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Sample records for cns midline cell

  1. T2*-based MR imaging (gradient echo or susceptibility-weighted imaging) in midline and off-midline intracranial germ cell tumors. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morana, Giovanni; Tortora, Domenico; Severino, Mariasavina; Rossi, Andrea; Alves, Cesar Augusto; Finlay, Jonathan L.; Nozza, Paolo; Ravegnani, Marcello; Pavanello, Marco; Milanaccio, Claudia; Garre, Maria Luisa; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2018-01-01

    The role of T2*-based MR imaging in intracranial germ cell tumors (GCTs) has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) or T2* gradient echo (GRE) features of germinomas and non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCTs) in midline and off-midline locations. We retrospectively evaluated all consecutive pediatric patients referred to our institution between 2005 and 2016, for newly diagnosed, treatment-naive intracranial GCT, who underwent MRI, including T2*-based MR imaging (T2* GRE sequences or SWI). Standard pre- and post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted imaging characteristics along with T2*-based MR imaging features of all lesions were evaluated. Diagnosis was performed in accordance with the SIOP CNS GCT protocol criteria. Twenty-four subjects met the inclusion criteria (17 males and 7 females). There were 17 patients with germinomas, including 5 basal ganglia primaries, and 7 patients with secreting NGGCT. All off-midline germinomas presented with SWI or GRE hypointensity; among midline GCT, all NGGCTs showed SWI or GRE hypointensity whereas all but one pure germinoma were isointense or hyperintense to normal parenchyma. A significant difference emerged on T2*-based MR imaging among midline germinomas, NGGCTs, and off-midline germinomas (p < 0.001). Assessment of the SWI or GRE characteristics of intracranial GCT may potentially assist in differentiating pure germinomas from NGGCT and in the characterization of basal ganglia involvement. T2*-based MR imaging is recommended in case of suspected intracranial GCT. (orig.)

  2. T2*-based MR imaging (gradient echo or susceptibility-weighted imaging) in midline and off-midline intracranial germ cell tumors. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morana, Giovanni; Tortora, Domenico; Severino, Mariasavina; Rossi, Andrea [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neuroradiology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Alves, Cesar Augusto [Hospital Das Clinicas, Radiology Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Finlay, Jonathan L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital and The Ohio State University, Division of Hematology, Oncology and BMT, Columbus, OH (United States); Nozza, Paolo [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Pathology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Ravegnani, Marcello; Pavanello, Marco [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neurosurgery Unit, Genoa (Italy); Milanaccio, Claudia; Garre, Maria Luisa [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neuro-oncology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Maghnie, Mohamad [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, University of Genova, Pediatric Endocrine Unit, Genoa (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    The role of T2*-based MR imaging in intracranial germ cell tumors (GCTs) has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) or T2* gradient echo (GRE) features of germinomas and non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCTs) in midline and off-midline locations. We retrospectively evaluated all consecutive pediatric patients referred to our institution between 2005 and 2016, for newly diagnosed, treatment-naive intracranial GCT, who underwent MRI, including T2*-based MR imaging (T2* GRE sequences or SWI). Standard pre- and post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted imaging characteristics along with T2*-based MR imaging features of all lesions were evaluated. Diagnosis was performed in accordance with the SIOP CNS GCT protocol criteria. Twenty-four subjects met the inclusion criteria (17 males and 7 females). There were 17 patients with germinomas, including 5 basal ganglia primaries, and 7 patients with secreting NGGCT. All off-midline germinomas presented with SWI or GRE hypointensity; among midline GCT, all NGGCTs showed SWI or GRE hypointensity whereas all but one pure germinoma were isointense or hyperintense to normal parenchyma. A significant difference emerged on T2*-based MR imaging among midline germinomas, NGGCTs, and off-midline germinomas (p < 0.001). Assessment of the SWI or GRE characteristics of intracranial GCT may potentially assist in differentiating pure germinomas from NGGCT and in the characterization of basal ganglia involvement. T2*-based MR imaging is recommended in case of suspected intracranial GCT. (orig.)

  3. Drosophila heart cell movement to the midline occurs through both cell autonomous migration and dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Timm; Schneider, Matthias; Schwendele, Bernd; Renault, Andrew D

    2014-12-15

    The Drosophila heart is a linear organ formed by the movement of bilaterally specified progenitor cells to the midline and adherence of contralateral heart cells. This movement occurs through the attachment of heart cells to the overlying ectoderm which is undergoing dorsal closure. Therefore heart cells are thought to move to the midline passively. Through live imaging experiments and analysis of mutants that affect the speed of dorsal closure we show that heart cells in Drosophila are autonomously migratory and part of their movement to the midline is independent of the ectoderm. This means that heart formation in flies is more similar to that in vertebrates than previously thought. We also show that defects in dorsal closure can result in failure of the amnioserosa to properly degenerate, which can physically hinder joining of contralateral heart cells leading to a broken heart phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Germ Cell Tumor Located in the Midline of the Anterior Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana PIRDOPSKA; Ivan TERZIEV; Sv. HRISTOVA; W. MLADENOVSKY; R. PETKOV

    2011-01-01

    Primary germ cell tumors involving midline of the anterior neck are extremely rare. Here we report a 68-year-old male who was operated due to a mass lesion in the anterior neck with infiltration of the isthmus of the thyroid gland. Histopathological examination revealed a germ cell tumor with extragonadal localization in the anterior neck infiltrating the isthmus of the thyroid gland.

  5. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

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    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  6. Condyloma-like squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva: report of two midline cases

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Shyam B; Wollina, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Shyam B Verma,1 Uwe Wollina21Nirvana Clinic, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 2Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, GermanyAbstract: Vulvar cancer is uncommon and may be confused with genital condylomata. We report two cases of middle-aged women presenting with exophytic vulvar tumors of the midline for which diagnosis of a vulvar squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histopathology. Risk factors, staging, and treatment options are...

  7. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  8. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Le Blanc, Katarina [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Stem Cell Research, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Immunology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  9. Single-minded and the evolution of the ventral midline in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linne, Viktoria; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2012-04-01

    In insects and crustaceans, ventral midline cells are present that subdivide the CNS into bilateral symmetric halves. In both arthropod groups unpaired midline neurons and glial cells have been identified that contribute to the embryonic patterning mechanisms. In the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, for example, the midline cells are involved in neural cell fate specification along the dorso-ventral axis but also in axonal pathfinding and organisation of the axonal scaffold. Both in insects and malacostracan crustaceans, the bHLH-PAS transcription factor single-minded is the master regulator of ventral midline development and homology has been suggested for individual midline precursors in these groups. The conserved arrangement of the axonal scaffold as well as the regular pattern of neural precursors in all euarthropod groups raises the question whether the ventral midline system is conserved in this phylum. In the remaining euarthropod groups, the chelicerates and myriapods, a single-minded homologue has been identified in the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum (chelicerate), however, the gene is not expressed in the ventral midline but in the median area of the ventral neuroectoderm. Here we show that At-sim is not required for ventral midline development. Furthermore, we identify sim homologues in representatives of arthropods that have not yet been analysed: the myriapod Strigamia maritima and a representative of an outgroup to the euarthropods, the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis. We compare the expression patterns to the A. tepidariorum sim homologue expression and furthermore analyse the nature of the arthropod midline cells. Our data suggest that in arthropods unpaired midline precursors evolved from the bilateral median domain of the ventral neuroectoderm in the last common ancestor of Mandibulata (insects, crustaceans, myriapods). We hypothesize that sim was expressed in this domain and recruited to ventral midline development. Subsequently, sim

  10. NUT midline carcinoma mimicking a germ cell tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yohei; Koyama, Takafumi; Takeuchi, Kengo; Shoji, Kazufusa; Hoshi, Kazuei; Oyama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy. Although more information on NMC has been recently accumulating in the literature, most oncologists and pathologists remain unfamiliar with the clinical and pathologic features of this disease. The clinical features of NMC sometimes mimic those of other malignancies, and NMC can therefore be overlooked if the diagnosis is not suspected. We present the case of a young male with NMC arising in the mediastinum with elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein levels suggestive of an extragonadal nonseminomatous germ-cell tumor. A 28-year-old Japanese male presented with cough and left-sided chest pain for 6 weeks. The patient had a mediastinal tumor with metastases to the right lung, lymph nodes, and bones at initial presentation. Nonseminomatous germ cell tumor was suspected due to the young age, location of the tumors, and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein. However, biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of NMC with immunohistochemistry. The tumor briefly responded to cytotoxic chemotherapy but subsequently progressed and became refractory to the chemotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was administered with dramatic shrinkage of the tumor and a metabolic response on 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) scan. However, the patient died 4.5 months after the diagnosis of NMC. Serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein may be elevated in patients with NMC. Regardless of the level of tumor markers, immunohistochemistry for NUT should be performed in cases of poorly differentiated carcinomas without glandular differentiation arising in the midline structures. 18 F-FDG PET/CT is useful for staging and assessing responses to therapy

  11. Radioprotection of mouse CNS endothelial cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubimova, N.; Coultas, P.; Martin, R.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Radioprotection using the minor groove binding DNA ligand Hoechst 33342 has been demonstrated in vitro, and more recently in vivo, in mouse lung. Intravenous administration was used for the lung studies, and both endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells-showed good up-take. Radiation damage to the endothelial cell population has also been postulated as important in late developing radionecrosis of spinal cord and brain. Endothelial cell density in brain can be readily determined by a fluorescent-histochemical technique. Treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and subsequent injection with L-DOPA results in an accumulation of dopamine (DA) in CNS endothelial cells. DA is converted to a fluorophore by exposure to paraformaldehyde, and cell numbers assayed by fluorescence microscopy. Earlier studies used this technique to monitor post-irradiation changes in endothelial cell density in rodent brain and showed the loss, within 24 hours, of a sensitive subpopulation comprising about 15% of the endothelial cells. Ten minutes after intravenous injection of Hoechst 33342 (80mg/kg) the ligand is confined by its limited penetration to the endothelial cells in mouse brain. When we irradiated at this time, there was protection against early endothelial cell loss. Ablation of the sensitive subpopulation in unprotected mice takes place over a dose range of 1 to 3 Gy γ-rays, but doses between 12 to 20 Gy are required in the presence of ligand. This protection equates to a very high dose modification factor of about 7 and possibly reflects a suppression of apoptosis in the sensitive endothelial subpopulation. The extent to which there is enhanced survival in the endothelial population as a whole and how the observed protection affects late CNS necrosis development has yet to be determined. However present results clearly show potential for the use of DNA-binding radioprotectors with limited penetration for investigations into the relative significance of

  12. Mast Cells and Innate Lymphoid Cells: Underappreciated Players in CNS Autoimmune Demyelinating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Melissa A; Weinberg, Rebecca B

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are autoimmune CNS inflammatory diseases. As a result of a breakdown in the relatively impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) in affected individuals, myelin-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells gain entry into the immune privileged CNS and initiate myelin, oligodendrocyte, and nerve axon destruction. However, despite the absolute requirement for T cells, there is increasing evidence that innate immune cells also play critical amplifying roles in disease pathogenesis. By modulating the character and magnitude of the myelin-reactive T cell response and regulating BBB integrity, innate cells affect both disease initiation and progression. Two classes of innate cells, mast cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), have been best studied in models of allergic and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Yet, there is emerging evidence that these cell types also exert a profound influence in CNS inflammatory disease. Both cell types are residents within the meninges and can be activated early in disease to express a wide variety of disease-modifying cytokines and chemokines. In this review, we discuss how mast cells and ILCs can have either disease-promoting or -protecting effects on MS and other CNS inflammatory diseases and how sex hormones may influence this outcome. These observations suggest that targeting these cells and their unique mediators can be exploited therapeutically.

  13. Radiation therapy of lethal midline granuloma type nasal T-cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Koh-ichi; Hareyama, Masato; Ohuchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Morita, Kazuo; Harabuchi, Yasuaki; Kataura, Akikatsu

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lethal midline granuloma (LMG) is disorder characterized by progressive, unrelenting ulceration, and necrosis of the nasal cavity and midline facial tissues. Several investigators have demonstrated that LMG (polymorphic reticulosis) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma, and the term nasal T-cell lymphoma of the LMG type (LMG-NTL) has since been widely used. Recently, expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on tumor cells has been reported in some cases. However, there is very little information about the optimal treatment for this disease. In this study, we report our observations on the clinical behavior of this tumor in comparison with nasal lymphoma of non-LMG-NTL type (non-LMG-NTL) that makes tumor mass and paranasal sinus lymphoma (PSL) to improve management of LMG-NTL. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients (10 men, 6 women) with LMG-NTL, 8 patients (4 men, 4 women) with non-LMG-NTL, and 6 patients (4 men, 2 women) with PSL were treated with radiation therapy between January 1975 and December 1994. Four of 8 patients with non-LMG-NTL had tumors of B-cell origin and four had T-cell derived tumors. All 6 patients with PSL had B-cell tumors. They had stage I or II disease. The radiation portal encompassed clinically involved areas with a generous margin. The median dose received was 40 Gy (range, 9-74 Gy) and the median TDF delivered was 63.3 (range, 13.7-103.5). One or two courses of VEPA chemotherapy (same drugs as CHOP, however, drugs doses and treatment schedule are a little different) were administered to the patients with non-LMG-NTL after radiotherapy and the patients with PSL before radiotherapy. In patients with LMG-NTL, between 1975 and 1981 one patient was treated with COPP, one with VEMP after radiotherapy, and two with radiotherapy alone. From 1982 to 1986, all three patients treated for LMG-NTL received VEPA before radiotherapy. Since 1987, of 11 patients treated for LMG-NTL, all except one received two courses of

  14. The expression of the T-box selector gene midline in the leg imaginal disc is controlled by both transcriptional regulation and cell lineage

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    Pia C. Svendsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila Tbx20 homologs midline and H15 act as selector genes for ventral fate in Drosophila legs. midline and H15 expression defines the ventral domain of the leg and the two genes are necessary and sufficient for the development of ventral fate. Ventral-specific expression of midline and H15 is activated by Wingless (Wg and repressed by Decapentaplegic (Dpp. Here we identify VLE, a 5 kb enhancer that drives ventral specific expression in the leg disc that is very similar to midline expression. Subdivision of VLE identifies two regions that mediate both activation and repression and third region that only mediates repression. Loss- and gain-of-function genetic mosaic analysis shows that the activating and repressing regions respond to Wg and Dpp signaling respectively. All three repression regions depend on the activity of Mothers-against-decapentaplegic, a Drosophila r-Smad that mediates Dpp signaling, and respond to ectopic expression of the Dpp target genes optomoter-blind and Dorsocross 3. However, only one repression region is responsive to loss of schnurri, a co-repressor required for direct repression by Dpp-signaling. Thus, Dpp signaling restricts midline expression through both direct repression and through the activation of downstream repressors. We also find that midline and H15 expression are both subject to cross-repression and feedback inhibition. Finally, a lineage analysis indicates that ventral midline-expressing cells and dorsal omb-expressing cells do not mix during development. Together this data indicates that the ventral-specific expression of midline results from both transcriptional regulation and from a lack of cell-mixing between dorsal and ventral cells.

  15. Ciona intestinalis Noto4 contains a phosphotyrosine interaction domain and is involved in the midline intercalation of notochord cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigehiro; Ueno, Naoto; Satoh, Nori; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Brachyury plays a pivotal role in the notochord formation in ascidian embryos. Ciona intestinalis Noto4 (Ci-Noto4) was isolated as a gene downstream of Ci-Bra. This gene encodes a 307 amino-acid protein with a C-terminal phosphotyrosine interaction domain (PTB/PID). Expression of Ci-Noto4 commences at the neural plate stage and is specific to notochord cells. Suppression of Ci-Noto4 levels with specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides resulted in the formation of two rows of notochord cells owing to a lack of midline intercalation between the bilateral populations of progenitor cells. In contrast, overexpression of Ci-Noto4 by injection of a Ci-Bra(promoter):Ci-Noto4-EGFP construct into fertilized eggs disrupted the localization of notochord cells. Ci-Noto4 overexpression did not affect cellular differentiation in the notochord, muscle, mesenchyme, or nervous system. Analysis of Ci-Noto4 regions that are responsible for its function suggested significant roles for the PTB/PID and a central region, an area with no obvious sequence similarity to other known proteins. These results suggested that PTB/PID-containing Ci-Noto4 is essential for midline intercalation of notochord cells in chordate embryos.

  16. Contribution of Schwann Cells to Remyelination in a Naturally Occurring Canine Model of CNS Neuroinflammation.

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    Kristel Kegler

    Full Text Available Gliogenesis under pathophysiological conditions is of particular clinical relevance since it may provide evidence for regeneration promoting cells recruitable for therapeutic purposes. There is evidence that neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR-expressing cells emerge in the lesioned CNS. However, the phenotype and identity of these cells, and signals triggering their in situ generation under normal conditions and certain pathological situations has remained enigmatic. In the present study, we used a spontaneous, idiopathic and inflammatory CNS condition in dogs with prominent lympho-histiocytic infiltration as a model to study the phenotype of Schwann cells and their relation to Schwann cell remyelination within the CNS. Furthermore, the phenotype of p75NTR-expressing cells within the injured CNS was compared to their counter-part in control sciatic nerve and after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, organotypic slice cultures were used to further elucidate the origin of p75NTR-positive cells. In cerebral and cerebellar white and grey matter lesions as well as in the brain stem, p75NTR-positive cells co-expressed the transcription factor Sox2, but not GAP-43, GFAP, Egr2/Krox20, periaxin and PDGFR-α. Interestingly, and contrary to the findings in control sciatic nerves, p75NTR-expressing cells only co-localized with Sox2 in degenerative neuropathy, thus suggesting that such cells might represent dedifferentiated Schwann cells both in the injured CNS and PNS. Moreover, effective Schwann cell remyelination represented by periaxin- and P0-positive mature myelinating Schwann cells, was strikingly associated with the presence of p75NTR/Sox2-expressing Schwann cells. Intriguingly, the emergence of dedifferentiated Schwann cells was not affected by astrocytes, and a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response provided an adequate environment for Schwann cells plasticity within the injured CNS. Furthermore, axonal damage was reduced in brain stem areas

  17. CD11c-expressing cells affect Treg behavior in the meninges during CNS infection1

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    O’Brien, Carleigh A.; Overall, Christopher; Konradt, Christoph; O’Hara Hall, Aisling C.; Hayes, Nikolas W.; Wagage, Sagie; John, Beena; Christian, David A.; Hunter, Christopher A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2017-01-01

    Treg cells play an important role in the CNS during multiple infections as well as autoimmune inflammation, but the behavior of this cell type in the CNS has not been explored. In mice, infection with Toxoplasma gondii leads to a Th1-polarized parasite-specific effector T cell response in the brain. Similarly, the Treg cells in the CNS during T. gondii infection are Th1-polarized, exemplified by T-bet, CXCR3, and IFN-γ expression. Unlike effector CD4+ T cells, an MHC Class II tetramer reagent specific for T. gondii did not recognize Treg cells isolated from the CNS. Likewise, TCR sequencing revealed minimal overlap in TCR sequence between effector and regulatory T cells in the CNS. Whereas effector T cells are found in the brain parenchyma where parasites are present, Treg cells were restricted to the meninges and perivascular spaces. The use of intravital imaging revealed that activated CD4+ T cells within the meninges were highly migratory, while Treg cells moved more slowly and were found in close association with CD11c+ cells. To test whether the behavior of Tregs in the meninges is influenced by interactions with CD11c+ cells, mice were treated with anti-LFA-1 antibodies to reduce the number of CD11c+ cells in this space. The anti-LFA-1 treatment led to fewer contacts between Tregs and the remaining CD11c+ cells and increased the speed of Treg cell migration. These data suggest that Treg cells are anatomically restricted within the CNS and the interaction with CD11c+ populations regulates their local behavior during T. gondii infection. PMID:28389591

  18. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

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    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  19. Neural Crest-Derived Mesenchymal Cells Require Wnt Signaling for Their Development and Drive Invagination of the Telencephalic Midline

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    Choe, Youngshik; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S.; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric region and produced ectopic smooth muscle cells instead of generating dermal and calvarial mesenchyme. In contrast, constitutive expression of stabilized ß-catenin in neural crest cells increased the number of mesenchymal lineage precursors suggesting that ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the expansion of neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, the loss of neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) leads to failure of telencephalic midline invagination and causes ventricular system defects. This study shows that ß-catenin signaling is required for the switch of neural crest cells to MSCs and mediates the expansion of MSCs to drive the formation of mesenchymal structures of the head. Furthermore, loss of these structures causes striking defects in forebrain morphogenesis. PMID:24516524

  20. Neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells require Wnt signaling for their development and drive invagination of the telencephalic midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshik Choe

    Full Text Available Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric region and produced ectopic smooth muscle cells instead of generating dermal and calvarial mesenchyme. In contrast, constitutive expression of stabilized ß-catenin in neural crest cells increased the number of mesenchymal lineage precursors suggesting that ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the expansion of neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, the loss of neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs leads to failure of telencephalic midline invagination and causes ventricular system defects. This study shows that ß-catenin signaling is required for the switch of neural crest cells to MSCs and mediates the expansion of MSCs to drive the formation of mesenchymal structures of the head. Furthermore, loss of these structures causes striking defects in forebrain morphogenesis.

  1. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

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    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  2. Immune cell entry to the CNS--a focus for immunoregulation of EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Tran, E; Hassan-Zahraee, M

    1999-01-01

    -requirement then to prove such a role. The point that emerges is that cytokine production in the CNS parenchyma is itself dependent on the prior infiltration of immune cells, and that without immune cell entry, EAE does not occur. This identifies events at the BBB, and in particular in the perivascular space, as critical...

  3. CNS infiltration of peripheral immune cells: D-Day for neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Gate, David; Town, Terrence

    2009-12-01

    While the central nervous system (CNS) was once thought to be excluded from surveillance by immune cells, a concept known as "immune privilege," it is now clear that immune responses do occur in the CNS-giving rise to the field of neuroimmunology. These CNS immune responses can be driven by endogenous (glial) and/or exogenous (peripheral leukocyte) sources and can serve either productive or pathological roles. Recent evidence from mouse models supports the notion that infiltration of peripheral monocytes/macrophages limits progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology and militates against West Nile virus encephalitis. In addition, infiltrating T lymphocytes may help spare neuronal loss in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, CNS leukocyte penetration drives experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis) and may also be pathological in both Parkinson's disease and human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. A critical understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for trafficking of immune cells from the periphery into the diseased CNS will be key to target these cells for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby allowing neuroregenerative processes to ensue.

  4. The zebrafish tailbud contains two independent populations of midline progenitor cells that maintain long-term germ layer plasticity and differentiate in response to local signaling cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Richard H.; Tsotras, Steve R.; Goto, Hana; Martin, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate body axis formation depends on a population of bipotential neuromesodermal cells along the posterior wall of the tailbud that make a germ layer decision after gastrulation to form spinal cord and mesoderm. Despite exhibiting germ layer plasticity, these cells never give rise to midline tissues of the notochord, floor plate and dorsal endoderm, raising the question of whether midline tissues also arise from basal posterior progenitors after gastrulation. We show in zebrafish that local posterior signals specify germ layer fate in two basal tailbud midline progenitor populations. Wnt signaling induces notochord within a population of notochord/floor plate bipotential cells through negative transcriptional regulation of sox2. Notch signaling, required for hypochord induction during gastrulation, continues to act in the tailbud to specify hypochord from a notochord/hypochord bipotential cell population. Our results lend strong support to a continuous allocation model of midline tissue formation in zebrafish, and provide an embryological basis for zebrafish and mouse bifurcated notochord phenotypes as well as the rare human congenital split notochord syndrome. We demonstrate developmental equivalency between the tailbud progenitor cell populations. Midline progenitors can be transfated from notochord to somite fate after gastrulation by ectopic expression of msgn1, a master regulator of paraxial mesoderm fate, or if transplanted into the bipotential progenitors that normally give rise to somites. Our results indicate that the entire non-epidermal posterior body is derived from discrete, basal tailbud cell populations. These cells remain receptive to extracellular cues after gastrulation and continue to make basic germ layer decisions. PMID:26674311

  5. Ascl1 (Mash1) lineage cells contribute to discrete cell populations in CNS architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Euiseok J; Battiste, James; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Johnson, Jane E

    2008-08-01

    Ascl1 (previously Mash1) is a bHLH transcription factor essential for neuronal differentiation and specification in the nervous system. Although it has been studied for its role in several neural lineages, the full complement of lineages arising from Ascl1 progenitor cells remains unknown. Using an inducible Cre-flox genetic fate-mapping strategy, Ascl1 lineages were determined throughout the brain. Ascl1 is present in proliferating progenitor cells but these cells are actively differentiating as evidenced by rapid migration out of germinal zones. Ascl1 lineage cells contribute to distinct cell types in each major brain division: the forebrain including the cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus, and thalamic nuclei, the midbrain including superior and inferior colliculi, and the hindbrain including Purkinje and deep cerebellar nuclei cells and cells in the trigeminal sensory system. Ascl1 progenitor cells at early stages in each CNS region preferentially become neurons, and at late stages they become oligodendrocytes. In conclusion, Ascl1-expressing progenitor cells in the brain give rise to multiple, but not all, neuronal subtypes and oligodendrocytes depending on the temporal and spatial context, consistent with a broad role in neural differentiation with some subtype specification.

  6. Rodent CNS neuron development: Timing of cell birth and death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Data obtained from a staged series of single paired injections of tritiated thymidine to pregnant Wistar rats or C57B16/j mice on selected embryonic days and several postnatal times are reported. All injected specimens were allowed to come to term, each litter culled to six pups and specimens were sacrificed on PN28, with fixation and embedding for paraffin and plastic embedding. The results are derived from serial paraffin sections of PN28 animals exposed to autoradiographic processing and plotted with respect to heavily labelled cell nuclei present in the selected brain stem nuclei and sensory ganglia. Counts from each time sample/structure are totalled and the percentage of cells in the total labelled population/structure represented by each injection time interval plotted.

  7. Efficient T-cell surveillance of the CNS requires expression of the CXC chemokine receptor 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline; Moos, Torben

    2004-01-01

    T-cells play an important role in controlling viral infections inside the CNS. To study the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in the migration and positioning of virus-specific effector T-cells within the brain, CXCR3-deficient mice were infected intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis......-cell-mediated immunopathology. Quantitative analysis of the cellular infiltrate in CSF of infected mice revealed modest, if any, decrease in the number of mononuclear cells recruited to the meninges in the absence of CXCR3. However, immunohistological analysis disclosed a striking impairment of CD8+ T-cells from CXCR3...

  8. An in vitro clonogenic assay to assess radiation damage in rat CNS glial progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Verhagen, I.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1990-01-01

    Normal glial progenitor cells can be isolated from the rat central nervous system (CNS) and cultured in vitro on a monolayer of type-1 astrocytes. These monolayers are able to support and stimulate explanted glial progenitor cells to proliferate. Employing these in vitro interactions of specific glial cell types, an in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay has been developed. This method offers the possibility to study the intrinsic radiosensitivity, repair and regeneration of glial progenitor cells after in vitro or in vivo irradiation. (author)

  9. Strength analysis of CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and helium sub-cooling jacket covering cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingfeng; Feng Quanke; Kawai Takeshi; Shen Feng; Yuan Luzheng; Cheng Liang

    2005-01-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now being constructed at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the helium sub-cooling jacket is adopted. The structure of the moderator cell is optimized by the stress FEM analysis. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for fitting it to the four cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen, not liquid deuterium, was used as a cold moderator. The helium sub-cooling jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the outer shell of the moderator cell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down first into the helium sub-cooling jacket and then flows up to the condenser. The theory of the self-regulation suitable to the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable and validated

  10. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP.

  11. CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and sub-cooling helium jacket around cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Cheng, Liang; Shen, Feng; Yuan, Luzheng

    2005-01-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now constructing at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the sub-cooling helium jacket is adopted. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for corresponding it to the 4 cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen not liquid deuterium were used as a cold moderator. The sub-cooling helium jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the inner shell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down firstly into the sub-cooling helium jacket and then flows up to the condenser. Therefore, the theory of the self-regulation for the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable

  12. CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and sub-cooling helium jacket surrounding cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Shen, Feng; Yuan, Luzheng

    2005-01-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now constructing at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the sub-cooling helium jacket is adopted. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for corresponding it to the 4 cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen not liquid deuterium were used as a cold moderator. The sub-cooling helium jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the inner shell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down firstly into the sub-cooling helium jacket and then flows up to the condenser. Therefore, the theory of the self-regulation for the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable

  13. Electrical Stimulation Elicit Neural Stem Cells Activation:New Perspectives in CNS Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratrel eHuang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are enthusiastically concerned about neural stem cell (NSC therapy in a wide array of diseases, including stroke, neurodegenerative disease, spinal cord injury (SCI and depression. Although enormous evidences have demonstrated that neurobehavioral improvement may benefit from NSC-supporting regeneration in animal models, approaches to endogenous and transplanted NSCs are blocked by hurdles of migration, proliferation, maturation and integration of NSCs. Electrical stimulation (ES may be a selective nondrug approach for mobilizing NSCs in the central nervous system (CNS. This technique is suitable for clinic application, because it is well established and its potential complications are manageable. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the emerging positive role of different electrical cues in regulating NSC biology in vitro and in vivo, as well as biomaterial-based and chemical stimulation of NSCs. In the future, ES combined with stem cell therapy or other cues probably becomes an approach for promoting brain repair.

  14. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Luarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  15. Comparing the different response of PNS and CNS injured neurons to mesenchymal stem cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfrini, Marianna; Ravasi, Maddalena; Maggioni, Daniele; Donzelli, Elisabetta; Tredici, Giovanni; Cavaletti, Guido; Scuteri, Arianna

    2018-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult bone marrow-derived stem cells actually proposed indifferently for the therapy of neurological diseases of both the Central (CNS) and the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS), as a panacea able to treat so many different diseases by their immunomodulatory ability and supportive action on neuronal survival. However, the identification of the exact mechanism of MSC action in the different diseases, although mandatory to define their real and concrete utility, is still lacking. Moreover, CNS and PNS neurons present many different biological properties, and it is still unclear if they respond in the same manner not only to MSC treatment, but also to injuries. For these reasons, in this study we compared the susceptibility of cortical and sensory neurons both to toxic drug exposure and to MSC action, in order to verify if these two neuronal populations can respond differently. Our results demonstrated that Cisplatin (CDDP), Glutamate, and Paclitaxel-treated sensory neurons were protected by the co-culture with MSCs, in different manners: through direct contact able to block apoptosis for CDDP- and Glutamate-treated neurons, and by the release of trophic factors for Paclitaxel-treated ones. A possible key soluble factor for MSC protection was Glutathione, spontaneously released by these cells. On the contrary, cortical neurons resulted more sensitive than sensory ones to the toxic action of the drugs, and overall MSCs failed to protect them. All these data identified for the first time a different susceptibility of cortical and sensory neurons, and demonstrated a protective action of MSCs only against drugs in peripheral neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MIDLINE DIASTEMA: TREATMENT OPTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Kumar; Pradnya; Varsha; Sumeet; Fareedi

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT : Maxillary midline diastema is a common esthetic problem in mixed and permanent dentition. The space can occur either as a transient malocclusion or created by developmental, pathological or iatrogenic factors. Many innovative therapies are available from restorative procedures such as composite build-up to surgery (fr enectomies) and Orthodontics is available. Treatment depends upon the correct diagnosis of its etiology and early intervention relevant ...

  17. Single Cell Electroporation Method for Mammalian CNS Neurons in Organotypic Slice Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Hayano, Yasufumi; Yamada, Akito; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    Axon tracing is an essential technique to study the projection pattern of neurons in the CNS. Horse radish peroxidase and lectins have contributed to revealing many neural connection patterns in the CNS (Itaya and van Hoesen, 1982; Fabian and Coulter, 1985; Yoshihara, 2002). Moreover, a tracing method with fluorescent dye has enabled the observation of growing axons in living conditions, and demon strated a lot of developmental aspects in axon growth and guidance (Harris et al., 1987; O'Rourke and Fraser, 1990; Kaethner and Stuermer, 1992; Halloran and Kalil, 1994; Yamamoto et al., 1997). More recently, genetically encoded fluores cent proteins can be used as a powerful tool to observe various biological events. Several gene transfer techniques such as microinjection, biolistic gene gun, viral infection, lipofection and transgenic technology have been developed (Feng et al., 2000; Ehrengruber et al., 2001; O'Brien et al., 2001; Ma et al., 2002; Sahly et al., 2003). In particular, the electroporation technique was proved as a valuable tool, since it can be applied to a wide range of tissues and cell types with little toxicity and can be performed with relative technical easiness. Most methods, including a stand ard electroporation technique, are suitable for gene transfer to a large number of cells. However, this is not ideal for axonal tracing, because observation of individ ual axons is occasionally required. To overcome this problem, we have developed an electroporation method using glass micropipettes containing plasmid solutions and small current injection. Here we introduce the method in detail and exemplified results with some example applications and discuss its usefulness.

  18. cells targeting a neuronal paraneoplastic antigen mediate tumor rejection and trigger CNS autoimmunity with humoral activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachère, Nathalie E; Orange, Dana E; Santomasso, Bianca D; Doerner, Jessica; Foo, Patricia K; Herre, Margaret; Fak, John; Monette, Sébastien; Gantman, Emily C; Frank, Mayu O; Darnell, Robert B

    2014-11-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic diseases (PND) involving immune responses directed toward intracellular antigens are poorly understood. Here, we examine immunity to the PND antigen Nova2, which is expressed exclusively in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. We hypothesized that ectopic expression of neuronal antigen in the periphery could incite PND. In our C57BL/6 mouse model, CNS antigen expression limits antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell expansion. Chimera experiments demonstrate that this tolerance is mediated by antigen expression in nonhematopoietic cells. CNS antigen expression does not limit tumor rejection by adoptively transferred transgenic T cells but does limit the generation of a memory population that can be expanded upon secondary challenge in vivo. Despite mediating cancer rejection, adoptively transferred transgenic T cells do not lead to paraneoplastic neuronal targeting. Preliminary experiments suggest an additional requirement for humoral activation to induce CNS autoimmunity. This work provides evidence that the requirements for cancer immunity and neuronal autoimmunity are uncoupled. Since humoral immunity was not required for tumor rejection, B-cell targeting therapy, such as rituximab, may be a rational treatment option for PND that does not hamper tumor immunity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Creatine kinase BB and beta-2-microglobulin as markers of CNS metastases in patients with small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A G; Bach, F W; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1985-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) and its BB isoenzyme (CK-BB) were measured in CSF in 65 evaluable patients suspected of CNS metastases secondary to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). In addition, CSF and plasma levels of beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) were measured in a group of 73 evaluable patients. Of the 65...

  20. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  1. The number of extranodal sites assessed by PET/CT scan is a powerful predictor of CNS relapse for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Villa, Diego; Michaelsen, Thomas Yssing

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Development of secondary central nervous system involvement (SCNS) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with poor outcomes. The CNS International Prognostic Index (CNS-IPI) has been proposed for identifying patients at greatest risk, but the optimal model is unknow...

  2. Management and Outcome of Patients With Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Single-Bone CNS-Risk Lesions: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chellapandian, Deepak; Shaikh, Furqan; van den Bos, Cor; Somers, Gino R.; Astigarraga, Itziar; Jubran, Rima; Degar, Barbara; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Mandel, Karen; Belletrutti, Mark; Dix, David; Visser, Johannes; Abuhadra, Nour; Chang, Tiffany; Rollins, Barret; Whitlock, James; Weitzman, Sheila; Abla, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    Children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and single-bone CNS-risk lesions have been reported to be at increased risk of diabetes insipidus (DI), central nervous system neurodegeneration (CNS-ND), and recurrence of disease. However, it is unknown whether the addition of chemotherapy or

  3. The farnesoid-X-receptor in myeloid cells controls CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucke, Stephanie; Herold, Martin; Liebmann, Marie; Freise, Nicole; Lindner, Maren; Fleck, Ann-Katrin; Zenker, Stefanie; Thiebes, Stephanie; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Buck, Dorothea; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Zipp, Frauke; Hemmer, Bernhard; Engel, Daniel Robert; Roth, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz; Klotz, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Innate immune responses by myeloid cells decisively contribute to perpetuation of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and their pharmacologic modulation represents a promising strategy to prevent disease progression in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Based on our observation that peripheral immune cells from relapsing-remitting and primary progressive MS patients exhibited strongly decreased levels of the bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid-X-receptor, NR1H4), we evaluated its potential relevance as therapeutic target for control of established CNS autoimmunity. Pharmacological FXR activation promoted generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages characterized by arginase-1, increased IL-10 production, and suppression of T cell responses. In mice, FXR activation ameliorated CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion and even suppressed advanced clinical disease upon therapeutic administration. In analogy to rodents, pharmacological FXR activation in human monocytes from healthy controls and MS patients induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype with suppressive properties including control of effector T cell proliferation. We therefore, propose an important role of FXR in control of T cell-mediated autoimmunity by promoting anti-inflammatory macrophage responses.

  4. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  5. Utility of MRI versus tumor markers for post-treatment surveillance of marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Victoria; Segal, Devorah; Gardner, Sharon L; Zagzag, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H; Allen, Jeffrey C; Karajannis, Matthias A

    2016-09-01

    Patients with marker-positive central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors are typically monitored for tumor recurrence with both tumor markers (AFP and b-hCG) and MRI. We hypothesize that the recurrence of these tumors will always be accompanied by an elevation in tumor markers, and that surveillance MRI may not be necessary. We retrospectively identified 28 patients with CNS germ cell tumors treated at our institution that presented with an elevated serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor marker at the time of diagnosis. We then identified those who had a tumor recurrence after having been in remission and whether each recurrence was detected via MRI changes, elevated tumor markers, or both. Four patients suffered a tumor recurrence. Only one patient had simultaneously elevated tumor markers and MRI evidence of recurrence. Two patients had evidence of recurrence on MRI without corresponding elevations in serum or CSF tumor markers. One patient had abnormal tumor markers with no evidence of recurrence on MRI until 6 months later. We conclude that in patients with marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors who achieve complete remission, continued surveillance imaging in addition to measurement of tumor markers is indicated to detect recurrences.

  6. Histological characterization and quantification of cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healty and demyelinated CNS tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Praet, J.; SANTERMANS, Eva; Reekmans, K.; de Vocht, N.; Le Blon, D.; Hoornaert, C.; Daans, J.; Goossens, H.; Berneman, Z.; HENS, Niel; Van der Linden, A.; Ponsaerts, P.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies involving intracerebral (stem) cell grafting are gaining popularity in many laboratories due to the reported beneficial effects of cell grafting on various diseases or traumata of the central nervous system (CNS). In this chapter, we describe a histological workflow to characterize and quantify cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue. First, we provide standardized protocols to isolate and cult...

  7. Ascl1 (Mash1) lineage cells contribute to discrete cell populations in CNS architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Euiseok J.; Battiste, James; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Johnson, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    Ascl1 (previously Mash1) is a bHLH transcription factor essential for neuronal differentiation and specification in the nervous system. Although it has been studied for its role in several neural lineages, the full complement of lineages arising from Ascl1 progenitor cells remains unknown. Using an inducible Cre-flox genetic fate mapping strategy, Ascl1 lineages were determined throughout the brain. Ascl1 is present in proliferating progenitor cells but these cells are actively differentiatin...

  8. Migration, fate and in vivo imaging of stem cells in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.3 (2009), s. 4-4 ISSN 1351-5101. [Congress of the European-Federation-of-Neurological-Societies /13./. 12.09.2009-15.09.2009, Florencie] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : CNS * ESC Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  9. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused by e...

  10. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes; Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  11. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF-UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes [Resident of Medical Practice, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz [Unit of Computed Tomography, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  12. Distinctive response of CNS glial cells in oro-facial pain associated with injury, infection and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro-da-Silva Alfredo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oro-facial pain following injury and infection is frequently observed in dental clinics. While neuropathic pain evoked by injury associated with nerve lesion has an involvement of glia/immune cells, inflammatory hyperalgesia has an exaggerated sensitization mediated by local and circulating immune mediators. To better understand the contribution of central nervous system (CNS glial cells in these different pathological conditions, in this study we sought to characterize functional phenotypes of glial cells in response to trigeminal nerve injury (loose ligation of the mental branch, infection (subcutaneous injection of lipopolysaccharide-LPS and to sterile inflammation (subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant-CFA on the lower lip. Each of the three insults triggered a specific pattern of mechanical allodynia. In parallel with changes in sensory response, CNS glial cells reacted distinctively to the challenges. Following ligation of the mental nerve, both microglia and astrocytes in the trigeminal nuclear complex were highly activated, more prominent in the principal sensory nucleus (Pr5 and subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C area. Microglial response was initiated early (days 3-14, followed by delayed astrocytes activation (days 7-28. Although the temporal profile of microglial and astrocyte reaction corresponded respectively to the initiation and chronic stage of neuropathic pain, these activated glial cells exhibited a low profile of cytokine expression. Local injection of LPS in the lower lip skin also triggered a microglial reaction in the brain, which started in the circumventricular organs (CVOs at 5 hours post-injection and diffused progressively into the brain parenchyma at 48 hours. This LPS-induced microglial reaction was accompanied by a robust induction of IκB-α mRNA and pro-inflammatory cytokines within the CVOs. However, LPS induced microglial activation did not specifically occur along the pain signaling pathway. In

  13. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M.; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Daley, George Q.; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of TLR3 immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE) 1–3. We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non hematopoietic central nervous system (CNS)-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of IFN-β and/or IFN-γ1 in response to poly(I:C) stimulation was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-γ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele demonstrated that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was further rescued by treatment with exogenous IFN-α/β, but not IFN-γ1.Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3 pathway deficiencies. PMID:23103873

  14. Adult DRG Stem/Progenitor Cells Generate Pericytes in the Presence of Central Nervous System (CNS) Developmental Cues, and Schwann Cells in Response to CNS Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marie; Maniglier, Madlyne; Deboux, Cyrille; Bachelin, Corinne; Zujovic, Violetta; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that the adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harbor neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the neural crest. However, the thorough characterization of their stemness and differentiation plasticity was not addressed. In this study, we investigated adult DRG-NPC stem cell properties overtime, and their fate when ectopically grafted in the central nervous system. We compared them in vitro and in vivo to the well-characterized adult spinal cord-NPCs derived from the same donors. Using micro-dissection and neurosphere cultures, we demonstrate that adult DRG-NPCs have quasi unlimited self-expansion capacities without compromising their tissue specific molecular signature. Moreover, they differentiate into multiple peripheral lineages in vitro. After transplantation, adult DRG-NPCs generate pericytes in the developing forebrain but remyelinating Schwann cells in response to spinal cord demyelination. In addition, we show that axonal and endothelial/astrocytic factors as well astrocytes regulate the fate of adult DRG-NPCs in culture. Although the adult DRG-NPC multipotency is restricted to the neural crest lineage, their dual responsiveness to developmental and lesion cues highlights their impressive adaptive and repair potentials making them valuable targets for regenerative medicine. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Laminin-411 Is a Vascular Ligand for MCAM and Facilitates TH17 Cell Entry into the CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Ken; Fitzgerald, Kent; Baker, Jeanne; Regnstrom, Karin; Gardai, Shyra; Bard, Frederique; Mocci, Simonetta; Seto, Pui; You, Monica; Larochelle, Catherine; Prat, Alexandre; Chow, Samuel; Li, Lauri; Vandevert, Chris; Zago, Wagner; Lorenzana, Carlos; Nishioka, Christopher; Hoffman, Jennifer; Botelho, Raquel; Willits, Christopher; Tanaka, Kevin; Johnston, Jennifer; Yednock, Ted

    2012-01-01

    TH17 cells enter tissues to facilitate pathogenic autoimmune responses, including multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the adhesion molecules involved in the unique migratory capacity of TH17 cells, into both inflamed and uninflamed tissues remain unclear. Herein, we characterize MCAM (CD146) as an adhesion molecule that defines human TH17 cells in the circulation; following in vitro restimulation of human memory T cells, nearly all of the capacity to secrete IL-17 is contained within the population of cells expressing MCAM. Furthermore, we identify the MCAM ligand as laminin 411, an isoform of laminin expressed within the vascular endothelial basement membranes under inflammatory as well as homeotstatic conditions. Purified MCAM-Fc binds to laminin 411 with an affinity of 27 nM, and recognizes vascular basement membranes in mouse and human tissue. MCAM-Fc binding was undetectable in tissue from mice with targeted deletion of laminin 411, indicating that laminin 411 is a major tissue ligand for MCAM. An anti-MCAM monoclonal antibody, selected for inhibition of laminin binding, as well as soluble MCAM-Fc, inhibited T cell adhesion to laminin 411 in vitro. When administered in vivo, the antibody reduced TH17 cell infiltration into the CNS and ameliorated disease in an animal model of MS. Our data suggest that MCAM and laminin 411 interact to facilitate TH17 cell entry into tissues and promote inflammation. PMID:22792325

  16. The Drosophila T-box transcription factor Midline functions within the Notch–Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor cell fates and regulates cell survival within the eye imaginal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeshna; Chen, Q. Brent; Saucier, Joseph D.; Drescher, Brandon; Zong, Yan; Morgan, Sarah; Forstall, John; Meriwether, Andrew; Toranzo, Randy; Leal, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    We report that the T-box transcription factor Midline (Mid), an evolutionary conserved homolog of the vertebrate Tbx20 protein, functions within the Notch–Delta signaling pathway essential for specifying the fates of sensory organ precursor cells. This complements an established history of research showing that Mid regulates the cell-fate specification of diverse cell types within the developing heart, epidermis and central nervous system. Tbx20 has been detected in diverse neuronal and epithelial cells of embryonic eye tissues in both mice and humans. However, the mechanisms by which either Mid or Tbx20 function to regulate cell-fate specification or other critical aspects of eye development including cell survival have not yet been elucidated. We have also gathered preliminary evidence suggesting that Mid may play an indirect, but vital role in selecting SOP cells within the third-instar larval eye disc by regulating the expression of the proneural gene atonal. During subsequent pupal stages, Mid specifies SOP cell fates as a member of the Notch–Delta signaling hierarchy and is essential for maintaining cell viability within by inhibiting apoptotic pathways. We present several new hypotheses that seek to understand the role of Mid in regulating developmental processes downstream of the Notch receptor that are critical for specifying unique cell fates, patterning the adult eye and maintaining cellular homeostasis during eye disc morphogenesis. PMID:23962751

  17. The Drosophila T-box transcription factor Midline functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor cell fates and regulates cell survival within the eye imaginal disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeshna; Chen, Q Brent; Saucier, Joseph D; Drescher, Brandon; Zong, Yan; Morgan, Sarah; Forstall, John; Meriwether, Andrew; Toranzo, Randy; Leal, Sandra M

    2013-01-01

    We report that the T-box transcription factor Midline (Mid), an evolutionary conserved homolog of the vertebrate Tbx20 protein, functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway essential for specifying the fates of sensory organ precursor (SOP) cells. These findings complement an established history of research showing that Mid regulates the cell-fate specification of diverse cell types within the developing heart, epidermis and central nervous system. Tbx20 has been detected in unique neuronal and epithelial cells of embryonic eye tissues in both mice and humans. However, the mechanisms by which either Mid or Tbx20 function to regulate cell-fate specification or other critical aspects of eye development including cell survival have not yet been elucidated. We have also gathered preliminary evidence suggesting that Mid may play an indirect, but vital role in selecting SOP cells within the third-instar larval eye disc by regulating the expression of the proneural gene atonal. During subsequent pupal stages, Mid specifies SOP cell fates as a member of the Notch-Delta signaling hierarchy and is essential for maintaining cell viability by inhibiting apoptotic pathways. We present several new hypotheses that seek to understand the role of Mid in regulating developmental processes downstream of the Notch receptor that are critical for specifying unique cell fates, patterning the adult eye and maintaining cellular homeostasis during eye disc morphogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adiponectin Suppresses T Helper 17 Cell Differentiation and Limits Autoimmune CNS Inflammation via the SIRT1/PPARγ/RORγt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Guo, Yawei; Ge, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhihui; Da, Yurong; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zimu; Xue, Zhenyi; Li, Yan; Ren, Yinghui; Jia, Long; Chan, Koon-Ho; Yang, Fengrui; Yan, Jun; Yao, Zhi; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Rongxin

    2017-09-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells are vital components of the adaptive immune system involved in the pathogenesis of most autoimmune and inflammatory syndromes, and adiponectin(ADN) is correlated with inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and type II diabetes. However, the regulatory effects of adiponectin on pathogenic Th17 cell and Th17-mediated autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) inflammation are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that ADN could inhibit Th1 and Th17 but not Th2 cells differentiation in vitro. In the in vivo study, we demonstrated that ADN deficiency promoted CNS inflammation and demyelination and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of human MS. Furthermore, ADN deficiency increased the Th1 and Th17 cell cytokines of both the peripheral immune system and CNS in mice suffering from EAE. It is worth mentioning that ADN deficiency predominantly promoted the antigen-specific Th17 cells response in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, ADN upregulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and inhibited retinoid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt); the key transcription factor during Th17 cell differentiation. These results systematically uncovered the role and mechanism of adiponectin on pathogenic Th17 cells and suggested that adiponectin could inhibit Th17 cell-mediated autoimmune CNS inflammation.

  19. EBI2 Is Highly Expressed in Multiple Sclerosis Lesions and Promotes Early CNS Migration of Encephalitogenic CD4 T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wanke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrival of encephalitogenic T cells at inflammatory foci represents a critical step in development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. EBI2 and its ligand, 7α,25-OHC, direct immune cell localization in secondary lymphoid organs. CH25H and CYP7B1 hydroxylate cholesterol to 7α,25-OHC. During EAE, we found increased expression of CH25H by microglia and CYP7B1 by CNS-infiltrating immune cells elevating the ligand concentration in the CNS. Two critical pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-23 (IL-23 and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, maintained expression of EBI2 in differentiating Th17 cells. In line with this, EBI2 enhanced early migration of encephalitogenic T cells into the CNS in a transfer EAE model. Nonetheless, EBI2 was dispensable in active EAE. Human Th17 cells do also express EBI2, and EBI2 expressing cells are abundant within multiple sclerosis (MS white matter lesions. These findings implicate EBI2 as a mediator of CNS autoimmunity and describe mechanistically its contribution to the migration of autoreactive T cells into inflamed organs.

  20. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and dna-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced cns alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Results Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1 was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5 showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left

  1. Gut-derived factors promote neurogenesis of CNS-neural stem cells and nudge their differentiation to an enteric-like neuronal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Subhash; Zou, Bende; Hanson, Jesse; Micci, Maria-Adelaide; Tiwari, Gunjan; Becker, Laren; Kaiser, Martin; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have explored the potential of central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (CNS-NSC) to repopulate the enteric nervous system. However, the exact phenotypic fate of gut-transplanted CNS-NSC has not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the gut microenvironment on phenotypic fate of CNS-NSC in vitro. With the use of Transwell culture, differentiation of mouse embryonic CNS-NSC was studied when cocultured without direct contact with mouse intestinal longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations (LM-MP) compared with control noncocultured cells, in a differentiating medium. Differentiated cells were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of specific markers and by whole cell patch-clamp studies for functional characterization of their phenotype. We found that LM-MP cocultured cells had a significant increase in the numbers of cells that were immune reactive against the panneuronal marker β-tubulin, neurotransmitters neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and showed an increase in expression of these genes, compared with control cells. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that coculture with LM-MP decreases cell excitability and reduces voltage-gated Na(+) currents but significantly enhances A-current and late afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and increases the expression of the four AHP-generating Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channel genes (KCNN), compared with control cells. In a separate experiment, differentiation of LM-MP cocultured CNS-NSC produced a significant increase in the numbers of cells that were immune reactive against the neurotransmitters nNOS, ChAT, and the neuropeptide VIP compared with CNS-NSC differentiated similarly in the presence of neonatal brain tissue. Our results show that the gut microenvironment induces CNS-NSC to produce neurons that share some of the

  2. Midline Craniofacial Masses in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Van Wyhe, Renae D.; Chamata, Edward S.; Hollier, Larry H.

    2016-01-01

    Nasal dermoids, encephaloceles, and gliomas are rare congenital lesions that result from improper embryologic development. The differentiation between them and a firm understanding of their pathology is necessary to avoid unnecessary complications. In view of their potential intracranial connection, prompt diagnosis and treatment are paramount. The authors review the embryology, diagnoses, radiologic work-up, surgical management, and complications of these midline craniofacial masses in child...

  3. An International Collaborative Study of Outcome and Prognostic Factors in Patients with Secondary CNS Involvement By Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl

    2016-01-01

    ) determine prognostic factors after SCNS.Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients diagnosed with SCNS during or after frontline immunochemotherapy (R-CHOP or equivalently effective regimens). SCNS was defined as new involvement of the CNS (parenchymal, leptomeningeal, and/or eye......Background: Secondary CNS involvement (SCNS) is a detrimental complication seen in ~5% of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with modern immunochemotherapy. Data from older series report short survival following SCNS, typically lt;6 months. However, data in patients...

  4. Highly encephalitogenic aquaporin 4-specific T cells and NMO-IgG jointly orchestrate lesion location and tissue damage in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeka, Bleranda; Hastermann, Maria; Hochmeister, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    In neuromyelitis optica (NMO), astrocytes become targets for pathogenic aquaporin 4 (AQP4)-specific antibodies which gain access to the central nervous system (CNS) in the course of inflammatory processes. Since these antibodies belong to a T cell-dependent subgroup of immunoglobulins, and since...

  5. Elimination of proliferating cells from CNS grafts using a Ki67 promoter-driven thymidine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannary Tieng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cell (PSC-based cell therapy is an attractive concept for neurodegenerative diseases, but can lead to tumor formation. This is particularly relevant as proliferating neural precursors rather than postmitotic mature neurons need to be transplanted. Thus, safety mechanisms to eliminate proliferating cells are needed. Here, we propose a suicide gene approach, based on cell cycle-dependent promoter Ki67-driven expression of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK. We generated a PSC line expressing this construct and induced neural differentiation. In vitro, proliferating PSC and early neural precursor cells (NPC were killed by exposure to ganciclovir. In vivo, transplantation of PSC led to tumor formation, which was prevented by early ganciclovir treatment. Transplanted NPC did not lead to tumor formation and their survival and neural maturation were not affected by ganciclovir. In conclusion, the cell cycle promoter-driven suicide gene approach described in this study allows killing of proliferating undifferentiated precursor cells without expression of the suicide gene in mature neurons. This approach could also be of use for other stem cell-based therapies where the final target consists of postmitotic cells.

