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Sample records for cms modules surface

  1. Point 5 - civil engineering : SX5, SX, travelling cranes, trucks, CMS modules, surface views, pit PX

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    > de 00:00 à 14:00 le 09 décembre 1995 Forage et carottage du sous-sol pour connaître l’état du terrain pour les futurs travaux souterrains de Génie Civil > de 14:01 à 19:15mn le 03 février 1997 Sondage et carottage dans le tunnel LEP/LHC vers le point2 > de 19 :16 à 38 :00mn le 13 juin 1997 Construction d’une galerie souterraine de liaison et du nouveau bâtiment de ventilation SU ?? sur le site du Point5 Vues du point5 avant l’agrandissement du site pour CMS

  2. Production chain of CMS pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The pictures show the production chain of pixel modules for the CMS detector. Fig.1: overview of the assembly procedure. Fig.2: bump bonding with ReadOut Chip (ROC) connected to the sensor. Fig.3: glueing a raw module onto the baseplate strips. Fig.4: glueing of the High Density Interconnect (HDI) onto a raw module. Fig.5: pull test after heat reflow. Fig.6: wafer sensor processing, Indium evaporation.

  3. Tests of CMS MSGC Modules at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumont, Willem; Bernier, Kim; Blum, Peter; Bouhali, Othmane; Boulogne, Isabelle; Bozzo, Marco; Brez, Alessandro; Buzulutskov, A; Coffin, Jean-Pierre Coffin; Daubie, Evelyne; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Devroede, O; Erbacher, Th; Fahrer, Manuel; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Flügge, Gunter; Gariano, G; Geist, Walter M; Gottschalk, M; Helleboid, Jean-Marie; Huss, Daniel; Iacopi, F; Kärcher, Kurt; Latronico, Luca; Lounis, Abdenour; Lumb, Nicholas; Maazouzi, Chaker; Macke, D; Massai, Marco Maria; Mörmann, Dirk; Müller, Th; Neuberger, D; Nowack, Andreas; Papanestis, Antonios; Raffo, R; Roederer, Frank; Schulte, R; Shekhtman, L I; Sigward, M H; Simonis, H J; Spandre, Gloria; Spezziga, Mario; Struczinski, W; Tatarinov, A A; Toropin, Alexander N.; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Dyck, C; Van Lancker, Luc; Van der Velde, C; Vanlaer, Pascal; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Zander, A; Barvich, Tobias; Zghiche, Amina; Zhukov, Valery; Brom, Jean-Marie; Ageron, M; Chowotz, Piotr; Albert, A; Mirabito, Laurent; Bluem, P.; Kaercher, K; Moermann, Dirk; Mueller, Th; Roederer, Frank; Weiler, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The CMS experiment, to be installed at the future p-p collider LHC at CERN, foresees the use of Micro-Strip Gas Counters ( MSGC's) for the outer layers of its central tracker. Present developments focus on the reliability of MSGC's in the harsh radiation environment imposed by the LHC. This paper reports on tests of two baseline CMS MSGC's identical to those foreseen for the barrel part of the tracker, in a high intensity pion beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute ( PSI), in april 1999.

  4. CMS Silicon Tracker Module Assembly and Testing at FNAL

    CERN Document Server

    Coppage, Don; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Kahl, William E; Medel, E; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Sogut, Kenan; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Spiegel, Leonard; Ten, Timour Borisovich

    2005-01-01

    This note is intended to provide details on a recent activity at FNAL in which CMS Tracker Outer Barrel modules were assembled and tested as part of a qualification of some of the sensor fabrication lines. At the same time the note serves to document the assembly and testing operations at FNAL for CMS silicon tracker modules. Of the 88 modules produced fo the qualification study at FNAL, one module was outside the mechanical alignment specification. For module bonding an introduced failure rate of 4.0x10^-4 faults per channel was observed. Eighty-five of the modules passed the full set of electrical tests. Two of the failures could be attributed to the sensors and one to a problem with the front-end hybrid. Additionally, a couple of the passed modules drew unusually high leakage currents. The high current modules are discussed in some detail.

  5. CMS Silicon Tracker Module Assembly and Testing at FNAL

    CERN Document Server

    Coppage, Don; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Kahl, William E; Medel, E; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Sogut, Kenan; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Spiegel, Leonard; Ten, Timour Borisovich

    2005-01-01

    This note is intended to provide details on a recent activity at FNAL in which CMS Tracker Outer Barrel modules were assembled and tested as part of a qualification of some of the sensor fabrication lines. At the same time the note serves to document the assembly and testing operations at FNAL for CMS silicon tracker modules. Of the 88 modules produced fo the qualification study at FNAL, one module was outside the mechanical alignment specification. For module bonding an introduced failure rate of 4.0x10^-4 faults per channel was observed. Eighty-five of the modules passed the full set of electrical tests. Two of the failures could be attributed to the sensors and one to a problem with the front-end hybrid. Additionally, a couple of the passed modules drew unusually high leakage currents. The high current modules are discussed in some detail.

  6. Automated silicon module assembly for the CMS silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Surrow, B

    2001-01-01

    The CMS silicon tracker requires the assembly of about 20000 individual silicon detector modules. To ensure the assembly of such an amount with high, reproducible quality, an automated procedure has been developed for module assembly based on a high-precision robotic positioning machine. This procedure allows a much higher throughput and will result in much reduced manpower requirements than for traditional manual techniques. (1 refs).

  7. Test of CMS tracker silicon detector modules with the ARC readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, M; Flügge, G; Franke, T; Hegner, B; Hermanns, T; Kasselmann, S T; Mnich, J; Nowack, A; Pooth, O; Pottgens, M

    2004-01-01

    The CMS tracker will be equipped with 16,000 silicon microstrip detector modules covering a surface of approximately 220 m**2. For quality control, a compact and inexpensive DAQ system is needed to monitor the mass production in industry and in the CMS production centres. To meet these requirements a set-up called APV Readout Controller (ARC) system was developed and distributed among all collaborating institutes to perform full readout tests of hybrids and modules at each production step. The system consists of all necessary hardware components, C++ based readout software using LabVIEW **1 Lab VIEW is a product of National Instruments, Austin, USA. as graphical user interface and provides full database connection to track every single module component during the production phase. Two preseries of Tracker End Cap (TEC) silicon detector modules have been produced by the TEC community and tested with the ARC system at Aachen. The results of the second series are presented.

  8. Detector Modules for the CMS Pixel Phase 1 Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, De Hua; Berger, Pirmin; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Starodumov, Andrey; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Pixel phase 1 upgrade detector consists of 1184 modules with new design. An important part of the production is the module qualification and calibration, ensuring their proper functionality within the detector. This paper summarizes the qualification and calibration results of modules used in the innermost two detector layers with focus on methods using module-internal calibration signals. Extended characterizations on pixel level such as electronic noise and bump bond connectivity, optimization of operational parameters, sensor quality and thermal stress resistance were performed using a customized setup with controlled environment. It could be shown that the selected modules have on average $0.55 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\, \\pm \\, 0.01 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\,$ defective pixels and that all performance parameters stay within their specifications.

  9. Modulární CMS systém

    OpenAIRE

    Gešvindr, David

    2010-01-01

    Tato bakalářská práce se zabývá tvorbou univerzálního CMS systému. V první části jsou teoreticky popsány vlastnosti CMS systémů a technologie používané pro jejich tvorbu. Součástí práce je také porovnání vybraných dostupných CMS systémů. Objasněn je návrh a implementace vlastního CMS systému v prostředí ASP.NET s využitím technologie AJAX. This bachelor thesis is focused on creating universal content management system. In a first part are theoretically described features of CMS systems and...

  10. An Automated Silicon Module Assembly System for the CMS Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Honma, Alan; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Lenzi, Michela; Mannelli, Marcello; Oh, Alexander; Spagnolo, Paolo; Surrow, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    The CMS Tracker requires the assembly of about 20000 silicon detector modules. To ensure the assembly of such a large quantity with high, reproducible quality, an automated system for module assembly has been developed based on a high-precision robotic positioning machine. This system allows a much higher throughput and will result in much reduced manpower requirements than for traditional manual techniques. This note describes the design and performance of the automated Silicon module assembly system which has been developed within the CERN CMS Silicon Tracker group.

  11. Tester Board for testing mass-produced SMB modules for CMS Preshower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Chou, C. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lee, Y. J.; Shiu, J. G.; Sun, C. D.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2007-09-01

    We have developed a Tester Board to test the electrical characteristics of the System Motherboard (SMB) for the CMS Preshower detector at CERN. The board is designed to test input resistances, output resistances, connections, interconnections and possible short- circuits of a module having up to 640 connector pins. The Tester Board is general-purpose in nature: it could be used to test any electronic module or cable by using dedicated cable sets. The module can detect a variety of problems not detected by either functional tests or the "flying probes" technique. The design, algorithms and results of using the Tester Board during mass production of CMS Preshower SMBs are presented.

  12. Tester Board for testing mass-produced SMB modules for CMS Preshower

    CERN Document Server

    Velikzhanin, Yu S; Hsiung, Y B; Lee, Y J; Shiu, J G; Sun, C D; Wang, Y Z

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Tester Board to test the electrical characteristics of the System Motherboard (SMB) for the CMS Preshower detector at CERN. The board is designed to test input resistances, output resistances, connections, interconnections and possible short- circuits of a module having up to 640 connector pins. The Tester Board is general-purpose in nature: it could be used to test any electronic module or cable by using dedicated cable sets. The module can detect a variety of problems not detected by either functional tests or the "flying probes" technique. The design, algorithms and results of using the Tester Board during mass production of CMS Preshower SMBs are presented.

  13. Automated procedures for the assembly of the CMS Phase 1 upgrade pixel modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alex; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the pixel tracker for the CMS experiment requires the assembly of approximately 1000 modules consisting of pixel sensors bump bonded to readout chips. The precision assembly of modules in this volume is made possible using several robotic processes for dispensing epoxy,positioning of sensor components, automatic wire-bonding and robotic deposition of elastomer for wire bond encapsulation. We will describe the these processes in detail, along with the measurements that quanitfy the quality of assembled modules, and describe the subsequent steps in which the sensor modules are used in the construction of the Phase 1 pixel tracker. With support from USCMS.

  14. Current Status of the Pixel Phase I Upgrade in CMS: Barrel Module Production

    CERN Document Server

    Bartek, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system, providing high precision space point measurements of charged particle trajectories. Before 2018 the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC is expected to reach about 2~x~$10^{34}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$, which will significantly increase the number of interactions per bunch crossing. To maintain a high tracking efficiency, CMS has planned to replace the current pixel system during phase I by a new lightweight detector, equipped with an additional 4th layer in the barrel, and one additional forward/backward disk. The present status of barrel modules production will be presented, including preliminary results from tests on the first production pixel modules of the new pixel tracker.

  15. Module Production and Qualification for the Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086689

    2015-01-01

    After consolidation of the LHC in 2013/14 its centre-of-mass energy will increase to 13TeV and the luminosity will reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}\\, \\textnormal{cm}^{-2} \\textnormal{s}^{-1}$, which is twice the design luminosity. The latter will result in more simultaneous particle collisions, which would significantly increase the dead time of the current readout chip of the CMS pixel detector. Therefore the entire CMS pixel detector is replaced in 2016/17 and a new digital readout with larger buffers will be used to handle increasing pixel hit rates. An additional fourth barrel-layer provides more space points to improve track reconstruction. Half of the required modules for layer four is being produced at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). This poster deals with the smallest discrete subunit of the pixel detector, the module and its assembly process. Moreover first production experience will be shown.

  16. Beam-loss-induced electrical stress test on CMS Silicon Strip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, M; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; MacPherson, A; Muller, T H; Weiler, T h

    2004-01-01

    Based on simulated LHC beam loss scenarios, fully depleted CMS silicon tracker modules and sensors were exposed to 42 ns-long beam spills of approximately 10**1**1 protons per spill at the PS at CERN. The ionisation dose was sufficient to short circuit the silicon sensors. The dynamic behaviour of bias voltage, leakage currents and voltages over coupling capacitors were monitored during the impact. Results of pre- and post-qualification as well as the dynamic behaviour are shown.

  17. Signal-to-Noise Measurements on Irradiated CMS Tracker Detector Modules in an Electron Testbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Bleyl, Mark; Steinbruck, G; Stoye, M; Dragicevica, M; Hrubec, Josef; Krammer, M; Frey, M; Hartmann, F; Weiler, T; Hegner, B

    2006-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is in the last phase of its construction. The harsh radiation environment at LHC will put strong demands in radiation hardness to the innermost parts of the detector. To assess the performance of irradiated microstrip detector modules, a testbeam was conducted at the Testbeam 22 facility of the DESY research center. The primary objective was the signal-to-noise measurement of irradiated CMS Tracker modules to ensure their functionality up to 10 years of LHC operation. The paper briefly summarises the basic setup at the facility and the hardware and software used to collect and analyse the data. Some interesting subsidiary results are shown, which confirm the expected behaviour of the detector with respect to the signal-to-noise performance over the active detector area and for different electron energies. The main focus of the paper are the results of the signal-to-noise measurements for CMS Tracker Modules which were exposed to different radiation doses...

  18. Module production for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siado Castaneda, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    For Run 2 the Large Hadron Collider will run at a much higher instantaneous luminosity, which requires an upgrade of the CMS pixel detector. The detector consists of rectangular silicon sensors, segmented into 100 μm by 150 μm pixels, bonded to readout chips, with one sensor and a 8x2 array of readout chips forming a module. Due to its high granularity and good spatial resolution, about 10 μm for a single hit, the pixel detector is used for track reconstruction, pileup mitigation, and b-quark tagging in many physics analyses. Being the innermost sub-detector of CMS it receives the most radiation damage, and therefore needs to be replaced most often. For the phase 1 upgrade an additional disk in the forward region and increased buffer space in the readout chip will improve the pixel performance by increasing efficiency and reducing fake rates. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln is one of the two sites where modules are being assembled. This talk features the steps of the assembly process as well as challenges encountered and overcome during production of over 500 modules. The CMS Collaboration.

  19. Beam loss studies on silicon strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The large beam energy of the LHC demands for a save beam abort system. Nevertheless, failures cannot be excluded with last assurance and are predicted to occur once per year. As the CMS experiment is placed in the neighboured LHC octant, it is affected by such events. The effect of an unsynchronized beam abort on the silicon strip modules of the CMS tracking detector has been investigated in this thesis by performing one accelerator and two lab experiments. The dynamical behaviour of operational parameters of modules and components has been recorded during simulated beam loss events to be able to disentangle the reasons of possible damages. The first study with high intensive proton bunches at the CERN PS ensured the robustness of the module design against beam losses. A further lab experiment with pulsed IR LEDs clarified the physical and electrical processes during such events. The silicon strip sensors on a module are protected against beam losses by a part of the module design that originally has not been...

  20. Qualification of the modules for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The innermost component of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, the silicon pixel tracker, will be replaced by a new device in early 2017 to cope with the significant increase in instantaneous luminosity expected for the remainder of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider. The upgraded detector is composed of two subcomponents: the barrel pixel (BPIX) and the forward pixel (FPIX). In this work, we describe the testing and calibration procedures that the FPIX detector subcomponents underwent as well as the quality assurance criteria used for selecting the best detector modules for the final installation. NSF

  1. 27 January 2011 - Mitglieder des Stiftungsrates Academia Engelberg, Switzerland in CMS surface and underground experimental area with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and ETHZ/CMS Physicist G. Dissertori.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michael Hoch

    2011-01-01

    27 January 2011 - Mitglieder des Stiftungsrates Academia Engelberg, Switzerland in CMS surface and underground experimental area with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and ETHZ/CMS Physicist G. Dissertori.

  2. CMS pixel upgrade for the phase I: Module production and qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñano Moya, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present CMS pixel detector has been designed to be fully efficient up to an LHC luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1. However, the luminosity will increase by a factor of two in the coming years. Therefore it is planned to build and install a new detector in the extended year-end technical stop in 2016-17. Barrel pixel modules are in production since spring/summer 2015 in five different centers. Module production requires bump bonding, wire bonding and gluing processes to finally assemble a full module. To have a uniform performance of all modules standard qualification procedures have been developed. All modules will be subjected to 10 thermal cycles between +17 °C and -25 °C and then electrically tested. In addition, module performance will be verified under high rate X-rays, and internal calibrate signals used for electrical tests will be calibrated in units of electrons using well defined X-ray fluorescence lines from different target materials. The qualification criteria, based on which modules are selected to be used in the final system, will be explained in detail.

  3. Qualification of Barrel Pixel Detector Modules for the Phase 1 Upgrade of the CMS Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kudella, Simon

    2016-01-01

    To withstand the higher particle rates of LHC Runs 2 and 3, with expected luminosities of up to $2\\times 10^{34}\\,\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$, the current CMS pixel detector at the LHC will be replaced as part of the CMS Phase I Upgrade during the extended winter shutdown in 2016/17. The new pixel detector features a new geometry with one additional detector layer in the barrel region~(BPIX) and one pair of additional disks in the forward region~(FPIX), new digital readout chips as well as a new CO$_{2}$-based cooling system for both the barrel and forward region. The BPIX detector module production is summarized, with special focus on the different stages of quality assurance. The quality tests as well as the calibrations which all produced modules undergo in a temperature and humidity controlled environment are described. Exemplarily, the KIT/Aachen production line and its subprocesses are presented together with its quality and yields.

  4. HDI flexible front-end hybrid prototype for the PS module of the CMS tracker upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, M.; Blanchot, G.; Gadek, T.; Honma, A.; Koliatos, A.

    2017-02-01

    The CMS tracker upgrade for the HL-LHC relies on different module types, depending on the position of the respective module. They are built with high-density interconnection flexible circuits that are wire bonded to silicon strip and pixel-strip sensors. The Front-End hybrids will contain several flip-chip bonded readout ASICs that are still under development. Mock-up prototypes are used to qualify the advanced flexible circuit technology and the parameters of the hybrids. This paper presents the Pixel-Strip (PS) mock-up hybrid in terms of testing, interconnection, fold-over, thermal properties and layout feasibility. Plans for circuit testing at operating temperature (-30o) are also presented.

  5. CMS Central Hadron Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Howard S.

    2001-01-01

    We present a description of the CMS central hadron calorimeter. We describe the production of the 1996 CMS hadron testbeam module. We show the results of the quality control tests of the testbeam module. We present some results of the 1995 CMS hadron testbeam.

  6. Performance of the modules for layer 1 of the CMS phase 1 pixel detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Berger, Pirmin; Starodumov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider will increase to up to 2x10$^{34}$\\;cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ by 2023. In order to cope with such luminosities, the pixel detector of the CMS experiment has been replaced in January 2017. The upgraded detector features four sensitive layers in the barrel part. A designated readout chip (PROC600V2) is used for layer 1, which is closest to the interaction point and therefore has to handle larger particle fluxes. An irradiation campaign has been performed with PROC600V2 to verify its radiation tolerance up to the maximum expected dose for 2017 of 0.2\\;MGy. Modules for layer 1 have been built with PROC600V2 for the detector production. The quality of every inserted module was assessed in a number of tests, some of which were performed using X-radiation. The characteristics of the modules used in the detector as well as the main failure modes will be presented.

  7. Readout architecture for the Pixel-Strip module of the CMS Outer Tracker Phase-2 upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Caratelli, Alessandro; Jan Kaplon; Kloukinas, Konstantinos; Simone Scarfi

    2016-01-01

    The Outer Tracker upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN introduces new challenges for the front-end readout electronics. In particular, the capability of identifying particles with high transverse momentum using modules with double sensor layers requires high speed real time interconnects between readout ASICs. The Pixel-Strip module combines a pixelated silicon layer with a silicon-strip layer. Consequently, it needs two different readout ASICs, namely the Short Strip ASIC (SSA) for the strip sensor and the Macro Pixel ASIC (MPA) for the pixelated sensor. The architecture proposed in this paper allows for a total data flow between readout ASICs of $\\sim$100\\,Gbps and reduces the output data flow from 1.3\\,Tbps to 30\\,Gbps per module while limiting the total power density to below 100\\,mW/cm$^2$. In addition a system-level simulation framework of all the front-end readout ASICs is developed in order to verify the data processing algorithm and the hardware implementation allowing mult...

  8. Detector Developments for the LHC CMS TOB Silicon Detector Modules and ATLAS TileCal Read-Out Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Poveda, J; Ferrer, A

    2005-01-01

    This Research Report is divided in two different parts corresponding to two different periods of time working in different collaborations. First, a general approach to the framework where this work is set is presented at the Introduction: the CERN laboratory near Geneva, the LHC accelerator and its two general purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS. The first part of this report consists in the study of the performance of the silicon strip detectors specifically designed for the Tracker Outer Barrel (TOB) of the CMS Tracker detector. Results of the performance of CMS TOB silicon detector modules mounted on the first assembled double-sided rod at CERN are presented. These results are given in terms of noise, noise occupancies, signal to noise ratios and signal efficiencies. The detector signal efficiencies and noise occupancies are also shown as a function of threshold for a particular clustering algorithm. Signal efficiencies versus noise occupancy plots as a function of the threshold level, which could also be us...

  9. PS-Module prototypes with MPA-light readout chip for the CMS Tracker Phase 2 Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    During the HL-LHC era an instantaneous luminosity of $5\\times10^{34}\\,\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ will be reached and possibly $3000\\mskip3mu\\mathrm{fb} ^{-1}$ integrated luminosity will be delivered. This results in the requirement for a major upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker detector. This contribution briefly reviews the module types and the front end readout electronics foreseen in the preparation program known as phase 2 upgrade. R\\&D towards the construction of full module prototypes for the Pixel-Strip (PS) module is ongoing. The module combines a macro-pixel sensor and a strip sensor and has $p_{\\mathrm{T}}\\,$-discrimination capability at module level. The current experience from module construction with a demonstrator assembly and initial laboratory testing with an alternative module concept for the PS-module is shown. A possible calibration method is introduced.

  10. PS-module prototypes with MPA-light readout chip for the CMS Tracker Phase 2 Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, J.

    2017-02-01

    During the HL-LHC era an instantaneous luminosity of 5×1034 cm‑2s‑1 will be reached and possibly 3000 fb‑1 integrated luminosity will be delivered. This results in the requirement for a major upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker detector. This contribution briefly reviews the module types and the front end readout electronics foreseen in the preparation program known as phase 2 upgrade. R&D towards the construction of full module prototypes for the Pixel-Strip (PS) module is ongoing. The module combines a macro-pixel sensor and a strip sensor and has pT -discrimination capability at module level. The current experience from module construction with a demonstrator assembly and initial laboratory testing with an alternative module concept for the PS-module is shown. A possible calibration method is introduced.

  11. The first module of CMS superconducting magnet is leaving towards CERN: a huge solenoid, which will hold the world record of stored energy

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first module of the five which will make up the CMS superconducting magnet is sailing today from Genova port to CERN. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of the experiments that will take place at the accelerator LHC. The device will arrive after 10-days of travel (1 page)

  12. The 2 Tbps "Data to Surface" System of the CMS Data Acquisition

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, R; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Cittolin, Sergio; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gómez-Reino Garrido, R; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Jacobs, C; Kreuzer, P; Lo Presti, G; Magrans De Abril, I; Marinelli, N; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Rosinsky, P; Schwick, C; Sphicas, P; Sumorok, J; Varela, K

    2006-01-01

    The Data Acquisition system of the CMS experiment, at the CERN LHC collider, is designed to build 1~MB events at a sustained rate of 100 kHz and to provide sufficient computing power to filter the events by a factor of 1000. The Data to Surface (D2S) system is the first layer of the Data Acquisition interfacing the underground subdetector readout electronics to the surface Event Builder. It collects the 100~GB/s input data from a large number of front-end cards (650) , implements a first stage event building by combining multiple sources into lar ger-size data fragments, and transports them to the surface for the full event building. The Data to Surface system can operate at the maximum rate of 2 Tbps. This paper describes the layout, reconfigurability and production validation of the D2S system which is to be installed by December 2005.

  13. Development and evaluation of test stations for the quality assurance of the silicon micro-strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poettgens, M.

    2007-11-22

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m{sup 2}, the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control of the quality is done by the members of the 21 participating institutes. Since the access to the silicon micro-strip tracker will be very limited after the installation in the CMS detector the installed modules must be of high quality. For this reason the modules are thoroughly tested and the test results are uploaded to a central database. By the development of a read-out system and the corresponding software the III. Physikalisches Institut made an important contribution for the electrical and functional quality control of hybrids and modules. The read-out system provides all features for the operation and test of hybrids and modules and stands out due to high reliability and simple handling. Because a very user-friedly and highly automated software it became the official test tool and was integrated in various test stands. The test stands, in which the read-out system is integrated in, are described and the tests which are implemented in the

  14. Involvement of p38 MAPK- and JNK-modulated expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in Naja nigricollis CMS-9-induced apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Liu, Wen-Hsin; Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Wang, Jeh-Jeng; Chang, Long-Sen

    2010-06-15

    CMS-9, a phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) isolated from Naja nigricollis venom, induced apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells, characterized by mitochondrial depolarization, modulation of Bcl-2 family members, cytochrome c release and activation of caspases 9 and 3. Moreover, an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was noted. Pretreatment with BAPTA-AM (Ca2+ chelator) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, ROS scavenger) proved that Ca2+ was an upstream event in inducing ROS generation. Upon exposure to CMS-9, activation of p38 MAPK and JNK was observed in K562 cells. BAPTA-AM or NAC abrogated CMS-9-elicited p38 MAPK and JNK activation, and rescued viability of CMS-9-treated K562 cells. SB202190 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) and SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) suppressed CMS-9-induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, Bcl-2 down-regulation, Bax up-regulation and increased mitochondrial translocation of Bax. Inactivation of PLA(2) activity reduced drastically the cytotoxicity of CMS-9, and a combination of lysophosphatidylcholine and stearic acid mimicked the cytotoxic effects of CMS-9. Taken together, our data suggest that CMS-9-induced apoptosis of K562 cells is catalytic activity-dependent and is mediated through mitochondria-mediated death pathway triggered by Ca2+/ROS-evoked p38 MAPK and JNK activation.

