Pierre [UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Because lactate accumulation is considered a surrogate for hypoxia and tumor radiation resistance, we studied the spatial distribution of the lactate-to-N-acetyl-aspartate ratio (LNR) before radiation therapy (RT) with 3D proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-{sup 1}H-MRSI) and assessed its impact on local tumor control in glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with newly diagnosed GBM included in a phase 2 chemoradiation therapy trial constituted our database. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI data before RT were evaluated and correlated to MRI data at relapse. The optimal threshold for tumor-associated LNR was determined with receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of the pre-RT LNR values and MRI characteristics of the tumor. This threshold was used to segment pre-RT normalized LNR maps. Two spatial analyses were performed: (1) a pre-RT volumetric comparison of abnormal LNR areas with regions of MRI-defined lesions and a choline (Cho)-to- N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio ≥2 (CNR2); and (2) a voxel-by-voxel spatial analysis of 4,186,185 voxels with the intention of evaluating whether pre-RT abnormal LNR areas were predictive of the site of local recurrence. Results: A LNR of ≥0.4 (LNR-0.4) discriminated between tumor-associated and normal LNR values with 88.8% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. LNR-0.4 voxels were spatially different from those of MRI-defined lesions, representing 44% of contrast enhancement, 64% of central necrosis, and 26% of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) abnormality volumes before RT. They extended beyond the overlap with CNR2 for most patients (median: 20 cm{sup 3}; range: 6-49 cm{sup 3}). LNR-0.4 voxels were significantly predictive of local recurrence, regarded as contrast enhancement at relapse: 71% of voxels with a LNR-0.4 before RT were contrast enhanced at relapse versus 10% of voxels with a normal LNR (P<.01). Conclusions: Pre-RT LNR-0.4 in GBM

  19. An invertebrate model for CNS drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Qadi, Sonia; Schiøtt, Morten; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ABC efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier (BBB), namely the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), restrain the development of central nervous system (CNS) drugs. Consequently, early screening of CNS drug candidates is pivotal to identify those affected by efflux activity. Therefore, simple,...... barriers. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest a conserved mechanism of brain efflux activity between insects and vertebrates, confirming that this model holds promise for inexpensive and high-throughput screening relative to in vivo models, for CNS drug discovery....

  20. Relapsing polychondritis: commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Altman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapsing Polychondritis (RP is a multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by episodic inflammation of cartilage and potentially progressive degeneration of cartilaginous tissue, such as auricular, nasal and laryngotracheobronchial cartilage. However, many other proteoglycan- rich structures may be involved, such as inner ear, eyes, blood vessels, heart and kidneys (1- 4. RP was first described by Jacksh-Wartenhorst in 1923, who named it “polychondropathia” (5. Pearson et al. (6 introduced the term “relapsing polychondritis” in 1960...

  1. Predictors of Exercise Relapse in a College Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullum, Julie; Clark, Matthew M.; King, Teresa K.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated factors that predicted exercise relapse among college students. Physically active undergraduates completed questionnaires measuring Prochaska's 10 processes for change of exercise, self-efficacy, and decisional balance. Exercise levels were assessed at baseline and 8 weeks later. At baseline, relapsers had significantly lower…

  2. Proteoglycan-based diversification of disease outcome in head and neck cancer patients identifies NG2/CSPG4 and syndecan-2 as unique relapse and overall survival predicting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnedi, Anna; Rossi, Silvia; Bertani, Nicoletta; Gulli, Mariolina; Silini, Enrico Maria; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Poli, Tito; Sesenna, Enrico; Lanfranco, Davide; Montebugnoli, Lucio; Leonardi, Elisa; Marchetti, Claudio; Cocchi, Renato; Ambrosini-Spaltro, Andrea; Foschini, Maria Pia; Perris, Roberto

    2015-05-03

    Tumour relapse is recognized to be the prime fatal burden in patients affected by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but no discrete molecular trait has yet been identified to make reliable early predictions of tumour recurrence. Expression of cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) is frequently altered in carcinomas and several of them are gradually emerging as key prognostic factors. A PG expression analysis at both mRNA and protein level, was pursued on primary lesions derived from 173 HNSCC patients from whom full clinical history and 2 years post-surgical follow-up was accessible. Gene and protein expression data were correlated with clinical traits and previously proposed tumour relapse markers to stratify high-risk patient subgroups. HNSCC lesions were indeed found to exhibit a widely aberrant PG expression pattern characterized by a variable expression of all PGs and a characteristic de novo transcription/translation of GPC2, GPC5 and NG2/CSPG4 respectively in 36%, 72% and 71% on 119 cases. Importantly, expression of NG2/CSPG4, on neoplastic cells and in the intralesional stroma (Hazard Ratio [HR], 6.76, p = 0.017) was strongly associated with loco-regional relapse, whereas stromal enrichment of SDC2 (HR, 7.652, p = 0.007) was independently tied to lymphnodal infiltration and disease-related death. Conversely, down-regulated SDC1 transcript (HR, 0.232, p = 0.013) uniquely correlated with formation of distant metastases. Altered expression of PGs significantly correlated with the above disease outcomes when either considered alone or in association with well-established predictors of poor prognosis (i.e. T classification, previous occurrence of precancerous lesions and lymphnodal metastasis). Combined alteration of all three PGs was found to be a reliable predictor of shorter survival. An unprecedented PG-based prognostic portrait is unveiled that incisively diversifies disease course in HNSCC patients beyond the currently known clinical and molecular

  3. Malignant lipogenesis defined by {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT predicts prostate cancer-specific survival in patients with biochemical relapse after prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regula, Naresh [Uppsala University, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Haeggman, Michael [Uppsala University, Section of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Silvia [Uppsala University, Section of Oncology, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala (Sweden); Soerensen, Jens [Uppsala University, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); PET Center Research Department, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    Malignant de novo lipogenesis is strongly linked to the aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa) under experimental conditions. {sup 11}C-Acetate PET/CT is a potential noninvasive biomarker of malignant lipogenesis in PCa, but its prognostic value is not known. The objective of this study was to analyse {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT image metrics in relation to survival. All patients undergoing {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT in one university hospital from 2005 to 2011 due to PSA relapse after previous prostatectomy were retrospectively evaluated. Two groups of patients were compared: those who died from PCa and those who were censored. All previously reported findings of local recurrence, regional or distal lymph node metastases and bone metastases were counted and evaluated regarding {sup 11}C-acetate uptake intensity (SUV{sub max}) and tumour volume. Total tumour volume and total lipogenic activity (TLA, summed SUV{sub max} x TV) were calculated. Survival analysis in the entire study population was followed by Cox proportional hazards ratio (HR) analysis. A total of 121 patients were included, and 22 PCa-specific deaths were recorded. The mean PSA level at the time of PET was 2.69 ± 4.35 ng/mL. The median follow-up of the study population was 79 ± 28 months. PET identified at least one PCa lesion in 53 % of patients. Five-year PCa-specific survival after PET was 80 % and 100 % in patients with a positive and a negative PET scan, respectively (p < 0.001). Time-to-death was linearly correlated with highest SUV{sub max} (r = -0.55, p = 0.01) and nonlinearly with TLA (r = -0.75, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed statistical significance for number of bone metastases (HR 1.74, p = 0.01), tertile of TLA (HR 5.63, p = 0.029) and postoperative Gleason score (HR 1.84, p = 0.045). Malignant {sup 11}C-acetate accumulation measured with PET/CT is a strong predictor of survival in the setting of PSA relapse after prostatectomy. The study provides further evidence for a

  4. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after isolated central nervous system relapse: our experiences and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, T; Morimoto, A; Kuroda, H; Imamura, T; Ishida, H; Tsunamoto, K; Naya, M; Hibi, S; Todo, S; Imashuku, S

    2006-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and central nervous system (CNS) relapse has historically been very poor. Although chemo-radiotherapy has improved outcomes, some patients still have a poor prognosis after CNS relapse. Therefore, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has recently become an option for treatment of CNS leukemia; however, information, particularly on the long-term outcome of transplant recipients, is limited. We performed allo-SCT in eight pediatric patients with ALL (n=7) or T-cell type non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1), who had isolated CNS relapse. All patients survived for a median of 70.5 (range, 13-153) months after SCT. Sequelae developed late in some patients: mental retardation (IQ=47) in one patient, severe alopecia in two patients, limited chronic graft-versus-host-disease in three patients, and amenorrhea and/or hypothyroidism in three patients. Except for a pre-school child with post transplant CNS relapse, six out of seven patients show normal school/social performance. Our results clearly indicate a high cure rate of isolated CNS relapse by allo-SCT in pediatric lymphoid malignancies; however, there needs to be further studies to determine which are the appropriate candidates for transplantation and what is the best transplant regimen to achieve high cure rate and maintain good quality of life.

  5. Oral Session 03: CNS Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to space radiation may have impacts on brain function, either during or following missions. It is most important to determine how low doses of protons and high-LET irradiation elicit changes in brain function. Within this framework, the role of oxidative stress should also be assessed, as well as other possible interaction mechanisms involving, e.g., genetic, environmental, and sex-dependent risk factors. The hippocampus is particularly susceptible to radiation. It plays an essential role in memory formation and consolidation and is one of the most investigated brain components for its responses to radiation. The hippocampus is also one of the first brain structures to be damaged in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, an important potential late impairment following irradiation. In ‘Section 3: CNS risk’, six papers have been presented focused on these issues. For details the reader is directed to the specific papers. Here a very short summary follows

  6. Relapsing pattern of brain metastasis after brain irradiation in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masao; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Kono, Koichi; Yoden, Eisaku; Mori, Takeki

    1997-01-01

    Many reports concerning radiation therapy for brain metastasis have been published, and which of the various methods urged by these reports provide optional control is still controversial. According to developing diagnosis of metastasis in CNS, therapeutic problems should be referred. We reviewed 67 patients with small cell lung cancer and brain metastasis who underwent brain irradiation (Ave. 47 Gy/5W), and all 15 patients with brain relapse after the irradiation. Relapsing patterns in this clinical setting were divided into local regrowth in the same lesions and re-metastasis (reseeding) in other regions, by reviewing follow up CT and MRI studies. Total survival among 15 patients with brain relapse and 52 without relapse was longer in the former cases than the later: 1-, and 2-year survival (47/19%, 13/8%) and MST (10.8/5.7 months), from the initial brain irradiation. The concerned significant factors limited in younger age, low value of LDH and improvement of NF. Of the 15 patients with brain relapse, 4 developed local regrowth and 11 did re-metastasis. The period of remission since brain irradiation were 172±94.4 and 393±281 days, respectively. Lower number of brain metastasis and lower value of LDH were shown in re-metastasis patients. At the time of brain relapse, 11 patients had recurrence of carcinomatous meningitis. 4 patients were treated with whole brain re-irradiation. All patients died of cancer, including 12 of relapsing CNS diseases and 3 of primary lesion and hepatic metastasis. Leukoencephalopathy developed in 2 patients. Survival since the brain relapse was 2 to 238 days without significant difference in cases of local regrowth and re-metastasis. According to our data on relapsing pattern of brain metastasis after conventional fractionated brain irradiation with an objective dose of 50 Gy, 75% of brain relapse were re-metastasis, we appreciate this irradiation for initial brain metastasis if limited to the brain. (author)

  7. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Clinicians Publications for Your Patients MS Navigator Program Programs and Services for Your Patients Contact Us Clinical Fellows ... Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting ...

  8. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... for You and Your Practice Publications for Clinicians Publications for Your Patients MS Navigator Program Programs and Services for Your Patients ... Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting MS ( ...

  9. Medical chart validation of an algorithm for identifying multiple sclerosis relapse in healthcare claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastek, Benjamin J; Oleen-Burkey, Merrikay; Lopez-Bresnahan, Maria V

    2010-01-01

    Relapse is a common measure of disease activity in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study was to test the content validity of an operational algorithm for detecting relapse in claims data. A claims-based relapse detection algorithm was tested by comparing its detection rate over a 1-year period with relapses identified based on medical chart review. According to the algorithm, MS patients in a US healthcare claims database who had either (1) a primary claim for MS during hospitalization or (2) a corticosteroid claim following a MS-related outpatient visit were designated as having a relapse. Patient charts were examined for explicit indication of relapse or care suggestive of relapse. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Medical charts were reviewed for 300 MS patients, half of whom had a relapse according to the algorithm. The claims-based criteria correctly classified 67.3% of patients with relapses (positive predictive value) and 70.0% of patients without relapses (negative predictive value; kappa 0.373: p value of the operational algorithm. Limitations of the algorithm include lack of differentiation between relapsing-remitting MS and other types, and that it does not incorporate measures of function and disability. The claims-based algorithm appeared to successfully detect moderate-to-severe MS relapse. This validated definition can be applied to future claims-based MS studies.

  10. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... MS Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting ... Here Start Here Colophon Stay Informed Join Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest MS Connection About the ...

  11. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting MS ( ... Start Here Colophon Stay Informed Join Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest MS Connection About the Society ...

  12. Proteoglycan-based diversification of disease outcome in head and neck cancer patients identifies NG2/CSPG4 and syndecan-2 as unique relapse and overall survival predicting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnedi, Anna; Rossi, Silvia; Bertani, Nicoletta; Gulli, Mariolina; Silini, Enrico Maria; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Poli, Tito; Sesenna, Enrico; Lanfranco, Davide; Montebugnoli, Lucio; Leonardi, Elisa; Marchetti, Claudio; Cocchi, Renato; Ambrosini-Spaltro, Andrea; Foschini, Maria Pia; Perris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Tumour relapse is recognized to be the prime fatal burden in patients affected by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but no discrete molecular trait has yet been identified to make reliable early predictions of tumour recurrence. Expression of cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) is frequently altered in carcinomas and several of them are gradually emerging as key prognostic factors. A PG expression analysis at both mRNA and protein level, was pursued on primary lesions derived from 173 HNSCC patients from whom full clinical history and 2 years post-surgical follow-up was accessible. Gene and protein expression data were correlated with clinical traits and previously proposed tumour relapse markers to stratify high-risk patient subgroups. HNSCC lesions were indeed found to exhibit a widely aberrant PG expression pattern characterized by a variable expression of all PGs and a characteristic de novo transcription/translation of GPC2, GPC5 and NG2/CSPG4 respectively in 36%, 72% and 71% on 119 cases. Importantly, expression of NG2/CSPG4, on neoplastic cells and in the intralesional stroma (Hazard Ratio [HR], 6.76, p = 0.017) was strongly associated with loco-regional relapse, whereas stromal enrichment of SDC2 (HR, 7.652, p = 0.007) was independently tied to lymphnodal infiltration and disease-related death. Conversely, down-regulated SDC1 transcript (HR, 0.232, p = 0.013) uniquely correlated with formation of distant metastases. Altered expression of PGs significantly correlated with the above disease outcomes when either considered alone or in association with well-established predictors of poor prognosis (i.e. T classification, previous occurrence of precancerous lesions and lymphnodal metastasis). Combined alteration of all three PGs was found to be a reliable predictor of shorter survival. An unprecedented PG-based prognostic portrait is unveiled that incisively diversifies disease course in HNSCC patients beyond the currently known clinical and molecular

  13. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Ricq, Emily L; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-10-21

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test-retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are available

  14. Lapse and relapse following inpatient treatment of opiate dependence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, B P

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a prospective follow-up study of consecutive opiate dependent patients admitted to a residential addiction treatment service for detoxification. We measured the rate of relapse following discharge, and sought to identify factors that were associated with early relapse (i.e., a return to daily opiate use). Follow-up interviews were conducted with 109 patients, of whom, 99 (91%) reported a relapse. The initial relapse occurred within one week in 64 (59%) cases. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that earlier relapse was significantly predicted by younger age, greater heroin use prior to treatment, history of injecting, and a failure to enter aftercare. Unexpectedly, those who were in a relationship with an opiate user had significantly delayed relapse. Those who completed the entire six-week inpatient treatment programme also had a significantly delayed relapse. In order to reduce relapse and the associated increased risk of fatal overdose, services providing residential opiate detoxification should prepare people for admission, strive to retain them in treatment for the full admission period and actively support their entry into planned aftercare in order to improve outcome.

  15. Social settings and addiction relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M A; Reischl, T M; Ramanthan, C S

    1995-01-01

    Despite addiction theorists' acknowledgment of the impact of environmental factors on relapse, researchers have not adequately investigated these influences. Ninety-six substance users provided data regarding their perceived risk for relapse, exposure to substances, and involvement in reinforcing activities. These three setting attributes were assessed in their home, work, and community settings. Reuse was assessed 3 months later. When controlling for confounding variables, aspects of the home settings significantly distinguished abstainers from reusers; perceived risk for relapse was the strongest predictor of reuse. Exposure to substances and involvement in reinforcing activities were not robust reuse indicators. The work and community settings were not significant determinants of reuse. These findings offer some initial support for the utility of examining social settings to better understand addiction relapse and recovery. Identification of setting-based relapse determinants provides concrete targets for relapse prevention interventions.

  16. Prognosis and treatment after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: 1985. A report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleyer, W.A.; Sather, H.; Hammond, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma constitute 42% to 45% of the cancers in infants, children, and adolescents: In 1985, an estimated 2025 children were newly diagnosed with these two cancers and 900 (43%) of the pediatric cancer deaths in the United States have been projected to be due to these diseases. The single most important obstacle to preventing these deaths is relapse, and prevention of relapse or salvage of the patient who has had a relapse continues to be a major therapeutic challenge. The most important initial step in the treatment of the child whose disease has relapsed is to determine, to the extent possible, the prognosis. In a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a relapse confers an extremely poor prognosis, regardless of site of relapse, tumor histology, or other original prognostic factors, prior therapy, or time to relapse. In the child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in relapse, the prognosis depends on multiple factors. The primary therapy is chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy with marrow grafting. Other options exist, including no therapy, or investigational therapy. The therapy selected should be predicated on the prognosis. In the child with an isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse off therapy, minimum therapy should be administered, particularly if the relapse occurred without prior cranial irradiation. In the child whose relapse is more than 6 months off therapy, conventional therapy should be considered. Also, a patient with an isolated CNS relapse on therapy after prior cranial irradiation should be given moderate therapy. Bone marrow transplantation or high-dose chemoradiotherapy with autologous marrow rescue should be reserved in children with a second or subsequent extramedullary relapse, and possibly for those with a first isolated overt testicular relapse on therapy

  17. Is high dose methotrexate without irradiation of the brain sufficiently effective in prevention of CNS disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cap, J.; Foltinova, A.; Kaiserova, E.; Mojzesova, A.; Sejnova, D.; Jamarik, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present 5-year results of treatment in 93 children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia using two therapeutic protocols containing multidrug chemotherapy including high dose methotrexate. We could ascertain different results in standard and high risk patients. In a group of 62 children with standard risk we observed improvement in complete remission rate being 98.9% after induction phase of therapy, only one patient died on septicemia. Relapse rate in this group was 21.2% and that 14. 7% in the bone marrow and 6.5% in CNS and no testicular relapse at all. In the group of 31 children with high risk leukemia all patients achieved complete remission. Only one of them died on acute pancreatitis due to toxicity. Overall relapse rate in this group was 28.9% with 12.8% of medullary relapse and 16.1 % of CNS relapse. The last one was significantly higher than in the previous study when brain irradiation was a part of therapeutic procedure. It seems that this treatment is effective mainly in the standard risk leukemia, however, in the high risk leukemias this procedure appears to be less effective in preventing CNS leukemia. In this group of patients irradiation of the brain need to be enclosed in the therapy. (authors)

  18. Disease Type- and Status-Specific Alteration of CSF Metabolome Coordinated with Clinical Parameters in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases of CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jin Park

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IDDs are a group of disorders with different aetiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions. These disorders include multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD, and idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM. Differential diagnosis of the CNS IDDs still remains challenging due to frequent overlap of clinical and radiological manifestation, leading to increased demands for new biomarker discovery. Since cerebrospinal fluid (CSF metabolites may reflect the status of CNS tissues and provide an interfacial linkage between blood and CNS tissues, we explored multi-component biomarker for different IDDs from CSF samples using gas chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling coupled to multiplex bioinformatics approach. We successfully constructed the single model with multiple metabolite variables in coordinated regression with clinical characteristics, expanded disability status scale, oligoclonal bands, and protein levels. The multi-composite biomarker simultaneously discriminated four different immune statuses (a total of 145 samples; 54 MS, 49 NMOSD, 30 ITM, and 12 normal controls. Furthermore, systematic characterization of transitional metabolic modulation identified relapse-associated metabolites and proposed insights into the disease network underlying type-specific metabolic dysfunctionality. The comparative analysis revealed the lipids, 1-monopalmitin and 1-monostearin were common indicative for MS, NMOSD, and ITM whereas fatty acids were specific for the relapse identified in all types of IDDs.

  19. Relapsing Polychondritis Following Alopecia Areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Starr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of alopecia areata followed by relapsing polychondritis is presented. Similar cases from the literature are reviewed and speculation about the relationship of these diseases is offered. Although the occurrence of these diseases together could be coincidental, an association seems immunologically plausible. Thus, relapsing polychondritis might be an unusual systemic manifestation of alopecia areata.

  20. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Employer Matching Gifts d Gifts of Stock or Securities d Giving Circles Golden Circle Circle of Distinction ... membranes surrounding nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS)), as well as the nerve fibers themselves. ...

  1. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... membranes surrounding nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS)), as well as the nerve fibers themselves. ... and problems with cognition (learning and memory or information processing). People with progressive forms of MS are ...

  2. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... About the Society d Vision Strategic Plan Independent Review of Society's Research Programs d Careers d Leadership ... membranes surrounding nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS)), as well as the nerve fibers themselves. ...

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... membranes surrounding nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS)), as well as the nerve fibers themselves. During these inflammatory attacks, activated immune cells cause small, localized areas of damage which ...

  4. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Tools Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Evoked Potentials (EP) d Other Conditions to Rule Out Lyme ... membranes surrounding nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS)), as well as the nerve fibers themselves. ...

  5. Evaluation of post-surgical relapse after mandibular setback surgery with minimal orthodontic preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Ki; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yun, Pil-Young; Kim, Jong-Wan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate of the patterns of post-surgical relapse after mandibular setback surgery with minimal orthodontic preparation (MS-MO). The subjects consisted of 15 patients with minimal pre-surgical orthodontic preparation (1.37 ± 1.69 months). Lateral cephalograms were taken in pre-surgical (T0), post-surgical 1 month (T1) and immediately after debonding (T2) stages. To evaluate the surgical changes (T1-T0) and the relapse (T2-T1), the linear and angular measurements were analyzed using paired t-test. Pearson's correlation coefficients of the horizontal and vertical relapses of Pog and Me to other measurements were calculated. Pog or Me in T1 were displaced rotationally on Ar-Pog or Ar-Me lines in T2 to evaluate the remaining surgical relapse except the rotational relapse from total relapse. The mandible relapsed anteriorly 3.53 mm (Pog) and 4.00 mm (Me) and superiorly 2.72 mm (Pog) and 2.44 mm (Me). FH to Ar-Pog and FH to Ar-Me decreased by about 2°. Pure surgical relapses at Pog and Me, except rotational relapses, were about 0.5 mm anteriorly and inferiorly 0.8 mm. The vertical relapse might induce mandibular rotation with the horizontal relapse. For an accurate prediction after MS-MO, the rotational relapse might be considered. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does improvement in maternal attachment representations predict greater maternal sensitivity, child attachment security and lower rates of relapse to substance use? A second test of Mothering from the Inside Out treatment mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchman, Nancy E; DeCoste, Cindy; Borelli, Jessica L; McMahon, Thomas J

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we replicated a rigorous test of the proposed mechanisms of change associated with Mothering from the Inside out (MIO), an evidence-based parenting therapy that aims to enhance maternal reflective functioning and mental representations of caregiving in mothers enrolled in addiction treatment and caring for young children. First, using data from 84 mothers who enrolled in our second randomized controlled trial, we examined whether therapist fidelity to core MIO treatment components predicted improvement in maternal reflective functioning and mental representations of caregiving, even after taking fidelity to non-MIO components into account. Next, we examined whether improvement in directly targeted outcomes (e.g., maternal mentalizing and mental representations of caregiving) led to improvements in the indirectly targeted outcome of maternal caregiving sensitivity, even after controlling for other plausible competing mechanisms (e.g., improvement in maternal psychiatric distress and substance use). Third, we examined whether improvement in targeted parenting outcomes (e.g., maternal mentalizing, mental representations of caregiving and caregiving sensitivity) was associated in improvement in child attachment status, even after controlling for competing mechanisms (e.g., improvement in maternal psychiatric distress and substance use). Finally, we examined whether improvement in maternal mentalizing and caregiving representations was associated with a reduction in relapse to substance use. Support was found for the first three tests of mechanisms but not the fourth. Implications for future research and intervention development are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intra and interpersonal determinants for relapse in drug addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristina Zerwes Ferreira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive qualitative research conducted with 20 drug addicts during treatment at a Center of Psychosocial Attention for Alcohol and other Drugs, aimed to identify intra and interpersonal determinants of relapse perceived by the drug addict. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, submitted to Content Analysis, and organized into categories following predictive determinants for relapse. The relapse occurred by intrapersonal determinants, as self-efficacy expressed by self-confidence in interrupting the drug consumption; the result expectation by anticipation of pleasurable drug effects; the motivation by the absence of volition to interrupt the consumption; coping with the difficulty to confront daily problems; negative and positive emotional states; and craving. Interpersonal determinants expressed by social support were related to the influence of thirds. The identification of these determinants during treatment to favor relapse prevention and effective rehabilitation.

  8. Metallothionein expression and roles in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2002-01-01

      Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight (6-7 kDa) nonenzymatic proteins (60-68 amino acid residues, 25-30% being cysteine) expressed ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. In the central nervous system (CNS), three MT isoforms are known, namely MT-I to MT-III. MT-I and MT-II (MT...

  9. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... in RRMS; however, each person's experience with RRMS will be unique. Following a relapse, the new symptoms ... and worsening, you and your MS care provider will likely want to consider a more aggressive treatment ...

  10. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... course – is characterized by clearly defined attacks of new or increasing neurologic symptoms. These attacks – also called ... either active (with relapses and/or evidence of new MRI activity) or not active , as well as ...

  11. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... defined attacks of new or increasing neurologic symptoms. These attacks – also called relapses or exacerbations – are followed ... as well as the nerve fibers themselves. During these inflammatory attacks, activated immune cells cause small, localized ...

  12. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Treating MS Comprehensive Care Find an MS Care Provider Medications Managing Relapses Rehabilitation Complementary & Alternative Medicines For Clinicians Resources & Support Library & Education Programs Find Support Advanced Care ...

  13. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... without symptoms of which the person is aware. What happens in RRMS? Relapsing-remitting MS is defined ... a different mechanism of action in order to control the disease activity more effectively and help prevent ...

  14. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Rule Out For Clinicians Treating MS Comprehensive Care Find an MS Care Provider Medications Managing Relapses Rehabilitation ... Medicines For Clinicians Resources & Support Library & Education Programs Find Support Advanced Care Needs Resources for Specific Populations ...

  15. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... the periods of remission. At different points in time, RRMS can be further characterized as either active ( ... increase in disability over a specified period of time following a relapse) or not worsening . An increase ...

  16. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Team Make the Most of Your Doctor Visits Advance Medical Directives d Find an MS Care Provider ... in RRMS; however, each person's experience with RRMS will be unique. Following a relapse, the new symptoms ...

  17. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... as shown by the arrows, often occur as part of a relapse. However, new MRI lesions indicating ... course of your disease at different points in time helps you and your MS care provider discuss ...

  18. Regional homogeneity changes between heroin relapse and non-relapse patients under methadone maintenance treatment: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haifeng; Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jiajie; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Li, Yongbin; Shi, Ming; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-18

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is recognized as one of the most effective treatments for heroin addiction but its effect is dimmed by the high incidence of heroin relapse. However, underlying neurobiology mechanism of heroin relapse under MMT is still largely unknown. Here, we took advantage of a resting-state fMRI technique by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo), and tried to explore the difference of brain function between heroin relapsers and non-relapsers in MMT. Forty MMT patients were included and received a 12-month follow-up. All patients were given baseline resting-state fMRI scans by using a 3.0 T GE Signa Excite HD whole-body MRI system. Monthly self-report and urine test were used to assess heroin relapse or non-relapse. Subjective craving was measured with visual analog scale. The correlation between ReHo and the degree of heroin relapse was analyzed. Compared with the non-relapsers, ReHo values were increased in the bilateral medial orbitofrontal cortex, right caudate, and right cerebellum of the heroin relapsers while those in the left parahippocampal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, right lingual gyrus, and precuneus were decreased in heroin relapsers. Importantly, altered ReHo in the right caudate were positively correlated with heroin relapse rates or subjective craving response. Using the resting-state fMRI technique by analysis of ReHo, we provided the first resting-state fMRI evidence that right caudate may serve as a potential biomarker for heroin relapse prediction and also as a promising target for reducing relapse risk.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for isolated extramedullary relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelli, Maria; Zecca, Marco; Messina, Chiara; Carraro, Elisa; Buldini, Barbara; Rovelli, Attilio Maria; Fagioli, Franca; Bertaina, Alice; Lanino, Edoardo; Favre, Claudio; Rabusin, Marco; Prete, Arcangelo; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Barberi, Walter; Porta, Fulvio; Caniglia, Maurizio; Santarone, Stella; D'Angelo, Paolo; Basso, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Franco

    2018-06-13

    Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may occur in extramedullary sites, mainly central nervous system (CNS) and testis. Optimal post-remissional treatment for isolated extramedullary relapse (IEMR) is still controversial. We collected data of children treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for ALL IEMR from 1990 to 2015 in Italy. Among 281 patients, 167 had a relapse confined to CNS, 73 to testis, 14 to mediastinum, and 27 to other organs. Ninety-seven patients underwent autologous HSCT, 79 received allogeneic HSCT from a matched family donor, 75 from a matched unrelated donor, and 30 from an HLA-haploidentical donor. The 10-year overall survival was 56% and was not influenced by gender, ALL blast immune-phenotype, age, site of relapse, duration of first remission, and type of HSCT. In multivariable analysis, the only prognostic factors were disease status at HSCT and year of transplantation. Patients transplanted in third or subsequent complete remission (CR) had a risk of death 2.3 times greater than those in CR2. Children treated after 2000 had half the risk of death than those treated before that year. Our results suggest that both autologous and allogeneic HSCT may be considered for the treatment of pediatric ALL IEMR after the achievement of CR2.

  20. [Clinical and biological prognostic factors in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yébenes-Ramírez, Manuel; Serrano, Josefina; Martínez-Losada, Carmen; Sánchez-García, Joaquín

    2016-09-02

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most frequent type of acute leukemia in adults. Despite recent advances in the characterization of pathogenesis of AML, the cure rates are under 40%, being leukemia relapse the most common cause of treatment failure. Leukaemia relapse occurs due to clonal evolution or clonal escape. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical and biological factors influencing outcomes in patients with AML relapse. We included a total of 75 AML patients who experienced leukaemia relapse after achieving complete remission. We performed complete immunophenotyping and conventional karyotyping in bone marrow aspirates obtained at diagnosis and at leukemia relapse. Overall survival (OS) of the series was 3.7%±2.3, leukaemia progression being the most common cause of death. Patients relapsing before 12 months and those with adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk had statistically significant worse outcomes. A percentage of 52.5 of patients showed phenotypic changes and 50% cytogenetic changes at relapse. We did not find significant clinical factors predicting clonal evolution. The presence of clonal evolution at relapse did not have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with relapsed AML have a dismal prognosis, especially those with early relapse and adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk. Clonal evolution with phenotypic and cytogenetic changes occurred in half of the patients without predictive clinical factors or impact on outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. CNS penetration of ART in HIV-infected children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hof, Malon; Blokhuis, Charlotte; Cohen, Sophie; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Pistorius, M. C. M.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Mathot, Ron A. A.; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2018-01-01

    Background: Paediatric data on CNS penetration of antiretroviral drugs are scarce. Objectives: To evaluate CNS penetration of antiretroviral drugs in HIV-infected children and explore associations with neurocognitive function. Patients and methods: Antiretroviral drug levels were measured in paired

  2. CNS adverse events associated with antimalarial agents. Fact or fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips-Howard, P. A.; ter Kuile, F. O.

    1995-01-01

    CNS adverse drug events are dramatic, and case reports have influenced clinical opinion on the use of antimalarials. Malaria also causes CNS symptoms, thus establishing causality is difficult. CNS events are associated with the quinoline and artemisinin derivatives. Chloroquine, once considered too

  3. CNS effects following the treatment of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rane, N.; Quaghebeur, G.

    2012-01-01

    Corporeal and central nervous system (CNS) axis chemotherapy and radiotherapy have long been used for the effective treatment and prophylaxis of CNS, body malignancies, and leukaemias. However, they are not without their problems. Following the proliferation of magnetic resonance neuroimaging in recent years it has become clear that the spectrum of toxicity that these therapies produce ranges from subclinical white matter changes to overt brain necrosis. The effects are both direct and indirect and via different pathological mechanisms. Chronic and progressive changes can be detected many years after the initial intervention. In addition to leucoencephalopathic changes, grey matter changes are now well described. Changes may be difficult to distinguish from tumour recurrence, though may be reversible and remediable, and are thus very important to differentiate. In this review toxic effects are classified and their imaging appearances discussed, with reference to specific syndromes.

  4. Therapeutic potential of agmatine for CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian B; Rosa, Priscila B; Olescowicz, Gislaine; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2017-09-01

    Agmatine is a neuromodulator that regulates multiple neurotransmitters and signaling pathways. Several studies have focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of this molecule, which seems to be mediated by a reduction in oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and proapoptotic signaling. Since these events are implicated in acute and chronic excitotoxicity-related disorders (ischemia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric disorders) as well as in nociception, agmatine has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Agmatine also stimulates the expression of trophic factors and adult neurogenesis, contributing to its ability to induce endogenous repair mechanisms. Therefore, considering its wide range of biological effects, this review summarizes the current knowledge about its protective and regenerative properties in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  6. Interneuron progenitor transplantation to treat CNS dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad O Chohan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field.

  7. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  8. Treatment options for Primary CNS Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghari, Altaf Ali; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Jabbar, Adnan; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2018-03-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare and aggressive brain tumour that is uniformly fatal. The rarity of the disease and the poor response to treatment makes it difficult to reach a consensus with regards to treatment options. In this review, the authors have discussed different treatment modalities used in the management of PCNSL including chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, as well as the results of recent clinical trials on treatment options for PCNSL.

  9. Engineering progress of CNS concept in Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.O.; Park, K.N.; Park, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy research Institute (KAERI) strives to provide utilizing facilities on and around the Hanaro reactor in order to activate advanced researches by neutron application. As one of the facilities to be installed, the conceptual design work of CNS was started in 1996 with a project schedule of 5 years so that its installation work can be finished by the year 2000. And the major engineering targets of this CNS facility are established for a minimum physical interference with the present facilities of the Hanaro, a reach-out of very-high-gain factors in the cold neutron flux, a simplicity of the maintenance of the facility, and a safety in the operation of the facility as well as the reactor. For the conceptual design of Hanaro CNS, the experience of utilization and production of cold neutron at WWR-M reactor Gatchina, Russia has been used with that of elaborations for PIK reactor in design for neutron guide systems and instruments. (author)

  10. Relapse prevention and smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J R; Glaros, A G

    1986-01-01

    A multicomponent smoking relapse prevention treatment based on Marlatt and Gordon's (1980) model of the relapse process was developed and evaluated. Behavior-analytic methods were used to develop assessment instruments, training situations, and coping responses. The prevention components were presented in the context of a basic broad-spectrum stop-smoking program, and were compared with the basic program plus discussion control, and the basic program alone. Smoking-related dependent variables generally did not differ between groups at any time from pre-treatment to 12 month follow-up. Only the subjects in the relapse prevention condition improved problem-solving and social skills needed to cope with high-risk situations. These subjects also tended to take longer to relapse and smoke fewer cigarettes at the time of relapse. Subjects above the median level of competence on measures of social skill at post-treatment remained abstinent significantly longer. Maintenance of non-smoking was found to be related to the degree of competence with which individuals deal with high-risk situations. Results are discussed in relation to models of compliance with therapeutic regimens.