  6. Cell division genes promote asymmetric interaction between Numb and Notch in the Drosophila CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, P; Truong, B; Bhat, K M

    1999-06-01

    Cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic factors mediate asymmetric cell divisions during neurogenesis in the Drosophila embryo. In the NB4-2->GMC-1->RP2/sib lineage, one of the well-studied neuronal lineages in the ventral nerve cord, the Notch (N) signaling interacts with the asymmetrically localized Numb (Nb) to specify sibling neuronal fates to daughter cells of GMC-1. In this current study, we have investigated asymmetric cell fate specifications by N and Nb in the context of cell cycle. We have used loss-of-function mutations in N and nb, cell division mutants cyclinA (cycA), regulator of cyclin A1 (rca1) and string/cdc25 phosphatase (stg), and the microtubule destabilizing agent, nocodazole, to investigate this issue. We report that the loss of cycA, rca1 or stg leads to a block in the division of GMC-1, however, this GMC-1 exclusively adopts an RP2 identity. While the loss of N leads to the specification of RP2 fates to both progeny of GMC-1 and loss of nb results in the specification of sib fates to these daughter cells, the GMC-1 in the double mutant between nb and cycA assumes a sib fate. These epistasis results indicate that both N and nb function downstream of cell division genes and that progression through cell cycle is required for the asymmetric localization of Nb. In the absence of entry to metaphase, the Nb protein prevents the N signaling from specifying sib fate to the RP2/sib precursor. These results are also consistent with our finding that the sib cell is specified as RP2 in N; nb double mutants. Finally, our results show that nocodazole-arrested GMC-1 in wild-type embryos randomly assumes either an RP2 fate or a sib fate. This suggests that microtubules are involved in mediating the antagonistic interaction between Nb and N during RP2 and sib fate specification.

  7. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanrieder, Jørg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    . Complementary proteomic experiments revealed the identity of these signature proteins that were predominantly expressed in the different glial cell types, including histone H4 for oligodendrocytes and S100-A10 for astrocytes. MALDI imaging MS was performed, and signature masses were employed as molecular...... tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination...

  8. Supratentorial CNS malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Clinical suspicion of a developmental anomaly of the central nervous system (CNS) is a frequent indication for performing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the brain. Classification systems for malformation of the CNS are constantly revised according to newer scientific research. Developmental abnormalities can be classified in two main types. The first category consists of disorders of organogenesis in which genetic defects or any ischemic, metabolic, toxic or infectious insult to the developing brain can cause malformation. These malformations result from abnormal neuronal and glial proliferation and from anomalies of neuronal migration and or cortical organization. They are divided into supra- and infratentorial and may involve grey or white matter or both. The second category of congenital brain abnormalities is disorders of histogenesis which result from abnormal cell differentiation with a relatively normal brain appearance. Supratentorial CNS malformations could be divided into anomalies in telencephalic commissure, holoprosencephalies and malformations in cortical development. There are three main telencephalic commissures: the anterior commissure, the hippocampal commissure and the corpus callosum. Their morphology (hypoplasia, hyperplasia, agenesis, dysgenesis, even atrophy) reflects the development of the brain. Their agenesis, complete or partial, is one of the most commonly observed features in the malformations of the brain and is a part of many syndromes. Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are heterogeneous group of disease which result from disruption of 3 main stages of cortical development. The common clinical presentation is refractory epilepsy and or developmental delay. The most common MCD are heterotopias, focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, pachygyria and lizencephaly. The exact knowledge of the brain anatomy and embryology is mandatory to provide a better apprehension of the

  9. Shh-ushing Midline Crossing through Remote Protein Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Eloísa; Sitko, Austen A; Bovolenta, Paola

    2018-01-17

    Shh contributes to neural circuit formation with different mechanisms. In this issue, Peng and colleagues (2018) identify a novel trans-axonal mechanism by which Shh derived from contralateral projecting retinal ganglion cells prevents midline crossing of Boc-expressing ipsilateral axons at the optic chiasm. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcriptome-wide survey of mouse CNS-derived cells reveals monoallelic expression within novel gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra M Li

    Full Text Available Monoallelic expression is an integral component of regulation of a number of essential genes and gene families. To probe for allele-specific expression in cells of CNS origin, we used next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq to analyze four clonal neural stem cell (NSC lines derived from Mus musculus C57BL/6 (B6×Mus musculus molossinus (JF1 adult female mice. We established a JF1 cSNP library, then ascertained transcriptome-wide expression from B6 vs. JF1 alleles in the NSC lines. Validating the assay, we found that 262 of 268 X-linked genes evaluable in at least one cell line showed monoallelic expression (at least 85% expression of the predominant allele, p-value<0.05. For autosomal genes 170 of 7,198 genes (2.4% of the total showed monoallelic expression in at least 2 evaluable cell lines. The group included eight known imprinted genes with the expected pattern of allele-specific expression. Among the other autosomal genes with monoallelic expression were five members of the glutathione transferase gene superfamily, which processes xenobiotic compounds as well as carcinogens and cancer therapeutic agents. Monoallelic expression within this superfamily thus may play a functional role in the response to diverse and potentially lethal exogenous factors, as is the case for the immunoglobulin and olfactory receptor superfamilies. Other genes and gene families showing monoallelic expression include the annexin gene family and the Thy1 gene, both linked to inflammation and cancer, as well as genes linked to alcohol dependence (Gabrg1 and epilepsy (Kcnma1. The annotated set of genes will provide a resource for investigation of mechanisms underlying certain cases of these and other major disorders.

  11. Pathological classification of human iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells towards safety assessment of transplantation therapy for CNS diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Keiko; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Shofuda, Tomoko; Fukusumi, Hayato; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Higuchi, Yuichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Isoda, Miho; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Eiji; Matsumoto, Morio; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-09-19

    The risk of tumorigenicity is a hurdle for regenerative medicine using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Although teratoma formation is readily distinguishable, the malignant transformation of iPSC derivatives has not been clearly defined due to insufficient analysis of histology and phenotype. In the present study, we evaluated the histology of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) generated from integration-free human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived iPSCs (iPSC-NSPCs) following transplantation into central nervous system (CNS) of immunodeficient mice. We found that transplanted iPSC-NSPCs produced differentiation patterns resembling those in embryonic CNS development, and that the microenvironment of the final site of migration affected their maturational stage. Genomic instability of iPSCs correlated with increased proliferation of transplants, although no carcinogenesis was evident. The histological classifications presented here may provide cues for addressing potential safety issues confronting regenerative medicine involving iPSCs.

  12. Innate Interferons Regulate CNS Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieu, Ruthe; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Mariboe, Anne

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) whose pathology is characterised by demyelination and axonal damage. This results from interplay between CNS-resident glia, infiltrating leukocytes and a plethora of cytokines and chemokines. Currently...... potential IFN-inducing receptor that signals through NF-kB. Receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK) belongs to the TNF-receptor superfamily and has been shown to induce IFN-beta in medullary thymic epithelial cells affecting autoimmune regulatory processes and osteoclast precursor cells in association to bone...

  13. Suppression of IL-12p70 formation by IL-2 or following macrophage depletion causes T-cell autoreactivity leading to CNS demyelination in HSV-1-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhong Hyun Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have established two mouse models of central nervous system (CNS demyelination that differ from most other available models of multiple sclerosis (MS in that they represent a mixture of viral and immune triggers. In the first model, ocular infection of different strains of mice with a recombinant HSV-1 that expresses murine IL-2 constitutively (HSV-IL-2 causes CNS demyelination. In the second model, depletion of macrophages causes CNS demyelination in mice that are ocularly infected with wild-type (WT HSV-1. In the present study, we found that the demyelination in macrophage-intact mice infected with HSV-IL-2 was blocked by depletion of FoxP3-expressing cells, while concurrent depletion of macrophages restored demyelination. In contrast, demyelination was blocked in the macrophage-depleted mice infected with wild-type HSV-1 following depletion of FoxP3-expressing cells. In macrophage-depleted HSV-IL-2-infected mice, demyelination was associated with the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, whereas in macrophage-depleted mice infected with WT HSV-1, demyelination was associated with CD4+ T cells. Macrophage depletion or infection with HSV-IL-2 caused an imbalance of T cells and TH1 responses as well as alterations in IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 but not other members of the IL-12 family or their receptors. Demyelination was blocked by adoptive transfer of macrophages that were infected with HSV-IL-12p70 or HSV-IL-12p40 but not by HSV-IL-12p35. These results indicate that suppression of IL-12p70 formation by IL-2 or following macrophage depletion causes T-cell autoreactivity leading to CNS demyelination in HSV-1-infected mice.

  14. Single cell cultures of Drosophila neuroectodermal and mesectodermal central nervous system progenitors reveal different degrees of developmental autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Karin; Technau, Gerhard M

    2009-08-03

    The Drosophila embryonic central nervous system (CNS) develops from two sets of progenitor cells, neuroblasts and ventral midline progenitors, which behave differently in many respects. Neuroblasts derive from the neurogenic region of the ectoderm and form the lateral parts of the CNS. Ventral midline precursors are formed by two rows of mesectodermal cells and build the CNS midline. There is plenty of evidence that individual identities are conferred to precursor cells by positional information in the ectoderm. It is unclear, however, how far the precursors can maintain their identities and developmental properties in the absence of normal external signals. To separate the respective contributions of autonomous properties versus extrinsic signals during their further development, we isolated individual midline precursors and neuroectodermal precursors at the pre-mitotic gastrula stage, traced their development in vitro, and analyzed the characteristics of their lineages in comparison with those described for the embryo. Although individually cultured mesectodermal cells exhibit basic characteristics of CNS midline progenitors, the clones produced by these progenitors differ from their in situ counterparts with regard to cell numbers, expression of molecular markers, and the separation of neuronal and glial fate. In contrast, clones derived from individually cultured precursors taken from specific dorsoventral zones of the neuroectoderm develop striking similarities to the lineages of neuroblasts that normally delaminate from these zones and develop in situ. This in vitro analysis allows for the first time a comparison of the developmental capacities in situ and in vitro of individual neural precursors of defined spatial and temporal origin. The data reveal that cells isolated at the pre-mitotic and pre-delamination stage express characteristics of the progenitor type appropriate to their site of origin in the embryo. However, presumptive neuroblasts, once

  15. Single cell cultures of Drosophila neuroectodermal and mesectodermal central nervous system progenitors reveal different degrees of developmental autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Technau Gerhard M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Drosophila embryonic central nervous system (CNS develops from two sets of progenitor cells, neuroblasts and ventral midline progenitors, which behave differently in many respects. Neuroblasts derive from the neurogenic region of the ectoderm and form the lateral parts of the CNS. Ventral midline precursors are formed by two rows of mesectodermal cells and build the CNS midline. There is plenty of evidence that individual identities are conferred to precursor cells by positional information in the ectoderm. It is unclear, however, how far the precursors can maintain their identities and developmental properties in the absence of normal external signals. Results To separate the respective contributions of autonomous properties versus extrinsic signals during their further development, we isolated individual midline precursors and neuroectodermal precursors at the pre-mitotic gastrula stage, traced their development in vitro, and analyzed the characteristics of their lineages in comparison with those described for the embryo. Although individually cultured mesectodermal cells exhibit basic characteristics of CNS midline progenitors, the clones produced by these progenitors differ from their in situ counterparts with regard to cell numbers, expression of molecular markers, and the separation of neuronal and glial fate. In contrast, clones derived from individually cultured precursors taken from specific dorsoventral zones of the neuroectoderm develop striking similarities to the lineages of neuroblasts that normally delaminate from these zones and develop in situ. Conclusion This in vitro analysis allows for the first time a comparison of the developmental capacities in situ and in vitro of individual neural precursors of defined spatial and temporal origin. The data reveal that cells isolated at the pre-mitotic and pre-delamination stage express characteristics of the progenitor type appropriate to their site of origin in

  16. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  17. Experiences in therapy for lethal midline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Takeru

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of the lethal midline granuloma or malignant granuloma of the nose were treated by irradiation and chemotherapy, which are generally prescribed for malignant lymphomas. Clinical, histological and laboratory examination indicated that they were the lethal midline granuloma and clearly differentiated from Wegener's granulomatosis or malignant lymphoma. All of the cases exhibited primary remission. The four cases were observed up to 38, 22, 14, and 10 months since the beginning of the therapy, showing no local or general recurrence. (author)

  18. LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT: Early relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found after CNS-symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Chr. G.; Laursen, Christian B.; Jeppesen, Stefan S.

    2016-01-01

    whether the introduction in 2010 of follow-up by CT of thorax and upper abdomen every three months has reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms.Results: All 827 NSCLC patients from Funen completing curative treatment from 2005 to 2013 were included. The total number of relapses found...... or III were found.Conclusion: CT-based follow-up has not reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms in stage II-IV, and therefore we suggest routine MR of the brain before curative treatment for this group of patients.Number, fractions(%), and [95%CI]Jan. 2005 - June 2010July 2010 - Dec...... after symptoms within 24 months decreased in the 3½ years after the introduction of CT-based follow-up, p < 0,001 (table), but the total fraction presenting with CNS-symptoms did not change, p = 0.296. Relapses after stage I cancer decreased (p = 0.025), while no differences or changes for stages II...

  19. Drug-induced activation of SREBP-controlled lipogenic gene expression in CNS-related cell lines: Marked differences between various antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vik-Mo Audun O

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology of schizophrenia is unknown, but neurodevelopmental disturbances, myelin- and oligodendrocyte abnormalities and synaptic dysfunction have been suggested as pathophysiological factors in this severe psychiatric disorder. Cholesterol is an essential component of myelin and has proved important for synapse formation. Recently, we demonstrated that the antipsychotic drugs clozapine and haloperidol stimulate lipogenic gene expression in cultured glioma cells through activation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP transcription factors. We here compare the action of chlorpromazine, haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone on SREBP activation and SREBP-controlled gene expression (ACAT2, HMGCR, HMGCS1, FDPS, SC5DL, DHCR7, LDLR, FASN and SCD1 in four CNS-relevant human cell lines. Results There were marked differences in the ability of the antipsychotic drugs to activate the expression of SREBP target genes, with clozapine and chlorpromazine as the most potent stimulators in a context of therapeutically relevant concentrations. Glial-like cells (GaMg glioma and CCF-STTG1 astrocytoma cell lines displayed more pronounced drug-induced SREBP activation compared to the response in HCN2 human cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, indicating that antipsychotic-induced activation of lipogenesis is most prominent in glial cells. Conclusion Our present data show a marked variation in the ability of different antipsychotics to induce SREBP-controlled transcriptional activation of lipogenesis in cultured human CNS-relevant cells. We propose that this effect could be relevant for the therapeutic efficacy of some antipsychotic drugs.

  20. Dendritic cell CNS recruitment correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis at the blood–brain barrier through paracellular transmigration and ERK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Divya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmigration of circulating dendritic cells (DCs into the central nervous system (CNS across the blood–brain barrier (BBB has not thus far been investigated. An increase in immune cell infiltration across the BBB, uncontrolled activation and antigen presentation are influenced by chemokines. Chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 is a potent chemoattractant known to be secreted by the BBB but has not been implicated in the recruitment of DCs specifically at the BBB. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by injection of MOG35–55 peptide and pertussis toxin intraperitoneally. Animals with increasing degree of EAE score were sacrificed and subjected to near-infrared and fluorescence imaging analysis to detect and localize the accumulation of CD11c+-labeled DCs with respect to CCL2 expression. To further characterize the direct effect of CCL2 in DC trafficking at the BBB, we utilized an in vitro BBB model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial cells to compare migratory patterns of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Further, this model was used to image transmigration using fluorescence microcopy and to assess specific molecular signaling pathways involved in transmigration. Results Near-infrared imaging of DC transmigration correlated with the severity of inflammation during EAE. Ex vivo histology confirmed the presence of CCL2 in EAE lesions, with DCs emerging from perivascular spaces. DCs exhibited more efficient transmigration than T cells in BBB model studies. These observations correlated with transwell imaging, which indicated a paracellular versus transcellular pattern of migration by DCs and T cells. Moreover, at the molecular level, CCL2 seems to facilitate DC transmigration in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. Conclusion CNS recruitment of DCs correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis and paracellular transmigration across the BBB

  1. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Varani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus (TOSV is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  2. CNS role evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J L; Baumgartner, R G

    1996-01-01

    THE CNS ROLE has been actualized in a variety of ways. Flexibility-inherent in the role-and the revolution in health care consciousness tend to place the CNS at risk for criticism regarding value to the organization. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a CNS task force evaluated the current reality of CNS practice and recommended role changes to include the financial analysis of patient care. After incorporating a financial perspective into our present practice, we have embarked on an interesting journey of post-Master's degree study, that of the tertiary care nurse practitioner. This practice option could elevated the clinical and financial aspects of providing cost-effective health care to a more autonomous role form; however, the transition has been challenging. Since 1990, the American Nurses Association has recommended that nursing school curricula change to meet the needs of the health care environment and provide increased career flexibility through creating one advanced degree incorporating both CNS and NP functions. Swiftly moving past differences and toward similarities will bridge the gap for advanced practice nurses in the future.

  3. Zika (PRVABC59 Infection Is Associated with T cell Infiltration and Neurodegeneration in CNS of Immunocompetent Neonatal C57Bl/6 Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanraj Manangeeswaran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV and its association with increased rates of Guillain Barre and other neurological disorders as well as congenital defects that include microcephaly has created an urgent need to develop animal models to examine the pathogenesis of the disease and explore the efficacy of potential therapeutics and vaccines. Recently developed infection models for ZIKV utilize mice defective in interferon responses. In this study we establish and characterize a new model of peripheral ZIKV infection using immunocompetent neonatal C57BL/6 mice and compare its clinical progression, virus distribution, immune response, and neuropathology with that of C57BL/6-IFNAR KO mice. We show that while ZIKV infected IFNAR KO mice develop bilateral hind limb paralysis and die 5-6 days post-infection (dpi, immunocompetent B6 WT mice develop signs of neurological disease including unsteady gait, kinetic tremors, severe ataxia and seizures by 13 dpi that subside gradually over 2 weeks. Immunohistochemistry show viral antigen predominantly in cerebellum at the peak of the disease in both models. However, whereas IFNAR KO mice showed infiltration by neutrophils and macrophages and higher expression of IL-1, IL-6 and Cox2, B6 WT mice show a cellular infiltration in the CNS composed predominantly of T cells, particularly CD8+ T cells, and increased mRNA expression levels of IFNg, GzmB and Prf1 at peak of disease. Lastly, the CNS of B6 WT mice shows evidence of neurodegeneration predominantly in the cerebellum that are less prominent in mice lacking the IFN response possibly due to the difference in cellular infiltrates and rapid progression of the disease in that model. The development of the B6 WT model of ZIKV infection will provide insight into the immunopathology of the virus and facilitate assessments of possible therapeutics and vaccines.

  4. Childhood Midline Tract Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood midline tract carcinoma occurs in the respiratory tract or other places along the center line of the body. It is sometimes caused by a change in the NUT gene (NUT midline carcinoma). Get information about childhood midline tract carcinoma, including symptoms, tests, and multimodality treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Spontaneous closure of midline diastema following frenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koora Kiran

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary midline diastema is a common aesthetic problem in mixed and early permanent dentitions. The space can occur either as a transient malocclusion or created by developmental, pathological or iatrogenical factors. Many innovative therapies varying from restorative procedures such as composite build-up to surgery (frenectomies and orthodontics are available. Although literature says every frenectomy procedure should be preceded by orthodontic treatment, we opted for frenectomy technique without any orthodontic intervention. Presented herewith is a case report of a 9-year-old girl with a high frenal attachment that had caused spacing of the maxillary central incisors. A spontaneous closure of the midline diastema was noted within 2 months following frenectomy. The patient was followed up for 4 months after which the space remained closed and there was no necessity for an orthodontic treatment at a later stage.

  6. Posterior midline cervical fetal cystic hygroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oak S

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior midline cervical cystic hygromas (PMC are frequently found associated with chromosomal aberrations and usually do not survive. The present report illustrates diagnosis of this condition by sonography in an 18 weeks old fetus and an amniocentesis revealed 45 x0 karyotype and increased concentration of alpha-fetoproteins. Pregnancy was terminated in view of Turner′s syndrome. The etiology and natural history of the condition is reviewed.

  7. Midline cervical cleft: a rare congenital anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renukaswamy, Gayathri Mandya; Soma, Marlene A; Hartley, Benjamin E J

    2009-11-01

    A midline cervical cleft (MCC) is a rare congenital anomaly due to failure of fusion of the first and second branchial arches during embryogenesis. It may present as a midline defect of the anterior neck skin with a skin projection or sinus, or as a subcutaneous fibrous cord. This report evaluates the clinical features and surgical management of an MCC. We analyzed a series of 4 patients with an MCC successfully treated at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London. Three male patients and 1 female patient between 4 and 11 months of age were found to have an MCC. Each patient presented with an erythematous, fibrous band of tissue extending between the chin and the suprasternal notch. Treatment comprised surgical excision of the lesion and Z-plasty repair. We present the embryology, common clinical presentation, investigations, differential diagnosis, and histology, along with a literature review, of this uncommon malformation of the anterior neck. An MCC is a differential diagnosis to consider when assessing a child with a midline cervical lesion. Early surgical excision with Z-plasty repair of the soft tissue defect is the treatment of choice to prevent long-term complications.

  8. Non-cell autonomous impairment of oligodendrocyte differentiation precedes CNS degeneration in the Zitter rat: Implications of macrophage/microglial activation in the pathogenesis

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    Ookawara Shigeo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zitter (zi/zi rat, a loss-of-function mutant of the glycosylated transmembrane protein attractin (atrn, exhibits widespread age-dependent spongiform degeneration, hypomyelination, and abnormal metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the brain. To date, the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes have remained unclear. Results Here, we show differentiation defects in zi/zi oligodendrocytes, accompanied by aberrant extension of cell-processes and hypomyelination. Axonal bundles were relatively preserved during postnatal development. With increasing in age, the injured oligodendrocytes in zi/zi rats become pathological, as evidenced by the accumulation of iron in their cell bodies. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that atrn expression was absent from an oligodendrocyte lineage, including A2B5-positive progenitors and CNPase-positive differentiated cells. The number and distribution of Olig2-positive oligodendrocyte progenitors was unchanged in the zi/zi brain. Furthermore, an in vitro differentiation assay of cultured oligodendrocyte progenitors prepared from zi/zi brains revealed their normal competence for proliferation and differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes. Interestingly, we demonstrated the accelerated recruitment of ED1-positive macrophages/microglia to the developing zi/zi brain parenchyma prior to the onset of hypomyelination. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of CD26 and IL1-β in the zi/zi brain during this early postnatal stage. Conclusion We demonstrated that the onset of the impairment of oligodendrocyte differentiation occurs in a non-cell autonomous manner in zi/zi rats. Hypomyelination of oligodendrocytes was not due to a failure of the intrinsic program of oligodendrocytes, but rather, was caused by extrinsic factors that interrupt oligodendrocyte development. It is likely that macrophage/microglial activation in the zi/zi CNS leads to disturbances in

  9. Extending the Neuroanatomic Territory of Diffuse Midline Glioma, K27M Mutant: Pineal Region Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrea R; Zaky, Wafik; Gokden, Murat; Fuller, Christine E; Ocal, Eylem; Leeds, Norman E; Fuller, Gregory N

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse midline glioma, H3-K27M mutant (DMG-K27M) is a newly described, molecularly distinct infiltrative glioma that almost exclusively arises in midline CNS structures, including the brain stem, especially the pons, as well as the thalamus and spinal cord with rare examples seen in the cerebellum, third ventricle, and hypothalamus. To our knowledge, only 1 case of a molecularly confirmed DMG-K27M arising in the pineal region has been previously reported. We present the second occurrence of a tissue-confirmed DMG-K27M of the pineal region, which, to our knowledge, is the first case reported in a child and the first case with documented preoperative MRI. This case, in addition to a prior report described in an adult, defines the lower end of a broad age range of DMG-K27M onset (12-65 years) and establishes the pineal gland as a bona fide site of origin for this newly codified midline glioma. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  11. Type, Frequency, and Spatial Distribution of Immune Cell Infiltrates in CNS Germinomas: Evidence for Inflammatory and Immunosuppressive Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Pia; Dörner, Evelyn; Dreschmann, Verena; Sakamato, Noriaki; Kristiansen, Glen; Calaminus, Gabriele; Vokuhl, Christian; Leuschner, Ivo; Pietsch, Torsten

    2018-02-01

    Central nervous system germinomas are characterized by a massive immune cell infiltrate. We systematically characterized these immune cells in 28 germinomas by immunophenotyping and image analysis. mRNA expression was analyzed by Nanostring technology and in situ RNA hybridization. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were composed of 61.8% ± 3.1% (mean ± SE) CD3-positive T cells, including 45.2% ± 3.5% of CD4-positive T-helper cells, 23.4% ± 1.5% of CD8-positive cytotoxic T cells, 5.5% ± 0.9% of FoxP3-positive regulatory T cells, and 11.9% ±1.3% PD-1-positive TILs. B cells accounted for 35.8% ± 2.9% of TILs and plasma cells for 9.3% ± 1.6%. Tumor-associated macrophages consisted of clusters of activated PD-L1-positive macrophages and interspersed anti-inflammatory macrophages expressing CD163. Germinoma cells did not express PD-L1. Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers and cytokines was high and comparable to mRNA levels in lymph node tissue. IFNG and IL10 mRNA was detected in subfractions of TILs and in PD-L1-positive macrophages. Taken together, the strong immune reaction observed in germinomas involves inflammatory as well as various suppressive mechanisms. Expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 and infiltration of cytotoxic T cells are biomarkers predictive of response to anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies, constituting a rationale for possible novel treatment approaches. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 70th Birthday symposium of Prof. Dr. Riederer: autologous adult stem cells in ischemic and traumatic CNS disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munter, J.P.J.M.; Wolters, E.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic and traumatic insults of the central nervous system both result in definite chronic disability, only to some extent responsive to rehabilitation. Recently, the application of autologous stem cells (fresh bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells including mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem

  13. IGF-1 delivery to CNS attenuates motor neuron cell death but does not improve motor function in type III SMA mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Wei-Cheng; Ting, Chen-Hung; Dodge, James C; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Cheng, Seng H; Passini, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of administering a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human IGF-1 (AAV2/1-hIGF-1) into the deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) of a type III SMA mouse model was evaluated. High levels of IGF-1 transcripts and protein were detected in the spinal cord at 2 months post-injection demonstrating that axonal connections between the cerebellum and spinal cord were able to act as conduits for the viral vector and protein to the spinal cord. Mice treated with AAV2/1-hIGF-1 and analyzed 8 months later showed changes in endogenous Bax and Bcl-xl levels in spinal cord motor neurons that were consistent with IGF-1-mediated anti-apoptotic effects on motor neurons. However, although AAV2/1-hIGF-1 treatment reduced the extent of motor neuron cell death, the majority of rescued motor neurons were non-functional, as they lacked axons that innervated the muscles. Furthermore, treated SMA mice exhibited abnormal muscle fibers, aberrant neuromuscular junction structure, and impaired performance on motor function tests. These data indicate that although CNS-directed expression of IGF-1 could reduce motor neuron cell death, this did not translate to improvements in motor function in an adult mouse model of type III SMA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Midline thalamic reuniens lesions improve executive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, J A; Abela, A R; Chudasama, Y

    2017-03-14

    The role of the thalamus in complex cognitive behavior is a topic of increasing interest. Here we demonstrate that lesions of the nucleus reuniens (NRe), a midline thalamic nucleus interconnected with both hippocampal and prefrontal circuitry, lead to enhancement of executive behaviors typically associated with the prefrontal cortex. Rats were tested on four behavioral tasks: (1) the combined attention-memory (CAM) task, which simultaneously assessed attention to a visual target and memory for that target over a variable delay; (2) spatial memory using a radial arm maze, (3) discrimination and reversal learning using a touchscreen operant platform, and (4) decision-making with delayed outcomes. Following NRe lesions, the animals became more efficient in their performance, responding with shorter reaction times but also less impulsively than controls. This change, combined with a decrease in perseverative responses, led to focused attention in the CAM task and accelerated learning in the visual discrimination task. There were no observed changes in tasks involving either spatial memory or value-based decision making. These data complement ongoing efforts to understand the role of midline thalamic structures in human cognition, including the development of thalamic stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for acquired cognitive disabilities (Schiff, 2008; Mair et al., 2011), and point to the NRe as a potential target for clinical intervention. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Midline nasal dermoid cyst with Tessier's 0 cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Chauhan, Dinesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    This is a rare anomaly of midline nasal dermoid cyst (NDC) along with Tessier's 0 cleft. Midline NDCs present most commonly result from aberrant embryological development, and most commonly give rise to bifid nasal deformity resulting in midline cleft of the nose. Craniofacial clefts are among the most disfiguring of all facial anomalies. They exist in a multitude of patterns and with varying degrees of severity. The bifid nose deformity is generally an indicator of Tessier number 0 cleft. We...

  16. Orthodontic Management of Midline Diastema in Mixed Dentition

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Arvind; Shetty, Raghvendra M; Dixit, Uma; Mallikarjun, K; Kohli, Anil

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Midline diastema is a space between the central incisors. Although physiologic transitory maxillary midline diastema is observed in children during eruption of maxillary anterior teeth in most cases, it is self-corrected after eruption of maxillary canines. However, midline diastema unrelated to the eruption of teeth has been observed owing to various etiologic factors. Treatment to align the central incisors depends on the predisposing factors.

  17. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  18. Fenda cervical mediana Midline cervical cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Tagliarini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A fenda mediana congênita do pescoço é anomalia rara da parte ventral do pescoço. Em torno de 100 casos foram relatados na literatura, sendo o primeiro caso descrito por Bailey em 1924. Este defeito é relatado em associação com fenda mediana do lábio inferior, fenda da mandíbula e da língua, e hipoplasia de outras estruturas cervicais medianas. Acredita-se que seja uma malformação originada dos dois primeiros arcos branquiais. O tratamento da lesão consiste na excisão vertical da lesão e reparação do defeito resultante. A maioria dos autores recomenda evitar a reparação simples da lesão, preferindo a fechamento com a utilização de zetaplastia múltiplas, com o intuito de evitar fibrose e retração local. Neste artigo relatamos dois casos dessa anomalia e realizamos revisão bibliográfica.The midline cervical cleft is an unusual congenital anomaly of the ventral neck and fewer than 100 cases have been reported overall and the first described by Bailey in 1924. This anomaly is report in association with median cleft of lower lip, cleft mandible and tongue, and hypoplasia of other midline neck structures. Its considered an anomaly originated from the two first branchial arches. The treatment of this cleft is a vertical complete excision and a closure with multiple Z-plasty. Many authors recommend avoid linear closure and prefer multiple Z-plasty for evicted fibrosis and local retraction. In this paper we report 2 case of this anomaly and the literature is reviewed.

  19. Flavonoids and the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna Katharina; Saaby, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are present in almost all terrestrial plants, where they provide UV-protection and colour. Flavonoids have a fused ring system consisting of an aromatic ring and a benzopyran ring with a phenyl substituent. The flavonoids can be divided into several classes depending on their structure....... Flavonoids are present in food and medicinal plants and are thus consumed by humans. They are found in plants as glycosides. Before oral absorption, flavonoids undergo deglycosylation either by lactase phloridzin hydrolase or cytosolic ß-glucocidase. The absorbed aglycone is then conjugated by methylation......, sulphatation or glucuronidation. Both the aglycones and the conjugates can pass the blood-brain barrier. In the CNS several flavones bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABA(A)-receptor resulting in sedation, anxiolytic or anti-convulsive effects. Flavonoids of several classes are inhibitors of monoamine...

  20. Ectopic pituitary adenoma presenting as midline nasopharyngeal mass.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ectopic pituitary adenomas are extremely rare. We report a case of ectopic pituitary adenoma in the midline of the nasopharynx. This adenoma probably arose from the pharyngeal remnant of Rathke\\'s pouch. METHODS: We discuss a case of a lady who presented to our unit with 2 months history of dryness and sensation of lump in her throat and a long standing history of hypothyroidism. Examination of nasopharynx revealed a smooth and fluctuant midline mass. CT scan of nose and paranasal sinuses confirmed the midline mass with small defect communicating with the sphenoid sinus. An initial diagnosis of Thornwaldt\\'s cyst was made and she underwent upper aerodigestive tract endoscopy and marsupialization of the mass. Histopathological examination revealed ectopic pituitary adenoma. CONCLUSION: Ectopic pituitary adenoma is an important differential diagnosis for a midline nasopharyngeal mass. It is recommended that prior to surgical resection of midline nasopharyngeal mass biopsy is taken and MRI is performed.

  1. Isolated vasculitis of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, F.; Reith, W.

    2000-01-01

    Vasculitis is a rare cause for disease of the CNS. The isolated vasculitis of the CNS is restricted to the CNS whereas other forms of vasculitis affect various organs including the CNS. Headache, encephalopathy, focal deficits and epileptic seizures are the major symptoms suggestive for vasculitis. One major criterion of the isolated vasculitis of the CNS is the lack of evidence for other vasculitis forms or for pathology of other organs. Angiography displays multifocal segmental stenosis of intracranial vessels. MRI demonstrates multiple lesions which in part show enhancement after gadolinium. A definite diagnosis can only be made on the grounds of biopsy from leptomeninges and parenchyma. Therapy consists of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid. (orig.) [de

  2. The role of the sonic hedgehog signalling pathway in patients with midline defects and congenital hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, L C; Gaston-Massuet, C; Andoniadou, C L; Carreno, G; Webb, E A; Kelberman, D; McCabe, M J; Panagiotakopoulos, L; Saldanha, J W; Spoudeas, H A; Torpiano, J; Rossi, M; Raine, J; Canham, N; Martinez-Barbera, J P; Dattani, M T

    2015-05-01

    The Gli family of zinc finger (GLI) transcription factors mediates the sonic hedgehog signalling pathway (HH) essential for CNS, early pituitary and ventral forebrain development in mice. Human mutations in this pathway have been described in patients with holoprosencephaly (HPE), isolated congenital hypopituitarism (CH) and cranial/midline facial abnormalities. Mutations in Sonic hedgehog (SHH) have been associated with HPE but not CH, despite murine studies indicating involvement in pituitary development. We aimed to establish the role of the HH pathway in the aetiology of hypothalamo-pituitary disorders by screening our cohort of patients with midline defects and/or CH for mutations in SHH, GLI2, Shh brain enhancer 2 (SBE2) and growth-arrest specific 1 (GAS1). Two variants and a deletion of GLI2 were identified in three patients. A novel variant at a highly conserved residue in the zinc finger DNA-binding domain, c.1552G > A [pE518K], was identified in a patient with growth hormone deficiency and low normal free T4. A nonsynonymous variant, c.2159G > A [p.R720H], was identified in a patient with a short neck, cleft palate and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. A 26·6 Mb deletion, 2q12·3-q21·3, encompassing GLI2 and 77 other genes, was identified in a patient with short stature and impaired growth. Human embryonic expression studies and molecular characterisation of the GLI2 mutant p.E518K support the potential pathogenicity of GLI2 mutations. No mutations were identified in GAS1 or SBE2. A novel SHH variant, c.1295T>A [p.I432N], was identified in two siblings with variable midline defects but normal pituitary function. Our data suggest that mutations in SHH, GAS1 and SBE2 are not associated with hypopituitarism, although GLI2 is an important candidate for CH. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. FGF signaling is required for brain left-right asymmetry and brain midline formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Judith M; Yost, H Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Early disruption of FGF signaling alters left-right (LR) asymmetry throughout the embryo. Here we uncover a role for FGF signaling that specifically disrupts brain asymmetry, independent of normal lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) asymmetry. When FGF signaling is inhibited during mid-somitogenesis, asymmetrically expressed LPM markers southpaw and lefty2 are not affected. However, asymmetrically expressed brain markers lefty1 and cyclops become bilateral. We show that FGF signaling controls expression of six3b and six7, two transcription factors required for repression of asymmetric lefty1 in the brain. We found that Z0-1, atypical PKC (aPKC) and β-catenin protein distribution revealed a midline structure in the forebrain that is dependent on a balance of FGF signaling. Ectopic activation of FGF signaling leads to overexpression of six3b, loss of organized midline adherins junctions and bilateral loss of lefty1 expression. Reducing FGF signaling leads to a reduction in six3b and six7 expression, an increase in cell boundary formation in the brain midline, and bilateral expression of lefty1. Together, these results suggest a novel role for FGF signaling in the brain to control LR asymmetry, six transcription factor expressions, and a midline barrier structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The meninges as barriers and facilitators for the movement of fluid, cells and pathogens related to the rodent and human CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Roy O.; Sharp, Matthew M.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2018-01-01

    Meninges that surround the CNS consist of an outer fibrous sheet of dura mater (pachymeninx) that is also the inner periosteum of the skull. Underlying the dura are the arachnoid and pia mater (leptomeninges) that form the boundaries of the subarachnoid space. In this review we (1) examine...

  5. Flavonoids and the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Jäger

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are present in almost all terrestrial plants, where they provide UV-protection and colour. Flavonoids have a fused ring system consisting of an aromatic ring and a benzopyran ring with a phenyl substituent. The flavonoids can be divided into several classes depending on their structure. Flavonoids are present in food and medicinal plants and are thus consumed by humans. They are found in plants as glycosides. Before oral absorption, flavonoids undergo deglycosylation either by lactase phloridzin hydrolase or cytosolic β-glucocidase. The absorbed aglycone is then conjugated by methylation, sulphatation or glucuronidation. Both the aglycones and the conjugates can pass the blood-brain barrier. In the CNS several flavones bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in sedation, anxiolytic or anti-convulsive effects. Flavonoids of several classes are inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A or B, thereby working as anti-depressants or to improve the conditions of Parkinson’s patients. Flavanols, flavanones and anthocyanidins have protective effects preventing inflammatory processes leading to nerve injury. Flavonoids seem capable of influencing health and mood.

  6. Analysis of perfusion weighted image of CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It is difficult to differentiate CNS lymphoma from other tumors such as malignant gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas with conventional MR imaging, because the imaging findings are overlapped between these tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the perfusion weighted MR imaging findings of CNS lymphomas and to compare the relative cerebral blood volume ratios between CNS lymphomas and other tumors such as high grade gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed MRI findings and clinical records in 13 patients with pathologically proven CNS lymphoma between January 2006 and November 2008. We evaluated the relative cerebral blood volume ratios of tumor, which were obtained by dividing the values obtained from the normal white matter on MRI. Results: Total 13 patients (M:F = 8:5; age range 46-67 years, mean age 52.3 years) were included. The CNS lymphomas showed relatively low values of maximum relative CBV ratio in most patients regardless of primary or secondary CNS lymphoma. Conclusion: Perfusion weighted image may be helpful in the diagnosis of CNS lymphoma in spite of primary or secondary or B cell or T cell.

  7. CNS infections in immunocompetent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, K.M.; Zimmer, A.; Reith, W.

    2008-01-01

    This article gives a review of the most frequent infective agents reasonable for CNS infections in immunocompetent patients as well as their localisation and imaging specifications. MRI scanning is the gold standard to detect inflammatory conditions in the CNS. Imaging can be normal or nonspecifically altered although the infection is culturally or bioptically proven. There are no pathognomonic, pathogen-specific imaging criteria. The localization and dimension of the inflammation depends on the infection pathway. (orig.) [de

  8. Transurethral deroofing of midline prostatic cyst for subfertile men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.B. Cornel (Erik); G.R. Dohle (Gert); E.J. Meuleman

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe evaluated the efficacy of transurethral deroofing of a midline prostatic cyst in subfertile men with one or more of the following semen abnormalities: decreased ejaculatory volume, decreased sperm motility and oligo- or azoospermia. Results from treatment

  9. Germinoma with Involvement of Midline and Off-Midline Intracranial Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Graciela Loto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Germinomas are malignant intracranial germ tumors, usually found in suprasellar regions. Less than 10% are localized in off-middle structures, and synchronous involvement of both structures has only exceptionally been published. A case of an 18-year-old male patient with progressive right-sided hemiparesis and panhypopituitarism was reviewed. Brain MRI showed a solid mass involving pituitary and hypothalamus with thickening of pituitary stalk, high intensity lesions on T2-weighted imaging in left internal capsule, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, and mild atrophy of the left internal capsule and cerebral peduncle. Nonadenomatous lesions were considered in the differential diagnosis. Alfa-fetoprotein (AFP levels were negative in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-HCG levels were slightly increased in CSF. A transsphenoidal biopsy identified a germinoma. Four cycles of chemotherapy with bleomicine, etoposide, and cysplatin were given, followed by radiotherapy, but patients died due to a recidiva. Conclusion. Germinoma must be considered in patients with insipidus diabetes with a sellar mass with thickening of pituitary stalk; and ectopic germinoma must be suspected in patients with slowly progressive hemiparesis with cerebral hemiatrophy. Even with a rare condition, colocalization of midline and off-midline germinoma must be suspected in the presence of these typical signs of both localizations.

  10. T-cell- and macrophage-mediated axon damage in the absence of a CNS-specific immune response: involvement of metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, T A; Woolley, S T; Hughes, P M; Sibson, N R; Anthony, D C; Perry, V H

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the fact that axon injury is an important component of multiple sclerosis pathology. The issue of whether a CNS antigen-specific immune response is required to produce axon injury remains unresolved. We investigated the extent and time course of axon injury in a rodent model of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction directed against the mycobacterium bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Using MRI, we determined whether the ongoing axon injury is restricted to the period during which the blood-brain barrier is compromised. DTH lesions were initiated in adult rats by intracerebral injection of heat-killed BCG followed by a peripheral challenge with BCG. Our findings demonstrate that a DTH reaction to a non-CNS antigen within a CNS white matter tract leads to axon injury. Ongoing axon injury persisted throughout the 3-month period studied and was not restricted to the period of blood-brain barrier breakdown, as detected by MRI enhancing lesions. We have previously demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are upregulated in multiple sclerosis plaques and DTH lesions. In this study we demonstrated that microinjection of activated MMPs into the cortical white matter results in axon injury. Our results show that axon injury, possibly mediated by MMPs, is immunologically non-specific and may continue behind an intact blood-brain barrier.

  11. Interneuron progenitor transplantation to treat CNS dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad O Chohan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field.

  12. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fadzilah, Noraziana; Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopatholo...

  13. Alpha?fetoprotein elevation in NUT midline carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    D?Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Palesandro, Erica; Moretti, Marina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Alessandra; Carnevale Schianca, Fabrizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Background Nuclear protein in testis (NUT) midline carcinoma is a rarely diagnosed and potentially under-recognized type of squamous carcinoma that is considered one of the most aggressive human solid tumors. Alpha-fetoprotein elevation has been associated with chronic liver diseases and a limited number of cancers. In particular, in presence of a mediastinal mass in a young man, alpha-fetoprotein elevation is considered nearly pathognomonic of a non-seminoma germ-cell tumor. Case presentatio...

  14. Perception of midline deviations in smile esthetics by laypersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jamille Barros; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo da; Caetano, Márcia Tereza de Oliveira; Motta, Andrea Fonseca Jardim da; Cury-Saramago, Adriana de Alcantara; Mucha, José Nelson

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the esthetic perception of upper dental midline deviation by laypersons and if adjacent structures influence their judgment. An album with 12 randomly distributed frontal view photographs of the smile of a woman with the midline digitally deviated was evaluated by 95 laypersons. The frontal view smiling photograph was modified to create from 1 mm to 5 mm deviations in the upper midline to the left side. The photographs were cropped in two different manners and divided into two groups of six photographs each: group LCN included the lips, chin, and two-thirds of the nose, and group L included the lips only. The laypersons performed the rate of each smile using a visual analog scale (VAS). Wilcoxon test, Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney test were applied, adopting a 5% level of significance. Laypersons were able to perceive midline deviations starting at 1 mm. Statistically significant results (p< 0.05) were found for all multiple comparisons of the values in photographs of group LCN and for almost all comparisons in photographs of group L. Comparisons between the photographs of groups LCN and L showed statistically significant values (p< 0.05) when the deviation was 1 mm. Laypersons were able to perceive the upper dental midline deviations of 1 mm, and above when the adjacent structures of the smiles were included. Deviations of 2 mm and above when the lips only were included. The visualization of structures adjacent to the smile demonstrated influence on the perception of midline deviation.

  15. Application of empowerment theory for CNS practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Catalano, J M

    1993-11-01

    Power is necessary for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) to successfully conduct objectives of practice in bureaucratic hospital settings. To obtain power, the CNS could use strategies of an empowerment theory to fully operationalize roles in hospitals. This article will discuss how the CNS may be empowered utilizing strategies in four empowering categories. In addition, the many benefits of empowering the CNS are reviewed.

  16. Deconstructing IgG4-related disease involvement of midline structures: Comparison to common mimickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzillotta, Marco; Campochiaro, Corrado; Trimarchi, Matteo; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Gerevini, Simonetta; Milani, Raffaella; Bozzolo, Enrica; Biafora, Matteo; Venturini, Elena; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Stone, John H; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Della-Torre, Emanuel

    2017-07-01

    A series of destructive and tumefactive lesions of the midline structures have been recently added to the spectrum of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). We examined the clinical, serological, endoscopic, radiological, and histological features that might be of utility in distinguishing IgG4-RD from other forms of inflammatory conditions with the potential to involve the sinonasal area and the oral cavity. We studied 11 consecutive patients with erosive and/or tumefactive lesions of the midline structures referred to our tertiary care center. All patients underwent serum IgG4 measurement, flow cytometry for circulating plasmablast counts, nasal endoscopy, radiological studies, and histological evaluation of tissue specimens. The histological studies included immunostaining studies to assess the number of IgG4 + plasma cells/HPF for calculation of the IgG4+/IgG + plasma cell ratio. Five patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), three with cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions (CIMDL), and three with IgG4-RD were studied. We found no clinical, endoscopic, or radiological findings specific for IgG4-RD. Increased serum IgG4 and plasmablasts levels were not specific for IgG4-RD. Rather, all 11 patients had elevated blood plasmablast concentrations, and several patients with GPA and CIMDL had elevated serum IgG4 levels. Storiform fibrosis and an IgG4+/IgG + plasma cell ratio >20% on histological examination, however, were observed only in patients with IgG4-RD. Histological examination of bioptic samples from the sinonasal area and oral cavity represents the mainstay for the diagnosis of IgG4-RD involvement of the midline structures.

  17. Immune regulation and CNS autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antel, J P; Owens, T

    1999-01-01

    The central nervous system is a demonstrated target of both clinical and experimental immune mediated disorders. Immune regulatory mechanisms operative at the levels of the systemic immune system, the blood brain barrier, and within the CNS parenchyma are important determinants of the intensity...... and duration of the tissue directed injury. Convergence of research, involving direct manipulation of specific cells and molecular mediators in animal models and in vitro analysis of human immune and neural cells and tissues, is providing increasing insight into the role of these immune regulatory functions...

  18. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ... that can affect thinking, learning, problem solving, speech, reading, writing, and memory. Clinical trials have tested the ...

  19. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttorp, Christiaan M.; Cremers, Niels A.; van Rheden, René; Regan, Raymond F.; Helmich, Pia; van Kempen, Sven; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2017-01-01

    Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES) is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO) mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling. PMID:29164113

  20. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan M. Suttorp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO, which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling.

  1. Glypicans and FGFs in CNS Development and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Antonella

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important events during central nervous system (CNS) development is the communication between cells. Cell-to-cell signaling implicates the interaction between a signaling molecules (or ligands) and their receptors. Ligand-receptor interaction is a tightly regulated process and is

  2. Targeted Intra-arterial Transplantation of Stem Cells to the Injured CNS is More Effective than Intravenous Administration - Engraftment is Dependent on Cell Type and Adhesion Molecule Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Johan; Södersten, Erik; Sundström, Erik

    2011-01-01

    with inflammation, such as traumatic brain injury, there is a transient up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which might provide enviromental cues for migration of stem cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this study was to i) analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment, ii...

  3. Genetic models for CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Wekerle, H; Antel, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of transgenic technology to over-express or prevent expression of genes encoding molecules related to inflammation has allowed direct examination of their role in experimental disease. This article reviews transgenic and knockout models of CNS demyelinating disease, focusing primarily on ...

  4. Basic Concepts of CNS Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this review are to: (1) provide a set of concepts to aid in the understanding of complex processes which occur during central nervous system (CNS) development; (2) illustrate how they contribute to our knowlege of adult brain anatomy; and (3) delineate how modifications of normal developmental processes may affect the structure and…

  5. CNS complications of rotavirus gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volosinova, D.

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus infection may be accompanied by serious complications, e.g. disabilities central nervous system (CNS). Theory rotavirus penetration across the blood-brain barrier and subsequent rota-associated convulsions by the 2-year case-history of the patient. Rotavirosis minor gastrointestinal symptoms may lead to erroneous diagnosis. (author)

  6. Ultrasonography of Midline Scalp Masses : A Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyo Kyeong; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Kyeong Sook; Jung, Seung Mun; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    We report our ultrasonographic experiences in the evaluation of small midline scalp masses. Ultrasonography was performed in four patients with midline scalp mass less than 3cm and its connecting tract into the cranialcavity. Ultrasonographic findings were correlated with pathologic results. There were three cephaloceles and one cystic lymph angioma. Two encephalomenin-goceles, located in occipital region, were mixed cystic and solid lesions and one atretic meningocele in parietal region was a solid lesion. Ultrasonogram of all three cases showed calvarial defect and connecting tract into the cranial cavity. On the contrary, a cystic lymph angioma in occipital region was a purely cystic mass without an associated calvarial defect. We suppose that ultrasonography could be a useful screening tool in the evaluation of midline scalp masses

  7. NASO FRONTAL LESIONS IN THE MIDLINE OF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Lugo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital nasofrontal lesions of the midline are rare congenital abnormalities such as dermoid cysts, nasal gliomas and encephaloceles, with an occurrence of 1: 20,000 to 40,000 births. Its importance lies in the connection to the central nervous system. The biopsy of the lesions with intracranial communication, produce cerebrospinal fluid leaks or meningitis. Objective: To determine the prevalence of midline nasofrontal lesions in a tertiary hospital of regional referral and it´s relationship with other malformations. Material and Methods: Study Design: Transversal retrospective. Male and female patients aged 1 month to 13 years of age with congenital lesions of the nasofrontal midline, treated at Children's Hospital from 1990 to 2005. Sample: was obtained by a non-probabilistic sample of consecutive cases. Through the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 13.0 which included descriptive statistics: median as a measure of central tendency and frequency distribution and proportion as a measure of dispersion. Results: a review of clinical records was conducted from 1990 to 2005, finding 38 of 67 records reviewed, 29 files were excluded because they correspond to the diagnosis of occipital encephalocele. Prevalence was 38 cases in 15 years. The gender distribution of nasofrontal midline lesions was slightly higher in females with 22 cases and 16 cases in males. The midline nasofrontal lesions found were midline encephalocele, gliomas and dermoid cysts. In our review most encephaloceles were not associated with the central nervous system and 11 cases did have an associated disorder; 5 cases with hydrocephalus and / or temporal or occipital cysts and 6 cases with nondevelopment of the corpus callosum plus hydrocephalus. Conclusion: Our prevalence was 38 cases in 15 years. Nasofrontal midline lesion disgnosis are usually made in the first months of life. Among the types of midline nasofrontal lesions, the most common type found

  8. Malignant lymphoma in central nervous system (CNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyoshi, Kenji; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni; Nishimura, Toshio.

    1984-01-01

    A 71-year-old male was admitted to Kohka Public Hospital on January 4, 1980, because of frequent vomiting and recent memory loss. Two weeks before admission upper G-I series showed no abnormalities. Physical and neurological examinations revealed no abnormalities except for slightly apathetic appearance and recent memory loss. Mild pleocytosis and marked increase of protein in CSF were observed. CT scan on January 17 showed high density areas in both medial sides of temporal lobes with remarkable contrast enhancement. His memory and, consciousness disturbances gradually aggravated, accompanied by abnormal density spreading around the ventricle walls like ventriculitis. He was transfered to Kyoto University Hospital on March 17, and malignant lymphoma was diagnosed on the basis of CSF cytology. Radiation and chemotherapy alleviated the CNS involvement and he regained normal mental function. On June 16, he developed pneumonia followed by status epilepticus. Autopsy findings revealed no lymphoid cell infiltration, but fibrous tissues in both hippocampal gyri and lymphomatous cells in the liver, which could not be suspected on clinical examinations. Apparent malignant lymphoma cells were not found in lymph nodes. This case indicated peculiar evolution of malignant lymphoma from liver to CNS or vice versa. We could not decide which organ was primary. CT findings of this case was very interesting; they resembled ventriculitis, which simulate tumors such as medulloblastoma or ependymoma spreading under ependymal lining. (author)

  9. Genetic studies in congenital anterior midline cervical cleft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L P; Pfeiffer, P; Andersen, M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anterior midline cervical cleft (CAMCC) is a rare anomaly, with less than 100 cases reported. The cause of CAMCC is unknown, but genetic factors must be considered as part of the etiology. Three cases of CAMCC are presented. This is the first genetic study of isolated CAMCC. Conventional...

  10. Incisional hernia after upper abdominal surgery: A randomised controlled trial of midline versus transverse incision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Halm (Jens); H. Lip (Harm); P.I.M. Schmitz (Paul); J. Jeekel (Hans)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To determine whether a transverse incision is an alternative to a midline incision in terms of incisional hernia incidence, surgical site infection, postoperative pain, hospital stay and cosmetics in cholecystectomy. Summary background data: Incisional hernias after midline

  11. Ectopic protein interactions within BRD4–chromatin complexes drive oncogenic megadomain formation in NUT midline carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Walsh, Erica M.; Zee, Barry M.; Pakozdi, Tibor; Hsi, Peter; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Dal Cin, Paola; Ince, Tan A.; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; French, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin factors generally act within large, multisubunit complexes; thus, identifying both their normal and aberrant interactors in cancer should provide important information regarding potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we apply this principle to analysis of BRD4–NUT, a fusion oncoprotein that drives an aggressive subtype of squamous cell cancer. We identify ZNF532 as a prominent BRD4–NUT–interacting protein in an established NUT midline carcinoma patient cell line, and ...

  12. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F.; Cambridge Univ.

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author)

  13. Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis, which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in the appearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported. The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role in the innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells of three CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcus simulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control. Results All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosis more effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages. Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were more common in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed in both assays. Conclusion This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococci by macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level. PMID:24207012

  14. Is preoperative brain midline shift a determinant factor for neurological improvement after cranioplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsien Lin

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: For patients who underwent craniectomy, an improvement in neurological function 1 year after cranioplasty was observed. The patients with brain midline shift showed more improvement in consciousness after cranioplasty than those without a brain midline shift. The presence of a preoperative brain midline shift may be an isolated determinant for the prediction of the outcome after cranioplasty.