  15. Performance of the CMS 2S $p_T$ module prototype using CBC2 readout at beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar

    2017-01-01

    As the LHC will enter into its high luminosity phase\\,(HL-LHC), operating at a luminosity of $5\\rm{\\mbox{-}}7.5\\times10^{34}~\\rm cm^{-2}\\rm s^{-1}$, the CMS experiment will replace the Run 2 tracker with a new one which will be able to sustain the increased number of collisions per bunch crossing, which can be as high as 200. The tracker information will be used in the Level-1 trigger to reject low $p_T$ tracks. In this paper, the performance of the modules of the proposed outer tracker in test beams is reported.

  16. CMS Forward-Backward MSGC milestone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, O; Barthe, S; Beaumont, W; Beckers, T; Beissel, F; Benhammou, Ya; Bergdolt, A M; Bernier, K; Boulogne, I; Bozzo, M; Brom, J M; Camps, C; Chorowicz, V; Coffin, J; Commichau, V; Contardo, D; Croix, J; De Troy, J G; Drouhin, F; Eberle, H; Flügge, G; Fontaine, J C; Geist, Walter M; Goerlach, U; Gundlfinger, K; Hangarter, K; Haroutunian, R; Helleboid, J M; Hoffer, M; Hoffmann, C; Huss, D; Ischebeck, R; Jeanneau, F; Juillot, P; Kapp, M R; Krauth, M; Kremp, J; Lounis, A; Lübelsmeyer, K; Maazouzi, C; Macke, D; Mirabito, L; Nowack, A; Pandoulas, D; Petertill, M; Pooth, O; Racca, C; Ripp, I; Schmitz, P; Schulte, R; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schunck, J P; Schuster, G; Schwaller, B; Sigward, M H; Smadja, G; Stefanescu, J; Tissot, S; Todorov, T; Udo, Fred; Van Doninck, W K; Van Dyck, C; Van Lancker, L; Van der Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Verdini, P G; Wortmann, R; Zghiche, A; Zhukov, V

    1998-01-01

    The CMS MF1 milestone was set in order to evaluate system aspects of the CMS forward-backward MSGC tracker, to check the design and feasibility of mass production and to set up assembly and test procedures. We describe the construction and the experience gained with the operation of a system of 38 MSGC detectors assembled in six multi-substrate detector modules corresponding to the geometry of the forward-backward MSGC tracker in CMS. These modules were equipped with MSGCs mounted side by side, forming a continuous detector surface of about 0.2 m2. Different designs were tried for these modules. The problems encountered are presented with the proposed solutions. Operation conditions for the 38 MSGCs are reported from an exposure to a muon beam at the CERN SPS. Gain uniformity along the wedge-shaped strip pattern and across the detector modules are shown together with the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, alignment and edge studies.

  17. CMS Forward-Backward MSGC milestone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, O; Barthe, S; Beaumont, W; Beckers, T; Beissel, F; Benhammou, Ya; Bergdolt, A M; Bernier, K; Boulogne, I; Bozzo, M; Brom, J M; Camps, C; Chorowicz, V; Coffin, J; Commichau, V; Contardo, D; Croix, J; De Troy, J G; Drouhin, F; Eberle, H; Flügge, G; Fontaine, J C; Geist, Walter M; Goerlach, U; Gundlfinger, K; Hangarter, K; Haroutunian, R; Helleboid, J M; Hoffer, M; Hoffmann, C; Huss, D; Ischebeck, R; Jeanneau, F; Juillot, P; Kapp, M R; Krauth, M; Kremp, J; Lounis, A; Lübelsmeyer, K; Maazouzi, C; Macke, D; Mirabito, L; Nowack, A; Pandoulas, D; Petertill, M; Pooth, O; Racca, C; Ripp, I; Schmitz, P; Schulte, R; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schunck, J P; Schuster, G; Schwaller, B; Sigward, M H; Smadja, G; Stefanescu, J; Tissot, S; Todorov, T; Udo, Fred; Van Doninck, W K; Van Dyck, C; Van Lancker, L; Van der Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Verdini, P G; Wortmann, R; Zghiche, A; Zhukov, V

    1998-01-01

    The CMS MF1 milestone was set in order to evaluate system aspects of the CMS forward-backward MSGC tracker, to check the design and feasibility of mass production and to set up assembly and test procedures. We describe the construction and the experience gained with the operation of a system of 38 MSGC detectors assembled in six multi-substrate detector modules corresponding to the geometry of the forward-backward MSGC tracker in CMS. These modules were equipped with MSGCs mounted side by side, forming a continuous detector surface of about 0.2 m2. Different designs were tried for these modules. The problems encountered are presented with the proposed solutions. Operation conditions for the 38 MSGCs are reported from an exposure to a muon beam at the CERN SPS. Gain uniformity along the wedge-shaped strip pattern and across the detector modules are shown together with the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, alignment and edge studies.

  18. The first module of the CMS experiment's superconducting solenoid has arrived at Point 5 after a long journey from Genoa to Geneva.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    We see the first module of the CMS coil, a silver cylinder with a diameter of 6.3 metres and a height of 2.5 metres, ready to be lifted onto the platform specially designed for the five modules at Point 5.

  19. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of analogue optoelectronic receiver modules for the CMS tracker

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 12-channel analogue optoelectronic receiver modules for the CMS Tracker. Following a market survey carried out among 56 firms in seventeen Member States and four firms in two non-Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2810/EP/CMS) was sent on 29 June 2001 to one firm in a Member State and one firm in a non-Member State. By the closing date, CERN had received one tender. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with NGK INSULATORS (JP), the only bidder, for the supply of 4500 units of 12-channel analogue optoelectronic receiver modules for a total amount of 228 485 949 Japanese yen, not subject to revision until 31 December 2003. At the rate of exchange stipulated in the tender, this amount is equivalent to approximately 3 110 500 Swiss francs. CERN's contribution to the total cost is 1 863 967 Swiss francs. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudica...

  20. CMS Factsheet

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    2016-01-01

    CMS Factsheets: containing facts about the CMS collaboration and detector. Printed copies of the English version are available from the CMS Secretariat. Responsible for translations: English only - E.Gibney (updated 2015)

  1. CMS Factsheet

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena; Rao, Achintya

    2016-01-01

    CMS Factsheets: containing facts about the CMS collaboration and detector. Printed copies of the English version are available from the CMS Secretariat. Responsible for translations: English only - E.Gibney (updated 2015)

  2. Design and test of the Digital Opto Hybrid Module for the CMS Tracker Inner Barrel and Disks.

    CERN Document Server

    Benotto, Franco; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Demaria, Natale; DeRobertis, G; Mersi, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important tasks to be performed in the CMS Tracker detector is the communication between hundreds of silicon modules and the central Control System under the supervision of the Data Acquisition System. To manage such complexity, modules are grouped in a hierarchical structure. Each group is controlled by a Communication and Control Unit (CCU). Several CCU form a ring with a Front End Controller as master. The entire Tracker Inner Barrel and Disks detector contains roughly 100 such rings called Control Rings. A description is given here of the implemented ring architecture for the detector and of the solutions found to provide a reliable and easy way to interconnect these groups.

  3. Performance of the CMS Tracker Optical Links and Future Upgrade Using Bandwidth Efficient Digital Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dris, Stefanos; Troska, J

    2006-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator will begin operation in 2007. The innermost CMS subdetector, the Tracker, comprises ~10 million detector channels read out by ~40 000 analog optical links. The optoelectronic components have been designed to meet the stringent requirements of a high energy physics (HEP) experiment in terms of radiation hardness, low mass and low power. Extensive testing has been performed on the components and on complete optical links in test systems. Their functionality and performance in terms of gain, noise, linearity, bandwidth and radiation hardness is detailed. Particular emphasis is placed on the gain, which directly affects the dynamic range of the detector data. It has been possible to accurately predict the variation in gain that will be observed throughout the system. A simulation based on production test data showed that the average gain would be ~38% higher than the design target at the Tracker operating temperatur...

  4. Channel control ASIC for the CMS hadron calorimeter front end readout module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray Yarema et al.

    2002-09-26

    The Channel Control ASIC (CCA) is used along with a custom Charge Integrator and Encoder (QIE) ASIC to digitize signals from the hybrid photo diodes (HPDs) and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the CMS hadron calorimeter. The CCA sits between the QIE and the data acquisition system. All digital signals to and from the QIE pass through the CCA chip. One CCA chip interfaces with two QIE channels. The CCA provides individually delayed clocks to each of the QIE chips in addition to various control signals. The QIE sends digitized PMT or HPD signals and time slice information to the CCA, which sends the data to the data acquisition system through an optical link.

  5. CMS pixel module qualification and Monte-Carlo study of $H \\to \\tau^{+}\\tau^{-} \\to l^{+}l^{-}ET$

    CERN Document Server

    Trüb, Peter; Pauss, F

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this work reports on the development of test and calibration algorithms for the qualification of the barrel modules of the CMS pixel detector. Several algorithms to test the hardware functionality and performance have been developed and implemented into an object-oriented software framework. Examples are the pixel readout test, the bump bonding test or the noise measurement. The qualification procedure also includes calibration routines. For instance the gain of each pixel or the temperature sensors of the readout chips have to be calibrated. Furthermore, an algorithm to unify the thresholds of all pixels was developed. According to specific quality criteria, each module is graded into one of three categories. Out of 981 tested modules, 806 were qualified for the usage in the detector. The second part of this work deals with a Monte-Carlo study of the Higgs decay channel $H\\to \\tau^{+}\\tau^{-} \\to l^{+}l^{-}Et$ with a jet balancing the large transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. In contras...

  6. Surface modulation of dental hard tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantbirojn, Daranee

    Tooth surfaces play a central role in the equilibrium of dental hard tissues, in which contrasting processes lead to loss or deposition of materials. The central interest of this Thesis was the modulation of tooth surfaces to control such equilibrium. Four specific studies were carried out to investigate different classes of surface modulating agents. These are: (1) Ionic modulation of the enamel surface to enhance stain removal . Dental stain is the most apparent form of tooth surface deposit. The nature of extrinsic stain in terms of spatial chemical composition was studied by using electron probe microanalysis. An ionic surface modulating agent, sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), was evaluated. Image analysis methodologies were developed and the ability of STPP in stain removal was proved. (2) Thin film modulation with substantive polymeric coating and the effect on in vitro enamel de/re-mineralization . A novel polymeric coating that formed a thin film on the tooth surface was investigated for its inhibitory effect on artificial enamel caries, without interfering with the remineralization process. The preventive effect was distinct, but the mineral redeposition was questionable. (3) Thick film modulation with fluoride containing sealants and the effect on in vitro enamel and root caries development. Fluoride incorporated into resin material is an example of combining different classes of surface modulating agents to achieve an optimal outcome. A proper combination, such as in resin modified glass ionomer, showed in vitro caries inhibitory effect beyond the material boundary in both enamel and dentin. (4) Thick film modulation with dental adhesives and the determination of adhesion to dentin. Dentin adhesives modulate intracoronal tooth surfaces by enhancing adhesion to restorative materials. Conventional nominal bond tests were inadequate to determine the performance of current high strength adhesives. It was shown that interfacial fracture toughness test was more

  7. CMS Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Center for Strategic Planning produces an annual CMS Statistics reference booklet that provides a quick reference for summary information about health...

  8. Simulation of light collection in the CMS lead tungstate crystals with the program Litrani: coating and surface effects

    CERN Document Server

    Chipaux, Rémi

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of the lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment under construction at CERN relies, among other things, on the correction of the calibration parameter from variations dues to crystal ageing. This ageing will be measured by a so-called monitoring system, but the relation between monitoring and calibration parameter variations is not so trivial, and depends much on the overall optical characteristics of crystal and photodetector. We present here simulations done with the program Litrani based on real ageing data for a realistic CMS crystal with a defined surface quality (optically polished, with or without one lateral face slightly depolished), covered by coatings of various characteristics, from totally absorbing to nominal aluminum or diffusing medium. The correlation coefficient between monitoring and scintillation signals depends greatly o n these characteristics, and varies between about 1.3 and more than 10 (the optimum being one). Submitted to or Presented at: Contact ...

  9. CMS launches the CMS Times

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to improve communication, the CMS collaboration has started to produce a weekly online newsletter: the CMS Times. Each edition features articles concerning the status of CMS construction, commissioning and analysis, as well as a basic 'events' calendar. All CMS collaborators will receive the CMS Times, but subscription is open to all. Suggestions and comments are, of course, welcome and can be made by sending mails to: cmstimes@cern.ch. The latest edition can be found at: http://cmsinfo.cern.ch/outreach/CMSTimes.html, or at the main CMS Outreach site: http://cmsinfo.cern.ch/outreach.

  10. Evaluation of Irradiated Barrel Detector Modules for the Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sibille, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01

    Prototype detector modules comprising sensors and the new readout chips were assembled and irradiated with protons at the CERN PS, and readout chips without sensors have been irradiated with protons at the Karls...

  11. Webinar on PTM with CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Introduction to CMS Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory Integrated waves, current, and sediment transport model in the Surface-water Modeling System ... CMS US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® PTM Webinar on PTM with CMS Mitchell E. Brown Civil Engineering Technician Honghai Li...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Webinar on PTM with CMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  12. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and ...

  13. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of em¬pl...

  14. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted.   CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat a...

  15. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natur...

  16. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natu...

  17. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the na...

  18. CMS Tracker Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Palmonari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    particle trajectories as well as primary and secondary vertices, multi-step calibration procedures including module alignment are required. Results from operating the CMS tracker during the first two years of 7 TeV LHC collisions will be presented. These include aspects such as the data acquisition, detector slow control, and data quality monitoring. Projections for the evolution of the CMS tracker performance with increasing irradiation will be given.

  19. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the ICMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS Management – CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management – CB – MB – FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through Indico. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2008 Annual Reviews are posted in Indico. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral student upon completion of their theses.  Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and name of their first employer. The Notes, Conference Reports and Theses published si...

  20. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-pT module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-pT track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-pT module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2 to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  1. Novel Trigger-Capable Modules for the Future CMS Tracking Detector and Inclusive Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment’s outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the $p_T$–module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using $p_T$ –module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In...

  2. Overview of CMS robotic silicon module assembly hardware based on Aerotech Gantry Positioning system.

    CERN Multimedia

    Honma, Alan

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the robotic silicon module assembly pilot project is to fully automate the gluing and pick and placement of silicon sensors and front-end hybrid onto a carbon-fibre frame. The basis for thesystem is the Aerotech Gantry Positioning System (AGS10000) machineshown in the centre of the picture. To the left is the PC which contains the controller card and runs the user interface. To the rightis the rack of associated electronics which interfaces with the CERNbuilt tooling and vacuum chuck system.

  3. CMS Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This reference provides significant summary information about health expenditures and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) programs. The...

  4. CMS silicon tracker milestone 200

    CERN Document Server

    Dierlamm, A

    2002-01-01

    The tracker of CMS will fully consist of silicon micro-strip and pixel sensors. Building a detector with 210 m/sup 2/ sensor surface in about 3 years requires a tightly controlled construction schedule. All different aspects of the production are exercised within a pre- production of 200 modules (Milestone 200) to identify and eliminate possible bottlenecks and to test the complete electronic chain. The quality, process stability and radiation hardness of the silicon sensors will be permanently monitored. Automatic assembly procedure and industrial bonding machines will guarantee a fast and reliable construction. All modules will be tested for signal, noise and pedestals at room temperature and operation temperature of -10 degrees C. Quality assurance of the Milestone 200 sensors and modules including irradiation and stability tests are presented. (6 refs).

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Test System for the Quality Assurance during the Mass Production of Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Franke, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of four large-scale experiments that is going to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For CMS an inner tracking system entirely equipped with silicon microstrip detectors was chosen. With an active area of about 198 m2 it will be the largest tracking device of the world that was ever constructed using silicon sensors. The basic components in the construction of the tracking system are approximately 16,000 so-called modules, which are pre-assembled units consisting of the sensors, the readout electronics and a support structure. The module production is carried out by a cooperation of number of institutes and industrial companies. To ensure the operation of the modules within the harsh radiation environment extensive tests have to be performed on all components. An important contribution to the quality assurance of the modules is made by a test system of which all components were developed in Aachen. In ad...

  6. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Mussgiller, Andreas [DESY-Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The CMS Binary Chip 2 (CBC2) is a prototype version of the front-end readout ASIC to be used in the silicon stripmodules of the CMS outer tracker during the high-luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC2 is produced in a 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of the double layer silicon strip modules, the so-called 2S modules. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide an on-board trigger with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-momentum track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S module prototypes equipped with CBC2 were put under test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data was collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy range of 2 to 4 GeV. The test setup, the event reconstruction, and the analysis results such as beam properties, alignment, clusters properties, and per-chip efficiency are presented.

  7. 30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michael Hoch

    2012-01-01

    30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  8. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  9. Status of sensor qualification for the PS module with on-chip pT discrimination for the CMS tracker phase 2 upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC is targeted to deliver 3000 fb-1 at a luminosity of 5×1034 cm-2 s-1. Higher granularity, 140 collisions per bunch crossing and existing bandwidth limitations require a reduction of the amount of data at module level. New modules have binary readout, on-chip pT discrimination and capabilities to provide track finding data at 40 MHz to the L1-trigger. The CMS collaboration has undertaken R&D effort to develop new planar sensors for the pixel-strip (PS) module, which has to withstand 1×1015 cm-2 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence in the innermost layer of the tracker. The module is composed of a strip sensor and a macro pixel sensor with 100 μm×1.5 mm pixel size. Sensors were characterized in the laboratory and the effects of different process parameters and sensor concepts were studied. This contribution presents a new sensor prototype with n-pixels in p-bulk material in planar technology for the PS module. A new inverted module concept is presented, which has advantages with respect to the baseline concept. Electrical characterization of sensors and SEM-images are presented.

  10. Live CMS

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CMS live from Facebook. The Pixel Tracker (or Pixel Detector) is the innermost instrument in the very heart of the CMS apparatus, installed around the LHC beampipe. This is the very point where new particles, such as the Higgs boson, are produced by the energy of the proton proton collisions, and so the Pixel detector receives the largest particle-flux of any sub-component of CMS. The new component is made up of two “parts”: a central barrel region (called BPIX), made of two cylindrical halves, and forward discs on either side of the collision point (FPIX). The new BPIX was manufactured by a consortium of European institutes from Switzerland, Italy and Germany, supported by CERN. The new FPIX was manufactured by 14 institutes in the USA.

  11. CMS overview

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Byungsik

    2015-01-01

    Most recent CMS data related to the high-density QCD are presented for pp and PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV and pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV. The PbPb collision is essential to understand collective behavior and the final-state effects for the detailed characteristics of hot, dense partonic matter, whereas the pPb collision provides the critical information on the initial-state effects including the modification of the parton distribution function in cold nuclei. This paper highlights some of recent heavy-ion related results from CMS.

  12. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  13. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  14. Status of sensor qualification for the PS module with on-chip $p_T$ discrimination for the CMS tracker phase 2 upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC is targeted to deliver $3000\\mskip3mu\\mathrm{fb} ^{-1}$ at a luminosity of $5\\times10^{34}\\mskip3mu\\mathrm{cm} ^{-2}\\mathrm{s} ^{-1}$. Higher granularity, 140 collisions per bunch crossing and existing bandwidth limitations require a reduction of the amount of data at module level. New modules have binary readout, on-chip $p_{\\mathrm{ T}}$ discrimination and capabilities to provide track finding data at $40\\mskip3mu\\mathrm{MHz}$ to the L1-trigger. The CMS collaboration has undertaken R\\&D effort to develop new planar sensors for the pixel-strip (PS) module, which has to withstand $1\\times10^{15}\\mskip3mu \\mathrm{cm} ^{-2}$ $1\\mskip3mu \\mathrm{MeV}$ neutron equivalent fluence in the innermost layer of the tracker. The module is composed of a strip sensor and a macro pixel sensor with $100\\mskip3mu \\mathrm{\\mu m}}$ x $1.5\\mskip3mu \\mathrm{mm}$ pixel size. Sensors were characterized in the laboratory and the effects of different process parameters and sensor concepts w...

  15. Some of the participants in the CMS magnet project pose in front of first module, which has just arrived at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Among them: Alain Hervé, CMS technical co-ordinator (holding his helmet); to his right, Pasquale Fabbricatore, in charge of the winding of the CMS magnet, from INFN in Genoa; and to his left, Domenico Campi, head of the CMS magnet group

  16. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 5 - CMS: CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: Come to LHC's Point 5 and visit the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that discovered the Higgs boson ! Descend 100 metres underground and take a walk in the cathedral-sized cavern housing the 14,000-tonne CMS detector. Ask Higgs hunters and other scientists just about anything, be it questions about their work, particle physics or the engineering challenges of building CMS.  On surface no restricted access  Point 5 will be abuzz all day long with activities for all ages, including literally "cool" cryogenics shows featuring the world's fastest ice-cream maker, dance performances, and much more.

  17. Construction and first beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is the technology choice of the CMS collaboration for the endcap calorimetry upgrade planned to cope with the harsh radiation and pileup environment at the High Luminosity-LHC. The HGCAL is realized as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 square centimetres interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on hexagonal silicon pad sensors, with 128 channels, have been constructed and tested in beams at FNAL and at CERN. The modules include many of the features required for this challenging detector, including a PCB glued directly to the sensor, using through-hole wire-bonding for signal readout and ~5mm spacing between layers - including the front-end electronics and all services. Tests in 2016 have used an existing front-end chip - Skiroc2 (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). We present results from first tests of these modules both in the laboratory and ...

  18. Lift of the positive preshower endcap (ES+) above CMS, from the UXC55 cavern into the SX5 surface building

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The first part of the endcap calorimetry of CMS, as seen by particles coming from interactions in the centre of CMS, is the "Endcap Preshower", or "ES" for short, with "ES-" and "ES+" being used to distinguish the two ends. The ES is used for particle identification in the highly-occupied endcap regions of CMS. Each ES comprises two orthogonal layers of silicon sensors, interspersed with lead layers that serve to generate electromagnetic showers. In order to withstand the high radiation environment in CMS, the ES silicon sensors need to be cooled; until now they have operated at around 8-10 degrees C, but when CMS restarts for the 2015 run it will need to go down to about -15 degrees C. At the same time, the exterior of the ES needs to be maintained at a constant +18 degrees C. The ES thus contains sophisticated cooling and heating systems! In November 2013 a problem was detected with one section of the ES- heating system and upon investigation traced to a faulty connector at the exterior of the ES- disc. Fur...

  19. CMS Wallet Card

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Wallet Card is a quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. The CMS Wallet Card is available for each year from 2004...

  20. CMS Fast Facts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has developed a new quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. CMS Fast Facts includes summary information on total program...

  1. CMS pixel module readout optimization and study of the Β⁰ lifetime in the semileptonic decay mode

    CERN Document Server

    Dambach, Sarah; Langenegger, Urs; Horisberger, Roland

    2009-01-01

    After more than twenty years of development, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will start continuously operating in mid 2009. An enormous amount of high energy collisions will take place inside the CMS experiment. The innermost detector of this experiment is the barrel pixel detector, with its main goals of track and vertex reconstruction. To do this reconstruction with a high precision, the charge produced inside the silicon sensor is read out as an analog signal. In the first part of this work, the analog readout chain is optimized by setting digital-to-analog converters on the readout chip. Procedures are developed to apply this optimization on more than 10’000 readout chips for the entire detector. The optimization is verified by comparing all optimized chips and with a simulation studying the hit resolution inside the detector. In the second part of this work the lifetime measurement of the B0 meson is studied in the semileptonic decay mode using a new reconstruction method for the undetected neutrino app...

  2. The CMS conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, I L; Marti, H P; Neuenschwander, J; Smith, R P; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Calvo, A; Campi, D; Curé, B; Desirelli, Alberto; Favre, G; Riboni, P L; Sgobba, Stefano; Tardy, T; Sequeira-Lopes-Tavares, S

    2000-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments, which are being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN, the design field of the CMS magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 13 m and the aperture is 6 m. This high magnetic field is achieved by means of a 4 layer, 5 modules superconducting coil. The coil is wound from an Al-stabilized Rutherford type conductor. The nominal current of the magnet is 20 kA at 4.5 K. In the CMS coil the structural function is ensured, unlike in other existing Al-stabilized thin solenoids, both by the Al-alloy reinforced conductor and the external former. In this paper the retained manufacturing process of the 50-km long reinforced conductor is described. In general the Rutherford type cable is surrounded by high purity aluminium in a continuous co-extrusion process to produce the Insert. Thereafter the reinforcement is joined by Electron Beam Welding to the pure Al of the insert, before being machined to the final dimensions. During the...

  3. CMS tracker observes muons

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A computer image of a cosmic ray traversing the many layers of the TEC+ silicon sensors. The first cosmic muon tracks have been observed in one of the CMS tracker endcaps. On 14 March, a sector on one of the two large tracker endcaps underwent a cosmic muon run. Since then, thousands of tracks have been recorded. These data will be used not only to study the tracking, but also to exercise various track alignment algorithms The endcap tested, called the TEC+, is under construction at RWTH Aachen in Germany. The endcaps have a modular design, with silicon strip modules mounted onto wedge-shaped carbon fibre support plates, so-called petals. Up to 28 modules are arranged in radial rings on both sides of these plates. One eighth of an endcap is populated with 18 petals and called a sector. The next major step is a test of the first sector at CMS operating conditions, with the silicon modules at a temperature below -10°C. Afterwards, the remaining seven sectors have to be integrated. In autumn 2006, TEC+ wil...

  4. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  5. The CMS Detector Power System

    CERN Document Server

    Lusin, S

    2008-01-01

    The power system for the on-detector electronics of the CMS Experiment comprises approximately 12000 low voltage channels, with a total power requirement of 1.1 MVA. The radiation environment inside the CMS experimental cavern combined with an ambient magnetic field (reaching up to 1.3 kGauss at the detector periphery) severely limit the available choices of low voltage supplies, effectively ruling out the use of commercial off-the-shelf DC power supplies. Typical current requirements at the CMS detector front end range from 1A-30A per channel at voltages ranging between 1.25V and 8V. This requires in turn that the final stage of the low voltage power supply be located on the detector periphery. Power to the CMS front-end electronics is stabilized by a 2 MVA uninterruptible power supply (UPS) located in a CMS surface building. This UPS isolates the CMS detector from disturbances on the local power grid and provides for 2 minutes of autonomy following a power failure, allowing for an orderly shutdown of detect...