  11. Neurotransmitter synthesis from CNS glutamine for central control of breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoop, B.; Systrom, D.; Chiang, C.H.; Shih, V.E.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum rate at which CNS glutamine (GLN) derived from glutamate (GLU) can be sequestered for synthesis of neurotransmitter GLU and/or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been determined in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. A total of 57 animals were studied under normal, hypoxic (Pa/sub O2/ greater than or equal to 20 mmHg), or hypercapnic (Pa/sub CO2/ less than or equal to 71 mm Hg) conditions. Thirteen of these were bilaterally vagotomized and carotid body denervated and studied only under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In 5 animals cerebrospinal fluid GLN transfer rate constant k was measured using 13 N-ammonia tracer. Measured cerebral cortical (CC) and medullary (MED) GLN concentrations c are found to vary with GLU metabolic rate r according to c-C/sub m/r/(r+R), where r, the product of k and corresponding tissue GLU concentration, is assumed equal to the maximum GLN metabolic rate via pathways other than for neurotransmitter synthesis. The constants C/sub m/ and R are the predicted maximum GLN concentration and its maximum rate of sequestration for neurotransmitter synthesis, respectively. For both CNS tissue types in all animals, C/sub m/ = 20.9 +- 7.4 (SD) mmoles/kg wet wt(mM) and R = 6.2 +- 2.3 mM/min. These values are consistent with results obtained in anesthetized rats

  12. Prophylactic CNS therapy in childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiko; Fujimoto, Takeo

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose methotrexate (MTX). Seventy children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) entered to this study between July 1978 and December 1980. According to initial white blood count (WBC), they were stratified to induce remission with; vincristine and prednine in low initial WBC ( lt 25,000/mm 3 ) group and these two agents plus adriamycin in high initial WBC ( gt 25,000/mm 3 ) group. After inducing remission, 62 children who achieved CR, received different CNS-prophlaxis; using a regimen of three doses of weekly high-dose MTX (1,000 mg/m 2 ) 6-hour infusion, which was repeated every 12 weeks-Group A (n = 14); high-dose MTX followed by 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MT X-Group B (n = 15), 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX-Group C (n = 16), and in 17 patients with high initial WBC, same as in Group A-Group D (n = 17). During an intravenous 6-h infusion of MTX at a dose of 1,000 mg/m 2 , the CSF concentration of MTX rose to 2.3 +- 2.4 x 10 -6 M after initiation of infusion and remained in 10 -7 M level for 48 hours. CNS-leukemia terminated complete remission in one of 14 children in Group A, two of 15 in Group B, two of 16 in Group C and two of 17 in Group D. The cumulative incidence of CNS-leukemia at 20 months calculated by the technique of Kaplan and Meier was 0% i n Group A, 18.1% in Group B, 7.1% in Group C and 50.8% in Group D. There was no statistical difference among Groups A, B and C. These data suggested that CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose intravenous MTX was effective as well as 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX in childhood ALL with low initial WBC. (author)

  13. Central Nervous System (CNS Disease Triggering Takotsubo Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is usually triggered by psychological or physical stress. One of the many physical sources of stress are central nervous system (CNS disorders. CNS disorders most frequently triggering TTS include subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, migraine, and intracerebral bleeding. More rare CNS-triggers of TTS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encephalitis, or traumatic brain or spinal cord injury. TTS triggered by any of the CNS disorders needs to be recognized since adequate treatment of TTS may improve the general outcome from the CNS disorder as well. Neurologists need to be aware of TTS as a complication of specific CNS disorders but TTS may be triggered also by CNS disorders so far not recognised as causes of TTS.

  14. SINS/CNS Nonlinear Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celestial Navigation System (CNS has characteristics of accurate orientation and strong autonomy and has been widely used in Hypersonic Vehicle. Since the CNS location and orientation mainly depend upon the inertial reference that contains errors caused by gyro drifts and other error factors, traditional Strap-down Inertial Navigation System (SINS/CNS positioning algorithm setting the position error between SINS and CNS as measurement is not effective. The model of altitude azimuth, platform error angles, and horizontal position is designed, and the SINS/CNS tightly integrated algorithm is designed, in which CNS altitude azimuth is set as measurement information. GPF (Gaussian particle filter is introduced to solve the problem of nonlinear filtering. The results of simulation show that the precision of SINS/CNS algorithm which reaches 130 m using three stars is improved effectively.

  15. The Role of Irrational Beliefs, Self Efficacy and Social Support in Relapse of Abuse Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toraj Hashemi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to determine the role of irrational beliefs system, self efficacy and social support network in predicting of relapse/non-relapse of drug misusing, and comparison of mentioned variables between these two groups. Method: For this purpose 100 persons who had repeated relapse and 100 persons who did not have relapse were selected by available sampling of Rehabilitation Organization of Tabriz city. Albert Alic’s irrational beliefs, Sherer’s self efficacy and Wax’s social support questionnaires administered among selected samples. Results: The results showed that, there were significant differences between two relapse and non-relapse groups on irrational beliefs, self-efficacy and social support. Conclusion: The results have applied implications in addiction treatment clinics.

  16. Social Resource Characteristics and Adolescent Substance Abuse Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vik, Peter W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined social resource network characteristics of adolescent substance abusers (n=19). Perceived similarity to one's social network emerged as important moderator of whether social network provided support to remain abstinent or elevated risk for relapse. Increased perceived support predicted continued posttreatment abstinence when recovering…

  17. CT studies before and after CNS treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretzschmar, K.; Gutjahr, P.; Kutzner, J.

    1980-01-01

    CT was performed on 72 children with acute lymphoblasitc leukemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Thirty-two of these patients were investigated prior to CNS radiation and intrathecal methotrexate therapy. Ten of these patients (31%) were known to have hydrocephalic dilatation of the CSF spaces. Clinical data and subsequent observations with analysis of the CT findings show that no difference in the attenuation values of brain tissue occurs in the absence of a CNS relapse. The percentage of abnormal findings before and after therapy remains constant. The adverse late effects described in the CT literature seem principally to be damage diagnosed too late. It is questionable if the CT demonstration of dilated CSF spaces before treatment has a prognostic significance. (orig.)

  18. Neurocognitive Predictors of Drug Relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Marhe (Reshmi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide, about 35 million people, that is 0.8% of the world’s adult population, use heroin and/or cocaine and more than 10-13% of these drug users are or will become drug dependent (UNODC, World Drug Report, 2012). Drug dependency is characterized as a chronic relapsing disorder

  19. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treating MS d Comprehensive Care Developing a Healthcare Team Make the Most of Your Doctor Visits Advance Medical Directives d Find an MS Care Provider Partners in MS Care d Managing Relapses Plasmapheresis d Rehabilitation Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) ...

  20. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Become an MS Activist Take Action Current Advocacy Issues Advocacy Results Advocacy News d Raise Awareness d ... MS are more likely to experience gradually worsening problems with walking and mobility, along with whatever other symptoms they may have. Diagnosing relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More ... Room MS Prevalence ...

  1. Immune regulation and CNS autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antel, J P; Owens, T

    1999-01-01

    The central nervous system is a demonstrated target of both clinical and experimental immune mediated disorders. Immune regulatory mechanisms operative at the levels of the systemic immune system, the blood brain barrier, and within the CNS parenchyma are important determinants of the intensity...... and duration of the tissue directed injury. Convergence of research, involving direct manipulation of specific cells and molecular mediators in animal models and in vitro analysis of human immune and neural cells and tissues, is providing increasing insight into the role of these immune regulatory functions...

  2. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Steven Wallis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiology of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor antagonists, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic.

  3. Mediators of the association of major depressive syndrome and anxiety syndrome with postpartum smoking relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Ji, Lingyun; Castro, Yessenia; Heppner, Whitney L; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Costello, Tracy J; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Velasquez, Mary M; Greisinger, Anthony; Cinciripini, Paul M; Wetter, David W

    2012-08-01

    Based on conceptual models of addiction and affect regulation, this study examined the mechanisms linking current major depressive syndrome (MDS) and anxiety syndrome (AS) to postpartum smoking relapse. Data were collected in a randomized clinical trial from 251 women who quit smoking during pregnancy. Simple and multiple mediation models of the relations of MDS and AS with postpartum relapse were examined using linear regression, continuation ratio logit models, and a bootstrapping procedure to test the indirect effects. Both MDS and AS significantly predicted postpartum smoking relapse. After adjusting for MDS, AS significantly predicted relapse. However, after adjusting for AS, MDS no longer predicted relapse. Situationally based self-efficacy, expectancies of controlling negative affect by means other than smoking, and various dimensions of primary and secondary tobacco dependence individually mediated the effect of both MDS and AS on relapse. In multiple mediation models, self-efficacy in negative/affective situations significantly mediated the effect of MDS and AS on relapse. The findings underscore the negative impact of depression and anxiety on postpartum smoking relapse and suggest that the effects of MDS on postpartum relapse may be largely explained by comorbid AS. The current investigation provided mixed support for affect regulation models of addiction. Cognitive and tobacco dependence-related aspects of negative and positive reinforcement significantly mediated the relationship of depression and anxiety with relapse, whereas affect and stress did not. The findings emphasize the unique role of low agency with respect to abstaining from smoking in negative affective situations as a key predictor of postpartum smoking relapse. © 2012 American Psychological Association

  4. Novel agents in CNS myeloma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzetti, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system localization of multiple myeloma (CNS-MM) accounts for about 1% of all MM.Treatment is still unsatisfactory. Many treatments have been described in the literature: chemotherapy (CHT), intrathecal therapy (IT), and radiotherapy (RT), with survivals reported between one month and six months. Recent drugs such as the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) and proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib) have changed the treatment of patients with MM, both younger and older, with a significant improvement in response and survival. The activity of new drugs in CNSMM has been reported but is still not well known. Bortezomib does not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), and IMID’s seem to have only a minimal crossover. The role of novel agents in CNS MM management will be discussed as well as the potential role of other new immunomodulatory drugs (pomalidomide) and proteasome inhibitors that seem to cross the BBB and hold promise into the treatment of this rare and still incurable localization of the disease.

  5. Malignant lymphoma in central nervous system (CNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyoshi, Kenji; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni; Nishimura, Toshio.

    1984-01-01

    A 71-year-old male was admitted to Kohka Public Hospital on January 4, 1980, because of frequent vomiting and recent memory loss. Two weeks before admission upper G-I series showed no abnormalities. Physical and neurological examinations revealed no abnormalities except for slightly apathetic appearance and recent memory loss. Mild pleocytosis and marked increase of protein in CSF were observed. CT scan on January 17 showed high density areas in both medial sides of temporal lobes with remarkable contrast enhancement. His memory and, consciousness disturbances gradually aggravated, accompanied by abnormal density spreading around the ventricle walls like ventriculitis. He was transfered to Kyoto University Hospital on March 17, and malignant lymphoma was diagnosed on the basis of CSF cytology. Radiation and chemotherapy alleviated the CNS involvement and he regained normal mental function. On June 16, he developed pneumonia followed by status epilepticus. Autopsy findings revealed no lymphoid cell infiltration, but fibrous tissues in both hippocampal gyri and lymphomatous cells in the liver, which could not be suspected on clinical examinations. Apparent malignant lymphoma cells were not found in lymph nodes. This case indicated peculiar evolution of malignant lymphoma from liver to CNS or vice versa. We could not decide which organ was primary. CT findings of this case was very interesting; they resembled ventriculitis, which simulate tumors such as medulloblastoma or ependymoma spreading under ependymal lining. (author)

  6. Diagnostic algorithm for relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, W K; Barkhof, Frederik; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2017-07-18

    To establish whether children with relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes (RDS) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Ab) show distinctive clinical and radiologic features and to generate a diagnostic algorithm for the main RDS for clinical use. A panel reviewed the clinical characteristics, MOG-Ab and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) Ab, intrathecal oligoclonal bands, and Epstein-Barr virus serology results of 110 children with RDS. A neuroradiologist blinded to the diagnosis scored the MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and serologic tests results were compared. The findings showed that 56.4% of children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), 25.4% with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 12.7% with multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and 5.5% with relapsing optic neuritis (RON). Blinded analysis defined baseline MRI as typical of MS in 93.5% of children with MS. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presentation was seen only in the non-MS group. Of NMOSD cases, 30.7% were AQP4-Ab positive. MOG-Ab were found in 83.3% of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD, 100% of MDEM, and 33.3% of RON. Children with MOG-Ab were younger, were less likely to present with area postrema syndrome, and had lower disability, longer time to relapse, and more cerebellar peduncle lesions than children with AQP4-Ab NMOSD. A diagnostic algorithm applicable to any episode of CNS demyelination leads to 4 main phenotypes: MS, AQP4-Ab NMOSD, MOG-Ab-associated disease, and antibody-negative RDS. Children with MS and AQP4-Ab NMOSD showed features typical of adult cases. Because MOG-Ab-positive children showed notable and distinctive clinical and MRI features, they were grouped into a unified phenotype (MOG-Ab-associated disease), included in a new diagnostic algorithm. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. The Cost of Relapse in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Mark; McCrone, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating mental illness characterised by periods of relapse that require resource intensive management. Quantifying the cost of relapse is central to the evaluation of the cost effectiveness of treating schizophrenia. We aimed to undertake a comprehensive search of the available literature on the cost of relapse. We performed a search on multiple databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Health Management Information Consortium) for any study reporting a cost of relapse or data from which such a cost could be calculated. Costs are reported in 2015 international dollars. We found 16 studies reporting costs associated with relapse over a defined period of time and identified a cost associated with hospitalisation for relapse in 43 studies. Eight clinical decision analyses also provided cost estimates. Studies from the US report excess costs of relapse of $6033-$32,753 (2015 Purchasing Power Parity dollars [PPP$]) over periods of 12-15 months. European studies report excess costs of $8665-$18,676 (2015 PPP$) over periods of 6-12 months. Estimates of the cost of hospitalisation for relapse are more diverse, and associated with marked differences in typical length of stay across jurisdictions. Wide ranges in the estimated cost of relapse may reflect differences in sample section and relapse definition as well as practice styles and differences in resource costs. Selection of the most appropriate cost estimate should be guided by the definition of relapse and the analysis setting.

  8. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F.; Cambridge Univ.

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author)

  9. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  10. Palmitoylethanolamide in CNS health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Russo, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2014-08-01

    The existence of acylethanolamides (AEs) in the mammalian brain has been known for decades. Among AEs, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and conspicuously produced by neurons and glial cells. Antihyperalgesic and neuroprotective properties of PEA have been mainly related to the reduction of neuronal firing and to control of inflammation. Growing evidence suggest that PEA may be neuroprotective during CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Advances in the understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of PEA have potentiated its interest as useful biological tool for disease management. Several rapid non-genomic and delayed genomic mechanisms of action have been identified for PEA as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α dependent. First, an early molecular control, through Ca(+2)-activated intermediate- and/or big-conductance K(+) channels opening, drives to rapid neuronal hyperpolarization. This is reinforced by the increase of the inward Cl(-) currents due to the modulation of the gamma aminobutyric acid A receptor and by the desensitization of the transient receptor potential channel type V1. Moreover, the gene transcription-mediated mechanism sustains the long-term anti-inflammatory effects, by reducing pro-inflammatory enzyme expression and increasing neurosteroid synthesis. Overall, the integration of these different modes of action allows PEA to exert an immediate and prolonged efficacious control in neuron signaling either on inflammatory process or neuronal excitability, maintaining cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the effect of PEA on metabolism, behavior, inflammation and pain perception, related to the control of central functions and the emerging evidence demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy in several neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Ibrutinib Treatment of Mantle Cell Lymphoma Relapsing at Central Nervous System: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Mannina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL accounts for about 5% of all lymphomas. Its clinical and histological features are heterogeneous. After a frequently good initial response, the disease generally and repeatedly relapses and finally the outcome is poor. Particularly severe is the prognosis of the rare occurrence of CNSi (Central Nervous System involvement. Ibrutinib, an oral inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK, has shown strong activity in relapsing patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL and MCL. Few reports are available about treatment with ibrutinib of patients presenting CNSi by lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD. In all of them, ibrutinib, at the dosage between 420 and 560 mg/day, showed an impressive effectiveness. Here we describe a case of MCL with CNS relapse showing an excellent response to ibrutinib administered at the unusual dose of 280 mg/day because of concomitant treatment of cardiological disease.

  12. Mer tyrosine kinase promotes the survival of t(1;19)-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sarah; Pfeiffer, Christian; Strube, Susanne; Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Loges, Sonja; Waizenegger, Jonas; Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Cario, Gunnar; Möricke, Anja; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M

    2015-01-29

    Patients with t(1;19)-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are prone to central nervous system (CNS) relapses, and expression of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, and Mer) receptor Mer is upregulated in these leukemias. We examined the functional role of Mer in the CNS in preclinical models and performed correlative studies in 64 t(1;19)-positive and 93 control pediatric ALL patients. ALL cells were analyzed in coculture with human glioma cells and normal rat astrocytes: CNS coculture caused quiescence and protection from methotrexate toxicity in Mer(high) ALL cell lines, which was antagonized by short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Mer. Mer expression was upregulated, prosurvival Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling were activated, and secretion of the Mer ligand Galectin-3 was stimulated. Mer(high) t(1;19) primary cells caused CNS involvement to a larger extent in murine xenografts than in their Mer(low) counterparts. Leukemic cells from Mer(high) xenografts showed enhanced survival in coculture. Treatment of Mer(high) patient cells with the Mer-specific inhibitor UNC-569 in vivo delayed leukemia onset, reduced CNS infiltration, and prolonged survival of mice. Finally, a correlation between high Mer expression and CNS positivity upon initial diagnosis was observed in t(1;19) patients. Our data provide evidence that Mer is associated with survival in the CNS in t(1;19)-positive ALL, suggesting a role as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Predictors of marijuana relapse in the human laboratory: robust impact of tobacco cigarette smoking status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Margaret; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D; Glass, Andrew; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Comer, Sandra D; Foltin, Richard W

    2013-02-01

    Few marijuana smokers in treatment achieve sustained abstinence, yet factors contributing to high relapse rates are unknown. Study 1: data from five inpatient laboratory studies assessing marijuana intoxication, withdrawal, and relapse were combined to assess factors predicting the likelihood and severity of relapse. Daily, nontreatment-seeking marijuana smokers (n = 51; 10 ± 5 marijuana cigarettes/day) were enrolled. Study 2: to isolate the effects of cigarette smoking, marijuana intoxication, withdrawal, and relapse were assessed in daily marijuana and cigarette smokers (n = 15) under two within-subject, counter-balanced conditions: while smoking tobacco cigarettes as usual (SAU), and after at least 5 days without cigarettes (Quit). Study 1: 49% of participants relapsed the first day active marijuana became available. Tobacco cigarette smokers (75%), who were not abstaining from cigarettes, were far more likely to relapse than non-cigarette smokers (odds ratio: 19, p marijuana administration and those with more negative affect and sleep disruption during marijuana withdrawal were more likely to have severe relapse episodes (p 87%) relapsed to marijuana whether in the SAU or Quit phase. Tobacco cigarette smoking did not significantly influence relapse, nor did it affect marijuana intoxication or most symptoms of withdrawal relative to tobacco cessation. Daily marijuana smokers who also smoke cigarettes have high rates of marijuana relapse, and cigarette smoking versus recent abstinence does not directly influence this association. These data indicate that current cigarette smoking is a clinically important marker for increased risk of marijuana relapse. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H

    2016-01-01

    with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration...

  15. Alcohol consumption and symptoms as predictors for relapse of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuithof, Marlous; ten Have, Margreet; van den Brink, Wim; Vollebergh, Wilma; de Graaf, Ron

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol consumption levels and alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms may serve as easily quantifiable markers for AUD relapse after remission and might help prevention workers identify at-risk individuals. We investigated the predictive value of alcohol consumption and AUD symptoms on relapse. Data are from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2). We selected 506 people in ≥12-month DSM-5 AUD remission at baseline and assessed their status at 3-year follow-up. AUD symptoms and drinking patterns were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Time since remission was assessed retrospectively at baseline and ranged from 1 to 48 years. Predictors for relapse were examined using Cox regression analysis. Cumulative AUD relapse rate was 5.6% at 5 years, 9.1% at 10 years and 12.0% at 20 years. Relapse was predicted by both medium (15-28/22-42 drinks weekly for women/men) and high (≥29/43) past alcohol intake, 6+ lifetime AUD symptoms, 'impaired control over use', and at-risk (≥8/15) current intake. The risk of relapse was especially high when medium or high past intake or 6+ lifetime symptoms coincided with current at-risk drinking. Only a minority of people in DSM-5 AUD remission relapsed, but the risk of relapse increased substantially with the presence of at least one of the risk factors. Moreover, at-risk current drinking coupled with other risk factors substantially increased the likelihood of relapse. Therefore, current drinking may provide an adequate reference point for relapse prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Late Ebola virus relapse causing meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael; Rodger, Alison; Bell, David J; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Filipe, Ana; Gifford, Robert J; Hopkins, Susan; Hughes, Joseph; Jabeen, Farrah; Johannessen, Ingolfur; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos; Lackenby, Angie; Lester, Rebecca; Liu, Rebecca S N; MacConnachie, Alisdair; Mahungu, Tabitha; Martin, Daniel; Marshall, Neal; Mepham, Stephen; Orton, Richard; Palmarini, Massimo; Patel, Monika; Perry, Colin; Peters, S Erica; Porter, Duncan; Ritchie, David; Ritchie, Neil D; Seaton, R Andrew; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Templeton, Kate; Warren, Simon; Wilkie, Gavin S; Zambon, Maria; Gopal, Robin; Thomson, Emma C

    2016-07-30

    There are thousands of survivors of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa. Ebola virus can persist in survivors for months in immune-privileged sites; however, viral relapse causing life-threatening and potentially transmissible disease has not been described. We report a case of late relapse in a patient who had been treated for severe Ebola virus disease with high viral load (peak cycle threshold value 13.2). A 39-year-old female nurse from Scotland, who had assisted the humanitarian effort in Sierra Leone, had received intensive supportive treatment and experimental antiviral therapies, and had been discharged with undetectable Ebola virus RNA in peripheral blood. The patient was readmitted to hospital 9 months after discharge with symptoms of acute meningitis, and was found to have Ebola virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). She was treated with supportive therapy and experimental antiviral drug GS-5734 (Gilead Sciences, San Francisco, Foster City, CA, USA). We monitored Ebola virus RNA in CSF and plasma, and sequenced the viral genome using an unbiased metagenomic approach. On admission, reverse transcriptase PCR identified Ebola virus RNA at a higher level in CSF (cycle threshold value 23.7) than plasma (31.3); infectious virus was only recovered from CSF. The patient developed progressive meningoencephalitis with cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. Clinical recovery was associated with addition of high-dose corticosteroids during GS-5734 treatment. CSF Ebola virus RNA slowly declined and was undetectable following 14 days of treatment with GS-5734. Sequencing of plasma and CSF viral genome revealed only two non-coding changes compared with the original infecting virus. Our report shows that previously unanticipated, late, severe relapses of Ebola virus can occur, in this case in the CNS. This finding fundamentally redefines what is known about the natural history of Ebola virus infection. Vigilance should be maintained in the thousands of Ebola survivors

  17. The farnesoid-X-receptor in myeloid cells controls CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucke, Stephanie; Herold, Martin; Liebmann, Marie; Freise, Nicole; Lindner, Maren; Fleck, Ann-Katrin; Zenker, Stefanie; Thiebes, Stephanie; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Buck, Dorothea; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Zipp, Frauke; Hemmer, Bernhard; Engel, Daniel Robert; Roth, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz; Klotz, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Innate immune responses by myeloid cells decisively contribute to perpetuation of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and their pharmacologic modulation represents a promising strategy to prevent disease progression in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Based on our observation that peripheral immune cells from relapsing-remitting and primary progressive MS patients exhibited strongly decreased levels of the bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid-X-receptor, NR1H4), we evaluated its potential relevance as therapeutic target for control of established CNS autoimmunity. Pharmacological FXR activation promoted generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages characterized by arginase-1, increased IL-10 production, and suppression of T cell responses. In mice, FXR activation ameliorated CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion and even suppressed advanced clinical disease upon therapeutic administration. In analogy to rodents, pharmacological FXR activation in human monocytes from healthy controls and MS patients induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype with suppressive properties including control of effector T cell proliferation. We therefore, propose an important role of FXR in control of T cell-mediated autoimmunity by promoting anti-inflammatory macrophage responses.

  18. Fifth CNS international steam generator conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Fifth CNS International Steam Generator Conference was held on November 26-29, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. In contrast with other conferences which focus on specific aspects, this conference provided a wide ranging forum on nuclear steam generator technology from life-cycle management to inspection and maintenance, functional and structural performance characteristics to design architecture. The 5th conference has adopted the theme: 'Management of Real-Life Equipment Conditions and Solutions for the Future'. This theme is appropriate at a time of transition in the industry when plants are looking to optimize the performance of existing assets, prevent costly degradation and unavailability, while looking ahead for new steam generator investments in life-extension, replacements and new-build. More than 50 technical papers were presented in sessions that gave an insight to the scope: life management strategies; fouling, cleaning and chemistry; replacement strategies and new build design; materials degradation; condition assessment/fitness for service; inspection advancements and experience; and thermal hydraulic performance

  19. Analysis of perfusion weighted image of CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It is difficult to differentiate CNS lymphoma from other tumors such as malignant gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas with conventional MR imaging, because the imaging findings are overlapped between these tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the perfusion weighted MR imaging findings of CNS lymphomas and to compare the relative cerebral blood volume ratios between CNS lymphomas and other tumors such as high grade gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed MRI findings and clinical records in 13 patients with pathologically proven CNS lymphoma between January 2006 and November 2008. We evaluated the relative cerebral blood volume ratios of tumor, which were obtained by dividing the values obtained from the normal white matter on MRI. Results: Total 13 patients (M:F = 8:5; age range 46-67 years, mean age 52.3 years) were included. The CNS lymphomas showed relatively low values of maximum relative CBV ratio in most patients regardless of primary or secondary CNS lymphoma. Conclusion: Perfusion weighted image may be helpful in the diagnosis of CNS lymphoma in spite of primary or secondary or B cell or T cell.

  20. The Rotter I-E scale as a predictor of relapse in a population of compulsive gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E E; Nora, R M; Bustos, N

    1992-06-01

    Profile surveys, completed Rotter I-E scales, and questionnaires on past relapse behavior were collected from 108 New Jersey compulsive gamblers who attended Gamblers Anonymous, and an attempt was made, based on the findings, to predict incidence of compulsive gamblers' relapse. Relationships between I-E scores and extent of relapse-free periods, and I-E scores and relapse, with the variables of religious background, age, marital status, education, type of work, and childhood physical abuse were investigated. In every instance the relationship found was statistically non-significant.

  1. The natural history of multiple sclerosis: a geographically based study 10: relapses and long-term disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfari, Antonio; Neuhaus, Anneke; Degenhardt, Alexandra; Rice, George P; Muraro, Paolo A; Daumer, Martin; Ebers, George C

    2010-07-01

    The relationship of relapses to long-term disability in multiple sclerosis is uncertain. Relapse reduction is a common therapeutic target but clinical trials have shown dissociation between relapse suppression and disability accumulation. We investigated relationships between relapses and disability progression for outcomes of requiring assistance to walk, being bedridden and dying from multiple sclerosis [Disability Status Scale 6, 8, 10] by analysing 28 000 patient-years of evolution in 806-bout onset patients from the London Ontario natural history cohort. Having previously shown no effect of relapse frequency among progressive multiple sclerosis subtypes, here we examined these measures in the pre-progressive or relapsing-remitting phase. Survival was compared among groups stratified by (i) early relapses--number of attacks during the first 2 years of multiple sclerosis; (ii) length of first inter-attack interval; (iii) interval between onset and Disability Status Scale 3 (moderate disability); (iv) number of attacks from the third year of disease up to onset of progression; and (v) during the entire relapsing-remitting phase. Early clinical features can predict hard disability outcomes. Frequent relapses in the first 2 years and shorter first inter-attack intervals predicted shorter times to reach hard disability endpoints. Attack frequencies, in the first 2 years, of 1 versus >or=3, gave differences of 7.6, 12.8 and 20.3 years in times from disease onset to Disability Status Scale 6, 8 and 10, respectively. Time to Disability Status Scale 3 highly and independently predicted time to Disability Status Scale 6, 8 and 10. In contrast, neither total number of relapsing-remitting phase attacks nor of relapses experienced during the relapsing-remitting phase after the second year up to onset of progression showed a deleterious effect on times from disease onset, from progression onset and from Disability Status Scale 3 to these hard endpoints. The failure of a

  2. Relapse Risk Assessment for Schizophrenia Patients (RASP): A New Self-Report Screening Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn; Carpenter, William; Waters, Heidi C; Gerlanc, Nicole M; Legacy, Susan N; Ruetsch, Charles

    2018-01-01

    The Relapse Assessment for Schizophrenia Patients (RASP) was developed as a six-question self-report screener that measures indicators of Increased Anxiety and Social Isolation to assess patient stability and predict imminent relapse. This paper describes the development and psychometric characteristics of the RASP. The RASP and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) were administered to patients with schizophrenia (n=166) three separate times. Chart data were collected on a subsample of patients (n=81). Psychometric analyses of RASP included tests of reliability, construct validity, and concurrent validity of items. Factors from RASP were correlated with subscales from PANSS (sensitivity to change and criterion validity [agreement between RASP and evidence of relapse]). Test-retest reliability returned modest to strong agreement at the item level and strong agreement at the questionnaire level. RASP showed good item response curves and internal consistency for the total instrument and within each of the two subscales (Increased Anxiety and Social Isolation). RASP Total Score and subscales showed good concurrent validity when correlated with PANSS Total Score, Positive, Excitement, and Anxiety subscales. RASP correctly predicted relapse in 67% of cases, with good specificity and negative predictive power and acceptable positive predictive power and sensitivity. The reliability and validity data presented support the use of RASP in settings where addition of a brief self-report assessment of relapse risk among patients with schizophrenia may be of benefit. Ease of use and scoring, and the ability to administer without clinical supervision allows for routine administration and assessment of relapse risk.

  3. 3rd ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Electronic Navigation Research Institute (ENRI) held its third International Workshop on ATM / CNS in 2013 with the theme of "Drafting the future sky". There is worldwide activity taking place in the research and development of modern air traffic management (ATM) and its enabling technologies in Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS). Pioneering work is necessary to contribute to the global harmonization of air traffic management and control. At this workshop, leading experts in  research, industry and academia from around the world met to share their ideas and approaches on ATM/CNS related topics.

  4. Autoimmune process in CNS under Cs-137 inner irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisyany, N.I.; Liubich, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothesis as to the development of radiation-induced brain injuries stands high among the concepts of the CNS post-radiation damage pathogenesis. To study the changes occurring in a living organism affected by a small-dose radiation due to incorporated radionuclides as well as to create adequate models are of critical importance in the post-Chernobyl period. The effects of chronic small-dose inner radiation on the development of autoimmune responses were evaluated by determining the level of the CNS proteins and protein-induced antibodies to the CNS components. (author)

  5. Prognostic value of comorbidity for auto-SCT eligibility and outcome in relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plattel, W. J.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; de Bock, G. H.; van Imhoff, G. W.

    Salvage reinduction therapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and auto-SCT is the treatment of choice for fit patients with refractory or relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We assessed the prognostic value of comorbidity at the time of relapse to predict receipt of auto-SCT

  6. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  7. Tumor relapse present in oncologic nasal repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez Chavez, Julio Cesar; Sanchez Wals, Lenia; Monzon Fernandez, Abel Nicolas; Morales Tirado, Roxana

    2009-01-01

    Tumor relapse is one of the more fearsome complications of the oncologic course and also to obscure the life prognosis, causing the loss of many reconstructions and of exhausting the repairing surgical possibilities. The aim of this study was to determine the relapse frequency, the repercussion on the repair and the subsequent medical course of patients operated on malign nasal tumors

  8. Air pollution: mechanisms of neuroinflammation and CNS disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle L; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-09-01

    Air pollution has been implicated as a chronic source of neuroinflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that produce neuropathology and central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain; systemic effects that impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-induced CNS pathology are poorly understood, new evidence suggests that microglial activation and changes in the blood-brain barrier are key components. Here we summarize recent findings detailing the mechanisms through which air pollution reaches the brain and activates the resident innate immune response to become a chronic source of pro-inflammatory factors and ROS, culminating in CNS disease.

  9. A map of taste neuron projections in the Drosophila CNS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-08

    Jul 8, 2014 ... information that they represent. The extensive ... physiology and behaviour in the wild type and in these mutants .... taste information is processed in the CNS. 2. ..... gene affecting the specificity of the chemosensory neurons of.

  10. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Nwamaka Nwogu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow. In this review, we provide an overview of the various factors influencing CNS penetration of ARV drugs with an emphasis on those commonly used in sub-Saharan Africa. We also summarize some key associations between ARV drug penetration, CNS efficacy, and neurotoxicity.

  11. CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantina Vasilatou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

  12. CNS-directed gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sands, Mark S; Haskins, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders usually caused by deficient activity of a single lysosomal enzyme. As most lysosomal enzymes are ubiquitously expressed, a deficiency in a single enzyme can affect multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system (CNS). At least 75% of all LSDs have a significant CNS component. Approaches such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can effectively treat the systemic dis...

  13. Prostate-Specific Antigen Persistence After Radical Prostatectomy as a Predictive Factor of Clinical Relapse-Free Survival and Overall Survival: 10-Year Data of the ARO 96-02 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wiegel@uniklinik-ulm.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Ulm (Germany); Bartkowiak, Detlef; Bottke, Dirk; Thamm, Reinhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Ulm (Germany); Hinke, Axel [WiSP, Research Institute Pharma GmbH, Langenfeld (Germany); Stöckle, Michael [Department of Urology, University Hospital Homburg/Saar (Germany); Rübe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Homburg/Saar (Germany); Semjonow, Axel [Department of Urology, University Hospital Münster (Germany); Wirth, Manfred [Department of Urology, University Hospital Dresden (Germany); Störkel, Stephan; Golz, Reinhard [Department of Pathology, HELIOS Hospital Wuppertal (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Giessen-Marburg (Germany); Hofmann, Rainer [Department of Urology, University Hospital Giessen-Marburg (Germany); Feldmann, Horst-Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital Fulda (Germany); Kälble, Tilman [Department of Urology, General Hospital Fulda (Germany); Siegmann, Alessandra; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Berlin (Germany); Steiner, Ursula; Miller, Kurt [Department of Urology, University Hospital Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    Objective: The ARO 96-02 trial primarily compared wait-and-see (WS, arm A) with adjuvant radiation therapy (ART, arm B) in prostate cancer patients who achieved an undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Here, we report the outcome with up to 12 years of follow-up of patients who retained a post-RP detectable PSA and received salvage radiation therapy (SRT, arm C). Methods and Materials: For the study, 388 patients with pT3-4pN0 prostate cancer with positive or negative surgical margins were recruited. After RP, 307 men achieved an undetectable PSA (arms A + B). In 78 patients the PSA remained above thresholds (median 0.6, range 0.05-5.6 ng/mL). Of the latter, 74 consented to receive 66 Gy to the prostate bed, and SRT was applied at a median of 86 days after RP. Clinical relapse-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Patients with persisting PSA after RP had higher preoperative PSA values, higher tumor stages, higher Gleason scores, and more positive surgical margins than did patients in arms A + B. For the 74 patients, the 10-year clinical relapse-free survival rate was 63%. Forty-three men had hormone therapy; 12 experienced distant metastases; 23 patients died. Compared with men who did achieve an undetectable PSA, the arm-C patients fared significantly worse, with a 10-year metastasis-free survival of 67% versus 83% and overall survival of 68% versus 84%, respectively. In Cox regression analysis, Gleason score ≥8 (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8), pT ≥ 3c (HR 2.4), and extraprostatic extension ≥2 mm (HR 3.6) were unfavorable risk factors of progression. Conclusions: A persisting PSA after prostatectomy seems to be an important prognosticator of clinical progression for pT3 tumors. It correlates with a higher rate of distant metastases and with worse overall survival. A larger prospective study is required to determine which patient subgroups

  14. A prospective neurocognitive evaluation of children treated with additional chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation following isolated central nervous system relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Parvesh; Mulhern, Raymond K.; Regine, William F.; Rivera, Gaston K.; Kun, Larry E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective assessment of neurocognitive performance was conducted in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) following isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse to evaluate the impact of additional systemic/intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation (CSI) upon long-term intellectual function. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one children with ALL manifesting an isolated CNS relapse between 1984 through 1989 underwent serial evaluations of intellectual function. Neurocognitive function was measured by the full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) as determined by the age-appropriate Wechsler Intelligence Scale and by achievement in reading, math, and spelling as assessed by the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT). Intelligence testing was initiated following isolated CNS relapse after clearance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology but prior to CSI and continued at annual intervals for a minimum of 4 years postmeningeal failure. Protocol treatment for isolated CNS relapse consisted of reinduction and maintenance systemic therapy, intrathecal (IT) triple-agent chemotherapy, and early CSI (cranium to 24 Gy and spine to 15 Gy at 1.5 Gy/fraction) as outlined on the institutional 'Total XI' trial. Results: All 21 children attained secondary CNS remission and underwent the planned additional systemic/IT chemotherapy and CSI. Fourteen of the 21 children remain in secondary continuous remission, while the remaining 7 experienced a second relapse and were removed from further neurocognitive assessment. For the eight female and six male long-term survivors, mean ages at original diagnosis and at CSI were 5.7 years (range = 0.6-16.2) and 7.0 years (range = 1.8-17.0), respectively. At a median follow-up interval of 4.6 years (ranges 1.7-6.8) post-CNS relapse, comparison of group mean initial to final FSIQs revealed no statistically significant difference between the two measures (94.5 vs. 95.9, respectively, n = 11, p = 0.52). None of the

  15. Sleep disorders in children after treatment for a CNS tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Van Santen, Hanneke M; Schouten-Van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N

    2012-08-01

    The long-term survival of children with a central nervous system (CNS) tumour is improving. However, they experience late effects, including altered habits and patterns of sleep. We evaluated the presence and type of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness in these children, and its associations with clinical characteristics and daily performance (fatigue and psychosocial functioning). In a cross-sectional study at the outpatient clinic of the Emma Children's Hospital AMC (February-June 2010), sleep, fatigue and psychosocial functioning were analysed in 31 CNS tumour patients (mean age: 11.8years; 20 boys) and compared with 78 patients treated for a non-CNS malignancy (mean age: 9.7years; 41 boys) and norm data. Questionnaires applied were the Sleep Disorder Scale for Children, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Sleeping habits and endocrine deficiencies were assessed with a self-developed questionnaire. Increased somnolence was found in CNS tumour patients compared with those with a non-CNS malignancy (8.8±2.8 versus 7.5±2.7; Psleep. No specific risk factors were identified for a sleep disorder in CNS tumour patients, but their excessive somnolence was correlated with lower fatigue related quality of life (QoL) (r=-0.78, Psleep quality and diminish fatigue. © 2011 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. [Research and control of relapse tuberculosis cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Fumio; Toyota, Makoto

    2009-12-01

    With this symposium, we focused on the relapse of tuberculosis in Japan. Out of 19,893 tuberculosis patients registered in 2007 in Japan, 7.48% were classified as relapse cases. Relapse cases have the risk of acquired drug resistance. But we have few analyses of the proportion of relapse tuberculosis cases with standard short course regimens for six months, factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse and the proportion of drug resistance among relapse TB cases in Japan. Therefore we analyzed the relapse tuberculosis cases in two rural areas and three urban areas. We also analyzed the proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases with the data of drug susceptibility survey of Ryoken. 1. Research of relapse tuberculosis cases: Makoto TOYOTA (Kochi City Public Health Center). To clarify the relapse rate and factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse, we investigated the relapse tuberculosis cases in the municipality where the proportion of elderly tuberculosis patients was high. Out of 902 tuberculosis patients registered in Kochi City Public Health Center during 10 years, 20 pulmonary tuberculosis patients were confirmed relapse cases with initial registered records. Pretreatment cavitations, sputum culture positivity at 2 months, medical miss-management (e.g. number of doses, duration of therapy) and poor adherence were considered to be factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse. Out of 20 relapse cases, 12 cases were detected with symptoms, while only 3 cases were detected by examination in law. 2. A clinical study on relapse cases of pulmonary tuberculosis: Shuichi TAKIKAWA (National Hospital Organization Nishibeppu National Hospital). The relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis was investigated. In the cases with a treatment history before short course chemotherapy, drug resistance rate was high, and thus it needs to be cautious of drug resistance at the time of the retreatment. In the cases with a treatment history of short course chemotherapy, relapse cases

  17. Second auto-SCT for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, W I; Gertz, M A; Lacy, M Q; Dispenzieri, A; Hayman, S R; Buadi, F K; Dingli, D; Hogan, W J; Kumar, S K

    2013-04-01

    High-dose therapy and auto-SCT remain integral in the initial treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), and are increasingly being applied for management of relapsed disease. We examined the outcomes in 98 patients undergoing salvage auto-SCT (auto-SCT2) for relapsed MM after receiving an initial transplant (auto-SCT1) between 1994 and 2009. The median age at auto-SCT2 was 60 years (range: 35-74). The median time between auto-SCT1 and auto-SCT2 was 46 months (range: 10-130). Treatment-related mortality was seen in 4%. The median PFS from auto-SCT2 was 10.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 7-14) months and the median OS from auto-SCT2 was 33 months (95% CI: 28-51). In a multivariable analysis, shorter time to progression (TTP) after auto-SCT1, not achieving a CR after auto-SCT2, higher number of treatment regimens before auto-SCT2 and a higher plasma cell labeling index at auto-SCT2 predicted for shorter PFS. However, only a shorter TTP after auto-SCT1 predicted for a shorter OS post auto-SCT2. Hence, auto-SCT2 is an effective and feasible therapeutic option for MM patients relapsing after other treatments, especially in patients who had a TTP of at least 12 months after their auto-SCT1.