  15. The diagnostic ability of an additional midline peripheral zone biopsy in transrectal ultrasonography-guided 12-core prostate biopsy to detect midline prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inpyeong Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effect of adding a midline peripheral zone (PZ biopsy to the 12-core biopsy protocol used to diagnose prostate cancer (PC, and to assess the clinical and pathologic characteristics of midline-positive PC in order to identify a potential subgroup of patients who would require midline PZ biopsy. Methods: This study included 741 consecutive patients who underwent a transrectal ultrasonography-guided, 12-core prostate biopsy with an additional midline core biopsy between October 2012 and December 2013. We grouped patients by the presence or absence of PC and subdivided patients with PC based on the involvement of the midline core. The clinical characteristics of these groups were compared, including serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA concentrations, PSA density, and pathological features in the biopsy specimens. Results: PC was detected in 289 patients (39.0%. Among the PC patients, 66 patients (22.8% had midline PC. No patients were diagnosed with PC based only on a midline core. The Gleason scores, number of positive cores, tumor core length, serum PSA concentrations, and PSA density were significantly higher in patients with midline-positive PC (P<0.001. Furthermore, significant cancer was more frequent in the midline-positive group (98.5% vs. 78.0%. Conclusion: Patients showing a positive result for PC in a midline PZ biopsy were more likely to have multiple tumors or large-volume PC with a high tumor burden. However, our data indicated that an additional midline core biopsy is unlikely to be helpful in detecting occult midline PC.

  16. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z

    2002-01-01

    +T-cells expressing CXCR3 were significantly enriched in CSF as compared with blood. Similar levels of CCR6+/CD3+T-cells were observed in blood and CSF, while levels of CCR2+/CD3+T-cells were lower in CSF than in blood. The CSF was virtually devoid of CCR5+/CXCR3- T-cells, suggesting that the expression of CCR5 alone...

  17. Nanomedicines for the Treatment of CNS Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahato, Ram I

    2017-03-01

    Targeting and delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) has been a major challenge. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Therefore, much effort has been channelled into improving transport of therapeutics across the BBB and into the CNS including the use of nanoparticles. In this thematic issue, several reviews and original research are presented that address "Nanomedicines for CNS Diseases." The articles in this issue are concentrated on either CNS-HIV disease or CNS tumors. In regards to CNS-HIV disease, there are two reviews that discuss the role of nanoparticles for improving the delivery of HIV therapeutics to the CNS. In addition, there are two original articles focusing on therapies for CNS-HIV, one of them uses nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA specific to a key protein in autophagy to microglia, and another discusses nanoparticle delivery of a soluble mediator to suppress neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a comprehensive review about gene therapy for CNS neurological diseases is also included. Finally, this issue also includes review articles on enhanced drug targeting to CNS tumors. These articles include a review on the use of nanoparticles for CNS tumors, a review on functionalization (ligands) of nanoparticles for drug targeting to the brain tumor by overcoming BBB, and the final review discusses the use of macrophages as a delivery vehicle to CNS tumors. This thematic issue provides a wealth of knowledge on using nanomedicines for CNS diseases.

  18. Abdominal rectus muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Lucas; Deerenberg, Eva B; van Dijk, Sven M; Lamme, Bas; Koning, Anton H; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Jeekel, Johannes; Lange, Johan F

    2014-04-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) can be attributed to multiple factors. The presence of a parastomal hernia has shown to be a risk factor for IH after midline laparotomy. Our hypothesis is that this increased risk of IH may be caused by changes in biomechanical forces, such as midline shift to the contralateral side of the colostomy owing to decreased restraining forces at the site of the colostomy, and left abdominal rectus muscle (ARM) atrophy owing to intercostal nerve damage. Patients were selected if they underwent end-colostomy via open operation between 2004 and 2011. Patients were eligible if computed tomography (CT) had been performed postoperatively. If available, preoperative CTs were collected for case-control analyses. Midline shift was measured using V-scope application in the I-space, a CAVE-like virtual reality system. For the ARM atrophy hypothesis, measurements of ARM were performed at the level of colostomy, and 3 and 8 cm cranial and caudal of the colostomy. Postoperative CT were available for 77 patients; of these patients, 30 also had a preoperative CT. Median follow-up was 19 months. A mean shift to the right side was identified after preoperative and postoperative comparison; from -1.3 ± 4.6 to 2.1 ± 9.3 (P = .043). Furthermore, during rectus muscle measurements, a thinner left ARM was observed below the level of colostomy. Creation of a colostomy alters the abdominal wall. Atrophy of the left ARM was seen caudal to the level of the colostomy, and a midline shift to the right side was evident on CT. These changes may explain the increased rate of IH after colostomy creation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital Midline Nasal Mass: Four Cases with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambhaji Govind Chintale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Congenital midline nasal masses include nasal dermoids, gliomas, encephaloceles. Although rare, these disorders are clinically important because of their potential for connection to the central nervous system. Preoperative knowledge of an intracranial connection is a necessity to allow for neurosurgical consultation and possible planning for craniotomy. This study discusses the clinical presentation of congenital midline nasal mass and the role of imaging modalities like CT scan and MRI in diagnosis and the surgical management. Materials and Methods  This prospective study is carried from March 2014 to March 2016, during which 4 cases presented to the Otorhinolaryngology department. Pre-operative evaluation of the patients included endoscopic evaluation along with haematological investigations, CT Scan and MRI. The masses were removed with nasal endoscopic sinus surgery or by external approaches and neurosurgical intervention. Result The age of the patients ranged from 3 years to 25 years. Three of them were male and one female. There was one case of nasoethmoidal encephalocele and the other three were dermoids (intranasal dermoid cyst, nasal dermoid cyst and nasal dermoid sinus cyst. Conclusion Congenital midline nasal masses are rare. These disorders are clinically important because of their intracranial connection which require proper evaluation with radiological imaging like CT scan and/or MRI before FNAC and any surgical intervention.

  20. Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Bert W.; Weinstein, Gregory S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a minimally invasive surgical technique to access the midline and anterior skull base using the optical and technical advantages of robotic surgical instrumentation. Methods and Materials: Ten experimental procedures focusing on approaches to the nasopharynx, clivus, sphenoid, pituitary sella, and suprasellar regions were performed on one cadaver and one live mongrel dog. Both the cadaver and canine procedures were performed in an approved training facility using the da Vinci Surgical Robot. For the canine experiments, a transoral robotic surgery (TORS) approach was used, and for the cadaver a newly developed combined cervical-transoral robotic surgery (C-TORS) approach was investigated and compared with standard TORS. The ability to access and dissect tissues within the various areas of the midline and anterior skull base were evaluated, and techniques to enhance visualization and instrumentation were developed. Results: Standard TORS approaches did not provide adequate access to the midline and anterior skull base; however, the newly developed C-TORS approach was successful in providing the surgical access to these regions of the skull base. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is an exciting minimally invasive approach to the skull base that warrants continued preclinical investigation and development

  1. An invertebrate model for CNS drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Qadi, Sonia; Schiøtt, Morten; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ABC efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier (BBB), namely the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), restrain the development of central nervous system (CNS) drugs. Consequently, early screening of CNS drug candidates is pivotal to identify those affected by efflux activity. Therefore, simple,...... barriers. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest a conserved mechanism of brain efflux activity between insects and vertebrates, confirming that this model holds promise for inexpensive and high-throughput screening relative to in vivo models, for CNS drug discovery....

  2. Oral Session 03: CNS Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to space radiation may have impacts on brain function, either during or following missions. It is most important to determine how low doses of protons and high-LET irradiation elicit changes in brain function. Within this framework, the role of oxidative stress should also be assessed, as well as other possible interaction mechanisms involving, e.g., genetic, environmental, and sex-dependent risk factors. The hippocampus is particularly susceptible to radiation. It plays an essential role in memory formation and consolidation and is one of the most investigated brain components for its responses to radiation. The hippocampus is also one of the first brain structures to be damaged in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, an important potential late impairment following irradiation. In ‘Section 3: CNS risk’, six papers have been presented focused on these issues. For details the reader is directed to the specific papers. Here a very short summary follows

  3. Palmitoylethanolamide in CNS health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Russo, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2014-08-01

    The existence of acylethanolamides (AEs) in the mammalian brain has been known for decades. Among AEs, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and conspicuously produced by neurons and glial cells. Antihyperalgesic and neuroprotective properties of PEA have been mainly related to the reduction of neuronal firing and to control of inflammation. Growing evidence suggest that PEA may be neuroprotective during CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Advances in the understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of PEA have potentiated its interest as useful biological tool for disease management. Several rapid non-genomic and delayed genomic mechanisms of action have been identified for PEA as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α dependent. First, an early molecular control, through Ca(+2)-activated intermediate- and/or big-conductance K(+) channels opening, drives to rapid neuronal hyperpolarization. This is reinforced by the increase of the inward Cl(-) currents due to the modulation of the gamma aminobutyric acid A receptor and by the desensitization of the transient receptor potential channel type V1. Moreover, the gene transcription-mediated mechanism sustains the long-term anti-inflammatory effects, by reducing pro-inflammatory enzyme expression and increasing neurosteroid synthesis. Overall, the integration of these different modes of action allows PEA to exert an immediate and prolonged efficacious control in neuron signaling either on inflammatory process or neuronal excitability, maintaining cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the effect of PEA on metabolism, behavior, inflammation and pain perception, related to the control of central functions and the emerging evidence demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy in several neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Detection of choline transporter-like 1 protein CTL1 in neuroblastoma × glioma cells and in the CNS, and its role in choline uptake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; O´Regan, S.; Newcombe, J.; Meunier, F. M.; Prentice, J.; Dove, R.; Lisá, Věra; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 4 (2009), s. 1297-1309 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : CTL1 * choline * cell growth Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.999, year: 2009

  5. Bortezomib-related neuropathy may mask CNS relapse in multiple myeloma: A call for diligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Tan, Kong Bing; Chng, Wee Joo

    2016-07-02

    Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of bortezomib. Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse in MM remains exceedingly rare and carries a dismal prognosis. We present an unusual case of bortezomib related neuropathy masking a CNS relapse of MM. A 57-year-old female was diagnosed with standard-risk MM with clinical and cytogenetic features not typically associated with CNS involvement. She was treated with 4 cycles of bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone (VCD) and achieved a VGPR, after which she underwent an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) followed by bortezomib maintenance. Six months after ASCT she developed symptoms suggestive of peripheral neuropathy which was attributed to bortezomib. However the symptoms persisted despite discontinuation of bortezomib. Imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis subsequently confirmed a CNS relapse. CNS involvement in MM (CNS-MM) is uncommon and is considered an aggressive disease. Recently published literature has reported biomarkers with prognostic potential. However, isolated CNS relapse is even less common; an event which carries a very poor prognosis. Given the heterogeneous neurologic manifestations associated with MM, clinical suspicion may be masked by confounding factors such as bortezomib-based therapy. The disease may further remain incognito if the patient does not exhibit any of the high risk features and biomarkers associated with CNS involvement. In the era of proteasome inhibitor (PtdIns)/immunomodulator (IMID)-based therapy for MM which carries neurologic adverse effects, it is prudent to consider CNS relapse early. This case further highlights the need for more robust biomarkers to predict CNS relapse and use of newer novel agents which demonstrate potential for CNS penetration.

  6. microRNAs in CNS disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocerha, Jannet; Kauppinen, Sakari; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2009-01-01

    RNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and are reported to mediate pivotal roles in many aspects of neuronal functions. Disruption of miRNA-based post-transcriptional regulation has been implicated in a range of CNS disorders as one miRNA is predicted to impact...

  7. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  8. Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome (with a posterior midline unsegmented bar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaissi, A Al; Ghachem, M Ben; Nassib, N; Chehida, F Ben [Hospital d' Enfants, Service d' orthopedie infantile, Tunis (Tunisia); Kozlowski, K [Department of Medical Imaging, Sydney (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome (SSS) is characterised by malsegmentation of the thoracic spine and carpal/tarsal fusions. A unilateral or bilateral unsegmented bar may be present in the thoracic spine. Presenting clinical signs are congenital scoliosis early in life, and shortening of the trunk with scoliosis and/or lordosis in older children. We report a 13-year-old girl with SSS and a midline unsegmented bar running along the spinal processes of T3 to L2 and extending into the posterior vertebral elements. (orig.)

  9. Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome (with a posterior midline unsegmented bar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaissi, A. Al; Ghachem, M. Ben; Nassib, N.; Chehida, F. Ben; Kozlowski, K.

    2005-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome (SSS) is characterised by malsegmentation of the thoracic spine and carpal/tarsal fusions. A unilateral or bilateral unsegmented bar may be present in the thoracic spine. Presenting clinical signs are congenital scoliosis early in life, and shortening of the trunk with scoliosis and/or lordosis in older children. We report a 13-year-old girl with SSS and a midline unsegmented bar running along the spinal processes of T3 to L2 and extending into the posterior vertebral elements. (orig.)

  10. Orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst crossing mandibular midline: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Kshirsagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst is a less-aggressive non-syndromic variant of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC. In this case report, we are highlighting an unusual presentation of OKC with paresthesia, non-vital teeth, and minimal cortical expansion. The radiograph of the patient revealed a radiolucency crossing the midline in the anterior mandible. This manuscript discusses a case which presented as a diagnostic dilemma due to variable clinical and radiological features mimicking different pathologies occurring in the anterior mandible. We have discussed various clinical and radiographic differential diagnoses of the same.

  11. Astroglial-Mediated Remodeling of the Interhemispheric Midline Is Required for the Formation of the Corpus Callosum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gobius, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the major axon tract that connects and integrates neural activity between the two cerebral hemispheres. Although ∼1:4,000 children are born with developmental absence of the corpus callosum, the primary etiology of this condition remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that midline crossing of callosal axons is dependent upon the prior remodeling and degradation of the intervening interhemispheric fissure. This remodeling event is initiated by astroglia on either side of the interhemispheric fissure, which intercalate with one another and degrade the intervening leptomeninges. Callosal axons then preferentially extend over these specialized astroglial cells to cross the midline. A key regulatory step in interhemispheric remodeling is the differentiation of these astroglia from radial glia, which is initiated by Fgf8 signaling to downstream Nfi transcription factors. Crucially, our findings from human neuroimaging studies reveal that developmental defects in interhemispheric remodeling are likely to be a primary etiology underlying human callosal agenesis.

  12. PEG minocycline-liposomes ameliorate CNS autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS. Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circulating polyethylene glycol (PEG minocycline liposomes are effective in treating EAE.Performing in vitro time kinetic studies of PEG minocycline-liposomes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, we determined that PEG minocycline-liposome preparations stabilized with CaCl(2 are effective in diminishing MMP-9 activity. Intravenous injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes every five days were as effective in ameliorating clinical EAE as daily intraperitoneal injections of minocycline. Treatment of animals with PEG minocycline-liposomes significantly reduced the number of CNS-infiltrating leukocytes, and the overall expression of MMP-9 in the CNS. There was also a significant suppression of MMP-9 expression and proteolytic activity in splenocytes of treated animals, but not in CNS-infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, leukocytes gaining access to the brain and spinal cord require the same absolute amount of MMP-9 in all treatment groups, but minocycline decreases the absolute cell number.Our data indicate that less frequent injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes are an effective alternative pharmacotherapy to daily minocycline injections for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases. Also, inhibition of MMP-9 remains a promising treatment target in EAE and patients with MS.

  13. HB-GAM (pleiotrophin) reverses inhibition of neural regeneration by the CNS extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveliev, Mikhail; Fenrich, Keith K.; Kislin, Mikhail; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Varjosalo, Markku; Kajander, Tommi; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Ahonen-Bishopp, Anni; Khiroug, Leonard; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Rougon, Geneviève; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans inhibit regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We report here that HB-GAM (heparin-binding growth-associated molecule; also known as pleiotrophin), a CS-binding protein expressed at high levels in the developing CNS, reverses the role of the CS chains in neurite growth of CNS neurons in vitro from inhibition to activation. The CS-bound HB-GAM promotes neurite growth through binding to the cell surface proteoglycan glypican-2; furthermore, HB-GAM abrogates the CS ligand binding to the inhibitory receptor PTPσ (protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma). Our in vivo studies using two-photon imaging of CNS injuries support the in vitro studies and show that HB-GAM increases dendrite regeneration in the adult cerebral cortex and axonal regeneration in the adult spinal cord. Our findings may enable the development of novel therapies for CNS injuries. PMID:27671118

  14. A novel immune-to-CNS communication pathway: cells of the meninges surrounding the spinal cord CSF space produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to an inflammatory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseler-Frank, Julie; Jekich, Brian M; Mahoney, John H; Bland, Sondra T; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2007-07-01

    Pain is enhanced in response to elevations of proinflammatory cytokines in spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), following either intrathecal injection of these cytokines or intrathecal immune challenge with HIV-1 gp120 that induces cytokine release. Spinal cord glia have been assumed to be the source of endogenous proinflammatory cytokines that enhance pain. However, assuming that spinal cord glia are the sole source of CSF cytokines may be an underestimate, as the cellular composition of the meninges surrounding the spinal cord CSF space includes several cell types known to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The present experiments provide the first investigation of the immunocompetent nature of the spinal cord meninges. Here, we explore whether rat meninges are responsive to intrathecal gp120. These studies demonstrate that: (a) intrathecal gp120 upregulates meningeal gene expression of proinflammatory signals, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and (b) intrathecal gp120 induces meningeal release of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. In addition, stimulation of isolated meninges in vitro with gp120 induced the release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that the resident cells of the meninges are able to respond without immune cell recruitment. Taken together, these data document that the meninges are responsive to immunogenic stimuli in the CSF and that the meninges may be a source of immune products detected in CSF. The ability of the meninges to release to proinflammatory signals suggests a potential role in the modulation of pain.

  15. 18-F-FDG PET/CT in Localizing Additional CNS Lesion in a Case of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Determining Accurate Extent of the Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Tripathy, Sarthak; Mukherjee, Anirban; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement is a rare manifestation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), with bone and skin lesions being more frequent. MR remains the investigation of choice for localizing brain lesions. However, due to poor sensitivity of MRI in detecting osseous and pulmonary lesions, it is not used routinely in staging purposes until and unless indicated. We hereby discuss a case of 6-year-old boy of LCH who was referred for 18-F-FDG PET/CT for staging and knowing the extent of the disease, but a lesion in hypothalamus was picked up incidentally on FDG PET-CT study that was confirmed by MRI.

  16. Observations at the CNS-PNS border of ventral roots connected to a neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sten Remahl

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that numerous sprouts originating from a neuroma, after nerve injury in neonatal animals, can invade spinal nerve roots. In this study the border between the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS-PNS border of ventral roots in kittens was examined with both light and electron microscopy after early postnatal sciatic nerve resection. A transient ingrowth of substance P positive axons was observed into the CNS, but no spouts remained 6 weeks after the injury. Using serial sections and electron microscopy it was possible to identify small bundles of unmyelinated axons that penetrated from the root fascicles for a short distance into the CNS. These axons ended blindly, sometimes with a growth cone-like terminal swelling filled with vesicles. The axon bundles were accompanied by p75 positive cells in both the root fascicles and the pia mater, but not in the CNS. It may thus be suggested that neurotrophin presenting p75 positive cells could facilitate axonal growth into the pia mater and that the lack of such cells in the CNS compartment might contribute to the failure of growth into the CNS. A maldevelopment of myelin sheaths at the CNS-PNS border of motor axons was observed and it seems possible that this could have consequences for the propagation of action potential across this region after neonatal nerve injury.

  17. Glucocorticoid treatment of MCMV infected newborn mice attenuates CNS inflammation and limits deficits in cerebellar development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kosmac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV.

  18. Digital analysis of facial landmarks in determining facial midline among Punjabi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kurian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prosthodontic rehabilitation aims to achieve the best possible facial esthetic appearance for a patient. Attaining facial symmetry forms the basic element for esthetics, and knowledge of the midline of face will result in a better understanding of dentofacial esthetics. Currently, there are no guidelines that direct the choice of specific anatomic landmarks to determine the midline of the face or mouth. Most clinicians choose one specific anatomic landmark and an imaginary line passing through it. Thus, the clinician is left with no established guidelines to determine facial midline. Objective: The purpose of the study is to digitally determine the relationship of facial landmarks with midline of face and formulate a guideline for choosing anatomic landmark among Punjabi population. Materials and Methods: Three commonly used anatomic landmarks, namely nasion, tip of the nose, and tip of the philtrum, were marked clinically on 100 participants (age range: 21–45 years. Frontal full-face digital images of the participants in smile were then made under standardized conditions. Midline analysis was carried out digitally using an image analyzing software. The entire process of midline analysis was done by a single observer and repeated twice. Reliability analysis and one-sample t-tests were conducted. Results: The results indicated that each of the four landmarks deviated uniquely and significantly (P < 0.001 from the midlines of the face as well as the mouth. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, the hierarchy of anatomic landmarks closest to the midline of the face in smile was as follows: (1 Intercommissural midlines, (2 Tip of philtrum, (3 Nasion, (4 Tip of the nose, and (5 Dental midlines. The hierarchy of anatomical landmarks closest to the intercommissural/mouth midline was: (1 Tip of philtrum, (2 Tip of the nose, (3 Nasion, and (4 dental midline.

  19. The retina as a window to the brain-from eye research to CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Anat; Benhar, Inbal; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Philosophers defined the eye as a window to the soul long before scientists addressed this cliché to determine its scientific basis and clinical relevance. Anatomically and developmentally, the retina is known as an extension of the CNS; it consists of retinal ganglion cells, the axons of which form the optic nerve, whose fibres are, in effect, CNS axons. The eye has unique physical structures and a local array of surface molecules and cytokines, and is host to specialized immune responses similar to those in the brain and spinal cord. Several well-defined neurodegenerative conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord have manifestations in the eye, and ocular symptoms often precede conventional diagnosis of such CNS disorders. Furthermore, various eye-specific pathologies share characteristics of other CNS pathologies. In this Review, we summarize data that support examination of the eye as a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis of select CNS diseases, and the use of the eye as a valuable model to study the CNS. Translation of eye research to CNS disease, and deciphering the role of immune cells in these two systems, could improve our understanding and, potentially, the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Outcome of patients with intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumors-lessons from the SIOP-CNS-GCT-96 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaminus, Gabriele; Frappaz, Didier; Kortmann, Rolf Dieter; Krefeld, Barbara; Saran, Frank; Pietsch, Torsten; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Garre, Maria Luisa; Ricardi, Umberto; Mann, Jillian R; Göbel, Ulrich; Alapetite, Claire; Murray, Matthew J; Nicholson, James C

    2017-11-29

    Following promising results to increase survival and reduce treatment burden in intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCTs), we conducted a European study using dose-intense chemotherapy followed by risk-adapted radiotherapy. All patients received 4 courses of cisplatin/etoposide/ifosfamide. Non-metastatic patients then received focal radiotherapy only (54 Gy); metastatic patients received 30 Gy craniospinal radiotherapy with 24 Gy boost to primary tumor and macroscopic metastatic sites. Patients with localized malignant NGGCT (n = 116) demonstrated 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 0.72 ± 0.04 and 0.82 ± 0.04, respectively. Primary tumor sites were: 67 pineal, 35 suprasellar, 5 bifocal, 9 others. One patient died postsurgery in clinical remission; 3 patients progressed during treatment and 27 (23%) relapsed afterward. Fourteen were local, 6 combined, and 7 distant relapses (outside radiation field). Seventeen of the 27 relapsed patients died of disease. Patients with metastatic disease (n = 33) demonstrated 5-year PFS and OS of 0.68 ± 0.09 and 0.75 ± 0.08, respectively; 1 patient died following progression on treatment and 9 (27%) relapsed afterward (5 local, 1 combined, 3 distant). Only one metastatic patient with recurrence was salvaged. Multivariate analysis identified diagnostic alpha-fetoprotein level (serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid level >1000 ng/mL, 19/149 patients, of whom 11 relapsed; P < 0.0003) and residual disease following treatment, including after second-look surgery (n = 52/145 evaluable patients, 26 relapsed; P = 0.0002) as significant prognostic indicators in this cohort. In localized malignant NGGCT, craniospinal radiotherapy could be avoided without increased relapses outside the radiotherapy field. Chemotherapy and craniospinal radiotherapy remain the gold standard for metastatic disease. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro

  1. CNS embryonal tumours: WHO 2016 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, J C; Hawkins, C; Pietsch, T; Jacques, T S

    2018-02-01

    Embryonal tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) present a significant clinical challenge. Many of these neoplasms affect young children, have a very high mortality and therapeutic strategies are often aggressive with poor long-term outcomes. There is a great need to accurately diagnose embryonal tumours, predict their outcome and adapt therapy to the individual patient's risk. For the first time in 2016, the WHO classification took into account molecular characteristics for the diagnosis of CNS tumours. This integration of histological features with genetic information has significantly changed the diagnostic work-up and reporting of tumours of the CNS. However, this remains challenging in embryonal tumours due to their previously unaccounted tumour heterogeneity. We describe the recent revisions made to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours and review the main changes, while highlighting some of the more common diagnostic testing strategies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  2. Lethal midline granuloma histologically. Management with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga T, L.; Misad, O.; Moscol, A.; Pinillos G, L.; Barriga T, O.; Heredia, A.; Pinillos A, L.; Mayer Z, T.

    1995-01-01

    From 1973 through 1990, 24 patients with lethal midline granuloma histologically demonstrated were treated with radiation therapy at the Radiation Oncology Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases from Peru. The authors reports the results of their experience, reviewed the literature and present a clinic and pathologic discussion of this rare entity. All the patients received radiotherapy as the main treatment and 12 of them received chemotherapy. The male to female ratio was 5:3 with a mean age of 29.33 years (range 6 to 84 years old). Symptoms of nasal obstruction were presented 45.83%, nasal enlargement in 33.33%, nasal discharge in 29.16% and fever in 29.16%, principally. We believe that radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in this report we can not demonstrate it because of the small number of patients. (authors). 28 refs., 10 tabs

  3. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Systematic Kinase Inhibitor Profiling Identifies CDK9 as a Synthetic Lethal Target in NUT Midline Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Brägelmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinase inhibitors represent the backbone of targeted cancer therapy, yet only a limited number of oncogenic drivers are directly druggable. By interrogating the activity of 1,505 kinase inhibitors, we found that BRD4-NUT-rearranged NUT midline carcinoma (NMC cells are specifically killed by CDK9 inhibition (CDK9i and depend on CDK9 and Cyclin-T1 expression. We show that CDK9i leads to robust induction of apoptosis and of markers of DNA damage response in NMC cells. While both CDK9i and bromodomain inhibition over time result in reduced Myc protein expression, only bromodomain inhibition induces cell differentiation and a p21-induced cell-cycle arrest in these cells. Finally, RNA-seq and ChIP-based analyses reveal a BRD4-NUT-specific CDK9i-induced perturbation of transcriptional elongation. Thus, our data provide a mechanistic basis for the genotype-dependent vulnerability of NMC cells to CDK9i that may be of relevance for the development of targeted therapies for NMC patients.

  5. Basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele in association with midline cleft lip and palate: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida; Rocha, Artur Bastos; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro; Furtado, Paulo Germano Cavalcanti

    2011-01-01

    Association of basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele with midline cleft lip and palate is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a nine-year-old girl presenting a midline facial cleft with meningocele that was noticeable through the palatine defect as a medial intranasal pulsatile mass. An analysis of clinical and radiological findings of the present case of cranial dysraphism is carried out. (author)

  6. Basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele in association with midline cleft lip and palate: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida; Rocha, Artur Bastos; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Furtado, Paulo Germano Cavalcanti [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Pediatria e Genetica

    2011-11-15

    Association of basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele with midline cleft lip and palate is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a nine-year-old girl presenting a midline facial cleft with meningocele that was noticeable through the palatine defect as a medial intranasal pulsatile mass. An analysis of clinical and radiological findings of the present case of cranial dysraphism is carried out. (author)

  7. Third ventricle midline shift on computed tomography as an alternative to septum pellucidum shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Carlos Francis A.; Oropilla, Jean Quint L; Alvarez, Victor M.

    2000-01-01

    The cerebral midline shift is measured using the displacement from midline of the third ventricle. It is an easily determined criterion from which CT scans of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hematoma may be investigated. Midline shift is a significant criteria in which to gauge the neurological status of patients. In a retrospective study of 32 patients with spontaneous unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage, a midline third ventricle shift correlated well with septum pellucidum shift. A greater than 7 mm midline third ventricle shift was associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score compared a shift less than 7mm. For the septum pellucidum, a greater than 10 mm shift was similarly associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score. (Author)

  8. Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 are up-regulated in brain resident cells in response to virus induced inflammation of the CNS via at least two distinctive pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Fenger, Christina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo

    2014-01-01

    underlie a virus induced up-regulation of SOCS in the CNS. We found that i.c. infection with either lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or yellow fever virus (YF) results in gradual up-regulation of SOCS1/3 mRNA expression peaking at day 7 post infection (p.i.). In the LCMV model, SOCS m...

  9. Uterine, but not ovarian, female reproductive organ involvement at presentation by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with poor outcomes and a high frequency of secondary CNS involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Cheah, Chan Y; Hutchings, Martin

    2016-01-01

    progression-free survival and overall survival compared to those without reproductive organ involvement, whereas ovarian DLBCL was not predictive of outcome. Secondary central nervous system (CNS) involvement (SCNS) occurred in 7/17 (41%) women with uterine DLBCL (two patients with concomitant ovarian DLBCL...

  10. Immune and inflammatory responses in the CNS : Modulation by astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; aschner, michael; hidalgo, juan

    2008-01-01

    Beyond their long-recognized support functions, astrocytes are active partners of neurons in processing information, synaptic integration, and production of trophic factors, just to name a few. Both microglia and astrocytes produce and secrete a number of cytokines, modulating and integrating...... the communication between hematogenous cells and resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This review will address (1) the functions of astrocytes in the normal brain and (2) their role in surveying noxious stimuli within the brain, with particular emphasis on astrocytic responses to damage or disease...

  11. Transabdominal midline reconstruction by minimally invasive surgery: technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, T N; Abdalla, R Z; Santo, M A; Tavares, R R F M; Abdalla, B M Z; Cecconello, I

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of the minimally invasive approach changed the way abdominal surgery was carried out. Open suture and mesh reinforcement in ventral hernia repair used to be the surgeon's choice of procedure. Although the laparoscopic approach, with defect bridging and mesh fixation, has been described since 1993, the procedure remains largely unchanged. Evidence shows that defect closure and retro-muscular mesh positioning have the best outcomes and are the best surgical practice. We therefore aimed to develop and demonstrate a procedure which combined the good results of open surgery using the Rives-Stoppa principles, particularly in terms of recurrence, with all the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. Between October 2012 and February 2014, 15 post-bariatric surgery patients underwent laparoscopic midline incisional hernia repair. The peritoneal cavity was accessed through a 5-mm optical view cannula at the superior left quadrant. A suprapubic and two right and left lower quadrant cannulas were inserted for inferior access and dissection. The defect adhesions were released. The whole midline was closed with an endoscopic linear stapler, including the defect, from the lower abdomen, 4 cm below the umbilicus, until the epigastric region, including posterior sheath mechanical suturing and cutting in the same movement. A retrorectus space was created in which a retro-muscular mesh was deployed. Fixation was done using a hernia stapler against the posterior sheath from the peritoneal cavity to the abdominal wall muscles. Selection was based on xifo-umbilical incisional midline hernias post open bariatric surgery. Pregnant women, cancer patients, or patients with clinical contraindications were excluded. The patients mean age was 51.2 years (range 39-67). Four patients were men and eleven women. Two had well-compensated fibromyalgia, four had diabetes, and five had hypertension. The mean BMI was 29.5 kg/m2 (range 23-31.6). Surgery was performed successfully in all

  12. Modulators of axonal growth and guidance at the brain midline with special reference to glial heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAVALCANTE LENY A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilaterally symmetric organisms need to exchange information between the left and right sides of their bodies to integrate sensory input and to coordinate motor control. Thus, an important choice point for developing axons is the Central Nervous System (CNS midline. Crossing of this choice point is influenced by highly conserved, soluble or membrane-bound molecules such as the L1 subfamily, laminin, netrins, slits, semaphorins, Eph-receptors and ephrins, etc. Furthermore, there is much circumstantial evidence for a role of proteoglycans (PGs or their glycosaminoglycan (GAG moieties on axonal growth and guidance, most of which was derived from simplified models. A model of intermediate complexity is that of cocultures of young neurons and astroglial carpets (confluent cultures obtained from medial and lateral sectors of the embryonic rodent midbrain soon after formation of its commissures. Neurite production in these cocultures reveals that, irrespective of the previous location of neurons in the midbrain, medial astrocytes exerted an inhibitory or non-permissive effect on neuritic growth that was correlated to a higher content of both heparan and chondroitin sulfates (HS and CS. Treatment with GAG lyases shows minor effects of CS and discloses a major inhibitory or non-permissive role for HS. The results are discussed in terms of available knowledge on the binding of HSPGs to interative proteins and underscore the importance of understanding glial polysaccharide arrays in addition to its protein complement for a better understanding of neuron-glial interactions.

  13. The prognostic significance of midline shift at presentation on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamburg, Eugene S.; Regine, William F.; Patchell, Roy A.; Strottmann, James M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Young, A. Byron

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: While patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who present with midline shift have a presumably worse prognosis, there is little literature evaluating the prognostic significance of this presentation in multivariate analysis in the context of other known prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1981 to September 1993, 219 patients underwent irradiation for intracranial glioma at our institution. One hundred fourteen patients with a diagnosis of a primary GBM were analyzed for the influence of the presence of midline shift at diagnosis on survival with respect to other known prognostic factors, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and extent of surgery. Eighty-five patients (74%) presented with midline shift. Surgical treatment consisted of subtotal/total resection in 86 patients (75%). Among patients presenting with midline shift, 68 (80%) underwent subtotal/total resection before irradiation. Results: Multivariate analysis of the entire cohort of patients found none of the potential prognostic factors analyzed to significantly influence survival. The overall median survival was 6 months. However, when multivariate analysis was limited to patients with a KPS of ≥ 70, only the presence of midline shift and age were found to significantly influence survival. Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and with midline shift present at diagnosis had a median survival of 8 months, as compared to 14 months for those not having midline shift at presentation (p = 0.04). Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and age > 50 years had a median survival of 5 months as compared to 11 months for those ≤ 50 (p 0.02). Conclusion: In this series, where 80% of patients who presented with a midline shift underwent decompressive resection of GBM before irradiation, the presence of midline shift at diagnosis remained an independent prognostic factor influencing survival among good performance status patients. While the role of decompressive surgery in this setting is

  14. Prediction of midline dose from entrance ad exit dose using OSLD measurements for total irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Park, Jong Min; Park, So Yeon; Chun, Min Soo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study aims to predict the midline dose based on the entrance and exit doses from optically stimulated luminescence detector (OSLD) measurements for total body irradiation (TBI). For TBI treatment, beam data sets were measured for 6 MV and 15 MV beams. To evaluate the tissue lateral effect of various thicknesses, the midline dose and peak dose were measured using a solid water phantom (SWP) and ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were measured using OSLDs. OSLDs were attached onto the central beam axis at the entrance and exit surfaces of the phantom. The predicted midline dose was evaluated as the sum of the entrance and exit doses by OSLD measurement. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was evaluated at various thicknesses. The ratio of the peak dose to the midline dose was 1.12 for a 30 cm thick SWP at both energies. When the patient thickness is greater than 30 cm, the 15 MV should be used to ensure dose homogeneity. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was less than 1.0 for thicknesses of less than 30 cm and 40 cm at 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. Therefore, the predicted midline dose can be underestimated for thinner body. At 15 MV, the ratios were approximately 1.06 for a thickness of 50 cm. In cases where adult patients are treated with the 15 MV photon beam, it is possible for the predicted midline dose to be overestimated for parts of the body with a thickness of 50 cm or greater. The predicted midline dose and OSLD-measured midline dose depend on the phantom thickness. For in-vivo dosimetry of TBI, the measurement dose should be corrected in order to accurately predict the midline dose.

  15. Lentiviral-mediated administration of IL-25 in the CNS induces alternative activation of microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiorino, C; Khorooshi, R; Ruffini, F

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-25 (IL-25) is the only anti-inflammatory cytokine of the IL-17 family, and it has been shown to be efficacious in inhibiting neuroinflammation. Known for its effects on cells of the adaptive immune system, it has been more recently described to be effective also on cells of the innate...... was partly inhibited and the CNS protected from immune-mediated damage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of M2 shift (alternative activation) induced in vivo on CNS-resident myeloid cells by gene therapy, and may constitute a promising strategy to investigate the potential role of protective...

  16. Metallothionein expression and roles in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2002-01-01

      Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight (6-7 kDa) nonenzymatic proteins (60-68 amino acid residues, 25-30% being cysteine) expressed ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. In the central nervous system (CNS), three MT isoforms are known, namely MT-I to MT-III. MT-I and MT-II (MT...

  17. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bielecki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was performed on the first 5 patients with foraminal (4 or central (1 stenosis operated on between December 2014 and February 2015. Three patients were fused at L4–L5 and two at the L5–S1 level. Results: No intra- or post-operative complications occurred with this approach. An improvement regarding the leading symptom in the early postoperative period (sciatica 4/4, claudication 1/1 was achieved in all patients. The mean improvements in the visual analogue scale for low back and leg pain were 2.2 and 4.8 respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were 52% (range: 16–82% before surgery and 33% (range: 12–56% at 3-month follow-up (mean improvement 19%. At the most recent follow-up, 4 patients reported the maintenance of the satisfactory result. The early standing and follow-up X-rays showed satisfactory screw placement in all patients. Conclusions : In our initial experience, the MIDLF technique seems to be an encouraging alternative to traditional transpedicular trajectory screws when short level lumbar fusion is needed. Nevertheless, longer observations on larger groups of patients are needed to reliably evaluate the safety of the method and the sustainability of the results.

  18. Bladder outlet obstruction due to a small midline prostatic cyst - diagnostic imaging and interventional radiological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueppe, T.; Kopka, L.; Friedrich, M.; Kuehn, M.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a bladder outlet obstruction due to a midline prostatic cyst. In the following clinical apperance, diagnostic imaging and therapy by CT-guided punction are reported. Differential diagnosis and therapy are discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. Midline sclerotomy approach for intraocular foreign body removal in phakic eyes using endoilluminator: A novel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravani, Raghav; Chawla, Rohan; Azad, Shorya Vardhan; Gupta, Yogita; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Atul

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to describe the removal of retained intraocular foreign body (RIOFB) by bimanual pars plana vitrectomy through midline sclerotomy in phakic patients. Technique: Four eyes with RIOFB and clear lens underwent microincision vitrectomy surgery. A chandelier illumination was placed through one of the existing ports. The foreign body (FB) was localized by direct visualization (intravitreal) or indentation (pars plana), stabilized using an intraocular magnet/FB forceps introduced through a midline sclerotomy and freed of vitreous from all sides using a vitrectomy cutter through the other port bimanually, reoriented along their long axis and extracted through the midline sclerotomy. Results: All four FBs were removed successfully without slippage or damage to the clear lens. Conclusion: Chandelier illumination-assisted removal of FB through midline sclerotomy helps in easier localization, stabilization and removal, avoiding lens touch even in anteriorly located FBs such as at pars plana. PMID:29676316

  20. In vitro site selection of a consensus binding site for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 homolog midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Najand

    Full Text Available We employed in vitro site selection to identify a consensus binding sequence for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 T-box transcription factor homolog Midline. We purified a bacterially expressed T-box DNA binding domain of Midline, and used it in four rounds of precipitation and polymerase-chain-reaction based amplification. We cloned and sequenced 54 random oligonucleotides selected by Midline. Electromobility shift-assays confirmed that 27 of these could bind the Midline T-box. Sequence alignment of these 27 clones suggests that Midline binds as a monomer to a consensus sequence that contains an AGGTGT core. Thus, the Midline consensus binding site we define in this study is similar to that defined for vertebrate Tbx20, but differs from a previously reported Midline binding sequence derived through site selection.

  1. Double Mesiodentes, Bilateral to Midline: A Report of Two Uncommon Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Avina Banari

    2013-01-01

    Background: Spontaneously erupted double mesiodentes, bilateral to midline are extremely rare and can alter both occlusion and appearance by affecting the eruption path, position, inclination and axial rotation of the maxillary permanent incisors. Case Report: Two cases of uncommon occurrence of spontaneously erupted double mesiodentes, bilateral to midline are presented here. The first case report highlights a situation where in treatment has been sought due to esthetic concerns arising,...

  2. Software Designation to Assess the Proximity of Different Facial Anatomic Landmarks to Midlines of the Mouth and Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkelgosha V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recognition and determination of facial and dental midline is important in dentistry. Currently, there are no verifiable guidelines that direct the choice of specific anatomic landmarks to determine the midline of the face or mouth. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine which of facial anatomic landmarks is closest to the midline of the face as well as that of the mouth. Materials and Methods: Frontal full-face digital images of 92 subjects (men and women age range: 20-30 years in smile were taken under standardized conditions; commonly used anatomic landmarks, nasion, tip of the nose, and tip of the philtrum were digitized on the images of subjects and aesthetic analyzer software used for midline analysis using Esthetic Frame. Deviations from the midlines of the face and mouth were measured for the 3 clinical landmarks; the existing dental midline was considered as the fourth landmark. The entire process of midline analysis was done by a single observer and repeated twice. Reliability analysis and 1-sample t- tests were conducted. Results: The Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs for reliability analysis of RFV and RCV measures made two times revealed that the reliabilities were all acceptable. The results indicated that each of the 4 landmarks deviated uniquely and significantly (P<.001 from the midlines of the face as well as mouth in both males and females. Conclusions: There was a significant difference between the mean ratios of the chosen anatomic landmarks and the midlines of the face and mouth. The hierarchy of anatomic landmarks closest to the midline of the face is: (1 midline of the commissures, (2 nasion , (3 tip of philtrum,(4 dental midline, and (5 tip ofthe nose. The closest anatomic landmarks to the mouth midline are: (1 tip of philtrum, (2 dental midline, (3 tip of nose, and (4 nasion.

  3. CNS penetration of ART in HIV-infected children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hof, Malon; Blokhuis, Charlotte; Cohen, Sophie; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Pistorius, M. C. M.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Mathot, Ron A. A.; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2018-01-01

    Background: Paediatric data on CNS penetration of antiretroviral drugs are scarce. Objectives: To evaluate CNS penetration of antiretroviral drugs in HIV-infected children and explore associations with neurocognitive function. Patients and methods: Antiretroviral drug levels were measured in paired

  4. CNS recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes specific for a peripheral virus infection triggers neuropathogenesis during polymicrobial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Matullo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although viruses have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS diseases of unknown etiology, including multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the reproducible identification of viral triggers in such diseases has been largely unsuccessful. Here, we explore the hypothesis that viruses need not replicate in the tissue in which they cause disease; specifically, that a peripheral infection might trigger CNS pathology. To test this idea, we utilized a transgenic mouse model in which we found that immune cells responding to a peripheral infection are recruited to the CNS, where they trigger neurological damage. In this model, mice are infected with both CNS-restricted measles virus (MV and peripherally restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. While infection with either virus alone resulted in no illness, infection with both viruses caused disease in all mice, with ∼50% dying following seizures. Co-infection resulted in a 12-fold increase in the number of CD8+ T cells in the brain as compared to MV infection alone. Tetramer analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (>35% of these infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes were LCMV-specific, despite no detectable LCMV in CNS tissues. Mechanistically, CNS disease was due to edema, induced in a CD8-dependent but perforin-independent manner, and brain herniation, similar to that observed in mice challenged intracerebrally with LCMV. These results indicate that T cell trafficking can be influenced by other ongoing immune challenges, and that CD8+ T cell recruitment to the brain can trigger CNS disease in the apparent absence of cognate antigen. By extrapolation, human CNS diseases of unknown etiology need not be associated with infection with any particular agent; rather, a condition that compromises and activates the blood-brain barrier and adjacent brain parenchyma can render the CNS susceptible to pathogen-independent immune attack.

  5. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases.

  6. CNS adverse events associated with antimalarial agents. Fact or fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips-Howard, P. A.; ter Kuile, F. O.

    1995-01-01

    CNS adverse drug events are dramatic, and case reports have influenced clinical opinion on the use of antimalarials. Malaria also causes CNS symptoms, thus establishing causality is difficult. CNS events are associated with the quinoline and artemisinin derivatives. Chloroquine, once considered too

  7. CNS effects following the treatment of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rane, N.; Quaghebeur, G.

    2012-01-01

    Corporeal and central nervous system (CNS) axis chemotherapy and radiotherapy have long been used for the effective treatment and prophylaxis of CNS, body malignancies, and leukaemias. However, they are not without their problems. Following the proliferation of magnetic resonance neuroimaging in recent years it has become clear that the spectrum of toxicity that these therapies produce ranges from subclinical white matter changes to overt brain necrosis. The effects are both direct and indirect and via different pathological mechanisms. Chronic and progressive changes can be detected many years after the initial intervention. In addition to leucoencephalopathic changes, grey matter changes are now well described. Changes may be difficult to distinguish from tumour recurrence, though may be reversible and remediable, and are thus very important to differentiate. In this review toxic effects are classified and their imaging appearances discussed, with reference to specific syndromes.

  8. Therapeutic potential of agmatine for CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian B; Rosa, Priscila B; Olescowicz, Gislaine; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2017-09-01

    Agmatine is a neuromodulator that regulates multiple neurotransmitters and signaling pathways. Several studies have focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of this molecule, which seems to be mediated by a reduction in oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and proapoptotic signaling. Since these events are implicated in acute and chronic excitotoxicity-related disorders (ischemia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric disorders) as well as in nociception, agmatine has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Agmatine also stimulates the expression of trophic factors and adult neurogenesis, contributing to its ability to induce endogenous repair mechanisms. Therefore, considering its wide range of biological effects, this review summarizes the current knowledge about its protective and regenerative properties in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  10. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  11. Treatment options for Primary CNS Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghari, Altaf Ali; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Jabbar, Adnan; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2018-03-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare and aggressive brain tumour that is uniformly fatal. The rarity of the disease and the poor response to treatment makes it difficult to reach a consensus with regards to treatment options. In this review, the authors have discussed different treatment modalities used in the management of PCNSL including chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, as well as the results of recent clinical trials on treatment options for PCNSL.

  12. Mucor irregularis infection and lethal midline granuloma: a case report and review of published literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong Ming; Lun, Li De

    2012-12-01

    Mucor irregularis (Rhizomucor variabilis) infection and lethal midline granuloma (LMG) are characterized by progressive swelling, ulceration, and destruction of the central face that is usually fatal. Pathological features are inflammation, necrosis, and granulation. LMG has been called by various names, and in recent years, it has been known as NK/T cell lymphoma. However, diagnosis still relies on the progressive necrosis course rather than malignancy in histology. The disease has long challenged physicians, particularly when it worsens with radiotherapy or chemotherapy but sometimes achieves total remission without anti-malignancy therapies. We describe a 35-year-old man who had typical clinical-pathological symptoms of LMG, which turned out to be primary M. irregularis infection; that was diagnosed by positive tissue culture and fungal elements in histology. The patient was successfully treated with antifungal therapy (liposomal amphotericin B, total 4,600 mg and amphotericin B total 277 mg, over a duration of 70 days). We hereby review current knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, radiographic characteristics, and pathologic features of LMG with those of M. irregularis infection and their associations. We conclude that primary M. irregulars infection can mimic the clinico-pathological symptoms of LMG and the condition responds favorably to aggressive antifungal therapy.

  13. Engineering progress of CNS concept in Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.O.; Park, K.N.; Park, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy research Institute (KAERI) strives to provide utilizing facilities on and around the Hanaro reactor in order to activate advanced researches by neutron application. As one of the facilities to be installed, the conceptual design work of CNS was started in 1996 with a project schedule of 5 years so that its installation work can be finished by the year 2000. And the major engineering targets of this CNS facility are established for a minimum physical interference with the present facilities of the Hanaro, a reach-out of very-high-gain factors in the cold neutron flux, a simplicity of the maintenance of the facility, and a safety in the operation of the facility as well as the reactor. For the conceptual design of Hanaro CNS, the experience of utilization and production of cold neutron at WWR-M reactor Gatchina, Russia has been used with that of elaborations for PIK reactor in design for neutron guide systems and instruments. (author)

  14. Dynamic of CSF and serum biomarkers in HIV-1 subtype C encephalitis with CNS genetic compartmentalization-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sergio M; Rotta, Indianara; Ribeiro, Clea E; Oliveira, Michelli F; Chaillon, Antoine; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Cunha, Ana Paula; Zonta, Marise; Bents, Joao França; Raboni, Sonia M; Smith, Davey; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald J

    2017-06-01

    Despite the effective suppression of viremia with antiretroviral therapy, HIV can still replicate in the central nervous system (CNS). This was a longitudinal study of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum dynamics of several biomarkers related to inflammation, the blood-brain barrier, neuronal injury, and IgG intrathecal synthesis in serial samples of CSF and serum from a patient infected with HIV-1 subtype C with CNS compartmentalization.The phylogenetic analyses of plasma and CSF samples in an acute phase using next-generation sequencing and F-statistics analysis of C2-V3 haplotypes revealed distinct compartmentalized CSF viruses in paired CSF and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. The CSF biomarker analysis in this patient showed that symptomatic CSF escape is accompanied by CNS inflammation, high levels of cell and humoral immune biomarkers, CNS barrier dysfunction, and an increase in neuronal injury biomarkers with demyelization. Independent and isolated HIV replication can occur in the CNS, even in HIV-1 subtype C, leading to compartmentalization and development of quasispecies distinct from the peripheral plasma. These immunological aspects of the HIV CNS escape have not been described previously. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CNS HIV escape and compartmentalization in HIV-1 subtype C.

  15. Prophylactic CNS therapy in childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiko; Fujimoto, Takeo

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose methotrexate (MTX). Seventy children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) entered to this study between July 1978 and December 1980. According to initial white blood count (WBC), they were stratified to induce remission with; vincristine and prednine in low initial WBC ( lt 25,000/mm 3 ) group and these two agents plus adriamycin in high initial WBC ( gt 25,000/mm 3 ) group. After inducing remission, 62 children who achieved CR, received different CNS-prophlaxis; using a regimen of three doses of weekly high-dose MTX (1,000 mg/m 2 ) 6-hour infusion, which was repeated every 12 weeks-Group A (n = 14); high-dose MTX followed by 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MT X-Group B (n = 15), 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX-Group C (n = 16), and in 17 patients with high initial WBC, same as in Group A-Group D (n = 17). During an intravenous 6-h infusion of MTX at a dose of 1,000 mg/m 2 , the CSF concentration of MTX rose to 2.3 +- 2.4 x 10 -6 M after initiation of infusion and remained in 10 -7 M level for 48 hours. CNS-leukemia terminated complete remission in one of 14 children in Group A, two of 15 in Group B, two of 16 in Group C and two of 17 in Group D. The cumulative incidence of CNS-leukemia at 20 months calculated by the technique of Kaplan and Meier was 0% i n Group A, 18.1% in Group B, 7.1% in Group C and 50.8% in Group D. There was no statistical difference among Groups A, B and C. These data suggested that CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose intravenous MTX was effective as well as 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX in childhood ALL with low initial WBC. (author)

  16. Central Nervous System (CNS Disease Triggering Takotsubo Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is usually triggered by psychological or physical stress. One of the many physical sources of stress are central nervous system (CNS disorders. CNS disorders most frequently triggering TTS include subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, migraine, and intracerebral bleeding. More rare CNS-triggers of TTS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encephalitis, or traumatic brain or spinal cord injury. TTS triggered by any of the CNS disorders needs to be recognized since adequate treatment of TTS may improve the general outcome from the CNS disorder as well. Neurologists need to be aware of TTS as a complication of specific CNS disorders but TTS may be triggered also by CNS disorders so far not recognised as causes of TTS.

  17. SINS/CNS Nonlinear Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celestial Navigation System (CNS has characteristics of accurate orientation and strong autonomy and has been widely used in Hypersonic Vehicle. Since the CNS location and orientation mainly depend upon the inertial reference that contains errors caused by gyro drifts and other error factors, traditional Strap-down Inertial Navigation System (SINS/CNS positioning algorithm setting the position error between SINS and CNS as measurement is not effective. The model of altitude azimuth, platform error angles, and horizontal position is designed, and the SINS/CNS tightly integrated algorithm is designed, in which CNS altitude azimuth is set as measurement information. GPF (Gaussian particle filter is introduced to solve the problem of nonlinear filtering. The results of simulation show that the precision of SINS/CNS algorithm which reaches 130 m using three stars is improved effectively.

  18. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  19. Clinical Utilization of M Spring for the Space Closure of Midline Diastema - Clinical Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyas, S Dhivya; Sankar, Hanumanth; Kommi, Pradeep Babu; Arani, Nandakumar; Keerthi, V Naga

    2016-03-01

    People approach orthodontist mainly for aesthetic purpose, midline diastema is one of the condition which causes aesthetic compromise. The midline diastema can be caused by various reasons such as high frenal attachment, midline pathology, etc. In the field of orthodontics, relapse rate is high while treating midline diastema. This relapse can be reduced only when there is bodily movement of the incisors in mesial direction. In this article, two cases of midline diastema are selected. Both the cases were treated using "M" spring which has three coils; two at periphery and one at the center and each coil was of 3mm diameter. "M" spring was fabricated using round 0.018" AJ Wilcock wire for one case and 0.017 X 0.025 TMA for another case. For both cases the duration of treatment was for six weeks. IOPA was taken after six weeks, the case in which rectangular wire was used; there was bodily movement of the central incisor in mesial direction. Whereas in round wire technique, predominantly tipping type of tooth movement was seen. The rectangular wire has two point contacts, because of which bodily movement was obtained. This technique of using rectangular wire to fabricate "M" spring has less inventory and chair side time.

  20. Gastric dilatation volvulus: a retrospective study of 203 dogs with ventral midline gastropexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, B; Seehaus, N; Hungerbühler, S; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the recurrence rate of gastric dilatation volvulus and the incidence of complications in subsequent coeliotomies following ventral midline gastropexy. The medical records of dogs treated for gastric dilatation volvulus by ventral midline gastropexy were retrospectively reviewed. Owners were contacted and invited to complete a questionnaire and to return to the clinic for ultrasonographic and radiographic follow-up. The questionnaire was completed by 203 owners 2 to 123 months postoperatively, 24 of whom attended the follow-up examination. Of the 203 dogs, 13 (6 · 4%) underwent subsequent ventral midline coeliotomy and none developed complications related to the gastropexy site. In 23 of the 24 re-evaluated dogs, the stomach was closely associated with the abdominal on radiography and/or ultrasound. The recurrence rate for clinical signs of gastric dilatation or gastric dilatation volvulus after ventral midline gastropexy was 6 · 4%. This study shows that the recurrence of gastric dilatation volvulus after ventral midline gastropexy is low and adhesion of the stomach to the abdominal wall is persistent in almost all dogs that were re-examined. The gastropexy site did not appear to interfere with subsequent coeliotomy. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Effects of x rays on the morphology and physiology of the CNS blood vessels of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, J [Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1974-01-01

    Irradiation of the CNS of mice with 4000 to 7600 R produces transitional disorder of the permeability of vascular walls, followed by a permanent (irreversible) degenerative lesion of blood capillaries and the surrounding astrogial cells. Intensity of this alterations may however not be the same in different terminal blood vessels. It is very likely that the above described lesion appearing in the acute phase can be the main cause of further alterations in the CNS which are observed in late phase of postradiation disease.