  6. The CMS silicon tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focardi, E. E-mail: focardi@pi.infn.it; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Creanza, D.; D' Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell' Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Frey, A.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Honma, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Leubelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B.Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Rizzo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Surrow, B.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Yahong, Li; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B

    2000-10-11

    This paper describes the Silicon microstrip Tracker of the CMS experiment at LHC. It consists of a barrel part with 5 layers and two endcaps with 10 disks each. About 10 000 single-sided equivalent modules have to be built, each one carrying two daisy-chained silicon detectors and their front-end electronics. Back-to-back modules are used to read-out the radial coordinate. The tracker will be operated in an environment kept at a temperature of T=-10 deg. C to minimize the Si sensors radiation damage. Heavily irradiated detectors will be safely operated due to the high-voltage capability of the sensors. Full-size mechanical prototypes have been built to check the system aspects before starting the construction.

  7. Photos from the CMS Photo Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Boreham, S

    2008-01-01

    Photos from the CMS Photo Book. Activities at Point 5 in Cessy, France, between 1998 - 2008. Images of assembly and Installation of the CMS detector: - Civil Engineering - Assembly in the Surface Building - Lowering of the Heavy Elements - Installing and connecting the CMS detector in the underground experiment These images illustrate the assembly, installation and commissioning of the CMS detector. They cover the activities at Point 5 in Cessy, France, between 1998 and 2008. CMS is one of the most complex scientific instruments ever built. It has taken about 20 years to go from conceptual design to the completion of construction of the CMS detector for the LHC start-up in September 2008. Accomplishing this has required the talents, efforts and resources of over 2500 scientists and engineers from about 180 institutions in 38 countries. caverns Compiled by: S. Cittolin, F. Marcastel and T.S. Virdee

  8. A Wave Modulation Model of Ripples over Long Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Peixiu; ZHENG Guizhen

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented on the modulation of ripples induced by a long surface wave (LW) and a new theoretical modulation model is proposed. In this model, the wind surface stress modulation is related to the modulation of tipple spectrum. The model results show that in the case of LW propagating in the wind direction with the wave age parameter of LW increasing, the area with enhanced shear stress shifts from the region near the LW crest on the upwind slope to the LW trough. With a smaller wave age parameter of LW, the tipple modulation has the maximum on the upwind slope in the vicinity of LW crest, while with a larger parameter the enhancement of ripple spectrum does not occur in that region. At low winds the amplitude of ripple modulation transfer function (MTF) is larger in the gravity wave range, while at moderate or high winds it changes little in the range from short gravity waves to capillary waves.

  9. Module for dielectric surfaces modification by fast neutral particles beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchenko, V. T.; Lisenkov, A. A.; Babinov, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the module for dielectric and wide-gap semiconductor surfaces modification by fast neutral beam. The module can be used for cleaning, etching or assisting of films deposition. The surface proceeding by neutral beam can prevent an accumulation of surface charge without using current compensation by inserting electrons to the beam or RF power supply. The module beside cathode and anode contains an electrode with floating potential. Insertion of the additional electrode causes electron retention in an electrostatic trap resulting the reducing of the module operating pressure. Moreover, the electrode with floating potential allows increasing the current efficient of the module. An important feature of the module is that neutralization of the ions extracted from the plasma occurs in the cathode potential well. Thereby ions that have not neutralized cannot leave nearcathode region and there are no fast ions in the output beam. Module does not contain sources of the magnetic fields or elements heated by external sources. Module operates with free cooling. Thus, the module does not need water cooling and can be freely moved in the vacuum chamber.

  10. CMS installations are put to the test

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CMS has just undergone two important tests: a spectacular test of the fire extinguishing system in the underground cavern (photo) and, on the surface, a strength test on the plug over the main shaft, which will bear the weight of the detector components when they are lowered into the CMS hall.

  11. Thermal Characterization and Optimization of the Pixel Module Support Structure for the Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, Max Philip

    2015-01-01

    article/pii/0011747168900570, accessed on 7/21/2015.[38] Torayca, T300 Data Sheet, http://www.toraycfa.com/pdfs/T300DataSheet.pdf, accessedon 8/12/2015.[39] Araldite, Araldite Standard,http://www.chemcenters.com/images/suppliers/169257/Araldite%20Standard.pdf, accessed on 6/19/2015.[40] S. Streuli, Paul-Scherrer-Institut (Villigen, Switzerland), private communication.[41] KERAFOL, Keratherm Thermal Grease: KP 98,http://www.mhw-intl.com/assets/greaseKP98.pdf, accessed on 6/19/2015.[42] K. Klein, 1. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen, private communication.[43] COMSOL Multiphysics R Modeling Software,https://www.comsol.de/, accessed on 7/28/2015.[44] COMSOL Multiphysics R Heat Transfer Software,https://www.comsol.de/heat-transfer-module, accessed on 28.7.2015.[45] Picture taken from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Composite_3d.png, accessed on 7/28/2015.[46] Mitsubishi Chemical, Dialead, K13D2U, http://www.mitsubishichemical.com/DataSheets/CarbonFiber/PD%20K13D2U.pdf, accessed on 7/29/2015.[47] Tenc...

  12. Modulation of cavity-polaritons by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Hey, R.;

    2006-01-01

    We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations.......We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations....

  13. Representatives of the companies receiving CMS Gold Awards on 15 March, pictured in front of the first superconducting coil module at the experiment construction site.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The fifth annual CMS awards ceremony was held at CERN on 15 March. This year, six of the approximately 1000 companies who work for CMS were honoured with the Gold Award for demonstrating excellence by providing parts on schedule, within budget and within specification. Two of the prize-winners also received the Crystal Award, which is given to a company that has taken further efforts to develop new designs, explore novel technologies and collaborate in research and development program

  14. Implementation of Structures in the CMS:Part 3, Culvert

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    describes the mathematical formulation and numerical implementation of a culvert in the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) operated through the Surface...wetland application in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. Figure 1. (a) Circular culvert, and (b) rectangular culvert. COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM : The CMS ...this application the same CMS model was adopted, culvert structures configured in the system , and a 50-day simulation was conducted. The

  15. CMS Program Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Enterprise Data and Analytics has developed CMS Program Statistics, which includes detailed summary statistics on national health care, Medicare...

  16. CMS Drug Spending

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has released several information products that provide spending information for prescription drugs in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The CMS Drug Spending...

  17. CMS brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which has started up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  18. CMS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  19. CMS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  20. CMS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F.

    2006-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  1. CMS brochure (English)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  2. CMS brochure (French)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  3. CMS Brochure (italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  4. CMS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F.

    2006-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  5. CMS Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  6. CMS brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which started up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  7. CMS brochure (Greek version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefèvre, C

    2006-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  8. CMS Records Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Records Schedule provides disposition authorizations approved by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for CMS program-related records...

  9. CMS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  10. Digging the CMS experimental cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    The huge CMS experimental cavern is located 100 m underground and has two access shafts through which the experiment's components will be lowered. Initially assembled on the surface, each part of the 12 500 tonne machine must be lowered individually with very little clearance.

  11. CMS 2006 - CMS France days; CMS 2006 les journees CMS FRANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huss, D.; Dobrzynski, L.; Virdee, J.; Boudoule, G.; Fontaine, J.C.; Faure, J.L.; Paganini, P.; Mathez, H.; Gross, L.; Charlot, C.; Trunov, A.; Patois, Y.; Busson, P.; Maire, M.; Berthon, U.; Todorov, T.; Beaudette, F.; Sirois, Y.; Baffioni, S.; Beauceron, S.; Delmeire, E.; Agram, J.L.; Goerlach, U.; Mangeol, D.; Salerno, R.; Bloch, D.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Blaha, J.; Drobychev, G.; Gras, P.; Hagenauer, M.; Denegri, D.; Lounis, A.; Faccio, F.; Lecoq, J

    2006-07-01

    These CMS talks give the opportunity for all the teams working on the CMS (Compact Muon Spectrometer) project to present the status of their works and to exchange ideas. 5 sessions have been organized: 1) CMS status and perspectives, 2) contributions of the different laboratories, 3) software and computation, 4) physics with CMS (particularly the search for the Higgs boson), and 5) electronic needs. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  12. CMS offline web tools

    CERN Document Server

    Metson, S; Bockelman, B; Dziedziniewicz, K; Egeland, R; Elmer, P; Eulisse, G; Evans, D; Fanfani, A; Feichtinger, D; Kavka, C; Kuznetsov, V; Van Lingen, F; Newbold, D; Tuura, L; Wakefield, S

    2008-01-01

    We describe a relatively new effort within CMS to converge on a set of web based tools, using state of the art industry techniques, to engage with the CMS offline computing system. CMS collaborators require tools to monitor various components of the computing system and interact with the system itself. The current state of the various CMS web tools is described along side current planned developments.

  13. CMS-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-27

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CMS -Wave 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward-marching, finite...difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection

  14. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-31

    System ( CMS ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...www.erdc.usace.army.mil/Missions/WaterResources/CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) The...System ( CMS ), which provides coupled wave and current forcing for PTM simulations. CMS -PTM is implemented in the Surface-water Modeling System, a

  15. CMS Comic Book Brochure

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    To raise students' awareness of what the CMS detector is, how it was constructed and what it hopes to find. Titled "CMS Particle Hunter," this colorful comic book style brochure explains to young budding scientists and science enthusiasts in colorful animation how the CMS detector was made, its main parts, and what scientists hope to find using this complex tool.

  16. On the cascade mechanism of short surface wave modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Charnotskii

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of short surface ripples by long surface or internal waves by a cascade mechanism is considered. At the first stage, the orbital velocity of the long wave (LW adiabatically modulates an intermediate length nonlinear gravity wave (GW, which generates a bound (parasitic capillary wave (CW near its crest in a wide spatial frequency band. Due to strong dependence of the CW amplitude on that of the GW, the resulting ripple modulation by LW can be strong. Adiabatic modulation at the first stage is calculated for an arbitrarily strong LW current. The CWs are calculated based on the Lonquet-Higgins theory, in the framework of a steady periodic solution, which proves to be sufficient for the cases considered. Theoretical results are compared with data from laboratory experiments. A discussion of related sea clutter data is given in the conclusion.

  17. CMS Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new "CMS Centre" is being established on the CERN Meyrin site by the CMS collaboration. It will be a focal point for communications, where physicists will work together on data quality monitoring, detector calibration, offline analysis of physics events, and CMS computing operations. Construction of the CMS Centre begins in the historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room, Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. TThe LHC@FNAL Centre, in operation at Fermilab in the US, will work very closely with the CMS Centre, as well as the CERN Control Centre. (Photo Fermilab)The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Contro...

  18. LHCC COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF CMS (JULY 07)

    CERN Multimedia

    Extract from the Draft Report 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CMS Collaboration has made significant progress towards producing a detector ready for LHC operation in 2008. The past year saw all sub-detector groups success fully produce high-quality components and modules, and integrate them into the final objects to be installed into the CMS magnet. Installation and commissioning of final components in the CMS UXC55 cavern are well-under-way. In particular, the heavy lowering of detector elements into the CMS experiment cavern is a major success. The new CMS master schedule V36 incorporates the revised LHC machine schedule and includes an optimized detector sequencing. In spite of various delays, it remains possible that CMS will have an initial detector ready to exploit the initial LHC run in spring 2008. Installation of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter End-Cap (EE) and Pre-shower (ES) detectors is scheduled to be completed no sooner than July 2008 and CMS now plans to install the complete Pixel Detector for ...

  19. Antidepressant like effects of hydrolysable tannins of Terminalia catappa leaf extract via modulation of hippocampal plasticity and regulation of monoamine neurotransmitters subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Y; Ramya, E M; Navya, K; Phani Kumar, G; Anilakumar, K R

    2017-02-01

    Terminalia catappa L. belonging to Combretaceae family is a folk medicine, known for its multiple pharmacological properties, but the neuro-modulatory effect of TC against chronic mild stress was seldom explored. The present study was designed to elucidate potential antidepressant-like effect of Terminalia cattapa (leaf) hydro-alcoholic extract (TC) by using CMS model for a period of 7 weeks. Identification of hydrolysable tannins was done by using LC-MS. After the CMS exposure, mice groups were administered with imipramine (IMP, 10mg/kg, i.p.) and TC (25, 50 and 100mg/kg of TC, p.o.). Behavioural paradigms used for the study included forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and sucrose preference test (SPT). After behavioural tests, monoamine neurotransmitter, cortisol, AchE, oxidative stress levels and mRNA expression studies relevant to depression were assessed. TC supplementation significantly reversed CMS induced immobility time in FST and other behavioural paradigms. Moreover, TC administration significantly restored CMS induced changes in concentrations of hippocampal neurotransmitters (5-HT, DA and NE) as well as levels of acetyl cholinesterase, cortisol, monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B), BDNF, CREB, and p-CREB. It suggests that TC supplementation could supress stress induced depression by regulating monoamine neurotransmitters, CREB, BDNF, cortisol, AchE level as well as by amelioration of oxidative stress. Hence TC can be used as a complementary medicine against depression-like disorder.

  20. Russian institute receives CMS Gold Award

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The Snezhinsk All-Russian Institute of Scientific Research for Technical Physics (VNIITF) of the Russian Federal Nuclear Centre (RFNC) is one of twelve CMS suppliers to receive awards for outstanding performance this year. The CMS Collaboration took the opportunity of the visit to CERN of the Director of VNIITF and his deputy to present the CMS Gold Award, which the institute has received for its exceptional performance in the assembly of steel plates for the CMS forward hadronic calorimeter. This calorimeter consists of two sets of 18 wedge-shaped modules arranged concentrically around the beam-pipe at each end of the CMS detector. Each module consists of steel absorber plates with quartz fibres inserted into them. The institute developed a special welding technique to assemble the absorber plates, enabling a high-quality detector to be produced at relatively low cost.RFNC-VNIITF Director Professor Georgy Rykovanov (right), is seen here receiving the Gold Award from Felicitas Pauss, Vice-Chairman of the CMS ...

  1. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered waveguide, which supports surface plasmon polaritons, is considered as an absorption modulator. The waveguide core consists of a silicon nitride layer and ultrathin layer with the varied carrier density embedded between two silver plates, which also serve as electrodes. Under...

  2. CMS MANANGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs; status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08; preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratulate CMS Management and the Detector Groups for the...

  3. Commissioning of the CMS Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Campi, D; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Klyukhin, V; Maire, G; Perinic, G; Brédy, P; Fazilleau, P; Kircher, F; Levésy, B; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Greco, M

    2007-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of the large experiments for the LHC at CERN. The superconducting magnet for CMS has been designed to reach a 4 T field in a free bore of 6 m diameter and 12.5 m length with a stored energy of 2.6 GJ at full current. The flux is returned through a 10 000 t yoke comprising of five wheels and two end caps composed of three disks each. The magnet was designed to be assembled and tested in a surface hall, prior to be lowered at 90 m below ground, to its final position in the experimental cavern. The distinctive feature of the cold mass is the four-layer winding, made from a reinforced and stabilized NbTi conductor. The design and construction was carried out by CMS participating institutes through technical and contractual endeavors. Among them CEA Saclay, INFN Genova, ETH Zurich, Fermilab, ITEP Moscow, University of Wisconsin and CERN. The construction of the CMS Magnet, and of the coil in particular, has been completed last year. The magnet has just been powered to full field ...

  4. International Masterclass at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, M

    2012-01-01

    The CMS collaboration welcomed a class of French high school students to the CERN facility in Meyrin, Switzerland on the 12 of March, 2012. Students spent the day meeting with physicists, hearing talks, asking questions, and participating in a hands-on exercise using real data collected by the CMS experiment on the Large Hadron Colider. Talks and other resources are available here: http://ippog-dev.web.cern.ch/resources/2012/ippog-international-masterclass-2012-cms

  5. CMS upgrades for SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    I will discuss the impact of the LHC luminosity upgrade on CMS detector. While most of the CMS can possibly cope with the increased luminosity, the Tracker must undergo a major redesign in technology both in terms of detector substrates as well as in the data transfer links. I will show the impact on CMS of reduced bunch length and machine elements close to the interaction point.

  6. Influence of the surface treatment of the CMS conductor on its adhesion properties at 300 K and 4.2 K

    CERN Document Server

    Rondeaux, F; Levesy, B; Reytier, M; Safrany, J S

    2001-01-01

    In the 4 T, 12.5 m long, 6 m bore diameter superconducting solenoid for the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at large hadron collider (LHC), the interfaces between the insulation and the conductor or the external cylinder are subjected to high shear forces during the cool down to 4.5 K and the operation phase up to 4 T. Due to the conductive cooling of the coil, the bonding at the different interfaces is a critical point, which is directly related to the quality of the surfaces. The influence of the surface treatment of the conductor on its adhesion properties has been studied at room temperature and in liquid helium at 4.2 K, using a shear force measurement procedure developed in our lab or a peeling test with tape. This paper presents the experimental results obtained on samples treated with solvent cleaning, sandblasting or anodic oxidation under four different sets of experimental conditions, then wrapped with glass tape and impregnated under vacuum. The robustness of the anodic oxidation process, a...

  7. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海涛; 程营; 王敬时; 刘晓峻

    2015-01-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection.

  8. Modulation of multiple photon energies by use of surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, A.; Lereu, A. L.; Arakawa, E. T.; Wig, A.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    A form of optical modulation at low pulse rates is reported in the case of surface plasmons excited by 1.55-µm photons in a thin gold foil. Several visible-photon energies are shown to be pulsed by the action of the infrared pulses, the effect being maximized when each visible beam also excites surface plasmons. The infrared surface plasmons are implicated as the primary cause of thermally induced changes in the foil. The thermal effects dissipate in sufficiently small times so that operation up to the kilohertz range in pulse repetition frequency is obtained. Unlike direct photothermal phenomena, no phase change is necessary for the effect to be observed.

  9. Low power sessile droplet actuation via modulated surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Herth, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Low power actuation of sessile droplets is of primary interest for portable or hybrid lab-on-a-chip and harmless manipulation of biofluids. In this paper, we show that the acoustic power required to move or deform droplets via surface acoustic waves can be substantially reduced through the forcing of the drops inertio-capillary modes of vibrations. Indeed, harmonic, superharmonic and subharmonic (parametric) excitation of these modes are observed when the high frequency acoustic signal (19.5 MHz) is modulated around Rayleigh-Lamb inertio-capillary frequencies. This resonant behavior results in larger oscillations and quicker motion of the drops than in the non-modulated case.

  10. The CMS Tracker Detector Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousaf Shah, S. [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)], E-mail: yousaf.shah@cern.ch; Tsirou, Andromachi; Verdini, Piero Giorgio [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Hartmann, Frank [University of Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Masetti, Lorenzo [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dirkes, Guido H. [University of Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Stringer, Robert [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Fahrer, Manuel [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-06-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid DCS (CMS) Silicon Strip Tracker is by far the largest detector ever built in micro-strip technology. It has an active surface area of 198 m{sup 2} consisting of 15,148 silicon modules with 9,316,352 readout channels read via 75,376 Analog Pipeline Voltage (APV) front-end chips and a total of 24,244 sensors. The Detector Control System (DCS) for the Tracker is a distributed control system that operates {approx}2000 power supplies for the silicon modules and also monitors its environmental sensors. The DCS receives information from about 10{sup 3} environmental probes (temperature and humidity sensors) located inside the detector's volume and values from these probes are driven through the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) of the Detector Safety System (DSS). A total of 10{sup 5} parameters are read out from the dedicated chips in the front-end electronics of the detector via the data acquisition system, and a total of 10{sup 5} parameters are read from the power supply modules. All these parameters are monitored, evaluated and correlated with the detector layout; actions are taken under specific conditions. The hardware for DCS consists of 10 PCs and 10 PLC systems that are continuously running the necessary control and safety routines. The DCS is a fundamental tool for the Tracker operation and its safety.

  11. The CMS Tracker Detector Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf Shah, S.; Tsirou, Andromachi; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Hartmann, Frank; Masetti, Lorenzo; Dirkes, Guido H.; Stringer, Robert; Fahrer, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid DCS (CMS) Silicon Strip Tracker is by far the largest detector ever built in micro-strip technology. It has an active surface area of 198 m 2 consisting of 15,148 silicon modules with 9,316,352 readout channels read via 75,376 Analog Pipeline Voltage (APV) front-end chips and a total of 24,244 sensors. The Detector Control System (DCS) for the Tracker is a distributed control system that operates ˜2000 power supplies for the silicon modules and also monitors its environmental sensors. The DCS receives information from about 10 3 environmental probes (temperature and humidity sensors) located inside the detector's volume and values from these probes are driven through the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) of the Detector Safety System (DSS). A total of 10 5 parameters are read out from the dedicated chips in the front-end electronics of the detector via the data acquisition system, and a total of 10 5 parameters are read from the power supply modules. All these parameters are monitored, evaluated and correlated with the detector layout; actions are taken under specific conditions. The hardware for DCS consists of 10 PCs and 10 PLC systems that are continuously running the necessary control and safety routines. The DCS is a fundamental tool for the Tracker operation and its safety.

  12. A new visitor centre for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At the inauguration of the new CMS visitor centre. The CMS experiment inaugurated a new visitor centre at its Cessy site on 14 June. This will allow the thousands of people who come to CERN each year to follow the construction of one the Laboratory's flagship experiments first-hand. CERN receives over 20,000 visitors each year. Until recently, many of them were taken on a guided tour of one of the LEP experiments. With the closure of LEP, however, trips underground are no longer possible, and the Visits' Service has put in place a number of other itineraries (Bulletin 46/2000). Since the CMS detector will be almost entirely constructed in a surface hall, it is now taking a big share of the limelight. The CMS visitor centre has been built on a platform overlooking CMS construction. It contains a set of clear descriptive posters describing the experiment, along with a video projection showing animations and movies about CMS construction. In the coming weeks, a display of CMS detector elements will be added, as...

  13. Auger Physicists visit CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Visit at CERN P5 CMS in the experimental cavern Alan Watson, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Leeds; Jim Cronin, Nobel Laureate, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Chicago; Jim Virdee, CMS Former Spokesperson, Imperial College; Jim Matthews, Auger Co-Spokesperson, Louisiana State University

  14. CMS Virtual Tour Greece

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    More than 500 high-school students from 7 locations in Greece visit virtually the CMS experiment. Read more about this record-breaking event here: http://home.web.cern.ch/students-educators/updates/2014/02/students-visit-heart-cms-detector

  15. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The Agendas and Minutes of the Management Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 The Agendas and Minutes of the Collaboration Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174

  16. Inserting the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The huge superconducting solenoid for CMS is inserted into the cryostat barrel. CMS uses the world's largest thin solenoid, in terms of energy stored, and is 12 m long, with a diameter of 6 m and weighing 220 tonnes. When turned on the magnet will produce a field strength of 4 T using superconducting niobium-titanium material at 4.5 K.

  17. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Agendas and Minutes of the Management Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 The Agendas and Minutes of the Collaboration Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174

  18. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Agendas and Minutes of the Management Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 The Agendas and Minutes of the Collaboration Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174  

  19. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

      The Agendas and Minutes of the Management Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 The Agendas and Minutes of the Collaboration Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174

  20. CMS experiment : animation showing the construction of the main structural components of CMS together

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    This 17-minute long animation shows the construction of the main structural components of CMS in the surface hall in Cessy and offers a detailed overview of the installation in the experimental cavern.

  1. CMS experiment : animation showing the construction of the main structural components of CMS together

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Multimedia Production Unit

    2003-01-01

    This 17-minute long animation shows the construction of the main structural components of CMS in the surface hall in Cessy and offers a detailed overview of the installation in the experimental cavern.

  2. CMS Experiment Data Processing at RDMS CMS Tier 2 Centers

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, V; Korenkov, V; Tikhonenko, E; Shmatov, S; Zhiltsov, V; Ilyin, V; Kodolova, O; Levchuk, L

    2012-01-01

    Russia and Dubna Member States (RDMS) CMS collaboration was founded in the year 1994 [1]. The RDMS CMS takes an active part in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Collaboration [2] at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [3] at CERN [4]. RDMS CMS Collaboration joins more than twenty institutes from Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) member states. RDMS scientists, engineers and technicians were actively participating in design, construction and commissioning of all CMS sub-detectors in forward regions. RDMS CMS physics program has been developed taking into account the essential role of these sub-detectors for the corresponding physical channels. RDMS scientists made large contribution for preparation of study QCD, Electroweak, Exotics, Heavy Ion and other physics at CMS. The overview of RDMS CMS physics tasks and RDMS CMS computing activities are presented in [5-11]. RDMS CMS computing support should satisfy the LHC data processing and analysis requirements at the running phase of the CMS experime...

  3. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included  shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs;  status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08;   preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratulate C...

  4. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Jim Virdee

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included  shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs;  status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08;   preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratula...

  5. Modulation of photoacoustic signal generation from metallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcham, Trevor; Homan, Kimberly; Frey, Wolfgang; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Hazle, John; Bouchard, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The ability to image metallic implants is important for medical applications ranging from diagnosis to therapy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been recently pursued as a means to localize metallic implants in soft tissue. The work presented herein investigates different mechanisms to modulate the PA signal generated by macroscopic metallic surfaces. Wires of five different metals are tested to simulate medical implants/tools, while surface roughness is altered or physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings are added to change the wires' overall optical absorption. PA imaging data of the wires are acquired at 970 nm. Results indicate that PA signal generation predominately occurs in a wire's metallic surface and not its aqueous surroundings. PA signal generation is similar for all metals tested, while addition of PVD coatings offers significant modulations (i.e., 4-dB enhancement and 26-dB reduction achieved) in PA signal generation. Results also suggest that PA signal increases with increasing surface roughness. Different coating and roughness schemes are then successfully utilized to generate spatial PA signal patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of surface modifications to enhance or reduce PA signal generation to permit improved PA imaging of implants/tools (i.e., providing location/orientation information) or to allow PA imaging of surrounding tissue.

  6. Members of the CMS crystal assembly team

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    From left to right: Hervé Cornet, Dominique Deyrail, Olivier Teller, Etiennette Auffray, Igor Tarasov, Michel Lebeau, Guy Chevenier, Norbert Frank and Rachid Kerkach. Below: one of the systems used to assembly the crystals in modules for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter.