  18. Altered energy production, lowered antioxidant potential, and inflammatory processes mediate CNS damage associated with abuse of the psychostimulants MDMA and methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Luke A.; Loftis, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage associated with psychostimulant dependence may be an ongoing, degenerative process with adverse effects on neuropsychiatric function. However, the molecular mechanisms regarding how altered energy regulation affects immune response in the context of substance use disorders are not fully understood. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effects of psychostimulant [particularly 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine] exposure on brain energy regulation, immune response, and neuropsychiatric function. Importantly, the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, depression, and anxiety) that persist following abstinence are associated with poorer treatment outcomes – increased relapse rates, lower treatment retention rates, and reduced daily functioning. Qualifying the molecular changes within the CNS according to the exposure and use patterns of specifically abused substances should inform the development of new therapeutic approaches for addiction treatment. PMID:24485894

  19. Early life adversity influences stress response association with smoking relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al'Absi, Mustafa; Lemieux, Andrine; Westra, Ruth; Allen, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    We examined the hypothesis that stress-related blunting of cortisol in smokers is particularly pronounced in those with a history of severe life adversity. The two aims of this study were first to examine hormonal, craving, and withdrawal symptoms during ad libitum smoking and after the first 24 h of abstinence in smokers who experienced high or low levels of adversity. Second, we sought to examine the relationship between adversity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hormones to predict relapse during the first month of a smoking cessation attempt. Hormonal and self-report measures were collected from 103 smokers (49 women) during ad libitum smoking and after the first 24 h of abstinence. HPA hormones were measured during baseline rest and in response to acute stress in both conditions. All smokers were interested in smoking cessation, and we prospectively used stress response measures to predict relapse during the first 4 weeks of the smoking cessation attempt. The results showed that high adversity was associated with higher distress and smoking withdrawal symptoms. High level of early life adversity was associated with elevated HPA activity, which was found in both salivary and plasma cortisol. Enhanced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stress response was evident in high-adversity but not in low-adversity relapsers. This study demonstrated that early life adversity is associated with stress-related HPA responses. The study also demonstrated that, among smokers who experienced a high level of life adversity, heightened ACTH and cortisol responses were linked with increased risk for smoking relapse.

  20. Clinical factors related to schizophrenia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Stefano; Bianchini, Oriana; De Girolamo, Giovanni; Aguglia, Eugenio; Crea, Luciana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Relapses represent one of the main problems of schizophrenia management. This article reviews the clinical factors associated with schizophrenia relapse. A research of the last 22 years of literature data was performed. Two-hundred nineteen studies have been included. Three main groups of factors are related to relapse: factors associated with pharmacological treatment, add-on psychotherapeutic treatments and general risk factors. Overall, the absence of a maintenance therapy and treatment with first generation antipsychotics has been associated with higher risk of relapse. Further, psychotherapy add-on, particularly with cognitive behaviour therapy and psycho-education for both patients and relatives, has shown a good efficacy for reducing the relapse rate. Among general risk factors, some could be modified, such as the duration of untreated psychosis or the substance misuse, while others could not be modified as male gender or low pre-morbid level of functioning. Several classes of risk factors have been proved to be relevant in the risk of relapse. Thus, a careful assessment of the risk factors here identified should be performed in daily clinical practice in order to individualise the relapse risk for each patient and to provide a targeted treatment in high-risk subjects.

  1. Factors of risk for relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis in-patient of the Hospital Santa Clara from Bogota 1992/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo Martinez, Patricia; Awad Garcia, Carlos; Pavia Albor, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis relapse is defined as these patients that make recurrence of tuberculosis after complete an adequate treatment, and these patients are again diagnosed bacteriologically with tuberculosis. We tried to identify the risk factors for relapse among adults, through an analytical study of cases and controls, with eighty patients among the tuberculosis programmed of Santa Clara Hospital between 1992-2000 with relapse diagnosis which meet criterion of case and eighty patients which meet criterion of control. We did a bivariate analysis with confidence intervals and univariate calculation with logistic regression analysis to predict the development of relapse for the different variables. Diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, silicosis are associated with relapse, but in our study we found another factors which are joined to relapse and we suggest that if we find these factors among tuberculosis patients would indicate the chance of relapse and this would create the necessity of use a larger number of doses of antituberculosis medicaments

  2. Metaplastic carcinoma. Breast. Relapse. Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, A.; Terrasa, J.; Garcia, J.M.; Rifa, J.

    1996-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. The appearance of unexpected mesenchymal elements within the epithelial tumors is the squamous metaplasia. These tumors have a different clinical behaviour that classical breast carcinoma. We present a case of metaplastic mammary carcinoma with multiple relapses treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The use of chemotherapy after local treatment has enhanced the relapse-free survival. The combined treatment modality seems to produce some benefit in the management of the local relapses of this neoplasms

  3. Predicting the 5-Year Risk of Biochemical Relapse After Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy in ≥PT2, pN0 Patients With a Comprehensive Tumor Control Probability Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Broggi, Sara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Fossati, Nicola [Division of Oncology/Unit of Urology, URI, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Goldner, Gregor [Klinik für Radioonkologie, Medizinische Universität Wien, Wien (Austria); Wiegel, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Hinkelbein, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitats Medizin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Boorjian, Stephen A. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Joniau, Steven [Department of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Palorini, Federica [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh [Department of Urology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Montorsi, Francesco [Division of Oncology/Unit of Urology, URI, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Van Poppel, Hein [Department of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Briganti, Alberto [Division of Oncology/Unit of Urology, URI, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To fit the individual biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) data from patients treated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy (RT) with a comprehensive tumor control probability (TCP) model. Methods and Materials: Considering pre-RT prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a surrogate of the number of clonogens, bRFS may be expressed as a function of dose-per-fraction–dependent radiosensitivity (α{sub eff}), the number of clonogens for pre-RT PSA = 1 ng/mL (C), and the fraction of patients who relapse because of clonogens outside the treated volume (K), assumed to depend (linearly or exponentially) on pre-RT PSA and Gleason score (GS). Data from 894 node-negative, ≥pT2, pN0 hormone-naive patients treated with adjuvant (n=331) or salvage (n=563) intent were available: 5-year bRFS data were fitted grouping patients according to GS (<7:392, =7:383, >7:119). Results: The median follow-up time, pre-RT PSA, and dose were 72 months, 0.25 ng/mL, and 66.6 Gy (range 59.4-77.4 Gy), respectively. The best-fit values were 0.23 to 0.26 Gy{sup −1} and 10{sup 7} for α{sub eff} and C for the model considering a linear dependence between K and PSA. Calibration plots showed good agreement between expected and observed incidences (slope: 0.90-0.93) and moderately high discriminative power (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.68-0.69). Cross-validation showed satisfactory results (average AUCs in the training/validation groups: 0.66-0.70). The resulting dose-effect curves strongly depend on pre-RT PSA and GS. bRFS rapidly decreases with PSA: the maximum obtainable bRFS (defined as 95% of the maximum) declined by about 2.7% and 4.5% for each increment of 0.1 ng/mL for GS <7 and ≥7, respectively. Conclusions: Individual data were fitted by a TCP model, and the resulting best-fit parameters were radiobiologically consistent. The model suggests that relapses frequently result from clonogens outside the irradiated volume, supporting the choice of lymph

  4. Genotype and Phenotype Predictors of Relapse of Graves’ Disease after Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, I-Ya; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Hsi, Edward; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Hsieh, Ching-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background For patients with Graves’ disease (GD), the primary goal of antithyroid drug therapy is to temporarily restore the patient to the euthyroid state and wait for a subsequent remission of the disease. This study sought to identify the predictive markers for the relapse of disease. Methods To do this, we studied 262 GD patients with long enough follow-up after drug withdrawal to determine treatment outcome. The patients were divided into three groups by time of relapse: early relapse group (n = 91) had an early relapse within 9 months, late relapse group (n = 65) had a relapse between 10 and 36 months, and long-term remission group (n = 106) were either still in remission after at least 3 years or relapsed after 3 years of drug withdrawal. We assessed the treatment outcome of 23 SNPs of costimulatory genes, phenotype and smoking habits. We used permutation to obtain p values for each SNP as an adjustment for multiple testing. Cox proportional hazards models was performed to assess the strength of association between the treatment outcome and clinical and laboratory variables. Results Four SNPs were significantly associated with disease relapse: rs231775 (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.18–3.26) at CTLA-4 and rs745307 (OR 7.97, 95% CI 1.01–62.7), rs11569309 (OR 8.09, 95% CI 1.03–63.7), and rs3765457 (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.08–6.28) at CD40. Combining risk alleles at CTLA-4 and CD40 improved the predictability of relapse. Using 3 years as the cutoff point for multivariate analysis, we found several independent predictors of disease relapse: number of risk alleles (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.09–1.56), a large goiter size at the end of the treatment (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05–1.61), persistent TSH-binding inhibitory Ig (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.15–2.35), and smoking habit (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.05–2.42). Conclusion Genetic polymorphism of costimulatory genes, smoking status, persistent goiter, and TSH-binding inhibitory Ig predict disease relapse. PMID:24783027

  5. Actuarial risk of isolated CNS involvement in Ewing's sarcoma following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigg, M.E.; Makuch, R.; Glaubiger, D.

    1985-01-01

    Records of 154 patients with Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute were reviewed to assess the incidence and risk of developing isolated central nervous system (CNS) Ewing's sarcoma. Sixty-two of the 154 patients had received CNS irradiation and intrathecal (i.t.) methotrexate as part of their initial therapy to prevent the occurrence of isolated CNS Ewing's sarcoma. The risk of developing isolate CNS Ewing's sarcoma was greatest within the first two years after diagnosis and was approximately 10%. The overall risk of CNS recurrence in the group of patients receiving DNS treatment was similar to the group receiving no therapy directed to the CNS. The occurrence of isolated CNS involvement was not prevented by the use of CNS irradiation and i.t. methotrexate. Because of a lack of efficacy to the CNS irradiation regimen, current treatment regimens do not include therapy directed to CNS

  6. The Impact of Stressful Life Events on Alcohol Relapse: Findings from the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Christina Delos; Pagano, Maria Elizabeth; Ronis, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Alcohol relapse is impacted by a variety of environmental, interpersonal, and intrapersonal factors. We examined the interaction between stressful life events, personality disorder subtype, and alcohol relapse among individuals enrolled in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (CLPS). Negative life events predicted relapse in all subjects. In individuals with a history of an alcohol use disorder prior to study entry, positive life events also predicted alcohol relapse. Individuals with Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) were found to be twice as likely to relapse in response to life stressors compared to individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), who were half as likely to relapse in response to life stressors. Further analysis revealed that individuals with OCPD and no history of an alcohol use disorder were almost 10 times more likely to relapse in the face of a stressful romantic problem, while those with ASPD and a history of an alcohol use disorder were six times more likely to relapse in response to a stressful financial event. These findings have implications for both the assessment and the treatment of individuals who present with co-morbid personality and alcohol use disorders.

  7. Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis in X-Linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease with Central Nervous System Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Koutsis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS and X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX, carrying a GJB1 mutation affecting connexin-32 (c.191G>A, p. Cys64Tyr which was recently reported by our group. This is the third case report of a patient with CMTX developing MS, but it is unique in the fact that other family members carrying the same mutation were found to have asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS involvement (diffuse white matter hyperintensity on brain MRI and extensor plantars. Although this may be a chance association, the increasing number of cases with CMTX and MS, especially with mutations involving the CNS, may imply some causative effect and provide insights into MS pathogenesis.

  8. Relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis in x-linked charcot-marie-tooth disease with central nervous system involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Floroskoufi, Paraskewi; Raftopoulou, Maria; Panas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), carrying a GJB1 mutation affecting connexin-32 (c.191G>A, p. Cys64Tyr) which was recently reported by our group. This is the third case report of a patient with CMTX developing MS, but it is unique in the fact that other family members carrying the same mutation were found to have asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS) involvement (diffuse white matter hyperintensity on brain MRI and extensor plantars). Although this may be a chance association, the increasing number of cases with CMTX and MS, especially with mutations involving the CNS, may imply some causative effect and provide insights into MS pathogenesis.

  9. CA-125 AUC as a predictor for epithelial ovarian cancer relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, António; Falcão, Amílcar; Godinho, Isabel; Santos, Jorge; Leitão, Fátima; de Oliveira, Carlos; Caramona, Margarida

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the usefulness of CA-125 normalized in time area under the curve (CA-125 AUC) to signalise epithelial ovarian cancer relapse. Data from a hundred and eleven patients were submitted to two different approaches based on CA-125 AUC increase values to predict patient relapse. In Criterion A total CA-125 AUC normalized in time value (AUC(i)) was compared with the immediately previous one (AUC(i-1)) using the formulae AUC(i) > or = F * AUC(i-1) (several F values were tested) to find the appropriate close related increment associated to patient relapse. In Criterion B total CA-125 AUC normalised in time was calculated and several cut-off values were correlated with patient relapse prediction capacity. In Criterion A the best accuracy was achieved with a factor (F) of 1.25 (increment of 25% from the previous status), while in Criterion B the best accuracies were achieved with cut-offs of 25, 50, 75 and 100 IU/mL. The mean lead time to relapse achieved with Criterion A was 181 days, while with Criterion B they were, respectively, 131, 111, 63 and 11 days. Based on our results we believe that conjugation and sequential application of both criteria in patient relapse detection should be highly advisable. CA-125 AUC rapid burst in asymptomatic patients should be firstly evaluated using Criterion A with a high accuracy (0.85) and with a substantial mean lead time to relapse (181 days). If a negative answer was obtained then Criterion B should performed to confirm the absence of relapse.

  10. Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis, which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in the appearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported. The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role in the innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells of three CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcus simulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control. Results All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosis more effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages. Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were more common in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed in both assays. Conclusion This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococci by macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level. PMID:24207012

  11. Pharmacological interventions for alcohol relapse prevention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    Health NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK ... ABSTRACT: Alcohol dependence is a chronic, debilitating disorder that is an important .... hours, or as long as alcohol remains in the blood. ... term and slightly improving days to relapse.

  12. Factors associated with relapse in schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    increases the economic burden on health care systems because of its associated morbidity .... Depression in schizophrenia has been associated with higher rates of relapse ... The researchers approached the psychiatric nursing staff of mental.

  13. Relapsing polychondritis and airway involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Armin; Rafeq, Samaan; Boiselle, Phillip; Sung, Arthur; Reddy, Chakravarthy; Michaud, Gaetane; Majid, Adnan; Herth, Felix J F; Trentham, David

    2009-04-01

    To assess the prevalence and characteristics of airway involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP). Retrospective chart review and data analysis of RP patients seen in the Rheumatology Clinic and the Complex Airway Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from January 2004 through February 2008. RP was diagnosed in 145 patients. Thirty-one patients had airway involvement, a prevalence of 21%. Twenty-two patients were women (70%), and they were between 11 and 61 years of age (median age, 42 years) at the time of first symptoms. Airway symptoms were the first manifestation of disease in 17 patients (54%). Dyspnea was the most common symptom in 20 patients (64%), followed by cough, stridor, and hoarseness. Airway problems included the following: subglottic stenosis (n = 8; 26%); focal and diffuse malacia (n = 15; 48%); and focal stenosis in different areas of the bronchial tree in the rest of the patients. Twelve patients (40%) required and underwent intervention including balloon dilatation, stent placement, tracheotomy, or a combination of the above with good success. The majority of patients experienced improvement in airway symptoms after intervention. One patient died during the follow-up period from the progression of airway disease. The rest of the patients continue to undergo periodic evaluation and intervention. In this largest cohort described in the English language literature, we found symptomatic airway involvement in RP to be common and at times severe. The nature of airway problems is diverse, with tracheomalacia being the most common. Airway intervention is frequently required and in experienced hands results in symptom improvement.

  14. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  15. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis in X-Linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease with Central Nervous System Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Floroskoufi, Paraskewi; Raftopoulou, Maria; Panas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), carrying a GJB1 mutation affecting connexin-32 (c.191G>A, p. Cys64Tyr) which was recently reported by our group. This is the third case report of a patient with CMTX developing MS, but it is unique in the fact that other family members carrying the same mutation were found to have asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS) involvement (diffuse white matter hyperintensity on bra...

  17. Risk factors for alcohol relapse following orthotopic liver transplantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James K; Stern, Theodore A; Prabhakar, Maithri; Musselman, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Each year, 5000-6000 individuals undergo orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in the United States, and of these, nearly 18% have alcoholic liver disease. Relapse to alcohol occurs in more than 40% of patients with OLT for alcoholic liver disease. We sought to identify factors that predict relapse to alcohol or medication nonadherence following OLT in patients with alcoholic liver disease and to review what randomized clinical interventions have addressed these factors following OLT. Our hypothesis was that there would be factors before and after OLT that predict relapse to alcohol following OLT, and that these, if targeted, might improve sobriety and associated outcomes of adherence with medications and appointments. We performed a review (focusing on articles published since 2004) with PubMed and MEDLINE searches using the following search terms: liver transplantation, recidivism, alcohol relapse, and predictors of alcohol relapse. We supplemented the online searches with manual reviews of article reference lists and selected relevant articles for further review by author consensus. In largely white populations, prospective studies document that shorter length of pretransplantation sobriety is a significant predictor of time to first drink and time to binge use. Presence of psychiatric comorbidity, high score on standardized High-risk Alcoholism Relapse Scale, and diagnosis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) alcohol dependence are predictive of posttransplantation alcohol relapse. Pretransplantation alcohol use history variables (e.g., family history of alcoholism) reliably discriminate between complete abstainers and those who drink, while medical and psychosocial characteristics at early post-liver transplantation period (e.g., more bodily pain) maximally discriminate patterns of alcohol use. Alcoholic individuals with early-onset, rapidly accelerating moderate use and early-onset, continuously increasing heavy use have

  18. Imaging of systemic lupus erythematosus. Part I: CNS, cardiovascular, and thoracic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, Y.P.; Naidoo, P.; Ngian, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease that has a relapsing and remitting course. It has a wide range of non-specific symptoms with various organ manifestations. In 1982, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published the revised criteria for the classification of SLE. The diagnosis of SLE may be made if four or more of the 11 ACR criteria are present, either serially or simultaneously, during any interval of observation. Whilst the diagnosis of SLE is based on clinical and laboratory features, with no universally accepted radiological diagnostic criteria, imaging is nonetheless useful for diagnosing specific organ manifestations, monitoring disease progression, and identifying complications secondary to immunosuppressive therapy. In this review, we describe the spectrum of radiological findings of SLE in various organ systems and compile a list of organ manifestations including the most frequently occurring diseases as well as the rare but not-to-be-missed diseases. This review aims to serve as a concise reference tool in an endeavour to assist clinicians and radiologists in the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. This pictorial review presents the various radiological findings of CNS, cardiovascular and thoracic manifestation of SLE. The gastrointestinal, renal and musculoskeletal systems will be covered in part II.

  19. Changes in circulating peptide YY and ghrelin are associated with early smoking relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Andrine M; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) during ad libitum smoking have been associated with decreased reported craving (ghrelin) and increased positive affect (PYY), and higher baseline ghrelin levels predicted subsequent increased risk of smoking relapse. The current study assessed PYY and ghrelin during ad libitum smoking and again after the initial 48h of a smoking cessation attempt. The data compared smokers who abstained for 28days (n=37), smokers who relapsed (n=54), and nonsmokers (n=37). Plasma samples and subjective measures assessing craving and mood were collected at the beginning of each session. Results showed that relapsers experienced greater levels of distress (ps <0.01). While nonsmokers and abstainers showed no change in ghrelin across the initial 48h, relapsers declined (p <0.01). With PYY, relapsers increased (p <0.05) across the early abstinent phase. PYY and ghrelin may be useful predictors of relapse, specifically in reference to early withdrawal. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Dysfunctional Default Mode Network in Methadone Treated Patients Who Have a Higher Heroin Relapse Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Defeng; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Kai; Shi, Lin; Zhu, Jia; Li, Yongbin; Yan, Xuejiao; Chen, Jiajie; Ye, Jianjun; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify whether heroin relapse is associated with changes in the functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) during methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of chronic heroin relapsers (HR) (12 males, 1 female, age: 36.1 ± 6.9 years) and abstainers (HA) (11males, 2 female; age: 42.1 ± 8.1 years) were investigated with an independent component analysis to address the functional connectivity of their DMN. Group comparison was then performed between the relapsers and abstainers. Our study found that the left inferior temporal gyrus and the right superior occipital gyrus associated with DMN showed decreased functional connectivity in HR when compared with HA, while the left precuneus and the right middle cingulum had increased functional connectivity. Mean intensity signal, extracted from left inferior temporal gyrus of HR patients, showed a significant negative correlation corresponding to the degree of heroin relapse. These findings suggest that altered functional connectivity of DMN may contribute to the potential neurobiological mechanism(s) of heroin relapse and have a predictive value concerning heroin relapse under MMT.

  1. Prognosis of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis after corticosteroid therapy-induced remission in terms of relapse and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Miyazawa

    Full Text Available Relapse and diabetes mellitus (DM are major problems for the prognosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP. We examined the prognosis of type 1 AIP after corticosteroid therapy (CST-induced remission in terms of relapse and DM.The study enrolled 82 patients diagnosed with type 1 AIP who achieved remission with CST. We retrospectively evaluated the relapse rate in terms of the administration period of CST, clinical factors associated with relapse, and the temporal change in glucose tolerance.During follow-up, 32 patients (39.0% experienced relapse. There was no significant clinical factor that could predict relapse before beginning CST. AIP patients who ceased CST within 2 or 3 years experienced significantly earlier relapse than those who had the continuance of CST (p = 0.050 or p = 0.020. Of the 37 DM patients, 15 patients (40.5% had pre-existing DM, 17 (45.9% showed new-onset DM, and 5 (13.5% developed CST-induced DM. Patients with new-onset DM were significantly more likely to show improvement (p = 0.008 than those with pre-existing DM.It was difficult to predict relapse of AIP based on clinical parameters before beginning CST. Relapse was likely to occur within 3 years after the beginning of CST and maintenance of CST for at least 3 years reduced the risk of relapse. The early initiation of CST for AIP with impaired glucose tolerance is desirable because pre-existing DM is refractory to CST.

  2. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C; Pajtler, Kristian W; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, André O; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S; Taylor, Michael D; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Ellison, David W; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-02-25

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration (CNS HGNET-MN1)," and "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR)," will enable meaningful clinical trials and the development of therapeutic strategies for patients affected by poorly differentiated CNS tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Are there clinically useful predictors and early warning signs for pending relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Riesbeck, Mathias

    2014-02-01

    Despite the availability of effective long-term treatment strategies in schizophrenia, relapse is still common. Relapse prevention is one of the major treatment objectives, because relapse represents burden and costs for patients, their environment, and society and seems to increase illness progression at the biological level. Valid predictors for relapse are urgently needed to enable more individualized recommendations and treatment decisions to be made. Mainly recent evidence regarding predictors and early warning signs of relapse in schizophrenia was reviewed. In addition, data from the first-episode (long-term) study (FES; Gaebel et al., 2007, 2011) performed within the German Research Network on Schizophrenia were analyzed. On the basis of FES data, premorbid adjustment, residual symptoms and some side effects are significant predictors. Although a broad spectrum of potential parameters has been investigated in several other studies, only a few and rather general valid predictors were identified consistently. Data of the FES also indicated that predictive power could be enhanced by considering interacting conjunctions, as suggested by the Vulnerability-Stress-Coping model. Prospective studies, however, are rare. In addition, prodromal symptoms as course-related characteristics likewise investigated in the FES add substantially to early recognition of relapse and may serve as early warning signs, but prognosis nevertheless remains a challenge. Comprehensive and well-designed studies are needed to identify and confirm valid predictors for relapse in schizophrenia. In this respect, broadly accepted and specifically defined criteria for relapse would greatly facilitate comparison of results across studies. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognostic value of comorbidity for auto-SCT eligibility and outcome in relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattel, W J; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; de Bock, G H; van Imhoff, G W

    2011-06-01

    Salvage reinduction therapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and auto-SCT is the treatment of choice for fit patients with refractory or relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We assessed the prognostic value of comorbidity at the time of relapse to predict receipt of auto-SCT and outcome. We analyzed 156 consecutive NHL patients, referred to our center between 1999 and 2007 for salvage reinduction therapy, followed by HDCT and auto-SCT. Comorbidity according to the hematopoietic SCT comorbidity index was scored at relapse and directly before HDCT and auto-SCT. Primary end points were actual receipt of auto-SCT and survival. At relapse, comorbidity scores of 0, 1-2 and ≥3 were found among 64 (41%), 62 (40%) and 30 (19%) patients, respectively. Ultimately, 95 patients received auto-SCT. Higher comorbidity scores at relapse were associated with significantly less chance of receiving auto-SCT and with inferior OS, independently from secondary age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (sAAIPI) scores. For transplanted patients, OS rates at 5 years were 62, 30 and 17% for relapse comorbidity scores of 0, 1-2 and ≥3, respectively. In patients with relapsed NHL, comorbidity at relapse is associated with receipt of auto-SCT and subsequent survival independently from the sAAIPI.

  5. Phantom limb pain: a case of maladaptive CNS plasticity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Herta; Nikolajsen, Lone; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    might be a phenomenon of the CNS that is related to plastic changes at several levels of the neuraxis and especially the cortex. Here, we discuss the evidence for putative pathophysiological mechanisms with an emphasis on central, and in particular cortical, changes. We cite both animal and human...

  6. Neurolymphomatosis: An International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Grisariu (Sigal); B. Avni (Batia); T.T. Batchelor (Tracy); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); F. Bokstein (Felix); D. Schiff (David); O. Kuittinen (Outi); M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); P. Roth (Patrick); A. Nemets (Anatoly); E. Shalom (Edna); D. Ben-Yehuda (Dina); T. Siegal (Tali)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNeurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare clinical entity. The International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group retrospectively analyzed 50 patients assembled from 12 centers in 5 countries over a 16-year period. NL was related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 90% and to acute leukemia in 10%.

  7. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  8. Metallothionein Expression and Roles During Neuropathology in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    , their receptors and neurotrophins (TGFb, TGFb-Receptor, bFGF, bFGF-Receptor, VEGF, NT-3, NT-4/5, NGF); angiogenesis; and growth cone formation. Hence, MT-I+II enhance CNS tissue repair as seen clearly after the cryogenic injury, after which MT-I+II promote substitution of the necrotic lesion cavity with a glial...

  9. Glypicans and FGFs in CNS Development and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Antonella

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important events during central nervous system (CNS) development is the communication between cells. Cell-to-cell signaling implicates the interaction between a signaling molecules (or ligands) and their receptors. Ligand-receptor interaction is a tightly regulated process and is

  10. Sleep disorders in children after treatment for a CNS tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term survival of children with a central nervous system (CNS) tumour is improving. However, they experience late effects, including altered habits and patterns of sleep. We evaluated the presence and type of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness in these children, and its associations with

  11. Daily corticosteroids reduce infection-associated relapses in frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Ashima; Sinha, Aditi; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Math, Aparna; Hari, Pankaj; Bagga, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Relapses of nephrotic syndrome often follow minor infections, commonly of the upper respiratory tract. Daily administration of maintenance prednisolone during intercurrent infections was examined to determine whether the treatment reduces relapse rates in children with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome. In a randomized controlled trial (nonblind, parallel group, tertiary-care hospital), 100 patients with idiopathic, frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome eligible for therapy with prolonged low-dose, alternate-day prednisolone with or without levamisole were randomized to either receive their usual dose of alternate-day prednisolone daily for 7 days during intercurrent infections (intervention group) or continue alternate-day prednisolone (controls). Primary outcome was assessed by comparing the rates of infection-associated relapses at 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were the frequency of infections and the cumulative amount of prednisolone received in both groups. Patients in the intervention group showed significantly lower infection-associated (rate difference, 0.7 episodes/patient per year; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.3, 1.1) and lower total relapse rates (0.9 episodes/patient per year, 95% CI 0.4, 1.4) without increase in steroid toxicity. Poisson regression, adjusted for occurrence of infections, showed that daily administration of prednisolone during infections independently resulted in 59% reduction in frequency of relapses (rate ratio, 0.41; 95% CI 0.3, 0.6). For every six patients receiving this intervention, one showed a reduction of relapse frequency to less than three per year. Daily administration of maintenance doses of prednisolone, during intercurrent infections, significantly reduces relapse rates and the proportion of children with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome.

  12. Applications of Genomic Sequencing in Pediatric CNS Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavle, Abhishek A; Lin, Frank Y; Parsons, D Williams

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in genome-scale sequencing methods have resulted in a significant increase in our understanding of the biology of human cancers. When applied to pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors, these remarkable technological breakthroughs have facilitated the molecular characterization of multiple tumor types, provided new insights into the genetic basis of these cancers, and prompted innovative strategies that are changing the management paradigm in pediatric neuro-oncology. Genomic tests have begun to affect medical decision making in a number of ways, from delineating histopathologically similar tumor types into distinct molecular subgroups that correlate with clinical characteristics, to guiding the addition of novel therapeutic agents for patients with high-risk or poor-prognosis tumors, or alternatively, reducing treatment intensity for those with a favorable prognosis. Genomic sequencing has also had a significant impact on translational research strategies in pediatric CNS tumors, resulting in wide-ranging applications that have the potential to direct the rational preclinical screening of novel therapeutic agents, shed light on tumor heterogeneity and evolution, and highlight differences (or similarities) between pediatric and adult CNS tumors. Finally, in addition to allowing the identification of somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, the analysis of patient-matched constitutional (germline) DNA has facilitated the detection of pathogenic germline alterations in cancer genes in patients with CNS tumors, with critical implications for genetic counseling and tumor surveillance strategies for children with familial predisposition syndromes. As our understanding of the molecular landscape of pediatric CNS tumors continues to advance, innovative applications of genomic sequencing hold significant promise for further improving the care of children with these cancers.

  13. PEG minocycline-liposomes ameliorate CNS autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS. Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circulating polyethylene glycol (PEG minocycline liposomes are effective in treating EAE.Performing in vitro time kinetic studies of PEG minocycline-liposomes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, we determined that PEG minocycline-liposome preparations stabilized with CaCl(2 are effective in diminishing MMP-9 activity. Intravenous injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes every five days were as effective in ameliorating clinical EAE as daily intraperitoneal injections of minocycline. Treatment of animals with PEG minocycline-liposomes significantly reduced the number of CNS-infiltrating leukocytes, and the overall expression of MMP-9 in the CNS. There was also a significant suppression of MMP-9 expression and proteolytic activity in splenocytes of treated animals, but not in CNS-infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, leukocytes gaining access to the brain and spinal cord require the same absolute amount of MMP-9 in all treatment groups, but minocycline decreases the absolute cell number.Our data indicate that less frequent injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes are an effective alternative pharmacotherapy to daily minocycline injections for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases. Also, inhibition of MMP-9 remains a promising treatment target in EAE and patients with MS.

  14. Relapses in Multiple Sclerosis: Definition, Pathophysiology, Features, Imitators, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan Sevim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS is defined as a neurologic deficit associated with an acute inflammatory demyelinating event that lasts at least 24 hours in the absence of fever and infection. Myelinoclasis and axonal transection occur in relapses. Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and many other features of the disease are directly related to the relapses. MS starts as the relapsing-remitting (RRMS form in 85% of patients. A large number of relapses in the first years, polysymptomatic relapses, and pyramidal system, brain stem, and spinal cord involvement are signs of a poor outcome. The average frequency of relapses is approximately one per year during the first years of RRMS. The frequency of relapses increases during systemic infections, psychological stress, and in the postpartum first 3 months. Seventy-five percent of relapses are monosymptomatic. Pseudo-relapses and paroxysmal symptoms are distinguished from relapses by their sudden onset, sudden termination, and shorter duration. Contrast enhancement is valuable in imaging, but undetectable in most relapses. The regression in the first few weeks of relapses is explained by reduction of the edema, and by remyelination in the following months. Relapses and their features are also among the main determinants of treatment. High-dose methylprednisolone and early treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone reduce post-relapse disability and shorten the duration of relapses. Plasmapheresis is a good option for patients who do not respond to steroid treatment. Identification of relapses by patients and physicians, distinguishing them from imitators, proper evaluation, treatment when necessary, and monitoring the results are of great importance for patients with MS. The educational levels of patients and physicians regarding these parameters should be increased. Well-designed studies that evaluate the long-term effect of relapse treatment on disability are needed.

  15. PARATHYROID CANCER OCCURRING IN RELAPSING SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kotova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a clinical case of parathyroid cancer in a patient with relapsing secondary hyperparathyroidism at 4 years after subtotal parathyroidectomy. Its unique character is related to the combination of relapsing secondary hyperparathyroidism, parathyromatosis, ectopic of an adenomatous hyperplastic parathyroid gland into the thyroid gland, and parathyroid cancer. Several most complicated aspects of parathyroid surgery are disclosed, such as the choice of strategy for surgical intervention in secondary hyperparathyroidism, complexity of morphological and cytological diagnostics of this disorder.