  2. Durable treatment response of relapsing CNS plasmacytoma using intrathecal chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and Daratumumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassadi, Ezzat; Murphy, Maurice; Hacking, Dayle; Farrell, Michael

    2018-04-01

    CNS myelomatous involvement is a rare complication of multiple myeloma with dismal outcome. This disease's optimal treatment is unclear. Combined approach of systemic therapy, radiotherapy, and intrathecal injections chemotherapy should be considered and autologous stem cell transplant consolidation is offered to eligible patients. The role of Daratumumab in this disease deserves further evaluation.

  3. CNS Damage Classification in Newborn Infants by Neural Network Based Cry Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Ekkel, T.

    2002-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of the human body is the whole system of brain, spinal marrow and nerve cells throughout the body that correlates and regulates the internal reactions of the body and controls its adjustment to the environment. It controls muscles and processes sensory information

  4. The Extracellular Environment of the CNS: Influence on Plasticity, Sprouting, and Axonal Regeneration after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Lindsey H.

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular environment of the central nervous system (CNS) becomes highly structured and organized as the nervous system matures. The extracellular space of the CNS along with its subdomains plays a crucial role in the function and stability of the CNS. In this review, we have focused on two components of the neuronal extracellular environment, which are important in regulating CNS plasticity including the extracellular matrix (ECM) and myelin. The ECM consists of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and tenascins, which are organized into unique structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs associate with the neuronal cell body and proximal dendrites of predominantly parvalbumin-positive interneurons, forming a robust lattice-like structure. These developmentally regulated structures are maintained in the adult CNS and enhance synaptic stability. After injury, however, CSPGs and tenascins contribute to the structure of the inhibitory glial scar, which actively prevents axonal regeneration. Myelin sheaths and mature adult oligodendrocytes, despite their important role in signal conduction in mature CNS axons, contribute to the inhibitory environment existing after injury. As such, unlike the peripheral nervous system, the CNS is unable to revert to a “developmental state” to aid neuronal repair. Modulation of these external factors, however, has been shown to promote growth, regeneration, and functional plasticity after injury. This review will highlight some of the factors that contribute to or prevent plasticity, sprouting, and axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:29849554

  5. Analysis of neurocognitive function and CNS endpoints in the PROTEA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Amanda; Johanssen, Veronika; Gerstoft, Jan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During treatment with protease inhibitor monotherapy, the number of antiretrovirals with therapeutic concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is lower, compared to standard triple therapy. However, the clinical consequences are unclear. METHODS: A total of 273 patients with HIV...... and the Grooved Pegboard Test at screening, baseline and at Week 48. A global neurocognitive score (NPZ-5) was derived by averaging the standardized results of the five domains. In a central nervous system (CNS) sub-study (n=70), HIV RNA levels in the CNS were evaluated at baseline and Week 48. Clinical adverse...... events related to the CNS were collected at each visit. RESULTS: Patients were 83% male and 88% White, with median age 43 years. There were more patients with nadir CD4 count below 200 cells/µL in the DRV/r monotherapy arm (41/137, 30%) than the triple therapy arm (30/136, 22%). At Week 48...

  6. Subcortical heterotopia appearing as huge midline mass in the newborn brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Kimura, Sachiko; Ochi, Satoko; Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who showed a huge midline mass in the brain at prenatal assessment. After birth, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a conglomerate mass with an infolded microgyrus at the midline, which was suspected as a midline brain-in-brain malformation. MRI also showed incomplete cleavage of his frontal cortex and thalamus, consistent with lobar holoprosencephaly. The patient underwent an incisional biopsy of the mass on the second day of life. The mass consisted of normal central nervous tissue with gray and white matter, representing a heterotopic brain. The malformation was considered to be a subcortical heterotopia. With maturity, focal signal changes and decreased cerebral perfusion became clear on brain imaging, suggesting secondary glial degeneration. Coincident with these MRI abnormalities, the child developed psychomotor retardation and severe epilepsy focused on the side of the intracranial mass.

  7. A new technique of "midline anchoring" in spinal cord stimulation dramatically reduces lead migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironer, Y Eugene; Brown, Christopher; Satterthwaite, John R; Cohen, Mary; Tonder, Lisa M; Grumman, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a popular method of treatment of chronic pain. Unfortunately, migration of the lead continues to be a serious complication of this therapy. In an attempt to reduce lateral migration of the SCS lead, we performed a retrospective assessment of a new technique of percutaneous lead placement. This new method of "midline anchoring" of the lead using the plica mediana dorsalis was tested against conventional technique in a retrospective study involving 122 trials and 91 implants of SCS over a period of five years. The use of "midline anchoring" resulted in a decrease in lead migration from 23% to 6% after trial insertion and from 24% to 7% after implantation. We conclude that "midline anchoring" of the SCS lead is an effective method of preventing lead migration.

  8. Slit stimulation recruits Dock and Pak to the roundabout receptor and increases Rac activity to regulate axon repulsion at the CNS midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xueping; Labrador, Juan Pablo; Hing, Huey; Bashaw, Greg J

    2003-09-25

    Drosophila Roundabout (Robo) is the founding member of a conserved family of repulsive axon guidance receptors that respond to secreted Slit proteins. Here we present evidence that the SH3-SH2 adaptor protein Dreadlocks (Dock), the p21-activated serine-threonine kinase (Pak), and the Rac1/Rac2/Mtl small GTPases can function during Robo repulsion. Loss-of-function and genetic interaction experiments suggest that limiting the function of Dock, Pak, or Rac partially disrupts Robo repulsion. In addition, Dock can directly bind to Robo's cytoplasmic domain, and the association of Dock and Robo is enhanced by stimulation with Slit. Furthermore, Slit stimulation can recruit a complex of Dock and Pak to the Robo receptor and trigger an increase in Rac1 activity. These results provide a direct physical link between the Robo receptor and an important cytoskeletal regulatory protein complex and suggest that Rac can function in both attractive and repulsive axon guidance.

  9. Clearance of an immunosuppressive virus from the CNS coincides with immune reanimation and diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGavern Dorian B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Once a virus infection establishes persistence in the central nervous system (CNS, it is especially difficult to eliminate from this specialized compartment. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to fully understand scenarios during which a persisting virus is ultimately purged from the CNS by the adaptive immune system. Such a scenario can be found following infection of adult mice with an immunosuppressive variant of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV referred to as clone 13. In this study we demonstrate that following intravenous inoculation, clone 13 rapidly infected peripheral tissues within one week, but more slowly inundated the entire brain parenchyma over the course of a month. During the establishment of persistence, we observed that genetically tagged LCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL progressively lost function; however, the severity of this loss in the CNS was never as substantial as that observed in the periphery. One of the most impressive features of this model system is that the peripheral T cell response eventually regains functionality at ~60–80 days post-infection, and this was associated with a rapid decline in virus from the periphery. Coincident with this "reanimation phase" was a massive influx of CD4 T and B cells into the CNS and a dramatic reduction in viral distribution. In fact, olfactory bulb neurons served as the last refuge for the persisting virus, which was ultimately purged from the CNS within 200 days post-infection. These data indicate that a functionally revived immune response can prevail over a virus that establishes widespread presence both in the periphery and brain parenchyma, and that therapeutic enhancement of an existing response could serve as an effective means to thwart long term CNS persistence.

  10. A clinical study of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemae, Toshiki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kin, Hiroshi; Kawase, Takeshi; Araki, Goro

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan were studied with respect to the development of the midline shift, the angiographic findings, the clinical pictures and the outcome of these patients. The CT findings of hemorrhagic infarction were also studied. No cases showed a midline shift on a CT scan taken within 6 hours after the onset. A midline shift was, however, noted as early as 9 hours after the onset, and it reached its peak between the 2nd and 7th day of the onset. It gradually disappeared by the end of the third week. Hemorrhagic infarction was diagnosed in 6 patients by either spinal tap or autopsy. The CT findings of these hemorrhagic infarction were divided into two types, solid hemorrhages with an unequivocal high density within the low-density area, and small, scattered hemorrhagic of almost the same density as normal brain tissue within the low-density area. In 19 of 21 patients, an round-edged occlusion and/or embolus were observed on the initial angiograms. The recanalization of the occluded vessels was proved in 10 of 14 patients by subsequent angiographic studies. Twenty of 21 patients showed a sudden development of neurological symptoms, and 15 patients had a history of various kinds of heart disease, such as atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease and myocardial infarction. The patients had atrial fibrillation on EKG on admission. These angiographic findings and clinical pictures strongly suggest that the infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan may be caused by a cerebral embolism of cardiac origin. Eight patients died of cerebral herniation between the 2nd and 6th day of the onset. Taking these poor outcomes into consideration, surgical as well as medical decompression of the brain would seem to be most important when the CT scan shows a midline shift. (author)

  11. Clinical study of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemae, T; Mizukami, M; Kin, H; Kawase, T; Araki, G [Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isezaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1978-12-01

    Twenty-one cases of acute cerebral infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan were studied with respect to the development of the midline shift, the angiographic findings, the clinical pictures and the outcome of these patients. The CT findings of hemorrhagic infarction were also studied. No cases showed a midline shift on a CT scan taken within 6 hours after the onset. A midline shift was, however, noted as early as 9 hours after the onset, and it reached its peak between the 2nd and 7th day of the onset. It gradually disappeared by the end of the third week. Hemorrhagic infarction was diagnosed in 6 patients by either spinal tap or autopsy. The CT findings of these hemorrhagic infarction were divided into two types, solid hemorrhages with an unequivocal high density within the low-density area, and small, scattered hemorrhagic of almost the same density as normal brain tissue within the low-density area. In 19 of 21 patients, an round-edged occlusion and/or embolus were observed on the initial angiograms. The recanalization of the occluded vessels was proved in 10 of 14 patients by subsequent angiographic studies. Twenty of 21 patients showed a sudden development of neurological symptoms, and 15 patients had a history of various kinds of heart disease, such as atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease and myocardial infarction. The patients had atrial fibrillation on EKG on admission. These angiographic findings and clinical pictures strongly suggest that the infarction with a midline shift on the CT scan may be caused by a cerebral embolism of cardiac origin. Eight patients died of cerebral herniation between the 2nd and 6th day of the onset. Taking these poor outcomes into consideration, surgical as well as medical decompression of the brain would seem to be most important when the CT scan shows a midline shift.

  12. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the healing of ventral midline abdominal incisions in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D A; Badertscher, R R; Boero, M J; Baker, G J; Foreman, J H

    1989-06-01

    Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the ventral midline incisions of 21 ponies following exploratory laparotomy. The incisions were evaluated before surgery and at weekly intervals from one to seven weeks after surgery. Both 5.0 and 7.5 MHz linear array and 7.5 MHz sector transducers were used for the evaluations. The incisional complications observed were drainage, oedema, suture sinus formation, suture abscess, superficial dehiscence and incisional hernia. Ultrasonographic imaging of the ventral midline incision was an easy, reliable and objective method for detecting and monitoring the progression of incisional complications in a non-invasive manner.

  13. Body schema and midline sensation influenced by unilateral manual stimulation of lower extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Uffe; Barth, Lasse; Skeie, Sindre

    Relevance: Clinical experience advocates manual stimulation in order to increase the sensation of the body and adjust the body schema. Unilateral treatment may affect the midline sensation and weight distribution in a standing position, but little evidence is available to support this procedure...... alignment was seen as a response to unilateral massage. It may be suggested, that the manipulated midline sensation and weight distribution reflects a state in which the participant's attention to a greater extent has been directed towards a specific body part due to the manual sensory stimulation. Impact...

  14. Novel agents in CNS myeloma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzetti, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system localization of multiple myeloma (CNS-MM) accounts for about 1% of all MM.Treatment is still unsatisfactory. Many treatments have been described in the literature: chemotherapy (CHT), intrathecal therapy (IT), and radiotherapy (RT), with survivals reported between one month and six months. Recent drugs such as the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) and proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib) have changed the treatment of patients with MM, both younger and older, with a significant improvement in response and survival. The activity of new drugs in CNSMM has been reported but is still not well known. Bortezomib does not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), and IMID’s seem to have only a minimal crossover. The role of novel agents in CNS MM management will be discussed as well as the potential role of other new immunomodulatory drugs (pomalidomide) and proteasome inhibitors that seem to cross the BBB and hold promise into the treatment of this rare and still incurable localization of the disease.

  15. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  16. Effects on DHEA levels by estrogen in rat astrocytes and CNS co-cultures via the regulation of CYP7B1-mediated metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fex Svenningsen, Åsa; Wicher, Grzegorz; Lundqvist, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is formed locally in the CNS and has been implicated in several processes essential for CNS function, including control of neuronal survival. An important metabolic pathway for DHEA in the CNS involves the steroid hydroxylase CYP7B1. In previous...... studies, CYP7B1 was identified as a target for estrogen regulation in cells of kidney and liver. In the current study, we examined effects of estrogens on CYP7B1-mediated metabolism of DHEA in primary cultures of rat astrocytes and co-cultures of rat CNS cells. Astrocytes, which interact with neurons...... whereby estrogen can exert protective effects in the CNS may involve increase of the levels of DHEA by suppression of its metabolism....

  17. Neonatal Stroke Causes Poor Midline Motor Behaviors and Poor Fine and Gross Motor Skills during Early Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Ying; Lo, Warren D.; Heathcock, Jill C.

    2013-01-01

    Upper extremity movements, midline behaviors, fine, and gross motor skills are frequently impaired in hemiparesis and cerebral palsy. We investigated midline toy exploration and fine and gross motor skills in infants at risk for hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Eight infants with neonatal stroke (NS) and thirteen infants with typical development (TD)…

  18. Self-Referential Processing, Rumination, and Cortical Midline Structures in Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Ayna Baladi; Fossati, Philippe; Lemogne, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    Major depression is associated with a bias toward negative emotional processing and increased self-focus, i.e., the process by which one engages in self-referential processing. The increased self-focus in depression is suggested to be of a persistent, repetitive and self-critical nature, and is conceptualized as ruminative brooding. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential processing has been previously emphasized in acute major depression. There is increasing evidence that self-referential processing as well as the cortical midline structures play a major role in the development, course, and treatment response of major depressive disorder. However, the links between self-referential processing, rumination, and the cortical midline structures in depression are still poorly understood. Here, we reviewed brain imaging studies in depressed patients and healthy subjects that have examined these links. Self-referential processing in major depression seems associated with abnormally increased activity of the anterior cortical midline structures. Abnormal interactions between the lateralized task-positive network, and the midline cortical structures of the default mode network, as well as the emotional response network, may underlie the pervasiveness of ruminative brooding. Furthermore, targeting this maladaptive form of rumination and its underlying neural correlates may be key for effective treatment. PMID:24124416

  19. Self-referential processing, rumination, and cortical midline structures in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayna Baladi Nejad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is associated with a bias towards negative emotional processing and increased self-focus, i.e. the process by which one engages in self-referential processing. The increased self-focus in depression is suggested to be of a persistent, repetitive and self-critical nature and is conceptualised as ruminative brooding. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential processing has been previously emphasised in acute major depression. There is increasing evidence that self-referential processing as well as the cortical midline structures play a major role in the development, course and treatment response of major depressive disorder. However, the links between self-referential processing, rumination, and the cortical midline structures in depression are still poorly understood. Here, we reviewed brain imaging studies in depressed patients and healthy subjects that have examined these links. The literature suggests that self-referential processing in major depression is associated with increased activity of the anterior cortical midline structures. Abnormal interactions between the lateralised task-positive network, and the midline cortical structures of the default mode network, as well as the emotional response network, may underlie the pervasiveness of ruminative brooding. Furthermore, targeting this maladaptive form of rumination and its underlying neural correlates may be key for effective treatment.

  20. Posterior fossa midline cryptococcoma in a patient with idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL is a rare disorder which is often diagnosed as HIV-negative AIDS in the light of poor immunity and AIDS-defining illnesses. We present a case of a 50-year-old male who presented with a midline posterior fossa tumour with ICL diagnosed as cerebellar cryptococcoma.

  1. Reply to: Can we avoid rectus abdominis muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Timmermans (Lucas); E.B. Deerenberg (Eva); S.M. van Dijk (Sven); B. Lamme (Bas); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J. Jeekel (Johannes); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractWe read with interest the letter to the editor by Stephenson et al regarding our article “Abdominal rectus muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation.” Any attempt to decrease the risk of parastomal herniation should be applauded, because its incidence of greater than

  2. A comparison of short-term outcome after laparoscopic, transverse, and midline right-sided colectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, E.; van Geloven, A. A. W.; Bemelman, W. A.; Wind, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the laparoscopy, transverse, and midline laparotomy in right-sided colectomies with respect to short- and long-term outcome. The short- and long-term results of all patients who had an elective right-sided hemicolectomy, from January 2006 to April 2009 for

  3. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Williams

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the adult central nervous system (CNS, chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease.

  4. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  5. Neonatal stroke causes poor midline motor behaviors and poor fine and gross motor skills during early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Ying; Lo, Warren D; Heathcock, Jill C

    2013-03-01

    Upper extremity movements, midline behaviors, fine, and gross motor skills are frequently impaired in hemiparesis and cerebral palsy. We investigated midline toy exploration and fine and gross motor skills in infants at risk for hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Eight infants with neonatal stroke (NS) and thirteen infants with typical development (TD) were assessed from 2 to 7 months of age. The following variables were analyzed: percentage of time in midline and fine and gross motor scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III). Infants with neonatal stroke demonstrated poor performance in midline behaviors and fine and gross motor scores on the BSID-III. These results suggest that infants with NS have poor midline behaviors and motor skill development early in infancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does pilonidal abscess heal quicker with off-midline incision and drainage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P M; Wysocki, A P

    2011-06-01

    No clinical trials have been done to guide the surgeon in the optimal technique of draining a pilonidal abscess. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the location of the incision influences wound healing. Electronic records from the surgical database at our 200-bed district general hospital were reviewed for operative technique (midline vs. lateral) for patients who underwent incision and drainage for acute pilonidal abscess between January 2003 and February 2010. These patients were admitted from the Emergency Department with a pilonidal abscess, underwent operative drainage, and returned for follow-up. The main outcome measure was wound healing time. Two hundred and forty-three pilonidal abscesses were drained, 134 with a lateral and 74 with a midline incision. All patients underwent simple longitudinal incision. No patient underwent de-roofing, marsupialisation, or closure. Forty-eight patients with midline drainage who returned for follow-up were matched for gender, age, and microbiology culture results with patients who underwent lateral drainage. Almost all were drained under general anesthesia with a median postoperative stay of 1 day. The overall length of follow-up was the same in both groups (P = 0.13). Abscesses that did not heal were followed-up for the same period of time irrespective of incision type (P = 0.48). Abscesses that healed after midline incision took approximately 3 weeks longer than those drained via a lateral incision (P = 0.02). Our study has limitations since it was a retrospective study that did not capture patients whose abscess drained spontaneously or were drained in the emergency department. Pilonidal abscess should be drained away from the midline.

  7. The ciliogenic transcription factor RFX3 regulates early midline distribution of guidepost neurons required for corpus callosum development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Benadiba

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum (CC is the major commissure that bridges the cerebral hemispheres. Agenesis of the CC is associated with human ciliopathies, but the origin of this default is unclear. Regulatory Factor X3 (RFX3 is a transcription factor involved in the control of ciliogenesis, and Rfx3-deficient mice show several hallmarks of ciliopathies including left-right asymmetry defects and hydrocephalus. Here we show that Rfx3-deficient mice suffer from CC agenesis associated with a marked disorganisation of guidepost neurons required for axon pathfinding across the midline. Using transplantation assays, we demonstrate that abnormalities of the mutant midline region are primarily responsible for the CC malformation. Conditional genetic inactivation shows that RFX3 is not required in guidepost cells for proper CC formation, but is required before E12.5 for proper patterning of the cortical septal boundary and hence accurate distribution of guidepost neurons at later stages. We observe focused but consistent ectopic expression of Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8 at the rostro commissural plate associated with a reduced ratio of GLIoma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 3 (GLI3 repressor to activator forms. We demonstrate on brain explant cultures that ectopic FGF8 reproduces the guidepost neuronal defects observed in Rfx3 mutants. This study unravels a crucial role of RFX3 during early brain development by indirectly regulating GLI3 activity, which leads to FGF8 upregulation and ultimately to disturbed distribution of guidepost neurons required for CC morphogenesis. Hence, the RFX3 mutant mouse model brings novel understandings of the mechanisms that underlie CC agenesis in ciliopathies.

  8. SU-E-T-81: A Study On Correlation Between Gamma Analysis for Midline and Lateralized Tumors Using VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Syam; Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the fluence for the midline and lateralized tumors for VMAT technique using 2D seven29 detector array combined with the Octavius phantom. Methods: 60 cases that are already being treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have selected for this study. This includes tumors situated at the medial and lateral. Medial refers to the tumor situated at the midline of the body and lateral means toward the side or away from the midline of the body. Verification plans were created for each treatment plan in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (version10, Varian medical systems, Palo Alto,CA) with the 2D Seven29 detector array and the Octavius phantom(PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac 2100 iX, linear accelerator equipped with a millennium 120 leaf collimator. Analysis was done by comparing the fluence measured for the tumors situated on the midline and tumors situated laterally. Results: Fluence measured for all the delivered plans were analyzed using Verisoft software (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). The gamma pass percentage for midline tumors were found to be higher compared with the lateralized ones. The standard deviation between gamma values for midline and lateralized tumors is 2.18 and 3.5 respectively. Also the standard deviation between the point doses for midline and lateralized tumors is 0.38 and 0.29 respectively. The average gamma passing rate for midline tumors is 96.55% and for lateralized tumors are 94.94% for 3%DD and 3mm DTA criteria. From the T test, it was found that there is no significant difference between the gamma pass percentage between midline and lateralized tumors with p value of 0.28. Conclusion: There is no particular correlation found in the gamma pass criteria for midline and lateralized tumors

  9. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H

    2016-01-01

    with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration...

  10. Mining the topography and dynamics of the 4D Nucleome to identify novel CNS drug pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gerald A; Allyn-Feuer, Ari; Georgoff, Patrick; Nikolian, Vahagn; Alam, Hasan B; Athey, Brian D

    2017-07-01

    The pharmacoepigenome can be defined as the active, noncoding province of the genome including canonical spatial and temporal regulatory mechanisms of gene regulation that respond to xenobiotic stimuli. Many psychotropic drugs that have been in clinical use for decades have ill-defined mechanisms of action that are beginning to be resolved as we understand the transcriptional hierarchy and dynamics of the nucleus. In this review, we describe spatial, temporal and biomechanical mechanisms mediated by psychotropic medications. Focus is placed on a bioinformatics pipeline that can be used both for detection of pharmacoepigenomic variants that discretize drug response and adverse events to improve pharmacogenomic testing, and for the discovery of novel CNS therapeutics. This approach integrates the functional topology and dynamics of the transcriptional hierarchy of the pharmacoepigenome, gene variant-driven identification of pharmacogenomic regulatory domains, and mesoscale mapping for the discovery of novel CNS pharmacodynamic pathways in human brain. Examples of the application of this pipeline are provided, including the discovery of valproic acid (VPA) mediated transcriptional reprogramming of neuronal cell fate following injury, and mapping of a CNS pathway glutamatergic pathway for the mood stabilizer lithium. These examples in regulatory pharmacoepigenomics illustrate how ongoing research using the 4D nucleome provides a foundation to further insight into previously unrecognized psychotropic drug pharmacodynamic pathways in the human CNS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Ricq, Emily L; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-10-21

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test-retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are available

  12. Fifth CNS international steam generator conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Fifth CNS International Steam Generator Conference was held on November 26-29, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. In contrast with other conferences which focus on specific aspects, this conference provided a wide ranging forum on nuclear steam generator technology from life-cycle management to inspection and maintenance, functional and structural performance characteristics to design architecture. The 5th conference has adopted the theme: 'Management of Real-Life Equipment Conditions and Solutions for the Future'. This theme is appropriate at a time of transition in the industry when plants are looking to optimize the performance of existing assets, prevent costly degradation and unavailability, while looking ahead for new steam generator investments in life-extension, replacements and new-build. More than 50 technical papers were presented in sessions that gave an insight to the scope: life management strategies; fouling, cleaning and chemistry; replacement strategies and new build design; materials degradation; condition assessment/fitness for service; inspection advancements and experience; and thermal hydraulic performance

  13. An investigation on the facial midline distance to some anatomic landmarks of the jaws among people with natural dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharraf R

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the dental midline is necessary in most dental procedures."nOne of the methods to fulfill this goal is to determine the facial midline based on the midpoints of the"nforehead, nose, upper lip and chin. However, for various reasons, this method has not always been"nproved successful. In such cases, different techniques, based on the investigations in the edentulous"npatients, have been suggested."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the conformity of some landmarks such as labial"nfrenum, incisive papilla and mid palatal suture with dental and facial midlines among people with natural"ndentition in order to obtain accurate anatomic landmarks for denture replacement."nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 96 dental students, having all their permanent teeth"nand without any orthognathic problem, were chosen. For each subject, Alginate impressions and dental"ncasts were prepared. Then, centric occlusion was recorded with a biting wax and the facial mid line was"ndetermined on the anterior part of it. The distances from the facial midline to the upper teeth midline,"nincisive papilla, labial frenum and mid palatal suture were determined with a special tool and were"nmeasured by a VERNIEH two times. In order to analyze the results, Chi- Square and t-student tests were"nused."nResults: The average of facial midline distance to the upper teeth midline, the labial frenum, the incisive"npapilla and the mid palatal suture were 0.83±0.60, 0.67±G.54, 0.83±00.63 and 0.81±0.62 mm,"nrespectively. There was no significant difference between males and females. Labial frenum showed the"nminimum distance to the facial midline, while the incisive papilla had the maximum. There was no"nsignificant difference between these anatomic landmarks, in conformity or unconformity with the facial"nmidline"nConclusion: Considering the low percentage of the subjects with complete conformity and the lack of

  14. Posterior midline activation during symptom provocation in acute stress disorder: An fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christopher Cwik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional imaging studies of patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder showed wide-spread activation of mid-line cortical areas during symptom provocation i.e., exposure to trauma-related cues. The present study aimed at investigating neural activation during exposure to trauma-related pictures in patients with Acute Stress Disorder (ASD shortly after the traumatic event. Nineteen ASD patients and 19 healthy control participants were presented with individualized pictures of the traumatic event and emotionally neutral control pictures during the acquisition of whole-brain data with a 3-T fMRI scanner. Compared to the control group and to control pictures, ASD patients showed significant activation in mid-line cortical areas in response to trauma-related pictures including precuneus, cuneus, postcentral gyrus and pre-supplementary motor area. The results suggest that the trauma-related pictures evoke emotionally salient self-referential processing in ASD patients.

  15. Laser-assisted multidisciplinary approach for closure and prevention of relapse of midline diastema

    OpenAIRE

    Amol Kamble; Preetam Shah; Priyam Rajesh Velani; Ganesh Jadhav

    2017-01-01

    Midline diastema, which occurs as spacing between the upper central incisors, is a common occurrence seen in the pediatric population. In the ugly duckling stage of development; no treatment is generally advocated as the diastema is a transient one. When diastemas occur due to other pathologies, they pose several problems in relation to esthetics and speech in a growing child. With the advent of time, patient's demand for esthetics has greatly increased. Along with this, a less time-consuming...

  16. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft: Diagnosis, Pathologic Findings, and Early Stage Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sinopidis, Xenophon; Kourea, Helen P.; Panagidis, Antonios; Alexopoulos, Vasileios; Tzifas, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Gabriel; Georgiou, George

    2012-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a very uncommon malformation of the anterior neck, with less than 100 cases reported in medical literature. Herein we present a case of a female neonate with this anomaly. A detailed description of the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics is performed. As it is derived from the natural history of the lesion, prompt clinical diagnosis, and operative treatment during early infancy predispose to a better aesthetic and functional prognosis.

  17. Does midline coincidence of upper and lower teeth affect smile aesthetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Jajoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of single mandibular incisor has always led to debate regarding midline and smile esthetics. The current case report describes the effect of mesiodens in worsening the Class II Division 1 malocclusion and its correction by extraction of mesiodens, upper first premolars, and single mandibular incisor. Satisfactory functional and esthetic results were achieved with well-settled Class II molar, Class I canine relationship, ideal overjet, and overbite. Two years postretention records show stable results.

  18. Sustained frontal midline theta enhancements during effortful listening track working memory demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Matthew G; Iyer, Nandini; Thompson, Eric R; Simpson, Brian D

    2017-11-27

    Recent studies demonstrate that frontal midline theta power (4-8 Hz) enhancements in the electroencephalogram (EEG) relate to effortful listening. It has been proposed that these enhancements reflect working memory demands. Here, the need to retain auditory information in working memory was manipulated in a 2-interval 2-alternative forced-choice delayed pitch discrimination task ("Which interval contained the higher pitch?"). On each trial, two square wave stimuli differing in pitch at an individual's ∼70.7% correct threshold were separated by a 3-second ISI. In a 'Roving' condition, the lowest pitch stimulus was randomly selected on each trial (uniform distribution from 840 to 1160 Hz). In a 'Fixed' condition, the lowest pitch was always 979 Hz. Critically, the 'Fixed' condition allowed one to know the correct response immediately following the first stimulus (e.g., if the first stimulus is 979 Hz, the second must be higher). In contrast, the 'Roving' condition required retention of the first tone for comparison to the second. Frontal midline theta enhancements during the ISI were only observed for the 'Roving' condition. Alpha (8-13 Hz) enhancements were apparent during the ISI, but did not differ significantly between conditions. Since conditions were matched for accuracy at threshold, results suggest that frontal midline theta enhancements will not always accompany difficult listening. Mixed results in the literature regarding frontal midline theta enhancements may be related to differences between tasks in regards to working memory demands. Alpha enhancements may reflect task general effortful listening processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Safety of achilles detachment and reattachment using a standard midline approach to insertional enthesophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Detachment with reattachment of the Achilles tendon is a common surgery for debridement of retrocalcaneal exostosis, bursitis, and other insertional pathologic entities. The technique involves a midline skin incision on the posterior Achilles to the tendon. The distal Achilles attachment is removed in a U-shaped manner, leaving the medial and lateral flares, but exposing the posterior spur. This midline approach provides excellent exposure and allows for rapid and efficient surgical debridement. The tendon is reapproximated and repaired with a suture anchor to facilitate fixation to the posterior calcaneus. Some surgeons have expressed concerned that the rupture risk could be increased in the postoperative period using this technique. The present study was a retrospective medical record review of 98 patients (100 feet) who had undergone a midline approach with Achilles reattachment after insertional Achilles debridement during a 3-year period. The demographic and comorbidity data were collected and analyzed. The outcome measures were postoperative rupture and the need for revision surgery. The mean age was 51.9 years, and the patients included 59 females (60.2%) and 39 males (39.8%). The complications included 4 rupture or avulsion revisions (4.0%) and 2 recurrent pain and tendinitis revisions (2.0%). The most common repeat repair procedure included hardware removal and a flexor hallucis longus transfer or augmentation. Nine patients (9.0%) had wound complications, 7 (77.8%) of which necessitated incision and drainage. The midline approach with Achilles detachment and reattachment is a safe and effective method of surgical treatment of insertional Achilles pathologic entities. The low reoperation rate of 4.0% will allow foot and ankle surgeons to safely rely on this approach. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Age-related changes of frontal-midline theta is predictive of efficient memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Z; Tóth, B; Boha, R; File, B; Molnár, M

    2014-07-25

    Frontal areas are thought to be the coordinators of working memory processes by controlling other brain areas reflected by oscillatory activities like frontal-midline theta (4-7 Hz). With aging substantial changes can be observed in the frontal brain areas, presumably leading to age-associated changes in cortical correlates of cognitive functioning. The present study aimed to test whether altered frontal-midline theta dynamics during working memory maintenance may underlie the capacity deficits observed in older adults. 33-channel EEG was recorded in young (18-26 years, N=20) and old (60-71 years, N=16) adults during the retention period of a visual delayed match-to-sample task, in which they had to maintain arrays of 3 or 5 colored squares. An additional visual odd-ball task was used to be able to measure the electrophysiological indices of sustained attentional processes. Old participants showed reduced frontal theta activity during both tasks compared to the young group. In the young memory maintenance-related frontal-midline theta activity was shown to be sensitive both to the increased memory demands and to efficient subsequent memory performance, whereas the old adults showed no such task-related difference in the frontal theta activity. The decrease of frontal-midline theta activity in the old group indicates that cerebral aging may alter the cortical circuitries of theta dynamics, thereby leading to age-associated decline of working memory maintenance function. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. P-glycoprotein trafficking as a therapeutic target to optimize CNS drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas P; Sanchez-Covarubias, Lucy; Tome, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit is to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from potentially harmful xenobiotic substances and maintain CNS homeostasis. Restricted access to the CNS is maintained via a combination of tight junction proteins as well as a variety of efflux and influx transporters that limits the transcellular and paracellular movement of solutes. Of the transporters identified at the BBB, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has emerged as the transporter that is the greatest obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. In this chapter, we provide data to support intracellular protein trafficking of P-gp within cerebral capillary microvessels as a potential target for improved drug delivery. We show that pain-induced changes in P-gp trafficking are associated with changes in P-gp's association with caveolin-1, a key scaffolding/trafficking protein that colocalizes with P-gp at the luminal membrane of brain microvessels. Changes in colocalization with the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of caveolin-1, by pain, are accompanied by dynamic changes in the distribution, relocalization, and activation of P-gp "pools" between microvascular endothelial cell subcellular compartments. Since redox-sensitive processes may be involved in signaling disassembly of higher-order structures of P-gp, we feel that manipulating redox signaling, via specific protein targeting at the BBB, may protect disulfide bond integrity of P-gp reservoirs and control trafficking to the membrane surface, providing improved CNS drug delivery. The advantage of therapeutic drug "relocalization" of a protein is that the physiological impact can be modified, temporarily or long term, despite pathology-induced changes in gene transcription. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol intake alters immune responses and promotes CNS viral persistence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Jennifer M; Taylor, Jonathan; Raué, Hans-Peter; Slifka, Mark K; Huang, Elaine

    2016-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to progressive liver disease and is associated with a variety of extrahepatic effects, including central nervous system (CNS) damage and neuropsychiatric impairments. Alcohol abuse can exacerbate these adverse effects on brain and behavior, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. This study investigated the role of alcohol in regulating viral persistence and CNS immunopathology in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), a model for HCV infections in humans. Female and male BALB/c mice (n=94) were exposed to alcohol (ethanol; EtOH) and water (or water only) using a two-bottle choice paradigm, followed one week later by infection with either LCMV clone 13 (causes chronic infection similar to chronic HCV), LCMV Armstrong (causes acute infection), or vehicle. Mice were monitored for 60days post-infection and continued to receive 24-h access to EtOH and water. Animals infected with LCMV clone 13 drank more EtOH, as compared to those with an acute or no viral infection. Six weeks after infection with LCMV clone 13, mice with EtOH exposure evidenced higher serum viral titers, as compared to mice without EtOH exposure. EtOH intake was also associated with reductions in virus-specific CD8(+) T cell frequencies (particularly CD11a(hi) subsets) and evidence of persistent CNS viremia in chronically infected mice. These findings support the hypothesis that EtOH use and chronic viral infection can result in combined toxic effects accelerating CNS damage and neuropsychiatric dysfunction and suggest that examining the role of EtOH in regulating viral persistence and CNS immunopathology in mice infected with LCMV can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of comorbid alcohol use disorder and chronic viral infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R., E-mail: bvuillemenot@bmrn.com [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Kennedy, Derek [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B. [Northern Biomedical Research, Inc., Muskegon, MI (United States); Butt, Mark T. [Tox Path Specialists, LLC, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O' Neill, Charles A. [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  4. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  5. Traumatic midline subarachnoid hemorrhage on initial computed tomography as a marker of severe diffuse axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Mbemba, Daddy; Mugikura, Shunji; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Murata, Takaki; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Tominaga, Teiji; Takahashi, Shoki; Takase, Kei

    2018-01-05

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that midline (interhemispheric or perimesencephalic) traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) on initial CT may implicate the same shearing mechanism that underlies severe diffuse axonal injury (DAI). METHODS The authors enrolled 270 consecutive patients (mean age [± SD] 43 ± 23.3 years) with a history of head trauma who had undergone initial CT within 24 hours and brain MRI within 30 days. Six initial CT findings, including intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and tSAH, were used as candidate predictors of DAI. The presence of tSAH was determined at the cerebral convexities, sylvian fissures, sylvian vallecula, cerebellar folia, interhemispheric fissure, and perimesencephalic cisterns. Following MRI, patients were divided into negative and positive DAI groups, and were assigned to a DAI stage: 1) stage 0, negative DAI; 2) stage 1, DAI in lobar white matter or cerebellum; 3) stage 2, DAI involving the corpus callosum; and 4) stage 3, DAI involving the brainstem. Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) scores were obtained in 232 patients. RESULTS Of 270 patients, 77 (28.5%) had DAI; tSAH and IVH were independently associated with DAI (p GOSE score at both hospital discharge and after 6 months. CONCLUSIONS Midline tSAH could implicate the same shearing mechanism that underlies severe DAI, for which midline tSAH on initial CT is a probable surrogate.

  6. Zebrafish IGF genes: gene duplication, conservation and divergence, and novel roles in midline and notochord development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuming Zou

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are key regulators of development, growth, and longevity. In most vertebrate species including humans, there is one IGF-1 gene and one IGF-2 gene. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of 4 distinct IGF genes (termed as igf-1a, -1b, -2a, and -2b in zebrafish. These genes encode 4 structurally distinct and functional IGF peptides. IGF-1a and IGF-2a mRNAs were detected in multiple tissues in adult fish. IGF-1b mRNA was detected only in the gonad and IGF-2b mRNA only in the liver. Functional analysis showed that all 4 IGFs caused similar developmental defects but with different potencies. Many of these embryos had fully or partially duplicated notochords, suggesting that an excess of IGF signaling causes defects in the midline formation and an expansion of the notochord. IGF-2a, the most potent IGF, was analyzed in depth. IGF-2a expression caused defects in the midline formation and expansion of the notochord but it did not alter the anterior neural patterning. These results not only provide new insights into the functional conservation and divergence of the multiple igf genes but also reveal a novel role of IGF signaling in midline formation and notochord development in a vertebrate model.

  7. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation......, it is not known what cell type mediates the role of TLR3 in the immunological control of HSV, and it is not known whether TLR3 sensing occurs prior to or after CNS entry. Here, we show that in mice TLR3 provides early control of HSV-2 infection immediately after entry into the CNS by mediating type I IFN...... responses in astrocytes. Tlr3-/- mice were hypersusceptible to HSV-2 infection in the CNS after vaginal inoculation. HSV-2 exhibited broader neurotropism in Tlr3-/- mice than it did in WT mice, with astrocytes being most abundantly infected. Tlr3-/- mice did not exhibit a global defect in innate immune...

  8. 3rd ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Electronic Navigation Research Institute (ENRI) held its third International Workshop on ATM / CNS in 2013 with the theme of "Drafting the future sky". There is worldwide activity taking place in the research and development of modern air traffic management (ATM) and its enabling technologies in Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS). Pioneering work is necessary to contribute to the global harmonization of air traffic management and control. At this workshop, leading experts in  research, industry and academia from around the world met to share their ideas and approaches on ATM/CNS related topics.

  9. Autoimmune process in CNS under Cs-137 inner irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisyany, N.I.; Liubich, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothesis as to the development of radiation-induced brain injuries stands high among the concepts of the CNS post-radiation damage pathogenesis. To study the changes occurring in a living organism affected by a small-dose radiation due to incorporated radionuclides as well as to create adequate models are of critical importance in the post-Chernobyl period. The effects of chronic small-dose inner radiation on the development of autoimmune responses were evaluated by determining the level of the CNS proteins and protein-induced antibodies to the CNS components. (author)

  10. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Noseda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS and central nervous system (CNS myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1, a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS.

  11. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  12. Prevalence of maxillary midline papillae recession and association with interdental smile line: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsakis, Georgios A; Maragou, Theodora; Ioannou, Andreas L; Romanos, Georgios E; Hinrichs, James E

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to record the prevalence and degree of absence of the maxillary midline interdental papilla and the proportion of patients displaying the maxillary midline papilla during maximum smile among a Caucasian population. Papillary recession was found in 46.4% of study participants (n = 211), while the prevalence of visible recession among maxillary midline papilla during maximum smile was 38.4%, which was statistically significantly less than that of patients diagnosed intraorally with loss of papillary height (P line as well as age and visible papillary recession were identified for individuals over 65 years of age. The high prevalence of midline papillary recession in the maxilla found in this population suggests that loss of papillary height constitutes a substantial clinical challenge.

  13. ­Glial and stem cell expression of murine Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 in the embryonic and perinatal nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantzen C. Collette

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors (FGFRs are involved in the development and function of multiple organs and organ systems, including the central nervous system (CNS. FGF signaling via FGFR1, one of the three FGFRs expressed in the CNS, stimulates proliferation of stem cells during prenatal and postnatal neurogenesis and participates in regulating cell-type ratios in many developing regions of the brain. Anomalies in FGFR1 signaling have been implicated in certain neuropsychiatric disorders. Fgfr1 expression has been shown, via in situ hybridization, to vary spatially and temporally throughout embryonic and postnatal development of the brain. However, in situ hybridization lacks sufficient resolution to identify which cell-types directly participate in FGF signaling. Furthermore, because antibodies raised against FGFR1 commonly cross-react with other members of the FGFR family, immunocytochemistry is not alone sufficient to accurately document Fgfr1 expression. Here, we elucidate the identity of Fgfr1 expressing cells in both the embryonic and perinatal mouse brain. Methods To do this, we utilized a tgFGFR1-EGFPGP338Gsat BAC line (tgFgfr1-EGFP+ obtained from the GENSAT project. The tgFgfr1-EGFP+ line expresses EGFP under the control of a Fgfr1 promoter, thereby causing cells endogenously expressing Fgfr1 to also present a positive GFP signal. Through simple immunostaining using GFP antibodies and cell-type specific antibodies, we were able to accurately determine the cell-type of Fgfr1 expressing cells. Results This technique revealed Fgfr1 expression in proliferative zones containing BLBP+ radial glial stem cells, such as the cortical and hippocampal ventricular zones, and cerebellar anlage of E14.5 mice, in addition to DCX+ neuroblasts. Furthermore, our data reveal Fgfr1 expression in proliferative zones containing BLBP+ cells of the anterior midline, hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum of P0.5 mice

  14. Air pollution: mechanisms of neuroinflammation and CNS disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle L; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-09-01

    Air pollution has been implicated as a chronic source of neuroinflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that produce neuropathology and central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain; systemic effects that impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-induced CNS pathology are poorly understood, new evidence suggests that microglial activation and changes in the blood-brain barrier are key components. Here we summarize recent findings detailing the mechanisms through which air pollution reaches the brain and activates the resident innate immune response to become a chronic source of pro-inflammatory factors and ROS, culminating in CNS disease.

  15. A map of taste neuron projections in the Drosophila CNS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-08

    Jul 8, 2014 ... information that they represent. The extensive ... physiology and behaviour in the wild type and in these mutants .... taste information is processed in the CNS. 2. ..... gene affecting the specificity of the chemosensory neurons of.

  16. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Nwamaka Nwogu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow. In this review, we provide an overview of the various factors influencing CNS penetration of ARV drugs with an emphasis on those commonly used in sub-Saharan Africa. We also summarize some key associations between ARV drug penetration, CNS efficacy, and neurotoxicity.

  17. CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantina Vasilatou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

  18. CNS-directed gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sands, Mark S; Haskins, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders usually caused by deficient activity of a single lysosomal enzyme. As most lysosomal enzymes are ubiquitously expressed, a deficiency in a single enzyme can affect multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system (CNS). At least 75% of all LSDs have a significant CNS component. Approaches such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can effectively treat the systemic dis...

  19. TIME COURSE MODIFICATIONS INDUCED BY PERINATAL ASPHYXIA IN RAT CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Capani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia (PA induced short and long term biochemical, synaptic, cytoskeletal and astrocytes alterations that has been associated with neuronal cell death following hypoxia . The lack of knowledge about the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction prompted us to investigate the changes in the synapse and neuronal cytoskeleton and related structures. For this study we used a well established murine model of PA. Full-term pregnant rats were rapidly decapitated and the uterus horns were placed in a water bath at 37 °C for different time of asphyxia. When their physiological conditions improved, they were given to surrogate mothers. One month, four month, 6 month and 18 month after PA rats were included in this study. Modifications were analyzed using photooxidation with phalloidin-eosin, conventional electron microscopy (EM, inmunocytochemistry and ethanolic phosphotungstic acid (E-PTA staining combining with electron tomography and 3-D reconstruction techniques and molecular biology studies. After one month of the PA insult, an increase in the F-actin staining in neostriatum and hippocampus synapses was observed using correlative fluorescent electron microscopy for phalloidin-eosin. Mushroom-shaped spines showed the most consistent staining. Strong alterations in the dendrite and astroglial cytoskeleton were found at four months of PA (1. After six months of PA, postsynaptic densities (PSDs of the rat neostriatum are highly modified . We observed an increment of PSDs thickness related with the duration and severity of the hypoxic insult. In addition, PSDs showed and increase in the ubiquitination level. Using 3-d reconstruction and electron tomography we observed showed clear signs of damage in the asphyctic PSDs. These changes are correlated with intense staining for ubiquitin (2. Finally, in 18 months old rat was observed a reduction in the number of synapses in the PA animals related with a decrease in BDNF staining.(3 Using protocols

  20. Role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, Simon W.F.; Riemer, Constanze; Madela, Kazimierz; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Gueltner, Sandra; Heise, Ines; Baier, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a multi-functional protein and participates in mediating inflammatory reactions. The pronounced overexpression of galectin-3 in prion-infected brain tissue prompted us to study the role of this protein in a murine prion model. Immunofluorescence double-labelling identified microglia as the major cell type expressing galectin-3. Ablation of galectin-3 did not affect PrP Sc -deposition and development of gliosis. However, galectin-3 -/- -mice showed prolonged survival times upon intracerebral and peripheral scrapie infections. Moreover, protein levels of the lysosomal activation marker LAMP-2 were markedly reduced in prion-infected galectin-3 -/- -mice suggesting a role of galectin-3 in regulation of lysosomal functions. Lower mRNA levels of Beclin-1 and Atg5 in prion-infected wild-type and galectin-3 -/- -mice indicated an impairment of autophagy although autophagosome formation was unchanged. The results point towards a detrimental role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS and suggest that endo-/lysosomal dysfunction in combination with reduced autophagy may contribute to disease development

  1. Sleep disorders in children after treatment for a CNS tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Van Santen, Hanneke M; Schouten-Van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N

    2012-08-01

    The long-term survival of children with a central nervous system (CNS) tumour is improving. However, they experience late effects, including altered habits and patterns of sleep. We evaluated the presence and type of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness in these children, and its associations with clinical characteristics and daily performance (fatigue and psychosocial functioning). In a cross-sectional study at the outpatient clinic of the Emma Children's Hospital AMC (February-June 2010), sleep, fatigue and psychosocial functioning were analysed in 31 CNS tumour patients (mean age: 11.8years; 20 boys) and compared with 78 patients treated for a non-CNS malignancy (mean age: 9.7years; 41 boys) and norm data. Questionnaires applied were the Sleep Disorder Scale for Children, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Sleeping habits and endocrine deficiencies were assessed with a self-developed questionnaire. Increased somnolence was found in CNS tumour patients compared with those with a non-CNS malignancy (8.8±2.8 versus 7.5±2.7; Psleep. No specific risk factors were identified for a sleep disorder in CNS tumour patients, but their excessive somnolence was correlated with lower fatigue related quality of life (QoL) (r=-0.78, Psleep quality and diminish fatigue. © 2011 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. MOG extracellular domain (p1-125) triggers elevated frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ Th1 cells in the CNS of mice and induces greater incidence of severe EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyagabhavan Mony, Jyothi; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Myelin-specific T cells are implicated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and drive experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is commonly induced with short peptides, whereas in MS, whole myelin proteins are available for immune response. We asked whether immunization with the immunoglobulin-l...

  3. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cavaliere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral ischemia.

  4. Inflammatory cytokines in the brain: does the CNS shape immune responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, T; Renno, T; Taupin, V; Krakowski, M

    1994-12-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been regarded as representing the intrusion of an unruly, ill-behaved mob of leukocytes into the well-ordered and organized domain of thought and reason. However, results accumulated over the past few years suggest that, far from being an immunologically privileged organ, T lymphocytes may be regular and frequent visitors to the CNS, for purposes of immune surveillance. Here, Trevor Owens and colleagues propose that the brain itself can regulate or shape immune responses therein. Furthermore, given that the immune cells may be subverted to autoimmunity, they suggest that the study of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the brain may shed light on the ability of the local environment to regulate immune responses.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs as Potential Inducers of Antineoplastic Effects in CNS Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tatenhorst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-inducible transcription factors which belong to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. In recent years it turned out that natural as well as synthetic PPAR agonists exhibit profound antineoplastic as well as redifferentiation effects in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. The molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still emerging, with partially controverse findings reported by a number of studies dealing with the influence of PPARs on treatment of tumor cells in vitro. Remarkably, studies examining the effects of these drugs in vivo are just beginning to emerge. However, the agonists of PPARs, in particular the thiazolidinediones, seem to be promising candidates for new approaches in human CNS tumor therapy.

  6. Son of sevenless directly links the Robo receptor to rac activation to control axon repulsion at the midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Bashaw, Greg J

    2006-11-22

    Son of sevenless (Sos) is a dual specificity guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that regulates both Ras and Rho family GTPases and thus is uniquely poised to integrate signals that affect both gene expression and cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, using genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology, we demonstrate that Sos is recruited to the plasma membrane, where it forms a ternary complex with the Roundabout receptor and the SH3-SH2 adaptor protein Dreadlocks (Dock) to regulate Rac-dependent cytoskeletal rearrangement in response to the Slit ligand. Intriguingly, the Ras and Rac-GEF activities of Sos can be uncoupled during Robo-mediated axon repulsion; Sos axon guidance function depends on its Rac-GEF activity, but not its Ras-GEF activity. These results provide in vivo evidence that the Ras and RhoGEF domains of Sos are separable signaling modules and support a model in which Robo recruits Sos to the membrane via Dock to activate Rac during midline repulsion.

  7. Midline body actions and leftward spatial Aiming in patients with spatial neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eChaudhari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial motor-intentional Aiming bias is a dysfunction in initiation/execution of motor intentional behavior, resulting in hypokinetic and hypometric leftward movements. Aiming bias may contribute to posture, balance and movement problems and uniquely account for disability in post-stroke spatial neglect. Body movement may modify and even worsen Aiming errors, but therapy techniques such as visual scanning training do not take this into account. Here, we evaluated 1 whether instructing neglect patients to move midline body parts improves their ability to explore left space, and 2 whether this has a different impact on different patients. A 68-year-old woman with spatial neglect after a right basal ganglia infarct had difficulty orienting to and identifying left-sided objects. She was prompted with four instructions: look to the left, point with your nose to the left, point with your [right] hand to the left, and stick out your tongue and point it to the left. She oriented leftward dramatically better when pointing with the tongue/nose, than she did when pointing with the hand. We then tested 9 more consecutive patients with spatial neglect using the same instructions. Only four of them made any orienting errors. Only one patient made >50% errors when pointing with the hand, and she did not benefit from pointing with the tongue/nose. We observed that pointing with the tongue could facilitate left-sided orientation in a stroke survivor with spatial neglect. If midline structures are represented more bilaterally, they may be less affected by Aiming bias. Alternatively, moving the body midline may be more permissive for leftward orienting than moving right body parts. We were not able to replicate this effect in another patient; we suspect that the magnitude of this effect may depend upon the degree to which patients have directional akinesia, spatial Where deficits, or cerebellar/frontal cortical lesions. Future research could examine these

  8. Superior interhemispheric approach for midline meningioma from the anterior cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, S; Derrey, S; Martinaud, O; Gérardin, E; Langlois, O; Fréger, P; Hannequin, D; Castel, H; Proust, F

    2011-07-01

    For suprasellar meningioma, the fronto-basal exposure is considered the standard approach. The superior interhemispheric (IH) approach is less described in the literature. To assess the surgical complications, functional outcome (visual, olfaction), morbidity and mortality rates and late recurrence, after resection by superior IH approach of midline skull base meningioma. Between 1998 and 2008, 52 consecutive patients with midline meningioma on the anterior portion of the skull base (mean age: 63.8 ± 13.1; sex ratio F/M: 3.7) were operated on via the superior IH approach. After a mean follow-up of 56.9 ± 32.9 months, an independent neurosurgeon proposed a prospective examination of functional outcome to each patient, as well as a visual and olfactory function assessment. Fifty-two patients were divided into a group with olfactory groove meningioma (n=34) and another with tuberculum sellae meningioma (n=18). The outcome was characterized by postoperative complications in 13 patients (25%), mortality rate in two (3.8%) and long-term morbidity at in 17 (37%) of 50 surviving patients. Based on multivariate analysis, no prognosis factor was significant as regards the favorable outcome. The mean postoperative KPS score (86.6 ± 9.4) was significantly improved. However, dysexecutive syndrome was observed in four patients (8%), hyposmia-anosmia in 34 (68%) and visual acuity deteriorated in one (2%). The superior IH approach could be considered a safe anteriorly orientated midline approach for removal OGM and TSM meningioma. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. An anterior-to-posterior shift in midline cortical activity in schizophrenia during self-reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Daphne J; Cassidy, Brittany S; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Lee, Su Mei; Coombs, Garth; Goff, Donald C; Gabrieli, John D; Moran, Joseph M

    2011-03-01

    Deficits in social cognition, including impairments in self-awareness, contribute to the overall functional disability associated with schizophrenia. Studies in healthy subjects have shown that social cognitive functions, including self-reflection, rely on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior cingulate gyrus, and these regions exhibit highly correlated activity during "resting" states. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia show dysfunction of this network during self-reflection and that this abnormal activity is associated with changes in the strength of resting-state correlations between these regions. Activation during self-reflection and control tasks was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 19 patients with schizophrenia and 20 demographically matched control subjects. In addition, the resting-state functional connectivity of midline cortical areas showing abnormal self-reflection-related activation in schizophrenia was measured. Compared with control subjects, the schizophrenia patients demonstrated lower activation of the right ventral mPFC and greater activation of the mid/posterior cingulate gyri bilaterally during self-reflection, relative to a control task. A similar pattern was seen during overall social reflection. In addition, functional connectivity between the portion of the left mid/posterior cingulate gyrus showing abnormally elevated activity during self-reflection in schizophrenia, and the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus was lower in the schizophrenia patients compared with control subjects. Schizophrenia is associated with an anterior-to-posterior shift in introspection-related activation, as well as changes in functional connectivity, of the midline cortex. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that aberrant midline cortical function contributes to social cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier

  10. Hypohyperdontia: Agenesis of three third molars and mandibular centrals associated with midline supernumerary tooth in mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agenesis of teeth in a patient who also presents with a supernumerary tooth is one of the rare numerical anomalies in human dentition. Agenesis of third molars was shown to be associated with other missing permanent teeth. A review of literature on hypodontia including third molar agenesis, hyperdontia and a concomitant presence of these two conditions which is termed as hypohyperdontia is presented along with a case showing agenesis of three third molars, both mandibular central incisors and a midline supernumerary tooth.