  7. CMS Analysis School Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, S. [Nebraska U.; Shipsey, I. [Purdue U.; Cavanaugh, R. [Illinois U., Chicago; Bloom, K. [Nebraska U.; Chan, Kai-Feng [Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; D' Hondt, J. [Vrije U., Brussels; Klima, B. [Fermilab; Narain, M. [Brown U.; Palla, F. [INFN, Pisa; Rolandi, G. [CERN; Schörner-Sadenius, T. [DESY

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  8. Data Scouting in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Dustin James

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the CMS collaboration introduced Data Scouting as a way to produce physics results with events that cannot be stored on disk, due to resource limits in the data acquisition and offline infrastructure. The viability of this technique was demonstrated in 2012, when 18 fb$^{-1}$ of collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV were collected. The technique is now a standard ingredient of CMS and ATLAS data-taking strategy. In this talk, we present the status of data scouting in CMS and the improvements introduced in 2015 and 2016, which promoted data scouting to a full-fledged, flexible discovery tool for the LHC Run II.

  9. SIGURNOST CMS-A

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluža, Marin; Vukelić, Bernard; Rojko, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Za razvoj web-sjedišta danas se često koriste CMS-ovi. Web-sjedišta meta su raznim malicioznim napadačima, stoga je potrebno poznavati razinu sigurnosti web-sjedišta i postaviti maksimalnu moguću razinu sigurnosti. U radu su prikazane osnovne značajke poznatijih CMS-ova u otvorenom pristupu Wordpress, Joomla i Drupal. Objašnjeno je deset najčešćih web-ranjivosti. Izvršeno je testiranje web-ranjivosti pomoću različitih programskih alata. Testirane su osnovne instalacije CMS-ova. Nakon ...

  10. CMS Tracker Alignment Performance Results Summer 2016

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking system of the CMS detector provides excellent resolution for charged particle tracks and an efficient way of tagging jets. In order to reconstruct good quality tracks, the position and orientation of each silicon pixel and strip modules need to be determined with a precision of several micrometers. The performance of the CMS tracker alignment in 2016 using cosmic-ray data recorded at 0 T magnetic field and proton-proton collision data recorded at 3.8 T magnetic field has been studied. The data-driven validation of the results are presented. The time-dependent movement of the pixel detector's large-scale structure is demonstrated.

  11. CMS Financial Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This section contains the annual CMS financial statements as required under the Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-576). The CFO Act marked a major...

  12. CMS Statistics Reference Booklet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The annual CMS Statistics reference booklet provides a quick reference for summary information about health expenditures and the Medicare and Medicaid health...

  13. CMS Space Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratnikova, N. [Fermilab; Huang, C.-H. [Fermilab; Sanchez-Hernandez, A. [CINVESTAV, IPN; Wildish, T. [Princeton U.; Zhang, X. [Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2014-01-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  14. CMS cavern inspection robot

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Robots which are immune to the CMS cavern environment, wirelessly controlled: -One actuated by smart materials (Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites and Macro Fiber Composites) -One regular brushed DC rover -One servo-driven rover -Stair-climbing robot

  15. CMS Financial Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This section contains the annual CMS financial statements as required under the Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-576). The CFO Act marked a major...

  16. Diphoton searches (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Quittnat, Milena Eleonore

    2016-01-01

    Many physics scenarios beyond the standard model predict the existence of heavy resonances decaying to diphotons. This talk presents searches for BSM physics in the diphoton final state at CMS, focusing on the recent results.

  17. CMS Collaboration Board Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first CMS Collaboration Board meeting of the year (2013) provided an opportunity to thank Teresa Rodrigo, Matthias Kasemann and Randy Ruchti, the 2011-12 CB Chair, Deputy Chair and Secretary, respectively.

  18. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Jing-Shi; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474162, 11274171, 11274099, and 11204145), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant Nos. 20110091120040 and 20120091110001).

  19. b Tagging in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tomalin, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Many of the exotic particles expected at the LHC, such as SUSY, Higgs bosons and top quarks, will decay to b quarks. This paper presents the methods used to identify b-jets at CMS. The algorithms exploit the long B hadron lifetime, semi-leptonic B decays and jet kinematics. The prospect for measuring the performance of these b-tags directly from CMS data is examined. Finally, the use of b-tagging in the High-Level Trigger is explained.

  20. The CMS Electronic Logbook

    CERN Multimedia

    Bukowiec, S; Beccati, B; Behrens, U; Biery, K; Branson, J; Cano, E; Cheung, H; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; Coarasa Perez, J A; Deldicque, C; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Hatton, D; Hwong, Y L; Loizides, C; Ma, F; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Meyer, A; Mommsen, R K; Moser, R; O’Dell, V; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Racz, A; Raginel, O; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Shpakov, D; Simon, M; Sumorok, K; Sungho Yoon, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS ELogbook (ELog) is a collaborative tool, which provides a platform to share and store information about various events or problems occurring in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN during operation. The ELog is based on a Model–View–Controller (MVC) software architectural pattern and uses an Oracle database to store messages and attachments. The ELog is developed as a pluggable web component in Oracle Portal in order to provide better management, monitoring and security.

  1. Success in the pipeline for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The very heart of any LHC experiment is not a pixel detector, nor a vertex locator but a beam pipe. It is the site of each collision and the boundary where the accelerator and experiment meet. As an element of complex design and manufacture the CMS beam pipe was fifteen years in the making and finally fully installed on Tuesday 10 June. Watch the video! End cap beam pipe installation in the CMS detector. Central beam pipe installation.The compensation modules were the final pieces to take their places in the cavern at Point 5: "These are like bellows," says Wolfram Zeuner, Deputy Technical Co-ordinator for CMS. "They allow us to compensate for the change in length when we heat or cool the beam pipe. And they are the very last elements; beam pipe installation, which began last year, is now complete." The beam pipe is neither too fragile nor too bulky, but just right to satisfy the conflicting n...

  2. Evacuation drill at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont-Sagorin and Christoph Schaefer

    2012-01-01

    Training personnel, including evacuation guides and shifters, checking procedures, improving collaboration with the CERN Fire Brigade: the first real-life evacuation drill at CMS took place on Friday 3 February from 12p.m. to 3p.m. in the two caverns located at Point 5 of the LHC.   CERN personnel during the evacuation drill at CMS. Evacuation drills are required by law and have to be organized periodically in all areas of CERN, both above and below ground. The last drill at CMS, which took place in June 2007, revealed some desiderata, most notably the need for a public address system. With this equipment in place, it is now possible to broadcast audio messages from the CMS control room to the underground areas.   The CMS Technical Coordination Team and the GLIMOS have focused particularly on preparing collaborators for emergency situations by providing training and organizing regular safety drills with the HSE Unit and the CERN Fire Brigade. This Friday, the practical traini...

  3. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  4. The CMS conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Blau, Bertrand; Curé, B; Folch, R; Hervé, A; Horváth, I L; Kircher, F; Musenich, R; Neuenschwander, J; Riboni, P; Seeber, B; Tavares, S; Sgobba, Stefano; Smith, R P

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The magnetic field is achieved by means of a four-layer superconducting solenoid. The stored magnetic energy is 2.7 GJ at nominal current of 20 kA (at 4.5 K operating temperature). The coil is wound from a high purity aluminum- stabilized Rutherford type conductor. Unlike other existing Al- stabilized thin solenoids, the structural integrity of the CMS coil is ensured both by the Al-alloy reinforcement welded to the conductor and an external support cylinder. The flat NbTi cable is embedded in high purity aluminum by a continuous co-extrusion process. (7 refs).

  5. The Latest from CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CMS is on track to be ready for physics one month in advance of the LHC restart. The final installations are being completed and tests are being run to ensure that the experiment is as well prepared as possible to exploit sustained LHC operation throughout 2010. Physics week in Bologna, Italy, was a valuable time for CMS collaborators to discuss preparations for numerous physics analyses, as well as the performance of the detector during the recent data-taking period with cosmics (CRAFT 09). During this five-week exercise, more than 300 million cosmic events were recorded with the magnetic field on. This large data-set is being used to further improve the sub-detector alignment, calibration and performance whilst awaiting p-p collisions. Meanwhile, in the experimental cavern, Wolfram Zeuner, Deputy Technical Coordinator of CMS, reports "We are now very nearly closed up again. We are just doing the final clean-up work and are ready t...

  6. Higgs Physics at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson performed by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations during the LHC Run 1 has been an important success. This document is a short review of the search for the Higgs boson performed by the CMS collaboration during the LHC Run 1 and Run 2. In the first part, after a brief description of the Higgs boson production and decay channels, the Run-1 results are presented emphasizing the possible hints of New Physics. The main part of this document is devoted to the search for the Higgs boson with the 13 TeV data collected by the CMS experiment in 2015 and 2016, including the Standard Model searches as well as the Beyond Standard Model searches, such as the search for additional Higgs bosons and for resonant and non-resonant double Higgs boson production.

  7. Distributed Analysis in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Fanfani, Alessandra; Sanches, Jose Afonso; Andreeva, Julia; Bagliesi, Giusepppe; Bauerdick, Lothar; Belforte, Stefano; Bittencourt Sampaio, Patricia; Bloom, Ken; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Brew, Chris; Calloni, Marco; Cesini, Daniele; Cinquilli, Mattia; Codispoti, Giuseppe; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Dong, Liang; Dongiovanni, Danilo; Donvito, Giacinto; Dykstra, David; Edelmann, Erik; Egeland, Ricky; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Evans, Dave; Fanzago, Federica; Farina, Fabio; Feichtinger, Derek; Fisk, Ian; Flix, Josep; Grandi, Claudio; Guo, Yuyi; Happonen, Kalle; Hernandez, Jose M; Huang, Chih-Hao; Kang, Kejing; Karavakis, Edward; Kasemann, Matthias; Kavka, Carlos; Khan, Akram; Kim, Bockjoo; Klem, Jukka; Koivumaki, Jesper; Kress, Thomas; Kreuzer, Peter; Kurca, Tibor; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Letts, James; Linden, Tomas; Lueking, Lee; Maes, Joris; Magini, Nicolo; Maier, Gerhild; McBride, Patricia; Metson, Simon; Miccio, Vincenzo; Padhi, Sanjay; Pi, Haifeng; Riahi, Hassen; Riley, Daniel; Rossman, Paul; Saiz, Pablo; Sartirana, Andrea; Sciaba, Andrea; Sekhri, Vijay; Spiga, Daniele; Tuura, Lassi; Vaandering, Eric; Vanelderen, Lukas; Van Mulders, Petra; Vedaee, Aresh; Villella, Ilaria; Wicklund, Eric; Wildish, Tony; Wissing, Christoph; Wurthwein, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment expects to manage several Pbytes of data each year during the LHC programme, distributing them over many computing sites around the world and enabling data access at those centers for analysis. CMS has identified the distributed sites as the primary location for physics analysis to support a wide community with thousands potential users. This represents an unprecedented experimental challenge in terms of the scale of distributed computing resources and number of user. An overview of the computing architecture, the software tools and the distributed infrastructure is reported. Summaries of the experience in establishing efficient and scalable operations to get prepared for CMS distributed analysis are presented, followed by the user experience in their current analysis activities.

  8. Electrical joints in the CMS superconducting magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Farinon, S; Curé, B; Fabbricatore, P; Greco, Michela; Musenich, R

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The CMS coil consists of five independent modules each containing four winding layers. Each winding layer is composed of a single length of aluminum stabilized and aluminum alloy reinforced conductor. Each of the four conductor lengths within a module will be electrically joined after winding is completed, and each of the five modules will be connected to the magnet bus bars during module assembly. Due to the large dimensions of the conductor and to the high current it carries, the conductor joints are sources of substantial and nontrivial joule heating during nonsteady state operation of the magnet. In addition to steady-state conditions, three transient conditions have been analyzed. The first is related to the current diffusion during a magnet transient that results in a time dep...

  9. Automating the CMS DAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  10. Automating the CMS DAQ

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Behrens, Ulf; Branson, James; Chaze, Olivier; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Hartl, Christian; Hegeman, Jeroen Guido; Holzner, Andre Georg; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Franciscus; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius; Morovic, Srecko; Nunez Barranco Fernandez, Carlos; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Ozga, Wojciech Andrzej; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Spataru, Andrei Cristian; Stieger, Benjamin Bastian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Veverka, Jan; Wakefield, Christopher Colin; Zejdl, Petr

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90\\% and to even improve it to 95\\% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  11. CMS Comic Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Gill, Karl Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Titled "CMS Particle Hunter," this colorful comic book style brochure explains to young budding scientists and science enthusiasts in colorful animation how the CMS detector was made, its main parts, and what scientists hope to find using this complex tool. Book invites young students to get involved in particle physics themselves to join the adventure. Written by Dave Barney and Aline Guevera. Layout and drawings by Eric Paiharey and Frederic Vignaux. Available in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Year Produced: 2006. Update: September 2013.

  12. Model of CMS Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Breuker

    1999-01-01

    A full scale CMS tracker mock-up exposed temporarily in the hall of building 40. The purpose of the mock-up is to study the routing of services, assembly and installation. The people in front are only a small fraction of the CMS tracker collaboration. Left to right : M. Atac, R. Castaldi, H. Breuker, D. Pandoulas,P. Petagna, A. Caner, A. Carraro, H. Postema, M. Oriunno, S. da Mota Silva, L. Van Lancker, W. Glessing, G. Benefice, A. Onnela, M. Gaspar, G. M. Bilei

  13. First Physics at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Mulders, Martijn

    2009-01-01

    The year 2008 marked the completion of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the LHC detectors. The construction and commissioning of these scientific instruments, unprecedented in scale, complexity and precision, involved a number of challenging physics measurements and analyses, even before the first proton-proton collisions. This report highlights a selection of such physics measurements for and by the Cosmic Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. These first physics analyses at CMS illustrate the depth of our understanding of the detector and demonstrate its readiness for data taking.

  14. Heavy Ions in CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Perez Tomei Thiago Rafael

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of the CMS experiment allow to investigate various hard probes, as well as bulk particle production and collective phenomena, using the calorimetry, muon and tracking systems covering a large range in pseudorapidity. In this paper selected results of the CMS experiment from p-p and Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV are discussed. First results from the recent p-Pb Run at √sNN = 5.02 TeV are also be presented.

  15. CMS Tracker operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Fiori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Tracker was repaired, recalibrated and commissioned successfully for the second run of Large Hadron Collider. In 2015 the Tracker performed well with improved hit efficiency and spatial resolution compared to Run I. Operations successfully transitioned to lower temperatures after commissioning environmental control and monitoring. This year the detector is expected to withstand luminosities that are beyond its design limits and will need a combined effort of both online and offline team to yield the high quality data that is required to reach our physics goals. We present the experience gained during the second run of the LHC and show the latest performance results of the CMS Tracker.

  16. ATLAS/CMS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00370685; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Precision studies of the Standard Model (SM) and the searches of the physics beyond the SM are ongoing at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A luminosity upgrade of LHC is planned, which provides a significant challenge for the experiments. In this report, the plans of the ATLAS and CMS upgrades are introduced. Physics prospects for selected topics, including Higgs coupling measurements, Bs,d -> mumu decays, and top quark decays through flavor changing neutral current, are also shown.

  17. Novel chemical cleaning of textured crystalline silicon for realizing surface recombination velocity <0.2 cm/s using passivation catalytic CVD SiN x /amorphous silicon stacked layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Nguyen, Cong; Koyama, Koichi; Higashimine, Koichi; Terashima, Shigeki; Okamoto, Chikao; Sugiyama, Shuichiro; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the development of a novel chemical cleaning method suitable for textured surfaces of crystalline silicon (c-Si) used for solar cells is demonstrated. To remove contaminants from such textured structures, chemicals have to penetrate into their complicated fine structures. Thus, the viscosity, reaction activity, and surface tension of the chemicals are adjusted by increasing the reaction temperature or introducing a surfactant. Actually, the use of concentrated (conc.) sulfuric acid (H2SO4) of 140 °C and the introduction of methanol (CH3OH) to other chemicals contribute to the improvement of the cleaning ability in textured structures. The present cleaning method in conjunction with plasma-damage-less catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD), often called hot-wire CVD passivation with silicon-nitride (SiN x )/amorphous silicon (a-Si) stacked layers, also contributes to the decrease in the surface recombination velocity (SRV) of c-Si. The maximum estimated SRV (SRVmax), evaluated under the assumed absence of recombination in bulk c-Si, is less than 1.1 cm/s for textured surfaces, and the real SRV, evaluated by changing the c-Si substrate thickness, is less than 0.2 cm/s.

  18. CMS-Wave Model: Part 5. Full-plane Wave Transformation and Grid Nesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    are available in previous reports and CHETNs (Lin et al. 2006; Demirbilek et al. 2007). CMS -Wave is part of the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ...the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Surface-water Modeling System (SMS). The CMS -Wave FP option is available in SMS Version 11.1 and higher...ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-81 April 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. CMS -Wave Model: Part 5. Full-plane Wave Transformation

  19. CERN Researchers' Night @ CMS + TOTEM

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Young researchers' shifter training at CMS; • Introduction talk with discussion, • CMS control room shadowing the shifters • TOTEM control room introduction and discusson • Scientific poster work shop and presentation • Science Art installations ‘Faces of CMS’ & ‘Science Cloud’ • CMS Shift diploma presentation

  20. Diboson Results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Nate Woods

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of diboson production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC, performed by the CMS Collaboration, are summarized. We report studies of ZZ production at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$~TeV, WZ production at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ and $13$~TeV, $\\mathrm{WV} \\to \\ell\

  1. Exclusive Production at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    I briefly introduce so-called central exclusive production. I mainly focus on the example analyses that have been performed in the CMS experiment at CERN. I conclude with ideas and perspectives for future work that will be done during Run 2 of the LHC. I pay special attention to the ultraperipheral collisions.

  2. CMS SEES FIRST COLLISIONS

    CERN Multimedia

      A very special moment.  On 23rd November, 19:40 we recorded our first collisions with 450GeV beams well centred in CMS.   If you have any comments / suggestions please contact Karl Aaron GILL (Editor)

  3. CMS Achieves New Milestone

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In a year highlighted by the discovery of a new, Higgs-like boson, we must remember that CMS has had a tremendous year overall, with many physics results that have pushed our envelope of knowledge further. As of this week, we have published 200 papers. Congratulations to everyone involved!

  4. New Management for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As of January 2010, Guido Tonelli becomes the new CMS Spokesperson with a two-year term of office. A Professor of General Physics at the University of Pisa, Italy, and a CERN Staff Member since January 2010, Tonelli had already been appointed as Deputy Spokesperson under the previous management. He has taken over from Jim Virdee, who was CMS Spokesperson from January 2007 to December 2009. Guido Tonelli, new CMS spokesperson At the same time as Tonelli becomes Spokesperson, two new Deputies, Albert De Roeck and Joe Incandela, as well as a whole new set of Coordinators, are also starting their terms of office. ”With the first data-taking run we have shown that CMS is an excellent experiment. The next challenge will be to transform CMS into a discovery machine with a view to making it synonymous with scientific excellence. This will be very tough but, again, the winning element will be the focus and coherent effort of the whole collaboration. On my side I'll do my best but I will need...

  5. BEH Boson (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Checchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The most relevant results on Higgs sector from CMS are presented. The status of the measurements of the Higgs Boson properties after the complete analysis of Run I dataset and an overview of the results obtained with the limited luminosity delivered at 13 TeV in 2015 are given. Implications of the results and future perspectives are also briefly discussed.

  6. Optical modulator based on propagating surface plasmon coupled fluorescent thin film: proof-of-concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Chuang; Weng, Yu-Hua; Xie, Kai-Xin; Chen, Min; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Li, Yao-Qun

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the propagating surface plasmon coupled fluorescent thin film can be utilized as a fluorescence modulator to mimic multiple representative Boolean logic operations. Surface plasmon mediated fluorescence presents characteristic properties including directional and polarized emission, which hold the feasibility in creating a universal optical modulator. In this work, through constructing the thin layer with the specific thickness, surface plasmon mediated fluorescence can be modulated with an ON-OFF ratio by more than 5-fold, under a series of coupling configurations.

  7. \\title{Test beam results of the first CMS\\\\double-sided strip module prototypes\\\\using the CBC2 read-out chip}

    CERN Document Server

    Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    In November 2013 the first 2S-$p_{T}$ module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2~to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  8. Research and development of MRI surface coil for TMJ MR imaging; Modulated Helmholtz surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukimoto, Yoshiaki; Kukimoto, Kyoko (Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan)); Shirakawa, Toyomi

    1989-12-01

    Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are a major cause of jaw pain and dysfunction as well as other related clinical symptoms. TMJ diagnosis is the abnormal position and appearance of the disk. Most X-ray-based methods are useful for evaluating bony abnormalities, but their reduced soft-tissue contrast often makes the diagnostic evaluation of TMJ disorders difficult. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very recent addition to the medical diagnostic of TMJ diseases. MR imaging can produce high-quality tomographic images of greater soft-tissue contrast without ionizing radiation or known biological hazards. MR system was circular type Simens Magnetom 1.5 tesla. Display matrix was 256x256. A Modulated Helmholtz type coil of 17 cm in diameter was developed in Kameda General Hospital in order to increase signal to noise ratio in the area of bilateral TMJs. The distance between two coils was 16-20 cm. The head was placed in supine position in the center of two surface coils. A Modulated Helmholtz type coil: 1. Modulated Helmholtz type coil was used as an emitter and a receiver. 2. Modulated Helmholtz type coil had a pair of 17 cm coils, which were movable according to head width of each patient. 3. MR imaging of bilateral TMJs was taken at once because of no necessity to reset a surfacecoil. 4. It was easy to set positioning of the head. (author).

  9. The Upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrueck, Georg

    2014-01-01

    During the high luminosity phase of the LHC starting around 2025 (HL-LHC), the machine is expected to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of $5\\cdot10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. A total of 3000~fb$^{-1}$ of data is foreseen to be delivered, hereby increasing the physics potential of the LHC experiments significantly. However, this fivefold increase in luminosity compared to the design luminosity of the LHC will lead to a higher track multiplicity in the silicon tracking detectors of the experiments, and to severe radiation levels. In order to maintain physics capability, CMS will build a completely new tracking detector comprising a pixel detector and an outer tracker. Furthermore, information from the outer tracker will be used in the first level trigger of CMS to ensure a sufficient trigger rejection. For this purpose, CMS will use so-called p$_{T}$ modules which will provide a momentum measurement at the module level. These modules consist of two back-to-back strip sensors for the outer layers, and a st...

  10. Modulation of surface plasmon coupling-in by one-dimensional surface corrugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Tejeira, F; Rodrigo, Sergio G; Martin-Moreno, L [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencas-ICMA, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Garcia-Vidal, F J [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Devaux, E; Dintinger, J; Ebbesen, T W [Laboratoire de Nanostructures, ISIS, Universite Louis Pasteur, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Krenn, J R [Institute of Physics, Karl Franzens University, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Radko, I P; Bozhevolnyi, S I [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Gonzalez, M U; Weeber, J C; Dereux, A [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Universite de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5027, F-21078 Dijon (France)], E-mail: lmm@unizar.es

    2008-03-15

    Surface plasmon-polaritons have recently attracted renewed interest in the scientific community for their potential in sub-wavelength optics, light generation and non-destructive sensing. Given that they cannot be directly excited by freely propagating light due to their intrinsic binding to the metal surface, the light-plasmon coupling efficiency becomes of crucial importance for the success of any plasmonic device. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the modulation (enhancement or suppression) of such a coupling efficiency by means of one-dimensional surface corrugation. Our approach is based on simple wave interference and enables us to make quantitative predictions which have been experimentally confirmed at both the near-infrared and telecom ranges.

  11. CMS General Poster 2009 : to raise awareness of CMS, the CMS detector, its parts and people

    CERN Document Server

    CMS outreach

    2012-01-01

    A poster which is identical to the two inside pages of the CMS brochure. The poster contains an image of a cross section of the CMS detector, explanation of detector parts, the aims of the CMS experiment and numbers of scientists and institutions associated with the experiment.

  12. 42 CFR 405.874 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.874 Section... Part B Program § 405.874 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  13. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in center-of-mass energy, a new energy frontier has been opened by the Large Hadron Collider. More than 25 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=13 TeV have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS experiments during 2016. This enormous dataset can be used to test the Standard Model in a complete new regime with tremendous precision and it has the potential to unveil new physics or set strong bounds on it. In this talk some of the most recent results made public by the CMS Collaboration will be presented. The focus will mainly be on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, with particular emphasis on searches for dark matter candidates.

  14. Higgs physics at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, André G.

    2016-12-01

    This article reviews recent measurements of the properties of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson using data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC: its mass, width and couplings to other SM particles. We also summarise highlights from searches for new physical phenomena in the Higgs sector as they are proposed in many extensions of the SM: flavour violating and invisible decay modes, resonances decaying into Higgs bosons and searches for additional Higgs bosons.

  15. CMS lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    These crystals are made from lead tungstate, a crystal that is as clear as glass yet with nearly four times the density. They have been produced in Russia to be used as scintillators in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the CMS experiment, part of the LHC project at CERN. When an electron, positron or photon passes through the calorimeter it will cause a cascade of particles that will then be absorbed by these scintillating crystals, allowing the particle's energy to be measured.

  16. The CMS superconducting solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The huge solenoid that will generate the magnetic field for the CMS experiment at the LHC is shown stored in the assembly hall above the experimental cavern. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. It weighs 220 tonnes and will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field, storing enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  17. Content management systems (CMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Oriahi, Harrison

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the three most common and widely used content management systems (CMS) used to power several millions of business websites on the internet. Since there are many other content managements systems online, this report provides some helpful guides on each of the three most used systems and the web design projects that each of them maybe most suitable. There are plenty of options when it comes to selecting a content management system for a development project and this the...

  18. CMS central barrel yoke

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The CMS experiment at CERN will use a massive solenoid housed within this return yoke, which will weigh 12 500 tonnes when completed. Magnetic fields generated within this structure will reach levels greater than any other magnet of this kind and will store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold. Within the yoke is positioned the external vacuum chamber into which the solenoid will be placed.

  19. Dibosons from CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martelli Arabella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is here presented the diboson production cross section measured by the CMS collaboration in pp collisions data at √s = 7 TeV. Wγ and Zγ results from 2010 analyses (36 pb−1 are presented together with 2011 first measurements of WW, WZ and ZZ final states obtained using 1.1 fb−1. Results obtained with 2010 data are also interpreted in term of anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  20. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  1. Surface modulation of silicon surface by excimer laser at laser fluence below ablation threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit (CPMU), Bangalore, Jakkur PO (India)

    2010-04-15

    Controlled single step fabrication of silicon conical surface modulations on [311] silicon surface is reported utilizing KrF excimer laser [{lambda}=248 nm] at laser fluence below ablation threshold laser fluence. When laser fluence was increased gradually from 0 to 0.2 J/cm{sup 2} for fixed 200 numbers of shots; first nanopores are observed to form at 0.1 J/cm{sup 2}, then very shallow nanocones evolve as a function of laser fluence. At 0.2 J/cm{sup 2}, nanoparticles are observed to form. Up to 0.15 J/cm{sup 2} the very shallow nanocone volume is smaller but increases at a fast rate with laser fluence thereafter. It is observed that the net material volume before and after the laser irradiation remains the same, a sign of the melting and resolidification without any ablation. (orig.)