  16. Significance of definitions of relapse after discontinuation of oral antivirals in HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoridis, George V; Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Su, Tung-Hung; Siakavellas, Spyros; Liu, Chun-Jen; Kourikou, Anastasia; Yang, Hung-Chih; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2017-08-31

    Relapses are observed in most hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative chronic hepatitis B patients who discontinue treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs); however, the rates of relapse vary widely among studies, and whether all patients with relapse need retreatment is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of different definitions on the rates of posttreatment relapse and therefore on the probability of retreatment in patients who have discontinued effective long-term NA therapy. In total, 130 HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B patients without cirrhosis and before NA treatment were included. All had on-therapy virological remission for ≥24 months and close follow-up for ≥12 months after stopping NA treatment or until retreatment, which started on stringent predefined criteria. Relapses rates based on several predetermined definitions of virological and perhaps biochemical criteria were assessed. The median duration of therapy was 60 months and the median duration of on-therapy virological remission was 43 months. During a median off-NAs follow-up of 15 months, no patient experienced liver decompensation or died. Cumulative relapse rates were 2%-49%, 4%-73%, 11%-82%, and 16%-90% at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, whereas cumulative retreatment rates were 15%, 22%, and 40% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, after discontinuation of NA therapy. No patient characteristic was independently associated with the probability of relapse based on at least two definitions or of retreatment. In HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B patients who discontinue NA therapy, the definition of relapse has a great impact on off-NAs relapse rates and potentially on the probability of retreatment. Regardless of definition, off-NAs relapses cannot be easily predicted by patient characteristics. A substantial proportion of such patients may not require retreatment if stringent criteria are adopted. (Hepatology 2017). © 2017 by the American Association

  17. The shifting landscape of metastatic breast cancer to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Matthew R; Fukui, Olivia; Chew, Brandon; Bhatia, Sanjay; Karlovits, Steven

    2013-07-01

    The improved survival following the diagnosis of breast cancer has potentially altered the characteristics and course of patients presenting with CNS involvement. We therefore sought to define our current cohort of breast cancer patients with metastatic disease to the CNS in regard to modern biomarkers and clinical outcome. Review of clinical and radiographic records of women presenting to a tertiary medical center with the new diagnosis of CNS metastatic disease from breast cancer. This was a retrospective review from patients identities obtained from two prospective databases. There were 88 women analyzed who were treated over the period of January 2003 to February 2010, average age 56.9 years. At the time of initial presentation of CNS disease, 68 % of patients had multiple brain metastases, 17 % had a solitary metastasis, and 15 % had only leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The median survival for all patients from the time of diagnosis of breast disease was 50.0 months, and 9.7 months from diagnosis of CNS involvement. The only factor related to overall survival was estrogen receptor-positive pathology (57.6 v. 38.2 months, p = .02 log-rank); those related to survival post CNS diagnosis were presentation with LMD (p = .004, HR = 3.1, Cox regression) and triple-negative hormonal/HER2 status (p = .02, HR = 2.3, Cox regression). Patients with either had a median survival of 3.1 months (no patients in common). Of the 75 patients who initially presented with metastatic brain lesions, 20 (26 %) subsequently developed LMD in the course of their disease (median 10.4 months), following which survival was grim (1.8 months median). Symptoms of LMD were most commonly lower extremity weakness (14/33), followed by cranial nerve deficits (11/33). The recently described Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) tumor index stratified median survival at 2.5, 5.9, 13.1, and 21.7 months, respectively, for indices of 1-4 (p = .004, log-rank), which

  18. Relapse to cocaine seeking in an invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaning-Kwarteng, Akua O; Asif-Malik, Aman; Pei, Yue; Canales, Juan J

    2017-06-01

    Addiction is characterised by cycles of compulsive drug taking, periods of abstinence and episodes of relapse. The extinction/reinstatement paradigm has been extensively used in rodents to model human relapse and explore underlying mechanisms and therapeutics. However, relapse to drug seeking behaviour has not been previously demonstrated in invertebrates. Here, we used a cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in the flatworm, planarian, followed by extinction and reinstatement of drug seeking. Once baseline preference was established for one of two distinctly textured environments (i.e. compartments with a coarse or smooth surface), planarian received pairings of cocaine (5μM) in the non-preferred, and vehicle in the most preferred, environment, and were tested for conditioning thereafter. Cocaine produced robust CPP, measured as a significant increase in the time spent in the cocaine-paired compartment. Subsequently, planarian underwent extinction training, reverting back to their original preference within three sessions. Brief exposure to cocaine (5μM) or methamphetamine (5μM) reinstated cocaine-seeking behaviour. By contrast, the high affinity dopamine transporter inhibitor, (N-(n-butyl)-3α-[bis (4-fluorophenyl) methoxy]-tropane) (JHW007), which in rodents exhibits a neurochemical and behavioural profile distinct from cocaine, was ineffective. The present findings demonstrate for the first time reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in an invertebrate model and suggest that the long-term adaptations underlying drug conditioning and relapse are highly conserved through evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Relapsing/remitting type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Megen, Kayleigh M.; Spindler, Matthew P.; Keij, Fleur M.; Bosch, Ineke; Sprangers, Fleur; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune disease associated with irreversible loss of insulin secretory function that follows a chronic progressive course. However, it has been speculated that relapsing/remitting disease progression may occur in type 1 diabetes. Methods: We

  20. Recurrence and Relapse in Bipolar Mood Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gh Mousavi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy in acute phase of bipolar mood disorder, patients often experience relapses or recurrent episodes. Hospitalization of patients need a great deal of financial and humanistic resources which can be saved through understanding more about the rate of relapse and factors affecting this rate. Methods: In a descriptive analytical study, 380 patients with bipolar disorder who were hospitalized in psychiatric emergency ward of Noor hospital, Isfahan, Iran, were followed. Each patient was considered for; the frequency of relapse and recurrence, kind of pharmachotherapy, presence of psychotherapeutic treatments, frequency of visits by psychiatrist and the rank of present episode. Results: The overall prevalence of recurrence was 42.2%. Recurrence was lower in patients using lithium carbonate or sodium valproate or combined therapy (about 40%, compared to those using carbamazepine (80%. Recurrence was higher in patients treated with only pharmacotherapy (44.5% compared to those treated with both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (22.2%. Patients who were visited monthy by psychiatrist had lower rate of recurrence compared to those who had irregular visits. Conclusion: The higher rate of recurrence observed in carbamazepine therapy may be due to its adverse reactions and consequently poor compliance to this drug. Lower rates of recurrence with psychotherapy and regular visits may be related to the preventive effects of these procedures and especially to the effective management of stress. Keywords: Bipolar Mood Disorder, Recurrence, Relapse.

  1. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  2. Tendencies the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Jimenez Medina, Jose

    2004-01-01

    It is known that the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors is based on the use of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) and that chemotherapy (QMT) is used even more, as well as the other drugs. A bibliographic review was made to update the knowledge on the current trends and perspectives of RT applied to CNS tumors. The following were found among them: a) combinations of RT and CMT; b) radiosensitizers incorporated to the radiant treatment; c) angiogenesis inhibitors associated with RT; d) the scale-up or increase of the RT doses thanks to the development of new technologies, such as 3 D conformal radiotherapy, intensity- modulated radiotherapy, surgery and others. Another field of research is that of the changes in the rhythm or fractioning of the RT: hyperfractionated, accelerated, combinations of both, etc., which will allow mainly to increase the dosage scale-up

  3. CNS-targets in control of energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinridders, André; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2009-12-01

    The exceeding efforts in understanding the signals initiated by nutrients and hormones in the central nervous system (CNS) to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis have largely revolutionized our understanding of the neurocircuitry in control of peripheral metabolism. The ability of neurons to sense nutrients and hormones and to adopt a coordinated response to these signals is of crucial importance in controlling food intake, energy expenditure, glucose and lipid metabolism. Anatomical lesion experiments, pharmacological inhibition of signaling pathways, and, more recently, the analysis of conditional mouse mutants with modifications of hormone and nutrient signaling in defined neuronal populations have broadened our understanding of these complex neurocircuits. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of the CNS in sensing and transmitting nutritional and hormonal signals to control energy and glucose homeostasis and aims to define them as potential novel drug targets for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book is a compilation of selected papers from the 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS (EIWAC2015). The work focuses on novel techniques for aviation infrastructure in air traffic management (ATM) and communications, navigation, surveillance, and informatics (CNSI) domains. The contents make valuable contributions to academic researchers, engineers in the industry, and regulators of aviation authorities. As well, readers will encounter new ideas for realizing a more efficient and safer aviation system. .

  5. Morphological evaluation of fetus CNS and its related anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Katayama, Kazuaki; Mochizuki, Matsuto

    1989-01-01

    The fetus central nervous system was evaluated morphologically by ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT scan to analyze the prenatal diagnostic value for CNS anomalies. A total of 31 patients with 42 lesions had been diagnosed during the preceding 7 years. The patients included 24 with hydrocephalus, three with anencephaly, three with myeloschisis, three with holoprosencephaly, three with an encephalocele, two with a Dandy-Walker cyst, one with hydroencephalodysplasia, one with an intracranial neoplasm, one with sacrococcygeal teratoma, and one with sacral agenesis. Compared with US and MRI, CT proved to be more accurate in the detection of spine and cranium-bone morphology. This finding seems to be valuable in the diagnosis of spina bifida, cranium bifidum and some cases of hypertensive hydrocephalus, especially in the axial view. MRI was definitely superior in the anatomico-pathological diagnosis of cerebral dysgenesis, ventriculomegaly, intracranial tumors, and other brain parenchymal changes in view of multi-dimensional analysis. The most considerable disadvantage of MRI in the diagnosis of a fetus CNS anomaly is the poor information about spine and cranium morphology. A super-conducting MRI system is still insufficient to demonstrate the spinal cord of a fetus. US was routinely used, and the multidimensional slices were useful for screening the CNS abnormalies. Some of the fetus brain lesions, such as intracranial hematomas, had a specific echogenecity on US. However, US sometimes failed to demarcate the cerebral parenchymal or subdural morphological changes because its artifacts had hyperchoic shadows. While US, MRI, and CT were valuable diagnostic tools in the morphological evaluation of fetus CNS and its related anomalies, each modality has different diagnostic advantages and disadvantages. Improvement can be expected when these diagnostic imaging modalities are complementary, depending upon the nature of the anatomy. (J.P.N.)

  6. Primary CNS lymphoma in nonimmunocompromised patients magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J.; Fernandez, J.M.; Galarraga, M.I.; Pozo, A.; Montes, A.; Ablanedo, P.

    1995-01-01

    Prymary lymphoma of the CNS (PLCNS) is a relatively infrequent malignant tumor that has become increasingly common over the past decade. The radiological signs, although not pathognomonic, are quite specific and suggestive of the correct diagnosis, thus facilitating therapeutic management. We present six cases of PLCNS in nonimmunocopromised patients studied by MR in our hospital over the past two and a half years. We describe theradiological findings, correlating them with those mentioned in the literature. 14 refs

  7. Melanocortin signaling in the CNS directly regulates circulating cholesterol

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Tilve, Diego; Hofmann, Susanna M; Basford, Joshua; Nogueiras, Ruben; Pfluger, Paul T; Patterson, James T; Grant, Erin; Wilson-Perez, Hilary E; Granholm, Norman A; Arnold, Myrtha; Trevaskis, James L; Butler, Andrew A; Davidson, William S; Woods, Stephen C; Benoit, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol circulates in the blood in association with triglycerides and other lipids, and elevated blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol carries a risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, whereas high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in the blood is thought to be beneficial. Circulating cholesterol is the balance among dietary cholesterol absorption, hepatic synthesis and secretion, and the metabolism of lipoproteins by various tissues. We found that the CNS is also an impo...

  8. Computerized tomography data on CNS affection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, M.M.; Bliznyuk, O.I.; Todua, F.I.; Tumanova, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain was employed in 40 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinical cerebral pathology was obvious in 30 and absent in 10 patients. By CT cerebral symptoms were divided of 4 groups. Clinical symptom complexes of CNS defects and SLE were reflected on definite CT images correlated with focal damage to the brain. CT picture of enlarged subarachnoid space, ventricles and basal cisterns can be observed in SLE patients without neurological symptoms. This indicated likely subclinical cerebral affection

  9. EMMPRIN, an upstream regulator of MMPs, in CNS biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Deepak Kumar; Hahn, Jennifer Nancy; Yong, V Wee

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are engaged in pathologies associated with infections, tumors, autoimmune disorders and neurological dysfunctions. With the identification of an upstream regulator of MMPs, EMMPRIN (Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, CD147), it is relevant to address if EMMPRIN plays a role in the pathology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This would enable the possibility of a more upstream and effective therapeutic target. Indeed, conditions including gliomas, Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and other insults such as hypoxia/ischemia show elevated levels of EMMPRIN which correlate with MMP production. In contrast, given EMMPRIN's role in CNS homeostasis with respect to regulation of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and interactions with adhesion molecules including integrins, we need to consider that EMMPRIN may also serve important regulatory or protective functions. This review summarizes the current understanding of EMMPRIN's involvement in CNS homeostasis, its possible roles in escalating or reducing neural injury, and the mechanisms of EMMPRIN including and apart from MMP induction. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CNS Involvement in Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: CT and MR Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Woong

    2007-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder that is characterized by proliferation of benign histiocytes, and this commonly involves the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow and central nervous system (CNS). We report here on the CT and MR imaging findings in a case of CNS HLH that showed multiple ring enhancing masses mimicking abscess or another mass on the CT and MR imaging. emophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder that is characterized by nonmalignant diffuse infiltration of multiple organs, including the central nervous system (CNS), by lymphocytes and histiocytes (1). Many radiologic reports describing diffuse white matter infiltrations, parenchymal atrophy and calcification have been published, but the characteristics of these findings remain non-specific, especially in immunocompromised patients. We present here a case of HLH in a 3-year-old boy who presented with multiple ring enhancing lesions involving the brain. In conclusion, although the CT and MRI findings of HLH with ring enhancing parenchymal lesions are nonspecific and mimic abscess, and especially in the immunosuppressed patients, increased diffusion at the center on DWI may be a finding of HLH to differentiate it from abscess, which has restricted diffusion at the center. However, the pathologic correlation with DWI according to the lesion stage certainly needs further study with a larger number of patients

  12. Adverse CNS-effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiter, C H; Deckert, J

    1996-11-01

    In 1962 propranolol, the first beta adrenoceptor antagonist (beta blocker), was brought on to the market. There is now a host of different beta blockers available, and these compounds are among the most commonly prescribed groups of drugs. The efficacy of beta blockers has been proven predominantly for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Beta blockers are also used for certain types of CNS disorders, such as anxiety disorders, essential tremor and migraine. While low toxicity means that they have a favorable risk-benefit ratio, given the high intensity of use, it is essential to have a comprehensive knowledge of adverse events. Adverse events of beta blockers that can be related to the CNS are quite often neglected, even in textbooks of clinical pharmacology or review articles, and thus often misdiagnosed. The following article, therefore, after summarizing the use of beta blockers for CNS indications, critically reviews the literature on centrally mediated adverse events. General pharmacological features of beta blockers and their molecular basis of action will briefly be addressed to the extent that they are or may become relevant for central nervous pharmacotherapy and side-effects.

  13. Disability, body image and sports/physical activity in adult survivors of childhood CNS tumors: population-based outcomes from a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boman, Krister K.; Hörnquist, Lina; de Graaff, Lisanne; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Childhood CNS tumor survivors risk health and functional impairments that threaten normal psychological development and self-perception. This study investigated the extent to which health and functional ability predict adult survivors' body image (BI) and self-confidence regarding sports and

  14. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Byoung Dae

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS: Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Hur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Crossed two relapse prevention conditions (skills training-vs-discussion control) with two levels of aversive smoking in volunteer subjects (N=123). Results indicated that relapse-prevention skill training did prevent relapse among cigarette smokers. Lighter smokers were more favorably influenced. (LLL)

  17. Dynamics of myeloid cell populations during relapse-preventive immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydström, Anna; Hallner, Alexander; Aurelius, Johan; Sander, Frida Ewald; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Thoren, Fredrik Bergh; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Martner, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Relapse of leukemia in the postchemotherapy phase contributes to the poor prognosis and survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996), 84 patients with AML in first complete remission who had not undergone transplantation received immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose IL-2 with the aim of preventing relapse. The dynamics of myeloid cell counts and expression of activation markers was assessed before and after cycles of immunotherapy and correlated with clinical outcome in terms of relapse risk and survival. During cycles, a pronounced increase in blood eosinophil counts was observed along with a reduction in monocyte and neutrophil counts. A strong reduction of blood monocyte counts during the first HDC/IL-2 treatment cycle predicted leukemia-free survival. The HDC component of the immunotherapy exerts agonist activity at histamine type 2 receptors (H2Rs) that are expressed by myeloid cells. It was observed that the density of H 2 R expression in blood monocytes increased during cycles of immunotherapy and that high monocyte H 2 R expression implied reduced relapse risk and improved overall survival. Several other activation markers, including HLA-DR, CD86, and CD40, were induced in monocytes and dendritic cells during immunotherapy but did not predict clinical outcome. In addition, expression of HLA-ABC increased in all myeloid populations during therapy. A low expression of HLA-ABC was associated with reduced relapse risk. These results suggest that aspects of myeloid cell biology may impact clinical benefit of relapse-preventive immunotherapy in AML. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Received View of Addiction, Relapse and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndasauka, Yamikani; Wei, Zhengde; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    It is important to highlight that attempts at understanding and explaining addiction have been made for centuries. It is, however, just five decades ago, with the growth of science and technology that more interest has been observed in this field. This chapter examines different views and theories that have been posited to understand and explain addiction. More attention will be given to prominent views that seem to draw consensus among researchers and medical practitioners. The first section of the chapter introduces the addiction debate, the different theories that have been provided to explain it from different perspectives and disciplines such as neurosciences, philosophy and psychology. Then, the chapter discusses different views on the role of relapse and what it entails in understanding addiction. The second section discusses different proposed and used forms of treating addiction. Thus, the chapter discusses the received view of addiction, the understanding of relapse as a critical element in addiction and treatments.

  19. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...

  20. Economic costs associated with an MS relapse

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, K.

    2014-09-01

    This was an prospective audit composed of medical chart review and patient questionnaire. Relapses were stratified into 3 groups: low, moderate and high intensity. Age, gender, MS subtype, disease duration, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score, disease modifying therapy (DMT) use and employment status were recorded. Direct costs included GP visits, investigations, clinic visit, consultations with medical staff, medication and admission costs. Indirect costs assessed loss of earnings, partner\\'s loss of earnings, childcare, meals and travel costs.

  1. Clinical trial: factors associated with freedom from relapse of heartburn in patients with healed reflux oesophagitis--results from the maintenance phase of the EXPO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenz, J; Armstrong, D; Zetterstrand, S; Eklund, S; Leodolter, A

    2009-06-01

    Ability to predict freedom from heartburn relapse during maintenance therapy for healed reflux oesophagitis may facilitate optimal treatment choices for individual patients. To determine factors predicting freedom from heartburn relapse during maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy in patients with healed reflux oesophagitis. This post-hoc analysis used data from the maintenance phase of the EXPO study (AstraZeneca study code: SH-NEG-0008); 2766 patients with healed reflux oesophagitis and resolved heartburn received once-daily esomeprazole 20 mg or pantoprazole 20 mg for 6 months. Multiple logistic regression analysis determined factors associated with freedom from heartburn relapse. Heartburn relapse rates were lower with esomeprazole than pantoprazole in all subgroups analysed. Esomeprazole treatment was the factor most strongly associated with freedom from heartburn relapse (odds ratio 2.08; P heartburn relapse were Helicobacter pylori infection, greater age, non-obesity, absence of epigastric pain at baseline, pre-treatment nonsevere heartburn and GERD symptom duration heartburn relapse during maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy for healed reflux oesophagitis, the strongest being choice of proton pump inhibitor. These findings outline the importance of optimizing acid control and identifying predictors of relapse for effective long-term symptom management in reflux oesophagitis patients.

  2. TBI parameters and relapse of acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Tadashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Mori, Tomoyuki.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study, which involved 240 acute leukemia patients (ALL: 115, ANL: 125) who received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with preconditioning by total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy, was to examine retrospectively the TBI factors that may have influenced a leukemic relapse. The patients were divided into two groups: 124 patients who had received their BMT within a diagnosis-transplantation period of 9 months or less (DTP9 group), and 116 patients who had received their BMT within a diagnosis-transplantation period of 10 months or more (DTP10 group). It was concluded that: (1) the higher the TBI dose, the fewer the relapse rates in DTP9 group; (2) the longer the TBI period, the greater the increase in the relapse rate in DTP10 group. It was thus speculated that an effective TBI regimen for acute leukemia patients may vary depending on the length of time that has elapsed from the diagnosis of leukemia to the BMT. (author)

  3. Predicting effects and risk of relapse into depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gbyl, Krzysztof; Rosenberg, Raben; Larsson, Henrik Bo Wiberg

    Formål: Vi ønsker at undersøge hjernen hos patienter med svær depression før og efter elektrokonvulsiv terapi (ECT), samt ved en kontrol efter 6 måneder med det formål at: 1. undersøge hjernevævet så en evt. skadelig effekt af ECT-behandling kan udelukkes 2. belyse mekanismerne bag ECT for at finde...... prædiktorer for gunstige resultater, tidligt tilbagefald og for bivirkninger 3. undersøge omfanget af og baggrunden for påvirkningen af hukommelsesfunktionen Metode: I studiet planlægger vi at undersøge 60 patienter henvist til ECT på Psykiatrisk Center Glostrup, Amager og København pga. svær depression....... Desuden vha. den mest moderne MR-teknik at belyse om ECT kan skade hjernevævet. De nævnte prædiktorer vil muliggøre at behandlingen af de sværeste depressioner vil kunne forbedres og individualiseres i langt højere end i dag, hvorved sygdomsprognosen kan forbedres betydeligt. Vi forventer yderligere...

  4. Global map of physical interactions among differentially expressed genes in multiple sclerosis relapses and remissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, Tamir; Atar, Shimshi; Ruppin, Eytan; Gurevich, Michael; Achiron, Anat

    2011-09-15

    to report new sets of genes that according to their gene expression and physical interactions are predicted to be differentially expressed in MS versus healthy subjects, and in MS patients in relapse versus remission. Some of these genes may be useful biomarkers for diagnosing MS and predicting relapses in MS patients.

  5. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  6. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Le Blanc, Katarina [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Stem Cell Research, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Immunology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  7. Immune and inflammatory responses in the CNS : Modulation by astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; aschner, michael; hidalgo, juan

    2008-01-01

    Beyond their long-recognized support functions, astrocytes are active partners of neurons in processing information, synaptic integration, and production of trophic factors, just to name a few. Both microglia and astrocytes produce and secrete a number of cytokines, modulating and integrating...... the communication between hematogenous cells and resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This review will address (1) the functions of astrocytes in the normal brain and (2) their role in surveying noxious stimuli within the brain, with particular emphasis on astrocytic responses to damage or disease...

  8. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian M.; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W.; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the “neurotoxic” and “neuroprotective” arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  9. A bidirectional association between the gut microbiota and CNS disease in a biphasic murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Sara L; Kasper, Eli J; Keever, Abigail; Liljenberg, Caleb; Kirby, Trevor; Magori, Krisztian; Kasper, Lloyd H; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier

    2017-11-02

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of inflammatory disease as shown using experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Gut microbes influence the response of regulatory immune cell populations in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which drive protection in acute and chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Recent observations suggest that communication between the host and the gut microbiome is bidirectional. We hypothesized that the gut microbiota differs between the acute inflammatory and chronic progressive stages of a murine model of secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SP-MS). This non-obese diabetic (NOD) model of EAE develops a biphasic pattern of disease that more closely resembles the human condition when transitioning from relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS to SP-MS. We compared the gut microbiome of NOD mice with either mild or severe disease to that of non-immunized control mice. We found that the mice which developed a severe secondary form of EAE harbored a dysbiotic gut microbiome when compared with the healthy control mice. Furthermore, we evaluated whether treatment with a cocktail of broad-spectrum antibiotics would modify the outcome of the progressive stage of EAE in the NOD model. Our results indicated reduced mortality and clinical disease severity in mice treated with antibiotics compared with untreated mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that there are reciprocal effects between experimental CNS inflammatory demyelination and modification of the microbiome providing a foundation for the establishment of early therapeutic interventions targeting the gut microbiome that could potentially limit disease progression.

  10. Primary CNS lymphoma as a cause of Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Cory; Voll, Chris; Macaulay, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Korsakoff syndrome presents with memory dysfunction with retrograde amnesia, anterograde amnesia, limited insight into dysfunction, and confabulation. The most common etiology of Korsakoff syndrome is thiamine deficiency secondary to alcoholism. There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. A 46-year-old male with a long history of alcoholism presented with a history of confusion, amnesia, and confabulation with no localizing features on neurological examination. The patient showed no clinical change with intravenous thiamine. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a heterogenous, enhancing mass lesion centered within the third ventricle, with other lesions found throughout cortical and subcortical regions. The patient was given dexamethasone i.v. without noticeable clinical improvement but with marked radiological improvement with mass reduction. Stereotactic biopsy revealed a diagnosis of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Most patients presenting with Korsakoff syndrome have thiamine deficiency; however, mass lesions can produce an identical clinical picture. This is the first case report of a patient with primary CNS lymphoma presenting as Korsakoff syndrome.

  11. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  12. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Residual sleep disturbance and risk of relapse during the continuation/maintenance phase treatment of major depressive disorder with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath Patrick J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relapse of major depressive disorder (MDD is a common clinical problem. This study was designed to determine whether residual sleep disturbance (insomnia and hypersomnia predict risk of relapse during the continuation and maintenance treatment of MDD. Methods A total of 570 patients with MDD were treated with open-label, flexible dose fluoxetine (range 20 to 60 mg; mean dose = 45.8 mg/day; SD = 15.1 for 12 weeks. Under double blind conditions, 262 patients who achieved clinical response were randomly assigned to continue fluoxetine or to switch to placebo for 52 weeks or until relapse. Residual sleep disturbance during the baseline visit of the double-blind phase was assessed using items 4, 5, 6 (insomnia and 22, 23, 24 (hypersomnia of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS. Survival analysis was utilized to determine the effect of residual sleep disturbance on risk of relapse. Results The severities of early (P > 0.05, middle (P > 0.05, late (P > 0.05, or total (P > 0.05 residual insomnia were not found to significantly predict risk of relapse during continuation and maintenance-phase treatment. Similarly, the severities of early bedtime (P > 0.05, oversleeping (P > 0.05, napping (P > 0.05, or total (P > 0.05 residual hypersomnia were not found to significantly predict risk of relapse during continuation and maintenance-phase treatment. Conclusion The present study did not identify the severity of residual sleep disturbance among fluoxetine responders to predict risk of MDD relapse. The size of our sample may have precluded us from identifying more modest effects of residual sleep disturbance on the risk of relapse in MDD patients. Future studies are needed to further explore the relationship between residual sleep disturbance and relapse in MDD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00427128

  14. Remitting - Relapsing Polyneuropathy In Juvenile Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taly AB

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A five-year-old girl manifested with acute relapsing polyradiculo-neuropathy. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid proteins, electro-physiological evidence of conduction block and remitting course suggested possible acquired demyelinating radiculoneuropathy. However, intellectual deterioration during follow up, evidence of extensive, symmetrical and periventricular demyelination on MRI of brain and metachromatic on sural nerve biopsy led to the diagnosis of metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD. Inherited neuropathies such as MLD may occasionally present atypically in the early stages. Recognition of this variation has considerable therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  15. Breast cancer relapse stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Braojos, Ines; Diaz Gestoso, Yadira; Franco Odio, Sonia; Samuel Gonzalez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer has always been the most common malignancy in women and is the leading cause of death in women, study relapses Stages I and II therapeutic guidelines applied in the service Mastology the 1985 - 1989, was our first objective, the database used was Clinical history, which gave us all the material necessary, treatments were: In tumors up to 3 cm node-conserving surgery plus treatment N0 with ionizing radiation on the breast tangential C0G0 in tumors greater than 3 cm or less with N1 was modified radical mastectomy according to node status for the study of the part and the receiver adjuvant treatment conducted. (Author)

  16. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  17. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  18. Differential expression of metallothioneins in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Carrasco, J; Hidalgo, J

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS. Metallothioneins-I+II are antioxidant proteins induced in the CNS by immobilisation stress, trauma or degenerative diseases which have been postulated to play a neuroprotective role, while the CNS isoform metallothionein......-III has been related to Alzheimer's disease. We have analysed metallothioneins-I-III expression in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, we have examined the putative role of interferon-gamma, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in the control of metallothioneins expression...

  19. Nasal-to-CNS drug delivery: where are we now and where are we heading? An industrial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Margaret S; Boyden, Tracey; Pegg, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Delivery of drug therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier is a challenging task for pharmaceutical scientists. Nasal-to-CNS drug delivery has shown promising results in preclinical efficacy models and investigatory human clinical trials. The further development of this technology with respect to the establishment of valid, predictable preclinical species models, translatable pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships and definition of toxicology impact will help attract additional pharmaceutical investment in this drug-delivery approach. Further discoveries in nasal nanotechnology, targeted delivery devices and diagnostic olfactory imaging will serve to fuel the advancements in this area of drug delivery.

  20. Changes in circulating leptin levels during the initial stage of cessation are associated with smoking relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Andrine; Nakajima, Motohiro; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Allen, Sharon; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2015-09-01

    Leptin has been linked to tobacco craving and withdrawal-related symptoms. Very few studies have examined leptin prospectively in both male and female nonsmokers and smokers. We examine leptin concentrations prospectively in both male and female nonsmokers and smokers to assess the associations of leptin with psychological symptoms and smoking relapse during ad libitum smoking, the first 48 h post quit, and 4 weeks post-cessation. Self-report psychological, anthropomorphic, and biological measures (cotinine, carbon monoxide, and plasma leptin) were collected before and after 48 h of smoking abstinence. Smokers were stratified at 28 days post quit as abstinent or relapsed if they had smoked daily for seven consecutive days at any point in the 28 days. Leptin concentration (square root transformed ng/ml) increased over the 48-h abstinence, but only in female abstainers. In contrast, leptin was very stable across time for nonsmokers, relapsers, and males. Cox regression supported that increased leptin was associated with decreased risk of relapse. Leptin was correlated negatively with withdrawal symptoms for abstainers only. Females produce more leptin than males and this level increases from ad libitum smoking to 48-h post quit. The current analysis indicates that a leptin increase early in cessation predicts abstinence. The increase in women, but not men, in response to abstinence provides further evidence of important gender differences. The negative correlation between leptin and withdrawal symptoms indicates a possible protective effect of leptin. Further research is ongoing to elucidate the psychological and biological determinants of this effect.

  1. Second allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for relapsed ALL in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M; Horikoshi, Y; Okamoto, Y; Takahashi, Y; Hasegawa, D; Koh, K; Takita, J; Inoue, M; Kigasawa, H; Ogawa, A; Sasahara, Y; Kawa, K; Yabe, H; Sakamaki, H; Suzuki, R; Kato, K

    2012-10-01

    A second SCT is generally accepted as the only potentially curative approach for ALL patients that relapse after SCT, but the role of second SCT for pediatric ALL is not fully understood. We performed a retrospective analysis of 171 pediatric patients who received a second allo-SCT for relapsed ALL after allo-SCT. OS at 2 years was 29.4 ± 3.7%, the cumulative incidence of relapse was 44.1 ± 4.0% and non-relapse mortality was 18.8 ± 3.5%. Relapse occurred faster after the second SCT than after the first SCT (117 days vs 164 days, P=0.04). Younger age (9 years or less), late relapse (180 days or more after first SCT), CR at the second SCT, and myeloablative conditioning were found to be related to longer survival. Neither acute GVHD nor the type of donor influenced the outcome of second SCT. Multivariate analysis showed that younger age and late relapse were associated with better outcomes. Our analysis suggests that second SCT for relapsed pediatric ALL is an appropriate treatment option for patients that have achieved CR, which is associated with late relapse after the first SCT.

  2. 6. CNS international conference on CANDU maintenance. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 6th CNS International Conference on CANDU Maintenance took place in Toronto, Ontario on November 16-18, 2003. The theme for the conference was 'Maintenance for Life'. About 270 delegates attended the conference held by the Canadian Nuclear Society. The conference consisted of four parallel sessions, a pattern that continued throughout the conference. Papers were grouped under the following headings: Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Assessments; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Inspections; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Maintenance; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Universal Delivery Machine; Water Upgrading; Performance and Plant Life Improvement; Steam Generator Life Management; Steam Generator Modifications; Steam Generators - Inspections; Steam Generators - Assessments; Maintenance Programs; Feeder Inspections; Feeder Assessment and Mitigation; Valve Maintenance; Instrumentation and Control; Inspection Technology; and Fuel Handling

  3. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  4. Brain abscess with an unexpected finding: Actinomyces meyeri CNS infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Wejse, Christian

    -up. The source of infection was most likely periodontitis with spread to the lungs from aspiration or oropharyngeal secretion into the respiratory tract, alternatively from haematogenous spread. Conclusions: We report of the successful treatment of a cerebral abscess caused by A. meyeri with narrow spectrum......Background: CNS infection caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare and the subtype Actinomyces meyeri even rarer. Risk factors include periodontal disease and alcohol overuse. We present a case report of a 54-year-old female with dental and lung foci. Case history: A female was hospitalised with tonic...... oedema. By MRI an abscess was suspected and the patient was transferred to the department of neurosurgery, where drainage was performed. Microscopy revealed gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods and iv. treatment with ceftriaxone 4g x 1 and metronidazole 1g x 1 was commenced. Pus cultures showed...

  5. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases.

  6. Radioprotection of mouse CNS endothelial cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubimova, N.; Coultas, P.; Martin, R.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Radioprotection using the minor groove binding DNA ligand Hoechst 33342 has been demonstrated in vitro, and more recently in vivo, in mouse lung. Intravenous administration was used for the lung studies, and both endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells-showed good up-take. Radiation damage to the endothelial cell population has also been postulated as important in late developing radionecrosis of spinal cord and brain. Endothelial cell density in brain can be readily determined by a fluorescent-histochemical technique. Treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and subsequent injection with L-DOPA results in an accumulation of dopamine (DA) in CNS endothelial cells. DA is converted to a fluorophore by exposure to paraformaldehyde, and cell numbers assayed by fluorescence microscopy. Earlier studies used this technique to monitor post-irradiation changes in endothelial cell density in rodent brain and showed the loss, within 24 hours, of a sensitive subpopulation comprising about 15% of the endothelial cells. Ten minutes after intravenous injection of Hoechst 33342 (80mg/kg) the ligand is confined by its limited penetration to the endothelial cells in mouse brain. When we irradiated at this time, there was protection against early endothelial cell loss. Ablation of the sensitive subpopulation in unprotected mice takes place over a dose range of 1 to 3 Gy γ-rays, but doses between 12 to 20 Gy are required in the presence of ligand. This protection equates to a very high dose modification factor of about 7 and possibly reflects a suppression of apoptosis in the sensitive endothelial subpopulation. The extent to which there is enhanced survival in the endothelial population as a whole and how the observed protection affects late CNS necrosis development has yet to be determined. However present results clearly show potential for the use of DNA-binding radioprotectors with limited penetration for investigations into the relative significance of

  7. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  8. Integrity of Literature on Expressed Emotion and Relapse in Patients with Schizophrenia Verified by a p-Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Marc J; Hall, Daniel L; Carbonella, Julia Y; Weisman de Mamani, Amy; Hooley, Jill M

    2017-06-01

    There is growing concern that much published research may have questionable validity due to phenomena such as publication bias and p-hacking. Within the psychiatric literature, the construct of expressed emotion (EE) is widely assumed to be a reliable predictor of relapse across a range of mental illnesses. EE is an index of the family climate, measuring how critical, hostile, and overinvolved a family member is toward a mentally ill patient. No study to date has examined the evidential value of this body of research as a whole. That is to say, although many studies have shown a link between EE and symptom relapse, the integrity of the literature from which this claim is derived has not been tested. In an effort to confirm the integrity of the literature of EE predicting psychiatric relapse in patients with schizophrenia, we conducted a p-curve analysis on all known studies examining EE (using the Camberwell Family Interview) to predict psychiatric relapse over a 9- to 12-month follow-up period. Results suggest that the body of literature on EE is unbiased and has integrity, as there was a significant right skew of p-values, a nonsignificant left skew of p-values, and a nonsignificant test of flatness. We conclude that EE is a robust and valuable predictor of symptom relapse in schizophrenia. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  9. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  10. Do polymorphisms in MDR1 and CYP3A5 genes influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harivenkatesh, Natarajan; Kumar, Lalit; Bakhshi, Sameer; Sharma, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Gogia, Ajay; Shastri, Shivaram S; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding for imatinib transporters and metabolizing enzymes on cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is not known. One hundred and four patients (52 cases with cytogenetic relapse and 52 controls without relapse) with chronic-phase CML on imatinib therapy and have completed 5 years of follow-up were enrolled. The following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped; C1236T, C3435T, G2677T/A in MDR1 gene and A6986G in CYP3A5 gene, using PCR-RFLP method and validated by direct gene sequencing. Imatinib trough levels were measured using LC-MS/MS. Patients with CC genotype for MDR1-C1236T polymorphism were at significantly higher risk for cytogenetic relapse [OR =4.382, 95% CI (1.145, 16.774), p = .022], while those with TT genotype for MDR1-C3435T polymorphism had significantly lower risk of relapse [OR =0.309, 95% CI (0.134, 0.708), p = .005]. Imatinib trough levels were lower in patients with relapse compared to those without relapse (1551.4 ± 1324.1 vs. 2154.2 ± 1358.3 ng/mL; p = .041). MDR1-C3435T genotype [adjusted-OR: 0.266; 95% CI (0.111, 0.636); p = .003] and trough levels (p = .014) were independent predictors of relapse in multivariate analysis. To conclude, C1236T and C3435T polymorphisms in MDR1 gene and trough levels significantly influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse. MDR1-C3435T genotype might emerge as a potential biomarker to predict the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with CML.