  11. Midline versus transverse incision for cesarean delivery in low-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, Nanna; Aabakke, Anna J M; Secher, Niels J

    2014-01-01

    While transverse incision is the recommended entry technique for cesarean delivery in high-income countries, it is our experience that midline incision is still used routinely in many low-income settings. Accordingly, international guidelines lack uniformity on this matter. Although evidence...... is limited, the literature suggests important advantages of the transverse incision, with lower risk of long-term disabilities such as wound disruption and hernia. Also, potential extra time spent on this incision appears not to impact neonatal outcome. Therefore, we suggest that it is time for a change...

  12. Ephrin-B3 is the midline barrier that prevents corticospinal tract axons from recrossing, allowing for unilateral motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullander, K; Croll, S D; Zimmer, M; Pan, L; McClain, J; Hughes, V; Zabski, S; DeChiara, T M; Klein, R; Yancopoulos, G D; Gale, N W

    2001-04-01

    Growing axons follow highly stereotypical pathways, guided by a variety of attractive and repulsive cues, before establishing specific connections with distant targets. A particularly well-known example that illustrates the complexity of axonal migration pathways involves the axonal projections of motor neurons located in the motor cortex. These projections take a complex route during which they first cross the midline, then form the corticospinal tract, and ultimately connect with motor neurons in the contralateral side of the spinal cord. These obligatory contralateral connections account for why one side of the brain controls movement on the opposing side of the body. The netrins and slits provide well-known midline signals that regulate axonal crossings at the midline. Herein we report that a member of the ephrin family, ephrin-B3, also plays a key role at the midline to regulate axonal crossing. In particular, we show that ephrin-B3 acts as the midline barrier that prevents corticospinal tract projections from recrossing when they enter the spinal gray matter. We report that in ephrin-B3(-/-) mice, corticospinal tract projections freely recross in the spinal gray matter, such that the motor cortex on one side of the brain now provides bilateral input to the spinal cord. This neuroanatomical abnormality in ephrin-B3(-/-) mice correlates with loss of unilateral motor control, yielding mice that simultaneously move their right and left limbs and thus have a peculiar hopping gait quite unlike the alternate step gait displayed by normal mice. The corticospinal and walking defects in ephrin-B3(-/-) mice resemble those recently reported for mice lacking the EphA4 receptor, which binds ephrin-B3 as well as other ephrins, suggesting that the binding of EphA4-bearing axonal processes to ephrin-B3 at the midline provides the repulsive signal that prevents corticospinal tract projections from recrossing the midline in the developing spinal cord.

  13. Actuarial risk of isolated CNS involvement in Ewing's sarcoma following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigg, M.E.; Makuch, R.; Glaubiger, D.

    1985-01-01

    Records of 154 patients with Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute were reviewed to assess the incidence and risk of developing isolated central nervous system (CNS) Ewing's sarcoma. Sixty-two of the 154 patients had received CNS irradiation and intrathecal (i.t.) methotrexate as part of their initial therapy to prevent the occurrence of isolated CNS Ewing's sarcoma. The risk of developing isolate CNS Ewing's sarcoma was greatest within the first two years after diagnosis and was approximately 10%. The overall risk of CNS recurrence in the group of patients receiving DNS treatment was similar to the group receiving no therapy directed to the CNS. The occurrence of isolated CNS involvement was not prevented by the use of CNS irradiation and i.t. methotrexate. Because of a lack of efficacy to the CNS irradiation regimen, current treatment regimens do not include therapy directed to CNS

  14. AKAP12 mediates barrier functions of fibrotic scars during CNS repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ho Cha

    Full Text Available The repair process after CNS injury shows a well-organized cascade of three distinct stages: inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling. In the new tissue formation stage, various cells migrate and form the fibrotic scar surrounding the lesion site. The fibrotic scar is known as an obstacle for axonal regeneration in the remodeling stage. However, the role of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage remains largely unknown. We found that the number of A-kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12-positive cells in the fibrotic scar was increased over time, and the cells formed a structure which traps various immune cells. Furthermore, the AKAP12-positive cells strongly express junction proteins which enable the structure to function as a physical barrier. In in vivo validation, AKAP12 knock-out (KO mice showed leakage from a lesion, resulting from an impaired structure with the loss of the junction complex. Consistently, focal brain injury in the AKAP12 KO mice led to extended inflammation and more severe tissue damage compared to the wild type (WT mice. Accordingly, our results suggest that AKAP12-positive cells in the fibrotic scar may restrict excessive inflammation, demonstrating certain mechanisms that could underlie the beneficial actions of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage during the CNS repair process.

  15. Treatment Options for Primary CNS Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ... that can affect thinking, learning, problem solving, speech, reading, writing, and memory. Clinical trials have tested the ...

  16. General Information about Primary CNS Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ... that can affect thinking, learning, problem solving, speech, reading, writing, and memory. Clinical trials have tested the ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Primary CNS Lymphoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ... that can affect thinking, learning, problem solving, speech, reading, writing, and memory. Clinical trials have tested the ...

  18. Mer tyrosine kinase promotes the survival of t(1;19)-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sarah; Pfeiffer, Christian; Strube, Susanne; Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Loges, Sonja; Waizenegger, Jonas; Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Cario, Gunnar; Möricke, Anja; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M

    2015-01-29

    Patients with t(1;19)-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are prone to central nervous system (CNS) relapses, and expression of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, and Mer) receptor Mer is upregulated in these leukemias. We examined the functional role of Mer in the CNS in preclinical models and performed correlative studies in 64 t(1;19)-positive and 93 control pediatric ALL patients. ALL cells were analyzed in coculture with human glioma cells and normal rat astrocytes: CNS coculture caused quiescence and protection from methotrexate toxicity in Mer(high) ALL cell lines, which was antagonized by short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Mer. Mer expression was upregulated, prosurvival Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling were activated, and secretion of the Mer ligand Galectin-3 was stimulated. Mer(high) t(1;19) primary cells caused CNS involvement to a larger extent in murine xenografts than in their Mer(low) counterparts. Leukemic cells from Mer(high) xenografts showed enhanced survival in coculture. Treatment of Mer(high) patient cells with the Mer-specific inhibitor UNC-569 in vivo delayed leukemia onset, reduced CNS infiltration, and prolonged survival of mice. Finally, a correlation between high Mer expression and CNS positivity upon initial diagnosis was observed in t(1;19) patients. Our data provide evidence that Mer is associated with survival in the CNS in t(1;19)-positive ALL, suggesting a role as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Prospective evaluation of delayed central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Lohr, Frank; Fruehauf, Stefan; Wildermuth, Susanne; Kampen, Michael van; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of chronic radiation effects on the healthy adult brain using neuropsychological testing of intelligence, attention, and memory. Methods and Materials: 58 patients (43 ± 10 yr) undergoing hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (TBI, 14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy in 4 days) before bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were prospectively included. Twenty-one recurrence-free long-term survivors were re-examined 6-36 months (median 27 months) after completion of TBI. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence, attention, and memory using normative, standardized psychometric tests. Mood status was controlled, as well. Test results are given as IQ scores (population mean 100) or percentiles for attention and memory (population mean 50). Results: The 21 patients showed normal baseline test results of IQ (101 ± 13) and attention (53 ± 28), with memory test scores below average (35 ± 21). Test results of IQ (98 ± 17), attention (58 ± 27), and memory (43 ± 28) showed no signs of clinically measurable radiation damage to higher CNS (central nervous system) functions during the follow-up. The mood status was improved. Conclusion: The investigation of CNS toxicity after hyperfractionated TBI showed no deterioration of test results in adult recurrence-free patients with tumor-free CNS. The median follow-up of 27 months will be extended.

  20. Line Laser as an Assistance for Facial and Dental Midlines Evaluation in Single-Splint Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-Chih; Chen, Yu-Ray; Lin, James Cheng-Yi

    2017-10-01

    Coincidence of facial and dental midlines is one of the important goals in orthognathic-orthodontic treatment to achieve optimum facial aesthetics and good occlusal functions. Tools assisting diagnosis of facial midline are usually ruler or dental floss. These tools are usually hand held and hinder the global sight required in facial evaluation. Line laser device projects a steady narrow laser line and is commonly used in construction and carpentry to replace traditional chalk line tool. The authors take the advantages of line laser and incorporate it into facial evaluation in the authors' practice of single-splint orthognathic surgery.During June 2013 to May 2015, the authors used line laser device to evaluate facial and dental midlines in 28 patients of facial asymmetry requiring orthognathic surgery during consultation in office and intraoperative evaluation. The details of integrating this device to practice are described. All the patients showed improved facial symmetry and coincidence of facial and dental midlines after operation. Postoperative orthodontics were finished smoothly.Line laser is available from general utility stores and is safe to use according to laser safety regulation. From the authors' experiences, it is burden free to apply in facial and dental midlines evaluation and improves the practice.

  1. Chemical rescue of cleft palate and midline defects in conditional GSK-3beta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Karen J; Arron, Joseph R; Stankunas, Kryn; Crabtree, Gerald R; Longaker, Michael T

    2007-03-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) has integral roles in a variety of biological processes, including development, diabetes, and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. As such, a thorough understanding of GSK-3beta function will have a broad impact on human biology and therapeutics. Because GSK-3beta interacts with many different pathways, its specific developmental roles remain unclear. We have discovered a genetic requirement for GSK-3beta in midline development. Homozygous null mice display cleft palate, incomplete fusion of the ribs at the midline and bifid sternum as well as delayed sternal ossification. Using a chemically regulated allele of GSK-3beta (ref. 6), we have defined requirements for GSK-3beta activity during discrete temporal windows in palatogenesis and skeletogenesis. The rapamycin-dependent allele of GSK-3beta produces GSK-3beta fused to a tag, FRB* (FKBP/rapamycin binding), resulting in a rapidly destabilized chimaeric protein. In the absence of drug, GSK-3beta(FRB)*(/FRB)* mutants appear phenotypically identical to GSK-3beta-/- mutants. In the presence of drug, GSK-3betaFRB* is rapidly stabilized, restoring protein levels and activity. Using this system, mutant phenotypes were rescued by restoring endogenous GSK-3beta activity during two distinct periods in gestation. This technology provides a powerful tool for defining windows of protein function during development.

  2. Outcomes and Complications of the Midline Anterior Approach 3 Years after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charla R. Fischer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new questionnaire to assess outcomes related to the midline anterior lumbar approach and to identify risk factors for negative patient responses. Methods. A retrospective review of 58 patients who underwent anterior lumbar surgery at a single institution for either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis in 2009 was performed. The outcome measures included our newly developed Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire (ALSQ, ODI, and EQ-5D. Results. There were 58 patients available for followup, 27 women and 31 men. The average age at surgery was 50.8 years, with an average followup of 2.92 years. The average change in ODI was 34.94 (22.7 and EQ-5D was 0.28 (0.29. The rate of complications with the anterior approach was 10.3% and there was one male patient (3.2% with retrograde ejaculation. Determination of the effectiveness of the new ALSQ revealed that it significantly correlated to the EQ-5D and ODI (P<0.05. Smoking was associated with a negative response on thirteen questions. BMP use was not associated with a negative response on any sexual function questions. Conclusions. Our new Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire determines patient perceived complications related to the midline anterior lumbar surgical approach.

  3. A reliable approach to the closure of large acquired midline defects of the back

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, L.A.; Lewis, V.L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic regionalized approach for the reconstruction of acquired thoracic and lumbar midline defects of the back is described. Twenty-three patients with wounds resulting from pressure necrosis, radiation injury, and postoperative wound infection and dehiscence were successfully reconstructed. The latissimus dorsi, trapezius, gluteus maximus, and paraspinous muscles are utilized individually or in combination as advancement, rotation, island, unipedicle, turnover, or bipedicle flaps. All flaps are designed so that their vascular pedicles are out of the field of injury. After thorough debridement, large, deep wounds are closed with two layers of muscle, while smaller, more superficial wounds are reconstructed with one layer. The trapezius muscle is utilized in the high thoracic area for the deep wound layer, while the paraspinous muscle is used for this layer in the thoracic and lumbar regions. Superficial layer and small wounds in the high thoracic area are reconstructed with either latissimus dorsi or trapezius muscle. Corresponding wounds in the thoracic and lumbar areas are closed with latissimus dorsi muscle alone or in combination with gluteus maximus muscle. The rationale for systematic regionalized reconstruction of acquired midline back wounds is described

  4. The safe zone for blinded sternal interventions based on CT evaluation of midline congenital sternal foramina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boruah, Deb K.; Dhingani, Dhaval D.; Achar, Shashidhar; Augustine, Antony; Mahanta, Kangkana; Prakash, Arjun; Yadav, Rajnikant R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safe zone for performing blind sternal procedures based on computed tomography (CT) evaluation of congenital midline sternal foramina using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). This retrospective study was carried out on 1,180 patients who underwent MDCT of the thorax from March 2015 to February 2016. The MDCT images were evaluated in axial and reformatted planes. Morphometry and prevalence of midline congenital sternal foramina (SF) and manubrio-foraminal distance (MFD) were evaluated. The safe zone was defined for a blinded intervention, based on palpable anatomical landmarks. Data were presented in terms of percentage, mean ± standard deviation and calculations were carried out using Microsoft Excel. The prevalence of SF in our study sample was 11.6 %. The majority of SF were located in a typical position in the lower sternal body at the level of fifth costo-chondral junction (CCJ) in 108 patients (78.8 %). The structure directly beneath the SF was mediastinal fat in 73 patients (53.3 %), followed by anterior pericardium in 44 patients (32.1 %) and lung parenchyma in 20 patients (14.6 %). The mean MFD in our study population was 11.90 ± 1.31 cm. Sternal interventions should be avoided at the level of fourth to sixth CCJ, which is considered the danger zone. An intervention at the fourth to sixth CCJ may lead to disastrous consequences in patients who have SF. (orig.)

  5. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Manifesting as a Unilateral Subdural Hematoma with a Marked Midline Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Inamasu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma. When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery.

  6. The safe zone for blinded sternal interventions based on CT evaluation of midline congenital sternal foramina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boruah, Deb K.; Dhingani, Dhaval D.; Achar, Shashidhar; Augustine, Antony; Mahanta, Kangkana [Assam Medical College and Hospital, Department of Radio-diagnosis, Dibrugarh, Assam (India); Prakash, Arjun [NIMHANS, Department of Radio-diagnosis, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Yadav, Rajnikant R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute and Medical Sciences, Department of Radio-diagnosis, Lucknow (India)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safe zone for performing blind sternal procedures based on computed tomography (CT) evaluation of congenital midline sternal foramina using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). This retrospective study was carried out on 1,180 patients who underwent MDCT of the thorax from March 2015 to February 2016. The MDCT images were evaluated in axial and reformatted planes. Morphometry and prevalence of midline congenital sternal foramina (SF) and manubrio-foraminal distance (MFD) were evaluated. The safe zone was defined for a blinded intervention, based on palpable anatomical landmarks. Data were presented in terms of percentage, mean ± standard deviation and calculations were carried out using Microsoft Excel. The prevalence of SF in our study sample was 11.6 %. The majority of SF were located in a typical position in the lower sternal body at the level of fifth costo-chondral junction (CCJ) in 108 patients (78.8 %). The structure directly beneath the SF was mediastinal fat in 73 patients (53.3 %), followed by anterior pericardium in 44 patients (32.1 %) and lung parenchyma in 20 patients (14.6 %). The mean MFD in our study population was 11.90 ± 1.31 cm. Sternal interventions should be avoided at the level of fourth to sixth CCJ, which is considered the danger zone. An intervention at the fourth to sixth CCJ may lead to disastrous consequences in patients who have SF. (orig.)

  7. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kosterin, Paul [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Salzberg, Brian M. [Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M. [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Thom, Stephen R., E-mail: sthom@smail.umaryland.edu [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  9. The Effect of the Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus on the Regeneration Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-Goo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Following central nervous system(CNS injury, inhibitory influences at the site of axonal damage occur. Glial cells become reactive and form a glial scar, gliosis. Also myelin debris such as MAG inhibits axonal regeneration. Astrocyte-rich gliosis relates with up-regulation of GFAP and CD81, and eventually becomes physical and mechanical barrier to axonal regeneration. MAG is one of several endogenous axon regeneration inhibitors that limit recovery from CNS injury and disease. It was reported that molecules that block such inhibitors enhanced axon regeneration and functional recovery. Recently it was reported that treatment with anti-CD81 antibodies enhanced functional recovery in the rat with spinal cord injury. So in this current study, the author investigated the effect of the water extract of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus on the regulation of CD81, GFAP and MAG that increase when gliosis occurs. Methods : MTT assay was performed to examine cell viability, and cell-based ELISA, western blot and PCR were used to detect the expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG. Then also immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm in vivo. Results : Water extract of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus showed relatively high cell viability at the concentration of 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.5%. The expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG in astrocytes was decreased after the administration of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus water extract. These results was confirmed in the brain sections following cortical stab injury by immunohistochemistry. Conclusion : The authors observed that Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus significantly down-regulates the expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG. These results suggest that Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus can be a candidate to regenerate CNS injury.

  10. Immune Players in the CNS : The Astrocyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Cathy J.; Massie, Ann; De Keyser, Jacques

    In the finely balanced environment of the central nervous system astrocytes, the most numerous cell type, play a role in regulating almost every physiological system. First found to regulate extracellular ions and pH, they have since been shown to regulate neurotransmitter levels, cerebral blood

  11. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS-STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV-induced t......Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV......-induced type I IFN expression in CNS cells and these cytokines are induced in a cGAS-STING-dependent manner. Consistently, mice defective in cGAS or STING are highly susceptible to acute HSE. Although STING is redundant for cell-autonomous antiviral resistance in astrocytes and neurons, viral replication...... is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS-STING pathway...

  12. Change in frequency of the maxillary midline diastema appearing in photographs of Caucasian females in two fashion magazines from 2003 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kylie C; Sherriff, Martyn; Stewart Denize, E

    2014-06-01

    To ascertain if there has been a change in the frequency of appearance of maxillary midline diastema in two leading women's fashion magazines over a decade. Two observers counted the frequency of maxillary midline diastema that appeared in Caucasian female models featured in British Vogue and Glamour (UK). An increase in the frequency of maxillary midline diastema appearing in both publications was observed between 2003 and 2012. This change may indicate an increase in the acceptance of the maxillary midline diastema, which may in turn, influence orthodontic and aesthetic dentistry treatment planning. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  13. Semi-empirical equivalent field method for dose determination in midline block fields for cobalt - 60 beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagoe, S.N.A.; Nani, E.K.; Yarney, J.; Edusa, C.; Quayson-Sackey, K.; Nyamadi, K.M.; Sasu, E.

    2012-01-01

    For teletherapy treatment time calculations, midline block fields are resolved into two fields, but neglecting scattering from other fields, the effective equivalent square field size of the midline block is assumed to the resultant field. Such approach is underestimation, and may be detrimental in achieving the recommended uncertainty of ± 5 % for patient's radiation dose delivery. By comparison, the deviations of effective equivalent square field sizes by calculations and experiments were within 13.2 % for cobalt 60 beams of GWGP80 cobalt 60 teletherapy. Therefore, a modified method incorporating the scatter contributions was adopted to estimate the effective equivalent square field size for midline block field. The measured outputs of radiation beams with the block were compared with outputs of square fields without the blocks (only the block tray) at depths of 5 and 10 cm for the teletherapy machine employing isocentric technique, and the accuracy was within ± 3 % for the cobalt 60 beams. (au)

  14. Acute radiation sickness - morphology of CNS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarad, V.

    1989-01-01

    The effect was studied of supralethal doses of 60 Co gamma radiation on morphological changes in the brains of laboratory animals. For experiments, female rats irradiated with doses of 15 to 960 Gy, female mice irradiated with doses of 50 to 300 Gy and dogs irradiated with 6 to 500 Gy were used. For evaluation of the changes, light microscopy, electron microscopy and histochemistry were employed. The findings generally agreed with the results by other authors whose numerous studies are reviewed in detail. They included brain edema, alterations in enzyme activities, dystrophic changes and hemorrhages in nerve cells, marked structural changes in blood capillaries, damage of endothelial cells, etc. The observed changes in the activities of blood-brain barrier enzymes, increased pinocytotic activity and the formation of endothelial tunnels accompanied with necrosis of part of endothelial cells are clear morphological manifestations of marked alterations in the function of the blood-brain barrier that result in brain edema development. The increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier significantly worsens primary changes induced by radiation, especially in nerve cels, and adversely affects possible repair processes. (L.O.). 146 figs., 8 tabs., 352 refs

  15. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C; Pajtler, Kristian W; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, André O; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S; Taylor, Michael D; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Ellison, David W; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-02-25

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration (CNS HGNET-MN1)," and "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR)," will enable meaningful clinical trials and the development of therapeutic strategies for patients affected by poorly differentiated CNS tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Health resource utilisation costs in acute patients with persistent midline cervical tenderness following road trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Helen M; Wolfe, Rory; Cameron, Peter A; Cooper, D James; Malham, Gregory M; Varma, Dinesh K; Fitt, Gregory J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Liew, Susan M

    2012-11-01

    The costs associated with patients discharged with isolated clinician-elicited persistent midline tenderness and negative computed tomography (CT) findings have not been reported. Our aim was to determine the association of acute and post-acute patient and injury characteristics with health resource costs in such patients following road trauma. In a prospective cohort study, road trauma patients presenting with isolated persistent midline cervical tenderness and negative CT, who underwent additional acute imaging with MRI, were recruited. Patients were reviewed in the outpatient spine clinic following discharge, and were followed up at 6 and 12 months post-trauma. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the association of injury mechanism, clinical assessment, socioeconomic factors and outcome findings with health resource costs generated in the acute hospital and post-acute periods. There were 64 patients recruited, of whom 24 (38%) had cervical spine injury detected on MRI. Of these, 2 patients were managed operatively, 6 were treated in cervical collars and 16 had the cervical spine cleared and were discharged. At 12 months, there were 25 patients (44%) with residual neck pain, and 22 (39%) with neck-related disability. The mean total cost was AUD $10,153 (SD=10,791) and the median was $4015 (IQR: 3044-6709). Transient neurologic deficit, which fully resolved early in the emergency department, was independently associated with higher marginal mean acute costs (represented in the analysis by the β coefficient) by $3521 (95% CI: 50-6880). Low education standard (β coefficient: $5988, 95% CI: 822-13,317), neck pain at 6 months (β coefficient: $4017, 95% CI: 426-9254) and history of transient neurologic deficit (β coefficient: $8471, 95% CI: 1766-18,334) were associated with increased post-acute costs. In a homogeneous group of road trauma patients with non fracture-related persistent midline cervical tenderness, health resource costs varied

  17. Transoral robotic surgery vs. endoscopic partial midline glossectomy for obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Folk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare sleep-related outcomes in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS patients following base of tongue resection via robotic surgery and endoscopic midline glossectomy. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 114 robotic and 37 endoscopic midline glossectomy surgeries were performed between July 2010 and April 2015 as part of single or multilevel surgery. Patients were excluded for indications other than sleep apnea or if complete sleep studies were not obtained. Thus, 45 robotic and 16 endoscopic surgeries were included in the analysis. Results: In the robotic surgery group there were statistically significant improvements in AHI [(44.4 ± 22.6 events/h–(14.0 ± 3.0 events/h, P < 0.001] Epworth Sleepiness Scale (12.3 ± 4.6 to 4.5 ± 2.9, P < 0.001, and O2 nadir (82.0% ± 6.1% to 85.0% ± 5.4%, P < 0.001. In the endoscopic group there were also improvements in AHI (48.7 ± 30.2 to 27.4 ± 31.9, P = 0.06, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (12.6 ± 5.5 to 8.3 ± 4.5, P = 0.08, and O2 nadir (80.2% ± 8.6% to 82.7% ± 6.5%, P = 0.4. Surgical success rate was 75.6% and 56.3% in the robotic and endoscopic groups, respectively. Greater volume of tissue removed was predictive of surgical success in the robotic cases (10.3 vs. 8.6 ml, P = 0.02. Conclusions: Both robotic surgery and endoscopic techniques for tongue base reduction improve objective measures of sleep apnea. Greater success rates may be achieved with robotic surgery compared to traditional methods. Keywords: Sleep surgery, Transoral robotic surgery, TORS, Midline glossectomy, Partial glossectomy, Posterior glossectomy

  18. Phantom limb pain: a case of maladaptive CNS plasticity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Herta; Nikolajsen, Lone; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    might be a phenomenon of the CNS that is related to plastic changes at several levels of the neuraxis and especially the cortex. Here, we discuss the evidence for putative pathophysiological mechanisms with an emphasis on central, and in particular cortical, changes. We cite both animal and human...

  19. Neurolymphomatosis: An International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Grisariu (Sigal); B. Avni (Batia); T.T. Batchelor (Tracy); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); F. Bokstein (Felix); D. Schiff (David); O. Kuittinen (Outi); M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); P. Roth (Patrick); A. Nemets (Anatoly); E. Shalom (Edna); D. Ben-Yehuda (Dina); T. Siegal (Tali)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNeurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare clinical entity. The International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group retrospectively analyzed 50 patients assembled from 12 centers in 5 countries over a 16-year period. NL was related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 90% and to acute leukemia in 10%.

  20. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  1. Metallothionein Expression and Roles During Neuropathology in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    , their receptors and neurotrophins (TGFb, TGFb-Receptor, bFGF, bFGF-Receptor, VEGF, NT-3, NT-4/5, NGF); angiogenesis; and growth cone formation. Hence, MT-I+II enhance CNS tissue repair as seen clearly after the cryogenic injury, after which MT-I+II promote substitution of the necrotic lesion cavity with a glial...

  2. Problems of prophylactic CNS radiotherapy in acute children's leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Pribylova, O.; Abrahamova, J.; Hynieova, H.; Hrodek, O.

    1980-01-01

    The prophylactic treatment of the CNS was conducted by cobalt teletherapy of the cranium and by intrathecal application of MTX after the induction of primary remission in 70 children with acute leukemia throughout 5 years up to the end of 1978. The method of the combined radio- and chemoprophylaxis of the CNS was being changed during the years, especially as far as the radiation dose for the cranium was concerned. A detailed analysis made in a group of 59 children with the minimum interval of 18 months from the beginning of the treatment showed the best results after the application of a dose of 24 Gy/3 weeks. Following this procedure the relapse of leukemia in the CNS occurred in 9% only, whereas on the application of doses of 20 Gy and lower it occurred in 35 to 40%. On the whole 24 out of 59 children, i.e. 41%, are surviving, 35 children, i.e. 59%, died. Mostly complete, but only temporary, epilation was an invariable consequence of the irradiation of the cranium. The somnolence syndrome was only sporadically observed. It cannot be excluded, however, that some of its forms in patients discharged from hospital escaped attention. No case was recorded of serious impairment of the CNS of the leukoencephalopathic type. Up to now the psychomotor, intellectual and emotional development of the surviving children has been normal. (author)

  3. Sleep disorders in children after treatment for a CNS tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term survival of children with a central nervous system (CNS) tumour is improving. However, they experience late effects, including altered habits and patterns of sleep. We evaluated the presence and type of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness in these children, and its associations with

  4. [Regularities of fixation of brain serum antibodies from patients with lateral amyotrophic sclerosis in rabbit CNS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaeva, L S; Gannyshkina, I V; Zavalishin, I A; Markova, E D; Ivanova-Smolenskaia, I A

    2002-01-01

    Kuhns' indirect immunofluorescent test was used to study fixation of serum brain antibodies (Ab) of patients with bulbar, cervicothoracic, lumbosacral lateral amyotropic sclerosis (LAS) on brain sections of rabbits. The disease is characterized by formation of brain Ab complementary to various structures of nervous and glial cells, myelin of fibers from different conducting systems, vessels which exhibit both common and individual antigenic properties. It was found that fixation of antineuronal, antimyelin brain Ab of patients with bulbar, cervicothoracic and lumbosacral LAS in different CNS structures varies.

  5. Glial cells and volume transmission in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Chvátal, Alexandr

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2000), s. 397-409 ISSN 0197-0186 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226; GA ČR GV309/97/K048; GA ČR GA309/99/0657; GA ČR GA305/99/0655; GA MŠk VS96130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : ion homeostasis * glia * tortuossity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.662, year: 2000

  6. Oral subcutaneous midline leiomyomatous hamartoma presenting as congenital incisive papilla overgrowth in a toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Loomba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital soft-tissue tumors of oral cavity are mostly hyperplastic and benign in nature. This article presents an unusual case of congenital subcutaneous hamartoma of incisive papilla in a 2-year-old female child causing feeding and breathing difficulty. Total excisional biopsy was done under local anesthesia. Histopathology of tissue in reticulin-stained slide showed the presence of immature muscle fibers whereas Masson's trichrome stain revealed collagen fibers and smooth muscles confirming the diagnosis of oral midline subcutaneous smooth muscle (leiomyomatous hamartoma of incisive papilla. It is important for dental professionals to be aware of this oral lesion present from birth mimicking overgrowth of incisive papilla, by its presentation, differential diagnosis, histopathology, and management.

  7. Morning glory disc anomaly, midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation: an association worth looking for

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quah, Boon Long; Hamilton, Jill; Blaser, Susan; Heon, Elise; Tehrani, Nasrin N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 4-year-old boy who presented to the ophthalmology department for assessment of convergent strabismus. Ophthalmic examination showed a left morning glory optic disc anomaly and retinal detachment. Plain films obtained for investigation of short stature prior to ophthalmic examination revealed delayed bone age. Ophthalmological findings prompted CT and MRI imaging and angiographic investigations. Midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation were identified. These findings may be associated with morning glory optic disc anomaly, and their association is often under-recognized. It is important that clinicians and radiologists be aware of this spectrum of disorders, as the vascular abnormalities may predispose the patient to transient ischemic attacks and strokes. Growth delay may result from hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  8. Morning glory disc anomaly, midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation: an association worth looking for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quah, Boon Long [Kandang Kerbau Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Singapore National Eye Centre, Department of Ophthalmology (Singapore); Hamilton, Jill [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Heon, Elise; Tehrani, Nasrin N. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 4-year-old boy who presented to the ophthalmology department for assessment of convergent strabismus. Ophthalmic examination showed a left morning glory optic disc anomaly and retinal detachment. Plain films obtained for investigation of short stature prior to ophthalmic examination revealed delayed bone age. Ophthalmological findings prompted CT and MRI imaging and angiographic investigations. Midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation were identified. These findings may be associated with morning glory optic disc anomaly, and their association is often under-recognized. It is important that clinicians and radiologists be aware of this spectrum of disorders, as the vascular abnormalities may predispose the patient to transient ischemic attacks and strokes. Growth delay may result from hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  9. [Midline Cyst of the Prostate with Increased Urinary Frequency and Urgency : A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kosuke; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio

    2018-02-01

    A 40-year-old man presented to our institution with a few-month history of increased urinary frequency, urgency and voiding difficulty. He had severe lower urinary tract symptoms with an International Prostate Symptom Score of 28 and quality of life score of 6. The mean urinary frequency and voided volume was 20 times per day and 150 ml, respectively. Abdominal ultrasonography and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging revealed the prostate measuring 15 cm3 with a 3 cm midline cyst which compressed the posterior of the bladder wall. A subsequent examination indicated that his lower urinary tract symptoms could be attributed to the cystic mass which mainly affected his storage symptoms. The patient underwent transurethral unroofing of the prostate cyst. Immediately after the surgery, his storage symptoms were improved greatly. The voiding volume was increased to 250 ml, and the frequency of urination was decreased to 8 times. No recurrent symptoms were found for seven months after the surgery.

  10. Four cases of small, traumatic hemorrhage in the deep midline portion of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suho; Tsukahara, Tetsuya; Iwama, Mitsuru; Nishikawa, Michio

    1981-01-01

    Four cases recently encountered are presented in which computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated a small, traumatic hemorrhage in the deep midline portion of the brain. The lesions of hemorrhage revealed by CT were: Case 1, in the septum pellucidum and left lateral ventricle; Case 2, in the Monro's foramen and right lateral ventricle and Case 3, midbrain. These three cases had no other abnormal findings. In addition, a hemorrhage of the corpus callosum and diffuse brain damage were seen in Case 4. These small hemorrhages might be caused not only by the direct damage, but also by a local tendency to bleed due to hystoiogical fragility or the existence of a vascular anomaly, such as AVM or cryptic angioma. The prognoses quod vitam of our cases were relatively better than the previous reports of these hemorrhages, but the prognoses quod functionem were poor. The patients have shown prolonged psychoneurological disorder; these symptoms might be caused by damage to the limbic system. (author)

  11. Applications of Genomic Sequencing in Pediatric CNS Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavle, Abhishek A; Lin, Frank Y; Parsons, D Williams

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in genome-scale sequencing methods have resulted in a significant increase in our understanding of the biology of human cancers. When applied to pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors, these remarkable technological breakthroughs have facilitated the molecular characterization of multiple tumor types, provided new insights into the genetic basis of these cancers, and prompted innovative strategies that are changing the management paradigm in pediatric neuro-oncology. Genomic tests have begun to affect medical decision making in a number of ways, from delineating histopathologically similar tumor types into distinct molecular subgroups that correlate with clinical characteristics, to guiding the addition of novel therapeutic agents for patients with high-risk or poor-prognosis tumors, or alternatively, reducing treatment intensity for those with a favorable prognosis. Genomic sequencing has also had a significant impact on translational research strategies in pediatric CNS tumors, resulting in wide-ranging applications that have the potential to direct the rational preclinical screening of novel therapeutic agents, shed light on tumor heterogeneity and evolution, and highlight differences (or similarities) between pediatric and adult CNS tumors. Finally, in addition to allowing the identification of somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, the analysis of patient-matched constitutional (germline) DNA has facilitated the detection of pathogenic germline alterations in cancer genes in patients with CNS tumors, with critical implications for genetic counseling and tumor surveillance strategies for children with familial predisposition syndromes. As our understanding of the molecular landscape of pediatric CNS tumors continues to advance, innovative applications of genomic sequencing hold significant promise for further improving the care of children with these cancers.

  12. Disorders of balance and gait in essential tremor are associated with midline tremor and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskovcová, Martina; Ulmanová, Olga; Sprdlík, Otakar; Sieger, Tomáš; Nováková, Jana; Jech, Robert; Růžička, Evžen

    2013-02-01

    Disorders of balance and gait have been observed in patients with essential tremor (ET), but their association with tremor severity remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate postural instability and gait changes in ET patients and to investigate their relationship to tremor characteristics with regard to cerebellar dysfunction as a possible common pathogenetic mechanism in ET. Thirty ET patients (8F, mean (SD) age 55.8 (17.8), range 19-81 years) and 25 normal controls (7F, 53.0 (17.7), 19-81) were tested with the scales of Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB), and International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). Posturography and gait were assessed using a Footscan® system. Tremor was evaluated by the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (TRS) and accelerometry in five upper limb positions. A mean (SD) TRS sum score of 27.0 (13.2) corresponded to mild to moderate tremor severity in most patients. In comparison with controls, ET subjects exhibited lower tandem gait velocity (0.21 vs. 0.26 m/s, P = 0.028), more missteps (0.57 vs. 0.12, P = 0.039), and increased postural sway in tandem stance (sway area 301.1 vs. 202.9 mm(2), P = 0.045). In normal gait, step width increased with the midline tremor subscore of TRS (Pearson r = 0.60, P = 0.046). Moreover, significant correlations were found between age and quantitative measures of normal and tandem gait in ET patients but not in controls. ABC, FAB, and ICARS scores did not significantly differ between patients and controls. In conclusion, gait and balance alterations in ET patients occur even without subjective complaints. Their relationship with midline tremor and dependence on age suggest a connection with cerebellar dysfunction.

  13. Effect of painful and non-painful sensorimotor manipulations on subjective body midline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eBouffard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic pain often show disturbances in their body perception. Understanding the exact role played by pain is however complex, as confounding factors can contribute to the observed deficits in these clinical populations. To address this question, acute experimental pain was used to test the effect of lateralized pain on body perception in healthy subjects. Subjects were asked to indicate the position of their body midline (subjective body midline, SBM by stopping a moving luminescent dot projected on a screen placed in front of them, in a completely dark environment. The effect of other nonpainful sensorimotor manipulations was also tested to assess the potential unspecific attentional effects of stimulating one side of the body. SBM judgment was made in seventeen volunteers under control and three experimental conditions: 1 painful (heat stimulation; 2 nonpainful vibrotactile stimulation; and 3 muscle contraction. The effects of the stimulated side and the type of trial (control vs. experimental condition, were tested separately for each condition with a 2 x 2 repeated measures ANOVA. The analyses revealed a significant interaction in both pain (p = 0.05 and vibration conditions (p = 0.04. Post-hoc tests showed opposite effects of pain and vibration. Pain applied on the right arm deviated the SBM toward the right (stimulated side (p = 0.03 while vibration applied on the left arm deviated the SBM toward the right (not stimulated side (p = 0.01. These opposite patterns suggest that the shift in SBM is likely to be specifically linked to the stimulation modality. It is concluded that acute experimental pain can induce an SBM shift toward the stimulated side, which might be functionally beneficial to protect the painful area of the body. Interestingly, it appears to be easier to bias SBM toward the right side, regardless of the modality and of the stimulated side.

  14. Self-regulation of frontal-midline theta facilitates memory updating and mental set shifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eEnriquez-Geppert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontal-midline (fm theta oscillations as measured via the electroencephalogram (EEG have been suggested as neural working language of executive functioning. Their power has been shown to increase when cognitive processing or task performance is enhanced. Thus, the question arises whether learning to increase fm-theta amplitudes would functionally impact the behavioral performance in tasks probing executive functions (EFs. Here, the effects of neurofeedback, a learning method to self-up-regulate fm-theta over frontal-midline electrodes, on the four most representative EFs, memory updating, set shifting, conflict monitoring, and motor inhibition are presented. Before beginning and after completing an individualized, eight-session gap-spaced neurofeedback intervention, the three-back, letter/number task-switching, Stroop, and stop-signal tasks were tested while measuring the EEG. Self-determined up-regulation of fm-theta and its putative role for executive functioning were compared to an active control group, the so-called pseudo-neurofeedback group. Task-related fm-theta activity after training differed significantly between groups. More importantly, though, after neurofeedback significantly enhanced behavioral performance was observed. The training group showed higher accuracy scores in the three-back task and reduced mixing and shifting costs in letter/number task-switching. However, this specific protocol type did not affect performance in tasks probing conflict monitoring and motor inhibition. Thus, our results suggest a modulation of proactive but not reactive mechanisms of cognitive control. In sum, the modulation of fm-theta via neurofeedback may serve as potent treatment approach for executive dysfunctions.

  15. Kinesthetic motor imagery training modulates frontal midline theta during imagination of a dart throw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, E; Doppelmayr, M

    2016-12-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is a frequently used and effective method for motor learning in sports as well as in other domains. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies indicated that experts within a certain sport exhibit a more pronounced brain activity during MI as compared to novices. Similar to the execution, during MI the motor sequence has to be planned. Thus, the frontal attentional system, in part represented by the frontal midline theta (4-7Hz), is closely related to these processes and presumably plays a major role in MI as well. In this study, a MI dart training and its impact on frontal midline theta activity (fmt) during MI are examined. 53 healthy subjects with no prior dart experience were randomly allocated to a kinesthetic training group (KinVis) or to a control group (Control). Both groups performed 15 training sessions. While in the KinVis group dart throwing was accompanied by MI, the Control group trained without MI. Dart performance and fmt activity during MI within the first and the 15th session were compared. As expected, the performance increase was more pronounced in the KinVis group. Furthermore, frontal theta amplitude was significantly increased in the KinVis group during MI in the 15th training session as compared to the baseline. These results confirm the effectivity of MI. The enhanced fmt activity in the KinVis group can be interpreted as a better allocation of the requested resources in the frontal attentional network after MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mock-up tests on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixture in the vertical tube simulating the CNS channel of the CARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingfeng; Feng Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Xu Jian

    2007-01-01

    A two-phase thermo-siphon loop for removing nuclear heating and maintaining the stable liquid level in the moderator cell was adopted for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China advanced research reactor (CARR). The moderator is liquid hydrogen. The two-phase thermo-siphon loop consists of the crescent-shape moderator cell, the moderator transfer tube, and the condenser. The hydrogen is supplied from the buffer tank to the condenser. The main feature of the loop is that the moderator cell is covered by the helium sub-cooling system. The cold helium gas from the helium refrigerator is firstly introduced into the helium sub-cooling system and then flows up through the tube covering the moderator transfer tube into the condenser. The main part of this system is installed in the CNS vertical channel made of aluminum alloy 6061 T6 (Al-6061-T6) of 6 mm in thickness, 270 mm in outer diameter and about 6 m in height. For confirming the safety of the CNS channel, the combustion tests using a tube compatible with the CNS channel were carried out using the hydrogen-air mixture under which air is introduced into the tube at 1 atmosphere, and then hydrogen gas is supplied from the gas cylinder up to the test pressures. And maximum test pressure is 0.14 MPa G. This condition is involved with the maximum design basis accident of the CARR-CNS. The peak pressure due to combustion was 1.09 MPa, and the design pressure of the CNS channel is 3 MPa. The safety of the CNS was thus verified even if the maximum design basis accident occurs. The pressure and stress distributions along the axial direction and the displacement of the tube were also measured

  17. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exerts CNS region-specific effects on rat microglial inflammatory and TLR4 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M C Smith

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH during sleep is a hallmark of sleep apnea, causing significant neuronal apoptosis, and cognitive and behavioral deficits in CNS regions underlying memory processing and executive functions. IH-induced neuroinflammation is thought to contribute to cognitive deficits after IH. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that IH would differentially induce inflammatory factor gene expression in microglia in a CNS region-dependent manner, and that the effects of IH would differ temporally. To test this hypothesis, adult rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (2 min intervals of 10.5% O2 for 8 hours/day during their respective sleep cycles for 1, 3 or 14 days. Cortex, medulla and spinal cord tissues were dissected, microglia were immunomagnetically isolated and mRNA levels of the inflammatory genes iNOS, COX-2, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 and the innate immune receptor TLR4 were compared to levels in normoxia. Inflammatory gene expression was also assessed in tissue homogenates (containing all CNS cells. We found that microglia from different CNS regions responded to IH differently. Cortical microglia had longer lasting inflammatory gene expression whereas spinal microglial gene expression was rapid and transient. We also observed that inflammatory gene expression in microglia frequently differed from that in tissue homogenates from the same region, indicating that cells other than microglia also contribute to IH-induced neuroinflammation. Lastly, microglial TLR4 mRNA levels were strongly upregulated by IH in a region- and time-dependent manner, and the increase in TLR4 expression appeared to coincide with timing of peak inflammatory gene expression, suggesting that TLR4 may play a role in IH-induced neuroinflammation. Together, these data indicate that microglial-specific neuroinflammation may play distinct roles in the effects of intermittent hypoxia in different CNS regions.

  18. Dual DNA methylation patterns in the CNS reveal developmentally poised chromatin and monoallelic expression of critical genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    Full Text Available As a first step towards discovery of genes expressed from only one allele in the CNS, we used a tiling array assay for DNA sequences that are both methylated and unmethylated (the MAUD assay. We analyzed regulatory regions of the entire mouse brain transcriptome, and found that approximately 10% of the genes assayed showed dual DNA methylation patterns. They include a large subset of genes that display marks of both active and silent, i.e., poised, chromatin during development, consistent with a link between differential DNA methylation and lineage-specific differentiation within the CNS. Sixty-five of the MAUD hits and 57 other genes whose function is of relevance to CNS development and/or disorders were tested for allele-specific expression in F(1 hybrid clonal neural stem cell (NSC lines. Eight MAUD hits and one additional gene showed such expression. They include Lgi1, which causes a subtype of inherited epilepsy that displays autosomal dominance with incomplete penetrance; Gfra2, a receptor for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF that has been linked to kindling epilepsy; Unc5a, a netrin-1 receptor important in neurodevelopment; and Cspg4, a membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan associated with malignant melanoma and astrocytoma in human. Three of the genes, Camk2a, Kcnc4, and Unc5a, show preferential expression of the same allele in all clonal NSC lines tested. The other six genes show a stochastic pattern of monoallelic expression in some NSC lines and bi-allelic expression in others. These results support the estimate that 1-2% of genes expressed in the CNS may be subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate that the group includes genes implicated in major disorders of the CNS as well as neurodevelopment.

  19. Auditory system physiology (CNS) : behavioral studies psychoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Neff, William

    1975-01-01

    nerve; subsequently, however, they concluded that the recordings had been from aberrant cells of the cochlear nucleus lying central to the glial margin of the VIII nerve (GALAMBOS and DAVIS, 1948). The first successful recordmgs from fibres of the cochlear nerve were made by TASAKI (1954) in the guinea pig. These classical but necessarily limited results were greatly extended by ROSE, GALAMBOS, and HUGHES (1959) in the cat cochlear nucleus and by KATSUKI and co-workers (KATSUKI et at. , 1958, 1961, 1962) in the cat and monkey cochlear nerve. Perhaps the most significant developments have been the introduction of techniques for precise control of the acoustic stimulus and the quantitative analysis of neuronal response patterns, notably by the laboratories of KIANG (e. g. GERSTEIN and KIANG, 1960; KIANG et at. , 1962b, 1965a, 1967) and ROSE (e. g. ROSE et at. , 1967; HIND et at. , 1967). These developments have made possible a large number of quanti­ tative investigations of the behaviour of representative num...

  20. Potential Role of Oxidative Stress in mediating the Effect of Hypergravity on the Developing CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Lipinski, B.

    The present studies will explore the mechanisms through which altered gravity affects the developing CNS We have previously shown that exposure to hypergravity during the perinatal period adversely impacts cerebellar structure and function Pregnant rat dams were exposed to 1 65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge at NASA-ARC from gestational day G 5 through giving birth Both dams and their offspring remained at 1 65 G until pups reached postnatal day P 21 Control rats were raised under identical conditions in stationary cages On P21 motor behavior as determined by performance on a rotorod was more negatively impacted in hypergravity-exposed HG male 39 5 than in HG female pups 29 1 The total number of Purkinje cells determined stereologically in cerebella isolated from a subset of P21 rats was decreased in both HG males and HG female pups but the correlation between Purkinje cell number and rotorod performance was more consistent in male pups The level of 3-nitrosotyrosine 3-NT an index of oxidative damage to proteins was determined by ELISA in cerebellar tissue derived from a separate subset of P21 rats The level of 3-NT was increased by 127 in HG males but only 42 in HG females These results suggest that the effect of altered gravity on the developing brain may be mediated by oxidative stress These results also suggest that the developing male CNS may be more sensitive to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress than the developing female CNS Supported by NIEHS grant ES11946-01

  1. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  2. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, but Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns as "Windows" To Discover Why. Part III: The Frontal Midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Marjorie

    A longitudinal research study observed 30 children between the ages of infancy and elementary age to determine if using large muscle motor patterns to master the three identified midlines that concur with the body planes used in anatomy is reflected in academic classroom learning levels. This third part of the study focused on the frontal midline.…

  3. Midline submental orotracheal intubation in maxillofacial injuries: A substitute to tracheostomy where postoperative mechanical ventilation is not required

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malti Agrawal

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: There were no significant operative or postoperative complications. Postoperative submental scarring was acceptable [6] . We conclude that midline submental intubation is a simple and useful technique with low morbidity. It can be chosen in selected cases of maxillofacial trauma and is an excellent substitute to tracheostomy where postoperative mechanical ventilation is not required.

  4. The Effect of Midline Corset Platysmaplasty on Degree of Face-lift Flap Elevation During Concomitant Deep-Plane Face-lift: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacono, Andrew A; Malone, Melanie H

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation of the effects of midline platysmaplasty concomitant with rhytidectomy. To determine whether midline platysmaplasty limits the degree of lift during deep-plane face-lift. Deep-plane rhytidectomy was performed on 10 cadaveric hemifaces. The redundant skin for excision after performing the face-lift was measured with and without midline platymaplasty. Deep-plane rhytidectomy. The redundant skin was measured preauricularly in the vertical and horizontal dimension, and postauricularly after deep-plane face-lift and after adding a midline platysmaplasty. Concomitant midline platysmaplasty significantly reduced the amount of lift during concomitant deep-plane rhytidectomy preauricularly in the vertical dimension by 40.5% (from 37.0 mm excess skin redraped to 22.0 mm) and postauricularly by 23.9% (from 40.6 mm excess skin redraped to 30.9 mm) (P jawline and midface during rhytidectomy. NA.

  5. The shifting landscape of metastatic breast cancer to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Matthew R; Fukui, Olivia; Chew, Brandon; Bhatia, Sanjay; Karlovits, Steven

    2013-07-01

    The improved survival following the diagnosis of breast cancer has potentially altered the characteristics and course of patients presenting with CNS involvement. We therefore sought to define our current cohort of breast cancer patients with metastatic disease to the CNS in regard to modern biomarkers and clinical outcome. Review of clinical and radiographic records of women presenting to a tertiary medical center with the new diagnosis of CNS metastatic disease from breast cancer. This was a retrospective review from patients identities obtained from two prospective databases. There were 88 women analyzed who were treated over the period of January 2003 to February 2010, average age 56.9 years. At the time of initial presentation of CNS disease, 68 % of patients had multiple brain metastases, 17 % had a solitary metastasis, and 15 % had only leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The median survival for all patients from the time of diagnosis of breast disease was 50.0 months, and 9.7 months from diagnosis of CNS involvement. The only factor related to overall survival was estrogen receptor-positive pathology (57.6 v. 38.2 months, p = .02 log-rank); those related to survival post CNS diagnosis were presentation with LMD (p = .004, HR = 3.1, Cox regression) and triple-negative hormonal/HER2 status (p = .02, HR = 2.3, Cox regression). Patients with either had a median survival of 3.1 months (no patients in common). Of the 75 patients who initially presented with metastatic brain lesions, 20 (26 %) subsequently developed LMD in the course of their disease (median 10.4 months), following which survival was grim (1.8 months median). Symptoms of LMD were most commonly lower extremity weakness (14/33), followed by cranial nerve deficits (11/33). The recently described Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) tumor index stratified median survival at 2.5, 5.9, 13.1, and 21.7 months, respectively, for indices of 1-4 (p = .004, log-rank), which

  6. Free focus radiography with miniaturized dental x-ray machines: a comparison of ''midline'' and ''lateral'' techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    The use of free focus radiography (FFR) employing miniaturized dental x-ray machines with radiation probes has never been generally accepted in dentistry despite its recognized radiographic potential. The present investigation studied ways to improve imaging and lower radiation burdens in dental free focus radiography. Relatively high air exposures ranging from 42,050 mR per film for high-resolution images to 3,214 mR per film for lower-resolution images using a current midline radiographic technique for panoramic FFR were found. In a proposed lateral FFR panoramic technique, reduced exposures ranged from 420 mR per film for high-resolution images to 14 mR per film for lower-resolution images. In each technique the lower exposure was obtained with a rare earth imaging system. A proposed modification of the current midline FFR technique using a rare earth imaging system and heavy added copper filtration was found to produce exposures in the range normally used in dentistry (207 mr), and the resultant image was high in contrast with relatively low detail. A comparison of essential characteristics of midline and lateral FFR techniques failed to identify specific advantages for the midline technique in current use. Lateral exposure modes in dental FFR should receive increased attention in the interest of good imaging and radiation control. It was noted that existing miniaturized dental x-ray machines may have been designed specifically for use of the midline FFR exposure technique, and modification of this equipment to support reliable lateral exposure modes was recommended

  7. The CNS connectome of a tadpole larva of Ciona intestinalis (L.) highlights sidedness in the brain of a chordate sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kerrianne; Lu, Zhiyuan; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2016-12-06

    Left-right asymmetries in brains are usually minor or cryptic. We report brain asymmetries in the tiny, dorsal tubular nervous system of the ascidian tadpole larva, Ciona intestinalis . Chordate in body plan and development, the larva provides an outstanding example of brain asymmetry. Although early neural development is well studied, detailed cellular organization of the swimming larva's CNS remains unreported. Using serial-section EM we document the synaptic connectome of the larva's 177 CNS neurons. These formed 6618 synapses including 1772 neuromuscular junctions, augmented by 1206 gap junctions. Neurons are unipolar with at most a single dendrite, and few synapses. Some synapses are unpolarised, others form reciprocal or serial motifs; 922 were polyadic. Axo-axonal synapses predominate. Most neurons have ciliary organelles, and many features lack structural specialization. Despite equal cell numbers on both sides, neuron identities and pathways differ left/right. Brain vesicle asymmetries include a right ocellus and left coronet cells.

  8. XY sex chromosome complement, compared with XX, in the CNS confers greater neurodegeneration during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Sienmi; Itoh, Noriko; Askarinam, Sahar; Hill, Haley; Arnold, Arthur P; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2014-02-18

    Women are more susceptible to multiple sclerosis (MS) and have more robust immune responses than men. However, men with MS tend to demonstrate a more progressive disease course than women, suggesting a disconnect between the severity of an immune attack and the CNS response to a given immune attack. We have previously shown in an MS model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, that autoantigen-sensitized XX lymph node cells, compared with XY, are more encephalitogenic. These studies demonstrated an effect of sex chromosomes in the induction of immune responses, but did not address a potential role of sex chromosomes in the CNS response to immune-mediated injury. Here, we examined this possibility using XX versus XY bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with a common immune system of one sex chromosomal type. We found that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice with an XY sex chromosome complement in the CNS, compared with XX, demonstrated greater clinical disease severity with more neuropathology in the spinal cord, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. A candidate gene on the X chromosome, toll-like receptor 7, was then examined. Toll-like receptor 7 expression in cortical neurons was higher in mice with XY compared with mice with XX CNS, consistent with the known neurodegenerative role for toll-like receptor 7 in neurons. These results suggest that sex chromosome effects on neurodegeneration in the CNS run counter to effects on immune responses, and may bear relevance to the clinical enigma of greater MS susceptibility in women but faster disability progression in men. This is a demonstration of a direct effect of sex chromosome complement on neurodegeneration in a neurological disease.