  2. Glimos Instructions for CMS Underground Guiding - in french

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Dupont, Niels; Brodski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation in french, the basic safety rules for CMS underground visits are explained. The trainees are taught how to plan/organize a CMS underground visit along important safety aspects of the CMS underground (Point 5). Content owners and presenters (CMS safety team) : Niels Dupont (in french), Michael Brodski (in german), William Esposito (in english) A pdf document on the subject is available as material from the indico event page. (TO BE DONE from https://twiki.cern.ch/Edutech/CMSGlimosInstructions!)   Tell us what you think via e-learning.support at cern.ch More tutorials in the e-learning collection of the CERN Document Server (CDS) http://cds.cern.ch/collection/E-learning%20modules?ln=en All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  3. Glimos Instructions for CMS Underground Guiding - in english

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Dupont, Niels; Esposito, William

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation in english, the basic safety rules for CMS underground visits are explained. The trainees are taught how to plan/organize a CMS underground visit along important safety aspects of the CMS underground (Point 5). Content owners and presenters (CMS safety team) : Niels Dupont (in french), Michael Brodski (in german), William Esposito (in english) A pdf document on the subject is available as material from the indico event page. (TO BE DONE from https://twiki.cern.ch/Edutech/CMSGlimosInstructions!)   Tell us what you think via e-learning.support at cern.ch More tutorials in the e-learning collection of the CERN Document Server (CDS) http://cds.cern.ch/collection/E-learning%20modules?ln=en All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  4. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  5. Status of RDMS CMS computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, V.; Golutvin, I.; Kodolova, O.; Korenkov, V.; Levchuk, L.; Shmatov, S.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zhiltsov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a high-performance general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. More than twenty institutes from Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are involved in Russia and Dubna Member States (RDMS) CMS Collaboration. A proper computing grid-infrastructure has been constructed at the RDMS institutes for the participation in the running phase of the CMS experiment. Current status of RDMS CMS computing and plans of its development to the next LHC start are presented.

  6. Polarization-sensitive surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry biosensor using the photoelastic modulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Ho, Ho Pui; Wu, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    A surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) is reported. We show that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan , cos and ellipse orientation angle , can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals at the f......A surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) is reported. We show that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan , cos and ellipse orientation angle , can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals...

  7. QCD Physics (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Cerci, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Jets which are the signatures of quarks and gluons in the detector can be described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in terms of parton-parton scattering. Jets are abundantly produced at the LHC's high energy scales. Measurements of inclusive jets, dijets and multijets can be used to test perturbative QCD predictions and to constrain parton distribution functions (PDF), as well as to measure the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{S}$. The measurements use the samples of proton-proton collisions collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at various center-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV.

  8. CMS silicon tracker developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C. E-mail: carlo.civinini@fi.infn.it; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Creanza, D.; D' Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell' Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.D.R.; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; Focardi, E.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Frey, A.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Honma, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B. Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Surrow, B.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Yahong, Li; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B

    2002-01-21

    The CMS Silicon tracker consists of 70 m{sup 2} of microstrip sensors which design will be finalized at the end of 1999 on the basis of systematic studies of device characteristics as function of the most important parameters. A fundamental constraint comes from the fact that the detector has to be operated in a very hostile radiation environment with full efficiency. We present an overview of the current results and prospects for converging on a final set of parameters for the silicon tracker sensors.

  9. CMS silicon tracker developments

    CERN Document Server

    Civinini, C; Angarano, M M; Azzi, P; Babucci, E; Bacchetta, N; Bader, A; Bagliesi, G; Basti, A; Biggeri, U; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Boemi, D; Bosi, F; Borrello, L; Bozzi, C; Braibant, S; Breuker, Horst; Bruzzi, Mara; Buffini, A; Busoni, S; Candelori, A; Caner, A; Castaldi, R; Castro, A; Catacchini, E; Checcucci, B; Ciampolini, P; Creanza, D; D'Alessandro, R; Da Rold, M; Demaria, N; De Palma, M; Dell'Orso, R; Della Marina, R; Dutta, S; Eklund, C; Feld, L; Fiore, L; Focardi, E; French, M; Freudenreich, Klaus; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M; Giraldo, A; Glessing, B; Gu, W H; Hall, G; Hammarström, R; Hebbeker, T; Honma, A; Hrubec, Josef; Huhtinen, M; Kaminski, A; Karimäki, V; König, S; Krammer, Manfred; Lariccia, P; Lenzi, M; Loreti, M; Lübelsmeyer, K; Lustermann, W; Mättig, P; Maggi, G; Mannelli, M; Mantovani, G C; Marchioro, A; Mariotti, C; Martignon, G; McEvoy, B; Meschini, M; Messineo, A; Migliore, E; My, S; Paccagnella, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Pandoulas, D; Papi, A; Parrini, G; Passeri, D; Pieri, M; Piperov, S; Potenza, R; Radicci, V; Raffaelli, F; Raymond, M; Santocchia, A; Schmitt, B; Selvaggi, G; Servoli, L; Sguazzoni, G; Siedling, R; Silvestris, L; Starodumov, Andrei; Stavitski, I; Stefanini, G; Surrow, B; Tempesta, P; Tonelli, G; Tricomi, A; Tuuva, T; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Viertel, Gert M; Xie, Z; Li Ya Hong; Watts, S; Wittmer, B

    2002-01-01

    The CMS Silicon tracker consists of 70 m/sup 2/ of microstrip sensors which design will be finalized at the end of 1999 on the basis of systematic studies of device characteristics as function of the most important parameters. A fundamental constraint comes from the fact that the detector has to be operated in a very hostile radiation environment with full efficiency. We present an overview of the current results and prospects for converging on a final set of parameters for the silicon tracker sensors. (9 refs).

  10. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    The highlights of the most recent CMS results with 13 TeV data will be presented in this overview. The Standard Model precision measurements, including the top quark production, will be shown first. This will be followed by the presentation of Higgs boson studies with the early 13 TeV data. Then the focus will shift to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, including the searches for several Supersymmetric scenarios, using different analysis techniques. The talk will conclude with searches for the exotic resonances, with an emphasis on studies of the high-mass diphoton production.

  11. Top Physics (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Daskalakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Recent results on the inclusive and differential production cross sections of top-quark pair and single top-quark processes are presented, obtained using data from proton-proton collisions collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The large centre-of-mass energies available at LHC allow for the copious production of top-quark pairs in association with other final state particles at high transverse momentum. Measurements of such processes as well as of the top-quark mass and other properties will be discussed. The results are compared with the most up-to-date standard model theory predictions.

  12. The winding line for the CMS reinforced conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbricatore, P; D'Urzo, C; Farinon, S; Gaddi, A; Levesy, B; Loche, L; Musenich, R; Rondeaux, F; Penco, R; Valle, N

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The use of a reinforced conductor for the CMS coil required a sustained activity of development at industrial level, to understand how to handle, to pre-bend and to wind the conductor with an inner winding technique. The winding line was designed and constructed according to this experience. The working principles of the line are under test through the winding of a prototype of a CMS coil module. The prototype has the same radius of a CMS module (6900 mm outer diameter), but a shorter axial length (670 mm against 2500 for the module). The critical operations are related to the accurate pre-bending of the conductor, the positioning of the turns into the winding, the axial compaction, and the correct handling of 50-ton windings. (9 refs).

  13. Surface plasmon transmission through discontinuous conducting surfaces: Plasmon amplitude modulation by grazing scattered fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Mayoral-Astorga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied numerically the diffraction of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP when it encounters a wide multi-wavelength slit in conducting films. As a jump process a SPP is excited beyond the slit by wave scattering at the second slit edge. The exciting radiation is produced when the incident SPP collapses at the first slit edge. We have found that the transmitted SPP supports inherent and unavoidable interference with grazing scattered radiation; the spatial modulation extends to the fields in the diffraction region where a series of low intensity spots arises. We demonstrate that the SPP generated on the second slab depends on the frequency but not on the wave vector of the collapsed SPP; a SPP is transmitted even when the two metals forming the slit are different. The numerical results were obtained using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD method with a grid size λ/100.

  14. Surface plasmon transmission through discontinuous conducting surfaces: Plasmon amplitude modulation by grazing scattered fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayoral-Astorga, L. A.; Gaspar-Armenta, J. A.; Ramos-Mendieta, F. [Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 México (Mexico)

    2016-04-15

    We have studied numerically the diffraction of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) when it encounters a wide multi-wavelength slit in conducting films. As a jump process a SPP is excited beyond the slit by wave scattering at the second slit edge. The exciting radiation is produced when the incident SPP collapses at the first slit edge. We have found that the transmitted SPP supports inherent and unavoidable interference with grazing scattered radiation; the spatial modulation extends to the fields in the diffraction region where a series of low intensity spots arises. We demonstrate that the SPP generated on the second slab depends on the frequency but not on the wave vector of the collapsed SPP; a SPP is transmitted even when the two metals forming the slit are different. The numerical results were obtained using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method with a grid size λ/100.

  15. The CMS trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-09-08

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  16. The CMS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; El Sawy, Mai; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, $\\tau$ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  17. CMS Resistive plate Champers

    CERN Document Server

    Zainab, Karam

    2013-01-01

    There are many types of gas detectors which are used in CERN in LHC project, There is a main parts for the gas detectors which must be in all gas detectors types like Multiwire proportional chambers, such as the micromesh gaseous structure chamber (the MicroMegas), Gas-electron multiplier (GEM) detector, Resistive Plate Champers... Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment detecting muons which are powerful tool for recognizing signatures of interesting physics processes. The CMS detector uses: drift tube (DT), cathode strip chamber (CSC) and resistive plate chamber (RPC). Building RPC’s was my project in summer student program (hardware). RPC’s have advantages which are triggering detector and Excellent time resolution which reinforce the measurement of the correct beam crossing time. RPC’s Organized in stations :  RPC barrel (RB) there are 4 stations, namely RB1, RB2, RB3, and RB4  While in the RPC endcap (RE) the 3 stations are RE1, RE2, and RE3. In the endcaps a new starion will be added and this...

  18. The CMS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Brigljevic, V; Cano, E; Cittolin, Sergio; Csilling, Akos; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Jacobs, C; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Larsen, H; Magrans de Abril, Ildefons; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schwick, C; Sphicas, Paris; ODell, V; Suzuki, I; Berti, L; Maron, G; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L; Ninane, A; Erhan, S; Bhattacharya, S; Branson, J G

    2003-01-01

    The data acquisition system of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider will employ an event builder which will combine data from about 500 data sources into full events at an aggregate throughput of 100 GByte/s. Several architectures and switch technologies have been evaluated for the DAQ Technical Design Report by measurements with test benches and by simulation. This paper describes studies of an EVB test-bench based on 64 PCs acting as data sources and data consumers and employing both Gigabit Ethernet and Myrinet technologies as the interconnect. In the case of Ethernet, protocols based on Layer-2 frames and on TCP/IP are evaluated. Results from ongoing studies, including measurements on throughput and scaling are presented. The architecture of the baseline CMS event builder will be outlined. The event builder is organised into two stages with intelligent buffers in between. The first stage contains 64 switches performing a first level of data concentration by building super-fragments from fragmen...

  19. Opportunistic Resource Usage in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, Peter [RWTH Aachen U.; Hufnagel, Dirk [Fermilab; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Gutsche, O. [Fermilab; Tadel, M. [UC, San Diego; Sfiligoi, I. [UC, San Diego; Letts, J. [UC, San Diego; Wuerthwein, F. [UC, San Diego; McCrea, A. [UC, San Diego; Bockelman, B. [Nebraska U.; Fajardo, E. [Andes U., Merida; Linares, L. [Andes U., Merida; Wagner, R. [TI, San Diego; Konstantinov, P. [Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res.; Blumenfeld, B. [Johns Hopkins U.; Bradley, D. [Wisconsin U., Madison

    2014-01-01

    CMS is using a tiered setup of dedicated computing resources provided by sites distributed over the world and organized in WLCG. These sites pledge resources to CMS and are preparing them especially for CMS to run the experiment's applications. But there are more resources available opportunistically both on the GRID and in local university and research clusters which can be used for CMS applications. We will present CMS' strategy to use opportunistic resources and prepare them dynamically to run CMS applications. CMS is able to run its applications on resources that can be reached through the GRID, through EC2 compliant cloud interfaces. Even resources that can be used through ssh login nodes can be harnessed. All of these usage modes are integrated transparently into the GlideIn WMS submission infrastructure, which is the basis of CMS' opportunistic resource usage strategy. Technologies like Parrot to mount the software distribution via CVMFS and xrootd for access to data and simulation samples via the WAN are used and will be described. We will summarize the experience with opportunistic resource usage and give an outlook for the restart of LHC data taking in 2015.

  20. CMS Data Analysis School Model

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, Sudhir; Cavanaugh, R; Bloom, K; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J; Klima, B; Narain, M; Palla, F; Rolandi, G; Schörner-Sadenius, T

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the  concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Center), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe , CMS is trying to  engage the collaboration discovery potential and maximize the physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents of CMS, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the caree...

  1. CMS ready for winding up

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    End of October, the last lengths of conductor for the CMS superconducting solenoid have been produced. This is another large sub-project of the CMS Magnet being successfully finished, after completion of the Yoke last year (see Bulletin 43/2002).

  2. Data Quality Monitoring for the CMS Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, S; Mennea, Maria Santa; Zito, G

    2006-01-01

    The CMS silicon tracker, consisting of about 17,000 detector modules and divided into micro-strip and pixel sensors, will be the largest silicon tracker ever realized for high energy physics experiments. The detector performance will be monitored using applications based on the CMS Data Quality Monitoring\\,(DQM) framework and running on the High-Level Trigger Farm as well as local DAQ systems. The monitorable quantities of this large number of modules are divided into hierarchical structures reflecting the detector sections. In addition, they are organized into structures corresponding to the levels of data processing. The information produced are delivered to client applications according to their subscription requests. The client applications summarize and visualize the quantities received. We describe here the functionalities of the CMS tracker DQM applications and report preliminary performance tests.

  3. CMS tracker slides into centre stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As preparations for the magnet test and cosmic challenge get underway, a prototype tracker has been carefully inserted into the centre of CMS. The tracker, in its special platform, is slowly inserted into the centre of CMS. The CMS prototype tracker to be used for the magnet test and cosmic challenge coming up this summer has the same dimensions -2.5 m in diameter and 6 m in length- as the real one and tooling exactly like it. However, the support tube is only about 1% equipped, with 2 m2 of silicon detectors installed out of the total 200 m2. This is already more than any LEP experiment ever used and indicates the great care needed to be taken by engineers and technicians as these fragile detectors were installed and transported to Point 5. Sixteen thousand silicon detectors with a total of about 10 million strips will make up the full tracker. So far, 140 modules with about 100 000 strips have been implanted into the prototype tracker. These silicon strips will provide precision tracking for cosmic muon...

  4. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Yoann, E-mail: levy@fzu.cz [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Derrien, Thibault J.-Y. [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Bulgakova, Nadezhda M. [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); S.S. Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, 1 Lavrentyev ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Gurevich, Evgeny L. [Chair of Applied Laser Technologies, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Mocek, Tomáš [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • The surface temperature dynamics in Ti and Si is studied upon fs laser irradiation. • To model conditions of LIPSS formation, the laser energy coupling is modulated. • Temperature modulation survives more than 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si. • Under certain conditions, periodic nano-melting develops along the surface. - Abstract: Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is a complicated phenomenon which involves periodic spatial modulation of laser energy absorption on the irradiated surface, transient changes in optical response, surface layer melting and/or ablation. The listed processes strongly depend on laser fluence and pulse duration as well as on material properties. This paper is aimed at studying the spatiotemporal evolution of a periodic modulation of the deposited laser energy, once formed upon irradiation of metal (Ti) and semiconductor (Si) surfaces. Assuming that the incoming laser pulse interferes with a surface electromagnetic wave, the resulting sinusoidal modulation of the absorbed laser energy is introduced into a two-dimensional two-temperature model developed for titanium and silicon. Simulations reveal that the lattice temperature modulation on the surfaces of both materials following from the modulated absorption remains significant for longer than 50 ps after the laser pulse. In the cases considered here, the partially molten phase exists 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si, suggesting that molten matter can be subjected to temperature-driven relocation toward LIPSS formation, due to the modulated temperature profile on the material surfaces. Molten phase at nanometric distances (nano-melting) is also revealed.

  5. Equilibrium configurations of director in a planar nematic cell with one spatially modulated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Ledney

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study two-dimensional equilibrium configurations of nematic liquid crystal (NLC director in a cell confined between two parallel surfaces: a planar surface and a spatially modulated one. The relief of the modulated surface is described by a smooth periodic sine-like function. The director easy axis orientation is homeotropic at one of the bounding surfaces and is planar at the other one. Strong NLC anchoring with both surfaces is assumed. We consider the case where disclination lines occur in the bulk of NLC strictly above local extrema of the modulated surface. These disclination lines run along the crests and troughs of the relief waves. In the approximation of planar director deformations we obtain analytical expressions describing a director distribution in the bulk of the cell. Equilibrium distances from disclination lines to the modulated surface are calculated and their dependences on the cell thickness and the period and depth of the surface relief are studied. It is shown that the distances from disclination lines to the modulated surface decrease as the depth of the relief increases.

  6. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yoann; Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is a complicated phenomenon which involves periodic spatial modulation of laser energy absorption on the irradiated surface, transient changes in optical response, surface layer melting and/or ablation. The listed processes strongly depend on laser fluence and pulse duration as well as on material properties. This paper is aimed at studying the spatiotemporal evolution of a periodic modulation of the deposited laser energy, once formed upon irradiation of metal (Ti) and semiconductor (Si) surfaces. Assuming that the incoming laser pulse interferes with a surface electromagnetic wave, the resulting sinusoidal modulation of the absorbed laser energy is introduced into a two-dimensional two-temperature model developed for titanium and silicon. Simulations reveal that the lattice temperature modulation on the surfaces of both materials following from the modulated absorption remains significant for longer than 50 ps after the laser pulse. In the cases considered here, the partially molten phase exists 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si, suggesting that molten matter can be subjected to temperature-driven relocation toward LIPSS formation, due to the modulated temperature profile on the material surfaces. Molten phase at nanometric distances (nano-melting) is also revealed.

  7. Modulated surface textures for enhanced scattering in thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isabella, O.; Battaglia, C.; Ballif, C.; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-scale randomly textured front transparent oxides are superposed on micro-scale etched glass substrates to form modulated surface textures. The resulting enhanced light scattering is implemented in single and double junction thin-film silicon solar cells.

  8. The silicon microstrip tracker for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Pandoulas, D; Angarano, M M; Azzi, P; Babucci, E; Bacchetta, N; Bader, A J; Bagliesi, G; Bartalini, P; Basti, A; Biggeri, U; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Boemi, D; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Bozzi, C; Braibant, S; Breuker, Horst; Bruzzi, Mara; Candelori, A; Caner, A; Castaldi, R; Castro, A; Catacchini, E; Checcucci, B; Ciampolini, P; Civinini, C; Creanza, D; D'Alessandro, R; Da Rold, M; Demaria, N; De Palma, M; Dell'Orso, R; Della Marina, R; Dutta, S; Eklund, C; Elliot-Peisert, A; Feld, L; Fiore, L; Focardi, E; French, M; Freudenreich, Klaus; Fürtjes, A; Giassi, A; Giraldo, A; Glessing, W D; Gu, W H; Hall, G; Hammarström, R; Hebbeker, T; Honkanen, J A; Hrubec, Josef; Huhtinen, M; Kaminski, A; Karimäki, V; Kellogg, R G; König, S J; Krammer, Manfred; Lariccia, P; Lenzi, M; Loreti, M; Lübelsmeyer, K; Lustermann, W; Mättig, P; Maggi, G; Mannelli, M; Mantovani, G C; Marchioro, A; Mariotti, C; Martignon, G; McEvoy, B; Meschini, M; Messineo, A; My, S; Paccagnella, S; Palla, Fabrizio; Parrini, G; Passeri, D; Pieri, M; Piperov, S; Potenza, R; Raffaelli, F; Raso, G; Raymond, M; Schmitt, B; Selvaggi, G; Servoli, L; Sguazzoni, G; Siedling, R; Silvestris, L; Skog, K; Starodumov, Andrei; Stavitski, I; Stefanini, G; Tempesta, P; Tonelli, G; Tricomi, A; Tuuva, T; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Viertel, Gert M; Wang, Y; Watts, S; Wittmer, B; Xie, Z

    1999-01-01

    The CMS silicon strip tracker involves about 70 m/sup 2/ of instrumented silicon, with approximately 18500 microstrip detectors read out by 5*10/sup 6/ electronics channels. It has to satisfy a set of stringent requirements imposed by the environment and by the physics expected at the LHC: low cell occupancy and good resolution, radiation hardness aided by adequate cooling, low mass combined with high stability. These conditions have been incorporated in a highly modular design of the detector modules and their support structures, chosen to facilitate construction and to allow for easy assembly and maintenance. (3 refs).

  9. Optimizing CMS Data Formats for Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Boonchokchuay, Peerut

    2015-01-01

    This project examines two ways to improve CMS MiniAOD creation and analysis performance: one on job configuration level; the other on class definition level. Measurements of time to read various objects, size on disk and resident memory size are presented as Output Module parameters and PAT object definitions are inspected. We found that increasing basket size could lessen MiniAOD size and time to read whereas some others were set near the optimal point. Modifying string containing attributes also shows a slight decrease in size and time to read objects in comparison with the original MiniAOD structure.

  10. Surface phase defects induced downstream laser intensity modulation in high-power laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Wei Zhou; Wanjun Dai; Dongxia Hu; Xuewei Deng; Wanqing Huang; Lidan Zhou; Qiang Yuan; Xiaoxia Huang; De’en Wang; Ying Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optics surface phase defects induced intensity modulation in high-power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion research is studied. Calculations and experiments reveal an exact mapping of the modulation patterns and the optics damage spot distributions from the surface phase defects. Origins are discussed during the processes of optics manufacturing and diagnostics, revealing potential improvements for future optics manufacturing techniques and diagnostic index, which is meaningful for fusion level laser facility construction and its operation safety.

  11. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Button, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen

    2015-06-14

    The goals of the project were: Determine applicability of transmission line method (TLM) to evaluate sheet resistance of soils on module glass;
    Evaluate various soils on glass for changes in surface resistance and their ability to promote potential-induced degradation with humidity (PID);
    Evaluate PID characteristics, rate, and leakage current increases on full-size mc-Si modules associated with a conductive soil on the surface.

  12. Electroweak Results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    We present recent CMS measurements on electroweak boson production including single, double, and triple boson final states. Electroweak processes span many orders of magnitude in production cross section. Measurements of high-rate processes provide stringent tests of the standard model. In addition, rare triboson proceses and final states produced through vector boson scattering are newly accessible with the large integrated luminosity provided by the LHC. If new physics lies just beyond the reach of the LHC, its effects may manifest as enhancements to the high energy kinematics in mulitboson production. We present limits on new physics signatures using an effective field theory which models these modifications as modifications of electroweak gauge couplings. Since electroweak measurements will continue to benefit from the increasing integrated luminosity provided by the LHC, the future prospects of electroweak physics are discussed.

  13. Self Assembly Modulated by Interactions of Two Heterogeneously Charged Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, R.; Pincus, P. A.; Safran, S. A.

    2008-09-01

    Recent experiments have measured attractive interactions between two surfaces that each bear two molecular species with opposite charge. Such surfaces form charged domains of finite size. We present a theoretical model that predicts the dependence of the domain size, phase behavior and the interlayer forces as a function of spacing and salt concentration for two such interacting surfaces. A strong correlation between two length scales, the screening length and the surface separation, at the spinodal is shown. Remarkably, the first-order phase transition to infinite sized domains depends logarithmically on the ratio of the domain size to the molecular size. Finally, we fit the predicted pressure with experiments.

  14. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  15. Status of the CMS magnet (MT17)

    CERN Document Server

    Hervé, A; Campi, D; Cannarsa, P; Fabbricatore, P; Feyzi, F; Gerwig, H; Grillet, J P; Horváth, I L; Kaftanov, V S; Kircher, F; Loveless, R; Maugain, J M; Perinic, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sbrissa, E; Smith, R P; Veillet, L

    2002-01-01

    The CMS experiment (Compact Muon Solenoid) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with a free bore of 6 m diameter and 12.5-m length, enclosed inside a 10 000-ton return yoke. The magnet will be assembled and tested in a surface hall at Point 5 of the LHC at the beginning of 2004 before being transferred by heavy lifting means to an experimental hall 90 m below ground level. The design and construction of the magnet is a common project of the CMS Collaboration. The task is organized by a CERN based group with strong technical and contractual participation from CEA Saclay, ETH Zurich, Fermilab, INFN Genova, ITEP Moscow, University of Wisconsin and CERN. The magnet project will be described, with emphasis on the present status of the fabrication. (15 refs).

  16. Effect of surface steps on the microstructure of lateral composition modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; NORMAN,A.G.; RENO,JOHN L.; JONES,ERIC D.; TWESTEN,R.D.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; MOUTINHO,H.; MASCARENHAS,A.

    2000-03-23

    Growth of InAs/AlAs short-period superlattices on appropriately miscut (001) InP substrates is shown to alter the microstructure of composition modulation from a 2D organization of short compositionally enriched wires to a single dominant modulation direction and wire lengths up to {approximately}1 {micro}m. The effects of miscut are interpreted in terms of surface step orientation and character. The material is strongly modulated and exhibits intense optical emission. The 1D modulations appear potentially useful for new devices that take advantage of the preferred direction formed in the growth plane.

  17. A Pulse Power Modulator System for Commercial High Power Ion Beam Surface Treatment Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, D.M.; Cockreham, B.D.; Dragt, A.J.; Ives, H.C.; Neau, E.L.; Reed, K.W.; White, F.E.