  11. Effectiveness of Prescription-Based CNS Stimulants on Hospitalization in Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Christopher; Polcwiartek, Christoffer; Asztalos, Marton

    2018-01-01

    were used to investigate the effectiveness of CNS stimulants in patients with schizophrenia between 1995 and 2014; a mirror-image model with 605 individuals, using paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and a follow-up study with 789 individuals, using a conditional risk-set model. RESULTS: CNS...

  12. CNS metastasis from malignant uveal melanoma: a clinical and histopathological characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, S K; Lindegaard, J; Isager, P

    2008-01-01

    was observed in two cases (14%). The amount of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes was pronounced in three cases (23%). CONCLUSION: The proportion of uveal melanoma patients having CNS metastasis was 0.7%. Eleven patients had multiple organ metastases, and the average time from the initial CNS symptoms to death...

  13. Pre-emptive treatment with rituximab of molecular relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels S; Pedersen, Lone B; Laurell, Anna

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Minimal residual disease (MRD) is predictive of clinical progression in mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL). According to the Nordic MCL-2 protocol we prospectively analyzed the efficacy of pre-emptive treatment using rituximab to MCL patients in molecular relapse after autologous stem cell...

  14. HB-GAM (pleiotrophin) reverses inhibition of neural regeneration by the CNS extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveliev, Mikhail; Fenrich, Keith K.; Kislin, Mikhail; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Varjosalo, Markku; Kajander, Tommi; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Ahonen-Bishopp, Anni; Khiroug, Leonard; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Rougon, Geneviève; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans inhibit regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We report here that HB-GAM (heparin-binding growth-associated molecule; also known as pleiotrophin), a CS-binding protein expressed at high levels in the developing CNS, reverses the role of the CS chains in neurite growth of CNS neurons in vitro from inhibition to activation. The CS-bound HB-GAM promotes neurite growth through binding to the cell surface proteoglycan glypican-2; furthermore, HB-GAM abrogates the CS ligand binding to the inhibitory receptor PTPσ (protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma). Our in vivo studies using two-photon imaging of CNS injuries support the in vitro studies and show that HB-GAM increases dendrite regeneration in the adult cerebral cortex and axonal regeneration in the adult spinal cord. Our findings may enable the development of novel therapies for CNS injuries. PMID:27671118

  15. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudick, R.A.; Stuart, W.H.; Calabresi, P.A.; Confavreux, C.; Galetta, S.L.; Radue, E.W.; Lublin, F.D.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Wynn, D.R.; Lynn, F.; Panzara, M.A.; Sandrock, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is used to modify the course of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Despite interferon beta therapy, many patients have relapses. Natalizumab, an alpha4 integrin antagonist, appeared to be safe and effective alone and when added to interferon beta-1a in preliminary studies.

  16. Prefrontal cortex plasticity mechanisms in drug seeking and relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, M.C.; Spijker, S.; Smit, A.B.; de Vries, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Development of pharmacotherapy to reduce relapse rates is one of the biggest challenges in drug addiction research. The enduring nature of relapse suggests that it is maintained by long-lasting molecular and cellular adaptations in the neuronal circuitry that mediates learning and processing of

  17. Frequency of relapse among Nigerian children with steroid‑sensitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The clinical course of steroid‑sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) among Nigerian children has rarely been reported; this makes prognostication difficult. Objectives: The objective was to determine the frequency of relapses including frequent relapses (FR) and steroid‑dependence (SD) in a cohort of Nigerian ...

  18. Symptomatic relapse of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in southern Africa. Much of this disease burden is thought to be due to symptomatic relapse of previously treated infection. We studied the contribution of inadequate secondary fluconazole prophylaxis to symptomatic relapses of cryptococcal ...

  19. Power2: Relapse Management with Adolescents Who Stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Gordon W.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for relapse management in adolescents who stutter. The package includes game-based training techniques in problem solving, communication skills, and assertiveness; coping responses for stuttering episodes; and realistic expectations for fluency and relapse. Follow-up results with…

  20. Factors associated with relapse in schizophrenia | Kazadi | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. Early identification and prevention of relapse in patients with schizophrenia has significant therapeutic and socioeconomic implications. The aim of this study was to determine the factors, if any, that may be associated with relapse in a group of patients in Johannesburg. Method. Patients were recruited from mental ...

  1. An Integrative Ambient Agent Model for Unipolar Depression Relapse Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, A.A.; Klein, M.C.A.; Treur, J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges for persons with a history of unipolar depression is to stay healthy throughout their lifetime. In principle, having more severe prior onset cases escalates the risk to fall into a relapse. In this article, first a domain model of the process of depression, recovery and relapse

  2. Relapse and craving in alcohol-dependent individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Mheen, H,; Snelleman, M.; Schoenmakers, T.M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Negative affective states and alcohol-related stimuli increase risk of relapse in alcohol dependence. In research and in clinical practice, craving is often used as another important indicator of relapse, but this lacks a firm empirical foundation. Objectives: The goal of the present

  3. Relapse prevention in patients with schizophrenia : A nursing intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijel, Berno van

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development and testing of a nursing intervention with a view to preventing psychotic relapses in patients suffering from schizophrenia or a related disorder. The purpose of the intervention is to recognise the early signs of an oncoming psychotic relapse. If

  4. Bortezomib or high-dose dexamethasone for relapsed multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. Richardson (Paul Gerard); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); M.W. Schuster (Michael); D. Irwin (David); E.A. Stadtmauer (Edward); T. Facon (Thierry); J-L. Harousseau (Jean-Luc); D. Ben-Yehuda (Dina); S. Lonial (Sagar); H. Goldschmidt (Hartmut); D. Reece (Donna); J.F. San Miguel (Jesús Fernando); J. Bladé (Joan); M. Boccadoro (Mario); J. Cavenagh (Jamie); W. Dalton (William); A.L. Boral (Anthony); D.-L. Esseltine (Dixie-Lee); J.B. Porter (Jane); D. Schenkein (David); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: This study compared bortezomib with high-dose dexamethasone in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who had received one to three previous therapies. METHODS: We randomly assigned 669 patients with relapsed myeloma to receive either an intravenous bolus of bortezomib (1.3

  5. An intervention study to prevent relapse in patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meijel, B.; Kruitwagen, C.; van der Gaag, M.; Kahn, R.S.; Grypdonck, M.H.E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the use of relapse prevention plans (RPPs) in nursing practice is an effective intervention in reducing relapse rates among patients with schizophrenia. Design and Methods: Experimental design. Patients with schizophrenia (or a related psychotic disorder) and nurses

  6. Extinction of relapsed fear does not require the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingawi, Nura W; Westbrook, R Frederick; Laurent, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    It is well established that extinguished fears are restored with the passage of time or a change in physical context. These fear restoration phenomena are believed to mimic the conditions under which relapse occurs in patients that have been treated for anxiety disorders by means of cue-exposure therapy. Here, we used a rodent model to extinguish relapsed fear and assess whether this new extinction prevents further relapse. We found that activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is required to initially extinguish conditioned fear, but this activity was not necessary to subsequently extinguish relapsed fear. That is, extinction of spontaneously recovered or renewed fear was spared by BLA inactivation. Yet, this BLA-independent learning of extinction did not protect against further relapse: extinction of relapsed fear conducted without BLA activity was still likely to return after the passage of time or a shift in physical context. These findings have important clinical implications. They indicate that pharmacological agents with anxiolytic properties may disrupt initial cue-exposure therapy but may be useful when therapy is again needed due to relapse. However, they also suggest that these agents will not protect against further relapse, implying the need for developing drugs that target other brain regions involved in fear inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relapse prevention in anorexia nervosa: Experiences of patients and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, Tamara; van de Lagemaat, Marleen; van Meijel, Berno; Coenen, Jasmijn; Hoek, Hans W; van Elburg, Annemarie A

    2018-03-24

    One of the main aims of treatment after successful recovery from anorexia nervosa (AN) is to prevent a relapse. The Guideline Relapse Prevention (GRP) Anorexia Nervosa offers a structured approach to relapse prevention. This study explores how patients and their parents experience working with the guideline. It also describes the factors that support or hinder successful application of the guideline. A descriptive qualitative research design was chosen involving in-depth interviews with seventeen patients with anorexia nervosa and six sets of parents. Patients and family members were generally satisfied with the support provided by the GRP. It contributed significantly to a better understanding of the personal process of relapse. Patients and families valued being able to keep in touch with their professional during the aftercare programme. The GRP supports the patient's use of self-management strategies for relapse prevention. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Improved outcome after relapse in children with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Clausen, Niels; Gustafsson, Göran

    2007-01-01

    investigated. The study included all 146 children in the Nordic countries diagnosed with AML between 1988 and 2003, who relapsed. Data on disease characteristics and relapse treatment were related to outcome. Sixty-six percentage achieved remission with survival after relapse (5 years) 34 +/- 4%. Of 122......In the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology paediatric study acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 93, event-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 66%, indicating that many patients were cured following relapse. Factors influencing outcome in children with relapsed AML were...... patients who received re-induction therapy, 77% entered remission with 40 +/- 5% survival. Remission rates were similar for different re-induction regimens but fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based therapy had low treatment-related mortality. Prognostic factors for survival...

  9. Increased multiple sclerosis relapses related to lower prevalence of pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vinícius Martins da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study aims to investigate the presence of pain amongst multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Method One hundred MS patients responded to questionnaires evaluating neuropathic and nociceptive pain, depression and anxiety. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann–Whitney U, Chi-Square and two-tailed Fisher’s exact tests and multivariate logistic regression. Results Women had a statistically higher prevalence of pain (p = 0.037, and chances of having pain after the age of 50 reduced. Women with pain had a statistically significant lower number of relapses (p = 0.003, restricting analysis to those patients with more than one relapse. After the second relapse, each relapse reduced the chance of having pain by 46%. Presence of pain was independent of Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS anxiety, and depression. Conclusion Our findings suggest a strong inverse association between relapses and pain indicating a possible protective role of focal inflammation in the control of pain.

  10. Modeling the effector - regulatory T cell cross-regulation reveals the intrinsic character of relapses in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrealdea Javier

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relapsing-remitting dynamics is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS. Although current understanding of both cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is significant, how their activity generates this prototypical dynamics is not understood yet. In order to gain insight about the mechanisms that drive these relapsing-remitting dynamics, we developed a computational model using such biological knowledge. We hypothesized that the relapsing dynamics in autoimmunity can arise through the failure in the mechanisms controlling cross-regulation between regulatory and effector T cells with the interplay of stochastic events (e.g. failure in central tolerance, activation by pathogens that are able to trigger the immune system. Results The model represents five concepts: central tolerance (T-cell generation by the thymus, T-cell activation, T-cell memory, cross-regulation (negative feedback between regulatory and effector T-cells and tissue damage. We enriched the model with reversible and irreversible tissue damage, which aims to provide a comprehensible link between autoimmune activity and clinical relapses and active lesions in the magnetic resonances studies in patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Our analysis shows that the weakness in this negative feedback between effector and regulatory T-cells, allows the immune system to generate the characteristic relapsing-remitting dynamics of autoimmune diseases, without the need of additional environmental triggers. The simulations show that the timing at which relapses appear is highly unpredictable. We also introduced targeted perturbations into the model that mimicked immunotherapies that modulate effector and regulatory populations. The effects of such therapies happened to be highly dependent on the timing and/or dose, and on the underlying dynamic of the immune system. Conclusion The relapsing dynamic in MS

  11. TIME COURSE MODIFICATIONS INDUCED BY PERINATAL ASPHYXIA IN RAT CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Capani

    2015-04-01

    of estradiol treatment we were able to revert some of these alterations using PI3K/Akt/GSK3. Overall these results demonstrate that synaptic dysfunction following PA might be produced by early changes in the actin organization and long-term misfolding and aggregation of proteins in the PSDs. Therefore, we hypothesize that the synaptic and neuronal cytoskeleton changes induced by PA in the rat CNS could lead to the cellular dysfunction and death in adult animals. Estradiol appears as a new therapeutic tool to slacken the damage induces by perinatal asphyxia on the CNS.

  12. Relapse of incisor crowding: a visit to the Prince of Salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Areal, Luis; Gandía, Jose-Luis

    2013-03-01

    The management of the retention period after comprehensive orthodontic treatment is of great importance, as a primary goal of clinician. Considerable controversy still surrounds the problem of stability after the retention period. Many studies analyze factors associated to the presence of crowding or incisor irregularity and find predictive features on its relapse. Most studies have reported little o no correlation between the treatment changes in the biological parameters - clinical, biometric (irregularity index, intermolar width, intercanine width, arch length, overjet, overbite), or cephalometric variables- that ocurred and the posttretament and postretention changes that may predict their future development. This article provides a bibliographical overview on the relapse of dental alignment in treated cases. In a brief historical introduction, the first studies on the long-term stability of orthodontic results are analysed. The article then goes on to assess studies that focus attention on anteroinferior alignment before finally studying relapse of upper crowding. It concludes by making some final comments in the light of the bibliography provided and the differents schools regarding retention needs and methods.

  13. Growth of Malignant Non-CNS Tumors Alters Brain Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Nersisyan, Lilit; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David; Mancini, Maria; Sidransky, David; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Cancer survivors experience numerous treatment side effects that negatively affect their quality of life. Cognitive side effects are especially insidious, as they affect memory, cognition, and learning. Neurocognitive deficits occur prior to cancer treatment, arising even before cancer diagnosis, and we refer to them as “tumor brain.” Metabolomics is a new area of research that focuses on metabolome profiles and provides important mechanistic insights into various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. Many neurological diseases and conditions affect metabolic processes in the brain. However, the tumor brain metabolome has never been analyzed. In our study we used direct flow injection/mass spectrometry (DI-MS) analysis to establish the effects of the growth of lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and sarcoma on the brain metabolome of TumorGraft™ mice. We found that the growth of malignant non-CNS tumors impacted metabolic processes in the brain, affecting protein biosynthesis, and amino acid and sphingolipid metabolism. The observed metabolic changes were similar to those reported for neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging, and may have potential mechanistic value for future analysis of the tumor brain phenomenon. PMID:29515623

  14. Role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, Simon W.F.; Riemer, Constanze; Madela, Kazimierz; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Gueltner, Sandra; Heise, Ines; Baier, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a multi-functional protein and participates in mediating inflammatory reactions. The pronounced overexpression of galectin-3 in prion-infected brain tissue prompted us to study the role of this protein in a murine prion model. Immunofluorescence double-labelling identified microglia as the major cell type expressing galectin-3. Ablation of galectin-3 did not affect PrP Sc -deposition and development of gliosis. However, galectin-3 -/- -mice showed prolonged survival times upon intracerebral and peripheral scrapie infections. Moreover, protein levels of the lysosomal activation marker LAMP-2 were markedly reduced in prion-infected galectin-3 -/- -mice suggesting a role of galectin-3 in regulation of lysosomal functions. Lower mRNA levels of Beclin-1 and Atg5 in prion-infected wild-type and galectin-3 -/- -mice indicated an impairment of autophagy although autophagosome formation was unchanged. The results point towards a detrimental role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS and suggest that endo-/lysosomal dysfunction in combination with reduced autophagy may contribute to disease development

  15. Fluids and barriers of the CNS: a historical viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddelow Shane A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tracing the exact origins of modern science can be a difficult but rewarding pursuit. It is possible for the astute reader to follow the background of any subject through the many important surviving texts from the classical and ancient world. While empirical investigations have been described by many since the time of Aristotle and scientific methods have been employed since the Middle Ages, the beginnings of modern science are generally accepted to have originated during the 'scientific revolution' of the 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. The scientific method is so fundamental to modern science that some philosophers consider earlier investigations as 'pre-science'. Notwithstanding this, the insight that can be gained from the study of the beginnings of a subject can prove important in the understanding of work more recently completed. As this journal undergoes an expansion in focus and nomenclature from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF into all barriers of the central nervous system (CNS, this review traces the history of both the blood-CSF and blood-brain barriers from as early as it was possible to find references, to the time when modern concepts were established at the beginning of the 20th century.

  16. CNS fungal meningitis to the "Top of the basilar"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Logan CS; Kirschner RC; Simonds GR

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) infections are a rare complication of epidural steroid injections and without strong clinical suspicion, fungal organisms may be overlooked among the long differential of causes of meningitis.Rare sequela of fungal meningitis is the development of stroke.To our knowledge, we present the first case of post epidural steroid injection(ESI) fungal meningitis leading toa basilar artery stroke, otherwise known as“top of the basilar” syndrome.We present a49-year-old female with a history ofESIs who presented to the emergency department with headache, neck stiffness, and abdominal pain.She was discharged after her labs and symptoms were deemed inconsistent with meningitis.She was eventually admitted and twelve days after her originalED visit, she was diagnosed with meningitis and started on anti-fungal treatment.She was discharged88 days later but was readmitted due to left sided weakness and mental status changes.She quickly lost motor and bulbar functions.AnMRA showed diminished distal flow through the basilar artery, suggesting near complete occlusion.Although appropriate long term anti-fungal treatment was started, the patient still succumbed to a rare vascular event.Physicians who are treating patients forESI meningitis should be aware of the potential for vasculitic and encephalitic complications.

  17. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress preconditioning of spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne I Rodgers

    Full Text Available Cortical spreading depression (CSD is closely associated with important pathologies including stroke, seizures and migraine. The mechanisms underlying SD in its various forms are still incompletely understood. Here we describe SD-like events in an invertebrate model, the ventilatory central pattern generator (CPG of locusts. Using K(+ -sensitive microelectrodes, we measured extracellular K(+ concentration ([K(+](o in the metathoracic neuropile of the CPG while monitoring CPG output electromyographically from muscle 161 in the second abdominal segment to investigate the role K(+ in failure of neural circuit operation induced by various stressors. Failure of ventilation in response to different stressors (hyperthermia, anoxia, ATP depletion, Na(+/K(+ ATPase impairment, K(+ injection was associated with a disturbance of CNS ion homeostasis that shares the characteristics of CSD and SD-like events in vertebrates. Hyperthermic failure was preconditioned by prior heat shock (3 h, 45 degrees C and induced-thermotolerance was associated with an increase in the rate of clearance of extracellular K(+ that was not linked to changes in ATP levels or total Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity. Our findings suggest that SD-like events in locusts are adaptive to terminate neural network operation and conserve energy during stress and that they can be preconditioned by experience. We propose that they share mechanisms with CSD in mammals suggesting a common evolutionary origin.

  19. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The interplay of history of depression and craving in terms of smoking relapse among treatment seeking smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cano, Rubén; Paulus, Daniel J; López-Durán, Ana; Martínez-Vispo, Carmela; Fernández Del Río, Elena; Becoña, Elisardo; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Although there is an interconnection between history of major depressive disorder and smoking, there has been relatively limited scientific attention oriented on the interplay between history of major depressive disorder and smoking maintenance processes. The current study sought to address whether history of major depressive disorder and post-cessation craving interact in the prediction of relapse among treatment-seeking smokers. Separate models were evaluated as a function of sex. Participants (n = 319, Mage = 41.7, 62.1% female) were treatment-seeking smokers who were abstinent at the end of six weekly 1-hour sessions involving psychosocial treatment for cessation. Participants completed a baseline assessment and reported post-cessation craving. Smoking status was assessed at 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up after the end of treatment. There was a significant interactive effect evident for females (B = 0.05, OR = 1.05, p = 0.013), but not males. The form of the interaction indicated females with history of major depressive disorder and greater post-treatment craving evinced the highest rate of relapse. Findings suggest that history of major depressive disorder and post-treatment craving are related to increased risk of relapse for female, but not male, smokers. Sex differences play a fundamental role in the explanation of the interaction of history of major depressive disorder and craving post-treatment in smoking relapse. Considering sex differences related to smoking relapse may help to tailor smoking cessation treatments.

  1. When the Tail Can't Wag the Dog: The Implications of CNS-Intrinsic Initiation of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre S Davis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The CNS (central nervous system is unquestionably the central organ that regulates directly or indirectly all physiological systems in the mammalian body. Yet, when considering the defence of the CNS from pathogens, the CNS has often been considered passive and subservient to the pro-inflammatory responses of the immune system. In this view, neuroinflammatory disorders are examples of when the tail (the immune system wags the dog (the CNS to the detriment of an individual's function and survival.

  2. The retina as a window to the brain-from eye research to CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Anat; Benhar, Inbal; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Philosophers defined the eye as a window to the soul long before scientists addressed this cliché to determine its scientific basis and clinical relevance. Anatomically and developmentally, the retina is known as an extension of the CNS; it consists of retinal ganglion cells, the axons of which form the optic nerve, whose fibres are, in effect, CNS axons. The eye has unique physical structures and a local array of surface molecules and cytokines, and is host to specialized immune responses similar to those in the brain and spinal cord. Several well-defined neurodegenerative conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord have manifestations in the eye, and ocular symptoms often precede conventional diagnosis of such CNS disorders. Furthermore, various eye-specific pathologies share characteristics of other CNS pathologies. In this Review, we summarize data that support examination of the eye as a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis of select CNS diseases, and the use of the eye as a valuable model to study the CNS. Translation of eye research to CNS disease, and deciphering the role of immune cells in these two systems, could improve our understanding and, potentially, the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Observations at the CNS-PNS border of ventral roots connected to a neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sten Remahl

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that numerous sprouts originating from a neuroma, after nerve injury in neonatal animals, can invade spinal nerve roots. In this study the border between the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS-PNS border of ventral roots in kittens was examined with both light and electron microscopy after early postnatal sciatic nerve resection. A transient ingrowth of substance P positive axons was observed into the CNS, but no spouts remained 6 weeks after the injury. Using serial sections and electron microscopy it was possible to identify small bundles of unmyelinated axons that penetrated from the root fascicles for a short distance into the CNS. These axons ended blindly, sometimes with a growth cone-like terminal swelling filled with vesicles. The axon bundles were accompanied by p75 positive cells in both the root fascicles and the pia mater, but not in the CNS. It may thus be suggested that neurotrophin presenting p75 positive cells could facilitate axonal growth into the pia mater and that the lack of such cells in the CNS compartment might contribute to the failure of growth into the CNS. A maldevelopment of myelin sheaths at the CNS-PNS border of motor axons was observed and it seems possible that this could have consequences for the propagation of action potential across this region after neonatal nerve injury.

  4. MRI diagnosis of bone marrow relapse in children with ALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.H.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Connolly, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia is well known, but there are few reports describing the MRI features of pediatric leukemic relapse. Our purpose was to describe the MRI appearance of pediatric leukemic relapse. A total of 53 consecutive children with a history of ALL were referred for musculoskeletal MRI from 1 January 1998 to 28 February 2007 at one center, and from 1 January 2000 to 2 May 2007 at a second center. From this group, 14 children seen at initial diagnosis of leukemia and 2 children who underwent MRI after therapy for relapse were excluded. The remaining 37 children, 8 with relapse and 29 in remission, were studied. Images of patients with relapse and in remission were reviewed for type and configuration of marrow infiltration; coexisting marrow alterations including osteonecrosis or stress reaction were also reviewed. All eight children with relapse demonstrated nodular lesions with well-defined margins. Coexisting osteonecrosis was present in three children (38%) and pathologic fracture in one. Among the 29 children in remission, 9 showed stress reaction/fracture, 14 showed osteonecrosis and 9 showed ill-defined nodules, and in 5 the marrow was completely normal. Well-defined nodules in all patients with leukemic relapse suggest that this appearance is characteristic and distinct from the published findings of diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia. (orig.)

  5. MRI diagnosis of bone marrow relapse in children with ALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Frangoul, Haydar A. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Connolly, Susan A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia is well known, but there are few reports describing the MRI features of pediatric leukemic relapse. Our purpose was to describe the MRI appearance of pediatric leukemic relapse. A total of 53 consecutive children with a history of ALL were referred for musculoskeletal MRI from 1 January 1998 to 28 February 2007 at one center, and from 1 January 2000 to 2 May 2007 at a second center. From this group, 14 children seen at initial diagnosis of leukemia and 2 children who underwent MRI after therapy for relapse were excluded. The remaining 37 children, 8 with relapse and 29 in remission, were studied. Images of patients with relapse and in remission were reviewed for type and configuration of marrow infiltration; coexisting marrow alterations including osteonecrosis or stress reaction were also reviewed. All eight children with relapse demonstrated nodular lesions with well-defined margins. Coexisting osteonecrosis was present in three children (38%) and pathologic fracture in one. Among the 29 children in remission, 9 showed stress reaction/fracture, 14 showed osteonecrosis and 9 showed ill-defined nodules, and in 5 the marrow was completely normal. Well-defined nodules in all patients with leukemic relapse suggest that this appearance is characteristic and distinct from the published findings of diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia. (orig.)

  6. Postpartum smoking relapse--a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notley, Caitlin; Blyth, Annie; Craig, Jean; Edwards, Alice; Holland, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Many women quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapse after the baby is born. To understand why and identify ways of preventing this, this study reviewed the qualitative literature on women's experience of postpartum smoking relapse. A systematic review of qualitative studies and process evaluations of trials. We undertook a thematic synthesis of published qualitative data. We screened 1336 papers. Twenty-two papers reporting on 16 studies were included, reporting on the views of 1031 postpartum women. Factors affecting relapse and barriers and facilitators to relapse prevention were identified around the key themes of beliefs, social influences, motivation, physiological factors and identity. Women's beliefs about smoking as a means of coping with stress and the need for social support, especially from a partner, emerged as important. Extrinsic motivation to quit during the pregnancy (for the health of the fetus) appeared to be a factor in prompting relapse after the baby was born. During the immediate postpartum period women believed that physiological changes influence cigarette cravings. The stress of caring for a newborn, sleeplessness and adjusting to a new mothering identity were also reported to be important. Among women who quit smoking during pregnancy, those who relapse postpartum talk commonly about no longer needing to protect the baby and the effects of stress. Partner support and a sense of changed identity are cited as factors preventing relapse. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Preventing relapse after incentivized choice treatment: A laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Mark E; Thrailkill, Eric A; Bergeria, Cecilia L; Davis, Danielle R

    2017-08-01

    Two experiments with rats examined relapse of an operant behavior that occurred after the behavior was suppressed by reinforcing (incentivizing) an alternative behavior. In the first phase, a target response (R1) was reinforced. In a treatment phase, R1 was still reinforced, but a new response (R2) was introduced and associated with a larger reinforcer. As in human contingency management treatments, incentivizing R2 this way was effective at suppressing R1. However, when R2's reinforcement was discontinued, there was a robust and immediate relapse to R1. Experiment 1 found that the strength of R1 during relapse testing was not different from that seen in a no treatment control. Experiment 2 found that relapse could nevertheless be reduced by presenting reinforcers not contingent on responding during the test. Either the reinforcer for R1 or the reinforcer for R2 (which were qualitatively different types of food pellets) were effective. The experiments introduce a laboratory method for studying relapse and how to prevent it after contingency management treatments, and suggest at least one treatment that discourages relapse. The incentivized choice paradigm differs from other models of relapse of operant behavior (e.g., resurgence, renewal, reinstatement) in that it does not focus on the return of behaviors that are inhibited by extinction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Glucocorticoid treatment of MCMV infected newborn mice attenuates CNS inflammation and limits deficits in cerebellar development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kosmac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV.

  9. Preventing postpartum smoking relapse: an opportunity for neonatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Sharron

    2009-08-01

    Smoking during pregnancy and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke have harmful and sometimes devastating effects on the health of the newborn. Although interventions for smoking cessation during pregnancy demonstrate effectiveness for increasing smoking abstinence, the majority of women relapse in the postpartum period. However, modifying contributing factors for relapse may improve the success of sustained abstinence. Many parents are eager to quit smoking and willing to participate in smoking cessation interventions. Through a population-based approach to healthcare, neonatal nurses are in an ideal position to prevent relapse and to promote smoking abstinence; they can coordinate and lead efforts for establishing smoking cessation strategies that integrate obstetric, newborn, and pediatric services.

  10. Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Misdiagnosed as Relapsing Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female patient presented at the outpatients’ Department of Ophthalmology with epiphora, eyelid swelling, and a foreign body feeling in the right eye. The symptoms were present for 4 months, and the patient was treated as suffering from relapsing conjunctivitis. The slit lamp examination revealed keratitis due to exposure, related with the deficient closure of the eyelids. There was a 2 mm difference in the readings with the Hertel exophthalmometry examination between the eyes. Her medical history was clear, and she was referred for computed tomography of the orbits and brain and biochemical examinations (FT3, FT4, and TSH to investigate the presence of an intraorbital mass. FT3 was significantly increased and TSH was accordingly low, indicating the diagnosis of Graves’ disease, which presented without other signs and symptoms apart from ophthalmopathy. Computed tomography scan excluded the diagnosis of an intraorbital mass. Therefore, it is important not to underestimate the ocular manifestations of systemic diseases.

  11. Pemphigus erythematosus relapse associated with atorvastatin intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Schiavo A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ada Lo Schiavo,1 Rosa Valentina Puca,1 Francesca Romano,1 Roberto Cozzi2 1Department of Dermatology, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Dermatology, AORN "A Cardarelli", Naples, Italy Abstract: Statins, also known as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaril-CoA reductase inhibitors, are well-tolerated drugs used for prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Although they are generally considered safe, some serious adverse effects, such as myositis, myopathy, and rhabdomyolysis can rarely occur. Furthermore, recent data from long-term follow-up on patients who have been taking statins for a long period of time suggest that prolonged exposure to statins may trigger autoimmune reactions. The exact mechanism of statin-induced autoimmune reactions is unclear. Statins, as proapoptotic agents, release nuclear antigen into the circulation and may induce the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Herein we report the case of a 70 year-old man who developed a relapse of pemphigus erythematosus, a syndrome with features of both lupus erythematosus and pemphigus, after atorvastatin intake. Keywords: pemphigus erythematosus, autoimmune disease, treatment, pathogenesis, statins

  12. Cognitive impairment in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saška Roškar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify changes in cognitive abilities that affect patients with relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS and to find out which instrument manifests them best. The performance of MS patients was compared to a matched group of healthy people using three neuropsychological tests: Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST, Stroop color and word test and Trail making test (TMT part B. Results on all three tests indicate general cognitive impairments in the group of patients. Compared to the group of healthy people patients with MS exhibited impaired ability of abstract reasoning (WCST, impaired cognitive flexibility and less resistance to irrelevant stimuli (Stroop color and word test, slowed information processing and impaired ability of shifting attention from one symbol to another (TMT. The largest differences between groups occured in Stroop color and word test as well as in TMT. The estimation of cognitive abilities of MS patients is of high importance and sistematicaly observing of changes in those abilities should be considered.

  13. A Motion Videogame for Opioid Relapse Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroms, Lorien C; Leavitt, Leah E; Van Alstyne, Judy M; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M; Fishman, Marc J; Greenberg, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a body motion-activated videogame, targeting the prevention of opioid relapse among youth in the context of outpatient treatment. Participants attended four weekly gameplay sessions. Surveys were conducted at baseline and following each week's gameplay and assessed satisfaction with gameplay, craving intensity, and self-efficacy to refuse opioids. Participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with the videogame throughout the 4 weeks and agreed with the statement that they would be more likely to attend treatment sessions if the game was present (mean=4.6; standard deviation [SD]=0.7) and would recommend the videogame to other people in treatment (mean=4.2; SD=0.8). All participants recommended playing the videogame as part of treatment at least weekly, with a third recommending playing daily. Self-reported cravings declined over the 4-week period from baseline (mean=12.7; SD=8.4) to Week 4 (mean=9.8; SD=8.3), although the decline was not significant. Although participants stated that they liked the game, one-third of participants had dropped out of the study by the fourth session of gameplay. Preliminary evidence indicates that a motion videogame for addiction recovery may be feasible and acceptable within the context of outpatient treatment, although additional efforts are needed to keep youth in treatment. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the game on long-term abstinence, treatment adherence, and engagement.

  14. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kosterin, Paul [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Salzberg, Brian M. [Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M. [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Thom, Stephen R., E-mail: sthom@smail.umaryland.edu [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  15. Uterine, but not ovarian, female reproductive organ involvement at presentation by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with poor outcomes and a high frequency of secondary CNS involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Cheah, Chan Y; Hutchings, Martin

    2016-01-01

    progression-free survival and overall survival compared to those without reproductive organ involvement, whereas ovarian DLBCL was not predictive of outcome. Secondary central nervous system (CNS) involvement (SCNS) occurred in 7/17 (41%) women with uterine DLBCL (two patients with concomitant ovarian DLBCL...

  16. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  17. Novel therapeutic options for relapsed hairy cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Preetesh; Polliack, Aaron; Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) achieve a response to therapy with cladribine or pentostatin with or without rituximab. However, late relapses can occur. Treatment of relapsed HCL can be difficult due to a poor tolerance to chemotherapy, increased risk of infections and decreased responsiveness to chemotherapy. The identification of BRAFV600E mutations and the role of aberrant MEK kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) pathways in the pathogenesis of HCL have helped to develop novel targeted therapies for these patients. Currently, the most promising therapeutic strategies for relapsed or refractory HCL include recombinant immunoconjugates targeting CD22 (e.g. moxetumomab pasudotox), BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib and B cell receptor signaling kinase inhibitors such as ibrutinib. Furthermore, the VH4-34 molecular variant of classic HCL has been identified to be less responsive to chemotherapy. Herein, we review the results of the ongoing clinical trials and potential future therapies for relapsed/refractory HCL.

  18. Relapse of Legionella longbeachae infection in an immunocompromised patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Hullenaar, N. G.; van Ketel, R. J.; Kuijper, E. J.; Bakker, P. J.; Dankert, J.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the first known case of Legionella longbeachae infection in the Netherlands in a patient with myasthenia gravis. Infection with L. longbeachae relapsed after prolonged therapy with erythromycin. No environmental source of L. longbeachae could be traced

  19. CLIPPERS among patients diagnosed with non-specific CNS neuroinflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, B M; Lindelof, M; Illes, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids (CLIPPERS) is an inflammatory CNS disorder characterized by 1) subacute onset of cerebellar and brainstem symptoms, 2) peripontine contrast-enhancing perivascular lesions with a "salt-and-pepper" appeara...

  20. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A.; Toprak, Umut H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T. W.; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A.; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J.; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C.; Pajtler, Kristian W.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D.; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M.; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J.; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C.; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M.; von Bueren, André O.; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C.; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V. Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S.; Taylor, Michael D.; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ellison, David W.; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally

  1. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A.; Toprak, Umut H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A.; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J.; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C.; Pajtler, Kristian W.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D.; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M.; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J.; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C.; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M.; Von Bueren, André O.; Von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C.; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V. Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S.; Taylor, Michael D.; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ellison, David W.; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of

  2. Netrin-1 Confines Rhombic Lip-Derived Neurons to the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Yung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During brainstem development, newborn neurons originating from the rhombic lip embark on exceptionally long migrations to generate nuclei important for audition, movement, and respiration. Along the way, this highly motile population passes several cranial nerves yet remains confined to the CNS. We found that Ntn1 accumulates beneath the pial surface separating the CNS from the PNS, with gaps at nerve entry sites. In mice null for Ntn1 or its receptor DCC, hindbrain neurons enter cranial nerves and migrate into the periphery. CNS neurons also escape when Ntn1 is selectively lost from the sub-pial region (SPR, and conversely, expression of Ntn1 throughout the mutant hindbrain can prevent their departure. These findings identify a permissive role for Ntn1 in maintaining the CNS-PNS boundary. We propose that Ntn1 confines rhombic lip-derived neurons by providing a preferred substrate for tangentially migrating neurons in the SPR, preventing their entry into nerve roots.

  3. Micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia: an unknown association of two uncommon CNS disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinder, G.; Corat-Simon, J.; Hershkovitz, E.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of two known pathologies of the CNS in an unusual association: the concomitant presentation of the micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia. To our knowledge, this association is unreported to date. (orig.)

  4. Micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia: an unknown association of two uncommon CNS disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinder, G. [MAR Bikur Cholim Hospital Jerusalem (MOR-MAR), Jerusalem (Israel); Corat-Simon, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zrifin, Beer Jakov (Israel); Hershkovitz, E. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Soroka Medical Center, Beer Sheba (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    We describe a case of two known pathologies of the CNS in an unusual association: the concomitant presentation of the micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia. To our knowledge, this association is unreported to date. (orig.)