  9. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  10. Tendencies the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Jimenez Medina, Jose

    2004-01-01

    It is known that the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors is based on the use of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) and that chemotherapy (QMT) is used even more, as well as the other drugs. A bibliographic review was made to update the knowledge on the current trends and perspectives of RT applied to CNS tumors. The following were found among them: a) combinations of RT and CMT; b) radiosensitizers incorporated to the radiant treatment; c) angiogenesis inhibitors associated with RT; d) the scale-up or increase of the RT doses thanks to the development of new technologies, such as 3 D conformal radiotherapy, intensity- modulated radiotherapy, surgery and others. Another field of research is that of the changes in the rhythm or fractioning of the RT: hyperfractionated, accelerated, combinations of both, etc., which will allow mainly to increase the dosage scale-up

  11. CNS-targets in control of energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinridders, André; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2009-12-01

    The exceeding efforts in understanding the signals initiated by nutrients and hormones in the central nervous system (CNS) to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis have largely revolutionized our understanding of the neurocircuitry in control of peripheral metabolism. The ability of neurons to sense nutrients and hormones and to adopt a coordinated response to these signals is of crucial importance in controlling food intake, energy expenditure, glucose and lipid metabolism. Anatomical lesion experiments, pharmacological inhibition of signaling pathways, and, more recently, the analysis of conditional mouse mutants with modifications of hormone and nutrient signaling in defined neuronal populations have broadened our understanding of these complex neurocircuits. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of the CNS in sensing and transmitting nutritional and hormonal signals to control energy and glucose homeostasis and aims to define them as potential novel drug targets for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Cell surface glycan engineering of neural stem cells augments neurotropism and improves recovery in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Imitola, Jaime; Starossom, Sarah C.; Zhu, Bing; Wang, Yue; Lee, Jack; Ali, Amal J.; Olah, Marta; AbuElela, Ayman; Khoury, Samia J.; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies offer potential for neural repair in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory and degenerative disorders. Typically, these conditions present with multifocal CNS lesions making it impractical to inject NSCs

  13. 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book is a compilation of selected papers from the 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS (EIWAC2015). The work focuses on novel techniques for aviation infrastructure in air traffic management (ATM) and communications, navigation, surveillance, and informatics (CNSI) domains. The contents make valuable contributions to academic researchers, engineers in the industry, and regulators of aviation authorities. As well, readers will encounter new ideas for realizing a more efficient and safer aviation system. .

  14. Morphological evaluation of fetus CNS and its related anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Katayama, Kazuaki; Mochizuki, Matsuto

    1989-01-01

    The fetus central nervous system was evaluated morphologically by ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT scan to analyze the prenatal diagnostic value for CNS anomalies. A total of 31 patients with 42 lesions had been diagnosed during the preceding 7 years. The patients included 24 with hydrocephalus, three with anencephaly, three with myeloschisis, three with holoprosencephaly, three with an encephalocele, two with a Dandy-Walker cyst, one with hydroencephalodysplasia, one with an intracranial neoplasm, one with sacrococcygeal teratoma, and one with sacral agenesis. Compared with US and MRI, CT proved to be more accurate in the detection of spine and cranium-bone morphology. This finding seems to be valuable in the diagnosis of spina bifida, cranium bifidum and some cases of hypertensive hydrocephalus, especially in the axial view. MRI was definitely superior in the anatomico-pathological diagnosis of cerebral dysgenesis, ventriculomegaly, intracranial tumors, and other brain parenchymal changes in view of multi-dimensional analysis. The most considerable disadvantage of MRI in the diagnosis of a fetus CNS anomaly is the poor information about spine and cranium morphology. A super-conducting MRI system is still insufficient to demonstrate the spinal cord of a fetus. US was routinely used, and the multidimensional slices were useful for screening the CNS abnormalies. Some of the fetus brain lesions, such as intracranial hematomas, had a specific echogenecity on US. However, US sometimes failed to demarcate the cerebral parenchymal or subdural morphological changes because its artifacts had hyperchoic shadows. While US, MRI, and CT were valuable diagnostic tools in the morphological evaluation of fetus CNS and its related anomalies, each modality has different diagnostic advantages and disadvantages. Improvement can be expected when these diagnostic imaging modalities are complementary, depending upon the nature of the anatomy. (J.P.N.)

  15. Primary CNS lymphoma in nonimmunocompromised patients magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J.; Fernandez, J.M.; Galarraga, M.I.; Pozo, A.; Montes, A.; Ablanedo, P.

    1995-01-01

    Prymary lymphoma of the CNS (PLCNS) is a relatively infrequent malignant tumor that has become increasingly common over the past decade. The radiological signs, although not pathognomonic, are quite specific and suggestive of the correct diagnosis, thus facilitating therapeutic management. We present six cases of PLCNS in nonimmunocopromised patients studied by MR in our hospital over the past two and a half years. We describe theradiological findings, correlating them with those mentioned in the literature. 14 refs

  16. Melanocortin signaling in the CNS directly regulates circulating cholesterol

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Tilve, Diego; Hofmann, Susanna M; Basford, Joshua; Nogueiras, Ruben; Pfluger, Paul T; Patterson, James T; Grant, Erin; Wilson-Perez, Hilary E; Granholm, Norman A; Arnold, Myrtha; Trevaskis, James L; Butler, Andrew A; Davidson, William S; Woods, Stephen C; Benoit, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol circulates in the blood in association with triglycerides and other lipids, and elevated blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol carries a risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, whereas high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in the blood is thought to be beneficial. Circulating cholesterol is the balance among dietary cholesterol absorption, hepatic synthesis and secretion, and the metabolism of lipoproteins by various tissues. We found that the CNS is also an impo...

  17. Computerized tomography data on CNS affection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, M.M.; Bliznyuk, O.I.; Todua, F.I.; Tumanova, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain was employed in 40 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinical cerebral pathology was obvious in 30 and absent in 10 patients. By CT cerebral symptoms were divided of 4 groups. Clinical symptom complexes of CNS defects and SLE were reflected on definite CT images correlated with focal damage to the brain. CT picture of enlarged subarachnoid space, ventricles and basal cisterns can be observed in SLE patients without neurological symptoms. This indicated likely subclinical cerebral affection

  18. Disruption of motor behavior and injury to the CNS induced by 3-thienylboronic acid in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfán-García, E.D.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M. [Academias de Fisiología Humana, Bioquímica y Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Medicina del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Plan de San Luis y Díaz Mirón s/n, 11340 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Espinosa-García, C. [Departamento de Biología de la Reproducción, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM), 09310 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Castillo-Mendieta, N.T.; Maldonado-Castro, M.; Querejeta, E.; Trujillo-Ferrara, J.G. [Academias de Fisiología Humana, Bioquímica y Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Medicina del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Plan de San Luis y Díaz Mirón s/n, 11340 Ciudad de México (Mexico); and others

    2016-09-15

    The scarcity of studies on boron containing compounds (BCC) in the medicinal field is gradually being remedied. Efforts have been made to explore the effects of BCCs due to the properties that boron confers to molecules. Research has shown that the safety of some BCCs is similar to that found for boron-free compounds (judging from the acute toxicological evaluation). However, it has been observed that the administration of 3-thienylboronic acid (3TB) induced motor disruption in CD1 mice. In the current contribution we studied in deeper form the disruption of motor performance produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 3TB in mice from two strains (CD1 and C57BL6). Disruption of motor activity was dependent not only on the dose of 3TB administered, but also on the DMSO concentration in the vehicle. The ability of 3TB to enter the Central Nervous System (CNS) was evidenced by Raman spectroscopy as well as morphological effects on the CNS, such as loss of neurons yielding biased injury to the substantia nigra and striatum at doses ≥ 200 mg/kg, and involving granular cell damage at doses of 400 mg/kg but less injury in the motor cortex. Our work acquaints about the use of this compound in drug design, but the interesting profile as neurotoxic agent invite us to study it regarding the damage on the motor system. - Highlights: • Intraperitoneal 3-thienylboronic acid (3TB) induces tremor in CD1 or C57BL6 mice. • Injury on CNS as well as motor disruption is dose-dependent. • Damage is greater in basal ganglia than in cerebellum or motor cortex. • The DMSO as vehicle plays a key role in the induced effect. • Motor disruption seems to involve basal ganglia and cerebellum damage.

  19. Disruption of motor behavior and injury to the CNS induced by 3-thienylboronic acid in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfán-García, E.D.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.; Espinosa-García, C.; Castillo-Mendieta, N.T.; Maldonado-Castro, M.; Querejeta, E.; Trujillo-Ferrara, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of studies on boron containing compounds (BCC) in the medicinal field is gradually being remedied. Efforts have been made to explore the effects of BCCs due to the properties that boron confers to molecules. Research has shown that the safety of some BCCs is similar to that found for boron-free compounds (judging from the acute toxicological evaluation). However, it has been observed that the administration of 3-thienylboronic acid (3TB) induced motor disruption in CD1 mice. In the current contribution we studied in deeper form the disruption of motor performance produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 3TB in mice from two strains (CD1 and C57BL6). Disruption of motor activity was dependent not only on the dose of 3TB administered, but also on the DMSO concentration in the vehicle. The ability of 3TB to enter the Central Nervous System (CNS) was evidenced by Raman spectroscopy as well as morphological effects on the CNS, such as loss of neurons yielding biased injury to the substantia nigra and striatum at doses ≥ 200 mg/kg, and involving granular cell damage at doses of 400 mg/kg but less injury in the motor cortex. Our work acquaints about the use of this compound in drug design, but the interesting profile as neurotoxic agent invite us to study it regarding the damage on the motor system. - Highlights: • Intraperitoneal 3-thienylboronic acid (3TB) induces tremor in CD1 or C57BL6 mice. • Injury on CNS as well as motor disruption is dose-dependent. • Damage is greater in basal ganglia than in cerebellum or motor cortex. • The DMSO as vehicle plays a key role in the induced effect. • Motor disruption seems to involve basal ganglia and cerebellum damage.

  20. Blood-CNS Barrier Impairment in ALS Patients versus an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana eGarbuzova-Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a severe neurodegenerative disease with a compli-cated and poorly understood pathogenesis. Recently, alterations in the blood-Central Nervous System barrier (B-CNS-B have been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage. The majority of findings on ALS microvascular pathology have been deter-mined in mutant SOD1 rodent models, identifying barrier damage during disease develop-ment which might similarly occur in familial ALS patients carrying the SOD1 mutation. However, our knowledge of B-CNS-B competence in sporadic ALS (SALS has been limited. We recently showed structural and functional impairment in postmortem gray and white mat-ter microvessels of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients, suggesting pervasive barrier damage. Although numerous signs of barrier impairment (endothelial cell degenera-tion, capillary leakage, perivascular edema, downregulation of tight junction proteins, and microhemorrhages are indicated in both mutant SOD1 animal models of ALS and SALS pa-tients, other pathogenic barrier alterations have as yet only been identified in SALS patients. Pericyte degeneration, perivascular collagen IV expansion, and white matter capillary abnor-malities in SALS patients are significant barrier related pathologies yet to be noted in ALS SOD1 animal models. In the current review, these important differences in blood-CNS barrier damage between ALS patients and animal models, which may signify altered barrier transport mechanisms, are discussed. Understanding discrepancies in barrier condition between ALS patients and animal models may be crucial for developing effective therapies.

  1. EMMPRIN, an upstream regulator of MMPs, in CNS biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Deepak Kumar; Hahn, Jennifer Nancy; Yong, V Wee

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are engaged in pathologies associated with infections, tumors, autoimmune disorders and neurological dysfunctions. With the identification of an upstream regulator of MMPs, EMMPRIN (Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, CD147), it is relevant to address if EMMPRIN plays a role in the pathology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This would enable the possibility of a more upstream and effective therapeutic target. Indeed, conditions including gliomas, Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and other insults such as hypoxia/ischemia show elevated levels of EMMPRIN which correlate with MMP production. In contrast, given EMMPRIN's role in CNS homeostasis with respect to regulation of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and interactions with adhesion molecules including integrins, we need to consider that EMMPRIN may also serve important regulatory or protective functions. This review summarizes the current understanding of EMMPRIN's involvement in CNS homeostasis, its possible roles in escalating or reducing neural injury, and the mechanisms of EMMPRIN including and apart from MMP induction. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. CNS Involvement in Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: CT and MR Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Woong

    2007-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder that is characterized by proliferation of benign histiocytes, and this commonly involves the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow and central nervous system (CNS). We report here on the CT and MR imaging findings in a case of CNS HLH that showed multiple ring enhancing masses mimicking abscess or another mass on the CT and MR imaging. emophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder that is characterized by nonmalignant diffuse infiltration of multiple organs, including the central nervous system (CNS), by lymphocytes and histiocytes (1). Many radiologic reports describing diffuse white matter infiltrations, parenchymal atrophy and calcification have been published, but the characteristics of these findings remain non-specific, especially in immunocompromised patients. We present here a case of HLH in a 3-year-old boy who presented with multiple ring enhancing lesions involving the brain. In conclusion, although the CT and MRI findings of HLH with ring enhancing parenchymal lesions are nonspecific and mimic abscess, and especially in the immunosuppressed patients, increased diffusion at the center on DWI may be a finding of HLH to differentiate it from abscess, which has restricted diffusion at the center. However, the pathologic correlation with DWI according to the lesion stage certainly needs further study with a larger number of patients

  3. Adverse CNS-effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiter, C H; Deckert, J

    1996-11-01

    In 1962 propranolol, the first beta adrenoceptor antagonist (beta blocker), was brought on to the market. There is now a host of different beta blockers available, and these compounds are among the most commonly prescribed groups of drugs. The efficacy of beta blockers has been proven predominantly for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Beta blockers are also used for certain types of CNS disorders, such as anxiety disorders, essential tremor and migraine. While low toxicity means that they have a favorable risk-benefit ratio, given the high intensity of use, it is essential to have a comprehensive knowledge of adverse events. Adverse events of beta blockers that can be related to the CNS are quite often neglected, even in textbooks of clinical pharmacology or review articles, and thus often misdiagnosed. The following article, therefore, after summarizing the use of beta blockers for CNS indications, critically reviews the literature on centrally mediated adverse events. General pharmacological features of beta blockers and their molecular basis of action will briefly be addressed to the extent that they are or may become relevant for central nervous pharmacotherapy and side-effects.

  4. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had central nervous system involvement: a study from the Adult ALL Working Group of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Akio; Kako, Shinichi; Mitsuhashi, Kenjiro; Iwato, Koji; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Sawa, Masashi; Senoo, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Miyamura, Koichi; Takada, Satoru; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Morishima, Yasuo; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Mizuta, Shuichi; Tanaka, Junji

    2017-06-01

    The prognosis for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement (CNS+) who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unclear. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of allo-SCT for patients with CNS involvement and for patients without CNS involvement (CNS-) using a database in Japan. The eligibility criteria for this study were as follows: diagnosis of ALL, aged more than 16 years, allo-SCT between 2005 and 2012, and first SCT. Data for 2582 patients including 136 CNS+ patients and 2446 CNS- patients were used for analyses. As compared with CNS- patients, CNS+ patients were younger, had worse disease status at SCT and had poorer performance status (PS) at SCT (P < 0.01). Incidence of relapse was higher in CNS+ patients (P = 0.02), and incidence of CNS relapse was also higher (P < 0.01). The probability of 3-year overall survival (OS) was better in CNS- patients (P < 0.01) by univariate analysis. However, in patients who received SCT in CR, there was no difference in the probability of OS between CNS+ and CNS- patients (P = 0.38) and CNS involvement did not have an unfavorable effect on OS by multivariate analysis. CNS+ patients who achieved CR showed OS comparable to that of CNS- patients.

  5. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Byoung Dae

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS: Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Hur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. The morphology of midcingulate cortex predicts frontal-midline theta neurofeedback success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eEnriquez-Geppert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans differ in their ability to learn how to control their own brain activity by neurofeedback. However, neural mechanisms underlying these inter-individual differences, which may determine training success and associated cognitive enhancement, are not well understood. Here, it is asked whether neurofeedback success of frontal-midline (fm theta, an oscillation related to higher cognitive functions, could be predicted by the morphology of brain structures known to be critically involved in fm-theta generation. Nineteen young, right-handed participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of T1-weighted brain images, and took part in an individualized, eight-session neurofeedback training in order to learn how to enhance activity in their fm-theta frequency band. Initial training success, measured at the second training session, was correlated with the final outcome measure. We found that the inferior, superior and middle frontal cortices were not associated with training success. However, volume of the midcingulate cortex as well as volume and concentration of the underlying white matter structures act as predictor variables for the general responsiveness to training. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical foundation for the ability to learn to control one’s own brain activity.

  8. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial of polymer cable ties versus standard wire closure of midline sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Silvana F; Fuller, Louise; Zimmet, Adam; McGiffin, David; Seitz, Michael; Ch'ng, Stephanie; Gangahanumaiah, Shivanand; Bailey, Michael

    2018-04-16

    Midline sternotomy remains the most common access incision for cardiac operations. Traditionally, the sternum is closed with stainless steel wires. Wires are well known to stretch and break, however, leading to pain, nonunion, and potential deep sternal wound infection. We hypothesized that biocompatible plastic cable ties would achieve a more rigid sternal fixation, reducing postoperative pain and analgesia requirements. A prospective, randomized study compared the ZIPFIX (De Puy Synthes, West Chester, Pa) sternal closure system (n = 58) with standard stainless steel wires (n = 60). Primary outcomes were pain and analgesia requirements in the early postoperative period. Secondary outcome was sternal movement, as assessed by ultrasound at the postoperative follow-up visit. Groups were well matched in demographic and operative variables. There were no significant differences between groups in postoperative pain, analgesia, or early ventilatory requirements. Patients in the ZIPFIX group had significantly more movement in the sternum and manubrium on ultrasound at 4 weeks. ZIPFIX sternal cable ties provide reliable closure but no demonstrable benefit in this study in pain or analgesic requirements relative to standard wire closure after median sternotomy. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a transdermal lidocaine patch on indicators of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing midline ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merema, Danielle K; Schoenrock, Emily K; Le Boedec, Kevin; McMichael, Maureen A

    2017-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of a transdermal lidocaine patch (TLP) on indicators of postoperative pain in healthy dogs following ovariohysterectomy. DESIGN Randomized, blinded controlled trial. ANIMALS 40 healthy shelter-owned female dogs admitted to a student surgery program for ovariohysterectomy. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive after ovariohysterectomy a 5-cm-wide strip of TLP applied topically on both sides of the incision, for the full length of the incision and a wound dressing (n = 19) or a placebo patch (nonmedicated wound dressing; 21). All dogs underwent midline ovariohysterectomy. Immediately afterward, dogs received 2 IM morphine injections, carprofen (SC, q 12 h for 2 days), and the assigned patch (left in place for 18 hours). Postoperative comfort was evaluated by use of the short form of the Glasgow Composite Measures Pain Scale and serum cortisol concentrations measured prior to premedication and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 hours after surgery. RESULTS No significant difference in pain scores or serum cortisol concentrations was identified between dogs that received the TLP and dogs that received a placebo patch after ovariohysterectomy. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The TLP provided no additional analgesic benefit to dogs treated concurrently with recommended doses of morphine and carprofen following ovariohysterectomy. Additional studies are needed to investigate whether similar results might be achieved in dogs treated concurrently with other analgesics. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2017;250:1140-1147).

  10. Addition of rectus sheath relaxation incisions to emergency midline laparotomy for peritonitis to prevent fascial dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwah, Sanjay; Marwah, Nisha; Singh, Mandeep; Kapoor, Ajay; Karwasra, Rajender Kumar

    2005-02-01

    The incidence of fascial dehiscence and incisional hernia after two methods for abdominal wound closure (rectus sheath relaxation incisions and conventional mass closure) was studied in a randomized prospective clinical trial in a consecutive series of 100 patients undergoing midline laparotomy for peritonitis. The two groups were well matched for etiologies of peritonitis, the surgical procedures performed, and the presence of known risk factors for fascial dehiscence. Fifty patients each were randomized either to the conventional continuous mass closure procedure or the rectus sheath relaxation incision technique (designed to increase wound elasticity and decrease tension in the suture line) using identical polypropylene sutures. The incidence of postoperative complications such as duration of ileus, chest infection, and wound infection were not statistically different between the two groups. The intensity of postoperative pain in the rectus sheath relaxation incision group was significantly less. The incidence of wound hematoma was significantly increased in the rectus sheath relaxation incision group. The incidences of fascial dehiscence (16% vs,28%; p cases of peritonitis using the rectus sheath relaxation technique is safe and less painful, provides increased wound elasticity and decreased tension on the suture line, and significantly decreases the incidence of wound dehiscence.

  11. Metallothionein 1+2 protect the CNS during neuroglial degeneration induced by 6-aminonicotinamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, Mercedes; Camats, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    6-Aminonicotinamide (6-AN) is a niacin antagonist, which leads to degeneration of gray matter astrocytes. Metallothionein 1+2 (MT-1+2) are neuroprotective factors in the central nervous system (CNS), and to determine the roles for MT after 6-AN, we have examined transgenic mice overexpressing MT-1...... (NITT), and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase [TdT]-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate [dUTP]-digoxigenin nick end labeling-positive (TUNEL+), caspase-3+ apoptotic cells were significantly increased in the brainstem of normal mice after 6-AN. In the TgMTI* mice, the 6-AN-induced tissue...... damage was decreased in comparison to control mice, and they showed significantly reduced numbers of recruited macrophages and T lymphocytes, and a drastic reduction of oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. In addition, the accompanying reactive astrogliosis was increased in the transgenic mice...

  12. Age-related response of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic miceto phthalic anhydrideexposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related changes are associated with susceptibility to infection, malignancy, autoimmunity, response to vaccination and wound healing. To investigate the relationship of several pathological phenotypes of allergic inflammationto age, alterations in theIL-4 derived luciferase signal and general phenotype biomarkers were measured in young (2-month-old and old (12-month-old IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg mice with phthalic anhydride (PA-induced allergic inflammationfor 2 weeks. There was no difference in the ear phenotypes and thickness between young and old mice, although these levels were higher in the PA-treated group thantheacetone-olive oil (AOO-treated group. The luciferase signal was detected in the mesenteric lymph node (ML, thymus and pancreas of both young and old PA-treated mice, but showed a greater increasein old Tg mice (exceptin thethymus. Agreaterincrease inthe epidermal thickness and dermal thickness was measured in old PA-treated mice than young PA-treated mice, while total mast cell number remainedconstant in both groups. Furthermore, the concentration of IgE was greater in young PA-treated mice than in old PA-treated mice,as wasthe expression of VEGF and IL-6. Taken together, theresults of this study showed that an animal’s age is an important factor that must be considered when PA-induced allergic inflammation in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice areinvestigated to screen for allergens and therapeutic compounds.

  13. Inflammation in the CNS and Th17 Responses Are Inhibited by IFN-{gamma}-Induced IL-18 Binding Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Wheeler, Rachel D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for immune protection but may also cause pathology and must be regulated. Both Th1 and Th17 cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. We show in this study that IL-18-binding protein (IL-18bp......), the endogenous inhibitor of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-18, is upregulated by IFN-gamma in resident microglial cells in the CNS during multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. Test of function by overexpression of IL-18bp in the CNS using a viral vector led to marked reduction in Th17 responses and robust...... inhibition of incidence, severity, and histopathology of disease, independently of IFN-gamma. The disease-limiting action of IL-18bp included suppression of APC-derived Th17-polarizing cytokines. IL-18bp thus acts as a sensor for IFN-gamma and can regulate both Th1 and Th17 responses in the CNS....

  14. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seok [School of Business Administration, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  15. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jong Seok

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  16. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  17. Dose-dense chemoimmunotherapy and CNS prophylaxis in patients with high-risk DLBCL: a comparison of Nordic CRY-04 and CHIC studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppä, Sirpa; Jørgensen, Judit Meszaros; Brown, Peter De Nully

    Background: Survival of patients with high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is suboptimal, and the risk of central nervous system (CNS) progression relatively high. We investigated the efficacy of dose-dense chemoimmunotherapy and systemic CNS prophylaxis in two completed Nordic trials...... including patients less than 65 years with high-risk DLBCL. We combined individual patient data from these studies to compare clinical outcome and prognostic factors in patients treated with CNS prophylaxis given in the beginning (CHIC) vs at the end (CRY-04) of therapy. Patients and methods: Inclusion...... proliferation index (Ki67 expression available PET data, Deauville score 5 at the end of treatment was associated with increased rate of progression and death in both trials (p=0.012). Only one out of 17 biopsies from PET positive...

  18. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian M.; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W.; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the “neurotoxic” and “neuroprotective” arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  19. A philosophical perspective on the relation between cortical midline structures and the self

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eMusholt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been increasing evidence that an area in the brain called the cortical midline structures (CMS is implicated in what has been termed self-related processing. This article will discuss recent evidence for the relation between CMS and self-consciousness in light of several important philosophical distinctions. First, we should distinguish between being a self (i.e., being a subject of conscious experience and being aware of being a self (i.e., being able to think about oneself as such. While the former consists in having a first-person perspective on the world, the latter requires the ability to explicitly represent one’s own perspective as such. Further, we should distinguish between being aware of oneself 'as subject' and being aware of oneself 'as object'. The focus of existing studies investigating the relation between CMS and self has been predominantly on the ability to think about oneself (and in particular thinking of oneself 'as object', while the more basic aspects involved in being a self have been neglected. However, it is important to widen the scope of the cognitive neuroscience to include the latter, not least because this might have important implications for a better understanding of disorders of the self, such as those involved in schizophrenia. In order to do so, cognitive neuroscience should work together with philosophy, including phenomenology. Second, we need to distinguish between personal and subpersonal level explanations. It will be argued that although it is important to respect this distinction, in principle, some subpersonal facts can enter into constitutive conditions of personal level phenomena. However, in order for this to be possible, one needs both careful conceptual analysis and knowledge about relevant cognitive mechanisms.

  20. Midline oligodendrogliomas as studied by means of computed tomographic, angiographic, and positron-emission tomographic evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Kowada, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Mineura, Katsuyoshi (Akita Univ. (Japan). Hospital)

    1989-08-01

    Five patients with intraventricular oligodendroglioma involving the lateral ventricle were reviewed by computed tomography (CT), cerebral angiography, and positron-emission tomography (PET) to delineate specific neuroradiological features of the tumors in comparison to those involving the cerebral hemispheres. Intraventricular mass lesions, extending largely from the anterior horn to the body or trigone of the lateral ventricle, were seen as hyperdense tumors in on CT; none was iso- or hypodense. Asymmetrical dilation of the lateral ventricles was noted. Noteworthy was the fact that all of the lesions demonstrated a homogeneous contrast enhancement. Calcification or hypodense areas within the tumor matrix suggestive of cyst formation were found in 4 cases. No peritumoral edema was demonstrated. On angiograms, in all cases the tumors were visualized as hypervascular, space occupying mass lesions supplied by such feeding arteries as anterior and posterior choroidal, lenticulo-striate, thalamo-perforating, and pericallosal arteries. Among these arteries, either medial or lateral posterior choroidal arteries, or both, were commonly seen in these vascular tumors. Fine tumor vessels were also seen in the distal portion of these arteries. They were accompanied by a homogeneous tumor stain at either the late-arterial, capillary, or early-venous phase. PET images from a 21 year old female showed that the intraventricular tumor had an increased cerebral blood flow and volume at the tumor site, indicating a hypervascular tumor. However, this tumor was considered less malignant on the basis of its decreased rate of glycolysis, as evaluated by PET studies with 18-F-deoxyglucose. Lateral ventricular oligodendrogliomas, synonymously termed 'midline oligodendrogliomas,' have fairly specific neuroradiological features different from those of hemispheric oligodendrogliomas.

  1. Influence of the cortical midline structures on moral emotion and motivation in moral decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin; Chen, Jingyuan; Jeong, Changwoo; Glover, Gary H

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between the cortical midline structures (CMS), which have been regarded to be associated with selfhood, and moral decision making processes at the neural level. Traditional moral psychological studies have suggested the role of moral self as the moderator of moral cognition, so activity of moral self would present at the neural level. The present study examined the interaction between the CMS and other moral-related regions by conducting psycho-physiological interaction analysis of functional images acquired while 16 subjects were solving moral dilemmas. Furthermore, we performed Granger causality analysis to demonstrate the direction of influences between activities in the regions in moral decision-making. We first demonstrate there are significant positive interactions between two central CMS seed regions-i.e., the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)-and brain regions associated with moral functioning including the cerebellum, brainstem, midbrain, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex and anterior insula (AI); on the other hand, the posterior insula (PI) showed significant negative interaction with the seed regions. Second, several significant Granger causality was found from CMS to insula regions particularly under the moral-personal condition. Furthermore, significant dominant influence from the AI to PI was reported. Moral psychological implications of these findings are discussed. The present study demonstrated the significant interaction and influence between the CMS and morality-related regions while subject were solving moral dilemmas. Given that, activity in the CMS is significantly involved in human moral functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurotransmitter synthesis from CNS glutamine for central control of breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoop, B.; Systrom, D.; Chiang, C.H.; Shih, V.E.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum rate at which CNS glutamine (GLN) derived from glutamate (GLU) can be sequestered for synthesis of neurotransmitter GLU and/or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been determined in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. A total of 57 animals were studied under normal, hypoxic (Pa/sub O2/ greater than or equal to 20 mmHg), or hypercapnic (Pa/sub CO2/ less than or equal to 71 mm Hg) conditions. Thirteen of these were bilaterally vagotomized and carotid body denervated and studied only under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In 5 animals cerebrospinal fluid GLN transfer rate constant k was measured using 13 N-ammonia tracer. Measured cerebral cortical (CC) and medullary (MED) GLN concentrations c are found to vary with GLU metabolic rate r according to c-C/sub m/r/(r+R), where r, the product of k and corresponding tissue GLU concentration, is assumed equal to the maximum GLN metabolic rate via pathways other than for neurotransmitter synthesis. The constants C/sub m/ and R are the predicted maximum GLN concentration and its maximum rate of sequestration for neurotransmitter synthesis, respectively. For both CNS tissue types in all animals, C/sub m/ = 20.9 +- 7.4 (SD) mmoles/kg wet wt(mM) and R = 6.2 +- 2.3 mM/min. These values are consistent with results obtained in anesthetized rats

  3. Primary CNS lymphoma as a cause of Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Cory; Voll, Chris; Macaulay, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Korsakoff syndrome presents with memory dysfunction with retrograde amnesia, anterograde amnesia, limited insight into dysfunction, and confabulation. The most common etiology of Korsakoff syndrome is thiamine deficiency secondary to alcoholism. There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. A 46-year-old male with a long history of alcoholism presented with a history of confusion, amnesia, and confabulation with no localizing features on neurological examination. The patient showed no clinical change with intravenous thiamine. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a heterogenous, enhancing mass lesion centered within the third ventricle, with other lesions found throughout cortical and subcortical regions. The patient was given dexamethasone i.v. without noticeable clinical improvement but with marked radiological improvement with mass reduction. Stereotactic biopsy revealed a diagnosis of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Most patients presenting with Korsakoff syndrome have thiamine deficiency; however, mass lesions can produce an identical clinical picture. This is the first case report of a patient with primary CNS lymphoma presenting as Korsakoff syndrome.

  4. Autoantibody-induced internalization of CNS AQP4 water channel and EAAT2 glutamate transporter requires astrocytic Fc receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Shannon R; Clift, Ian C; Luo, Ningling; Kryzer, Thomas J; Lennon, Vanda A

    2017-05-23

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel-specific IgG distinguishes neuromyelitis optica (NMO) from multiple sclerosis and causes characteristic immunopathology in which central nervous system (CNS) demyelination is secondary. Early events initiating the pathophysiological outcomes of IgG binding to astrocytic AQP4 are poorly understood. CNS lesions reflect events documented in vitro following IgG interaction with AQP4: AQP4 internalization, attenuated glutamate uptake, intramyelinic edema, interleukin-6 release, complement activation, inflammatory cell recruitment, and demyelination. Here, we demonstrate that AQP4 internalization requires AQP4-bound IgG to engage an astrocytic Fcγ receptor (FcγR). IgG-lacking Fc redistributes AQP4 within the plasma membrane and induces interleukin-6 release. However, AQP4 endocytosis requires an activating FcγR's gamma subunit and involves astrocytic membrane loss of an inhibitory FcγR, CD32B. Interaction of the IgG-AQP4 complex with FcγRs triggers coendocytosis of the excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2). Requirement of FcγR engagement for internalization of two astrocytic membrane proteins critical to CNS homeostasis identifies a complement-independent, upstream target for potential early therapeutic intervention in NMO.

  5. Astrocyte-targeted expression of IL-6 protects the CNS against a focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, Mercedes; Lago, Natalia

    2003-01-01

    significantly increased up to but not including 20 dpl in the GFAP-IL6 mice. Oxidative stress as well as apoptotic cell death was significantly decreased throughout the time period studied in the GFAP-IL6 mice compared to controls. This could be linked to the altered inflammatory response as well......The effect of CNS-targeted IL-6 gene expression has been thoroughly investigated in the otherwise nonperturbed brain but not following brain injury. Here we examined the impact of astrocyte-targeted IL-6 production in a traumatic brain injury (cryolesion) model using GFAP-IL6 transgenic mice...... as to the transgenic IL-6-induced increase of the antioxidant, neuroprotective proteins metallothionein-I + II. These results indicate that although in the brain the chronic astrocyte-targeted expression of IL-6 spontaneously induces an inflammatory response causing significant damage, during an acute...

  6. Cytokine and chemokine inter-regulation in the inflamed or injured CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia A; Millward, Jason M

    2005-01-01

    the expression of chemokines in the CNS, in the absence of any other inflammatory event, but the profiles differ from those induced by axotomy. Chemokines that bind the CCR2 receptor are implicated in traffic of macrophages and T cells to the denervated hippocampus. Innate responses in the immune system...... are directed by Toll-like receptors (TLR). Our recent studies focus on specific TLR signals as upstream on-switches for glial cytokine and chemokine responses. The biological activity of chemokines is regulated by matrix metalloproteinase enzymes (MMPs) and specific members of this family are expressed...... in response to axonal lesioning. These findings strengthen the case for the sharing of signals between the immune and nervous system....

  7. Transverse Skin Crease versus Vertical Midline Incision versus Laparoscopy for Right Hemicolectomy: A Systematic Review—Current Status of Right Hemicolectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Santoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The right hemicolectomy may be conducted through laparoscopic or laparotomic surgery, transverse or midline incisions. The transverse laparotomy offers some advantages compared to the midline laparotomy and laparoscopy. A literature review was performed to evaluate the possible advantages of the transverse incision versus midline incision or laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. Methods. A systematic research was performed in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, BioMed Central, and the Science Citation Index. Results. Laparotomic right hemicolectomy with transverse incision is preferable to laparotomic hemicolectomy with midline incision. A transverse incision offers a lessened postoperative pain following physical activity, a lessened need to administer analgesic therapy during the post-operative time, better aesthetic results, and a better post-operative pulmonary function. Open surgery with transverse or midline incision ensured a shorter operative time, lower costs and a greater length of the incision compared to the laparoscopic. However, there are no differences in the oncological outcomes. Conclusions. It was not possible to identify significant differences between the open right hemicolectomy with transverse incision versus the open right hemicolectomy with midline incision or laparoscopic hemicolectomy.

  8. Primary CNS Nonamyloidogenic Light Chain Deposition Disease: Case Report and Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Juan Jose; Markert, James M; Meador, William; Chapman, Philip; Perry, Arie; Hackney, James R

    2017-12-01

    The true incidence of light chain deposition disease (LCDD) restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. To our knowledge only 7 cases of LCDD restricted to the brain have been previously reported. We herein describe an unusual example. A 44-year-old man presented with a history of ischemic retinopathy in 2004 and left lower extremity hypoesthesia in 2007 that progressed gradually to left-sided weakness and numbness in the 2 years prior to his hospitalization in 2015. A stereotactic brain biopsy was performed, displaying nonspecific hyaline deposits of amorphous "amyloid-like" material involving deep brain white matter and vessels. These were Congo red negative and were accompanied by a sparse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Plasma cells demonstrated kappa light chain class restriction by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). There was patchy reactivity with kappa immunohistochemistry in the amorphous deposits. A diagnosis of light chain deposition disease was made. Subsequent systemic myeloma and lymphoma workups were negative. Previously reported cases have included men and women, spanning the ages of 19 and 72 years, often presenting with hemiparesis, hypoesthesia, or seizures. Deposits have been reported in the cerebrum and cerebellum. T2/FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) changes are usual, but lesions may or may not produce contrast enhancement. The light chain deposition may be of kappa or lambda class. Most lesions have been accompanied by local lymphoid and/or plasma cell infiltrates exhibiting light chain restriction of the same class as the deposits. In summary, LCDD limited to the CNS is a rare lesion consisting of deposition of amyloid-like, but Congo red-negative monotypic light chain usually produced by local lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates.

  9. HDAC1 regulates the proliferation of radial glial cells in the developing Xenopus tectum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tao

    Full Text Available In the developing central nervous system (CNS, progenitor cells differentiate into progeny to form functional neural circuits. Radial glial cells (RGs are a transient progenitor cell type that is present during neurogenesis. It is thought that a combination of neural trophic factors, neurotransmitters and electrical activity regulates the proliferation and differentiation of RGs. However, it is less clear how epigenetic modulation changes RG proliferation. We sought to explore the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity on the proliferation of RGs in the visual optic tectum of Xenopus laevis. We found that the number of BrdU-labeled precursor cells along the ventricular layer of the tectum decrease developmentally from stage 46 to stage 49. The co-labeling of BrdU-positive cells with brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP, a radial glia marker, showed that the majority of BrdU-labeled cells along the tectal midline are RGs. BLBP-positive cells are also developmentally decreased with the maturation of the brain. Furthermore, HDAC1 expression is developmentally down-regulated in tectal cells, especially in the ventricular layer of the tectum. Pharmacological blockade of HDACs using Trichostatin A (TSA or Valproic acid (VPA decreased the number of BrdU-positive, BLBP-positive and co-labeling cells. Specific knockdown of HDAC1 by a morpholino (HDAC1-MO decreased the number of BrdU- and BLBP-labeled cells and increased the acetylation level of histone H4 at lysine 12 (H4K12. The visual deprivation-induced increase in BrdU- and BLBP-positive cells was blocked by HDAC1 knockdown at stage 49 tadpoles. These data demonstrate that HDAC1 regulates radial glia cell proliferation in the developing optical tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  10. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  11. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  12. Differential expression of metallothioneins in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Carrasco, J; Hidalgo, J

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS. Metallothioneins-I+II are antioxidant proteins induced in the CNS by immobilisation stress, trauma or degenerative diseases which have been postulated to play a neuroprotective role, while the CNS isoform metallothionein......-III has been related to Alzheimer's disease. We have analysed metallothioneins-I-III expression in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, we have examined the putative role of interferon-gamma, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in the control of metallothioneins expression...

  13. P13.10 Intracranial response to nivolumab in NSCLC patients with untreated or progressing CNS metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, S.; Dudnik, E.; Perlov, E.; Zer, A.; Flex, D.; Peled, N.; Siegal, T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in about 30% of patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Local treatment strategies (e.g., radiotherapy or surgery) result in delays in systemic therapy administration and are frequently associated with neurocognitive impairment. Nivolumab is an anti-PD1 immune check-point inhibitor which has been recently approved by the FDA as a second line treatment of NSCLC. Data regarding its intracranial activity is lacking. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed efficacy and safety of nivolumab administered intravenously at a dose of 3mg/kg q2 weeks in five pts with advanced NSCLC and new or progressing intracranial metastases which were diagnosed before or within 1 month after starting the treatment. Results: Pt baseline characteristics were as follows: median age 78y (range, 52–84); 2 males; 4 smokers; ECOG PS 0/1/2 - 2 pts/1 pt/2 pts; histological subtype: adenocarcinoma/ squamous-cell carcinoma/NSCLC NOS 3 pts /1 pt/1 pt; EGFR WT/ALK neg/KRAS M all/all/2 pts. Four pts had parenchymal brain metastases, three pts had leptomeningeal disease. All pts were asymptomatic and did not require corticosteroids or immediate brain irradiation. Dramatic response in the brain was observed in two pts (including 1 pt with leptomeningeal spread demonstrating a complete response in the CNS); time-to-response comprised 5 weeks and 9 weeks; all responses are still ongoing at the time of the report (18+ weeks, 19+ weeks). In one pt stabilization of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis for 10 weeks was achieved. Systemic responses and intracranial responses were largely concordant. No treatment-related or CNS-metastases related grade ≥ 3 adverse events were observed. Conclusions: Nivolumab has a promising intracranial activity and favorable safety profile in pts with NSCLC and untreated/progressing CNS metastases. Nivolumab CNS activity warrants further evaluation.

  14. Prenatal MR imaging of Dandy-Walker complex: Midline sagittal area analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alex M.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Liu, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure the mid-sagittal areas of vermis (VA) and of posterior fossa (PFA) and determine their differences among fetuses with various Dandy-Walker (DW) entities and control subjects. Methods: We reviewed data in 25 fetal patients with a MR diagnosis of DW complex including hypoplastic vermis (HV), HV with rotation (HVR), and mega cistern magna (MCM), and in 85 fetal controls with normal CNS. PFA and VA of each subject were manually traced on mid-sagittal MR images. Regarding each of VA and PFA, after age correction, we determined statistically significant differences among HVR, HV, MCM, and control groups. Results: The mean VA residue of MCM was greater than that of the control, which was in turn greater than those of HVR and HV. The mean PF residue of the control was smaller than all other groups. Conclusion: Fetuses with HVR or HV had smaller VA than fetuses with MCM or control subjects. Fetuses with MCM, HVR, or HV had larger PFA than control subjects. These results may be an early step leading to better understanding of the confusion about the PF anomalies in future.

  15. tACS phase locking of frontal midline theta oscillations disrupts working memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankim Subhash Chander

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Frontal midline theta (FMT oscillations (4-8Hz are strongly related to cognitive and executive control during mental tasks such as memory processing, arithmetic problem solving or sustained attention. While maintenance of temporal order information during a working memory (WM task was recently linked to FMT phase, a positive correlation between FMT power, WM demand and WM performance was shown. However, the relationship between these measures is not well understood, and it is unknown whether purposeful FMT phase manipulation during a WM task impacts FMT power and WM performance. Here we present evidence that FMT phase manipulation mediated by transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS can block WM demand-related FMT power increase and disrupt normal WM performance. Methods: 20 healthy volunteers were assigned to one of two groups (group A, group B and performed a 2-back task across a baseline block (block 1 and an intervention block (block 2 while 275-sensor magnetoencephalography (MEG was recorded. After no stimulation was applied during block 1, participants in group A received tACS oscillating at their individual FMT frequency over the prefrontal cortex (PFC while group B received sham stimulation during block 2. After assessing and mapping phase locking values (PLV between the tACS signal and brain oscillatory activity across the whole brain, FMT power and WM performance were assessed and compared between blocks and groups. Results: During block 2 of group A but not B, FMT oscillations showed increased PLV across task-related cortical areas underneath the frontal tACS electrode. While WM task-related FMT power increase (FMTpower and WM performance were comparable across groups in block 1, tACS resulted in lower FMTpower and WM performance compared to sham stimulation in block 2. Conclusion: tACS-related manipulation of FMT phase can disrupt WM performance and influence WM task-related FMT power increase. This finding may have

  16. 6. CNS international conference on CANDU maintenance. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 6th CNS International Conference on CANDU Maintenance took place in Toronto, Ontario on November 16-18, 2003. The theme for the conference was 'Maintenance for Life'. About 270 delegates attended the conference held by the Canadian Nuclear Society. The conference consisted of four parallel sessions, a pattern that continued throughout the conference. Papers were grouped under the following headings: Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Assessments; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Inspections; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Maintenance; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Universal Delivery Machine; Water Upgrading; Performance and Plant Life Improvement; Steam Generator Life Management; Steam Generator Modifications; Steam Generators - Inspections; Steam Generators - Assessments; Maintenance Programs; Feeder Inspections; Feeder Assessment and Mitigation; Valve Maintenance; Instrumentation and Control; Inspection Technology; and Fuel Handling

  17. Brain abscess with an unexpected finding: Actinomyces meyeri CNS infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Wejse, Christian

    -up. The source of infection was most likely periodontitis with spread to the lungs from aspiration or oropharyngeal secretion into the respiratory tract, alternatively from haematogenous spread. Conclusions: We report of the successful treatment of a cerebral abscess caused by A. meyeri with narrow spectrum......Background: CNS infection caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare and the subtype Actinomyces meyeri even rarer. Risk factors include periodontal disease and alcohol overuse. We present a case report of a 54-year-old female with dental and lung foci. Case history: A female was hospitalised with tonic...... oedema. By MRI an abscess was suspected and the patient was transferred to the department of neurosurgery, where drainage was performed. Microscopy revealed gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods and iv. treatment with ceftriaxone 4g x 1 and metronidazole 1g x 1 was commenced. Pus cultures showed...

  18. Comparison of electrocautery incision with scalpel incision in midline abdominal surgery - A double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Lalgudi Dorairajan; Balaji, Nitesh; Kumar, Sathasivam Suresh; Kate, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    To compare the electrocautery incision with scalpel incision in patients undergoing abdominal surgery using a midline incision with respect to incision time, blood loss during incision, postoperative incision site pain and wound infection. Patients undergoing midline abdominal surgery were randomized into electrocautery and scalpel groups. The incision dimensions, incision time and blood loss during incision were noted intraoperatively. Postoperative pain and wound infection were recorded on every postoperative day for one week. 41 patients in each of the two groups were analyzed. Gender and age distribution was similar in both the groups. The mean incision time per unit wound area in the electrocautery group and scalpel group was 9.40 ± 3.37 s/cm(2) and 9.07 ± 3.40 s/cm(2) (p = 0.87) respectively. The mean blood loss per unit wound area was significantly lower in the electrocautery group at 6.46 ± 3.94 ml when compared to that of 23.40 ± 15.28 ml in the scalpel group (p= electrocautery and scalpel groups (14.63% vs. 12.19%; p = 0.347). With a comparable Postoperative incision site pain, wound infection rate and significantly lower blood loss with the equal time taken for the incision, electrocautery can be considered safe and effective in making skin incision in midline laparotomy compared to scalpel incision. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sonic Hedgehog mutations are not a common cause of congenital hypopituitarism in the absence of complex midline cerebral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Sabrina Soares; Fernandes-Rosa, Fábio L; Turatti, Wendy; Coeli-Lacchini, Fernanda Borchers; Martinelli, Carlos E; Nakiri, Guilherme S; Moreira, Ayrton C; Santos, Antônio C; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R

    2015-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and GLI2, an obligatory mediator of SHH signal transduction, are holoprosencephaly (HPE)-associated genes essential in pituitary formation. GLI2 variants have been found in patients with congenital hypopituitarism without complex midline cerebral defects (MCD). However, data on the occurrence of SHH mutations in these patients are limited. We screened for SHH and GLI2 mutations or copy number variations (CNV) in patients with congenital hypopituitarism without MCD or with variable degrees of MCD. Detailed data on clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings of 115 patients presenting with congenital hypopituitarism without MCD, septo-optic dysplasia or HPE were analysed. The SHH and GLI2 genes were directly sequenced, and the presence of gene CNV was analysed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Anterior pituitary deficiency was found in 74% and 53% of patients with SOD or HPE, respectively. Diabetes insipidus was common in patients with HPE (47%) but infrequent in patients with congenital hypopituitarism or SOD (7% and 8%, respectively). A single heterozygous nonsense SHH mutation (p.Tyr175Ter) was found in a patient presenting with hypopituitarism and alobar HPE. No other SHH mutations or CNV were found. Nine GLI2 variations (8 missense and 1 frameshift) including a homozygous and a compound heterozygous variation were found in patients with congenital hypopituitarism or SOD, but not in HPE patients. No GLI2 CNV were found. SHH mutations or copy number variations are not a common cause of congenital hypopituitarism in patients without complex midline cerebral defects. GLI2 variants are found in some patients with congenital hypopituitarism without complex midline cerebral defects or septo-optic dysplasia. However, functional analyses of these variants are needed to strengthen genotype-phenotype relationship. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Thermo-siphon Mock-up Test for the HANARO-CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jungwoon; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Hark Rho; Kim, Youngki; Kim, Myong Seop; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Bong Su

    2006-04-15

    In order to moderate thermal neutrons into cold neutrons, the liquid hydrogen is selected as a moderator for the HANARO CNS. By the non-nuclear heat load and nuclear heat load induced from collision of gamma-ray, beta-ray, and thermal neutrons, the liquid hydrogen in the moderator cell evaporates and flows into the heat exchanger. This evaporated hydrogen gas is liquefied by the cryogenic helium supplied from the helium refrigeration system,, then flows back to the moderator cell. This is so-called two-phase thermo-siphon. The most important point in the stable thermo-siphon is to have the good balance between the cooling capacity of the HRS and the heat load on the moderator cell so as to maintain the stable two-phase liquid level in the moderator cell. Accordingly, for not only the experience of the cryogenic two-phase thermo-siphon but also setup of the operation procedure, the full-scaled mock-up test has been performed using the liquid hydrogen. Through the test, the stable thermo-siphon establishment is confirmed at the cold normal operation; furthermore, the detail design parameter is validated. On top of the normal operation procedure setup, the abnormal operation procedure is settled based on the understanding the abnormal pressure and temperature transient dynamics in the hydrogen system.

  1. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  2. Head midline position for preventing the occurrence or extension of germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsik, Olga; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Bruschettini, Matteo

    2017-07-20

    Preterm birth is known to constitute the major risk factor for development of germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH). Head position may affect cerebral hemodynamics and thus may be involved indirectly in development of GM-IVH. Turning the head toward one side may functionally occlude jugular venous drainage on the ipsilateral side while increasing intracranial pressure and cerebral blood volume. Thus, it has been suggested that cerebral venous pressure is reduced and hydrostatic brain drainage improved if the patient is in supine midline position with the bed tilted 30°. The midline position might be achieved in the supine position and, with the use of physical aids, in the lateral position as well. Midline position should be kept, at least when the incidence of GM-IVH is greatest, that is, during the first two to three days of life. Primary objective To assess whether head midline position is more effective than any other head position for preventing or extending germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage in infants born at ≤ 32 weeks' gestational age. Secondary objectives To perform subgroup analyses regarding gestational age, birth weight, intubated versus not intubated, and with or without GM-IVH at trial entry. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 8), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to September 19, 2016), Embase (1980 to September 19,.2016), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to September 19, 2016). We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials. Randomized clinical controlled trials, quasi-randomized trials, and cluster-randomized controlled trials comparing placing very preterm infants in a head midline position versus placing them in a prone or lateral decubitus

  3. MRI patterns in recurrence of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Altedorneburg, Gernot; Heuser, Lothar; Pels, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PCNSL are rare but highly malignant brain tumors. ► PCNSL recur in different anatomic sites compared with initial presentation. ► Non-parenchymal contrast enhancement is a frequent finding at initialdiagnosis and at relapse. -- Abstract: Purpose: Primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSL) are highly malignant non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma restricted to the CNS. While MRI features of PCNSL at initial presentation have been comprehensively described, literature on MRI-characteristics at relapse is sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate anatomic location and contrast enhancement patterns at PCNSL recurrence by cranial MRI. Methods: Sixteen immunocompetent patients (9 men, 7 women, median age 65 years) with histologically proven PCNSL and initial response to a standardized polychemotherapy, but suffering from a relapse were consecutively recorded. Native and contrast-enhanced MRI examinations carried out at initial presentation and at time of relapse were compared. Anatomical site of parenchymal enhancement, frequency and presence of non-parenchymal contrast enhancement (i.e. ventricular, superficial, subependymal) patterns at initial presentation and at relapse were recorded and compared. Results: Local recurrence was found at the site of the initial tumor presentation in four of the 16 cases. Six of 11 patients presenting a unilateral PCNSL at initial presentation had a bilateral involvement at relapse. In two cases, recurrence appeared solely on the contralateral side without involvement of the hemisphere initially affected. At both dates, subependymal enhancement was the most often found non-parenchymal pattern (six at initial presentation, and five at relapse). The number of patients with a ventricular contrast enhancement increased from one at initial presentation to four at relapse. Conclusions: PCNSL tend to recur in different parenchymal anatomic sites as compared with the site of the initial tumor presentation. Contrast-enhancing non

  4. Effectiveness of Prescription-Based CNS Stimulants on Hospitalization in Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Christopher; Polcwiartek, Christoffer; Asztalos, Marton

    2018-01-01

    were used to investigate the effectiveness of CNS stimulants in patients with schizophrenia between 1995 and 2014; a mirror-image model with 605 individuals, using paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and a follow-up study with 789 individuals, using a conditional risk-set model. RESULTS: CNS...

  5. CNS metastasis from malignant uveal melanoma: a clinical and histopathological characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, S K; Lindegaard, J; Isager, P

    2008-01-01

    was observed in two cases (14%). The amount of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes was pronounced in three cases (23%). CONCLUSION: The proportion of uveal melanoma patients having CNS metastasis was 0.7%. Eleven patients had multiple organ metastases, and the average time from the initial CNS symptoms to death...