    1999-05-24

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (lBESTrM) process utilizes high energy pulsed ion beams to deposit energy onto the surface of a material allowing near instantaneous melting of the surface layer. The melted layer typically re-solidifies at a very rapid rate which forms a homogeneous, fine- grained structure on the surface of the material resulting in significantly improved surface characteristics. In order to commercialize the IBESTTM process, a reliable and easy-to-operate modulator system has been developed. The QM-I modulator is a thyratron-switched five-stage magnetic pulse compression network which drives a two-stage linear induction adder. The adder provides 400 kV, 150 ns FWHM pulses at a maximum repetition rate of 10 pps for the acceleration of the ion beam. Special emphasis has been placed upon developing the modulator system to be consistent with long-life commercial service.

  18. Finite element stress analysis of the CMS magnet coil

    CERN Document Server

    Desirelli, Alberto; Farinon, S; Levesy, B; Ps, C; Rey, J M; Sgobba, Stefano

    2000-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments which are being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN. The design field of the CMS magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.38 m and the aperture is 6.36 m. This is achieved with a 4 layer-5 module superconducting Al-stabilized coil energised at a nominal current of 20 kA. The finite element analysis (FEA) carried out is axisymmetric elasto-plastic. FEA has also been carried out on the suspension system and on the conductor. (8 refs).

  19. ESTIMATION OF PV MODULE SURFACE TEMPERATURE USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Coskun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to use the artificial neural network (ANN method to estimate the surface temperature of a photovoltaic (PV panel. Using the experimentally obtained PV data, the accuracy of the ANN model was evaluated. To train the artificial neural network (ANN, outer temperature solar radiation and wind speed values were inputs and surface temperature was an output. The ANN was used to estimate PV panel surface temperature. Using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm the feed forward artificial neural network was trained. Two back propagation type ANN algorithms were used and their performance was compared with the estimate from the LM algorithm. To train the artificial neural network, experimental data were used for two thirds with the remaining third used for testing. Additionally scaled conjugate gradient (SCG back propagation and resilient back propagation (RB type ANN algorithms were used for comparison with the LM algorithm. The performances of these three types of artificial neural network were compared and mean error rates of between 0.005962 and 0.012177% were obtained. The best estimate was produced by the LM algorithm. Estimation of PV surface temperature with artificial neural networks provides better results than conventional correlation methods. This study showed that artificial neural networks may be effectively used to estimate PV surface temperature.

  20. Modulation of human osteoblasts by metal surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Sehr, Harald; de Wild, Michael; Portenier, Jeannette; Gobrecht, Jens; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2013-08-01

    The use of metal implants in dental and orthopedic surgery is continuously expanding and highly successful. While today longevity and load-bearing capacity of the implants fulfill the expectations of the patients, acceleration of osseointegration would be of particular benefit to shorten the period of convalescence. To further clarify the options to accelerate the kinetics of osseointegration, within this study, the osteogenic properties of structurally identical surfaces with different metal coatings were investigated. To assess the development and function of primary human osteoblasts on metal surfaces, cell viability, differentiation, and gene expression were determined. Titanium surfaces were used as positive, and surfaces coated with gold were used as negative controls. Little differences in the cellular parameters tested for were found when the cells were grown on titanium discs sputter coated with titanium, zirconium, niobium, tantalum, gold, and chromium. Cell number, activity of cell layer-associated alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and levels of transcripts encoding COL1A1 and BGLAP did not vary significantly in dependence of the surface chemistry. Treatment of the cell cultures with 1,25(OH)2 D3 /Dex, however, significantly increased ALP activity and BGLAP messenger RNA levels. The data demonstrate that the metal layer coated onto the titanium discs exerted little modulatory effects on cell behavior. It is suggested that the microenvironment regulated by the peri-implant tissues is more effective in regulating the tissue response than is the material of the implant itself.

  1. The Control System for the CMS Strip Tracking Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel; Chen, Jie; Dierlamm, Alexander; Frey, Martin; Masetti, Lorenzo; Militaru, Otilia; Shah, Yousaf; Stringer, Robert; Tsirou, Andromachi

    2008-01-01

    The Tracker of the CMS silicon strip tracking detector covers a surface of 206 m2. 9648128 channels are available on 75376 APV front-end chips on 15232 modules, built of 24328 silicon sensors. The power supply of the detector modules is split up in 1944 power supplies with two low voltage for front end power and two high voltage channels each for the bias voltage of the silicon sensors. In addition 356 low voltage channels are needed to power the control chain. The tracker will run at -20°C at low relative humidity for at least 10 years. The Tracker Control System handles all interdependencies of control, low and high voltages, as well as fast ramp downs in case of higher than allowed temperatures or currents in the detector and experimental cavern problems. This is ensured by evaluating $10^{4}$ power supply parameters, $10^{3}$ information from Tracker Safety System and $10^{5}$ information from the tracker front end.

  2. CMS Requirements for the Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Holtman; J.Amundson; 等

    2001-01-01

    CMS physicists need to seamlessly access their experimental data and results,independent of location and storage medium,in order to focus on the exploration for the new physics signals arther than the complexities of worldwide data management .In order to achieve this goal,CMS has adopted a tiered worldwide computing model which will incorporate emerging Grid technology.CMS has started to use Grid tools for data processing,replication and migration,Important Grid components are expected to be delivered by the Data Grid projects.like projects,CMS has created a set of long-term requirements to the Grid projects.These requirements are presented and discussed.

  3. CMS plotter graphics training manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawby, R.D.

    1981-03-01

    This manual includes explanations of several graphics programs that use a Conversation Monitor System (CMS) terminal and a table-top plotter to produce a copy on bond paper or transparency film. 13 figures.

  4. Sinusoidal phase-modulating laser diode interferometer for real-time surface profile measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guotian He; Xiangzhao Wang; Aijun Zeng; Feng Tang

    2007-01-01

    A sinusoidal phase-modulating (SPM) laser diode (LD) interferometer for real-time surface profile measurement is proposed and its principle is analyzed. The phase signal of the surface profile is detected from the sinusoidal phase-modulating interference signal using a real-time phase detection circuit. For 60 × 60 measurement points of the surface profile, the measuring time is 10 ms. A root mean square (RMS) measurement repeatability of 3.93 nm is realized, and the measurement resolution reaches 0.19 nm.

  5. Mechanisms of femtosecond LIPSS formation induced by periodic surface temperature modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2016-06-01

    Here we analyze the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on metal surfaces upon single femtosecond laser pulses. Most of the existing models of the femtosecond LIPSS formation discuss only the appearance of a periodic modulation of the electron and ion temperatures. However the mechanism how the inhomogeneous surface temperature distribution induces the periodically-modulated surface profile under the conditions corresponding to ultrashort-pulse laser ablation is still not clear. Estimations made on the basis of different hydrodynamic instabilities allow to sort out mechanisms, which can bridge the gap between the temperature modulation and the LIPSS. The proposed theory shows that the periodic structures can be generated by single ultrashort laser pulses due to ablative instabilities. The Marangoni and Rayleigh-Bénard convection on the contrary cannot cause the LIPSS formation.

  6. Inauguration of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    In early 2005 the final piece of the CMS solenoid magnet arrived, marked by this ceremony held in the CMS assembly hall at Cessy, France. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. Weighing 220 tonnes, it will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field and store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  7. Excavating the CMS experimental cavern

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Diggers work 100 m underground to remove rock from the huge cavern that will soon be the site for the CMS experiment at CERN. Workers travel down the shaft into the cavern in an elevator maneuvered by a crane, equipment must also be lowered in this way. When the cavern is completed, the 12 500 tonne CMS experiment will then be lowered piece by piece, as no crane on Earth will be able to carry the experiment's full weight.

  8. Dark Matter searches at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    This talk describes searches for directly produced Dark Matter particles in CMS. The searches are performed using the datasets recorded with the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. Final states with a monojet, monophoton, and monolepton signature are among the final states considered, as well as dark-matter particles produced in association with bottom and top quarks.

  9. Forward energy measurement with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kheyn, Lev

    2016-01-01

    Energy flow is measured in the forward region of CMS at pseudorapidities up to 6.6 in pp interactions at 13 TeV with forward (HF) and very forward (CASTOR) calorimeters. The results are compared to model predictions. The CMS results at different center-of-mass energies are intercompared using pseudorapidity variable shifted by beam rapidity, thus studying applicability of hypothesis of limiting fragmentation.

  10. The CMS detector before closure

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2006-01-01

    The CMS detector before testing using muon cosmic rays that are produced as high-energy particles from space crash into the Earth's atmosphere generating a cascade of energetic particles. After closing CMS, the magnets, calorimeters, trackers and muon chambers were tested on a small section of the detector as part of the magnet test and cosmic challenge. This test checked the alignment and functionality of the detector systems, as well as the magnets.

  11. QCD Physics Potential of CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Rabbertz, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    In view of the approaching LHC operation the feasibility and accuracy of QCD measurements with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) involving hadrons and jets are discussed. This summary is based on analyses performed at CMS for center-of-mass energies of 10 as well as 14 TeV assuming event numbers ranging from some days of data taking up to 100/pb of integrated luminosity with proton-proton collisions.

  12. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  13. CMS multicore scheduling strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio [Madrid, CIEMAT; Hernandez, Jose [Madrid, CIEMAT; Holzman, Burt [Fermilab; Majewski, Krista [Fermilab; McCrea, Alison [UC, San Diego

    2014-01-01

    In the next years, processor architectures based on much larger numbers of cores will be most likely the model to continue 'Moore's Law' style throughput gains. This not only results in many more jobs in parallel running the LHC Run 1 era monolithic applications, but also the memory requirements of these processes push the workernode architectures to the limit. One solution is parallelizing the application itself, through forking and memory sharing or through threaded frameworks. CMS is following all of these approaches and has a comprehensive strategy to schedule multicore jobs on the GRID based on the glideinWMS submission infrastructure. The main component of the scheduling strategy, a pilot-based model with dynamic partitioning of resources that allows the transition to multicore or whole-node scheduling without disallowing the use of single-core jobs, is described. This contribution also presents the experiences made with the proposed multicore scheduling schema and gives an outlook of further developments working towards the restart of the LHC in 2015.

  14. CMS Multicore Scheduling Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In the next years, processor architectures based on much larger numbers of cores will be most likely the model to continue Moores Law style throughput gains. This not only results in many more jobs in parallel running the LHC Run 1 era monolithic applications. Also the memory requirements of these processes push the workernode architectures to the limit. One solution is parallelizing the application itself, through forking and memory sharing or through threaded frameworks. CMS is following all of these approaches and has a comprehensive strategy to schedule multi-core jobs on the GRID based on the glideIn WMS submission infrastructure. We will present the individual components of the strategy, from special site specific queues used during provisioning of resources and implications to scheduling; to dynamic partitioning within a single pilot to allow to transition to multi-core or whole-node scheduling on site level without disallowing single-core jobs. In this presentation, we will present the experiences mad...

  15. The CMS crystal calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lustermann, W

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of the energy of electrons and photons with very high accuracy is of primary importance far the study of many physics processes at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in particular for the search of the Higgs Boson. The CMS experiment will use a crystal calorimeter with pointing geometry, almost covering 4p, as it offers a very good energy resolution. It is divided into a barrel composed of 61200 lead tungstate crystals, two end-caps with 14648 crystals and a pre-shower detector in front of the end-cap. The challenges of the calorimeter design arise from the high radiation environment, the 4 Tesla magnetic eld, the high bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz and the large dynamic range, requiring the development of fast, radiation hard crystals, photo-detectors and readout electronics. An overview of the construction and design of the calorimeter will be presented, with emphasis on some of the details required to meet the demanding performance goals. 19 Refs.

  16. Recent CMS Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorigo Tommaso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The CMS experiment obtained a large number of groundbreaking results from the analysis of 7- and 8-TeV proton-proton collisions produced so far by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In this brief summary only a few of those results will be discussed. The new scalar discovered in 2012 has been studied in detail and all its characteristics have been found in agreement with standard model predictions for a Brout-Englert-Higgs boson. The large sample of top quark events collected in 2011 and 2012 have allowed world-class measurements of its mass; the combination of those results is Mt = 173.49 ± 0.36 ± 0.91 GeV. The rare decay Bs0 → μμ has been observed and found in agreement with standard model predictions; the search for the rare decay B0 → μμ has allowed to set a 95% CL limit on the branching fraction at 1.1 × 10−9. These two results strongly constrain new physics models.

  17. A new dawn for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Supported by a gigantic crane and a factory-size room full of enthusiasm, the central barrel of CMS made its final journey underground on 28 February. The central section of the CMS detector starts its dramatic 10-hour descent underground.Several hours (and 100 metres) later, the massive barrel rests on the cavern floor. CMS scientists, journalists, photographers and members of the transport crew basked in the final rays of the 'solenoid-set' on 28 February as the central barrel of the CMS detector sinks below the horizon and began its ten-hour descent into the cavern 100 metres below. Thirteen metres long and weighing as much as five jumbo jets (1920 tonnes), the barrel is the largest of the 15 chunks of CMS detector that are being lowered one by one into the cavern. 'This is a challenging feat of engineering, as there are just 20 cm of leeway between the detector and the walls of the shaft,' said Austin Ball, Technical Coordinator of CMS. The section of the detector, which contains the solenoid of the magne...

  18. The Alignment of the CMS Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Lampen, Pekka Tapio

    2013-01-01

    The CMS all-silicon tracker consists of 16588 modules, embedded in a solenoidal magnet providing a field of B = 3.8 T. The targeted performance requires that the alignment determines the module positions with a precision of a few micrometers. Ultimate local precision is reached by the determination of sensor curvatures, challenging the algorithms to determine about 200k parameters simultaneously, as is feasible with the Millepede II program. The main remaining challenge are global distortions that systematically bias the track parameters and thus physics measurements. They are controlled by adding further information into the alignment workflow, e.g. the mass of decaying resonances or track data taken with B = 0 T. To make use of the latter and also to integrate the determination of the Lorentz angle into the alignment procedure, the alignment framework has been extended to treat position sensitive calibration parameters. This is relevant since due to the increased LHC luminosity in 2012, the Lorentz angle ex...

  19. The New Silicon Strip Detectors for the CMS Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dragicevic, Marko

    2010-01-01

    The first introductory part of the thesis describes the concept of the CMS experiment. The tasks of the various detector systems and their technical implementations in CMS are explained. To facilitate the understanding of the basic principles of silicon strip sensors, the subsequent chapter discusses the fundamentals in semiconductor technology, with particular emphasis on silicon. The necessary process steps to manufacture strip sensors in a so-called planar process are described in detail. Furthermore, the effects of irradiation on silicon strip sensors are discussed. To conclude the introductory part of the thesis, the design of the silicon strip sensors of the CMS Tracker are described in detail. The choice of the substrate material and the complex geometry of the sensors are reviewed and the quality assurance procedures for the production of the sensors are presented. Furthermore the design of the detector modules are described. The main part of this thesis starts with a discussion on the demands on the ...

  20. Electrically modulated dynamic spreading of drops on soft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Daga, Ashish; DasGupta, Sunando; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-07-01

    The intricate interaction between the deformability of a substrate and the dynamic spreading of a liquid drop on the same, under the application of an electrical voltage, has remained far from being well understood. Here, we demonstrate that electrospreading dynamics on soft substrates is dictated by the combined interplay of electrocapillarity, the wetting line friction, and the viscoelastic energy dissipation at the contact line. Our results reveal that during such electro-elastocapillarity mediated spreading of a sessile drop, the contact radius evolution exhibits a universal power-law in a substrate elasticity based non-dimensional time, with an electrical voltage dependent spreading exponent. Simultaneously, the macroscopic dynamic contact angle variation follows a general power-law in the contact line velocity, normalized by elasticity dependent characteristic velocity scale. These findings will be beneficial for comprehending droplet spreading dynamics stemming from the combination of electrically modulated spreading and "soft wetting." Hence, our results are likely to provide the foundation for the development of a plethora of applications involving droplet manipulations by exploiting the interplay between electrically triggered spreading and substrate-compliance over interfacial scales.

  1. Modulating macrophage polarization with divalent cations in nanostructured titanium implant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Ho; Kim, Youn-Jeong; Jang, Je-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale topographical modification and surface chemistry alteration using bioactive ions are centrally important processes in the current design of the surface of titanium (Ti) bone implants with enhanced bone healing capacity. Macrophages play a central role in the early tissue healing stage and their activity in response to the implant surface is known to affect the subsequent healing outcome. Thus, the positive modulation of macrophage phenotype polarization (i.e. towards the regenerative M2 rather than the inflammatory M1 phenotype) with a modified surface is essential for the osteogenesis funtion of Ti bone implants. However, relatively few advances have been made in terms of modulating the macrophage-centered early healing capacity in the surface design of Ti bone implants for the two important surface properties of nanotopography and and bioactive ion chemistry. We investigated whether surface bioactive ion modification exerts a definite beneficial effect on inducing regenerative M2 macrophage polarization when combined with the surface nanotopography of Ti. Our results indicate that nanoscale topographical modification and surface bioactive ion chemistry can positively modulate the macrophage phenotype in a Ti implant surface. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that chemical surface modification using divalent cations (Ca and Sr) dramatically induces the regenerative M2 macrophage phenotype of J774.A1 cells in nanostructured Ti surfaces. In this study, divalent cation chemistry regulated the cell shape of adherent macrophages and markedly up-regulated M2 macrophage phenotype expression when combined with the nanostructured Ti surface. These results provide insight into the surface engineering of future Ti bone implants that are harmonized between the macrophage-governed early wound healing process and subsequent mesenchymal stem cell-centered osteogenesis function.

  2. Hierarchical surface code for network quantum computing with modules of arbitrary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2016-10-01

    The network paradigm for quantum computing involves interconnecting many modules to form a scalable machine. Typically it is assumed that the links between modules are prone to noise while operations within modules have a significantly higher fidelity. To optimize fault tolerance in such architectures we introduce a hierarchical generalization of the surface code: a small "patch" of the code exists within each module and constitutes a single effective qubit of the logic-level surface code. Errors primarily occur in a two-dimensional subspace, i.e., patch perimeters extruded over time, and the resulting noise threshold for intermodule links can exceed ˜10 % even in the absence of purification. Increasing the number of qubits within each module decreases the number of qubits necessary for encoding a logical qubit. But this advantage is relatively modest, and broadly speaking, a "fine-grained" network of small modules containing only about eight qubits is competitive in total qubit count versus a "course" network with modules containing many hundreds of qubits.

  3. Decadal modulation of global surface temperature by internal climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Aiguo; Fyfe, John C.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Dai, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernible warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations, which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyse observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called `hiatus' period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from those associated with GHG-induced warming or aerosol-induced cooling. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

  4. Study of the timing performance of the SKIROC2-CMS for the CMS HGCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Huiberts, Simon Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity phase of the LHC (starting operation in 2025) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity, with 25 ns bunch crossing intervals and up to 140 pileup events. In this context, the High Granularity Calorimeter will provide electromagnetic and hadronic energy measurement in the forward direction of the upgraded CMS. The test beam campaign of the first HGCal modules, started in Summer 2016 at CERN with 8 fully equipped layers of the EE section, will continue in Summer 2017 aiming at the test of a full prototype including the electronic and the hadronic parts. The assessment of the calorimeter performance on a beam test bench is a fundamental phase for the development of a new detector, allowing to test the mechanical structure and electronic chain, characterize the modules performance and measure the shower developments for electrons and hadrons. The aim of the work was to determine the timing performance and the timing characteristics of the single module tested in May 2...

  5. Enhancement of the Modulation Bandwidth for surface Plasmon coupled LEDs for Visible Light Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiehui; Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The modulation bandwidth of surface plasmon coupled GaN-based LEDs is increased by ~1.2 times to 434.5 MHz compared with normal LED by applying Ag nanoparticles. These findings will help for the industrialization of VLC system.......The modulation bandwidth of surface plasmon coupled GaN-based LEDs is increased by ~1.2 times to 434.5 MHz compared with normal LED by applying Ag nanoparticles. These findings will help for the industrialization of VLC system....

  6. High modulation bandwidth of a light-emitting diode with surface plasmon coupling (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Han; Tu, Charng-Gan; Yao, Yu-Feng; Chen, Sheng-Hung; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Hao-Tsung; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, Chih-Chung

    2017-02-01

    Besides lighting, LEDs can be used for indoor data transmission. Therefore, a large modulation bandwidth becomes an important target in the development of visible LED. In this regard, enhancing the radiative recombination rate of carriers in the quantum wells of an LED is a useful method since the modulation bandwidth of an LED is related to the carrier decay rate besides the device RC time constant To increase the carrier decay rate in an LED without sacrificing its output power, the technique of surface plasmon (SP) coupling in an LED is useful. In this paper, the increases of modulation bandwidth by reducing mesa size, decreasing active layer thickness, and inducing SP coupling in blue- and green-emitting LEDs are illustrated. The results are demonstrated by comparing three different LED surface structures, including bare p-type surface, GaZnO current spreading layer, and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) for inducing SP coupling. In a single-quantum-well, blue-emitting LED with a circular mesa of 10 microns in radius, SP coupling results in a modulation bandwidth of 528.8 MHz, which is believed to be the record-high level. A smaller RC time constant can lead to a higher modulation bandwidth. However, when the RC time constant is smaller than 0.2 ns, its effect on modulation bandwidth saturates. The dependencies of modulation bandwidth on injected current density and carrier decay time confirm that the modulation bandwidth is essentially inversely proportional to a time constant, which is inversely proportional to the square-root of carrier decay rate and injected current density.

  7. Debugging Data Transfers in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bagliesi, G; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bonacorsi, D; Fisk, I; Flix, J; Hernandez, J; D'Hondt, J; Kadastik, M; Klem, J; Kodolova, O; Kuo, C M; Letts, J; Maes, J; Magini, N; Metson, S; Piedra, J; Pukhaeva, N; Tuura, L; Sonajalg, S; Wu, Y; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Wurthwein, F

    2010-01-01

    The CMS experiment at CERN is preparing for LHC data taking in several computing preparation activities. In early 2007 a traffic load generator infrastructure for distributed data transfer tests called the LoadTest was designed and deployed to equip the WLCG sites that support CMS with a means for debugging, load-testing and commissioning data transfer routes among CMS computing centres. The LoadTest is based upon PhEDEx as a reliable, scalable data set replication system. The Debugging Data Transfers (DDT) task force was created to coordinate the debugging of the data transfer links. The task force aimed to commission most crucial transfer routes among CMS sites by designing and enforcing a clear procedure to debug problematic links. Such procedure aimed to move a link from a debugging phase in a separate and independent environment to a production environment when a set of agreed conditions are achieved for that link. The goal was to deliver one by one working transfer routes to the CMS data operations team...

  8. Performance and track-based alignment of the Phase-1 upgraded CMS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is a multi-purpose detector constructed in order to study high-energy particle collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The all-silicon design of the tracking system of the CMS experiment provided excellent resolution for charged tracks and an efficient tagging of jets during Run 1 and Run 2 of the LHC. After the pixel detector of the CMS experiment was upgraded and installed during the shutdown in the beginning of 2017, the positions and orientations of the tracker modules needed to be determined with a precision of several micrometers. The alignment also needs to be quickly recalculated each time the state of the CMS magnet is changed between 0 T and 3.8 T. The latest results of the CMS tracker performance in the 2017 run are presented, with a special focus on alignment and resolution performance using several million reconstructed tracks from cosmic rays and collision data.

  9. 3D Surface Configuration Modulated 2D Symmetry Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lok-Teng Sio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available To perceive a symmetric pattern, an observer needs to find correspondence between two image elements across the symmetric axis, implying an excitatory relationship between perceptual mechanisms responding to these elements. To perceive a 3D structure in a random dot stereogram (RDS, the perceptual mechanisms tuned to different disparities would inhibit each other. We investigated whether putting corresponding elements of a symmetric pattern in different depths would affect symmetry detection. The symmetry patterns consisted of dots (0.19degx0.19deg occupying .5% of the display. We measured the coherence threshold for detecting symmetric patterns rendered on 14 possible 3D structures that were produced by an RDS. The coherence threshold for symmetric patterns on a slant surface was similar to that on a frontoparallel plane even though in the former the depths of the two sides of the symmetric axis were different. The threshold increased dramatically when one side of the axis inclined toward the observer while the other side inclined away though the depth difference between the two sides was the same as that in the slant condition. The threshold reduced on a hinge configuration whose joint coincide with the symmetry axis. Our result suggests that co-planarity is a decisive factor for symmetry detection.

  10. Rectification is required to extract oscillatory envelope modulation from surface electromyographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Christopher J; Dalton, Brian H; Luu, Billy L; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    Rectification of surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings prior to their correlation with other signals is a widely used form of preprocessing. Recently this practice has come into question, elevating the subject of EMG rectification to a topic of much debate. Proponents for rectifying suggest it accentuates the EMG spike timing information, whereas opponents indicate it is unnecessary and its nonlinear distortion of data is potentially destructive. Here we examine the necessity of rectification on the extraction of muscle responses, but for the first time using a known oscillatory input to the muscle in the form of electrical vestibular stimulation. Participants were exposed to sinusoidal vestibular stimuli while surface and intramuscular EMG were recorded from the left medial gastrocnemius. We compared the unrectified and rectified surface EMG to single motor units to determine which method best identified stimulus-EMG coherence and phase at the single-motor unit level. Surface EMG modulation at the stimulus frequency was obvious in the unrectified surface EMG. However, this modulation was not identified by the fast Fourier transform, and therefore stimulus coherence with the unrectified EMG signal failed to capture this covariance. Both the rectified surface EMG and single motor units displayed significant coherence over the entire stimulus bandwidth (1-20 Hz). Furthermore, the stimulus-phase relationship for the rectified EMG and motor units shared a moderate correlation (r = 0.56). These data indicate that rectification of surface EMG is a necessary step to extract EMG envelope modulation due to motor unit entrainment to a known stimulus.

  11. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  12. The CMS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is one of the Large Hadron Collider multi-purpose experiments. Its large subsystems size sum up to around 6 million Detector Control System (DCS) channels to be supervised. A cluster of ~100 servers is needed to provide the required processing resources. To cope with such a size a scalable approach has been chosen factorizing the DCS system as much as possible. CMS DCS has made a clear division between its computing resources and functionality by creating a computing framework allowing for plugging in functional components. DCS components are developed by the subsystems expert groups while the computing infrastructure is developed centrally. To ease the component development task, a framework based on PVSSII [1] has been developed by the CERN Joint Controls Project [2] (JCOP). This paper describes the current status of CMS Detector Control System, giving an overview of the DCS computing infrastructure, the integration of DCS subsystem functional components an...