  5. Association of peripheral inflammation with body mass index and depressive relapse in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, David J; Andreazza, Ana C; Hughes, John; Dhanoa, Taj; Torres, Ivan J; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Young, L Trevor; Lam, Raymond W; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2016-03-01

    Bipolar I disorder (BD) is associated with increased inflammation, which is believed to be central to disease etiology and progression. However, BD patients also have high rates of obesity, itself an inflammatory condition, and the relative contributions of mood illness and obesity to inflammation are unknown. Moreover, the impact of inflammation on clinical illness course has not been well studied. The objectives of this analysis were therefore: (1) to determine if inflammation in BD is mood illness-related or secondary to elevated body mass index (BMI), and (2) to investigate the impact of inflammation on prospectively-ascertained relapse into depression and mania. We measured the serum levels of 7 inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, γ-interferon, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], IL-1α, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8) and 2 anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in 52 early-stage BD patients and 22 healthy subjects. In patients, a multivariate multiple regression model that controlled for psychotropic medications found that higher BMI, but not recent (past-6-month) mood episodes, predicted greater inflammatory cytokines (p=.05). Healthy subjects also had a BMI-related increase in inflammatory cytokines (pdepressive relapse in the 12 months after cytokine measurement: IL-1α (pdepressive relapse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Unique Case of Relapsing Polychondritis Presenting with Acute Pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Higgins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapsing polychondritis (RP is an inflammatory disease of the cartilaginous tissue primarily affecting the cartilaginous structures of the ear, nose, joints, and the respiratory system. Cardiovascular complications of RP are associated with high morbidity and mortality and occur most commonly as valvular disease. Pericarditis is a less common complication, occurring in 4% of patients with RP and has not previously been described at presentation. We describe a case of relapsing polychondritis with acute pericarditis at presentation.

  7. Intestinal Microbiota and Relapse After Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Jonathan U; Devlin, Sean M; Staffas, Anna; Lumish, Melissa; Khanin, Raya; Littmann, Eric R; Ling, Lilan; Kosuri, Satyajit; Maloy, Molly; Slingerland, John B; Ahr, Katya F; Porosnicu Rodriguez, Kori A; Shono, Yusuke; Slingerland, Ann E; Docampo, Melissa D; Sung, Anthony D; Weber, Daniela; Alousi, Amin M; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Ponce, Doris M; Barker, Juliet N; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio A; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G; Jenq, Robert R; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2017-05-20

    Purpose The major causes of mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and infection. We have reported previously that alterations in the intestinal flora are associated with GVHD, bacteremia, and reduced overall survival after allo-HCT. Because intestinal bacteria are potent modulators of systemic immune responses, including antitumor effects, we hypothesized that components of the intestinal flora could be associated with relapse after allo-HCT. Methods The intestinal microbiota of 541 patients admitted for allo-HCT was profiled by means of 16S ribosomal sequencing of prospectively collected stool samples. We examined the relationship between abundance of microbiota species or groups of related species and relapse/progression of disease during 2 years of follow-up time after allo-HCT by using cause-specific proportional hazards in a retrospective discovery-validation cohort study. Results Higher abundance of a bacterial group composed mostly of Eubacterium limosum in the validation set was associated with a decreased risk of relapse/progression of disease (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82 per 10-fold increase in abundance; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.95; P = .009). When the patients were categorized according to presence or absence of this bacterial group, presence also was associated with less relapse/progression of disease (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.87; P = .01). The 2-year cumulative incidences of relapse/progression among patients with and without this group of bacteria were 19.8% and 33.8%, respectively. These associations remained significant in multivariable models and were strongest among recipients of T-cell-replete allografts. Conclusion We found associations between the abundance of a group of bacteria in the intestinal flora and relapse/progression of disease after allo-HCT. These might serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets to prevent relapse and improve survival after allo-HCT.

  8. Long-term results of pneumatic dilatation for relapsing symptoms of achalasia after Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Ludivine; Ropert, Alain; Brochard, Charlène; Bouguen, Guillaume; Pagenault, Maël; Siproudhis, Laurent; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pneumatic dilatation (PD) to treat symptom recurrence after Heller myotomy (HM). Consecutive patients receiving PD for relapsing symptoms following prior HM were included in this retrospective single-center study. Eckardt score ≤3 and/or ∆ Eckardt (difference between Eckardt score before and after dilatation) ≥3 defined the success of initial dilatation. Patients who maintained response longer than 2 months after initial dilatation were defined as short-term responders. Relapsers were offered further on-demand dilatation. Remission was defined as an Eckardt score ≤3 at the study endpoint. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to determine relapse rates. Eighteen patients (11 women, seven men) were included from January 2004 to January 2013. Ten patients had type I achalasia, and seven had type III, according to the Chicago classification. Thirty-nine PDs were performed (1.5 [1-2.25] per patient). All patients had short-term responses. The remission rate at the endpoint, after a median follow-up of 33 months, was 78%, but 44% were treated with on-demand PD during the follow-up interval. The proportions of patients without relapse and subsequent PD were 72% at 12 months, 65% at 24 and 36 months, and 49% at 48 months. No factors predictive of long-term response, particularly the type of achalasia, could be identified in this series. There were no perforations. In treating symptom recurrence following HM, PD was safe and effective over the long term when combined with subsequent PD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  10. The budget impact of introducing delayed-release dimethyl fumarate for treatment of relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Emily; Kansal, Anuraag R; Sarda, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    treatment of RRMS are predicted to be partially offset by reduced costs of relapses in the Canadian healthcare system.

  11. Salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. A single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Nakayama, Masashi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and prognostic factors of salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer at a single center in Japan. A retrospective review of the medical records of 51 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy was carried out. Salvage radiotherapy was undergone for the single indication of at least two consecutive prostate-specific antigen elevations >0.1 ng/ml. Salvage radiotherapy was delivered to the prostatic bed at a total dose of 60 or 64 Gy. Late toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. A total dose of 60 and 64 Gy were administered to 26 and 25 patients, respectively. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the initiation of radiotherapy was 0.29 ng/ml (range, 0.11-1.10 ng/ml). With a median follow-up of 57.3 months (range, 9.9-134.0 months), the prostate-specific antigen relapse-free rate at 5 years was 50.7%. Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards regression model revealed that the Gleason score at radical prostatectomy ≥8 significantly predicted prostate-specific antigen relapse after salvage radiotherapy (hazard ratio 4.531; 95% confidence interval 1.413-14.535; P=0.011). The prostate-specific antigen relapse-free rate at 5 years in the Gleason score at radical prostatectomy ≤7 and at radical prostatectomy ≥8 was 62.7 and 15.4%, respectively. Salvage radiotherapy was effective for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy with tolerable toxicities in Japanese patients. A high Gleason score seemed to be a poor prognostic factor. (author)

  12. Burden of a multiple sclerosis relapse: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleen-Burkey, Merrikay; Castelli-Haley, Jane; Lage, Maureen J; Johnson, Kenneth P

    2012-01-01

    Relapses are a common feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and increasing severity has been shown to be associated with higher healthcare costs, and to result in transient increases in disability. Increasing disability likely impacts work and leisure productivity, and lowers quality of life. The objective of this study was to characterize from the patient's perspective the impact of a multiple sclerosis (MS) relapse in terms of the economic cost, work and leisure productivity, functional ability, and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), for a sample of patients with RRMS in the US treated with immunomodulatory agents. A cross-sectional, web-based, self-report survey was conducted among members of MSWatch.com, a patient support website now known as Copaxone.com. Qualified respondents in the US had been diagnosed with RRMS and were using an immunomodulatory agent. The survey captured costs of RRMS with questions about healthcare resource utilization, use of community services, and purchased alterations and assistive items related to MS. The Work and Leisure Impairment instrument and the EQ-5D were used to measure productivity losses and HR-QOL (health utility), respectively. The Goodin MS neurological impairment questionnaire was used to measure functional disability; questions were added about relapses in the past year. Of 711 qualified respondents, 67% reported having at least one relapse during the last year, with a mean of 2.2 ± 2.3 relapses/year. Respondents who experienced at least one relapse had significantly higher mean annual direct and indirect costs compared with those who did not experience a relapse ($US38 458 vs $US28 669; p = 0.0004) [year 2009 values]. Direct health-related costs accounted for the majority of the increased cost ($US5201; 53%) and were mainly due to increases in hospitalizations, medications, and ambulatory care. Indirect costs, including informal care and productivity loss, accounted for the

  13. Glucocorticoids and relapse of major depression (dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone test in relation to relapse of major depression)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelhof, Bente C.; Huyser, Jochanan; Verweij, Mijke; Brouwer, Jantien P.; van Dyck, Richard; Fliers, Eric; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Schene, Aart H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms and predictors of relapse in major depressive disorder is still limited. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis dysregulation is thought to be related to the development and course of depression. METHODS: We investigated whether

  14. The neuropharmacology of relapse to food seeking: methodology, main findings, and comparison with relapse to drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sunila G; Adams-Deutsch, Tristan; Epstein, David H; Shaham, Yavin

    2009-09-01

    Relapse to old, unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatments. The mechanisms underlying this relapse are unknown. Surprisingly, until recently this clinical problem has not been systematically studied in animal models. Here, we review results from recent studies in which a reinstatement model (commonly used to study relapse to abused drugs) was employed to characterize the effect of pharmacological agents on relapse to food seeking induced by either food priming (non-contingent exposure to small amounts of food), cues previously associated with food, or injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. We also address methodological issues related to the use of the reinstatement model to study relapse to food seeking, similarities and differences in mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking versus drug seeking, and the degree to which the reinstatement procedure provides a suitable model for studying relapse in humans. We conclude by discussing implications for medication development and future research. We offer three tentative conclusions: (1)The neuronal mechanisms of food-priming- and cue-induced reinstatement are likely different from those of reinstatement induced by the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. (2)The neuronal mechanisms of reinstatement of food seeking are possibly different from those of ongoing food-reinforced operant responding. (3)The neuronal mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking overlap to some degree with those of reinstatement of drug seeking.

  15. Do predictors of smoking relapse change as a function of duration of abstinence? Findings from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hua-Hie; Borland, Ron; Cummings, K Michael; Partos, Timea

    2018-07-01

    To estimate predictors of time to smoking relapse and test if prediction varied by quit duration. Longitudinal cohort data from the International Tobacco Control Four-Country survey with annual follow up collected between 2002 and 2015. Canada, United States, United Kingdom and Australia. A total of 9171 eligible adult smokers who had made at least one quit attempt during the study period. Time to relapse was the main outcome. Predictor variables included pre-quit baseline measures of nicotine dependence, smoking and quitting-related motivations, quitting capacity and social influence, and also two post-quit measures, use of stop-smoking medications and quit duration (1-7 days, 8-14 days, 15-31 days, 1-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months, 1-2 years and 2+ years), along with socio-demographics. All factors were predictive of relapse within the first 6 months of quitting but only wanting to quit, quit intentions and number of friends who smoke were still predictive of relapse in the 6-12-month period of quitting [hazard ratios (HR) = 1.20, P < 0.05; 1.13, P < 0.05; and 1.21, P < 0.001, respectively]. Number of friends smoking was the only remaining predictor of relapse in the 1-2 years quit period (HR = 1.19, P = 0.001) with none predictive beyond the 2-year quit period. Use of stop-smoking medications during quit attempts was related negatively to relapse during the first 2 weeks of quitting (HR = 0.71-0.84), but related positively to relapse in the 1-6-month quit period (HR = 1.29-1.54). Predictive effects of all factors showed significant interaction with quit duration except for perceiving smoking as an important part of life, prematurely stubbing out a cigarette and wanting to quit. Among adult smokers in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia, factors associated with smoking relapse differ between the early and later stages of a quit attempt, suggesting that the determinants of relapse change as a function of abstinence

  16. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention in opioid Dependence Treatment &Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Findings: therapy compliance, retention in treatment, decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and increase in health was significantly in both combination of psychological intervention method than the Naltroxan group. Mindfulness-based on relapse prevention was more effective than CBT relapse prevention in decreasing of, social dysfunction, relapse prevention, increase of therapy compliance, and health. Results: Mindfulness based relapse prevention was superior to CBT and Naltroxan and considerably increased effectiveness of opioid relapse prevention therapy.

  17. Regional homogeneity changes between heroin relapse and non-relapse patients under methadone maintenance treatment: a resting-state fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Haifeng; Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jiajie; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Li, Yongbin; Shi, Ming; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is recognized as one of the most effective treatments for heroin addiction but its effect is dimmed by the high incidence of heroin relapse. However, underlying neurobiology mechanism of heroin relapse under MMT is still largely unknown. Here, we took advantage of a resting-state fMRI technique by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo), and tried to explore the difference of brain function between heroin relapsers and non-relapsers in MMT. Met...

  18. Alcohol-seeking and relapse: A focus on incentive salience and contextual conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyear, Milan D; Villaruel, Franz R; Chaudhri, Nadia

    2017-08-01

    Environmental stimuli that reliably accompany alcohol intake can become associated with the pharmacological effects of alcohol through classical (Pavlovian) conditioning. Of growing interest to addiction researchers is whether or not this process results in the attribution of incentive salience to alcohol-predictive cues, which could motivate alcohol-seeking behavior and relapse. To evaluate this question, we present a review of rodent behavioral studies that examined the capacity of alcohol-predictive cues to (i) support sign-tracking behavior, (ii) serve as conditioned reinforcers, and (iii) produce Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer. A second, emerging area of research is focused on delineating the role of context in alcohol-seeking behavior and relapse. Here, we review studies showing that alcohol-associated contexts (i) support conditioned place preference, (ii) renew extinguished alcohol-seeking behavior, and (iii) modulate alcohol-seeking responses elicited by discrete alcohol-predictive cues. These behavioral effects may be mediated by unique psychological processes, and have important implications for cue-reactivity studies and neurobiological research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Relapse Prevention: An Overview of Marlatts Cognitive- Behavioral Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Relapse prevention(RPis an important component of alcoholism treatment. The RP model proposed by Marlatt and Gordon suggests that both immediate determinants (e.g.,high- risk situations, coping skills, outcome expectancies, and the abstinence violation effect and covert antecedents (e.g., lifestyle factor and urges and cravings can contribute to relapse.The RP model also incorporates numerous specific and global intervention strategies that allow therapist and client to address each step of the relapse process. Specific interventions include identifying specific high-risk situations for each client and enhancing the client's skills for coping with those situations, increasing the client's self- efficacy, eliminating myths regarding alcohol's effects, managing lapses, and restructuring the client's perceptions of the relapse process. Global strategies comprise balancing the client's lifestyle and helping him or her develop positive addictions, employing stimulus control techniques and urgemanagement techniques, and developing relapse road maps. Several studies have provided theoretical and practical support for the RP model.

  20. Contribution of Schwann Cells to Remyelination in a Naturally Occurring Canine Model of CNS Neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Kegler

    Full Text Available Gliogenesis under pathophysiological conditions is of particular clinical relevance since it may provide evidence for regeneration promoting cells recruitable for therapeutic purposes. There is evidence that neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR-expressing cells emerge in the lesioned CNS. However, the phenotype and identity of these cells, and signals triggering their in situ generation under normal conditions and certain pathological situations has remained enigmatic. In the present study, we used a spontaneous, idiopathic and inflammatory CNS condition in dogs with prominent lympho-histiocytic infiltration as a model to study the phenotype of Schwann cells and their relation to Schwann cell remyelination within the CNS. Furthermore, the phenotype of p75NTR-expressing cells within the injured CNS was compared to their counter-part in control sciatic nerve and after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, organotypic slice cultures were used to further elucidate the origin of p75NTR-positive cells. In cerebral and cerebellar white and grey matter lesions as well as in the brain stem, p75NTR-positive cells co-expressed the transcription factor Sox2, but not GAP-43, GFAP, Egr2/Krox20, periaxin and PDGFR-α. Interestingly, and contrary to the findings in control sciatic nerves, p75NTR-expressing cells only co-localized with Sox2 in degenerative neuropathy, thus suggesting that such cells might represent dedifferentiated Schwann cells both in the injured CNS and PNS. Moreover, effective Schwann cell remyelination represented by periaxin- and P0-positive mature myelinating Schwann cells, was strikingly associated with the presence of p75NTR/Sox2-expressing Schwann cells. Intriguingly, the emergence of dedifferentiated Schwann cells was not affected by astrocytes, and a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response provided an adequate environment for Schwann cells plasticity within the injured CNS. Furthermore, axonal damage was reduced in brain stem areas

  1. CNS infiltration of peripheral immune cells: D-Day for neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Gate, David; Town, Terrence

    2009-12-01

    While the central nervous system (CNS) was once thought to be excluded from surveillance by immune cells, a concept known as "immune privilege," it is now clear that immune responses do occur in the CNS-giving rise to the field of neuroimmunology. These CNS immune responses can be driven by endogenous (glial) and/or exogenous (peripheral leukocyte) sources and can serve either productive or pathological roles. Recent evidence from mouse models supports the notion that infiltration of peripheral monocytes/macrophages limits progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology and militates against West Nile virus encephalitis. In addition, infiltrating T lymphocytes may help spare neuronal loss in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, CNS leukocyte penetration drives experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis) and may also be pathological in both Parkinson's disease and human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. A critical understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for trafficking of immune cells from the periphery into the diseased CNS will be key to target these cells for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby allowing neuroregenerative processes to ensue.

  2. Current approaches to enhance CNS delivery of drugs across the brain barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu CT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cui-Tao Lu,1 Ying-Zheng Zhao,2,3 Ho Lun Wong,4 Jun Cai,5 Lei Peng,2 Xin-Qiao Tian1 1The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Hainan Medical College, Haikou City, Hainan Province, People’s Republic of China; 3College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 4School of Pharmacy, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Departments of Pediatrics and Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: Although many agents have therapeutic potentials for central nervous system (CNS diseases, few of these agents have been clinically used because of the brain barriers. As the protective barrier of the CNS, the blood–brain barrier and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier maintain the brain microenvironment, neuronal activity, and proper functioning of the CNS. Different strategies for efficient CNS delivery have been studied. This article reviews the current approaches to open or facilitate penetration across these barriers for enhanced drug delivery to the CNS. These approaches are summarized into three broad categories: noninvasive, invasive, and miscellaneous techniques. The progresses made using these approaches are reviewed, and the associated mechanisms and problems are discussed. Keywords: drug delivery system, blood–brain barrier (BBB, central nervous system, brain-targeted therapy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF

  3. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  4. Detail Design of the hydrogen system and the gas blanketing system for the HANARO-CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Kim, Young Ki; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Bong Su; Lee, Yong Seop

    2007-04-01

    The cold neutron source (CNS), which will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, makes thermal neutrons to moderate into the cold neutrons with the ranges of 0.1 ∼ 10 meV passing through a moderator at about 22K. A moderator to produce cold neutrons is liquid hydrogen, which liquefies by the heat transfer with cryogenic helium flowing from the helium refrigeration system (HRS). Because of its installed location, the hydrogen system is designed to be surrounded by the gas blanketing system to notify the leakage on the system and to prevent hydrogen leakage out of the CNS. The hydrogen system, consisted of hydrogen charging unit, hydrogen storage unit, hydrogen buffer tank, and hydrogen piping, is designed to smoothly and safely supply hydrogen to and to draw back hydrogen from the IPA of the CNS under the HRS operation mode. Described is that calculation for total required hydrogen amount in the CNS as well as operation schemes of the hydrogen system. The gas blanketing system (GBS) is designed for the supply of the compressed nitrogen gas into the air pressurized valves for the CNS, to isolate the hydrogen system from the air and the water, and to prevent air or water intrusion into the vacuum system as well as the hydrogen system. All detail descriptions are shown inhere as well as the operation scheme for the GBS

  5. Cladribine tablets for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rammohan, Kottil; Giovannoni, Gavin; Comi, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the phase III CLARITY study, treatment with cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 3.5 or 5.25mg/kg over 96 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rates (ARR) versus placebo in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Further post hoc analyses...... of CLARITY study data were conducted to determine the efficacy of cladribine tablets across patient subgroups stratified by baseline characteristics. METHODS: Relapse rates over the 96-week CLARITY study were analyzed in cohorts stratified by demographics; disease duration; treatment history and disease...... activity at baseline. RESULTS: In the intent-to-treat population (n=437, 433 and 456 in the placebo, cladribine 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg groups, respectively), treatment with cladribine tablets 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg led to consistent improvements in ARR versus placebo in patients stratified by gender; age (≤40...

  6. Topotecan in the treatment of relapsed small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Quoix

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth QuoixService de Pneumologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg, FranceAbstract: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC represents about 15% to 20% of all lung cancers. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of the treatment, cisplatin–etoposide combination being the most used combination as first-line therapy. Despite high initial chemosensitivity, most SCLC patients will experience relapse sooner or later. Unfortunately, second-line chemotherapy does not result in a high response rate like first-line therapy, most patients having developed wide chemoresistance. This chemoresistance is far more important in refractory patients, ie, those who never responded to first-line therapy or who relapsed within 3 months after the end of chemotherapy, than in sensitive patients, ie, those who relapse more than 3 months after the end of chemotherapy. Topotecan, a topoisomerase I inhibitor, is the most studied drug in this second-line setting and has proved its efficacy as a single agent and in combination. A phase III trial comparing oral topotecan to best supportive care (BSC in relapsed SCLC demonstrated a significant survival benefit as well as a better quality of life. Although the usual schedule is 1.5 mg/m2, days 1–5 intravenously, it is not convenient for patients with relapsed SCLC, especially those who are refractory because of their short survival expectation. Oral topotecan is of similar efficacy and much more convenient with limited stay in a treatment unit and has a comparable toxicity profile for these patients with short expected survival. Combination of topotecan with platinum salts or taxanes does not seem to improve further the outcome of the patients and thus single-agent therapy with topotecan is the standard treatment for relapsed SCLC.Keywords: topotecan, small cell lung cancer, chemoresistance

  7. Confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker for acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daas, Loay; Viestenz, Arne; Schnabel, Philipp Albert; Fries, Fabian N; Hager, Tobias; SzentmÁry, Nora; Seitz, Berthold

    2018-01-01

    Acanthameoba keratitis is a serious ophthalmological condition with a potentially vision-threatening prognosis. Early diagnosis and recognition of relapse, and the detection of persistent Acanthamoeba cysts, are essential for informing the prognosis and managing the condition. We suggest the use of in vivo confocal microscopy not only to identify the early signs of relapse after keratoplasty in patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis, but also as an additional follow-up tool after antimicrobial crosslinking. This study shows that in vivo confocal microscopy is, in experienced hands, a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Clin. Anat. 31:60-63, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A simple technique for correction of relapsed overjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkirala, Neelima; Saxena, Ruchi

    2014-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are usually growth related discrepancies, which often become more severe when growth is completed Orthognathic surgery can be a part of the treatment plan, although a good number of cases can be treated non-surgically by camouflage treatment. The purpose of this report is to review the relapse tendency in patients treated non-surgically. A simple technique is described to combat one such post-treatment relapse condition in an adult patient who had undergone orthodontic treatment by extraction of a single lower incisor.

  9. Relapse of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder Associated with Intravenous Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Uzawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine unmasks silent symptoms and eases neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis patients; however, the effects of lidocaine in neuromyelitis optica have never been reported. We describe the case of a 59-year-old Japanese woman with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder who developed optic neuritis 1 day after intravenous lidocaine injection for treating allodynia. Her symptom seemed to result from a relapse of neuromyelitis optica induced by lidocaine administration, and not because of the transient effects of intravenous lidocaine administration. The possibility that lidocaine administration results in relapse of neuromyelitis optica due to its immunomodulating effects cannot be ruled out.

  10. Late Relapses in Stage I Testicular Cancer Patients on Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard

    2016-01-01

    Cancer (DaTeCa) database. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We estimated survival and relapse probabilities and compared the results using log-rank tests and Cox regression analyses. We compared differences in patient characteristics by using χ(2), Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney tests...... no significant differences in patient characteristics at orchiectomy or relapse. Limitations include retrospective design and exclusion of patients who had been offered adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of VLR is minimal, and the patients carry a good prognosis. Patient characteristics of CS-1 surveillance...

  11. [11C]NS8880, a promising PET radiotracer targeting the norepinephrine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Karina Højrup; Peters, Dan; Nielsen, Elsebeth Ø

    2014-01-01

    -azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (NS8880), targeting NET. NS8880 has an in vitro binding profile comparable to desipramine and is structurally not related to reboxetine. METHODS: Labeling of NS8880 with [11C] was achieved by a non-conventional technique: substitution of pyridinyl fluorine with [11C]methanolate...... yields with high purity. The PET in vivo evaluation in pig and rat revealed a rapid brain uptake of [11C]NS8880 and fast obtaining of equilibrium. Highest binding was observed in thalamic and hypothalamic regions. Pretreatment with desipramine efficiently reduced binding of [11C]NS8880. CONCLUSION: Based...... on the pre-clinical results obtained so far [11C]NS8880 displays promising properties for PET imaging of NET....

  12. Serial brain MRI findings in CNS involvement of familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Suh, Jeong Soo; Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hong, Ki Sook; Kim, Hak Jin

    2002-01-01

    Familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a fatal early childhood disorder characterized by multiorgan lymphohistiocytic infiltration and active hemophagocytosis. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is not uncommon and is characterized by rapidly progressive tissue damage affecting both the gray and white matter. We encountered a case of familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with CNS involvement. Initial T2-weighted MRI of the brain demonstrated high signal intensity in the right thalamus, though after chemotherapy, which led to the relief of neurologic symptoms, this disappeared. After four months. however, the patient's neurologic symptoms recurred, and follow-up T2-weighted MR images showed high signal intensity in the thalami, basal ganglia, and cerebral and cerebellar white matter. Brain MRI is a useful imaging modality for the evaluation of CNS involvement and monitoring the response to treatment

  13. Analysis of neurocognitive function and CNS endpoints in the PROTEA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Amanda; Johanssen, Veronika; Gerstoft, Jan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During treatment with protease inhibitor monotherapy, the number of antiretrovirals with therapeutic concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is lower, compared to standard triple therapy. However, the clinical consequences are unclear. METHODS: A total of 273 patients with HIV...... and the Grooved Pegboard Test at screening, baseline and at Week 48. A global neurocognitive score (NPZ-5) was derived by averaging the standardized results of the five domains. In a central nervous system (CNS) sub-study (n=70), HIV RNA levels in the CNS were evaluated at baseline and Week 48. Clinical adverse...... events related to the CNS were collected at each visit. RESULTS: Patients were 83% male and 88% White, with median age 43 years. There were more patients with nadir CD4 count below 200 cells/µL in the DRV/r monotherapy arm (41/137, 30%) than the triple therapy arm (30/136, 22%). At Week 48...

  14. Intellectual abilities among survivors of childhood leukaemia as a function of CNS irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiser, C.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight children in remission at least 2 years after completing chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were assessed on standardised psychological tests. It was found that 7 who never had central nervous system (CNS) irradiation and 9 having prophylactic CNS irradiation at least 6 months after diagnosis tended to perform at average or above levels, while those 10 each having prophylactic CNS irradiation (within 2 months of diagnosis) were generally at lower ability. Within the latter group 3 children showed serious intellectual impairments, while the group as a whole functioned especially poorly on quantitative tasks and those involving speeded performance with abstract material. General language ability was not affected. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. (author)

  15. Cancers of the Brain and CNS: Global Patterns and Trends in Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Mortazavi, S A R; Paknahad, M

    2018-03-01

    Miranda-Filho et al. in their recently published paper entitled "Cancers of the brain and CNS: global patterns and trends in incidence" provided a global status report of the geographic and temporal variations in the incidence of brain and CNS cancers in different countries across continents worldwide. While the authors confirm the role of genetic risk factors and ionizing radiation exposures, they claimed that no firm conclusion could be drawn about the role of exposure to non-ionizing radiation. The paper authored by Miranda-Filho et al. not only addresses a challenging issue, it can be considered as a good contribution in the field of brain and CNS cancers. However, our correspondence addresses a basic shortcoming of this paper about the role of electromagnetic fields and cancers and provides evidence showing that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs), at least at high levels and long durations, can increases the risk of cancer.

  16. Neonatal CNS infection and inflammation caused by Ureaplasma species: rare or relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2015-02-01

    Colonization with Ureaplasma species has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and perinatal transmission has been implicated in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates. Little is known about Ureaplasma-mediated infection and inflammation of the CNS in neonates. Controversy remains concerning its incidence and implication in the pathogenesis of neonatal brain injury. In vivo and in vitro data are limited. Despite improving care options for extremely immature preterm infants, relevant complications remain. Systematic knowledge of ureaplasmal infection may be of great benefit. This review aims to summarize pathogenic mechanisms, clinical data and diagnostic pitfalls. Studies in preterm and term neonates are critically discussed with regard to their limitations. Clinical questions concerning therapy or prophylaxis are posed. We conclude that ureaplasmas may be true pathogens, especially in preterm neonates, and may cause CNS inflammation in a complex interplay of host susceptibility, serovar pathogenicity and gestational age-dependent CNS vulnerability.

  17. Clearance of an immunosuppressive virus from the CNS coincides with immune reanimation and diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGavern Dorian B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Once a virus infection establishes persistence in the central nervous system (CNS, it is especially difficult to eliminate from this specialized compartment. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to fully understand scenarios during which a persisting virus is ultimately purged from the CNS by the adaptive immune system. Such a scenario can be found following infection of adult mice with an immunosuppressive variant of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV referred to as clone 13. In this study we demonstrate that following intravenous inoculation, clone 13 rapidly infected peripheral tissues within one week, but more slowly inundated the entire brain parenchyma over the course of a month. During the establishment of persistence, we observed that genetically tagged LCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL progressively lost function; however, the severity of this loss in the CNS was never as substantial as that observed in the periphery. One of the most impressive features of this model system is that the peripheral T cell response eventually regains functionality at ~60–80 days post-infection, and this was associated with a rapid decline in virus from the periphery. Coincident with this "reanimation phase" was a massive influx of CD4 T and B cells into the CNS and a dramatic reduction in viral distribution. In fact, olfactory bulb neurons served as the last refuge for the persisting virus, which was ultimately purged from the CNS within 200 days post-infection. These data indicate that a functionally revived immune response can prevail over a virus that establishes widespread presence both in the periphery and brain parenchyma, and that therapeutic enhancement of an existing response could serve as an effective means to thwart long term CNS persistence.

  18. CD11c-expressing cells affect Treg behavior in the meninges during CNS infection1

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Carleigh A.; Overall, Christopher; Konradt, Christoph; O’Hara Hall, Aisling C.; Hayes, Nikolas W.; Wagage, Sagie; John, Beena; Christian, David A.; Hunter, Christopher A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2017-01-01

    Treg cells play an important role in the CNS during multiple infections as well as autoimmune inflammation, but the behavior of this cell type in the CNS has not been explored. In mice, infection with Toxoplasma gondii leads to a Th1-polarized parasite-specific effector T cell response in the brain. Similarly, the Treg cells in the CNS during T. gondii infection are Th1-polarized, exemplified by T-bet, CXCR3, and IFN-γ expression. Unlike effector CD4+ T cells, an MHC Class II tetramer reagent specific for T. gondii did not recognize Treg cells isolated from the CNS. Likewise, TCR sequencing revealed minimal overlap in TCR sequence between effector and regulatory T cells in the CNS. Whereas effector T cells are found in the brain parenchyma where parasites are present, Treg cells were restricted to the meninges and perivascular spaces. The use of intravital imaging revealed that activated CD4+ T cells within the meninges were highly migratory, while Treg cells moved more slowly and were found in close association with CD11c+ cells. To test whether the behavior of Tregs in the meninges is influenced by interactions with CD11c+ cells, mice were treated with anti-LFA-1 antibodies to reduce the number of CD11c+ cells in this space. The anti-LFA-1 treatment led to fewer contacts between Tregs and the remaining CD11c+ cells and increased the speed of Treg cell migration. These data suggest that Treg cells are anatomically restricted within the CNS and the interaction with CD11c+ populations regulates their local behavior during T. gondii infection. PMID:28389591

  19. Kinetic modelling of [123I]CNS 1261--a potential SPET tracer for the NMDA receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Mulligan, Rachel S.; Gunn, Roger N; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Owens, Jonathan; Wyper, David; Ell, Peter J.; Pilowsky, Lyn S.

    2003-01-01

    N-(1-napthyl)-N'-(3-[ 123 I]-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine ([ 123 I]CNS 1261) is a novel SPET ligand developed for imaging the NMDA receptor intra-channel MK 801/PCP/ketamine site. Data was acquired in 7 healthy volunteers after bolus injection of [ 123 I]CNS 1261. Kinetic modeling showed reversible tracer binding. Arterial and venous time-activity curves overlapped after 90 min. The rank order of binding was: Thalamus > striatum > cortical regions > white matter. This distribution concurs with [ 11 C]-ketamine and [ 18 F]-memantine PET studies . These data provide a methodological basis for further direct in vivo challenge studies

  20. Effects of x rays on the morphology and physiology of the CNS blood vessels of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, J [Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1974-01-01

    Irradiation of the CNS of mice with 4000 to 7600 R produces transitional disorder of the permeability of vascular walls, followed by a permanent (irreversible) degenerative lesion of blood capillaries and the surrounding astrogial cells. Intensity of this alterations may however not be the same in different terminal blood vessels. It is very likely that the above described lesion appearing in the acute phase can be the main cause of further alterations in the CNS which are observed in late phase of postradiation disease.

  1. Lentiviral-mediated administration of IL-25 in the CNS induces alternative activation of microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiorino, C; Khorooshi, R; Ruffini, F

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-25 (IL-25) is the only anti-inflammatory cytokine of the IL-17 family, and it has been shown to be efficacious in inhibiting neuroinflammation. Known for its effects on cells of the adaptive immune system, it has been more recently described to be effective also on cells of the innate...... was partly inhibited and the CNS protected from immune-mediated damage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of M2 shift (alternative activation) induced in vivo on CNS-resident myeloid cells by gene therapy, and may constitute a promising strategy to investigate the potential role of protective...

  2. Metallothionein-1+2 protect the CNS after a focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, Mercedes; Penkowa, Milena; Lago, Natalia

    2002-01-01

    We have evaluated the physiological relevance of metallothionein-1+2 (MT-1+2) in the CNS following damage caused by a focal cryolesion onto the cortex. In comparison to normal mice, transgenic mice overexpressing the MT-1 isoform (TgMTI* mice) showed a significant decrease of the number...... dramatically reduced the cryolesion-induced oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis. Remarkably, these effects were also obtained by the intraperitoneal administration of MT-2 to both normal and MT-1+2 knock-out mice. These results fully support the notion that MT-1+2 are essential in the CNS for coping...

  3. Imaging aspects of neurologic emergencies in children treated for non-CNS malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaste, S.C.; Langston, J.; Rodriguez-Galindo, C.; Furman, W.L.; Thompson, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    There is a paucity of radiologic literature addressing neurologic emergencies in children receiving therapy for non-CNS primary malignancies. In the acute setting, many of these children present to local community hospitals. This pictorial is from a single institutional experience describing the spectrum of neurologic emergencies seen in children with non-CNS cancers. We hope to familiarize pediatric radiologists with these entities in order to expedite diagnosis, facilitate treatment, and minimize morbity and mortality that may be associated with these complications. (orig.)

  4. Neuroprotective effects of estrogen in CNS injuries: insights from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Narayan Raghava,1 Bhaskar C Das,2 Swapan K Ray1 1Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Among the estrogens that are biosynthesized in the human body, 17β-estradiol (estradiol or E2 is the most common and the best estrogen for neuroprotection in animal models of the central nervous system (CNS injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI, traumatic brain injury (TBI, and ischemic brain injury (IBI. These CNS injuries are not only serious health problems, but also enormous economic burden on the patients, their families, and the society at large. Studies from animal models of these CNS injuries provide insights into the multiple neuroprotective mechanisms of E2 and also suggest the possibility of translating the therapeutic efficacy of E2 in the treatment SCI, TBI, and IBI in humans in the near future. The pathophysiology of these injuries includes loss of motor function in the limbs, arms and their extremities, cognitive deficit, and many other serious consequences including life-threatening paralysis, infection, and even death. The potential application of E2 therapy to treat the CNS injuries may become a trend as the results are showing significant therapeutic benefits of E2 for neuroprotection when administered into the animal models of SCI, TBI, and IBI. This article describes the plausible mechanisms how E2 works with or without the involvement of estrogen receptors and provides an overview of the known neuroprotective effects of E2 in these three CNS injuries in different animal models. Because activation of estrogen receptors has profound implications in maintaining and also affecting normal physiology, there are notable impediments in translating E2 therapy to the clinics for neuroprotection in CNS injuries in humans. While E2 may not yet be the sole molecule for

  5. What is the optimal value of the g-ratio for myelinated fibers in the rat CNS? A theoretical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Chomiak

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space.In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (approximately 0.77. Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (approximately 0.6.These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints.