  6. Anosognosia in mild cognitive impairment: Relationship to activation of cortical midline structures involved in self-appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Michele L.; Jabbar, Britta M.; Schmitz, Taylor W.; Trivedi, Mehul A.; Gleason, Carey E.; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Rowley, Howard A.; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2009-01-01

    Awareness of cognitive dysfunction shown by individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a condition conferring risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is variable. Anosognosia, or unawareness of loss of function, is beginning to be recognized as an important clinical symptom of MCI. However, little is known about the brain substrates underlying this symptom. We hypothesized that MCI participants’ activation of cortical midline structures (CMS) during self-appraisal would covary with level of insight into cognitive difficulties (indexed by a discrepancy score between patient and informant ratings of cognitive decline in each MCI participant). To address this hypothesis, we first compared 16 MCI participants and 16 age-matched controls, examining brain regions showing conjoint or differential BOLD response during self-appraisal. Second, we used regression to investigate the relationship between awareness of deficit in MCI and BOLD activity during self-appraisal, controlling for extent of memory impairment. Between-group comparisons indicated that MCI participants show subtly attenuated CMS activity during self-appraisal. Regression analysis revealed a highly-significant relationship between BOLD response during self-appraisal and self-awareness of deficit in MCI. This finding highlights the level of anosognosia in MCI as an important predictor of response to self-appraisal in cortical midline structures, brain regions vulnerable to changes in early AD. PMID:17445294

  7. Targeted CNS delivery using human MiniPromoters and demonstrated compatibility with adeno-associated viral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N de Leeuw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical for human gene therapy is the availability of small promoters tools to drive gene expression in a highly specific and reproducible manner. We tackled this challenge by developing human DNA MiniPromoters (MiniPs using computational biology and phylogenetic conservation. MiniPs were tested in mouse as single-copy knock-ins at the Hprt locus on the X chromosome and evaluated for lacZ reporter expression in central nervous system (CNS and non–CNS tissue. Eighteen novel MiniPs driving expression in mouse brain were identified, 2 MiniPs for driving pan-neuronal expression and 17 MiniPs for the mouse eye. Key areas of therapeutic interest were represented in this set: the cerebral cortex, embryonic hypothalamus, spinal cord, bipolar and ganglion cells of the retina, and skeletal muscle. We also demonstrated that three retinal ganglion cell MiniPs exhibit similar cell type specificity when delivered via adeno-associated virus vectors intravitreally. We conclude that our methodology and characterization has resulted in desirable expression characteristics that are intrinsic to the MiniPromoter, not dictated by copy-number effects or genomic location, and results in constructs predisposed to success in adeno-associated virus. These MiniPs are immediately applicable for preclinical studies toward gene therapy in humans and are publicly available to facilitate basic and clinical research, and human gene therapy.

  8. Malignant lymphoma in central nervous system (CNS). Report of a case with characteristic CT finding and amnesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiyoshi, Kenji; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Nishimura, Toshio

    1984-07-01

    A 71-year-old male was admitted to Kohka Public Hospital on January 4, 1980, because of frequent vomiting and recent memory loss. Two weeks before admission upper G-I series showed no abnormalities. Physical and neurological examinations revealed no abnormalities except for slightly apathetic appearance and recent memory loss. Mild pleocytosis and marked increase of protein in CSF were observed. CT scan on January 17 showed high density areas in both medial sides of temporal lobes with remarkable contrast enhancement. His memory and, consciousness disturbances gradually aggravated, accompanied by abnormal density spreading around the ventricle walls like ventriculitis. He was transfered to Kyoto University Hospital on March 17, and malignant lymphoma was diagnosed on the basis of CSF cytology. Radiation and chemotherapy alleviated the CNS involvement and he regained normal mental function. On June 16, he developed pneumonia followed by status epilepticus. Autopsy findings revealed no lymphoid cell infiltration, but fibrous tissues in both hippocampal gyri and lymphomatous cells in the liver, which could not be suspected on clinical examinations. Apparent malignant lymphoma cells were not found in lymph nodes. This case indicated peculiar evolution of malignant lymphoma from liver to CNS or vice versa. We could not decide which organ was primary. CT findings of this case was very interesting; they resembled ventriculitis, which simulate tumors such as medulloblastoma or ependymoma spreading under ependymal lining.

  9. Therapy of CNS leukemia with intraventricular chemotherapy and low-dose neuraxis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinherz, P.; Jereb, B.; Galicich, J.

    1985-01-01

    Successful treatment of CNS leukemic relapse has been frustrated by frequent local recurrence and eventual marrow relapse. The authors describe the treatment of meningeal leukemia in 39 children with intrathecal remission induction followed by the placement of an Ommaya reservoir to facilitate the administration and distribution of chemotherapeutic agents into the CSF. Six hundred or 900 rad of craniospinal radiation and maintenance intraventricular and intrathecal chemotherapy was then administered. Systemic reinduction therapy was added in the later cases. Sixteen children (41%) experienced no further events, with 17+ months to 13+ years (median, 25 months) follow-up . Eleven patients (28%) had CNS recurrence, nine (23%) bone marrow (BM) relapse, and two (5%) testicular relapse as the next adverse event. The course of patients with first isolated CNS relapse differed from that of the others. Eleven (69%) of 16 patients treated for first isolated CNS relapse are alive and 9 are event free, while only 35% of patients whose CNS relapse occurred simultaneously or after recurrent disease at other sites are alive (P = .04). Seven of 23 in the later group are event free. The difference is due to the increased incidence of BM relapse in the later group (30% v 6%; P = .04). For patients with first isolated CNS relapse, the life-table median CNS remission duration is 42 months. The projected CNS relapse-free survival and event-free survival 8 to 10 years after CNS relapse are 40% and 32%, respectively. Headache, nausea, and emesis of short duration were frequent during therapy. In three patients, the reservoir had to be removed for infection. No patient suffered neurologic deficit related to the reservoir. The therapy described can reduce the CNS relapse rate with manageable toxicity

  10. Risk Factors for Subsequent Central Nervous System Tumors in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Melissa; Shaw, Bronwen E; Brazauskas, Ruta

    2017-01-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk of subsequent solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors. The risk of CNS tumors after HCT in pediatric HCT recipients is not known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CNS tumors in pediatric recipients...

  11. Growth of Malignant Non-CNS Tumors Alters Brain Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Nersisyan, Lilit; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David; Mancini, Maria; Sidransky, David; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Cancer survivors experience numerous treatment side effects that negatively affect their quality of life. Cognitive side effects are especially insidious, as they affect memory, cognition, and learning. Neurocognitive deficits occur prior to cancer treatment, arising even before cancer diagnosis, and we refer to them as “tumor brain.” Metabolomics is a new area of research that focuses on metabolome profiles and provides important mechanistic insights into various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. Many neurological diseases and conditions affect metabolic processes in the brain. However, the tumor brain metabolome has never been analyzed. In our study we used direct flow injection/mass spectrometry (DI-MS) analysis to establish the effects of the growth of lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and sarcoma on the brain metabolome of TumorGraft™ mice. We found that the growth of malignant non-CNS tumors impacted metabolic processes in the brain, affecting protein biosynthesis, and amino acid and sphingolipid metabolism. The observed metabolic changes were similar to those reported for neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging, and may have potential mechanistic value for future analysis of the tumor brain phenomenon. PMID:29515623

  12. Fluids and barriers of the CNS: a historical viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddelow Shane A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tracing the exact origins of modern science can be a difficult but rewarding pursuit. It is possible for the astute reader to follow the background of any subject through the many important surviving texts from the classical and ancient world. While empirical investigations have been described by many since the time of Aristotle and scientific methods have been employed since the Middle Ages, the beginnings of modern science are generally accepted to have originated during the 'scientific revolution' of the 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. The scientific method is so fundamental to modern science that some philosophers consider earlier investigations as 'pre-science'. Notwithstanding this, the insight that can be gained from the study of the beginnings of a subject can prove important in the understanding of work more recently completed. As this journal undergoes an expansion in focus and nomenclature from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF into all barriers of the central nervous system (CNS, this review traces the history of both the blood-CSF and blood-brain barriers from as early as it was possible to find references, to the time when modern concepts were established at the beginning of the 20th century.

  13. CNS fungal meningitis to the "Top of the basilar"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Logan CS; Kirschner RC; Simonds GR

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) infections are a rare complication of epidural steroid injections and without strong clinical suspicion, fungal organisms may be overlooked among the long differential of causes of meningitis.Rare sequela of fungal meningitis is the development of stroke.To our knowledge, we present the first case of post epidural steroid injection(ESI) fungal meningitis leading toa basilar artery stroke, otherwise known as“top of the basilar” syndrome.We present a49-year-old female with a history ofESIs who presented to the emergency department with headache, neck stiffness, and abdominal pain.She was discharged after her labs and symptoms were deemed inconsistent with meningitis.She was eventually admitted and twelve days after her originalED visit, she was diagnosed with meningitis and started on anti-fungal treatment.She was discharged88 days later but was readmitted due to left sided weakness and mental status changes.She quickly lost motor and bulbar functions.AnMRA showed diminished distal flow through the basilar artery, suggesting near complete occlusion.Although appropriate long term anti-fungal treatment was started, the patient still succumbed to a rare vascular event.Physicians who are treating patients forESI meningitis should be aware of the potential for vasculitic and encephalitic complications.

  14. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress preconditioning of spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne I Rodgers

    Full Text Available Cortical spreading depression (CSD is closely associated with important pathologies including stroke, seizures and migraine. The mechanisms underlying SD in its various forms are still incompletely understood. Here we describe SD-like events in an invertebrate model, the ventilatory central pattern generator (CPG of locusts. Using K(+ -sensitive microelectrodes, we measured extracellular K(+ concentration ([K(+](o in the metathoracic neuropile of the CPG while monitoring CPG output electromyographically from muscle 161 in the second abdominal segment to investigate the role K(+ in failure of neural circuit operation induced by various stressors. Failure of ventilation in response to different stressors (hyperthermia, anoxia, ATP depletion, Na(+/K(+ ATPase impairment, K(+ injection was associated with a disturbance of CNS ion homeostasis that shares the characteristics of CSD and SD-like events in vertebrates. Hyperthermic failure was preconditioned by prior heat shock (3 h, 45 degrees C and induced-thermotolerance was associated with an increase in the rate of clearance of extracellular K(+ that was not linked to changes in ATP levels or total Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity. Our findings suggest that SD-like events in locusts are adaptive to terminate neural network operation and conserve energy during stress and that they can be preconditioned by experience. We propose that they share mechanisms with CSD in mammals suggesting a common evolutionary origin.

  16. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The mastermind approach to CNS drug therapy: translational prediction of human brain distribution, target site kinetics, and therapeutic effects

    OpenAIRE

    de Lange, Elizabeth CM

    2013-01-01

    Despite enormous advances in CNS research, CNS disorders remain the world?s leading cause of disability. This accounts for more hospitalizations and prolonged care than almost all other diseases combined, and indicates a high unmet need for good CNS drugs and drug therapies. Following dosing, not only the chemical properties of the drug and blood?brain barrier (BBB) transport, but also many other processes will ultimately determine brain target site kinetics and consequently the CNS effects. ...

  18. When the Tail Can't Wag the Dog: The Implications of CNS-Intrinsic Initiation of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre S Davis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The CNS (central nervous system is unquestionably the central organ that regulates directly or indirectly all physiological systems in the mammalian body. Yet, when considering the defence of the CNS from pathogens, the CNS has often been considered passive and subservient to the pro-inflammatory responses of the immune system. In this view, neuroinflammatory disorders are examples of when the tail (the immune system wags the dog (the CNS to the detriment of an individual's function and survival.

  19. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier as the primary effect of CNS irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, P; Gash, D M; Hansen, J T; Nelson, D F; Williams, J P

    1994-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is believed to be unique in organ microcirculation due to the 'tight junctions' which exist between endothelial cells and, some argue, the additional functional components represented by the perivascular boundary of neuroglial cells; these selectively exclude proteins and drugs from the brain parenchyma. This study was designed to examine the effects of irradiation on the BBB and determine the impact of the altered pathophysiology on the production of central nervous system (CNS) late effects such as demyelination, gliosis and necrosis. Rats, irradiated at 60 Gy, were serially sacrificed at 2, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Magnetic resonance image analysis (MRI) was obtained prior to sacrifice with selected animals from each group. The remaining animals underwent horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) perfusion at the time of sacrifice. The serial studies showed a detectable disruption of the BBB at 2 weeks post-irradiation and this was manifested as discrete leakage; late injury seen at 24 weeks indicated diffuse vasculature leakage, severe loss of the capillary network, cortical atrophy and white matter necrosis. Reversal or repair of radiation injury was seen between 6 and 12 weeks, indicating a bimodal peak in events. Blood-brain barrier disruption is an early, readily recognizable pathophysiological event occurring after radiation injury, is detectable in vivo/in vitro by MRI and HRP studies, and appears to precede white matter necrosis. Dose response studies over a wide range of doses, utilizing both external and interstitial irradiation, are in progress along with correlative histopathologic and ultrastructural studies.

  20. Albumin nanoparticles targeted with Apo E enter the CNS by transcytosis and are delivered to neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zensi, Anja; Begley, David; Pontikis, Charles; Legros, Celine; Mihoreanu, Larisa; Wagner, Sylvia; Büchel, Claudia; von Briesen, Hagen; Kreuter, Jörg

    2009-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a considerable obstacle to brain entry of the majority of drugs and thus severely restricts the therapy of many serious CNS diseases including brain tumours, brain HIV, Alzheimer and other neurodegenerative diseases. The use of nanoparticles coated with polysorbate 80 or with attached apolipoprotein E has enabled the delivery of drugs across the BBB. However, the mechanism of this enhanced transport is still not fully understood. In this present study, human serum albumin nanoparticles, with covalently bound apolipoprotein E (Apo E) as a targetor as well as without apolipoprotein E, were manufactured and injected intravenously into SV 129 mice. The animals were sacrificed after 15 and 30 min, and their brains were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Only the nanoparticles with covalently bound apolipoprotein E were detected in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurones, whereas no uptake into the brain was detectable with nanoparticles without apolipoprotein E. We have also demonstrated uptake of the albumin/ApoE nanoparticles into mouse endothelial (b.End3) cells in vitro and their intracellular localisation. These findings indicate that nanoparticles with covalently bound apolipoprotein E are taken up into the cerebral endothelium by an endocytic mechanism followed by transcytosis into brain parenchyma.

  1. Dysregulated RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) Assembly within CNS Corresponds with Abnormal miRNA Expression during Autoimmune Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Cwiklińska, Hanna; Mycko, Marcin P; Cichalewska, Maria; Domowicz, Małgorzata; Lewkowicz, Natalia; Jurewicz, Anna; Selmaj, Krzysztof W

    2015-05-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) associate with Argonaute (Ago), GW182, and FXR1 proteins to form RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). RISCs represent a critical checkpoint in the regulation and bioavailability of miRNAs. Recent studies have revealed dysregulation of miRNAs in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE); however, the function of RISCs in EAE and MS is largely unknown. Here, we examined the expression of Ago, GW182, and FXR1 in CNS tissue, oligodendrocytes (OLs), brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes, and CD3(+)splenocytes (SCs) of EAE mic, and found that global RISC protein levels were significantly dysregulated. Specifically, Ago2 and FXR1 levels were decreased in OLs and brain-infiltrating T cells in EAE mice. Accordingly, assembly of Ago2/GW182/FXR1 complexes in EAE brain tissues was disrupted, as confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel with alterations in RISC complex content in OLs, we found downregulation of miRNAs essential for differentiation and survival of OLs and myelin synthesis. In brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes, aberrant RISC formation contributed to miRNA-dependent proinflammatory helper T-cell polarization. In CD3(+) SCs, we found increased expression of both Ago2 and FXR1 in EAE compared with nonimmunized mice. Therefore, our results demonstrate a gradient in expression of miRNA between primary activated T cells in the periphery and polarized CNS-infiltrating T cells. These results suggest that, in polarized autoreactive effector T cells, miRNA synthesis is inhibited in response to dysregulated RISC assembly, allowing these cells to maintain a highly specific proinflammatory program. Therefore, our findings may provide a mechanism that leads to miRNA dysregulation in EAE/MS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357521-17$15.00/0.

  2. IL-1 signal affects both protection and pathogenesis of virus-induced chronic CNS demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Byung S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theiler’s virus infection induces chronic demyelinating disease in mice and has been investigated as an infectious model for multiple sclerosis (MS. IL-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both the autoimmune disease model (EAE and this viral model for MS. However, IL-1 is known to play an important protective role against certain viral infections. Therefore, it is unclear whether IL-1-mediated signaling plays a protective or pathogenic role in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. Methods Female C57BL/6 mice and B6.129S7-Il1r1tm1Imx/J mice (IL-1R KO were infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (1 x 106 PFU. Differences in the development of demyelinating disease and changes in the histopathology were compared. Viral persistence, cytokine production, and immune responses in the CNS of infected mice were analyzed using quantitative PCR, ELISA, and flow cytometry. Results Administration of IL-1β, thereby rending resistant B6 mice susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelinating disease, induced a high level of Th17 response. Interestingly, infection of TMEV into IL-1R-deficient resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice also induced TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. High viral persistence was found in the late stage of viral infection in IL-1R-deficient mice, although there were few differences in the initial anti-viral immune responses and viral persistent levels between the WT B6 and IL-1R-deficiecent mice. The initial type I IFN responses and the expression of PDL-1 and Tim-3 were higher in the CNS of TMEV-infected IL-1R-deficient mice, leading to deficiencies in T cell function that permit viral persistence. Conclusions These results suggest that the presence of high IL-1 level exerts the pathogenic role by elevating pathogenic Th17 responses, whereas the lack of IL-1 signals promotes viral persistence in the spinal cord due to insufficient T cell activation by elevating the production of

  3. The CNS glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The gut-brain axis plays a key role in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In response to luminal stimulation of macronutrients and microbiota-derived metabolites (secondary bile acids and short chain fatty acids), glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and -2) are cosecreted from endocrine L cells in the gut and coreleased from preproglucagonergic neurons in the brain stem. Glucagon-like peptides are proposed as key mediators for bariatric surgery-improved glycemic control and energy balance. Little is known about the GLP-2 receptor (Glp2r)-mediated physiological roles in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet Glp1r has been studied extensively. This review will highlight the physiological relevance of the central nervous system (CNS) Glp2r in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis and focuses on cellular mechanisms underlying the CNS Glp2r-mediated neural circuitry and intracellular PI3K signaling pathway. New evidence (obtained from Glp2r tissue-specific KO mice) indicates that the Glp2r in POMC neurons is essential for suppressing feeding behavior, gastrointestinal motility, and hepatic glucose production. Mice with Glp2r deletion selectively in POMC neurons exhibit hyperphagic behavior, accelerated gastric emptying, glucose intolerance, and hepatic insulin resistance. GLP-2 differentially modulates postsynaptic membrane excitability of hypothalamic POMC neurons in Glp2r- and PI3K-dependent manners. GLP-2 activates the PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling pathway in POMC neurons by Glp2r-p85α interaction. Intracerebroventricular GLP-2 augments glucose tolerance, suppresses glucose production, and enhances insulin sensitivity, which require PI3K (p110α) activation in POMC neurons. Thus, the CNS Glp2r plays a physiological role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis. This review will also discuss key questions for future studies. PMID:24990862

  4. Effects of curved midline and varying width on the description of the effective diffusivity of Brownian particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Yoshua; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2018-05-01

    Axial diffusion in channels and tubes of smoothly-varying geometry can be approximately described as one-dimensional diffusion in the entropy potential with a position-dependent effective diffusion coefficient, by means of the modified Fick–Jacobs equation. In this work, we derive analytical expressions for the position-dependent effective diffusivity for two-dimensional asymmetric varying-width channels, and for three-dimensional curved midline tubes, formed by straight walls. To this end, we use a recently developed theoretical framework using the Frenet–Serret moving frame as the coordinate system (2016 J. Chem. Phys. 145 074105). For narrow tubes and channels, an effective one-dimensional description reducing the diffusion equation to a Fick–Jacobs-like equation in general coordinates is used. From this last equation, one can calculate the effective diffusion coefficient applying Neumann boundary conditions.

  5. Central nervous system prophylaxis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Khan, Nadia; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Kizilbash, Sani Haider; Barta, Stefan K

    2016-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a relatively uncommon manifestation; with most cases of CNS involvement occuring during relapse after primary therapy. CNS dissemination typically occurs early in the disease course and is most likely present subclinically at the time of diagnosis in many patients who later relapse in the CNS. CNS relapse in these patients is associated with poor outcomes. Based on a CNS relapse rate of 5% in DLBCL and weighing the benefits against the toxicities, universal application of CNS prophylaxis is not justified. The introduction of rituximab has significantly reduced the incidence of CNS relapse in DLBCL. Different studies have employed other agents for CNS prophylaxis, such as intrathecal chemotherapy and high-dose systemic agents with sufficient CNS penetration. If CNS prophylaxis is to be given, it should be preferably administered during primary chemotherapy. However, there is no strong evidence that supports any single approach for CNS prophylaxis. In this review, we outline different strategies of administering CNS prophylaxis in DLBCL patients reported in literature and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. CLIPPERS among patients diagnosed with non-specific CNS neuroinflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, B M; Lindelof, M; Illes, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids (CLIPPERS) is an inflammatory CNS disorder characterized by 1) subacute onset of cerebellar and brainstem symptoms, 2) peripontine contrast-enhancing perivascular lesions with a "salt-and-pepper" appeara...

  7. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A.; Toprak, Umut H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T. W.; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A.; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J.; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C.; Pajtler, Kristian W.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D.; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M.; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J.; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C.; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M.; von Bueren, André O.; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C.; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V. Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S.; Taylor, Michael D.; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ellison, David W.; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally

  8. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A.; Toprak, Umut H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A.; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J.; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C.; Pajtler, Kristian W.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D.; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M.; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J.; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C.; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M.; Von Bueren, André O.; Von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C.; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V. Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S.; Taylor, Michael D.; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ellison, David W.; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of

  9. Netrin-1 Confines Rhombic Lip-Derived Neurons to the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Yung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During brainstem development, newborn neurons originating from the rhombic lip embark on exceptionally long migrations to generate nuclei important for audition, movement, and respiration. Along the way, this highly motile population passes several cranial nerves yet remains confined to the CNS. We found that Ntn1 accumulates beneath the pial surface separating the CNS from the PNS, with gaps at nerve entry sites. In mice null for Ntn1 or its receptor DCC, hindbrain neurons enter cranial nerves and migrate into the periphery. CNS neurons also escape when Ntn1 is selectively lost from the sub-pial region (SPR, and conversely, expression of Ntn1 throughout the mutant hindbrain can prevent their departure. These findings identify a permissive role for Ntn1 in maintaining the CNS-PNS boundary. We propose that Ntn1 confines rhombic lip-derived neurons by providing a preferred substrate for tangentially migrating neurons in the SPR, preventing their entry into nerve roots.

  10. Micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia: an unknown association of two uncommon CNS disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinder, G.; Corat-Simon, J.; Hershkovitz, E.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of two known pathologies of the CNS in an unusual association: the concomitant presentation of the micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia. To our knowledge, this association is unreported to date. (orig.)

  11. Micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia: an unknown association of two uncommon CNS disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinder, G. [MAR Bikur Cholim Hospital Jerusalem (MOR-MAR), Jerusalem (Israel); Corat-Simon, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zrifin, Beer Jakov (Israel); Hershkovitz, E. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Soroka Medical Center, Beer Sheba (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    We describe a case of two known pathologies of the CNS in an unusual association: the concomitant presentation of the micropituitarism and cortical dysplasia. To our knowledge, this association is unreported to date. (orig.)

  12. New physical examination tests for lumbar spondylolisthesis and instability: low midline sill sign and interspinous gap change during lumbar flexion-extension motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kang; Jhun, Hyung-Joon

    2015-04-22

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis (LS) and lumbar instability (LI) are common disorders in patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. However, few physical examination tests for LS and LI have been reported. In the study described herein, new physical examination tests for LS and LI were devised and evaluated for their validity. The test for LS was designated "low midline sill sign", and that for LI was designated "interspinous gap change" during lumbar flexion-extension motion. The validity of the low midline sill sign was evaluated in 96 patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. Validity of the interspinous gap change during lumbar flexion-extension motion was evaluated in 73 patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the two tests were also investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the low midline sill sign for LS were 81.3% and 89.1%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of the test were 78.8% and 90.5%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the interspinous gap change test for LI were 82.2% and 60.7%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of the test were 77.1% and 68.0%, respectively. The low midline sill sign and interspinous gap change tests are effective for the detection of LS and LI, and can be performed easily in an outpatient setting.

  13. Narrow CSF space at high convexity and high midline areas in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus detected by axial and coronal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Morioka (Japan); Honda, Satoshi [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Iwamura, Akihide [Kohnodai Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Ichikawa (Japan); Shibata, Eri [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Morioka (Japan); Ohba, Hideki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology, Morioka (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the narrowing of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity and high midline areas, which is speculated to be one of the clinical characteristics of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). We retrospectively examined axial and coronal T1-weighted images of 14 iNPH patients and 12 age-matched controls. The narrowness of the CSF space at the high convexity/midline was blindly evaluated by five raters using a continuous confidence rating scale for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Axial and coronal imaging accurately determined the presence of the narrow cisterns/sulci at the high convexity/midline and was capable of predicting probable/definite iNPH with a high degree of accuracy. there were also no significant differences in the detection of this finding between the axial and coronal images. Both axial and coronal T1-weighted MRI can detect the narrow CSF space at the high convexity/midline accurately and may therefore facilitate clinicians in choosing a management strategy for iNPH patients. (orig.)

  14. Narrow CSF space at high convexity and high midline areas in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus detected by axial and coronal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Honda, Satoshi; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Iwamura, Akihide; Shibata, Eri; Ohba, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the narrowing of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity and high midline areas, which is speculated to be one of the clinical characteristics of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). We retrospectively examined axial and coronal T1-weighted images of 14 iNPH patients and 12 age-matched controls. The narrowness of the CSF space at the high convexity/midline was blindly evaluated by five raters using a continuous confidence rating scale for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Axial and coronal imaging accurately determined the presence of the narrow cisterns/sulci at the high convexity/midline and was capable of predicting probable/definite iNPH with a high degree of accuracy. there were also no significant differences in the detection of this finding between the axial and coronal images. Both axial and coronal T1-weighted MRI can detect the narrow CSF space at the high convexity/midline accurately and may therefore facilitate clinicians in choosing a management strategy for iNPH patients. (orig.)

  15. Targeting Breast Cancer CNS Metastasis with Oncolytic Polioviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    8217. Monte . iii. K. Merrill, aindr M. craincier. Genetic deiettinstnt-s af VV-inariivaicit PVS-RII’O (+ corrspondn ingt I X Wil’fiul. Sitrsial cell iype... Ararat M, Graham FL (2002) Preferential transformation of human neuronal cells by human adenoviruses and the origin of HEK 293 cells. Faseb J 16: 869

  16. The MiRNA Journey from Theory to Practice as a CNS Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta eStoicea

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small nucleotide sequences that control gene transcription, have the potential to serve an expanded function as indicators in the diagnosis and progression of neurological disorders. Studies involving debilitating neurological diseases such as, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injuries, Parkinson’s disease and CNS tumors, already provide validation for their clinical diagnostic use. These small nucleotide sequences have several features, making them favorable candidates as biomarkers, including function in multiple tissues, stability in bodily fluids, a role in pathogenesis, and the ability to be detected early in the disease course. Cerebrospinal fluid, with its cell-free environment, collection process that minimizes tissue damage, and direct contact with the brain and spinal cord, is a promising source of miRNA in the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. Despite the advantages of miRNA analysis, current analytic technology is not yet affordable as a clinically viable diagnostic tool and requires standardization. The goal of this review is to explore the prospective use of CSF miRNA as a reliable and affordable biomarker for different neurological disorders.

  17. The MiRNA Journey from Theory to Practice as a CNS Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Du, Amy; Lakis, D. Christie; Tipton, Courtney; Arias-Morales, Carlos E.; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small nucleotide sequences that control gene transcription, have the potential to serve an expanded function as indicators in the diagnosis and progression of neurological disorders. Studies involving debilitating neurological diseases such as, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injuries, Parkinson's disease and CNS tumors, already provide validation for their clinical diagnostic use. These small nucleotide sequences have several features, making them favorable candidates as biomarkers, including function in multiple tissues, stability in bodily fluids, a role in pathogenesis, and the ability to be detected early in the disease course. Cerebrospinal fluid, with its cell-free environment, collection process that minimizes tissue damage, and direct contact with the brain and spinal cord, is a promising source of miRNA in the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. Despite the advantages of miRNA analysis, current analytic technology is not yet affordable as a clinically viable diagnostic tool and requires standardization. The goal of this review is to explore the prospective use of CSF miRNA as a reliable and affordable biomarker for different neurological disorders. PMID:26904099

  18. Torque Audit and Visual Inspection of the In-Pool Assembly for CNS in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jin Won; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Min Su; Han, Jae Sam; Kim, Hyung Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    The Cold Neutron Source (CNS) was installed at the HANARO in 2009 and has been operated over 2 years to supply cold neutrons for the cold neutron scattering instruments. The liquid hydrogen, which is cooled down to 152±3 kPa(a) by the helium refrigeration system, in the moderator cell of In-Pool Assembly (IPA) is used to moderate thermal neutrons into cold neutrons. Cold neutron flux is dependent upon the state of liquid hydrogen, which can be identified by the pressure. So the operation of the helium refrigeration system is most important to keep the hydrogen pressure stable. Another factor influencing cold neutron flux is the thickness of the water film gap between the outer surface of IPA and the inner surface of CN vertical hole. The IPA was installed in the CN vertical hole closely to the CN beam tube within a minimum water film gap to get maximum cold neutron flux. But if tightening bolts assembling the IPA on the reactor structure become loose in abnormal cases, the water film gap could be changed and therefore influence cold neutron flux. So we need to check the installation torques and to inspect the assembly status of the IPA on the reactor structure to ensure that the water film gap is kept well as initially installed. This paper presents the results of the torque audit and the visual inspection of the IPA performed in 2011

  19. Torque Audit and Visual Inspection of the In-Pool Assembly for CNS in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Won; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Min Su; Han, Jae Sam; Kim, Hyung Kyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The Cold Neutron Source (CNS) was installed at the HANARO in 2009 and has been operated over 2 years to supply cold neutrons for the cold neutron scattering instruments. The liquid hydrogen, which is cooled down to 152{+-}3 kPa(a) by the helium refrigeration system, in the moderator cell of In-Pool Assembly (IPA) is used to moderate thermal neutrons into cold neutrons. Cold neutron flux is dependent upon the state of liquid hydrogen, which can be identified by the pressure. So the operation of the helium refrigeration system is most important to keep the hydrogen pressure stable. Another factor influencing cold neutron flux is the thickness of the water film gap between the outer surface of IPA and the inner surface of CN vertical hole. The IPA was installed in the CN vertical hole closely to the CN beam tube within a minimum water film gap to get maximum cold neutron flux. But if tightening bolts assembling the IPA on the reactor structure become loose in abnormal cases, the water film gap could be changed and therefore influence cold neutron flux. So we need to check the installation torques and to inspect the assembly status of the IPA on the reactor structure to ensure that the water film gap is kept well as initially installed. This paper presents the results of the torque audit and the visual inspection of the IPA performed in 2011

  20. Perspectives and new aspects of metalloproteinases' inhibitors in therapy of CNS disorders: from chemistry to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Budzynska, Barbara; Skalicka-Wozniak, Krystyna; Kurzepa, Jacek

    2018-05-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and, at the same time, influence cell differentiation, migration, proliferation and survival. Their importance in variety of human diseases including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary emphysema and fibrotic disorders has been known for many years but special attention should be paid on the role of MMPs in the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Till now, there are not many well documented physiological MMP target proteins in the brain and only some pathological ones. Numerous neurodegenerative diseases is a consequence or result in disturbed remodeling of brain ECM, therefore proper action of MMPs as well as control of their activity may play crucial roles in the development and the progress of these diseases. In present review we discuss the role of metalloproteinase inhibitors, from the well-known natural endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) through exogenous synthetic ones like (4-phenoxyphenylsulfonyl)methylthiirane (SB-3CT), tetracyclines, batimastat (BB-94) and FN-439. As the MMP-TIMP system has been well described in physiological development as well as in pathological conditions mainly in neoplasctic diseases, the knowledge about the enzymatic system in mammalian brain tissue remain still poorly understood in this context. Therefore, we focus on MMPs inhibition in the context of physiological function of adult brain as well as pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, brain injuries and others. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Primary ewing sarcoma of the anterior mandible localized to the midline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, E.; Brouns, E.R.E.A.; Korones, D.N.; Pochal, W.F.; Philipone, E.M.; Zegarelli, D.J.; Yoon, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant, small, round blue-cell tumor of the bone that is usually located in the long bones and the pelvis. Fewer than 3% of all Ewing sarcomas originate in the head and neck region and these are mostly located in the posterior mandible. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl

  2. TRPM2 Channel Aggravates CNS Inflammation and Cognitive Impairment via Activation of Microglia in Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanohara, Jun; Kakae, Masashi; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mori, Yasuo; Arai, Ken; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Kaneko, Shuji

    2018-04-04

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is a characteristic seen in widespread CNS diseases, including neurodegenerative and mental disorders, and is commonly accompanied by cognitive impairment. Recently, several studies demonstrated that chronic cerebral hypoperfusion can induce the excessive inflammatory responses that precede neuronal dysfunction; however, the precise mechanism of cognitive impairment due to chronic cerebral hypoperfusion remains unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca 2+ -permeable channel that is abundantly expressed in immune cells and is involved in aggravation of inflammatory responses. Therefore, we investigated the pathophysiological role of TRPM2 in a mouse chronic cerebral hypoperfusion model with bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS). When male mice were subjected to BCAS, cognitive dysfunction and white matter injury at day 28 were significantly improved in TRPM2 knock-out (TRPM2-KO) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice, whereas hippocampal damage was not observed. There were no differences in blood-brain barrier breakdown and H 2 O 2 production between the two genotypes at 14 and 28 d after BCAS. Cytokine production was significantly suppressed in BCAS-operated TRPM2-KO mice compared with WT mice at day 28. In addition, the number of Iba1-positive cells gradually decreased from day 14. Moreover, daily treatment with minocycline significantly improved cognitive perturbation. Surgical techniques using bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that activated Iba1-positive cells in white matter could be brain-resident microglia, not peripheral macrophages. Together, these findings suggest that microglia contribute to the aggravation of cognitive impairment by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, and that TRPM2 may be a potential target for chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-related disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is manifested in a wide variety of CNS diseases, including neurodegenerative

  3. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colleoni, Silvia; Galli, Cesare; Giannelli, Serena G.; Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio; Broccoli, Vania; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  4. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleoni, Silvia, E-mail: silviacolleoni@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Galli, Cesare [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Dipartimento Clinico Veterinario, Universita di Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (Italy); Giannelli, Serena G. [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio [Laboratory of Functional Neurochemistry, Interdepartmental Research Center for Parkinson' s Disease, Neurological Institute C. Mondino, Via Mondino 2, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Broccoli, Vania, E-mail: broccoli.vania@hsr.it [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lazzari, Giovanna, E-mail: giovannalazzari@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  5. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in the choroid plexus: a potential link between vascular pro-inflammatory mediators and the CNS during peripheral tissue inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K.; Yang, H.-Y. T.; Berk, J. D.; Tran, J. H.; Iadarola, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    During peripheral tissue inflammation, inflammatory processes in the CNS can be initiated by blood-borne pro-inflammatory mediators. The choroid plexus, the site of CSF production, is a highly specialized interface between the vascular system and CNS, and thus, this structure may be an important element in communication between the vascular compartment and the CNS during peripheral tissue inflammation. We investigated the potential participation of the choroid plexus in this process during peripheral tissue inflammation by examining expression of the SCYA2 gene which codes for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). MCP-1 protein was previously reported to be induced in a variety of cells during peripheral tissue inflammation. In the basal state, SCYA2 is highly expressed in the choroid plexus as compared to other CNS tissues. During hind paw inflammation, SCYA2 expression was significantly elevated in choroid plexus, whereas it remained unchanged in a variety of brain regions. The SCYA2-expressing cells were strongly associated with the choroid plexus as vascular depletion of blood cells by whole-body saline flush did not significantly alter SCYA2 expression in the choroid plexus. In situ hybridization suggested that the SCYA2-expressing cells were localized to the choroid plexus stroma. To elucidate potential molecular mechanisms of SCYA2 increase, we examined genes in the NF-κβ signaling cascade including TNF-α, IL-1β and IκBα in choroid tissue. Given that we also detected increased levels of MCP-1 protein by ELISA, we sought to identify potential downstream targets of MCP-1 and observed altered expression levels of mRNAs encoding tight junction proteins TJP2 and claudin 5. Finally, we detected a substantial up-regulation of the transcript encoding E-selectin, a molecule which could participate in leukocyte recruitment to the choroid plexus along with MCP-1. Together, these results suggest that profound changes occur in the choroid plexus during

  6. Radiation dose and intra-articular access: comparison of the lateral mortise and anterior midline approaches to fluoroscopically guided tibiotalar joint injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ambrose J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A.; Chang, Connie Y.; Simeone, Frank J.; Palmer, William E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Balza, Rene [Centro Medico de Occidente, Department of Radiology, Maracaibo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the lateral mortise and anterior midline approaches to fluoroscopically guided tibiotalar joint injections with respect to successful intra-articular needle placement, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, and dose area product (DAP). This retrospective study was IRB-approved and HIPAA-compliant. 498 fluoroscopically guided tibiotalar joint injections were performed or supervised by one of nine staff radiologists from 11/1/2010-12/31/2013. The injection approach was determined by operator preference. Images were reviewed on a PACS workstation to determine the injection approach (lateral mortise versus anterior midline) and to confirm intra-articular needle placement. Fluoroscopy time (minutes), radiation dose (mGy), and DAP (μGy-m{sup 2}) were recorded and compared using the student's t-test (fluoroscopy time) or the Wilcoxon rank sum test (radiation dose and DAP). There were 246 lateral mortise injections and 252 anterior midline injections. Two lateral mortise injections were excluded from further analysis because no contrast was administered. Intra-articular location of the needle tip was documented in 242/244 lateral mortise injections and 252/252 anterior midline injections. Mean fluoroscopy time was shorter for the lateral mortise group than the anterior midline group (0.7 ± 0.5 min versus 1.2 ± 0.8 min, P < 0.0001). Mean radiation dose and DAP were less for the lateral mortise group than the anterior midline group (2.1 ± 3.7 mGy versus 2.5 ± 3.5 mGy, P = 0.04; 11.5 ± 15.3 μGy-m{sup 2} versus 13.5 ± 17.3 μGy-m{sup 2}, P = 0.006). Both injection approaches resulted in nearly 100 % rates of intra-articular needle placement, but the lateral mortise approach used approximately 40 % less fluoroscopy time and delivered 15 % lower radiation dose and DAP to the patient. (orig.)

  7. Role of ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters in erlotinib CNS penetration and intracellular accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeliegy, Mohamed A; Carcaboso, Angel M; Tagen, Michael; Bai, Feng; Stewart, Clinton F

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of drug transporters in central nervous system (CNS) penetration and cellular accumulation of erlotinib and its metabolite, OSI-420. After oral erlotinib administration to wild-type and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-knockout mice (Mdr1a/b(-/-), Abcg2(-/-), Mdr1a/b(-/-)Abcg2(-/-), and Abcc4(-/-)), plasma was collected and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) was sampled using intracerebral microdialysis. A pharmacokinetic model was fit to erlotinib and OSI-420 concentration-time data, and brain penetration (P(Brain)) was estimated by the ratio of ECF-to-unbound plasma area under concentration-time curves. Intracellular accumulation of erlotinib was assessed in cells overexpressing human ABC transporters or SLC22A solute carriers. P(Brain) in wild-type mice was 0.27 ± 0.11 and 0.07 ± 0.02 (mean ± SD) for erlotinib and OSI-420, respectively. Erlotinib and OSI-420 P(Brain) in Abcg2(-/-) and Mdr1a/b(-/-)Abcg2(-/-) mice were significantly higher than in wild-type mice. Mdr1a/b(-/-) mice showed similar brain ECF penetration as wild-type mice (0.49 ± 0.37 and 0.04 ± 0.02 for erlotinib and OSI-420, respectively). In vitro, erlotinib and OSI-420 accumulation was significantly lower in cells overexpressing breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) than in control cells. Only OSI-420, not erlotinib, showed lower accumulation in cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) than in control cells. The P-gp/BCRP inhibitor elacridar increased erlotinib and OSI-420 accumulation in BCRP-overexpressing cells. Erlotinib uptake was higher in OAT3- and OCT2-transfected cells than in empty vector control cells. Abcg2 is the main efflux transporter preventing erlotinib and OSI-420 penetration in mouse brain. Erlotinib and OSI-420 are substrates for SLC22A family members OAT3 and OCT2. Our findings provide a mechanistic basis for erlotinib CNS penetration, cellular uptake, and efflux mechanisms. ©2010 AACR.

  8. Current approaches to enhance CNS delivery of drugs across the brain barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu CT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cui-Tao Lu,1 Ying-Zheng Zhao,2,3 Ho Lun Wong,4 Jun Cai,5 Lei Peng,2 Xin-Qiao Tian1 1The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Hainan Medical College, Haikou City, Hainan Province, People’s Republic of China; 3College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 4School of Pharmacy, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Departments of Pediatrics and Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: Although many agents have therapeutic potentials for central nervous system (CNS diseases, few of these agents have been clinically used because of the brain barriers. As the protective barrier of the CNS, the blood–brain barrier and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier maintain the brain microenvironment, neuronal activity, and proper functioning of the CNS. Different strategies for efficient CNS delivery have been studied. This article reviews the current approaches to open or facilitate penetration across these barriers for enhanced drug delivery to the CNS. These approaches are summarized into three broad categories: noninvasive, invasive, and miscellaneous techniques. The progresses made using these approaches are reviewed, and the associated mechanisms and problems are discussed. Keywords: drug delivery system, blood–brain barrier (BBB, central nervous system, brain-targeted therapy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF

  9. Detail Design of the hydrogen system and the gas blanketing system for the HANARO-CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Kim, Young Ki; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Bong Su; Lee, Yong Seop

    2007-04-01

    The cold neutron source (CNS), which will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, makes thermal neutrons to moderate into the cold neutrons with the ranges of 0.1 ∼ 10 meV passing through a moderator at about 22K. A moderator to produce cold neutrons is liquid hydrogen, which liquefies by the heat transfer with cryogenic helium flowing from the helium refrigeration system (HRS). Because of its installed location, the hydrogen system is designed to be surrounded by the gas blanketing system to notify the leakage on the system and to prevent hydrogen leakage out of the CNS. The hydrogen system, consisted of hydrogen charging unit, hydrogen storage unit, hydrogen buffer tank, and hydrogen piping, is designed to smoothly and safely supply hydrogen to and to draw back hydrogen from the IPA of the CNS under the HRS operation mode. Described is that calculation for total required hydrogen amount in the CNS as well as operation schemes of the hydrogen system. The gas blanketing system (GBS) is designed for the supply of the compressed nitrogen gas into the air pressurized valves for the CNS, to isolate the hydrogen system from the air and the water, and to prevent air or water intrusion into the vacuum system as well as the hydrogen system. All detail descriptions are shown inhere as well as the operation scheme for the GBS

  10. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericles Calias

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S. I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  11. Reconstruction of the maxillary midline papilla following a combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment in adult periodontal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaropoli, Daniele; Re, Stefania; Corrente, Giuseppe; Abundo, Roberto

    2004-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of a combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment in determining the reconstruction of midline papilla lost following periodontitis. Twenty-eight patients, with infrabony defect and extrusion of one maxillary central incisor, were treated. At baseline, all patients presented opening of the interdental diastema and loss of the papilla. At 7-10 days after open-flap surgery, the intrusive movement started. For each patient, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and papilla presence index (PI) were assessed at baseline, end of treatment and after 1 year. PI was also evaluated independently in patients with narrow or wide periodontal biotype (NPB-WPB). All parameters showed statistical improvement between the initial and final measurements, and showed no changes at follow-up time. The mean residual PPD was 2.50 mm, with a decrease of 4.29 mm, while the mean CAL gain was 5.93 mm. Twenty-three out of 28 patients improved the PI score at the end of therapy. No statistical difference was recorded in PI values between groups NPB and WPB. The presented clinical protocol resulted in the improvement of all parameters examined. At the end of orthodontic treatment, a predictable reconstruction of the interdental papilla was reported, both in patients with thin or wide gingiva. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004.

  12. Frontal midline theta rhythm and gamma power changes during focused attention on mental calculation: an MEG beamformer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryouhei eIshii

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fmθ appears widely distributed over medial prefrontal areas in EEG recordings, indicating focused attention. Although mental calculation is often used as an attention-demanding task, little has been reported on calculation-related activation in Fmθ experiments. In this study we used spatially filtered MEG and permutation analysis to precisely localize cortical generators of the magnetic counterpart of Fmθ, as well as other sources of oscillatory activity associated with mental calculation processing (i.e., arithmetic subtraction. Our results confirmed and extended earlier EEG/MEG studies indicating that Fmθ during mental calculation is generated in the dorsal anterior cingulate and adjacent medial prefrontal cortex. Mental subtraction was also associated with gamma event-related synchronization, as an index of activation, in right parietal regions subserving basic numerical processing and number-based spatial attention. Gamma event-related desynchronization appeared in the right lateral prefrontal cortex, likely representing a mechanism to interrupt neural activity that can interfere with the ongoing cognitive task.

  13. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography Anomalias de sistema nervoso central em defeitos de linha média facial com hipertelorismo detectados por ressonância magnética e tomografia computadorizada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Gil-da-Silva-Lopes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI and computed tomography (CT in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II. There was no significative difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18 was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up.Este estudo objetivou descrever e comparar as anomalias estruturais do sistema nervoso central (SNC detectadas por meio de ressonância magnética (RM e tomografia computadorizada (TC de crânio em indivíduos com defeitos de linha média facial com hipertelorismo (DLMFH isolados ou associados a anomalias congênitas múltiplas (ACM. O protocolo de investigação incluiu exame dismorfológico, RX de crânio e face, CT e RM de crânio. Foram estudados 24 indivíduos, sendo que 12 apresentavam a forma isolada (Grupo I e os demais, DLMFH com ACM de etiologia não esclarecida (Grupo II. Não houve diferença entre os dois grupos e os resultados foram agrupados. Além de várias anomalias de SNC já descritas, a RM foi útil para detecção de erros de migração neuronal. Os dados sugerem que as alterações estruturais de SNC e os DLMFH têm relação embriológica, o que deve ser levado em conta durante o seguimento clínico.

  14. Piracetam and piracetam-like drugs: from basic science to novel clinical applications to CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykh, Andrei G; Sadaie, M Reza

    2010-02-12

    There is an increasing interest in nootropic drugs for the treatment of CNS disorders. Since the last meta-analysis of the clinical efficacy of piracetam, more information has accumulated. The primary objective of this systematic survey is to evaluate the clinical outcomes as well as the scientific literature relating to the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, dosing, toxicology and adverse effects of marketed and investigational drugs. The major focus of the literature search was on articles demonstrating evidence-based clinical investigations during the past 10 years for the following therapeutic categories of CNS disorders: (i) cognition/memory; (ii) epilepsy and seizure; (iii) neurodegenerative diseases; (iv) stroke/ischaemia; and (v) stress and anxiety. In this article, piracetam-like compounds are divided into three subgroups based on their chemical structures, known efficacy and intended clinical uses. Subgroup 1 drugs include piracetam, oxiracetam, aniracetam, pramiracetam and phenylpiracetam, which have been used in humans and some of which are available as dietary supplements. Of these, oxiracetam and aniracetam are no longer in clinical use. Pramiracetam reportedly improved cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injuries. Although piracetam exhibited no long-term benefits for the treatment of mild cognitive impairments, recent studies demonstrated its neuroprotective effect when used during coronary bypass surgery. It was also effective in the treatment of cognitive disorders of cerebrovascular and traumatic origins; however, its overall effect on lowering depression and anxiety was higher than improving memory. As add-on therapy, it appears to benefit individuals with myoclonus epilepsy and tardive dyskinesia. Phenylpiracetam is more potent than piracetam and is used for a wider range of indications. In combination with a vasodilator drug, piracetam appeared to have an additive beneficial effect on various

  15. [11C]NS8880, a promising PET radiotracer targeting the norepinephrine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Karina Højrup; Peters, Dan; Nielsen, Elsebeth Ø

    2014-01-01

    -azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (NS8880), targeting NET. NS8880 has an in vitro binding profile comparable to desipramine and is structurally not related to reboxetine. METHODS: Labeling of NS8880 with [11C] was achieved by a non-conventional technique: substitution of pyridinyl fluorine with [11C]methanolate...... yields with high purity. The PET in vivo evaluation in pig and rat revealed a rapid brain uptake of [11C]NS8880 and fast obtaining of equilibrium. Highest binding was observed in thalamic and hypothalamic regions. Pretreatment with desipramine efficiently reduced binding of [11C]NS8880. CONCLUSION: Based...... on the pre-clinical results obtained so far [11C]NS8880 displays promising properties for PET imaging of NET....

  16. Serial brain MRI findings in CNS involvement of familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Suh, Jeong Soo; Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hong, Ki Sook; Kim, Hak Jin

    2002-01-01

    Familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a fatal early childhood disorder characterized by multiorgan lymphohistiocytic infiltration and active hemophagocytosis. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is not uncommon and is characterized by rapidly progressive tissue damage affecting both the gray and white matter. We encountered a case of familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with CNS involvement. Initial T2-weighted MRI of the brain demonstrated high signal intensity in the right thalamus, though after chemotherapy, which led to the relief of neurologic symptoms, this disappeared. After four months. however, the patient's neurologic symptoms recurred, and follow-up T2-weighted MR images showed high signal intensity in the thalami, basal ganglia, and cerebral and cerebellar white matter. Brain MRI is a useful imaging modality for the evaluation of CNS involvement and monitoring the response to treatment

  17. Intellectual abilities among survivors of childhood leukaemia as a function of CNS irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiser, C.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight children in remission at least 2 years after completing chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were assessed on standardised psychological tests. It was found that 7 who never had central nervous system (CNS) irradiation and 9 having prophylactic CNS irradiation at least 6 months after diagnosis tended to perform at average or above levels, while those 10 each having prophylactic CNS irradiation (within 2 months of diagnosis) were generally at lower ability. Within the latter group 3 children showed serious intellectual impairments, while the group as a whole functioned especially poorly on quantitative tasks and those involving speeded performance with abstract material. General language ability was not affected. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. (author)

  18. Cancers of the Brain and CNS: Global Patterns and Trends in Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Mortazavi, S A R; Paknahad, M

    2018-03-01

    Miranda-Filho et al. in their recently published paper entitled "Cancers of the brain and CNS: global patterns and trends in incidence" provided a global status report of the geographic and temporal variations in the incidence of brain and CNS cancers in different countries across continents worldwide. While the authors confirm the role of genetic risk factors and ionizing radiation exposures, they claimed that no firm conclusion could be drawn about the role of exposure to non-ionizing radiation. The paper authored by Miranda-Filho et al. not only addresses a challenging issue, it can be considered as a good contribution in the field of brain and CNS cancers. However, our correspondence addresses a basic shortcoming of this paper about the role of electromagnetic fields and cancers and provides evidence showing that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs), at least at high levels and long durations, can increases the risk of cancer.

  19. Neonatal CNS infection and inflammation caused by Ureaplasma species: rare or relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2015-02-01

    Colonization with Ureaplasma species has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and perinatal transmission has been implicated in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates. Little is known about Ureaplasma-mediated infection and inflammation of the CNS in neonates. Controversy remains concerning its incidence and implication in the pathogenesis of neonatal brain injury. In vivo and in vitro data are limited. Despite improving care options for extremely immature preterm infants, relevant complications remain. Systematic knowledge of ureaplasmal infection may be of great benefit. This review aims to summarize pathogenic mechanisms, clinical data and diagnostic pitfalls. Studies in preterm and term neonates are critically discussed with regard to their limitations. Clinical questions concerning therapy or prophylaxis are posed. We conclude that ureaplasmas may be true pathogens, especially in preterm neonates, and may cause CNS inflammation in a complex interplay of host susceptibility, serovar pathogenicity and gestational age-dependent CNS vulnerability.