  13. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers: Advanced Modulation Formats and Coherent Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodes Lopez, Roberto

    transmission link with real-time demodulation. Furthermore, advanced modulation formats are considered in this thesis to expand the state-of-the-art in high-speed short-range data transmission system based on VCSELs. First, directly modulation of a VCSEL with a 4-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-4) signal......This thesis expands the state-of-the-art in coherent detection for optical fiber access networks employing vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as light sources. Bit rates up to 10 Gb/s over 25 km single-mode fibre (SMF) transmission distance have been achieved supporting a passive...... generation optical fiber access networks regarding long reach, high splitting ratio, no optical amplification, no external modulation, and use of a single fiber for upstream and downstream transmission. An important contribution of this thesis is the novel concept of chirpassisted coherent detection...

  14. 3-D surface profilometry based on modulation measurement by applying wavelet transform method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Chen, Feng; Xiao, Chao; Wei, Yongchao

    2017-01-01

    A new analysis of 3-D surface profilometry based on modulation measurement technique by the application of Wavelet Transform method is proposed. As a tool excelling for its multi-resolution and localization in the time and frequency domains, Wavelet Transform method with good localized time-frequency analysis ability and effective de-noizing capacity can extract the modulation distribution more accurately than Fourier Transform method. Especially for the analysis of complex object, more details of the measured object can be well remained. In this paper, the theoretical derivation of Wavelet Transform method that obtains the modulation values from a captured fringe pattern is given. Both computer simulation and elementary experiment are used to show the validity of the proposed method by making a comparison with the results of Fourier Transform method. The results show that the Wavelet Transform method has a better performance than the Fourier Transform method in modulation values retrieval.

  15. CMS upgrade and future plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoepfner Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CMS plans for operation at the LHC phase-II unprecedented in terms of luminosity thus resulting in serious consequences for detector performance. To achieve the goal to maintain the present excellent performance of the CMS detector, several upgrades are necessary. To handle the high phase-II data rates, the readout and trigger systems are redesigned using recent technology developments. The high particle rates will accelerate detector aging and require replacement of the tracker and forward calorimeters. In addition, the muon system will be extended.

  16. Maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules over non-isolated surface singularities and matrix problems

    CERN Document Server

    Burban, Igor

    2017-01-01

    In this article the authors develop a new method to deal with maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules over non-isolated surface singularities. In particular, they give a negative answer on an old question of Schreyer about surface singularities with only countably many indecomposable maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules. Next, the authors prove that the degenerate cusp singularities have tame Cohen-Macaulay representation type. The authors' approach is illustrated on the case of \\mathbb{k} x,y,z/(xyz) as well as several other rings. This study of maximal Cohen-Macaulay modules over non-isolated singularities leads to a new class of problems of linear algebra, which the authors call representations of decorated bunches of chains. They prove that these matrix problems have tame representation type and describe the underlying canonical forms.

  17. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser vapor sensor using swelling polymer reflection modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Dohn, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Vapor detection using a low-refractive index polymer for reflection modulation of the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated. The VCSEL sensor concept presents a simple method to detect the response of a sensor polymer in the presence of volatile organic...

  18. Content Management System (CMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Καλτουρουμίδης, Κυριάκος Ο.

    2012-01-01

    Ένα σύστημα διαχείρισης περιεχομένων (content management system - CMS) είναι η συλλογή των διαδικασιών με τις οποίες μπορεί να γίνει διαχείριση της ροής εργασιών σε ένα συνεργατικό περιβάλλον. Αυτές οι διαδικασίες θα πρέπει να επιτρέπουν σε πολλά άτομα να συμμετέχουν και να μοιράζονται αποθηκευμένα δεδομένα, να ελέγχεται η πρόσβαση στα δεδομένα με βάση τους ρόλους των χρηστών, να βοηθείται η εύκολη αποθήκευση και ανάκτηση των δεδομένων, να διευκολύνεται η σύνταξη εκθέσεων και η επικοινωνία με...

  19. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-4, Angle Measurement Instruments, Optical Projections and Surface Texture Gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This fourth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes the universal bevel protractor and the sine bar, the engineering microscope and optical projector, and several types of surface texture gages. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3)…

  20. Arrays of surface-normal electroabsorption modulators for the generation and signal processing of microwave photonics signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noharet, Bertrand; Wang, Qin; Platt, Duncan; Junique, Stéphane; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of an array of 16 surface-normal electroabsorption modulators operating at 1550nm is presented. The modulator array is dedicated to the generation and processing of microwave photonics signals, targeting a modulation bandwidth in excess of 5GHz. The hybrid integration of the

  1. JINR participation in the CMS project

    CERN Document Server

    Golutvin, I A

    2002-01-01

    The physics potential and the prospects of future experiments at the CMS detector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN are discussed. A status report is given on the research, development, and construction of the CMS endcap detectors for which JINR bears the full responsibility in the framework of the CMS collaboration. (7 refs).

  2. CMS 2012 data already exceed 2011 sample

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In just over two months of operations in 2012, CMS has recorded more data than in the 2011 run. As of the short technical stop starting 18 June, the LHC had delivered 6.65 fb−1 of collisions to CMS, of which CMS has recorded 6.15 fb−1, at an average efficiency of over 92%.

  3. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  4. CERN Open Days CMS Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Themes: 1) You are here (location P5, Cessy) 2) CERN 3) LHC 4) CMS Detector 5) Magnet 6) Subdetectors (Tracker, ECAL, HCAL, Muons) 7) Trigger and Data Acquisition 8) Collaboration 9) Site Geography 10) Construction 11) Lowering and Installation 12) Physics

  5. Machine Learning applications in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Machine Learning is used in many aspects of CMS data taking, monitoring, processing and analysis. We review a few of these use cases and the most recent developments, with an outlook to future applications in the LHC Run III and for the High-Luminosity phase.

  6. A productive year for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

      Some of the many results obtained by CMS since the start of data-taking in 2010. If you have any comments / suggestions please contact the editors: Marzena Lapka (marzena.lapka@cern.ch) and Achintya Rao (achintya.rao@cern.ch)

  7. CMS launches new educational tools

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    On 5 and 11 November, almost 90 pupils from the Fermi scientific high school in Livorno, Italy, took part in two Masterclass sessions organised by CMS.   CMS Masterclass participants.  The pupils took over a hall at CERN for an afternoon to test a new software tool called CIMA (CMS Instrument for Masterclass Analysis) for the first time. The software simplifies the process of recording results and reduces the number of steps required to enter data. During the exercise, each group of pupils had to analyse about a hundred events from the LHC. For each event, the budding physicists determined whether what they saw was a candidate W boson, Z boson or Higgs boson, identified the decay mode and entered key data. At the end of the analysis, they used the results to reconstruct a mass diagram. CIMA was developed by a team of scientists from the University of Aachen, Germany, the University of Notre-Dame, United States, and CERN. CMS has also added yet another educational tool to its already l...

  8. SUSY searches at the CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kazana, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Results of the 2015 early searches for supersymmetric particles obtained by the CMS experiment with 13\\,TeV data are reviewed.With an integrated luminosity of 2.2\\,fb$^{-1}$, limits on the gluino mass have been lifted up to higher values with respect to previous limits from 19.5\\,fb$^{-1}$ of 8\\,TeV data.

  9. Heavy flavor results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ronchese, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy flavor particles produced in LHC $pp$ collisions at $7, 8,$ and $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ constitute an excellent opportunity to test the standard model and probe for new physics effects. Recent results by the CMS Collaboration on heavy flavor production and decays are presented.

  10. Searches for supersymmetry at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: F. Giordano on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-15

    Among the most promising prospects for a theory of physics beyond the standard model is supersymmetry. In this talk, the latest results from the CMS experiment at the LHC on searches for supersymmetry produced through strong production and electroweak production channels are presented using 20/fb of data from the 8 TeV LHC run, with particular focus on gluino and stop searches.

  11. CMS the art of science

    CERN Document Server

    Hoch, Michael; Denegri, Daniel; Preece, Stephen; Storr, Mick

    2016-01-01

    The physicist as artist: Michael Hoch photographed the extraordinary science cabinet of wonders CMS (the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment) at CERN. With a foreword by François Englert, 2013 Nobel Laureate in Physics and co-discoverer of the Higgs boson.

  12. CMS - The Compact Muon Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

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Matveev, V; Kracikova, T; Shmatov, S; Vasilev, S; Kurenkov, A; Oleynik, D; Verkheev, A; Voytishin, N; Proskuryakov, A; Bogdanova, G; Petrova, E; Bagaturia, I; Tsamalaidze, Z; Fiori, F; Zhao, Z; Arcaro, D J; Barberis, E; Wamorkar, T; Wang, B; Ralph, D K; Velasco, M M; Anastassov, A I; Odell, N J; Sevova, S; Li, W; Merlo, J; Onel, Y; Mermerkaya, H; Moeller, A R; Haytmyradov, M; Dong, R; Bugg, W M; Ragghianti, G C; Delannoy sotomayor, A G; Thapa, K; Yagil, A; Gerosa, R A; Schmitz, E J; Kapustinsky, J S; Greene, S V; Zhang, L; Vlimant, J V; Mughal, A; Cury siqueira, S; Gershtein, Y; Arora, S R R; Lin, W X; Stickland, D P; Mc donald, K T; Pivarski, J M C; Higginbotham, S L; Rosenfield, M; Long, O R; Johnson, K F; Adams, T; Susa, T; Rykaczewski, H; Ge, Y; Liu, S; Li, J; Li, L; Bloom, K A; Monroy montanez, J A; Kunori, S; Wang, Z; Favart, D; Maltoni, F; Vidal marono, M; Francois, B A L; Delcourt, M; Markov, S I; Seez, C; Richards, A J; Ferguson, W; De wit, A M; Saoulidou, N; Chatziangelou, M; Karathanasis, G; Kontaxakis, P; Jones, J A; Strologas, J; Katsoulis, P; Dutt, S; Roy chowdhury, S; Bhardwaj, R; Purohit, A; Singh, B; Behera, P K; Spagnolo, P; Tonelli, G E; Fedi, G; Giannini, L; Poulios, S; Groote, J F; Untuc, B; Oztirpan, F O; Koseoglu, I; Luiggi lopez, E E; Krohn, M D; Hadley, N J; Shin, Y H; Safonov, A; Eusebi, R; Rose, A K; Erbacher, R D; Funk, G N; Pilot, J R; Klimenko, S; Matchev, K; Gleyzer, S; Wang, J; Bortignon, P; Curry, D A; Sun, W M; Soffi, L; Lantz, S R; Wright, D; Cline, D; Cousins jr, R D; Yang, X; Schnaible, C J; Dasgupta, A; Bradley, D C; Duric, S; Monzat, D; Dodd, L M; Tikalsky, J L; Kapusta, J; Gilbert, W J; Lesko, Z J; Marinelli, N; Wayne, M R; Heering, A H; Galanti, M; Han, J Y; Duh, Y; Roy, A; Arabgol, M; Hacker, T J; Salva, S; Petrov, V; Barychevski, V; Drobychev, G; Lobko, A; Conte, E R E; Kasprowicz, G H; Kyberd, P; Cole, J E; Reid, I D; Lopez, J M; Salazar gonzalez, C A; Benzon, A M; Pelagio, L; Walsh, M F; Carpinteyro bernardino, S; Postnov, A; Lelas, D; Vaitkus, J V; Jurciukonis, D; Bacevieius, G; Sulmanas, B; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, W; Jalil, S H; Kahl, W E; Taylor, D R; Choi, Y I; Roy, T; Guerrero ibarra, D F; Schoenenberger, M A; Khateri, P; Safarzadeh samani, B; Etesami, S M; Fiorini, E; Pullia, A; Magni, S; Fiorendi, S; Sanabria arenas, J C; Florez bustos, C A; Holguin coral, A; Mendez, H; Srimanobhas, N; Jaikar, A H; Arteche gonzalez, F J; Call, K R; Calderon monroy, M A; Bakhet, N; Aly mohamed mahmoud mohamed, R; Elkafrawy, T; Hammad, A H A; Abdelmaguid, A; Mal, P K; Yuan, L; Al kindi, A; Lomidze, I; Prangishvili, I; Adamov, G; Dube, S S; Dugad, S; Mohanty, G B; Bhat, M A; Bheesette, S; Abou kors, D J; Nakad, Z S

    CMS is a general purpose proton-proton detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the LHC. It is also well adapted for studies at the initially lower luminosities. The CMS Collaboration consists of over 1800 scientists and engineers from 151 institutes in 31 countries. The main design goals of CMS are: \\begin{enumerate} \\item a highly performant muon system, \\item the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter \\item high quality central tracking \\item hermetic calorimetry \\item a detector costing less than 475 MCHF. \\end{enumerate} All detector sub-systems have started construction. Engineering Design Reviews of parts of these sub-systems have been successfully carried-out. These are held prior to granting authorization for purchase. The schedule for the LHC machine and the experiments has been revised and CMS will be ready for first collisions now expected in April 2006. \\\\\\\\ ~~~~$\\bullet$ Magnet \\\\ The detector (see Figure) will be built around a long (13~m) and large bore ($\\phi$=5.9~m) high...

  13. Infrared beam-steering using acoustically modulated surface plasmons over a graphene monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Paiyen

    2014-09-01

    We model and design a graphene-based infrared beamformer based on the concept of leaky-wave (fast traveling wave) antennas. The excitation of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) over a \\'one-atom-thick\\' graphene monolayer is typically associated with intrinsically \\'slow light\\'. By modulating the graphene with elastic vibrations based on flexural waves, a dynamic diffraction grating can be formed on the graphene surface, converting propagating SPPs into fast surface waves, able to radiate directive infrared beams into the background medium. This scheme allows fast on-off switching of infrared emission and dynamic tuning of its radiation pattern, beam angle and frequency of operation, by simply varying the acoustic frequency that controls the effective grating period. We envision that this graphene beamformer may be integrated into reconfigurable transmitter/receiver modules, switches and detectors for THz and infrared wireless communication, sensing, imaging and actuation systems.

  14. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces HIPAA requirements to the extent warranted (as determined by CMS)...

  15. Link board for CMS RPC-production issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzuzi, K. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)], E-mail: Kukka.Banzuzi@oxinst.com; Iskanius, M.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vaeisaenen, V. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    This paper describes the work done in relation to putting a relatively high volume HEP readout electronics module into production. The main features of this fibre optic data transfer board designed for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector are described, concentrating on how the final implementation was arrived at. An automated production testing method is introduced, and results are given of its efficiency in finding faulty boards and localising the faults.

  16. Photo-thermal modulation of surface plasmon polariton propagation at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, S; Weeber, J-C; Zacharatos, F; Hassan, K; Bernardin, T; Cluzel, B; Fatome, J; Finot, C

    2013-09-23

    We report on photo-thermal modulation of thin film surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) excited at telecom wavelengths and traveling at a gold/air interface. By operating a modulated continuous-wave or a Q-switched nanosecond pump laser, we investigate the photo-thermally induced modulation of SPP propagation mediated by the temperature-dependent ohmic losses in the gold film. We use a fiber-to-fiber characterization set-up to measure accurately the modulation depth of the SPP signal under photo-thermal excitation. On the basis of these measurements, we extract the thermo-plasmonic coefficient of the SPP mode defined as the temperature derivative of the SPP damping constant. Next, we introduce a figure of merit which is relevant to characterize the impact of temperature onto the properties of bounded or weakly leaky SPP modes supported by a given metal at a given wavelength. By combining our measurements with tabulated values of the temperature-dependent imaginary part of gold dielectric function, we compute the thermo-optical coefficients (TOC) of gold at telecom wavelengths. Finally, we investigate a pulsed photo-thermal excitation of the SPP in the nanosecond regime. The experimental SPP depth of modulation obtained in this situation are found to be in fair agreement with the modulation depths computed by using our values of gold TOC.

  17. Modeling Regional-Scale Sediment Transport and Medium-Term Morphology Change at a Dual-Inlet System Examined with the Coastal Modeling System (CMS): A Case Study at Johns Pass and Blind Pass, West-Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and 2008. The bathymetry surveys were conducted using a synchronized, precision echo sounder and RTK - GPS (Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning...integrate hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and morphology change through the coupling of two modules , CMS- Flow and CMS-Wave. CMS-Flow solves depth

  18. Flexible custom designs for CMS DAQ

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, Roberta; Boyer, Vincent; Brett, Angela Mary; Cano, Eric; Carboni, Andrea; Ciganek, Marek; Cittolin, Sergio; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gulmini, Michele; Gutleber, Johannes; Jacobs, Claude; Maron, Gaetano; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Murray, Steven John; Oh, Alexander; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Pieri, Marco; Pollet, Lucien; Racz, Attila; Sakulin, Hannes; Schwick, Christoph; Sumorok, Konstanty; Suzuki, Ichiro; Tsirigkas, Dimitrios; Varela, Joao

    2006-01-01

    The CMS central DAQ system is built using commercial hardware (PCs and networking equipment), except for two components: the Front-end Readout Link (FRL) and the Fast Merger Module (FMM). The FRL interfaces the sub-detector specific front-end electronics to the central DAQ system in a uniform way. The FRL is a compact-PCI module with an additional PCI 64bit connector to host a Network Interface Card (NIC). On the sub-detector side, the data are written to the link using a FIFO-like protocol (SLINK64). The link uses the Low Voltage Differential Signal (LVDS) technology to transfer data with a throughput of up to 400 MBytes/s. The FMM modules collect status signals from the front-end electronics of the sub-detectors, merge and monitor them and provide the resulting signals with low latency to the first level trigger electronics. In particular, the throttling signals allow the trigger to avoid buffer overflows and data corruption in the front-end electronics when the data produced in the front-end exceeds the c...

  19. Modulating contact angle hysteresis to direct fluid droplets along a homogenous surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingxiang; Gupta, Rohini; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-02-01

    The shape and motion of drops on surfaces is governed by the balance between the driving and the pinning forces. Here we demonstrate control over the motion of droplets on an inclined surface by exerting control over the contact angle hysteresis. The external modulation of contact angle hysteresis is achieved through a voltage-induced local molecular reorganization within the surface film at the solid-liquid interface. We show that tuning contact angle hysteresis alone is sufficient to direct and deform drops when subjected to a constant external driving force, here gravity, in the absence of a pre-defined surface energy gradient or pattern. We also show that the observed stretching and contraction of the drops mimic the motion of an inchworm. Such reversible manipulation of the pinning forces could be an attractive means to direct drops, especially with the dominance of surface forces at micro-/nanoscale.

  20. A computer module used to calculate the horizontal control surface size of a conceptual aircraft design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01

    The creation of a computer module used to calculate the size of the horizontal control surfaces of a conceptual aircraft design is discussed. The control surface size is determined by first calculating the size needed to rotate the aircraft during takeoff, and, second, by determining if the calculated size is large enough to maintain stability of the aircraft throughout any specified mission. The tail size needed to rotate during takeoff is calculated from a summation of forces about the main landing gear of the aircraft. The stability of the aircraft is determined from a summation of forces about the center of gravity during different phases of the aircraft's flight. Included in the horizontal control surface analysis are: downwash effects on an aft tail, upwash effects on a forward canard, and effects due to flight in close proximity to the ground. Comparisons of production aircraft with numerical models show good accuracy for control surface sizing. A modified canard design verified the accuracy of the module for canard configurations. Added to this stability and control module is a subroutine that determines one of the three design variables, for a stable vectored thrust aircraft. These include forward thrust nozzle position, aft thrust nozzle angle, and forward thrust split.

  1. The CMS High Level Trigger System: Experience and Future Development

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Bowen, Matthew; Branson, James G; Bukowiec, Sebastian; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa, J A; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Flossdorf, Alexander; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, R; Hartl, Christian; Hegeman, Jeroen; Holzner, André; Y L Hwong; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, R K; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Polese, Giovanni; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Shpakov, Dennis; Simon, M; Spataru, A C; Sumorok, Konstanty

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC features a two-level trigger system. Events accepted by the first level trigger, at a maximum rate of 100 kHz, are read out by the Data Acquisition system (DAQ), and subsequently assembled in memory in a farm of computers running a software high-level trigger (HLT), which selects interesting events for offline storage and analysis at a rate of order few hundred Hz. The HLT algorithms consist of sequences of offline-style reconstruction and filtering modules, executed on a farm of 0(10000) CPU cores built from commodity hardware. Experience from the operation of the HLT system in the collider run 2010/2011 is reported. The current architecture of the CMS HLT, its integration with the CMS reconstruction framework and the CMS DAQ, are discussed in the light of future development. The possible short- and medium-term evolution of the HLT software infrastructure to support extensions of the HLT computing power, and to address remaining performance and maintenance issues, are discussed.

  2. Surface supersaturation in flow-rate modulation epitaxy of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Tetsuya; Lin, Chia-Hung; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kumakura, Kazuhide

    2017-06-01

    Hillocks on N-face GaN (000 1 bar) films are effectively eliminated by group-III-source flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME), wherein the flow-rate of group-III sources are sequentially modulated under a constant supply of NH3. A hillock-free smooth surface obtained by group-III-source FME is attributed to the enhancement of step-flow growth. We found that a hillock originates from a micropipe and grows by spiral growth around the micropipe. The spiral growth rate rapidly decreases with decreasing the degree of surface supersaturation σ, while the step-flow growth rate decreases linearly. For group-III-source FME, wherein σ is lower than conventional continuous growth, the spiral growth rate could be lower than the step-flow growth one so that the formation of hillocks is suppressed.

  3. Effects of Photovoltaic Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-06-14

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 orders of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  4. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  5. Ultra-high modulation depth exceeding 2,400% in optically controlled topological surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sangwan; Jang, Houk; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Moon, Jisoo; Sung, Ji Ho; Park, Jun; Cha, Soonyoung; Oh, Seongshik; Jo, Moon-Ho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2015-10-30

    Modulating light via coherent charge oscillations in solids is the subject of intense research topics in opto-plasmonics. Although a variety of methods are proposed to increase such modulation efficiency, one central challenge is to achieve a high modulation depth (defined by a ratio of extinction with/without light) under small photon-flux injection, which becomes a fundamental trade-off issue both in metals and semiconductors. Here, by fabricating simple micro-ribbon arrays of topological insulator Bi2Se3, we report an unprecedentedly large modulation depth of 2,400% at 1.5 THz with very low optical fluence of 45 μJ cm(-2). This was possible, first because the extinction spectrum is nearly zero due to the Fano-like plasmon-phonon-destructive interference, thereby contributing an extremely small denominator to the extinction ratio. Second, the numerator of the extinction ratio is markedly increased due to the photoinduced formation of massive two-dimensional electron gas below the topological surface states, which is another contributor to the ultra-high modulation depth.

  6. Ultrasound neuro-modulation chip: activation of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans by surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Kaiyue; Huang, Bin; Niu, Lili; Li, Fei; Cai, Feiyan; Chen, Yan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Hankui; Kang, Lijun; Meng, Long; Zheng, Hairong

    2017-05-16

    Ultrasound neuro-modulation has gained increasing attention as a non-invasive method. In this paper, we present an ultrasound neuro-modulation chip, capable of initiating reversal behaviour and activating neurons of C. elegans under the stimulation of a single-shot, short-pulsed ultrasound. About 85.29% ± 6.17% of worms respond to the ultrasound stimulation exhibiting reversal behaviour. Furthermore, the worms can adapt to the ultrasound stimulation with a lower acoustic pulse duration of stimulation. In vivo calcium imaging shows that the activity of ASH, a polymodal sensory neuron in C. elegans, can be directly evoked by the ultrasound stimulation. On the other hand, AFD, a thermal sensitive neuron, cannot be activated by the ultrasound stimulation using the same parameter and the temperature elevation during the stimulation process is relatively small. Consistent with the calcium imaging results, the tax-4 mutants, which are insensitive to temperature increase, do not show a significant difference in avoidance probability compared to the wild type. Therefore, the mechanical effects induced by ultrasound are the main reason for neural and behavioural modulation of C. elegans. With the advantages of confined acoustic energy on the surface, compatible with standard calcium imaging, this neuro-modulation chip could be a powerful tool for revealing the molecular mechanisms of ultrasound neuro-modulation.

  7. Can large scale surface circulation changes modulate the sea surface warming pattern in the Tropical Indian Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2016-06-01

    The increased rate of Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) surface warming has gained a lot of attention in the recent years mainly due to its regional climatic impacts. The processes associated with this increased surface warming is highly complex and none of the mechanisms in the past studies could comprehend the important features associated with this warming such as the negative trends in surface net heat fluxes and the decreasing temperature trends at thermocline level. In this work we studied a previously unexplored aspect, the changes in large scale surface circulation pattern modulating the surface warming pattern over TIO. We use ocean reanalysis datasets and a suit of Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) experiments to address this problem. Both reanalysis and OGCM reveal strengthening large scale surface circulation pattern in the recent years. The most striking feature is the intensification of cyclonic gyre circulation around the thermocline ridge in the southwestern TIO. The surface circulation change in TIO is mainly associated with the surface wind changes and the geostrophic response to sea surface height decrease in the western/southwestern TIO. The surface wind trends closely correspond to SST warming pattern. The strengthening mean westerlies over the equatorial region are conducive to convergence in the central and divergence in the western equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) resulting central warming and western cooling. The resulting east west SST gradient further enhances the equatorial westerlies. This positive feedback mechanism supports strengthening of the observed SST trends in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The cooling induced by the enhanced upwelling in the west is compensated to a large extent by warming due to reduction in mixed layer depth, thereby keeping the surface temperature trends in the west to weak positive values. The OGCM experiments showed that the wind induced circulation changes redistribute the excess heat received in the western

  8. Comparison of root water uptake modules using either the surface energy balance or potential transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Isabelle; Varado, Noémie; Olioso, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Numerical models simulating changes in soil water content with time rely on accurate estimation of root water uptake. This paper considers two root water uptake modules that have a compensation mechanism allowing for increased root uptake under conditions of water stress. These modules, proposed by Lai and Katul and Li et al. [Adv. Water Resour. 23 (2000) 427 and J. Hydrol. 252 (2001) 189] use potential transpiration weighted, for each soil layer, by a water stress and a compensation function in order to estimate actual transpiration. The first objective of the paper was to assess the accuracy of the proposed root extraction modules against two existing data sets, acquired under dry conditions for a winter wheat and a soybean crop. In order to perform a fair comparison, both modules were included as possible root water extraction modules within the Simple Soil Plant Atmosphere Transfer (SiSPAT) model. In this first set of simulations, actual transpiration was calculated using the solution of the surface energy budget as implemented in the SiSPAT model. Under such conditions, both root extraction modules were able to reproduce accurately the time evolution of soil moisture at various depths, soil water storage and daily evaporation. Results were generally improved when we activated the compensation mechanisms. However, we showed that Lai and Katul [Adv. Water Resour. 23 (2000) 427] module was sensitive to soil hydraulic properties through its water stress function, whereas the Li et al. [J. Hydrol. 252 (2001) 189] module was not very sensitive to the specification of its parameter. The latter module is therefore recommended for inclusion into a larger scale hydrological model, due to its robustness. When water balance models are run at larger scales or on areas with scarce data, actual transpiration is often calculated using models based on potential transpiration without solving the surface energy balance. The second objective of the paper was to assess the loss of

  9. Active fibre optic splitter for the CMS RPC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzuzi, Kukka [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2, FIN-00014 (Finland)]. E-mail: Kukka.Banzuzi@oxinst.fi; Iskanius, Matti [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O, Box 20, Lapprenranta, FIN-53851 (Finland); Karjalainen, Ahti [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O, Box 20, Lapprenranta, FIN-53851 (Finland); Tuuva, Tuure [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O, Box 20, Lapprenranta, FIN-53851 (Finland)

    2006-09-15

    An electronics module has been designed and tested for the CMS RPC detector readout. The module consists of twelve sub-blocks, each of which receives an optical signal at 1.6 GHz, converts it into electronic form for the splitting process and sends it forth to two or four destinations in optical form. It is a critical part in the trigger system of the experiment. Details of the design are presented, as well as test results confirming that the splitter fulfils all system requirements.