  6. What is the optimal value of the g-ratio for myelinated fibers in the rat CNS? A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2009-11-13

    The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space. In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (approximately 0.77). Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (approximately 0.6). These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints.

  7. Smoking relapse situations among a community-recruited sample of Spanish daily smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Bárbara; López-Durán, Ana; Martínez-Vispo, Carmela; Fernández Del Río, Elena; Martínez, Úrsula; Rodríguez-Cano, Rubén; Míguez, M Carmen; Becoña, Elisardo

    2017-12-01

    Relapse is a common factor within the behavior change process. However, there is scarce and limited knowledge of smoking relapse situations in population-based samples. The aim of this study was to identify smoking relapse situations among a sample of Spanish relapsers from the general population. A sample of 775 relapsers was recruited among the general population using a snowball method. Participants completed a survey including sociodemographic, smoking-related and psychopathology variables. Smoking relapse situations were identified through specific questions assessing different aspects related to the last relapse episode. The majority of smoking relapse situations were attributed to positive affect (36.6%) and negative affect (34.3%), followed by lack of control (10.1%), smoking habit (6.7%), craving or nicotine withdrawal (6.3%), and social pressure (5.9%). Being unemployed and having a mental disorder in the past increased the likelihood of relapse in situations of negative affect. Being single and having quit smoking to save money were associated with an increased likelihood of relapse in situations of positive affect. Affect plays a significant role in smoking relapse among a community sample of unassisted Spanish smokers. Relapse may be much more of an affective and situational process than a habit, physiological or social pressure. Findings from this study may help develop tailored community smoking relapse prevention strategies or programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment-related mortality in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is particularly challenging due to the high treatment intensity needed to induce and sustain a second remission. To improve results, it is important to understand how treatment-related toxicity impacts survival...

  9. Does Extended Telephone Callback Counselling Prevent Smoking Relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segan, C. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether extended callback counselling that proactively engaged ex-smokers with the task of embracing a smoke-free lifestyle (four to six calls delivered 1-3 months after quitting, i.e. when craving levels and perceived need for help had declined) could reduce relapse compared with a revised version of…

  10. Irinotecan for relapsed Wilms tumor in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hol, Janna A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Graf, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    While irinotecan has been studied in various pediatric solid tumors, its potential role in Wilms tumor (WT) is less clear. We evaluated response and outcome of irinotecan-containing regimens in relapsed WT and compared our results to the available literature. Among 14 evaluable patients, one...

  11. A Qualitative Exploration of Drug Abuse Relapse Following Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Manirul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Taro; Alam, Faruq; Rabbani, Golam

    2012-01-01

    Drug use is an alarming issue in Bangladesh. Most drug users return to drugs after treatment, in what becomes a vicious cycle of treatment and relapse. This study explored why they return and what pathways they follow. We carried out 5 key informant interviews, 10 in-depth interviews, 2 focus group discussions, 3 case studies, 8 observations, and…

  12. Functional symptoms in clinically definite MS--pseudo-relapse syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merwick, A

    2012-02-03

    Although the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) have become more formalized and sensitive in the era of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the assessment of individual relapses may not always be straightforward or easily linked to a particular lesion seen on imaging. In addition, acute episodes often have to be assessed outside of normal working hours or when the individual patients usual medical team is not available. Often the emergency department physicians have little formal neurological training and are under time pressure to get patients through the system as quickly as possible. It is therefore possible to mislabel functional symptoms as being true relapses. To illustrate scenarios of possible pseudo-relapse, three clinical vignettes are described. Misclassification of functional symptoms as relapse carries a number of inherent risks. Functional symptoms can be multifactorial and may cause a burden of disease. A multidisciplinary approach may be useful in minimizing unnecessary harm and identify if there is more than meets the eye to an episode of clinical deterioration.

  13. Relapse in Schizophrenia: Definitively not a Bolt from the Blue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španiel, F.; Bakstein, E.; Anýž, J.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Sieger, T.; Hrdlička, J.; Görnerová, N.; Höschl, C.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 669, 16 March (2018), s. 68-74 ISSN 0304-3940 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT14387 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : schizophrenia * early warning signs * relapse * prevention * telemedicine * information technology Subject RIV: FL - Psychiatry, Sexuology Impact factor: 2.180, year: 2016

  14. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Nagels, G.; Bissay, V.; De Keyser, J.

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and

  15. An Ambient Agent To Support Depression Relapse Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, A.A.; Klein, M.C.A.; Treur, J.; Boldi, P.; Vizzari, G.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges for the patients with a history of unipolar depression is to stay healthy throughout their lifetime. In principle, with more prior onset cases, it escalates the risk of the patients to fall into a relapse. In this paper, an ambient agent based model to support patients from

  16. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, Karolien H.; Florquin, Sandrine; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Verlaak, René; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Weening, Jan J.; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of

  17. [A case of relapsing iridocyclitis in tropical malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchinina, V V; Dushin, N V; Beliaev, V S; Barashkov, V I; Gonchar, P A; Frolov, M A

    1997-01-01

    An African student developed bilateral relapsing iridocyclitis with increased intraocular pressure. General examinations and parasitological studies revealed tropical malaria. Etiotropic and local therapy normalized intraocular pressure and improved vision acuity of both eyes. This case should be borne in mind by general practitioners as a possibility of transportation of various tropical diseases.

  18. Relapse and Mortality Risk of Stage I Testicular Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florvall, Cecilia; Frederiksen, Peder; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: - To assess the medical insurance risk for patients with stage I testicular cancer (TC), by calculating the overall mortality risk with and without relapse, and compare it to men from the Danish population. BACKGROUND: - Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in young males...

  19. Preventing Postpartum Smoking Relapse: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michele D; Cheng, Yu; Marcus, Marsha D; Kalarchian, Melissa A; Emery, Rebecca L

    2016-04-01

    Most women who quit smoking during pregnancy will relapse postpartum. Previous efforts to prevent postpartum relapse have been unsuccessful at increasing rates of sustained abstinence. To evaluate the relative efficacy of 2 different approaches to prevent postpartum smoking relapse. Pregnant women who recently had quit smoking were recruited before the end of pregnancy. Intervention sessions were conducted through a combination of telephone calls and in-person visits beginning at delivery and continuing through 24 weeks postpartum. Participants completed assessments at the prenatal baseline and at 12, 24, and 52 weeks postpartum. Participants were recruited between March 2008 and December 2012. The dates of the analysis were April 2014 to February 2015. Women received postpartum-adapted, behavioral smoking relapse prevention intervention and were randomly assigned to an enhanced cognitive behavioral intervention that included additional specialized strategies and content focused on women's postpartum concerns about mood, stress, and weight (Strategies to Avoid Returning to Smoking [STARTS]) or a supportive, time and attention-controlled comparison (SUPPORT). Intervention began before delivery and continued through 24 weeks postpartum. The primary outcome was biochemically confirmed sustained tobacco abstinence at 52 weeks postpartum. Secondary outcomes were self-reported mood, levels of perceived stress, and degree of concern about smoking-related weight gain. The study cohort comprised 300 participants (150 randomly assigned to each group). Their mean (SD) age was 24.99 (5.65) years. Overall, 38.0% (114 of 300), 33.7% (101 of 300), and 24.0% (72 of 300) of the sample maintained abstinence at 12, 24, and 52 weeks' postpartum, respectively. There were no differences between the intervention groups in abstinence or time to relapse. Self-reported depressive symptoms and perceived stress significantly improved over time, and improvements were similar for both

  20. Neural response to catecholamine depletion in remitted bulimia nervosa: Relation to depression and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Stefanie Verena; Mihov, Yoan; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Hasler, Gregor

    2017-07-01

    Bulimia nervosa has been associated with a dysregulated catecholamine system. Nevertheless, the influence of this dysregulation on bulimic symptoms, on neural activity, and on the course of the illness is not clear yet. An instructive paradigm for directly investigating the relationship between catecholaminergic functioning and bulimia nervosa has involved the behavioral and neural responses to experimental catecholamine depletion. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrate of catecholaminergic dysfunction in bulimia nervosa and its relationship to relapse. In a randomized, double-blind and crossover study design, catecholamine depletion was achieved by using the oral administration of alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (AMPT) over 24 h in 18 remitted bulimic (rBN) and 22 healthy (HC) female participants. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using a pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) sequence. In a follow-up telephone interview, bulimic relapse was assessed. Following AMPT, rBN participants revealed an increased vigor reduction and CBF decreases in the pallidum and posterior midcingulate cortex (pMCC) relative to HC participants showing no CBF changes in these regions. These results indicated that the pallidum and the pMCC are the functional neural correlates of the dysregulated catecholamine system in bulimia nervosa. Bulimic relapse was associated with increased depressive symptoms and CBF reduction in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus following catecholamine depletion. AMPT-induced increased CBF in this region predicted staying in remission. These findings demonstrated the importance of depressive symptoms and the stress system in the course of bulimia nervosa. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of major depression on remission and relapse of substance dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Deborah; Liu, Xinhua; Nunes, Edward; McCloud, Steven; Samet, Sharon; Endicott, Jean

    2002-04-01

    The effects of major depressive disorder (MDD) on the course of substance dependence may differ depending on the temporal relationship of depression to dependence. We investigated the effects of MDD on the outcome of substance dependence under 3 circumstances: (1) lifetime onset of MDD prior to lifetime onset of dependence onset, (2) current MDD occurring during a period of abstinence, and (3) current MDD during substance use that exceeded the expected effects of intoxication or withdrawal. A sample of 250 inpatients with DSM-IV cocaine, heroin, and/or alcohol dependence were followed up at 6, 12, and 18 months. The Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM) was used to make DSM-IV diagnoses. Using Cox proportional hazards models, stable remissions (those lasting at least 26 weeks) from DSM-IV cocaine, heroin, and/or alcohol dependence and from use were studied, as well as subsequent relapses of dependence and use. Patients with current substance-induced MDD were less likely to remit from dependence (adjusted hazards ratio, 0.11) than patients with no baseline MDD. A history of MDD prior to lifetime onset of substance dependence also reduced the likelihood of remission relative to the absence of such a history (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.49). Major depressive disorder during sustained abstinence predicted dependence relapse (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.07) and substance use after hospital discharge compared with those without abstinence MDD (adjusted hazards ratio, 1.45). The timing of depressive episodes relative to substance dependence served as an important factor in the remission and relapse of substance dependence and substance use.

  2. Opiate v CNS depressant therapy in neonatal drug abstinence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandall, S R; Doberczak, T M; Mauer, K R; Strashun, R H; Korts, D C

    1983-04-01

    Paregoric and phenobarbital, administered randomly in 153 passively addicted neonates, initially appeared to control neonatal abstinence signs equally well. However, seven of the 62 phenobarbital-treated newborns had abstinence-associated seizures within the first month of life, while none of 49 paregoric-treated neonates had seizures. Forty-two neonates initially requiring no specific pharmacotherapy for abstinence signs were born to mothers taking less methadone hydrochloride just before delivery. Five of those 42 neonates, however, had seizures within the first 14 days of life. Seizure occurrence could not be predicted from analysis of early abstinence patterns. We consider paregoric to be the treatment of choice for the neonatal abstinence syndrome. Phenobarbital use should be monitored with serum drug levels and modification of recommended dosage regimens considered.

  3. Motives to quit smoking and reasons to relapse differ by socioeconomic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisinger, Charlotta; Aadahl, Mette; Toft, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    To investigate motives, strategies and experiences to quit smoking and reasons to relapse as a function of socioeconomic status.......To investigate motives, strategies and experiences to quit smoking and reasons to relapse as a function of socioeconomic status....

  4. Intraoperative squash smear cytology in CNS lesions: A study of 150 pediatric cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Jindal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumors of the central nervous system in the pediatric age group occur relatively frequently during the early years of life. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancies of childhood and only second to acute childhood leukemia. Squash cytology is an indispensable diagnostic aid to central nervous system (CNS lesions. The definitive diagnosis of brain lesions is confirmed by histological examination. Aim: To study the cytology of CNS lesions in pediatric population and correlate it with histopathology. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty cases of CNS lesions in pediatric patients were studied over a period of 2 years. Intraoperative squash smears were prepared, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and examined. Remaining sample was subjected to histopathological examination. Results: Medulloblastoma (24.0% was the most frequently encountered tumor followed by pilocyctic astrocytoma (21.33% and ependymoma (13.33%. Diagnostic accuracy of squash smear technique was 94.67% when compared with histological diagnosis. Conclusion: Smear cytology is a fairly accurate tool for intraoperative CNS consultations.

  5. Mining the topography and dynamics of the 4D Nucleome to identify novel CNS drug pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gerald A; Allyn-Feuer, Ari; Georgoff, Patrick; Nikolian, Vahagn; Alam, Hasan B; Athey, Brian D

    2017-07-01

    The pharmacoepigenome can be defined as the active, noncoding province of the genome including canonical spatial and temporal regulatory mechanisms of gene regulation that respond to xenobiotic stimuli. Many psychotropic drugs that have been in clinical use for decades have ill-defined mechanisms of action that are beginning to be resolved as we understand the transcriptional hierarchy and dynamics of the nucleus. In this review, we describe spatial, temporal and biomechanical mechanisms mediated by psychotropic medications. Focus is placed on a bioinformatics pipeline that can be used both for detection of pharmacoepigenomic variants that discretize drug response and adverse events to improve pharmacogenomic testing, and for the discovery of novel CNS therapeutics. This approach integrates the functional topology and dynamics of the transcriptional hierarchy of the pharmacoepigenome, gene variant-driven identification of pharmacogenomic regulatory domains, and mesoscale mapping for the discovery of novel CNS pharmacodynamic pathways in human brain. Examples of the application of this pipeline are provided, including the discovery of valproic acid (VPA) mediated transcriptional reprogramming of neuronal cell fate following injury, and mapping of a CNS pathway glutamatergic pathway for the mood stabilizer lithium. These examples in regulatory pharmacoepigenomics illustrate how ongoing research using the 4D nucleome provides a foundation to further insight into previously unrecognized psychotropic drug pharmacodynamic pathways in the human CNS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Inflammatory cytokines in the brain: does the CNS shape immune responses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Renno, T; Taupin, V

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been regarded as representing the intrusion of an unruly, ill-behaved mob of leukocytes into the well-ordered and organized domain of thought and reason. However, results accumulated over the past few years suggest that, far ...

  7. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio, E-mail: lucio.vismari@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Batista Camargo Junior, Joao, E-mail: joaocamargo@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  8. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Williams

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the adult central nervous system (CNS, chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease.

  9. Nootropic, anxiolytic and CNS-depressant studies on different plant sources of shankhpushpi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Jai; Karan, Maninder; Vasisht, Karan

    2011-12-01

    Shankhpushpi, a well-known drug in Ayurveda, is extensively used for different central nervous system (CNS) effects especially memory enhancement. Different plants are used under the name shankhpushpi in different regions of India, leading to an uncertainty regarding its true source. Plants commonly used under the name shankhpushpi are: Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois., Evolvulus alsinoides Linn., both from Convolvulaceae, and Clitoria ternatea Linn. (Leguminosae). To find out the true source of shankhpushpi by evaluating and comparing memory-enhancing activity of the three above mentioned plants. Anxiolytic, antidepressant and CNS-depressant activities of these three plants were also compared and evaluated. The nootropic activity of the aqueous methanol extract of each plant was tested using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and step-down models. Anxiolytic, antidepressant and CNS-depressant studies were evaluated using EPM, Porsolt?s swim despair and actophotometer models, respectively. C. pluricaulis extract (CPE) at a dose of 100 mg/kg, p.o. showed maximum nootropic and anxiolytic activity (p nootropic, anxiolytic and CNS-depressant activity. The results of memory-enhancing activity suggest C. pluricaulis to be used as true source of shankhpushpi.

  10. Mast Cells and Innate Lymphoid Cells: Underappreciated Players in CNS Autoimmune Demyelinating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Melissa A; Weinberg, Rebecca B

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are autoimmune CNS inflammatory diseases. As a result of a breakdown in the relatively impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) in affected individuals, myelin-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells gain entry into the immune privileged CNS and initiate myelin, oligodendrocyte, and nerve axon destruction. However, despite the absolute requirement for T cells, there is increasing evidence that innate immune cells also play critical amplifying roles in disease pathogenesis. By modulating the character and magnitude of the myelin-reactive T cell response and regulating BBB integrity, innate cells affect both disease initiation and progression. Two classes of innate cells, mast cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), have been best studied in models of allergic and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Yet, there is emerging evidence that these cell types also exert a profound influence in CNS inflammatory disease. Both cell types are residents within the meninges and can be activated early in disease to express a wide variety of disease-modifying cytokines and chemokines. In this review, we discuss how mast cells and ILCs can have either disease-promoting or -protecting effects on MS and other CNS inflammatory diseases and how sex hormones may influence this outcome. These observations suggest that targeting these cells and their unique mediators can be exploited therapeutically.

  11. Immune cell entry to the CNS--a focus for immunoregulation of EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Tran, E; Hassan-Zahraee, M

    1999-01-01

    -requirement then to prove such a role. The point that emerges is that cytokine production in the CNS parenchyma is itself dependent on the prior infiltration of immune cells, and that without immune cell entry, EAE does not occur. This identifies events at the BBB, and in particular in the perivascular space, as critical...

  12. Migration, fate and in vivo imaging of stem cells in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.3 (2009), s. 4-4 ISSN 1351-5101. [Congress of the European-Federation-of-Neurological-Societies /13./. 12.09.2009-15.09.2009, Florencie] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : CNS * ESC Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  13. Comparative analysis of acid sphingomyelinase distribution in the CNS of rats and mice following intracerebroventricular delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Treleaven

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick A (NPA disease is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD caused by a deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase (ASM activity. Previously, we reported that biochemical and functional abnormalities observed in ASM knockout (ASMKO mice could be partially alleviated by intracerebroventricular (ICV infusion of hASM. We now show that this route of delivery also results in widespread enzyme distribution throughout the rat brain and spinal cord. However, enzyme diffusion into CNS parenchyma did not occur in a linear dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, although the levels of hASM detected in the rat CNS were determined to be within the range shown to be therapeutic in ASMKO mice, the absolute amounts represented less than 1% of the total dose administered. Finally, our results also showed that similar levels of enzyme distribution are achieved across rodent species when the dose is normalized to CNS weight as opposed to whole body weight. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy observed following ICV delivery of hASM in ASMKO mice could be scaled to CNS of the rat.

  14. CNS Damage Classification in Newborn Infants by Neural Network Based Cry Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Ekkel, T.

    2002-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of the human body is the whole system of brain, spinal marrow and nerve cells throughout the body that correlates and regulates the internal reactions of the body and controls its adjustment to the environment. It controls muscles and processes sensory information

  15. CSF Hypocretin-1 Levels and Clinical Profiles in Narcolepsy and Idiopathic CNS Hypersomnia in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Mona Skard; Evsiukova, Tatiana; Vilming, Steinar; Gjerstad, Michaela D.; Schrader, Harald; Gautvik, Kaare

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between CSF hypocretin-1 levels and clinical profiles in narcolepsy and CNS hypersomnia in Norwegian patients. Method: CSF hypocretin-1 was measured by a sensitive radioimmunoassay in 47 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 7 with narcolepsy without cataplexy, 10 with idiopathic CNS hypersomnia, and a control group. Results: Low hypocretin-1 values were found in 72% of the HLA DQB1*0602 positive patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Patients with low CSF hypocretin-1 levels reported more extensive muscular involvement during cataplectic attacks than patients with normal levels. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis occurred more frequently in patients with cataplexy than in the other patient groups, but with no correlation to hypocretin-1 levels. Conclusion: About three quarters of the HLA DQB1*0602 positive patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy had low CSF hypocretin-1 values, and appear to form a distinct clinical entity. Narcolepsy without cataplexy could not be distinguished from idiopathic CNS hypersomnia by clinical symptoms or biochemical findings. Citation: Heier MS; Evsiukova T; Vilming S; Gjerstad MD; Schrader H; Gautvik K. CSF hypocretin-1 levels and clinical profiles in narcolepsy and idiopathic CNS hypersomnia in norway. SLEEP 2007;30(8):969-973. PMID:17702265

  16. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio; Batista Camargo Junior, Joao

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  17. Diagnostic value of kinetic analysis using dynamic FDG PET in immunocompetent patients with primary CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yuka; Monden, Toshihide; Sasakawa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accumulation of FDG in immunocompetent patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma using qualitative and quantitative PET images and to compare baseline with follow-up PET after therapy. Twelve immunocompetent patients with CNS lymphoma were examined. Dynamic emission data were acquired for 60 min immediately following injection of FDG. In seven patients, repeated PET studies were performed after treatment. Applying a three-compartment five-parameter model, K 1 , k 2 , k 3 , k 4 , vascular fraction (V B ) and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR Glc ) were obtained. We evaluated the FDG uptake visually using qualitative and parametric images and quantitatively using parametric images. A total of 12 lesions were identified in ten patients with newly diagnosed CNS lymphoma. On visual analysis, ten lesions showed an increase on qualitative images, eight showed an increase on K 1 images, 12 showed an increase on k 3 images and ten showed an increase on CMR Glc images. On quantitative analysis, k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values of the lesion were significantly different from those of the normal grey matter (p 3 and CMR Glc images. The K 1 , k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values after treatment were significantly different from those obtained before treatment (p 3 , using dynamic FDG PET might be helpful for diagnosis of CNS lymphoma and for monitoring therapeutic assessment. (orig.)

  18. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused by e...

  19. Enhancing Psychosocial Outcomes for Young Adult Childhood CNS Cancer Survivors: Importance of Addressing Vocational Identity and Community Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; Wagner, Stacia; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vocational identity, community integration, positive and negative affect, and satisfaction with life in a group of young adult central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors. Participants in this study included 45 young adult CNS cancer survivors who ranged in age from 18 to 30 years…

  20. Distribution of CNS Species on Teat Skin and in Milk Samples from Dairy Cows in Automatic Milking Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmod, Yasser; Svennesen, Line; Pedersen, Karl

    identified in milk samples. Staphylococcus chromogenes was detected in both milk (n= 2) and teat skin (n= 1) samples. Data collection will be finished in April 2017. The final results will give new insights into herd specific CNS species patterns and the microbial ecology and epidemiology of common CNS...

  1. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R., E-mail: bvuillemenot@bmrn.com [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Kennedy, Derek [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B. [Northern Biomedical Research, Inc., Muskegon, MI (United States); Butt, Mark T. [Tox Path Specialists, LLC, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O' Neill, Charles A. [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  2. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  3. When can real-time quantitative RT-PCR effectively define molecular relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients? (Results of the French Belgian Swiss APL Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinat, Bruno; de Botton, Stéphane; Kelaidi, Charikleia; Ades, Lionel; Zassadowski, Fabien; Guillemot, Isabelle; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Legrand, Olivier; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Gardembas, Martine; Himberlin, Chantal; Cahn, Jean Yves; Guyotat, Denis; Bouscary, Didier; Parry, Anne; Rousselot, Philippe; Baruchel, Andre; Dombret, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Fenaux, Pierre; Chomienne, Christine

    2009-09-01

    10-20% of APL patients relapse and the challenge remains to early identify these patients to improve survival rate. We report PML-RARalpha transcript detection by RQ-PCR in 260 consecutive APL patients (n = 970 samples). 223 patients with samples of sufficient RNA quality to demonstrate they reached molecular remission were monitored for MRD. During follow-up, 38 of these patients were tested positive for PML-RARalpha mRNA. 13 out of the 38 patients (34%) effectively developed hematological relapse. In the first positive sample, specific PML-RARalpha NCN thresholds over which, or under which, patients could effectively be predicted to relapse or not, were identified and subsequently validated in a second cohort.

  4. Epigenetic heterogeneity affects the risk of relapse in children with t(8;21)RUNX1-RUNX1T1-rearranged AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Matteo; Tregnago, Claudia; Bisio, Valeria; Simula, Luca; Borella, Giulia; Manara, Elena; Zanon, Carlo; Zonta, Francesca; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Campello, Silvia; Buldini, Barbara; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina

    2018-02-02

    The somatic translocation t(8;21)(q22;q22)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 is one of the most frequent rearrangements found in children with standard-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Despite the favorable prognostic role of this aberration, we recently observed a higher than expected frequency of relapse. Here, we employed an integrated high-throughput approach aimed at identifying new biological features predicting relapse among 34 t(8;21)-rearranged patients. We found that the DNA methylation status of patients who suffered from relapse was peculiarly different from that of children maintaining complete remission. The epigenetic signature, made up of 337 differentially methylated regions, was then integrated with gene and protein expression profiles, leading to a network, where cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-motility pathways were found to be aberrantly activated in relapsed patients. We identified most of these factors as RUNX1-RUNX1T1 targets, with Ras Homolog Family Member (RHOB) overexpression being the core of this network. We documented how RHOB re-organized the actin cytoskeleton through its downstream ROCK-LIMK-COFILIN axis: this increases blast adhesion by stress fiber formation, and reduces mitochondrial apoptotic cell death after chemotherapy treatment. Altogether, our data show an epigenetic heterogeneity within t(8;21)-rearranged AML patients at diagnosis able to influence the program of the chimeric transcript, promoting blast re-emergence and progression to relapse.

  5. P-glycoprotein trafficking as a therapeutic target to optimize CNS drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas P; Sanchez-Covarubias, Lucy; Tome, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit is to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from potentially harmful xenobiotic substances and maintain CNS homeostasis. Restricted access to the CNS is maintained via a combination of tight junction proteins as well as a variety of efflux and influx transporters that limits the transcellular and paracellular movement of solutes. Of the transporters identified at the BBB, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has emerged as the transporter that is the greatest obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. In this chapter, we provide data to support intracellular protein trafficking of P-gp within cerebral capillary microvessels as a potential target for improved drug delivery. We show that pain-induced changes in P-gp trafficking are associated with changes in P-gp's association with caveolin-1, a key scaffolding/trafficking protein that colocalizes with P-gp at the luminal membrane of brain microvessels. Changes in colocalization with the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of caveolin-1, by pain, are accompanied by dynamic changes in the distribution, relocalization, and activation of P-gp "pools" between microvascular endothelial cell subcellular compartments. Since redox-sensitive processes may be involved in signaling disassembly of higher-order structures of P-gp, we feel that manipulating redox signaling, via specific protein targeting at the BBB, may protect disulfide bond integrity of P-gp reservoirs and control trafficking to the membrane surface, providing improved CNS drug delivery. The advantage of therapeutic drug "relocalization" of a protein is that the physiological impact can be modified, temporarily or long term, despite pathology-induced changes in gene transcription. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  7. Discrimination of different brain metastases and primary CNS lymphomas using morphologic criteria and diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bette, S.; Wiestler, B.; Huber, T.; Boeckh-Behrens, T.; Zimmer, C.; Kirschke, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Delbridge, C. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Meyer, B.; Gempt, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2016-12-15

    Brain metastases are a common complication of cancer and occur in about 15-40% of patients with malignancies. The aim of this retrospective study was to differentiate between metastases from different primary tumors/CNS lymphyomas using morphologic criteria, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage, cysts, pattern of contrast enhancement and location were reported in 200 consecutive patients with brain metastases/primary CNS lymphomas. FA and ADC values were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part, the necrosis and the non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Differences between histopathological subtypes of metastases were analyzed using non-parametric tests, decision trees and hierarchical clustering analysis. Significant differences were found in morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage or pattern of contrast enhancement. In diffusion measurements, significant differences between the different tumor entities were only found in ADC analyzed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part. Among single tumor entities, primary CNS lymphomas showed significantly lower median ADC values in the contrast-enhancing tumor part (ADC{sub lymphoma} 0.92 [0.83-1.07] vs. ADC{sub no} {sub lymphoma} 1.35 [1.10-1.64] P=0.001). Further differentiation between types of metastases was not possible using FA and ADC. There were morphologic differences among the main subtypes of brain metastases/CNS lymphomas. However, due to a high variability of common types of metastases and low specificity, prospective differentiation remained challenging. DTI including FA and ADC was not a reliable tool for differentiation between different histopathological subtypes of brain metastases except for CNS lymphomas showing lower ADC values. Biopsy, surgery and staging remain essential for diagnosis.

  8. SPARC and GluA1-Containing AMPA Receptors Promote Neuronal Health Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma V. Jones

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The proper formation and maintenance of functional synapses in the central nervous system (CNS requires communication between neurons and astrocytes and the ability of astrocytes to release neuromodulatory molecules. Previously, we described a novel role for the astrocyte-secreted matricellular protein SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine in regulating α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs and plasticity at developing synapses. SPARC is highly expressed by astrocytes and microglia during CNS development but its level is reduced in adulthood. Interestingly, SPARC has been shown to be upregulated in CNS injury and disease. However, the role of SPARC upregulation in these contexts is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SPARC administration on glutamate receptors on mature hippocampal neuron cultures and following CNS injury. We found that SPARC treatment increased the number of GluA1-containing AMPARs at synapses and enhanced synaptic function. Furthermore, we determined that the increase in synaptic strength induced by SPARC could be inhibited by Philanthotoxin-433, a blocker of homomeric GluA1-containing AMPARs. We then investigated the effect of SPARC treatment on neuronal health in an injury context where SPARC expression is upregulated. We found that SPARC levels are increased in astrocytes and microglia following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in vitro. Remarkably, chronic pre-treatment with SPARC prevented OGD-induced loss of synaptic GluA1. Furthermore, SPARC treatment reduced neuronal death through Philanthotoxin-433 sensitive GluA1 receptors. Taken together, this study suggests a novel role for SPARC and GluA1 in promoting neuronal health and recovery following CNS damage.

  9. Alcohol intake alters immune responses and promotes CNS viral persistence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Jennifer M; Taylor, Jonathan; Raué, Hans-Peter; Slifka, Mark K; Huang, Elaine

    2016-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to progressive liver disease and is associated with a variety of extrahepatic effects, including central nervous system (CNS) damage and neuropsychiatric impairments. Alcohol abuse can exacerbate these adverse effects on brain and behavior, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. This study investigated the role of alcohol in regulating viral persistence and CNS immunopathology in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), a model for HCV infections in humans. Female and male BALB/c mice (n=94) were exposed to alcohol (ethanol; EtOH) and water (or water only) using a two-bottle choice paradigm, followed one week later by infection with either LCMV clone 13 (causes chronic infection similar to chronic HCV), LCMV Armstrong (causes acute infection), or vehicle. Mice were monitored for 60days post-infection and continued to receive 24-h access to EtOH and water. Animals infected with LCMV clone 13 drank more EtOH, as compared to those with an acute or no viral infection. Six weeks after infection with LCMV clone 13, mice with EtOH exposure evidenced higher serum viral titers, as compared to mice without EtOH exposure. EtOH intake was also associated with reductions in virus-specific CD8(+) T cell frequencies (particularly CD11a(hi) subsets) and evidence of persistent CNS viremia in chronically infected mice. These findings support the hypothesis that EtOH use and chronic viral infection can result in combined toxic effects accelerating CNS damage and neuropsychiatric dysfunction and suggest that examining the role of EtOH in regulating viral persistence and CNS immunopathology in mice infected with LCMV can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of comorbid alcohol use disorder and chronic viral infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. HOW DOES FINGOLIMOD (GILENYA® FIT IN THE TREATMENT ALGORITHM FOR HIGHLY ACTIVE RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eFazekas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurological disorder characterised by inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS. Until recently, disease modifying treatment was based on agents requiring parenteral delivery, thus limiting long-term compliance. Basic treatments such as beta-interferon provide only moderate efficacy, and although therapies for second-line treatment and highly active MS are more effective, they are associated with potentially severe side effects. Fingolimod (Gilenya® is the first oral treatment of MS and has recently been approved as single disease-modifying therapy in highly active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS for adult patients with high disease activity despite basic treatment (beta-interferon and for treatment-naïve patients with rapidly evolving severe RRMS. At a scientific meeting that took place in Vienna on November 18th, 2011, experts from 10 Central and Eastern European countries discussed the clinical benefits and potential risks of fingolimod for MS, suggested how the new therapy fits within the current treatment algorithm and provided expert opinion for the selection and management of patients.

  11. Gray Matter Correlates of Cognitive Performance Differ between Relapsing-Remitting and Primary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Jonkman

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory/demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Most patients experience a relapsing-remitting (RR course, while about 15-20% of patients experience a primary progressive (PP course. Cognitive impairment affects approximately 40-70% of all MS patients and differences in cognitive impairment between RR-MS and PP-MS have been found. We aimed to compare RR-MS and PP-MS patients in terms of cognitive performance, and to investigate the MRI correlates of cognitive impairment in the two groups using measures of brain volumes and cortical thickness. Fifty-seven patients (42 RR-MS, 15 PP-MS and thirty-eight matched controls underwent neuropsychological (NP testing and MRI. PP-MS patients scored lower than RR-MS patients on most of the NP tests in absence of any specific pattern. PP-MS patients showed significantly lower caudate volume. There was no significant difference in MRI correlates of cognitive impairment between the two groups except for a prevalent association with MRI measures of cortical GM injury in RR-MS patients and with MRI measures of subcortical GM injury in PP-MS patients. This suggests that although cognitive impairment results from several factors, cortical and subcortical GM injury may play a different role depending on the disease course.

  12. Ketamine displaces the novel NMDA receptor SPET probe [123I]CNS-1261 in humans in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, James M.; Erlandsson, Kjell; Arstad, Erik; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Squassante, Lisa; Teneggi, Vincenza; Ell, Peter J.; Pilowsky, Lyn S.

    2006-01-01

    [ 123 I]CNS-1261 [N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine] is a high-affinity SPET ligand with selectivity for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study evaluated the effects of ketamine (a specific competitor for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site) on [ 123 I]CNS-1261 binding to NMDA receptors in vivo. Ten healthy volunteers underwent 2 bolus-plus-infusion [ 123 I]CNS-1261 scans, one during placebo and the other during a ketamine challenge. Ketamine administration led to a significant decrease in [ 123 I]CNS-1261 V T in most of the brain regions examined (P 123 I]CNS-1261 appears to be a specific ligand in vivo for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 NMDA binding site

  13. Ketamine displaces the novel NMDA receptor SPET probe [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 in humans in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, James M. [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: j.stone@iop.kcl.ac.uk; Erlandsson, Kjell [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, W1N 8AA (United Kingdom); Arstad, Erik [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom); Bressan, Rodrigo A. [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom); Squassante, Lisa [GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Verona 37135 (Italy); Teneggi, Vincenza [GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Verona 37135 (Italy); Ell, Peter J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, W1N 8AA (United Kingdom); Pilowsky, Lyn S. [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, W1N 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 [N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine] is a high-affinity SPET ligand with selectivity for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study evaluated the effects of ketamine (a specific competitor for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site) on [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 binding to NMDA receptors in vivo. Ten healthy volunteers underwent 2 bolus-plus-infusion [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 scans, one during placebo and the other during a ketamine challenge. Ketamine administration led to a significant decrease in [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 V {sub T} in most of the brain regions examined (P<.05). [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 appears to be a specific ligand in vivo for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 NMDA binding site.

  14. Strengths of families to limit relapse in mentally ill family members ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Relapse prevention in mental health care is important. Utilising the strengths of families can be a valuable approach in relapse prevention. Studies on family strengths have been conducted but little has been done on the strengths of family members to help limit relapse in mental health care users. The purpose ...

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  16. Use of iowa spaces for the orthodontic management of mandibular postsurgical skeletal relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Justus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been documented that there is a tendency for skeletal relapse after orthognathic surgery. This relapse occurs more often following mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy setbacks. The possible causes for lack of postsurgical stability as well as the clinical recommendations to manage the relapse are presented. Among these recommendations is the creation of Iowa Spaces.

  17. Breaking the rhythm of depression : Cognitive Behavior Therapy and relapse prevention for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L.H.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial part of the treatment of depression is the prevention of relapse and recurrence. Psychological interventions, especially cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) are helpful in preventing relapse and recurrence in depression. The effectivity of four types of relapse prevention cognitive behavior

  18. The Effectiveness of Transactional Behavior Analytic Group Therapy on the Prevention of Relapse among Detoxified People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mousa Kafi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addiction Phenomenon among detoxified people is an important therapeutic problem for substance abusers. The aim of this research was the study of effectiveness of transactional behavior analytic group therapy on prevention of relapse of detoxified people. Method: the research design was quasi experimental with witness group. By using of available sampling of detoxified people who referred to government centers for maintenance therapy with Methadone, 24 subjects that divided to two control and witness groups (12 subjects for each group selected of Bojnord city. Each subjects completed the write's relapse prediction scale as pretest. Post test administered after group therapy and after 5 months follow up test administered among two groups. Morphine test has done with follow up test simultaneously. Independent samples t-test and covariance analysis has run for analyzing of data. Results: The results of covariance showed that tempting of substance use was significantly differed in post test and follow up, but there was not significant difference in probability of substance use. Conclusion: Finding of this research showed, the transactional behavior analytic group therapy may be effective in tempting of substance use among detoxified people and it can considered by specialists.