  20. Thermal hydraulic considerations and mock-up tests for developing two-phase thermo-siphon loop of CARR-CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shejiao, Du; Qincheng, Bi; Tingkuan, Chen; Quanke, Feng

    2005-01-01

    The main component of the China Advanced Research Reactor Cold Neutron Source (CARR-CNS), which is under design, is a two-phase thermo-siphon loop of hydrogen. It consists of a condenser, a single tube with counter current flow avoiding flooding and a cylindrical-annulus moderator cell. The mockup tests were carried out using a full-scale loop with Freon-113, to validate the self-regulating characteristics of the loop, void fraction less than 20% in the liquid of the moderator cell and the requirements for establishing the condition under which the inner shell of the moderator cell has only vapor and the outer shell liquid. In the case of these mockup tests the density ratio of liquid to vapor and the volumetric vapor evaporation rate due to heat load are kept the same as those in normal operation of the CARR-CNS. The results show that the loop has the self-regulating characteristics and the inner shell of the moderator cell contains only vapor, the outer shell liquid. The average void fraction of the moderator cell was verified less than 20% under the volumetric vapor generation of 0.65 l/s corresponding to the nuclear heating of 800 W in the case of the liquid hydrogen. The local void fraction in the liquid hydrogen increases with the increase of the loop pressure under the condition of a constant volumetric evaporation

  1. Chikungunya fever: CNS infection and pathologies of a re-emerging arbovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Trina; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie Christine; Hoarau, Jean Jacques; Krejbich Trotot, Pascale; Denizot, Melanie; Lee-Pat-Yuen, Ghislaine; Sahoo, Renubala; Guiraud, Pascale; Ramful, Duksha; Robin, Stephanie; Alessandri, Jean Luc; Gauzere, Bernard Alex; Gasque, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and causes an acute symptomatic illness with fever, skin rash, and incapacitating arthralgia, which can evolve into chronic rheumatoid arthritis in elderly patients. This is a tropical disease originally described in central/east Africa in the 1960s, but its 2004 re-emergence in Africa and rapid spread in lands in and around the Indian Ocean (Reunion island, India, Malaysia) as well as Europe (Italy) led to almost 6 million cases worldwide. The risk of importation and spreading diseases with long-term sequelae is even greater today given the global distribution of the vectors (including in the Americas), increased tourism and the apparent capacity of CHIKV to produce high levels of viremia (10(9)-10(12) virus/ml of blood) and new mutants. CHIKV-associated neuropathology was described early in the 1960s, but it is the unprecedented incidence rate in Indian Ocean areas with efficient clinical facilities that allowed a better description of cases with severe encephalitis, meningoencephalitis, peripheral neuropathies and deaths among newborns (mother-to-child infection), infants and elderly patients. Death rates following CHIKV infection were estimated at 1:1000 cases in la Reunion's outbreak. These clinical observations have been corroborated by experimental infection in several mouse models, leading to CNS pathologies. We further describe in this review the capacity of CHIKV to infect neurons and glial cells, delineate the fundamental innate (intrinsic) immune defence mechanisms to protect from infection and argue about the possible mechanisms involved in the encephalopathy. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combinatorial actions of Tgfβ and Activin ligands promote oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipankar J; Zameer, Andleeb; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Huynh, Jimmy; Mahase, Sean; Laitman, Benjamin M; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Mitiku, Nesanet; Urbanski, Mateusz; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V; Casaccia, Patrizia; Hayot, Fernand; Bottinger, Erwin P; Brown, Chester W; John, Gareth R

    2014-06-01

    In the embryonic CNS, development of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes is limited by bone morphogenetic proteins, which constitute one arm of the transforming growth factor-β (Tgfβ) family and signal canonically via Smads 1/5/8. Tgfβ ligands and Activins comprise the other arm and signal via Smads 2/3, but their roles in oligodendrocyte development are incompletely characterized. Here, we report that Tgfβ ligands and activin B (ActB) act in concert in the mammalian spinal cord to promote oligodendrocyte generation and myelination. In mouse neural tube, newly specified oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) are first exposed to Tgfβ ligands in isolation, then later in combination with ActB during maturation. In primary OLP cultures, Tgfβ1 and ActB differentially activate canonical Smad3 and non-canonical MAP kinase signaling. Both ligands enhance viability, and Tgfβ1 promotes proliferation while ActB supports maturation. Importantly, co-treatment strongly activates both signaling pathways, producing an additive effect on viability and enhancing both proliferation and differentiation such that mature oligodendrocyte numbers are substantially increased. Co-treatment promotes myelination in OLP-neuron co-cultures, and maturing oligodendrocytes in spinal cord white matter display strong Smad3 and MAP kinase activation. In spinal cords of ActB-deficient Inhbb(-/-) embryos, apoptosis in the oligodendrocyte lineage is increased and OLP numbers transiently reduced, but numbers, maturation and myelination recover during the first postnatal week. Smad3(-/-) mice display a more severe phenotype, including diminished viability and proliferation, persistently reduced mature and immature cell numbers, and delayed myelination. Collectively, these findings suggest that, in mammalian spinal cord, Tgfβ ligands and ActB together support oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Combinatorial actions of Tgfβ and Activin ligands promote oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipankar J.; Zameer, Andleeb; Mariani, John N.; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Huynh, Jimmy; Mahase, Sean; Laitman, Benjamin M.; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Mitiku, Nesanet; Urbanski, Mateusz; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V.; Casaccia, Patrizia; Hayot, Fernand; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Brown, Chester W.; John, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    In the embryonic CNS, development of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes is limited by bone morphogenetic proteins, which constitute one arm of the transforming growth factor-β (Tgfβ) family and signal canonically via Smads 1/5/8. Tgfβ ligands and Activins comprise the other arm and signal via Smads 2/3, but their roles in oligodendrocyte development are incompletely characterized. Here, we report that Tgfβ ligands and activin B (ActB) act in concert in the mammalian spinal cord to promote oligodendrocyte generation and myelination. In mouse neural tube, newly specified oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) are first exposed to Tgfβ ligands in isolation, then later in combination with ActB during maturation. In primary OLP cultures, Tgfβ1 and ActB differentially activate canonical Smad3 and non-canonical MAP kinase signaling. Both ligands enhance viability, and Tgfβ1 promotes proliferation while ActB supports maturation. Importantly, co-treatment strongly activates both signaling pathways, producing an additive effect on viability and enhancing both proliferation and differentiation such that mature oligodendrocyte numbers are substantially increased. Co-treatment promotes myelination in OLP-neuron co-cultures, and maturing oligodendrocytes in spinal cord white matter display strong Smad3 and MAP kinase activation. In spinal cords of ActB-deficient Inhbb−/− embryos, apoptosis in the oligodendrocyte lineage is increased and OLP numbers transiently reduced, but numbers, maturation and myelination recover during the first postnatal week. Smad3−/− mice display a more severe phenotype, including diminished viability and proliferation, persistently reduced mature and immature cell numbers, and delayed myelination. Collectively, these findings suggest that, in mammalian spinal cord, Tgfβ ligands and ActB together support oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation. PMID:24917498

  4. CNS germinomas are characterized by global demethylation, chromosomal instability and mutational activation of the Kit-, Ras/Raf/Erk- and Akt-pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Simone Laura; Waha, Andreas; Steiger, Barbara; Denkhaus, Dorota; Dörner, Evelyn; Calaminus, Gabriele; Leuschner, Ivo; Pietsch, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    CNS germinomas represent a unique germ cell tumor entity characterized by undifferentiated tumor cells and a high response rate to current treatment protocols. Limited information is available on their underlying genomic, epigenetic and biological alterations. We performed a genome-wide analysis of genomic copy number alterations in 49 CNS germinomas by molecular inversion profiling. In addition, CpG dinucleotide methylation was studied by immunohistochemistry for methylated cytosine residues. Mutational analysis was performed by resequencing of candidate genes including KIT and RAS family members. Ras/Erk and Akt pathway activation was analyzed by immunostaining with antibodies against phospho-Erk, phosho-Akt, phospho-mTOR and phospho-S6. All germinomas coexpressed Oct4 and Kit but showed an extensive global DNA demethylation compared to other tumors and normal tissues. Molecular inversion profiling showed predominant genomic instability in all tumors with a high frequency of regional gains and losses including high level gene amplifications. Activating mutations of KIT exons 11, 13, and 17 as well as a case with genomic KIT amplification and activating mutations or amplifications of RAS gene family members including KRAS, NRAS and RRAS2 indicated mutational activation of crucial signaling pathways. Co-activation of Ras/Erk and Akt pathways was present in 83% of germinomas. These data suggest that CNS germinoma cells display a demethylated nuclear DNA similar to primordial germ cells in early development. This finding has a striking coincidence with extensive genomic instability. In addition, mutational activation of Kit-, Ras/Raf/Erk- and Akt- pathways indicate the biological importance of these pathways and their components as potential targets for therapy. PMID:27391150

  5. Abbreviated exposure to hypoxia is sufficient to induce CNS dysmyelination, modulate spinal motor neuron composition, and impair motor development in neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens O Watzlawik

    Full Text Available Neonatal white matter injury (nWMI is an increasingly common cause of cerebral palsy that results predominantly from hypoxic injury to progenitor cells including those of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Existing mouse models of nWMI utilize prolonged periods of hypoxia during the neonatal period, require complex cross-fostering and exhibit poor growth and high mortality rates. Abnormal CNS myelin composition serves as the major explanation for persistent neuro-motor deficits. Here we developed a simplified model of nWMI with low mortality rates and improved growth without cross-fostering. Neonatal mice are exposed to low oxygen from postnatal day (P 3 to P7, which roughly corresponds to the period of human brain development between gestational weeks 32 and 36. CNS hypomyelination is detectable for 2-3 weeks post injury and strongly correlates with levels of body and brain weight loss. Immediately following hypoxia treatment, cell death was evident in multiple brain regions, most notably in superficial and deep cortical layers as well as the subventricular zone progenitor compartment. PDGFαR, Nkx2.2, and Olig2 positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cell were significantly reduced until postnatal day 27. In addition to CNS dysmyelination we identified a novel pathological marker for adult hypoxic animals that strongly correlates with life-long neuro-motor deficits. Mice reared under hypoxia reveal an abnormal spinal neuron composition with increased small and medium diameter axons and decreased large diameter axons in thoracic lateral and anterior funiculi. Differences were particularly pronounced in white matter motor tracts left and right of the anterior median fissure. Our findings suggest that 4 days of exposure to hypoxia are sufficient to induce experimental nWMI in CD1 mice, thus providing a model to test new therapeutics. Pathological hallmarks of this model include early cell death, decreased OPCs and hypomyelination in early postnatal life

  6. 25th Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpee, Tatyana O.; Destexhe, Alain; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sekulić, Vladislav; Skinner, Frances K.; Wójcik, Daniel K.; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Cserpán, Dorottya; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Kresimir; Elices, Irene; Arroyo, David

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents A1 Functional advantages of cell-type heterogeneity in neural circuits Tatyana O. Sharpee A2 Mesoscopic modeling of propagating waves in visual cortex Alain Destexhe A3 Dynamics and biomarkers of mental disorders Mitsuo Kawato F1 Precise recruitment of spiking output at theta frequencies requires dendritic h-channels in multi-compartment models of oriens-lac...

  7. Water transport between CNS compartments: contributions of aquaporins and cotransporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, N; Zeuthen, T

    2010-01-01

    or hydrocephalus. The molecular pathways by which water molecules cross the cell membranes of the brain are not well-understood, although the discovery of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in the brain improved our understanding of some of these transport processes, particularly under pathological conditions. In the present...

  8. Comparison of positions of the trochlear groove line and the vertical midline of the pericondylar rectangle on axial computed tomography: a retrospective pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizic, Dinko

    2012-01-01

    To compare the positions of the trochlear groove (TG) line and the vertical midline of the pericondylar rectangle on axial computed tomography (CT). A retrospective pilot study was conducted in February and March 2011 comprising 14 knees in 9 consecutive patients with patellofemoral pain, a normal trochlear angle (124 -145 ), and no medical record of prior knee surgery. After the axial CT image displaying the center of the trochlear groove (''reference cut'') with a normal trochlear angle was identified, the pericondylar rectangle was drawn and located in the first quadrant of the Cartesian rectangular coordinate system. The x-coordinates of the vertical lines passing through the most posterior point of the trochlear groove (TG line) and the midpoints of the horizontal sides of the pericondylar rectangle (vertical midline) were obtained at 2-week intervals and statistically analyzed as matched pairs for differences (Wilcoxon signed rank test), agreements (Bland-Altman plot, intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) and relative variations (coefficient of variation [CV]). There were no statistically significant differences between matched pairs (2-tailed p from 0.583 to 0.641) whereas the agreements were substantial (bias = -0.37 and -0.45 respectively, ICC = 0.688 and 0.670 respectively) to almost perfect for duplicate measurements (bias = 0.11 and 0.04 respectively, ICC = 0.975 and 0.998 respectively), with much less relative variation with regard to the vertical midline (CV = 1.22% to CV = 0.34% respectively). The positions of the TG line and the vertical midline of the pericondylar rectangle on axial CT were identical. The latter was identified regardless of trochlear morphology. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of positions of the trochlear groove line and the vertical midline of the pericondylar rectangle on axial computed tomography: a retrospective pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizic, Dinko [Zagreb University Hospital Center, Clinical Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-09-15

    To compare the positions of the trochlear groove (TG) line and the vertical midline of the pericondylar rectangle on axial computed tomography (CT). A retrospective pilot study was conducted in February and March 2011 comprising 14 knees in 9 consecutive patients with patellofemoral pain, a normal trochlear angle (124 -145 ), and no medical record of prior knee surgery. After the axial CT image displaying the center of the trochlear groove (''reference cut'') with a normal trochlear angle was identified, the pericondylar rectangle was drawn and located in the first quadrant of the Cartesian rectangular coordinate system. The x-coordinates of the vertical lines passing through the most posterior point of the trochlear groove (TG line) and the midpoints of the horizontal sides of the pericondylar rectangle (vertical midline) were obtained at 2-week intervals and statistically analyzed as matched pairs for differences (Wilcoxon signed rank test), agreements (Bland-Altman plot, intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) and relative variations (coefficient of variation [CV]). There were no statistically significant differences between matched pairs (2-tailed p from 0.583 to 0.641) whereas the agreements were substantial (bias = -0.37 and -0.45 respectively, ICC = 0.688 and 0.670 respectively) to almost perfect for duplicate measurements (bias = 0.11 and 0.04 respectively, ICC = 0.975 and 0.998 respectively), with much less relative variation with regard to the vertical midline (CV = 1.22% to CV = 0.34% respectively). The positions of the TG line and the vertical midline of the pericondylar rectangle on axial CT were identical. The latter was identified regardless of trochlear morphology. (orig.)

  10. Kinetic modelling of [123I]CNS 1261--a potential SPET tracer for the NMDA receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Mulligan, Rachel S.; Gunn, Roger N; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Owens, Jonathan; Wyper, David; Ell, Peter J.; Pilowsky, Lyn S.

    2003-01-01

    N-(1-napthyl)-N'-(3-[ 123 I]-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine ([ 123 I]CNS 1261) is a novel SPET ligand developed for imaging the NMDA receptor intra-channel MK 801/PCP/ketamine site. Data was acquired in 7 healthy volunteers after bolus injection of [ 123 I]CNS 1261. Kinetic modeling showed reversible tracer binding. Arterial and venous time-activity curves overlapped after 90 min. The rank order of binding was: Thalamus > striatum > cortical regions > white matter. This distribution concurs with [ 11 C]-ketamine and [ 18 F]-memantine PET studies . These data provide a methodological basis for further direct in vivo challenge studies

  11. Metallothionein-1+2 protect the CNS after a focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, Mercedes; Penkowa, Milena; Lago, Natalia

    2002-01-01

    We have evaluated the physiological relevance of metallothionein-1+2 (MT-1+2) in the CNS following damage caused by a focal cryolesion onto the cortex. In comparison to normal mice, transgenic mice overexpressing the MT-1 isoform (TgMTI* mice) showed a significant decrease of the number...... dramatically reduced the cryolesion-induced oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis. Remarkably, these effects were also obtained by the intraperitoneal administration of MT-2 to both normal and MT-1+2 knock-out mice. These results fully support the notion that MT-1+2 are essential in the CNS for coping...

  12. Imaging aspects of neurologic emergencies in children treated for non-CNS malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaste, S.C.; Langston, J.; Rodriguez-Galindo, C.; Furman, W.L.; Thompson, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    There is a paucity of radiologic literature addressing neurologic emergencies in children receiving therapy for non-CNS primary malignancies. In the acute setting, many of these children present to local community hospitals. This pictorial is from a single institutional experience describing the spectrum of neurologic emergencies seen in children with non-CNS cancers. We hope to familiarize pediatric radiologists with these entities in order to expedite diagnosis, facilitate treatment, and minimize morbity and mortality that may be associated with these complications. (orig.)

  13. Neuroprotective effects of estrogen in CNS injuries: insights from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Narayan Raghava,1 Bhaskar C Das,2 Swapan K Ray1 1Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Among the estrogens that are biosynthesized in the human body, 17β-estradiol (estradiol or E2 is the most common and the best estrogen for neuroprotection in animal models of the central nervous system (CNS injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI, traumatic brain injury (TBI, and ischemic brain injury (IBI. These CNS injuries are not only serious health problems, but also enormous economic burden on the patients, their families, and the society at large. Studies from animal models of these CNS injuries provide insights into the multiple neuroprotective mechanisms of E2 and also suggest the possibility of translating the therapeutic efficacy of E2 in the treatment SCI, TBI, and IBI in humans in the near future. The pathophysiology of these injuries includes loss of motor function in the limbs, arms and their extremities, cognitive deficit, and many other serious consequences including life-threatening paralysis, infection, and even death. The potential application of E2 therapy to treat the CNS injuries may become a trend as the results are showing significant therapeutic benefits of E2 for neuroprotection when administered into the animal models of SCI, TBI, and IBI. This article describes the plausible mechanisms how E2 works with or without the involvement of estrogen receptors and provides an overview of the known neuroprotective effects of E2 in these three CNS injuries in different animal models. Because activation of estrogen receptors has profound implications in maintaining and also affecting normal physiology, there are notable impediments in translating E2 therapy to the clinics for neuroprotection in CNS injuries in humans. While E2 may not yet be the sole molecule for

  14. Transforaminal lumbar interbody graft placement using an articulating delivery arm facilitates increased segmental lordosis with superior anterior and midline graft placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shau, David N; Parker, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Zuckerman, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-05-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is a frequently performed method of lumbar arthrodesis in patients failing medical management of back and leg pain. Accurate placement of the interbody graft and restoration of lordosis has been shown to be crucial when performing lumbar fusion procedures. We performed a single-surgeon, prospective, randomized study to determine whether a novel articulating versus traditional straight graft delivery arm system allows for superior graft placement and increased lordosis for single-level TLIF. Thirty consecutive patients undergoing single-level TLIF were included and prospectively randomized to one of the 2 groups (articulated vs. straight delivery arm system). Three radiographic characteristics were evaluated at 6-week follow-up: (1) degree of segmental lumbar lordosis at the fused level; (2) the percent anterior location of the interbody graft in disk space; and (3) the distance (mm) off midline of the interbody graft placement. Randomization yielded 16 patients in the articulated delivery arm cohort and 14 in the straight delivery arm cohort. The articulating delivery arm system yielded an average of 14.7-degree segmental lordosis at fused level, 35% anterior location, and 3.6 mm off midline. The straight delivery arm system yielded an average of 10.7-degree segmental lordosis at fused level, 46% anterior location, and 7.0 mm off midline. All 3 comparisons were statistically significant (Plordosis compared with a traditional straight delivery arm system.

  15. Distal scar-to-midline distance in pilonidal Limberg flap surgery is a recurrence-promoting factor: A multicenter, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mehmet; Ozcan, Onder; Bilgic, Ethem; Kaplan, Elif Tugce; Kaplan, Tugba; Kaplan, Fatma Cigdem

    2017-11-01

    The Limberg flap (LF) procedure is widely performed for the treatment of sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus (SPS); however, recurrences continues to be observed. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between LF designs and the risk of SPS recurrence. Sixty-one cases with recurrent disease (study group) and 194 controls, with a minimum of 5 recurrence-free years following surgery (control group), were included in the study. LF reconstructions performed in each group were classified as off-midline closure (OMC) and non-OMC types. Subsequently, the 2 groups were analyzed. After adjustment for all variables, non-OMC types showed the most prominent correlation with recurrence, followed by interrupted suturing type, family history of SPS, smoking, prolonged healing time, and younger age. The best cut-off value for the critical distance from the midline was found to be 11 mm (with 72% sensitivity and 95% specificity for recurrence). We recommend OMC modifications, with the flap tailored to create a safe margin of at least 2 cm between the flap borders and the midline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling the endothelial blood-CNS barriers: a method for the production of robust in vitro models of the rat blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P Marc D; Paterson, Judy C; Thom, George; Ginman, Ulrika; Lundquist, Stefan; Webster, Carl I

    2013-06-18

    Modelling the blood-CNS barriers of the brain and spinal cord in vitro continues to provide a considerable challenge for research studying the passage of large and small molecules in and out of the central nervous system, both within the context of basic biology and for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Although there has been considerable success over the previous two decades in establishing useful in vitro primary endothelial cell cultures from the blood-CNS barriers, no model fully mimics the high electrical resistance, low paracellular permeability and selective influx/efflux characteristics of the in vivo situation. Furthermore, such primary-derived cultures are typically labour-intensive and generate low yields of cells, limiting scope for experimental work. We thus aimed to establish protocols for the high yield isolation and culture of endothelial cells from both rat brain and spinal cord. Our aim was to optimise in vitro conditions for inducing phenotypic characteristics in these cells that were reminiscent of the in vivo situation, such that they developed into tight endothelial barriers suitable for performing investigative biology and permeability studies. Brain and spinal cord tissue was taken from the same rats and used to specifically isolate endothelial cells to reconstitute as in vitro blood-CNS barrier models. Isolated endothelial cells were cultured to expand the cellular yield and then passaged onto cell culture inserts for further investigation. Cell culture conditions were optimised using commercially available reagents and the resulting barrier-forming endothelial monolayers were characterised by functional permeability experiments and in vitro phenotyping by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Using a combination of modified handling techniques and cell culture conditions, we have established and optimised a protocol for the in vitro culture of brain and, for the first time in rat, spinal cord endothelial cells. High yields of both CNS

  17. Physiological roles of CNS muscarinic receptors gained from knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Sørensen, Gunnar; Dencker, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    receptors modulating neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release in many brain regions, shaping neuronal plasticity, and affecting functions ranging from motor and sensory function to cognitive processes. As gene targeting technology evolves including the use of conditional, cell type specific strains......, knockout mice are likely to continue to provide valuable insights into brain physiology and pathophysiology, and advance the development of new medications for a range of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and addictions, as well as non-opioid analgesics...

  18. Shape change in the atlas with congenital midline non-union of its posterior arch: a morphometric geometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Luis; Palancar, Carlos; Pastor, Francisco; Llidó, Susana; Sanchís-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; Bastir, Markus

    2017-10-01

    The congenital midline non-union of the posterior arch of the atlas is a developmental variant present at a frequency ranging from 0.7% to 3.9%. Most of the reported cases correspond to incidental findings during routine medical examination. In cases of posterior non-union, hypertrophy of the anterior arch and cortical bone thickening of the posterior arches have been observed and interpreted as adaptive responses of the atlas to increased mechanical stress. We sought to determine if the congenital non-union of the posterior arch results in a change in the shape of the atlas. This study is an analysis of the first cervical vertebrae from osteological collections through morphometric geometric techniques. A total of 21 vertebrae were scanned with a high-resolution three-dimensional scanner (Artec Space Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg). To capture vertebral shape, 19 landmarks and 100 semilandmarks were placed on the vertebrae. Procrustes superimposition was applied to obtain size and shape data (MorphoJ 1.02; Klingenberg, 2011), which were analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA) and mean shape comparisons. The PCA resulted in two components explaining 22.32% and 18.8% of the total shape variance. The graphic plotting of both components indicates a clear shape difference between the control atlas and the atlas with posterior non-union. This observation was supported by statistically significant differences in mean shape comparisons between both types of vertebra (patlas is associated with significant changes in the shape of the vertebra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional connectivity-based parcellation and connectome of cortical midline structures in the mouse: a perfusion autoradiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschneider, Daniel P; Wang, Zhuo; Pang, Raina D

    2014-01-01

    Rodent cortical midline structures (CMS) are involved in emotional, cognitive and attentional processes. Tract tracing has revealed complex patterns of structural connectivity demonstrating connectivity-based integration and segregation for the prelimbic, cingulate area 1, retrosplenial dysgranular cortices dorsally, and infralimbic, cingulate area 2, and retrosplenial granular cortices ventrally. Understanding of CMS functional connectivity (FC) remains more limited. Here we present the first subregion-level FC analysis of the mouse CMS, and assess whether fear results in state-dependent FC changes analogous to what has been reported in humans. Brain mapping using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine was performed in mice during auditory-cued fear conditioned recall and in controls. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was analyzed in 3-D images reconstructed from brain autoradiographs. Regions-of-interest were selected along the CMS anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. In controls, pairwise correlation and graph theoretical analyses showed strong FC within each CMS structure, strong FC along the dorsal-ventral axis, with segregation of anterior from posterior structures. Seed correlation showed FC of anterior regions to limbic/paralimbic areas, and FC of posterior regions to sensory areas-findings consistent with functional segregation noted in humans. Fear recall increased FC between the cingulate and retrosplenial cortices, but decreased FC between dorsal and ventral structures. In agreement with reports in humans, fear recall broadened FC of anterior structures to the amygdala and to somatosensory areas, suggesting integration and processing of both limbic and sensory information. Organizational principles learned from animal models at the mesoscopic level (brain regions and pathways) will not only critically inform future work at the microscopic (single neurons and synapses) level, but also have translational value to advance our understanding of human brain

  20. Functional connectivity-based parcellation and connectome of cortical midline structures in the mouse: a perfusion autoradiography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Holschneider

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodent cortical midline structures (CMS are involved in emotional, cognitive and attentional processes. Tract tracing has revealed complex patterns of structural connectivity demonstrating connectivity-based integration and segregation for the prelimbic, cingulate area 1, retrosplenial dysgranular cortices dorsally, and infralimbic, cingulate area 2, and retrosplenial granular cortices ventrally. Understanding of CMS functional connectivity (FC remains more limited. Here we present the first subregion-level FC analysis of the mouse CMS, and assess whether fear results in state-dependent FC changes analogous to what has been reported in humans. Brain mapping using [14C]-iodoantipyrine was performed in mice during auditory-cued fear conditioned recall and in controls. Regional cerebral blood flow was analyzed in 3-D images reconstructed from brain autoradiographs. Regions-of-interest were selected along the CMS anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. In controls, pairwise correlation and graph theoretical analyses showed strong FC within each CMS structure, strong FC along the dorsal-ventral axis, with segregation of anterior from posterior structures. Seed correlation showed FC of anterior regions to limbic/paralimbic areas, and FC of posterior regions to sensory areas--findings consistent with functional segregation noted in humans. Fear recall increased FC between the cingulate and retrosplenial cortices, but decreased FC between dorsal and ventral structures. In agreement with reports in humans, fear recall broadened FC of anterior structures to the amygdala and to somatosensory areas, suggesting integration and processing of both limbic and sensory information. Organizational principles learned from animal models at the mesoscopic level (brain regions and pathways will not only critically inform future work at the microscopic (single neurons and synapses level, but also have translational value to advance our understanding of human brain

  1. Is risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapse related to adjuvant taxane treatment in node-positive breast cancer? Results of the CNS substudy in the intergroup Phase III BIG 02-98 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestalozzi, B.C.; Francis, P.; Quinaux, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer central nervous system (CNS) metastases are an increasingly important problem because of high CNS relapse rates in patients treated with trastuzumab and/or taxanes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated data from 2887 node-positive breast cancer patients randomised in the BIG...

  2. A bidirectional association between the gut microbiota and CNS disease in a biphasic murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Sara L; Kasper, Eli J; Keever, Abigail; Liljenberg, Caleb; Kirby, Trevor; Magori, Krisztian; Kasper, Lloyd H; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier

    2017-11-02

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of inflammatory disease as shown using experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Gut microbes influence the response of regulatory immune cell populations in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which drive protection in acute and chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Recent observations suggest that communication between the host and the gut microbiome is bidirectional. We hypothesized that the gut microbiota differs between the acute inflammatory and chronic progressive stages of a murine model of secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SP-MS). This non-obese diabetic (NOD) model of EAE develops a biphasic pattern of disease that more closely resembles the human condition when transitioning from relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS to SP-MS. We compared the gut microbiome of NOD mice with either mild or severe disease to that of non-immunized control mice. We found that the mice which developed a severe secondary form of EAE harbored a dysbiotic gut microbiome when compared with the healthy control mice. Furthermore, we evaluated whether treatment with a cocktail of broad-spectrum antibiotics would modify the outcome of the progressive stage of EAE in the NOD model. Our results indicated reduced mortality and clinical disease severity in mice treated with antibiotics compared with untreated mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that there are reciprocal effects between experimental CNS inflammatory demyelination and modification of the microbiome providing a foundation for the establishment of early therapeutic interventions targeting the gut microbiome that could potentially limit disease progression.

  3. Clinical, imaging and histopathological features of isolated CNS lymphomatoid granulomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Anil Kumar; Alexander, Mathew; Nair, Bijesh; Chacko, Geeta; Mani, Sunithi; Sudhakar, Sniya

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare systemic angiocentric/angiodestructive, B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Central nervous system involvement occurs as part of systemic disease. Isolated central nervous system disease is rare with only few case reports. A 53-year-old male presented with progressive cognitive decline, extrapyramidal features, and altered sensorium with seizures over the last 4 years. His magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multiple small enhancing nodules in subependymal/ependymal regions and along the vessels. Brain biopsy showed atypical lymphohistiocytic infiltrate suggestive of lymphomatoid granulomatosis. There was no evidence of systemic disease; thus, isolated central nervous system lymphomatoid granulomatosis was diagnosed

  4. Intraoperative squash smear cytology in CNS lesions: A study of 150 pediatric cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Jindal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumors of the central nervous system in the pediatric age group occur relatively frequently during the early years of life. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancies of childhood and only second to acute childhood leukemia. Squash cytology is an indispensable diagnostic aid to central nervous system (CNS lesions. The definitive diagnosis of brain lesions is confirmed by histological examination. Aim: To study the cytology of CNS lesions in pediatric population and correlate it with histopathology. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty cases of CNS lesions in pediatric patients were studied over a period of 2 years. Intraoperative squash smears were prepared, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and examined. Remaining sample was subjected to histopathological examination. Results: Medulloblastoma (24.0% was the most frequently encountered tumor followed by pilocyctic astrocytoma (21.33% and ependymoma (13.33%. Diagnostic accuracy of squash smear technique was 94.67% when compared with histological diagnosis. Conclusion: Smear cytology is a fairly accurate tool for intraoperative CNS consultations.

  5. Inflammatory cytokines in the brain: does the CNS shape immune responses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Renno, T; Taupin, V

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been regarded as representing the intrusion of an unruly, ill-behaved mob of leukocytes into the well-ordered and organized domain of thought and reason. However, results accumulated over the past few years suggest that, far ...

  6. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio, E-mail: lucio.vismari@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Batista Camargo Junior, Joao, E-mail: joaocamargo@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  7. Nootropic, anxiolytic and CNS-depressant studies on different plant sources of shankhpushpi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Jai; Karan, Maninder; Vasisht, Karan

    2011-12-01

    Shankhpushpi, a well-known drug in Ayurveda, is extensively used for different central nervous system (CNS) effects especially memory enhancement. Different plants are used under the name shankhpushpi in different regions of India, leading to an uncertainty regarding its true source. Plants commonly used under the name shankhpushpi are: Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois., Evolvulus alsinoides Linn., both from Convolvulaceae, and Clitoria ternatea Linn. (Leguminosae). To find out the true source of shankhpushpi by evaluating and comparing memory-enhancing activity of the three above mentioned plants. Anxiolytic, antidepressant and CNS-depressant activities of these three plants were also compared and evaluated. The nootropic activity of the aqueous methanol extract of each plant was tested using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and step-down models. Anxiolytic, antidepressant and CNS-depressant studies were evaluated using EPM, Porsolt?s swim despair and actophotometer models, respectively. C. pluricaulis extract (CPE) at a dose of 100 mg/kg, p.o. showed maximum nootropic and anxiolytic activity (p nootropic, anxiolytic and CNS-depressant activity. The results of memory-enhancing activity suggest C. pluricaulis to be used as true source of shankhpushpi.

  8. Comparative analysis of acid sphingomyelinase distribution in the CNS of rats and mice following intracerebroventricular delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Treleaven

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick A (NPA disease is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD caused by a deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase (ASM activity. Previously, we reported that biochemical and functional abnormalities observed in ASM knockout (ASMKO mice could be partially alleviated by intracerebroventricular (ICV infusion of hASM. We now show that this route of delivery also results in widespread enzyme distribution throughout the rat brain and spinal cord. However, enzyme diffusion into CNS parenchyma did not occur in a linear dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, although the levels of hASM detected in the rat CNS were determined to be within the range shown to be therapeutic in ASMKO mice, the absolute amounts represented less than 1% of the total dose administered. Finally, our results also showed that similar levels of enzyme distribution are achieved across rodent species when the dose is normalized to CNS weight as opposed to whole body weight. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy observed following ICV delivery of hASM in ASMKO mice could be scaled to CNS of the rat.

  9. CSF Hypocretin-1 Levels and Clinical Profiles in Narcolepsy and Idiopathic CNS Hypersomnia in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Mona Skard; Evsiukova, Tatiana; Vilming, Steinar; Gjerstad, Michaela D.; Schrader, Harald; Gautvik, Kaare

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between CSF hypocretin-1 levels and clinical profiles in narcolepsy and CNS hypersomnia in Norwegian patients. Method: CSF hypocretin-1 was measured by a sensitive radioimmunoassay in 47 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 7 with narcolepsy without cataplexy, 10 with idiopathic CNS hypersomnia, and a control group. Results: Low hypocretin-1 values were found in 72% of the HLA DQB1*0602 positive patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Patients with low CSF hypocretin-1 levels reported more extensive muscular involvement during cataplectic attacks than patients with normal levels. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis occurred more frequently in patients with cataplexy than in the other patient groups, but with no correlation to hypocretin-1 levels. Conclusion: About three quarters of the HLA DQB1*0602 positive patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy had low CSF hypocretin-1 values, and appear to form a distinct clinical entity. Narcolepsy without cataplexy could not be distinguished from idiopathic CNS hypersomnia by clinical symptoms or biochemical findings. Citation: Heier MS; Evsiukova T; Vilming S; Gjerstad MD; Schrader H; Gautvik K. CSF hypocretin-1 levels and clinical profiles in narcolepsy and idiopathic CNS hypersomnia in norway. SLEEP 2007;30(8):969-973. PMID:17702265

  10. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio; Batista Camargo Junior, Joao

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  11. Diagnostic value of kinetic analysis using dynamic FDG PET in immunocompetent patients with primary CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yuka; Monden, Toshihide; Sasakawa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accumulation of FDG in immunocompetent patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma using qualitative and quantitative PET images and to compare baseline with follow-up PET after therapy. Twelve immunocompetent patients with CNS lymphoma were examined. Dynamic emission data were acquired for 60 min immediately following injection of FDG. In seven patients, repeated PET studies were performed after treatment. Applying a three-compartment five-parameter model, K 1 , k 2 , k 3 , k 4 , vascular fraction (V B ) and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR Glc ) were obtained. We evaluated the FDG uptake visually using qualitative and parametric images and quantitatively using parametric images. A total of 12 lesions were identified in ten patients with newly diagnosed CNS lymphoma. On visual analysis, ten lesions showed an increase on qualitative images, eight showed an increase on K 1 images, 12 showed an increase on k 3 images and ten showed an increase on CMR Glc images. On quantitative analysis, k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values of the lesion were significantly different from those of the normal grey matter (p 3 and CMR Glc images. The K 1 , k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values after treatment were significantly different from those obtained before treatment (p 3 , using dynamic FDG PET might be helpful for diagnosis of CNS lymphoma and for monitoring therapeutic assessment. (orig.)

  12. Enhancing Psychosocial Outcomes for Young Adult Childhood CNS Cancer Survivors: Importance of Addressing Vocational Identity and Community Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; Wagner, Stacia; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vocational identity, community integration, positive and negative affect, and satisfaction with life in a group of young adult central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors. Participants in this study included 45 young adult CNS cancer survivors who ranged in age from 18 to 30 years…

  13. Distribution of CNS Species on Teat Skin and in Milk Samples from Dairy Cows in Automatic Milking Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmod, Yasser; Svennesen, Line; Pedersen, Karl

    identified in milk samples. Staphylococcus chromogenes was detected in both milk (n= 2) and teat skin (n= 1) samples. Data collection will be finished in April 2017. The final results will give new insights into herd specific CNS species patterns and the microbial ecology and epidemiology of common CNS...

  14. Location of gene expression in CNS using hybridization histochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penschow, J.D.; Haralambidis, J.; Aldred, P.; Tregear, G.W.; Coghlan, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The pursuit of improvements in sensitivity, specificity, and resolution has resulted in a myriad of published procedures designed for a variety of applications and of seemingly increasing complexity. The choice of technique now available, through significant recent technological advances, includes nonisotopic cDNA probe labels, single-stranded RNA (Riboprobe), and synthetic oligonucleotides as probes, in addition to the now familiar radiolabeled cDNA probes. The authors' aim is to simplify this choice by describing a convenient method applicable to the location of specific mRNA in brain and other tissues by either cDNA or synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes. The procedure is based on a /sup 32/P probe label which enables detection of the mRNA-DNA hybrids on X-ray fail autoradiographs of frozen sections within 48 hr of tissue collection. Single, labeled cells can be located in heterogeneous tissues in subsequent short exposure liquid emulsion autoradiographs. This technique has been used successfully over a period of 5 years on tissues as diverse as whole small animals, sheep brain, rat thyroid, and human tumors. Deproteination procedures employed with other methods, which have been found to be unnecessary for /sup 32/P, are not included, thus simplifying the procedure. The use of synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides is emphasized as their choice of probes for the reasons outlined. Apart from providing an escape route from dependence on a molecular biology laboratory, discriminating sequences of similar gene products can be synthesized and localized so that single cells within small groups can be further characterized by their biosynthetic function

  15. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  16. Discrimination of different brain metastases and primary CNS lymphomas using morphologic criteria and diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bette, S.; Wiestler, B.; Huber, T.; Boeckh-Behrens, T.; Zimmer, C.; Kirschke, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Delbridge, C. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Meyer, B.; Gempt, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2016-12-15

    Brain metastases are a common complication of cancer and occur in about 15-40% of patients with malignancies. The aim of this retrospective study was to differentiate between metastases from different primary tumors/CNS lymphyomas using morphologic criteria, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage, cysts, pattern of contrast enhancement and location were reported in 200 consecutive patients with brain metastases/primary CNS lymphomas. FA and ADC values were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part, the necrosis and the non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Differences between histopathological subtypes of metastases were analyzed using non-parametric tests, decision trees and hierarchical clustering analysis. Significant differences were found in morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage or pattern of contrast enhancement. In diffusion measurements, significant differences between the different tumor entities were only found in ADC analyzed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part. Among single tumor entities, primary CNS lymphomas showed significantly lower median ADC values in the contrast-enhancing tumor part (ADC{sub lymphoma} 0.92 [0.83-1.07] vs. ADC{sub no} {sub lymphoma} 1.35 [1.10-1.64] P=0.001). Further differentiation between types of metastases was not possible using FA and ADC. There were morphologic differences among the main subtypes of brain metastases/CNS lymphomas. However, due to a high variability of common types of metastases and low specificity, prospective differentiation remained challenging. DTI including FA and ADC was not a reliable tool for differentiation between different histopathological subtypes of brain metastases except for CNS lymphomas showing lower ADC values. Biopsy, surgery and staging remain essential for diagnosis.

  17. SPARC and GluA1-Containing AMPA Receptors Promote Neuronal Health Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma V. Jones

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The proper formation and maintenance of functional synapses in the central nervous system (CNS requires communication between neurons and astrocytes and the ability of astrocytes to release neuromodulatory molecules. Previously, we described a novel role for the astrocyte-secreted matricellular protein SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine in regulating α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs and plasticity at developing synapses. SPARC is highly expressed by astrocytes and microglia during CNS development but its level is reduced in adulthood. Interestingly, SPARC has been shown to be upregulated in CNS injury and disease. However, the role of SPARC upregulation in these contexts is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SPARC administration on glutamate receptors on mature hippocampal neuron cultures and following CNS injury. We found that SPARC treatment increased the number of GluA1-containing AMPARs at synapses and enhanced synaptic function. Furthermore, we determined that the increase in synaptic strength induced by SPARC could be inhibited by Philanthotoxin-433, a blocker of homomeric GluA1-containing AMPARs. We then investigated the effect of SPARC treatment on neuronal health in an injury context where SPARC expression is upregulated. We found that SPARC levels are increased in astrocytes and microglia following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in vitro. Remarkably, chronic pre-treatment with SPARC prevented OGD-induced loss of synaptic GluA1. Furthermore, SPARC treatment reduced neuronal death through Philanthotoxin-433 sensitive GluA1 receptors. Taken together, this study suggests a novel role for SPARC and GluA1 in promoting neuronal health and recovery following CNS damage.

  18. Ketamine displaces the novel NMDA receptor SPET probe [123I]CNS-1261 in humans in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, James M.; Erlandsson, Kjell; Arstad, Erik; Bressan, Rodrigo A.; Squassante, Lisa; Teneggi, Vincenza; Ell, Peter J.; Pilowsky, Lyn S.

    2006-01-01

    [ 123 I]CNS-1261 [N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine] is a high-affinity SPET ligand with selectivity for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study evaluated the effects of ketamine (a specific competitor for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site) on [ 123 I]CNS-1261 binding to NMDA receptors in vivo. Ten healthy volunteers underwent 2 bolus-plus-infusion [ 123 I]CNS-1261 scans, one during placebo and the other during a ketamine challenge. Ketamine administration led to a significant decrease in [ 123 I]CNS-1261 V T in most of the brain regions examined (P 123 I]CNS-1261 appears to be a specific ligand in vivo for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 NMDA binding site

  19. Ketamine displaces the novel NMDA receptor SPET probe [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 in humans in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, James M. [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: j.stone@iop.kcl.ac.uk; Erlandsson, Kjell [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, W1N 8AA (United Kingdom); Arstad, Erik [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom); Bressan, Rodrigo A. [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom); Squassante, Lisa [GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Verona 37135 (Italy); Teneggi, Vincenza [GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Verona 37135 (Italy); Ell, Peter J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, W1N 8AA (United Kingdom); Pilowsky, Lyn S. [Institute of Psychiatry, King' s College London, De Crespigny Park London, SE5 8AF (United Kingdom); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, W1N 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 [N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-iodophenyl)-N-methylguanidine] is a high-affinity SPET ligand with selectivity for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study evaluated the effects of ketamine (a specific competitor for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 site) on [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 binding to NMDA receptors in vivo. Ten healthy volunteers underwent 2 bolus-plus-infusion [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 scans, one during placebo and the other during a ketamine challenge. Ketamine administration led to a significant decrease in [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 V {sub T} in most of the brain regions examined (P<.05). [{sup 123}I]CNS-1261 appears to be a specific ligand in vivo for the intrachannel PCP/ketamine/MK-801 NMDA binding site.

  20. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by

  1. Interactions of the histamine and hypocretin systems in CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ling; Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerome M

    2015-07-01

    Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder. Here, we review the role of the histamine and hypocretin systems in sleep-wake modulation. Furthermore, we summarize the neuropathological changes to these two systems in narcolepsy and discuss the possibility that narcolepsy-associated histamine abnormalities could mediate or result from the same processes that cause the hypocretin cell loss. We also review the changes in the hypocretin and histamine systems, and the associated sleep disruptions, in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic approaches for manipulation of the histamine system.

  2. Differential diagnosis of CNS angiostrongyliasis: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthong, Vichai; Chindaprasirt, Jarin; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2013-06-01

    The diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic meningitis (EOM) is the identification of an absolute count of 10 eosinophils per ml or more than 10% of the total white blood cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the proper clinical context. The most common cause of EOM is Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection, termed meningitic angiostrongyliasis (MA). Neurognathostomiasis (NG) is the main parasitic disease in the differential diagnosis of meningitic angiostrongyliasis. This short review is based on articles published on Medline between 2000 and 2012 related to EOM. There are three main approaches that can be used to differentiate between MA and NG, involving clinical factors, history of larval exposure, and serological tests. MA patients presented with acute severe headache but without neurological deficit, combined with a history of eating uncooked snails or slugs. NG patients always presented with motor weakness, migratory swelling, radicular pain and had history of eating uncooked poultry or fish. Specific antigenic bands in immunoblot tests are helpful tools to differentiate the two diseases. Other causes of eosinophilic meningitis are neurocysticercosis, cerebral paragonimiasis, Toxoplasma canis, Baylisascaris, tuberculous meningitis, and cryptococcal meningitis.

  3. Information processing in the CNS: a supramolecular chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo

    2015-10-01

    How does central nervous system process information? Current theories are based on two tenets: (a) information is transmitted by action potentials, the language by which neurons communicate with each other-and (b) homogeneous neuronal assemblies of cortical circuits operate on these neuronal messages where the operations are characterized by the intrinsic connectivity among neuronal populations. In this view, the size and time course of any spike is stereotypic and the information is restricted to the temporal sequence of the spikes; namely, the "neural code". However, an increasing amount of novel data point towards an alternative hypothesis: (a) the role of neural code in information processing is overemphasized. Instead of simply passing messages, action potentials play a role in dynamic coordination at multiple spatial and temporal scales, establishing network interactions across several levels of a hierarchical modular architecture, modulating and regulating the propagation of neuronal messages. (b) Information is processed at all levels of neuronal infrastructure from macromolecules to population dynamics. For example, intra-neuronal (changes in protein conformation, concentration and synthesis) and extra-neuronal factors (extracellular proteolysis, substrate patterning, myelin plasticity, microbes, metabolic status) can have a profound effect on neuronal computations. This means molecular message passing may have cognitive connotations. This essay introduces the concept of "supramolecular chemistry", involving the storage of information at the molecular level and its retrieval, transfer and processing at the supramolecular level, through transitory non-covalent molecular processes that are self-organized, self-assembled and dynamic. Finally, we note that the cortex comprises extremely heterogeneous cells, with distinct regional variations, macromolecular assembly, receptor repertoire and intrinsic microcircuitry. This suggests that every neuron (or group of

  4. Molecular Pathology of Neuro-AIDS (CNS-HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Masliah

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive deficits in patients with HIV profoundly affect the quality of life of people living with this disease and have often been linked to the neuro-inflammatory condition known as HIV encephalitis (HIVE. With the advent of more effective anti-retroviral therapies, HIVE has shifted from a sub-acute to a chronic condition. The neurodegenerative process in patients with HIVE is characterized by synaptic and dendritic damage to pyramidal neurons, loss of calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons and myelin loss. The mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in HIVE might involve a variety of pathways, and several lines of investigation have found that interference with signaling factors mediating neuroprotection might play an important role. These signaling pathways include, among others, the GSK3b, CDK5, ERK, Pyk2, p38 and JNK cascades. Of these, GSK3b has been a primary focus of many previous studies showing that in infected patients, HIV proteins and neurotoxins secreted by immune-activated cells in the brain abnormally activate this pathway, which is otherwise regulated by growth factors such as FGF. Interestingly, modulation of the GSK3b signaling pathway by FGF1 or GSK3b inhibitors (lithium, valproic acid is protective against HIV neurotoxicity, and several pilot clinical trials have demonstrated cognitive improvements in HIV patients treated with GSK3b inhibitors. In addition to the GSK3b pathway, the CDK5 pathway has recently been implicated as a mediator of neurotoxicity in HIV, and HIV proteins might activate this pathway and subsequently disrupt the diverse processes that CDK5 regulates, including synapse formation and plasticity and neurogenesis. Taken together, the GSK3b and CDK5 signaling pathways are important regulators of neurotoxicity in HIV, and modulation of these factors might have therapeutic potential in the treatment of patients suffering from HIVE. In this context, the subsequent sections will focus on reviewing the

  5. Potential of stem cell based therapy and tissue engineering in the regeneration of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Yihua; Tsang, Kent K S; Zhang Han

    2006-01-01

    The insufficiency of self-repair and regeneration of the central nervous system (CNS) leads to difficulty of rehabilitation of the injured brain. In the past few decades, the significant progress in cell therapy and tissue engineering has contributed to the functional recovery of the CNS to a great extent. The present review focuses on the potential role of stem cell based therapy and tissue engineering in the regeneration of the CNS. (topical review)

  6. Postoperative Analgesic Efficacy of Bilateral Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Patients Undergoing Midline Colorectal Surgeries Using Ropivacaine: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Nahida; Bhat, Wasim Mohammad; Iqbal, Malik Zaffar; Wani, Anisur Rehman; Gurcoo, Showkat A; Rasool, Sahir

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is done as a part of multimodal analgesia for pain relief after abdominal surgeries. This prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of bilateral TAP block in patients undergoing midline colorectal surgeries using ropivacaine. Eighty patients scheduled for elective colorectal surgeries involving midline abdominal wall incision under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Group A received TAP block with 20 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine on either side of the abdominal wall, and Group B received 20 ml of normal saline. The time to request for rescue analgesia, total analgesic consumption in 24 h, and satisfaction with the anesthetic technique were assessed. The mean visual analog scale scores at rest and on coughing were higher in control group ( P > 0.05). Time (min) to request for the first rescue analgesia was prolonged in study group compared to control group ( P consumption in 24 h postoperatively was significantly high in control group ( P 0.05). The level of satisfaction concerning postoperative pain control/anesthetic technique was higher in study group ( P < 0.001). TAP block produces effective and prolonged postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing midline colorectal surgery. It is a technically simple block to perform with a high margin of safety. It produces a considerable reduction in mean intravenous postoperative tramadol requirements, reduction in postoperative pain scores, and increased time to first request for further analgesia, both at rest and on movement.

  7. Natural host genetic resistance to lentiviral CNS disease: a neuroprotective MHC class I allele in SIV-infected macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Mankowski

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5. Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001. Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease.

  8. Change in the balance of excitatory and inhibitory midline fiber crossing as an explanation for the hopping phenotype in EphA4 knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo, Carlos E.; Margaryan, Gayane; Borgius, Lotta

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the spinal cord termed central pattern generators (CPGs) are responsible for the generation of rhythmic movements, such as walking. The axon guidance molecule EphA4 has been suggested to play a role in the configuration of spinal CPG networks in mammals. In EphA4 knockout (Eph...... compared with EphA4 lacZ/+ mice. These results show that the hopping phenotype is the result of a change in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory signals across the midline and that EphA4-positive neurons play an essential role in the mammalian CPG....

  9. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    CNS germ cell tumors can be diagnosed and classified based on histology, tumor markers, or a combination of both. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood CNS germ cell tumors including molecular features and clinical features, diagnostic and staging evaluation, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  10. The N-terminal domain of APJ, a CNS-based coreceptor for HIV-1, is essential for its receptor function and coreceptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Naiming; Zhang Xiaoling; Fan Xuejun; Argyris, Elias; Fang Jianhua; Acheampong, Edward; DuBois, Garrett C.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    2003-01-01

    The human APJ, a G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor, has been found to be dramatically expressed in the human central nervous system (CNS) and also to serve as a coreceptor for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Studies with animal models suggested that APJ and its natural ligand, apelin, play an important role in the central control of body fluid homeostasis, and in regulation of blood pressure and cardiac contractility. In this study, we characterize the structural and functional determinants of the N-terminal domain of APJ in interactions with its natural ligand and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. We demonstrate that the second 10 residues of the N-terminal domain of APJ are critical for association with apelin, while the first 20 amino acids play an important role in supporting cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV-1 gp120. With site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified that the negatively charged amino acid residues Glu20 and Asp23 are involved in receptor and coreceptor functions, but residues Tyr10 and Tyr11 substantially contribute to coreceptor function for both T-tropic (CXCR4) and dual-tropic (CXCR4 and CCR5) HIV-1 isolates. Thus, this study provides potentially important information for further characterizing APJ-apelin functions in vitro and in vivo and designing small molecules for treatment of HIV-1 infection in the CNS

  11. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, C.E. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, Stott Lane, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: chockycj@yahoo.co.uk; Turnbull, I.W. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, Stott Lane, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences.

  12. The glymphatic system in CNS health and disease: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is unique in being the only organ system lacking lymphatic vessels to assist in the removal of interstitial metabolic waste products. Recent work has led to the discovery of the glymphatic system, a glial-dependent perivascular network that subserves a pseudo-lymphatic function in the brain. Within the glymphatic pathway, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) enters brain via periarterial spaces, passes into the interstitium via perivascular astrocytic aquaporin-4, and then drives the perivenous drainage of interstitial fluid (ISF) and its solute. Here we review the role of the glymphatic pathway in CNS physiology, factors known to regulate glymphatic flow, and pathologic processes where a breakdown of glymphatic CSF-ISF exchange has been implicated in disease initiation and progression. Important areas of future research, including manipulation of glymphatic activity aiming to improve waste clearance and therapeutic agent delivery, will also be discussed. PMID:29195051

  13. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offiah, C.E.; Turnbull, I.W.

    2006-01-01

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences

  14. Commercial viability of CNS drugs: balancing the risk/reward profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ginger S

    2014-01-01

    CNS has historically been a formidable therapeutic area in which to innovate owing to biological (e.g., complex neurobiology, difficulty reaching the target), as well as clinical (e.g., subjective clinical endpoints, high placebo response, lack of biomarkers) challenges. In the current market where many of the larger diseases are dominated by a generic standard of care, commercial challenges now make the triple threat of scientific-clinical-commercial risk too much for many players to tackle. However, opportunities do exist for smaller biotech companies to concentrate on narrowly focused patient populations associated with high unmet need for which risk can be tightly defined. In CNS, there are two major areas to balance the risk/reward profile and create commercially viable opportunities: To realize value, all companies (start-ups and big players) must define, measure and quantify clear and meaningful value to all stakeholders: physicians, patients, caregivers and payers. © 2013.

  15. Evaluation of CNS activities of aerial parts of Cynodon dactylon Pers. in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dilipkumar

    2008-01-01

    The dried extracts of aerial parts of Cynodon dactylon Pers. (Graminae) were evaluated for CNS activities in mice. The ethanol extract of aerial parts of C. dactylon (EECD) was found to cause significant depression in general behavioral profiles in mice. EECD significantly potentiated the sleeping time in mice induced by standard hypnotics viz. pentobarbitone sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate in a dose dependant manner. EECD showed significant analgesic properties as evidenced by the significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches induced in mice by 1.2% acetic acid solution. It also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine in mice. EECD inhibited the onset and the incidence of convulsion in a dose dependent manner against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsion. The present study indicates that EECD has significant CNS depressant activities.

  16. CNS manifestation in progressive facial hemiatrophy (Romberg's disease). MRI findings and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terstegge, K.; Henkes, H.; Kern, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article the authors describe the clinical and MR imaging findings of the CNS in three female patients with PFH and present a comprehensive review of the literature. One of three PFH patients had partial epilepsy. MRI showed ventricular enlargement, white matter lesions, flattening of the cortical surface and meningeal adhesions homolateral to the facial hemiatrophy. Two other patients had completely normal intracranial findings. These findings confirm that cerebral hemiatrophy can occur in a subgroup of PFH patients. The MRI pattern, however, does not seem to be consistent with a simple atrophic or malnutrition process. The authors consider chronic localized meningoencephalitis with vascular involvement as a possible underlying mechanism for the occasional CNS involvement in PFH. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Nogo-A is a reliable oligodendroglial marker in adult human and mouse CNS and in demyelinated lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Maruschak, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    to be strongly expressed in mature oligodendrocytes in vivo. In the present investigation we analyzed the expression patterns of Nogo-A in adult mouse and human CNS as well as in demyelinating animal models and multiple sclerosis lesions. Nogo-A expression was compared with that of other frequently used...... oligodendroglial markers such as CC1, CNP, and in situ hybridization for proteolipid protein mRNA. Nogo-A strongly and reliably labeled oligodendrocytes in the adult CNS as well as in demyelinating lesions and thus represents a valuable tool for the identification of oligodendrocytes in human and mouse CNS tissue...

  18. In vivo human apolipoprotein E isoform fractional turnover rates in the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin R Wildsmith

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and has been implicated in the risk for other neurological disorders. The three common ApoE isoforms (ApoE2, E3, and E4 each differ by a single amino acid, with ApoE4 increasing and ApoE2 decreasing the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Both the isoform and amount of ApoE in the brain modulate AD pathology by altering the extent of amyloid beta (Aβ peptide deposition. Therefore, quantifying ApoE isoform production and clearance rates may advance our understanding of the role of ApoE in health and disease. To measure the kinetics of ApoE in the central nervous system (CNS, we applied in vivo stable isotope labeling to quantify the fractional turnover rates of ApoE isoforms in 18 cognitively-normal adults and in ApoE3 and ApoE4 targeted-replacement mice. No isoform-specific differences in CNS ApoE3 and ApoE4 turnover rates were observed when measured in human CSF or mouse brain. However, CNS and peripheral ApoE isoform turnover rates differed substantially, which is consistent with previous reports and suggests that the pathways responsible for ApoE metabolism are different in the CNS and the periphery. We also demonstrate a slower turnover rate for CSF ApoE than that for amyloid beta, another molecule critically important in AD pathogenesis.

  19. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-01-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain. (orig.)

  20. Rotorcraft Low Altitude CNS (Communications, Navigation and Surveillance) Benefit/Cost Analysis, Rotorcraft Operations Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    inventory of rotorcraft activity by mission and location. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement Helicopter Helicopter Missions This document is available...helicopter is used to transport skiers /hikers to remote, normally inaccessible places. This mission is performed in rural or wilderness areas at altitudes...their applicability to the CNS benefit/cost analysis. Because of the uncertainty in the knowledge of the characteristics of both current and future