  19. Alkaline phosphatase expression during relapse after orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increasing of osteoblast activities during bone formation will be accompanied with the increasing expression of alkaline phosphatase enzyme (ALP. ALP can be obtained from clear fluid excreted by gingival crevicular fluid (GCF. Bone turnover, especially bone formation process, can be monitored through the expression of ALP secreted by GCF during orthodontic treatment. Thus, retention period is an important period that can be monitored through the level of bone metabolism around teeth. Purpose: This research were aimed to determine the relation of distance change caused by tooth relapse and ALP activities in gingival crevicular fluid after orthodontic; and to determine ALP as a potential biomarker of bone formation during retention period. Methods: Lower incisors of 25 guinea pigs were moved 3 mm to the distally by using open coil spring. Those relapse distance were measured and the gingival crevicular fluid was taken by using paper points to evaluate ALP levels on days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21 respectivelly by using a spectrophotometer (405 nm. t-test and ANOVA test were conducted to determine the difference of ALP activities among the time intervals. The correlation regression analysis was conducted to determine the relation of distance change caused by the relapse tooth movement and ALP activities. Results: The greatest relapse movement was occurred on day 3 after open coil spring was removed. There was significant difference of the average of distance decrease among groups A1-A5 (p<0.05. It was also known that ALP level was increased on day 3, but there was no significant difference of the average level of ALP among groups A1-A5 (p>0.05. Finally, based on the results of correlation analysis between the ALP level decreasing and the relapse distance on both right and left of mesial and distal sides, it is known that there was no relation between those two variables (p>0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that relapse after orthodontic

  20. Intralesional rituximab in primary conjunctival follicular lymphoma relapsed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Villa, S; Ruiz Rodríguez, M J; Vargas Pabón, M

    2017-07-01

    A 49-year-old woman experienced a local relapse of a primary follicular lymphoma (FL) of the conjunctiva. She received 4 weekly intra-lesional injections followed by 6 monthly injections of rituximab (6mg/ml). A clinical response was achieved after first injection. No adverse ocular event or signs of lymphoma relapse were seen after 10 months of follow-up. Intralesional administration of rituximab for treating primary FL of the conjunctiva was an effective and safe therapeutic option; therefore it could be an alternative to other conventional treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Evolving concepts in the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, Giancarlo; Radaelli, Marta; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    In the past 20 years the treatment scenario of multiple sclerosis has radically changed. The increasing availability of effective disease-modifying therapies has shifted the aim of therapeutic interventions from a reduction in relapses and disability accrual, to the absence of any sign of clinical...... or MRI activity. The choice for therapy is increasingly complex and should be driven by an appropriate knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the different drugs and of their risk-benefit profile. Because the relapsing phase of the disease is characterised by inflammation, treatment should be started...... as early as possible and aim to re-establish the normal complex interactions in the immune system. Before starting a treatment, neurologists should carefully consider the state of the disease, its prognostic factors and comorbidities, the patient's response to previous treatments, and whether the patient...

  2. Pyrexia-associated Relapse in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Yoshimura, Hajime; Kohara, Nobuo

    2018-04-27

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is a relapsing-remitting or chronic progressive demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. We report the case of a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy who experienced relapses on four occasions after experiencing pyrexia and flu-like symptoms. Our patient showed characteristic features, such as relapse after pyrexia and flu-like symptoms, remission after pyretolysis without treatment, and the absence of remarkable improvement in a nerve conduction study in the remission phase. The serum level of tumor necrosis factor-α was elevated in the relapse phase and reduced in the remission phase; thus, the induction of cytokine release by viral infection might have caused the relapses.

  3. Carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Keith; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Masszi, Tamás; Špička, Ivan; Oriol, Albert; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Siegel, David S; Mihaylov, Georgi G; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Rajnics, Péter; Suvorov, Aleksandr; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Ludwig, Heinz; Wang, Michael; Maisnar, Vladimír; Minarik, Jiri; Bensinger, William I; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Kukreti, Vishal; Zojwalla, Naseem; Tonda, Margaret E; Yang, Xinqun; Xing, Biao; Moreau, Philippe; Palumbo, Antonio

    2015-01-08

    Lenalidomide plus dexamethasone is a reference treatment for relapsed multiple myeloma. The combination of the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone has shown efficacy in a phase 1 and 2 study in relapsed multiple myeloma. We randomly assigned 792 patients with relapsed multiple myeloma to carfilzomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (carfilzomib group) or lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone (control group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Progression-free survival was significantly improved with carfilzomib (median, 26.3 months, vs. 17.6 months in the control group; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57 to 0.83; P=0.0001). The median overall survival was not reached in either group at the interim analysis. The Kaplan-Meier 24-month overall survival rates were 73.3% and 65.0% in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively (hazard ratio for death, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.99; P=0.04). The rates of overall response (partial response or better) were 87.1% and 66.7% in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively (P<0.001; 31.8% and 9.3% of patients in the respective groups had a complete response or better; 14.1% and 4.3% had a stringent complete response). Adverse events of grade 3 or higher were reported in 83.7% and 80.7% of patients in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively; 15.3% and 17.7% of patients discontinued treatment owing to adverse events. Patients in the carfilzomib group reported superior health-related quality of life. In patients with relapsed multiple myeloma, the addition of carfilzomib to lenalidomide and dexamethasone resulted in significantly improved progression-free survival at the interim analysis and had a favorable risk-benefit profile. (Funded by Onyx Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01080391.).

  4. Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent relapse of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourreille, Arnaud; Cadiot, Guillaume; Le Dreau, Gérard; Laharie, David; Beaugerie, Laurent; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Marteau, Philippe; Rampal, Patrick; Moyse, Dominique; Saleh, Ashraf; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Galmiche, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast that has been shown to have beneficial effects on the intestinal epithelial barrier and digestive immune system. There is preliminary evidence that S boulardii could be used to treat patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of S boulardii in patients with CD who underwent remission during therapy with steroids or aminosalicylates. We performed a prospective study of 165 patients who achieved remission after treatment with steroids or salicylates; they were randomly assigned to groups given S boulardii (1 g/day) or placebo for 52 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage of patients in remission at week 52. Time to relapse, Crohn's disease activity index scores, and changes in parameters of inflammation were secondary end points. CD relapsed in 80 patients, 38 in the S boulardii group (47.5%) and 42 in the placebo group (53.2%, a nonsignificant difference). The median time to relapse did not differ significantly between patients given S boulardii (40.7 weeks) vs placebo (39.0 weeks). There were no significant differences between groups in mean Crohn's disease activity index scores or erythrocyte sedimentation rates or in median levels of C-reactive protein. In a post hoc analysis, nonsmokers given S boulardii were less likely to experience a relapse of CD than nonsmokers given placebo, but this finding requires confirmation. Although the probiotic yeast S boulardii is safe and well tolerated, it does not appear to have any beneficial effects for patients with CD in remission after steroid or salicylate therapies. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Motivations for cannabis cessation, coping and adaptation strategies, and perceived benefits: impact on cannabis use relapse and abstinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauchard, E; Septfons, A; Chabrol, H

    2013-12-01

    energetic (reported by 68%) and more active during the day (62%), being able to control their life (67%), proving themselves they could quit (60%), saving money (60%), as well being less worried about their health (57%) were also reported as motivations to quit cannabis use. Different coping and adaptation strategies were also reported. First, environmental strategies such as disposing of both cannabis (71%) and equipment to smoke (71%), no longer going to places where cannabis is smoked (33%) or lifestyle changes (68%) were used to cope with cannabis cessation. Then cognitive strategies such as motivation, willingness (71%), self-control and having a positive perception of the situation (68%) were also reported. Regarding coping strategies, participants accepted and learned how to live with the new situation (68%), and social support from family (32%) and friends (30%) were reported. Perceived benefits were linked with motivations for cannabis cessation. Thus, participants reported having more energy (75%), being more active (73%), less tired (70%) and recovering memory (57%) after cannabis cessation. Fifty-two percent of participants relapsed after the quit attempt. Abstainers had significantly higher scores on two subscales: the "negative impact of cannabis use on one's health and on self and social image" (t(61)=-3.84; Pchange, relapse, and abstinence. Social and family support, as well as social network appears to be of prime importance in relapses and prevention programs for cannabis use. New perspectives for research on cannabis cessation self-change and relapses are thus highlighted, notably regarding factors that could predict relapse or success in cessation of smoking cannabis. Research on cannabis self-change and relapse are warranted for both prevention and therapeutic programs. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Docetaxel-induced polyploidization may underlie chemoresistance and disease relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Angela; Rida, Padmashree C G; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Kucuk, Omer; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-10-28

    Although docetaxel significantly improves survival in a variety of malignancies, its clinical utility is severely restricted by acquired chemoresistance and disease relapse. To uncover the mechanisms underlying these all too common occurrences, an abundance of research has focused on mutations and gene expression patterns; however, these findings are yet to translate into improved outcomes for patients being administered this drug. These analyses have overlooked a promising lead in the quest to discern key mediators of resistance and relapse following docetaxel therapy: polyploidization. This process is manifested following docetaxel-mediated mitotic arrest by the appearance of giant, multinucleated cells, which slipped from mitosis without undergoing cytokinesis. Polyploid cells generally possess supernumerary centrosomes, are chromosomally instable, and resist chemotherapy. We thus suspect that chemoresistance and relapse following treatment with docetaxel might be combatted by co-administration of centrosome declustering drugs, which could selectively destroy polyploid cells given that normal cells do not possess amplified centrosomes, an intriguing paradigm that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The modified Puestow procedure for chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombleholme, T M; deLorimier, A A; Way, L W; Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T; Harrison, M R

    1990-07-01

    Chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children is an unusual condition that often goes undiagnosed and untreated for years. In light of recent reports in adults that endocrine and exocrine function may be preserved by early pancreaticojejunostomy, we reviewed our experience with this procedure (one Duval, 10 Puestows) in 10 children between 1969 and 1989. The underlying etiology was familial pancreatitis in four patients, one case of unknown etiology, congenital ductal anomalies in four (one pancreas divisum, one annular pancreas, one choledochal cyst, and one ductal stenosis), and posttraumatic in one. All 10 had intractable recurrent abdominal pain. Preoperatively, only three patients evidenced exocrine insufficiency and none had endocrine insufficiency. There was complete resolution of pain in eight patients and improvement in two during a mean observation period of 4 years (range, 7 months to 19.75 years). Exocrine insufficiency resolved in two patients but has persisted in the third patient now on Viokase. Endocrine insufficiency has developed during follow-up in one patient. Pancreaticojejunostomy provides excellent relief of recurrent pain in chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is indicated when the diagnosis of chronic relapsing pancreatitis is suspected to define the ductal anatomy. Pancreaticojejunostomy may prevent the progression of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency if performed early in the course of the disease.

  8. Rituximab treatment for relapsed opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Morisada, Naoya; Takami, Yuichi; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ninchoji, Takeshi; Nozu, Kandai; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takada, Satoshi; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-03-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder that is associated with paraneoplastic diseases. Because OMS can frequently relapse, patients may be inflicted with neurological problems for a long time. Recently, rituximab (RTX) was introduced as a drug to treat OMS. To assess RTX treatment, we studied a patient who experienced recurrence of OMS. A 2-year-old Japanese boy, who had left adrenal neuroblastoma, suddenly showed OMS symptoms, including ataxia and opsoclonus. Surgical resection of the tumor and subsequent steroid therapy ameliorated his symptoms. When OMS relapsed during the time when prednisolone was reduced, he was treated with full-dose RTX therapy (375 mg/m2/week) for 4 consecutive weeks. However, 1year later, he presented again with OMS symptoms. This time, we only administered an additional single dose of RTX treatment (375 mg/m2), allowing remission of OMS symptoms. During 2 years after the additional RTX treatment, OMS symptoms did not appear, even when prednisolone was reduced. He had no adverse events associated with RTX during the whole treatment period. An additional single-dose RTX therapy might be effective for relapsed OMS patients who were previously treated with full-dose RTX therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High risk of postpartum relapses in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawiter, Eric C; Bove, Riley; Elsone, Liene; Alvarez, Enrique; Borisow, Nadja; Cortez, Melissa; Mateen, Farrah; Mealy, Maureen A; Sorum, Jaime; Mutch, Kerry; Tobyne, Sean M; Ruprecht, Klemens; Buckle, Guy; Levy, Michael; Wingerchuk, Dean; Paul, Friedemann; Cross, Anne H; Jacobs, Anu; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weinshenker, Brian

    2017-11-28

    To study the effect of pregnancy on the frequency of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) relapse and evaluate rates of pregnancy-related complications in an international multicenter setting. We administered a standardized survey to 217 women with NMOSD from 7 medical centers and reviewed their medical records. We compared the annualized relapse rate (ARR) during a baseline period 2 years prior to a participant's first pregnancy to that during pregnancy and to the 9 months postpartum. We also assessed pregnancy-related complications. There were 46 informative pregnancies following symptom onset in 31 women with NMOSD. Compared to baseline (0.17), ARR was increased both during pregnancy (0.44; p = 0.035) and during the postpartum period (0.69; p = 0.009). The highest ARR occurred during the first 3 months postpartum (ARR 1.33). A total of 8 of 76 (10.5%) with onset of NMOSD prior to age 40 experienced their initial symptom during the 3 months postpartum, 2.9 times higher than expected. The postpartum period is a particularly high-risk time for initial presentation of NMOSD. In contrast to published observations in multiple sclerosis, in neuromyelitis optica, relapse rate during pregnancy was also increased, although to a lesser extent than after delivery. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Relapse of nephrotic syndrome during post-rituximab peripheral blood B-lymphocyte depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mai; Kamei, Koichi; Ogura, Masao; Ishikura, Kenji; Ito, Shuichi

    2018-02-01

    Rituximab is effective against complicated childhood steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS). Peripheral blood B-lymphocyte (B-cell) depletion is strongly correlated with persistent remission, relapse rarely occurring during B-cell depletion; however, we have encountered several such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics and clinical course of 82 patients with SDNS treated with rituximab from January 2007 to December 2012 in our institution. Six of 82 patients (7.3%) had relapses during B-cell depletion after receiving rituximab (relapsed group). The remaining 76 patients did not have relapses during B-cell depletion (non-relapsed group). The median time to initial relapse during B-cell depletion was 85 days after receiving rituximab, which is significantly shorter than in the non-relapsed group (410 days, p = 0.0003). The median annual numbers of relapses after receiving rituximab were 2.5 and 0.9 in the relapsed and non-relapsed groups, respectively (p depletion did not differ between the two groups. Relapse during B-cell depletion after receiving rituximab suggests that various pathophysiological mechanisms play a part in childhood nephrotic syndrome.

  11. Incidence of extramedullary relapse after haploidentical SCT for advanced AML/myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Taniguchi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Soma, T; Ogawa, H

    2012-05-01

    Extramedullary (EM) relapse of leukemia after allo-SCT in patients with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome has been increasingly reported. The reduced effectiveness of the GVL effect in EM sites, as compared with BM, has been suggested to underlie this problem. We retrospectively analyzed the pattern of relapse after haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT), performed as the first or second SCT. Among 38 patients who received haplo-SCT as their first SCT, the cumulative incidences of BM and EM relapse at 3 years were 40.5 and 10.9%, respectively. Among 19 patients who received haplo-SCT as their second SCT, the cumulative incidences of BM and EM relapse were 30.9 and 31.9%, respectively. Moreover, most of the patients who underwent repeat haplo-SCT for the treatment of EM relapse had further EM relapse at other sites. Post-relapse survival did not differ significantly with different patterns of relapse. The frequent occurrence of EM relapse after haplo-SCT, particularly when performed as a second SCT, suggests that the potent GVL effect elicited by an HLA disparity also occurs preferentially in BM. Our findings emphasize the need for a treatment strategy for EM relapse that recognizes the reduced susceptibility of EM relapse to the GVL effect.

  12. Natural host genetic resistance to lentiviral CNS disease: a neuroprotective MHC class I allele in SIV-infected macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Mankowski

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5. Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001. Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease.

  13. Dynamic of CSF and serum biomarkers in HIV-1 subtype C encephalitis with CNS genetic compartmentalization-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sergio M; Rotta, Indianara; Ribeiro, Clea E; Oliveira, Michelli F; Chaillon, Antoine; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Cunha, Ana Paula; Zonta, Marise; Bents, Joao França; Raboni, Sonia M; Smith, Davey; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald J

    2017-06-01

    Despite the effective suppression of viremia with antiretroviral therapy, HIV can still replicate in the central nervous system (CNS). This was a longitudinal study of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum dynamics of several biomarkers related to inflammation, the blood-brain barrier, neuronal injury, and IgG intrathecal synthesis in serial samples of CSF and serum from a patient infected with HIV-1 subtype C with CNS compartmentalization.The phylogenetic analyses of plasma and CSF samples in an acute phase using next-generation sequencing and F-statistics analysis of C2-V3 haplotypes revealed distinct compartmentalized CSF viruses in paired CSF and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. The CSF biomarker analysis in this patient showed that symptomatic CSF escape is accompanied by CNS inflammation, high levels of cell and humoral immune biomarkers, CNS barrier dysfunction, and an increase in neuronal injury biomarkers with demyelization. Independent and isolated HIV replication can occur in the CNS, even in HIV-1 subtype C, leading to compartmentalization and development of quasispecies distinct from the peripheral plasma. These immunological aspects of the HIV CNS escape have not been described previously. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CNS HIV escape and compartmentalization in HIV-1 subtype C.

  14. The Extracellular Environment of the CNS: Influence on Plasticity, Sprouting, and Axonal Regeneration after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Lindsey H.

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular environment of the central nervous system (CNS) becomes highly structured and organized as the nervous system matures. The extracellular space of the CNS along with its subdomains plays a crucial role in the function and stability of the CNS. In this review, we have focused on two components of the neuronal extracellular environment, which are important in regulating CNS plasticity including the extracellular matrix (ECM) and myelin. The ECM consists of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and tenascins, which are organized into unique structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs associate with the neuronal cell body and proximal dendrites of predominantly parvalbumin-positive interneurons, forming a robust lattice-like structure. These developmentally regulated structures are maintained in the adult CNS and enhance synaptic stability. After injury, however, CSPGs and tenascins contribute to the structure of the inhibitory glial scar, which actively prevents axonal regeneration. Myelin sheaths and mature adult oligodendrocytes, despite their important role in signal conduction in mature CNS axons, contribute to the inhibitory environment existing after injury. As such, unlike the peripheral nervous system, the CNS is unable to revert to a “developmental state” to aid neuronal repair. Modulation of these external factors, however, has been shown to promote growth, regeneration, and functional plasticity after injury. This review will highlight some of the factors that contribute to or prevent plasticity, sprouting, and axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:29849554

  15. CNS recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes specific for a peripheral virus infection triggers neuropathogenesis during polymicrobial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Matullo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although viruses have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS diseases of unknown etiology, including multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the reproducible identification of viral triggers in such diseases has been largely unsuccessful. Here, we explore the hypothesis that viruses need not replicate in the tissue in which they cause disease; specifically, that a peripheral infection might trigger CNS pathology. To test this idea, we utilized a transgenic mouse model in which we found that immune cells responding to a peripheral infection are recruited to the CNS, where they trigger neurological damage. In this model, mice are infected with both CNS-restricted measles virus (MV and peripherally restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. While infection with either virus alone resulted in no illness, infection with both viruses caused disease in all mice, with ∼50% dying following seizures. Co-infection resulted in a 12-fold increase in the number of CD8+ T cells in the brain as compared to MV infection alone. Tetramer analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (>35% of these infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes were LCMV-specific, despite no detectable LCMV in CNS tissues. Mechanistically, CNS disease was due to edema, induced in a CD8-dependent but perforin-independent manner, and brain herniation, similar to that observed in mice challenged intracerebrally with LCMV. These results indicate that T cell trafficking can be influenced by other ongoing immune challenges, and that CD8+ T cell recruitment to the brain can trigger CNS disease in the apparent absence of cognate antigen. By extrapolation, human CNS diseases of unknown etiology need not be associated with infection with any particular agent; rather, a condition that compromises and activates the blood-brain barrier and adjacent brain parenchyma can render the CNS susceptible to pathogen-independent immune attack.

  16. Extramedullary Relapse Following Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Tsai, Nicole [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu, An [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen J. [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Approximately 5% to 20% of patients who undergo total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can develop extramedullary (EM) relapse. Whereas total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) provides a more conformally targeted radiation therapy for patients, organ sparing has the potential to place the patient at a higher risk for EM relapse than TBI. This study evaluated EM relapse in patients treated with TMLI at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for analysis had been enrolled in 1 of 3 prospective TMLI trials between 2006 and 2012. The TMLI targeted bones, major lymph node chains, liver, spleen, testes, and brain, using image-guided tomotherapy with total dose ranging from 12 to 15 Gy. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 47 years were studied. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Incidence of EM relapse and bone marrow (BM) relapse were 12.9% and 25.7%, respectively. Of the 13 patients who had EM relapse, 4 also had BM relapse, and 7 had EM disease prior to HCT. There were a total of 19 EM relapse sites as the site of initial recurrence: 11 soft tissue, 6 lymph node, 2 skin. Nine of these sites were within the target region and received ≥12 Gy. Ten initial EM relapse sites were outside of the target region: 5 sites received 10.1 to 11.4 Gy while 5 sites received <10 Gy. Pretransplantation EM was the only significant predictor of subsequent EM relapse. The cumulative incidence of EM relapse was 4% at 1 year and 11.4% at 2 years. Conclusions: EM relapse incidence was as frequent in regions receiving ≥10 Gy as those receiving <10 Gy. EM relapse rates following TMLI that included HCT regimens were comparable to published results with regimens including TBI and suggest that TMLI is not associated with an increased EM relapse risk.

  17. Extramedullary Relapse Following Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Stein, Anthony; Tsai, Nicole; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Palmer, Joycelynne; Liu, An; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen J.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 5% to 20% of patients who undergo total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can develop extramedullary (EM) relapse. Whereas total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) provides a more conformally targeted radiation therapy for patients, organ sparing has the potential to place the patient at a higher risk for EM relapse than TBI. This study evaluated EM relapse in patients treated with TMLI at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for analysis had been enrolled in 1 of 3 prospective TMLI trials between 2006 and 2012. The TMLI targeted bones, major lymph node chains, liver, spleen, testes, and brain, using image-guided tomotherapy with total dose ranging from 12 to 15 Gy. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 47 years were studied. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Incidence of EM relapse and bone marrow (BM) relapse were 12.9% and 25.7%, respectively. Of the 13 patients who had EM relapse, 4 also had BM relapse, and 7 had EM disease prior to HCT. There were a total of 19 EM relapse sites as the site of initial recurrence: 11 soft tissue, 6 lymph node, 2 skin. Nine of these sites were within the target region and received ≥12 Gy. Ten initial EM relapse sites were outside of the target region: 5 sites received 10.1 to 11.4 Gy while 5 sites received <10 Gy. Pretransplantation EM was the only significant predictor of subsequent EM relapse. The cumulative incidence of EM relapse was 4% at 1 year and 11.4% at 2 years. Conclusions: EM relapse incidence was as frequent in regions receiving ≥10 Gy as those receiving <10 Gy. EM relapse rates following TMLI that included HCT regimens were comparable to published results with regimens including TBI and suggest that TMLI is not associated with an increased EM relapse risk

  18. Salvage radiotherapy for patients with P.S.A. relapse after radical prostatectomy: comparisons among Astro and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quero, L.; Hennequin, V.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Mongiat-Artus, P.; Desgrandchamps, F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Study about the efficacy of salvage radiotherapy (R.T.), in terms of biochemical disease free survival (b.D.F.S.), according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions, for persistent or rising P.S.A. after radical prostatectomy. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of 59 patients who underwent R.T. between 1990 and 2003 for P.S.A. recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients received a median of 66 Gy to the prostate bed with 3D or 2D R.T.. The main end point was b.D.F.S. according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions. Different criterion sets were analysed to calculate b.D.F.S. and pretreatment factors that might predict biochemical relapse were sought for each. Results After a 38-month median follow-up, the 3-year b.D.F.S. rates were: 60 and 72% for Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/ml) definitions respectively. According to univariate analysis, pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml and seminal vesicle involvement were associated with biochemical relapse. Multivariate analysis retained only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml as an independent predictor of biochemical relapse for the two definitions. Conclusion Salvage R.T. is an effective treatment after radical prostatectomy according to Astro or Phoenix definitions. Only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml predicted relapse. (authors)

  19. Predictors of Relapse after Discontinuing Systemic Treatment in Childhood Autoimmune Chronic Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonini, Gabriele; Bracaglia, Claudia; Cattalini, Marco; Taddio, Andrea; Brambilla, Alice; De Libero, Cinzia; Pires Marafon, Denise; Caputo, Roberto; Cimaz, Rolando

    2017-06-01

    To identify clinical predictors of relapse in childhood autoimmune chronic uveitis after stopping systemic treatment. A retrospective, multicenter, cohort study. Ninety-four children in remission, receiving no treatments and with at least a 6-month followup, were enrolled. A higher probability of maintaining remission after discontinuing treatment was shown in idiopathic compared with juvenile idiopathic arthritis uveitis (Mantel-Cox chi-square = 23.21) if inactivity had been obtained within 6 months from starting systemic treatment (Mantel-Cox chi-square = 24.17) and by antitumor necrosis factor-α treatment (Mantel-Cox chi-square = 6.43). Type of disease, time, and type of systemic therapy to achieve inactivity predict different duration of uveitis remission after treatment withdrawal.

  20. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cavaliere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral ischemia.

  1. Inflammatory cytokines in the brain: does the CNS shape immune responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, T; Renno, T; Taupin, V; Krakowski, M

    1994-12-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been regarded as representing the intrusion of an unruly, ill-behaved mob of leukocytes into the well-ordered and organized domain of thought and reason. However, results accumulated over the past few years suggest that, far from being an immunologically privileged organ, T lymphocytes may be regular and frequent visitors to the CNS, for purposes of immune surveillance. Here, Trevor Owens and colleagues propose that the brain itself can regulate or shape immune responses therein. Furthermore, given that the immune cells may be subverted to autoimmunity, they suggest that the study of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the brain may shed light on the ability of the local environment to regulate immune responses.

  2. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, C.E. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, Stott Lane, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: chockycj@yahoo.co.uk; Turnbull, I.W. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, Stott Lane, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences.

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs as Potential Inducers of Antineoplastic Effects in CNS Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tatenhorst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-inducible transcription factors which belong to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. In recent years it turned out that natural as well as synthetic PPAR agonists exhibit profound antineoplastic as well as redifferentiation effects in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. The molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still emerging, with partially controverse findings reported by a number of studies dealing with the influence of PPARs on treatment of tumor cells in vitro. Remarkably, studies examining the effects of these drugs in vivo are just beginning to emerge. However, the agonists of PPARs, in particular the thiazolidinediones, seem to be promising candidates for new approaches in human CNS tumor therapy.

  4. The glymphatic system in CNS health and disease: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is unique in being the only organ system lacking lymphatic vessels to assist in the removal of interstitial metabolic waste products. Recent work has led to the discovery of the glymphatic system, a glial-dependent perivascular network that subserves a pseudo-lymphatic function in the brain. Within the glymphatic pathway, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) enters brain via periarterial spaces, passes into the interstitium via perivascular astrocytic aquaporin-4, and then drives the perivenous drainage of interstitial fluid (ISF) and its solute. Here we review the role of the glymphatic pathway in CNS physiology, factors known to regulate glymphatic flow, and pathologic processes where a breakdown of glymphatic CSF-ISF exchange has been implicated in disease initiation and progression. Important areas of future research, including manipulation of glymphatic activity aiming to improve waste clearance and therapeutic agent delivery, will also be discussed. PMID:29195051

  5. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offiah, C.E.; Turnbull, I.W.

    2006-01-01

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences

  6. Commercial viability of CNS drugs: balancing the risk/reward profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ginger S

    2014-01-01

    CNS has historically been a formidable therapeutic area in which to innovate owing to biological (e.g., complex neurobiology, difficulty reaching the target), as well as clinical (e.g., subjective clinical endpoints, high placebo response, lack of biomarkers) challenges. In the current market where many of the larger diseases are dominated by a generic standard of care, commercial challenges now make the triple threat of scientific-clinical-commercial risk too much for many players to tackle. However, opportunities do exist for smaller biotech companies to concentrate on narrowly focused patient populations associated with high unmet need for which risk can be tightly defined. In CNS, there are two major areas to balance the risk/reward profile and create commercially viable opportunities: To realize value, all companies (start-ups and big players) must define, measure and quantify clear and meaningful value to all stakeholders: physicians, patients, caregivers and payers. © 2013.

  7. Evaluation of CNS activities of aerial parts of Cynodon dactylon Pers. in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dilipkumar

    2008-01-01

    The dried extracts of aerial parts of Cynodon dactylon Pers. (Graminae) were evaluated for CNS activities in mice. The ethanol extract of aerial parts of C. dactylon (EECD) was found to cause significant depression in general behavioral profiles in mice. EECD significantly potentiated the sleeping time in mice induced by standard hypnotics viz. pentobarbitone sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate in a dose dependant manner. EECD showed significant analgesic properties as evidenced by the significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches induced in mice by 1.2% acetic acid solution. It also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine in mice. EECD inhibited the onset and the incidence of convulsion in a dose dependent manner against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsion. The present study indicates that EECD has significant CNS depressant activities.

  8. CNS manifestation in progressive facial hemiatrophy (Romberg's disease). MRI findings and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terstegge, K.; Henkes, H.; Kern, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article the authors describe the clinical and MR imaging findings of the CNS in three female patients with PFH and present a comprehensive review of the literature. One of three PFH patients had partial epilepsy. MRI showed ventricular enlargement, white matter lesions, flattening of the cortical surface and meningeal adhesions homolateral to the facial hemiatrophy. Two other patients had completely normal intracranial findings. These findings confirm that cerebral hemiatrophy can occur in a subgroup of PFH patients. The MRI pattern, however, does not seem to be consistent with a simple atrophic or malnutrition process. The authors consider chronic localized meningoencephalitis with vascular involvement as a possible underlying mechanism for the occasional CNS involvement in PFH. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Nogo-A is a reliable oligodendroglial marker in adult human and mouse CNS and in demyelinated lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Maruschak, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    to be strongly expressed in mature oligodendrocytes in vivo. In the present investigation we analyzed the expression patterns of Nogo-A in adult mouse and human CNS as well as in demyelinating animal models and multiple sclerosis lesions. Nogo-A expression was compared with that of other frequently used...... oligodendroglial markers such as CC1, CNP, and in situ hybridization for proteolipid protein mRNA. Nogo-A strongly and reliably labeled oligodendrocytes in the adult CNS as well as in demyelinating lesions and thus represents a valuable tool for the identification of oligodendrocytes in human and mouse CNS tissue...

  10. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in

  11. In vivo human apolipoprotein E isoform fractional turnover rates in the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin R Wildsmith

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and has been implicated in the risk for other neurological disorders. The three common ApoE isoforms (ApoE2, E3, and E4 each differ by a single amino acid, with ApoE4 increasing and ApoE2 decreasing the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Both the isoform and amount of ApoE in the brain modulate AD pathology by altering the extent of amyloid beta (Aβ peptide deposition. Therefore, quantifying ApoE isoform production and clearance rates may advance our understanding of the role of ApoE in health and disease. To measure the kinetics of ApoE in the central nervous system (CNS, we applied in vivo stable isotope labeling to quantify the fractional turnover rates of ApoE isoforms in 18 cognitively-normal adults and in ApoE3 and ApoE4 targeted-replacement mice. No isoform-specific differences in CNS ApoE3 and ApoE4 turnover rates were observed when measured in human CSF or mouse brain. However, CNS and peripheral ApoE isoform turnover rates differed substantially, which is consistent with previous reports and suggests that the pathways responsible for ApoE metabolism are different in the CNS and the periphery. We also demonstrate a slower turnover rate for CSF ApoE than that for amyloid beta, another molecule critically important in AD pathogenesis.

  12. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-01-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain. (orig.)

  13. Rotorcraft Low Altitude CNS (Communications, Navigation and Surveillance) Benefit/Cost Analysis, Rotorcraft Operations Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    inventory of rotorcraft activity by mission and location. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement Helicopter Helicopter Missions This document is available...helicopter is used to transport skiers /hikers to remote, normally inaccessible places. This mission is performed in rural or wilderness areas at altitudes...their applicability to the CNS benefit/cost analysis. Because of the uncertainty in the knowledge of the characteristics of both current and future

  14. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-03-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain.

  15. BOBATH THERAPY IN CORRECTION OF PSYCHOMOTOR DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN WITH ORGANIC INJURIES CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhovets, B. O.; Romanchuk, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The article represents therapy of Bobath such as one of the most effective author method which use in correction psychomotor development of children with disorders of musculoskeletal system. Bobath method is not new in the correction of movement disorders since last century and still supplementing and improving. In this work highlight topic of the effective use Bobath therapy in correction of psychomotor development in children age 3 – 6 years with organic involvement CNS. the experiment w...

  16. The glymphatic system in CNS health and disease: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is unique in being the only organ system lacking lymphatic vessels to assist in the removal of interstitial metabolic waste products. Recent work has led to the discovery of the glymphatic system, a glial-dependent perivascular network that subserves a pseudo-lymphatic function in the brain. Within the glymphatic pathway, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) enters brain via periarterial spaces, passes into the interstitium via perivascular astrocytic aquaporin-4, and th...

  17. Nanomaterials for delivery of nucleic acid to the central nervous system (CNS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Danyang; Wu, Lin-Ping

    2017-01-01

    -related disease, such as neurodegeneration and disorders, suitable, safe and effective drug delivery nanocarriers have to been developed to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB), which is the most inflexible barrier in human body. Here, we highlight the structure and function of barriers in the central nervous...... system (CNS) and summary several types of nanomaterials which can be potentially used in the brain delivery nucleic acid....

  18. Prospective evaluation of delayed central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Lohr, Frank; Fruehauf, Stefan; Wildermuth, Susanne; Kampen, Michael van; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of chronic radiation effects on the healthy adult brain using neuropsychological testing of intelligence, attention, and memory. Methods and Materials: 58 patients (43 ± 10 yr) undergoing hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (TBI, 14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy in 4 days) before bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were prospectively included. Twenty-one recurrence-free long-term survivors were re-examined 6-36 months (median 27 months) after completion of TBI. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence, attention, and memory using normative, standardized psychometric tests. Mood status was controlled, as well. Test results are given as IQ scores (population mean 100) or percentiles for attention and memory (population mean 50). Results: The 21 patients showed normal baseline test results of IQ (101 ± 13) and attention (53 ± 28), with memory test scores below average (35 ± 21). Test results of IQ (98 ± 17), attention (58 ± 27), and memory (43 ± 28) showed no signs of clinically measurable radiation damage to higher CNS (central nervous system) functions during the follow-up. The mood status was improved. Conclusion: The investigation of CNS toxicity after hyperfractionated TBI showed no deterioration of test results in adult recurrence-free patients with tumor-free CNS. The median follow-up of 27 months will be extended.

  19. Decreased Cognitive/CNS Function in Young Adults at Risk for Hypertension: Effects of Sleep Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. McCubbin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension has been linked to impaired cognitive/CNS function, and some of these changes may precede development of frank essential hypertension. The stress and fatigue of sleep deprivation may exacerbate these cognitive changes in young adults at risk. We hypothesize that individuals at risk for hypertension will show significant declines in cognitive function during a night of sleep deprivation. Fifty-one young adults were recruited for 28-hour total sleep deprivation studies. Hypertension risk was assessed by mildly elevated resting blood pressure and by family history of hypertension. A series of cognitive memory tasks was given at four test sessions across the sleep deprivation period. Although initially comparable in cognitive performance, persons at risk showed larger declines across the night for several indices of working memory, including code substitution, category, and order recall. These results suggest that cognitive/CNS changes may parallel or precede blood pressure dysregulation in the early stages of hypertension development. The role of CNS changes in the etiology of essential hypertension is discussed.

  20. Developmental hyperoxia alters CNS mechanisms underlying hypoxic ventilatory depression in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Corey B; Grandgeorge, Samuel H; Bavis, Ryan W

    2013-12-01

    Newborn mammals exhibit a biphasic hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR), but the relative contributions of carotid body-initiated CNS mechanisms versus central hypoxia on ventilatory depression during the late phase of the HVR are not well understood. Neonatal rats (P4-5 or P13-15) were treated with a nonselective P2 purinergic receptor antagonist (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid, or PPADS; 125mgkg(-1), i.p.) to pharmacologically denervate the peripheral chemoreceptors. At P4-5, rats reared in normoxia showed a progressive decline in ventilation during a 10-min exposure to 12% O2 (21-28% decrease from baseline). No hypoxic ventilatory depression was observed in the older group of neonatal rats (i.e., P13-15), suggesting that the contribution of central hypoxia to hypoxic ventilatory depression diminishes with age. In contrast, rats reared in moderate hyperoxia (60% O2) from birth exhibited no hypoxic ventilatory depression at either age studied. Systemic PPADS had no effect on the ventilatory response to 7% CO2, suggesting that the drug did not cross the blood-brain barrier. These findings indicate that (1) CNS hypoxia depresses ventilation in young, neonatal rats independent of carotid body activation and (2) hyperoxia alters the development of CNS pathways that modulate the late phase of the hypoxic ventilatory response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.