  10. CMS software deployment on OSG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B; Avery, P [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Thomas, M [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wuerthwein, F [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: bockjoo@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: thomas@hep.caltech.edu, E-mail: avery@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: fkw@fnal.gov

    2008-07-15

    A set of software deployment tools has been developed for the installation, verification, and removal of a CMS software release. The tools that are mainly targeted for the deployment on the OSG have the features of instant release deployment, corrective resubmission of the initial installation job, and an independent web-based deployment portal with Grid security infrastructure login mechanism. We have been deploying over 500 installations and found the tools are reliable and adaptable to cope with problems with changes in the Grid computing environment and the software releases. We present the design of the tools, statistics that we gathered during the operation of the tools, and our experience with the CMS software deployment on the OSG Grid computing environment.

  11. HGCal Simulation Analyses for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Sarah Marie

    2015-01-01

    This summer, I approached the topic of fast-timing detection of photons from Higgs decays via simulation analyses, working under the supervision of Dr. Adolf Bornheim of the California Institute of Technology. My specific project focused on simulating the high granularity calorimeter for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. CMS detects particles using calorimeters. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal) is arranged cylindrically to form a barrel section and two “endcaps.” Previously, both the barrel and endcap have employed lead tungstate crystal detectors, known as the “shashlik” design. The crystal detectors, however, rapidly degrade from exposure to radiation. This effect is most pronounced in the endcaps. To avoid the high expense of frequently replacing degraded detectors, it was recently decided to eliminate the endcap crystals in favor of an arrangement of silicon detectors known as the “High Granularity Calorimeter” (HGCal), while leaving the barrel detector technology unchanged. T...

  12. Moment of truth for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    One of the first events reconstructed in the Muon Drift Tubes, the Hadron Calorimeter and elements of the Silicon Tracker (TK) at 3 Tesla. The atmosphere in the CMS control rooms was electric. Everbody was at the helm for the first full-scale testing of the experiment. This was a crunch moment for the entire collaboration. On Tuesday, 22 August the magnet attained almost its nominal power of 4 Tesla! At the same moment, in a tiny improvised control room, the physicists were keyed up to test the entire detector system for the first time. The first cosmic ray tracks appeared on their screens in the week of 15 August. The tests are set to continue for several weeks more until the first CMS components are lowered into their final positions in the cavern.

  13. DeepFlavour in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Flavour-tagging of jets is an important task in collider based high energy physics and a field where machine learning tools are applied by all major experiments. A new tagger (DeepFlavour) was developed and commissioned in CMS that is based on an advanced machine learning procedure. A deep neural network is used to do multi-classification of jets that origin from a b-quark, two b-quarks, a c-quark, two c-quarks or light colored particles (u, d, s-quark or gluon). The performance was measured in both, data and simulation. The talk will also include the measured performance of all taggers in CMS. The different taggers and results will be discussed and compared with some focus on details of the newest tagger.

  14. Track Reconstruction Performance in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurri, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The expected performance of track reconstruction with LHC events using the CMS silicon tracker is presented. Track finding and fitting is accomplished with Kalman Filter techniques that achieve efficiencies above 99\\% on single muons with $p_T >$1~GeV/c. Difficulties arise in the context of standard LHC events with a high density of charged particles, where the rate of fake combinatorial tracks is very large for low $p_T$ tracks, and nuclear interactions in the tracker material reduce the tracking efficiency for charged hadrons. Recent improvements with the CMS track reconstruction now allow to efficiently reconstruct charged tracks with $p_T$ down to few hundred MeV/c and as few as three crossed layers, with a very small fake fraction, by making use of an optimal rejection of fake tracks in conjunction with an iterative tracking procedure.

  15. H->cc at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Ammara; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV was an extraordinary event for the CMS experiment and for particle physics as a whole. But to check whether this Higgs is the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson or not depends on one of its fundamental properties i.e. it’s coupling to fermions. The sensitivity of Higgs decay to the fermionic final states (H->tau anti-tau, H->bottom anti-bottom) is still limited. Furthermore, the sensitivity to the coupling of the Higgs boson to fermions of the second generation is even smaller. Recently, significant developments have been made within the CMS Collaboration in the development of charm tagging. These improvements, together with the increased dataset available in LHC Run-2, will enhance significantly the sensitivity to the H->cc coupling. In this report I study the decay of Higgs to charm anti charm quark pair.

  16. Heavy Ion Physics in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G; Chatrchyan, Serguei; Contardo, Didier; Damgov, Jordan; De Min, Alberto; Denegri, Daniel; Drapier, Olivier; Geist, Walter; Genchev, Vladimir; Haroutunian, Roger; Hayrapetyan, M G; Hencken, K; Jenkovszky, L L; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Kharlov, Yuri; Kodolova, Olga; Kotlinski, Danek; Kruglov, Nikolai A; Kva, R

    2000-01-01

    This note summarizes the CMS potential for Heavy Ions Collisions studies. The main physics topic is the study of Y to muon pair decays in view of Y family supression studies, with a detailed discussion of muon reconstruction efficiencies and purities in conditions of central Pb-Pb collisions. We also discuss energy flow and impact parameter measurements, the observability of continuum muon pairs and of Z to mu + mu decays, and of jets and hard direct photons as a means to study jet quenching. We also discuss pA interactions as well as gamma-gamma physics. The instrumental specificities of CMS for heavy ion running are discussed, including trigger and data acquisition aspects.

  17. Laser modulated scattering as a nondestructive evaluation tool for optical surfaces and thin film coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feit, M D; Kozlowski, M R; Rubenchik, A M; Sheehan, L; Wu, Z L

    1999-12-22

    Laser modulated scattering (LMS) is introduced as a non-destructive evaluation tool for defect inspection and characterization of optical surfaces and thin film coatings. This technique is a scatter sensitive version of the well-known photothermal microscopy (PTM) technique. It allows simultaneous measurement of the DC and AC scattering signals of a probe laser beam from an optical surface. By comparison between the DC and AC scattering signals, one can differentiate absorptive defects from non-absorptive ones. This paper describes the principle of the LMS technique and the experimental setup, and illustrates examples on using LMS as a tool for nondestructive evaluation of high quality optics.

  18. Grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance in conical mounting with polarization modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, G; Romanato, F

    2012-07-01

    A grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GCSPR) technique based on polarization modulation in conical mounting is presented. A metallic grating is azimuthally rotated to support double-surface plasmon polariton excitation and exploit the consequent sensitivity enhancement. Corresponding to the resonance polar angle, a polarization scan of incident light is performed, and reflectivity data are collected before and after functionalization with a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. The output signal exhibits a harmonic dependence on polarization, and the phase term is used as a parameter for sensing. This technique offers the possibility of designing extremely compact, fast, and cheap high-resolution plasmonic sensors based on GCSPR.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of the adsorption of a fibronectin module on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2004-04-13

    We report atomistic simulations of the adsorption of a fibronectin type I module on a hydrophobic graphite surface. This module comprises only beta-sheets, unlike the albumin fragments previously investigated by us which contained only alpha-helices (Raffaini, G.; Ganazzoli, F. Langmuir 2003, 19, 3403-3412). As done in the latter case, most simulations are carried out in an effective dielectric medium by energy minimizations and molecular dynamics (MD). Further optimizations and MD runs in the explicit presence of water are also performed to assess the stability of the geometries found and to describe the solvation of the adsorbed fibronectin module. The initial adsorption is accompanied by local rearrangements of the strands in contact with the surface, but the overall molecular structure is largely preserved. Much larger rearrangements take place at longer times as found through the MD runs, with the molecule spreading as much as possible so as to maximize the surface coverage, hence the interaction energy, despite a significant strain energy. Energetic aspects of adsorption together with the concomitant size change are discussed in comparison with our previous results for two albumin fragments.

  20. A constant compliance force modulation technique for scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging of polymer surface elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, E.W.; Pungor, A/

    2012-01-01

    A new method of force modulation scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging based on a constant compliance feedback loop is presented. The feedback adjusts the loading force applied by the SFM tip to the surface in order to maintain a constant compliance beneath the tip. The new method, constant compliance force modulation (CCFM), has the advantage of being able to quantify the loading force exerted by the tip onto the sample surface and thus to estimate the elastic modulus of the material probed by the SFM tip. Once the elastic modulus of one region is known, the elastic moduli of other surface regions can be estimated from the spatial map of loading forces using the Hertz model of deformation. Force vs. displacement measurements made on one surface locality could also be used to estimate the local modulus. Several model surfaces, including a rubber-toughened epoxy polymer blend which showed clearly resolved compliant rubber phases within the harder epoxy matrix, were analyzed with the CCFM technique to illustrate the method’s application. PMID:9195751

  1. Fabricating micro embossments on the metal surface through spatially modulating laser-induced shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y. X.; Xuan, T.; Lian, Z. C.; Hua, X. J.; Fu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose one improved method to fabricate micro embossments on the metal surface through laser shock processing. One mapping layer with holes must be actively designed and produced on the metal surface, with which, laser-induced shock wave will be spatially modulated. Laser shock experiments were conducted. Then the surface morphologies, and metallographic microstructures were characterized. The forming process of the micro embossments was simulated with ABAQUS. The results show that under the spatially modulated shock loading, the surface material flows from the high-pressure zone to the low-pressure zone, which is responsible for forming the micro embossments. The shapes, sizes and arrangements of the micro embossments conform to those of the mapping holes. The hardnesses on the entire laser-shocked zones improve remarkably due to the plastic deformation at a high strain rate. The influences of the laser energy and mask pattern on the embossed structures are presented. Within certain limits, increasing laser energy is beneficial for making the embossment more convex. However, further excessively increasing the laser energy, the embossment will exhibit the height saturation due to the pressure rise within the closed mapping hole. The transverse sizes of the mapping holes also can influence the embossment heights significantly. Process parameters need to be chosen carefully to suppress the severe adiabatic compression of the gas within the mapping holes, and then avoid weakening the mechanical properties of the micro embossments. This method has a potential application in manufacturing protruded structures on the metal surface.

  2. Non-Contact Surface Roughness Measurement by Implementation of a Spatial Light Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Aulbach

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface structure, especially the roughness, has a significant influence on numerous parameters, such as friction and wear, and therefore estimates the quality of technical systems. In the last decades, a broad variety of surface roughness measurement methods were developed. A destructive measurement procedure or the lack of feasibility of online monitoring are the crucial drawbacks of most of these methods. This article proposes a new non-contact method for measuring the surface roughness that is straightforward to implement and easy to extend to online monitoring processes. The key element is a liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulator, integrated in an interferometric setup. By varying the imprinted phase of the modulator, a correlation between the imprinted phase and the fringe visibility of an interferogram is measured, and the surface roughness can be derived. This paper presents the theoretical approach of the method and first simulation and experimental results for a set of surface roughnesses. The experimental results are compared with values obtained by an atomic force microscope and a stylus profiler.

  3. Dark matter searches with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The existence of dark matter, indicated by astronomical observations, is one of the main proofs of physics beyond the standard model. Despite its abundance, dark matter has not been directly observed yet. This talk presents several searches for dark matter production in proton-proton collisions at 7, 8, and 13 TeV at the LHC, performed by the CMS collaboration. They are interpreted in terms of simplified models with different structures and mediators, as well as generic effective theory terms.

  4. Exotic Meson Searches at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgut, Suleyman; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Exotic meson spectroscopy searches at the LHC yielded interesting results. Using an integrated luminosity of 25 . 6fb-1 recorded in proton-proton collisions at √{ 7} TeV and √{ 8} TeV, CMS searched for enhancements in multi-lepton final states in the mass range below the ϒ(1 S) ϒ(1 S) mass. Results will be presented and discussed.

  5. Double parton scattering in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sunar Cerci, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Recent results on the double parton scattering measurements performed using the proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS detector are presented. The observables, which are sensitive to double parton scattering, are investigated after being corrected for detector effects and selection efficiencies. Multivariate analysis techniques are used for increasing the sensitivity. The effective cross section, $\\sigma_{eff}$ is also extracted using different processes at various center-of-mass energies.

  6. Exotic quarkonium states at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Cristella, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Using large data samples of di-muon events, CMS has performed detailed measurements and searches for new states in the field of exotic quarkonia. We report on measurements of the charmonium X(3872), and search for its counterpart in the bottomonium sector. The investigation of the B+ to J/psi phi K+ decay reveals two structures in the J/psi phi mass spectrum. For the one closest to the kinematical threshold, and compatible with the Y(4140) state by CDF, a few explanations have been suggested such as a tetraquark partner of the X(3872), a molecular partner of the Y(3940) or a charmonium hybrid. Charged Z charmonium-like states are particularly interesting as candidates for tetra-quark states. Results from CMS are foreseen to be provided by applying a full amplitude analysis method to the neutral B meson 3-body decays into J/psi(or psi(2S)) Kaon Pion. Searches for tetraquarks are also performed in CMS in the multi-lepton final states including J/psi and Y.

  7. Physics with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D

    2009-01-01

    The CMS detector is a powerful instrument that was designed to discover physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). CMS plan to begin in 2009 by\\rediscovering" the SM. At lowest luminosity the underlying event and zero bias event will be measured. Next, jets at low Pt will be recorded and the spectra of Pt, mass, and scattering angle will be validated, both for dijets and photon + jet topologies, conrming the strong and EM sector of the SM. Since at the LHC the W cross section is 100 nb, early data on the W and Z cross section, W charge asymmetry, Z mass and width and Z decay asymmetry will serve to conrm the electroweak SM. Finally, the top cross section of 1 nb will provide a \\standard candle" for b jets, leptons and missing transverse energy (MET) all of which are crucial elements in searches beyond the SM. With this foundation, CMS will search for SUSY, extra dimensions and other signals of new Physics beyond the SM, some of which will be accessible in the data taken in 2009

  8. The CMS integration grid testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  9. Upgrade of the CMS Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Katja

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the Tracker of the CMS experiment, comprising of a pixel and a strip detector, has so far been excellent, as reflected in the wealth of beautiful physics results from CMS. However, the foreseen increases of both the instantaneous and the integrated luminosity by the LHC during the next ten years will necessitate a stepwise upgrade of the CMS tracking detector. \\\\ In the extended end-of-year shutdown 2016/17 the pixel detector will be exchanged. The new device is designed for an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\cdot 10^{34}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and an integrated luminosity of 500\\,fb$^{-1}$. The number of layers will be increased from three to four in the barrel part and from two to three in the end caps, thus providing four-hit coverage over the full pseudorapidity range. A smaller beampipe allows the reduction of the radius of the innermost layer, improving the tracking performance. Further improvements include a new readout chip, reduction of material, and the installation of more effi...

  10. The CMS Integration Grid Testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, G E; Aziz, Shafqat; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Ernst, Michael; Kaiser, Joseph; Ratnikova, Natalia; Wenzel, Hans; Wu, Yu-jun; Aslakson, Erik; Bunn, Julian; Iqbal, Saima; Legrand, Iosif; Newman, Harvey; Singh, Suresh; Steenberg, Conrad; Branson, James; Fisk, Ian; Letts, James; Arbree, Adam; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cavanaugh, Richard; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Kategari, Suchindra; Couvares, Peter; DeSmet, Alan; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Tannenbaum, Todd; Graham, Gregory E.; Aziz, Shafqat; Ernst, Michael; Kaiser, Joseph; Ratnikova, Natalia; Wenzel, Hans; Wu, Yujun; Aslakson, Erik; Bunn, Julian; Iqbal, Saima; Legrand, Iosif; Newman, Harvey; Singh, Suresh; Steenberg, Conrad; Branson, James; Fisk, Ian; Letts, James; Arbree, Adam; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cavanaugh, Richard; Rodriguez, Jorge; Kategari, Suchindra; Couvares, Peter; Smet, Alan De; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Tannenbaum, Todd

    2003-01-01

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distrib ution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuo us two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. ...

  11. REKAYASA CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMS JOOMLA BERBASIS OPEN SOURCE UNTUK PENGEMBANGAN SISTEM INFORMASI BERBASIS ONLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Iqbal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pada umumnya  para pengguna CMS Joomla dalam  membuat  website  hanya menggunakan fitur-fitur standar (seperti  sistem  konten,  web links, contact forms yang ada pada CMS Joomla tanpa melakukan pengembangan dari fitur-fitur tersebut. Hal  ini  akan  menjadi  suatu masalah  jika fitur yang diinginkan  belum  terdapat  pada CMS Joomla. Saat ini banyak pengembang web yang cenderung menggunakan CMS karena kemudahannya. Hal  ini  juga  memungkinkan  pengembangan  CMS untuk sistem  informasi  berbasis online, namun  belum  ada pengembang CMS yang menyediakan komponen atau fitur sistem informasi berbasis online. Sehingga tujuan penelitian  ini  adalah pengembangan  CMS yang difokuskan  dalam  hal  penambahan fitur berupa component dan module sistem informasi online.

  12. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapernick, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dixon, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werner, James [INL; Qualls, Louis [ORNL; Radel, Ross [SNL

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO{sub 2}-fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  13. Redox regulation of sperm surface thiols modulates adhesion to the fallopian tube epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talevi, Riccardo; Zagami, Maria; Castaldo, Marianna; Gualtieri, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Sperm that adhere to the fallopian tube epithelium are of superior quality and adhesion extends their fertile life. It has been postulated that periovulatory signals, as yet undefined, promote sperm release. In the in vitro studies described here, we examined the effects of several antioxidants, reportedly present within oviductal fluid, on the modulation of sperm-oviduct adhesion in bovine species. Results showed that 1) the cell-permeant thiols (penicillamine, beta mercaptoethanol, cysteine, and dithiotreitol), as well as the nonpermeant thiol, reduced glutathione, cause adhering spermatozoa to release from the epithelium; 2) thiol action is exerted on spermatozoa; and 3) oxidized glutathione, as well as the non-thiol antioxidants (dimethylthiourea, trolox, superoxide dismutase, and catalase) have no effect. Sperm surface sulfhydryls labeled with iodoacetamide fluorescein showed that spermatozoa devoid of sulfhydryls on the head surface adhered to the fallopian epithelium in vitro, whereas thiol-induced release increased the exposure of sulfhydryls on the sperm head surface. Finally, analysis of capacitation status demonstrated that uncapacitated spermatozoa adhered to the oviduct, and that thiol-induced release of spermatozoa was accompanied by capacitation. In conclusion, thiol-reducing agents in the oviductal fluid may modulate the redox status of sperm surface proteins, leading to the release of spermatozoa selected and stored through adhesion to the fallopian tube epithelium in the bovine species.

  14. Readout electronics and test bench for the CMS Phase I pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Del Burgo, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The present CMS pixel detector will be replaced with an upgraded pixel system during the LHC extended technical stop in winter 2016/2017. The CMS Phase 1 pixel upgrade combines a new pixel readout chip, which minimizes detection inefficiencies, with several other design improvements to maintain the excellent tracking performance of CMS at the higher luminosity conditions foreseen for the coming years. The upgraded detector features new readout electronics which require detailed evaluation. For this purpose a test stand has been setup, including a slice of the CMS pixel DAQ system, all components of the upgraded readout chain together with a number of detector modules. The test stand allows for detailed evaluation and verification of all detector components, and is also crucial to develop tests and procedures to be used during the detector assembly and the commissioning and calibration of the detector. In this talk the system test and its functionalities will be described with a focus on the tests performed fo...

  15. Modulation of graft architectures for enhancing hydrophobic interaction of biomolecules with thermoresponsive polymer-grafted surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, Naokazu; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Jun; Sakai, Kiyotaka; Okano, Teruo

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the effects of graft architecture of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) brush surfaces on thermoresponsive aqueous wettability changes and the temperature-dependent hydrophobic interaction of steroids in silica capillaries (I.D.: 50 μm). PIPAAm brushes were grafted onto glass substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) that is one of the living radical polymerization techniques. Increases in the graft density and chain length of PIPAAm brushes increased the hydration of polymer brushes, resulting in the increased hydrophilic properties of the surface below the transition temperature of PIPAAm at 32 °C. More hydrophobic surface properties were also observed on surfaces modified with the block copolymers of IPAAm and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) than that with IPAAm homopolymer-grafted surfaces over the transition temperature. Using PBMA-b-PIPAAm-grafted silica capillaries, the baseline separation of steroids was successfully achieved by only changing temperature. The incorporation of hydrophobic PBMA chains in grafted PIPAAm enhanced the hydrophobic interaction with testosterone above the transition temperature. The surface modification of hydrophobicity-enhanced thermoresponsive polymers is a promising method for the preparation of thermoresponsive biointerfaces that can effectively modulated their biomolecule and cell adsorption with the wide dynamic range of hydrophilic/hydrophobic property change across the transition temperature.

  16. A Time-Multiplexed Track-Trigger architecture for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Geoffrey; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Rose, A

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Tracker under development for the High Luminosity LHC includes an outer tracker based on ``PT-modules'' which will provide track stubs based on coincident clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, aiming to reject low transverse momentum track hits before data transmission to the Level-1 trigger. The tracker data will be used to reconstruct track segments in dedicated processors before onward transmission to other trigger processors which will combine tracker information with data originating from the calorimeter and muon detectors, to make the final L1 trigger decision. The architecture for processing the tracker data is still an open question. One attractive option is to explore a Time Multiplexed design similar to one which is currently being implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger as part of the Phase I trigger upgrade. The Time Multiplexed Trigger concept is explained, the potential benefits of applying it for processing future tracker data are described and a possible design based on cur...

  17. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Amstutz, Christian; Weber, Marc; Palla, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows \\mbox{co-simulation} with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g.~VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  18. CMS Full Simulation for Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Hildreth, M; Lange, D J; Kortelainen, M J

    2015-01-01

    During LHC shutdown between run-1 and run-2 intensive developments were carried out to improve performance of CMS simulation. For physics improvements migration from Geant4 9.4p03 to Geant4 10.0p02 has been performed. CPU performance has been improved by introduction of the Russian roulette method inside CMS calorimeters, optimization of CMS simulation sub-libraries, and usage of statics build of the simulation executable. As a result of these efforts, CMS simulation has been speeded up by about factor two. In this work we provide description of updates for different software components of CMS simulation. Development of a multi-threaded (MT) simulation approach for CMS will be also discuss.

  19. Data Logistics and the CMS Analysis Model

    CERN Document Server

    Managan, Julie E

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has brilliant prospects for uncovering new information about the physical structure of our universe. Soon physicists around the world will participate together in analyzing CMS data in search of new physics phenomena and the Higgs Boson. However, they face a significant problem: with 5 Petabytes of data needing distribution each year, how will physicists get the data they need? How and where will they be able to analyze it? Computing resources and scientists are scattered around the world, while CMS data exists in localized chunks. The CMS computing model only allows analysis of locally stored data, “tethering” analysis to storage. The Vanderbilt CMS team is actively working to solve this problem with the Research and Education Data Depot Network (REDDnet), a program run by Vanderbilt’s Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education (ACCRE). The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider ...

  20. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Dick [Fermilab

    2015-11-19

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize “opportunistic” resources — resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS — to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  1. Effect of optical surface flatness performance on spatial-light-modulator-based imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongqiang; Wan, Yuhong; Man, Tianlong; Han, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Spatial light modulator (SLM) has various of applications in the field of imaging, beam shaping, adaptive optics and so on. While SLM is used as an aberration correction element in super-resolution microscopy, the surface flatness of SLM could affect the imaging performance of the system due to the higher sensitivity to aberrations of these kind microscopic techniques. In this paper, the optical surface flatness of SLM is measured experimentally by employing the image plane digital holography. The topography of SLM is retrieved from the captured hologram. Aiming to the application of SLM as an adaptive correction element in super resolution microscopy, the aberrations introduced by the surface flatness of SLM are further evaluated and corrected in the same optical system.

  2. Readiness of CMS Simulation Towards LHC Startup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Sunanda; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    CMS experiment has used detector simulation software in its conceptual as well as technical design. With the detector construction near its completion, the role of simulation has changed toward understanding collision data to be collected by CMS in near future. CMS simulation software is becoming a data driven, realistic and accurate Monte Carlo program. The software architecture is described with some detail of the framework as well as detector specific components. Performance issues are discussed as well.

  3. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  4. 42 CFR 423.509 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 423.509 Section 423... Contracts with Part D plan sponsors § 423.509 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the Part D plan sponsor meets any of...

  5. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of the following:...

  6. Reception Test of Petals for the End Cap TEC+ of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, R; Klein, Katja; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Adler, Volker; Adolphi, Roman; Ageron, Michel; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Atz, Bernd; Barvich, Tobias; Baulieu, Guillaume; Beaumont, Willem; Beissel, Franz; Bergauer, Thomas; Berst, Jean-Daniel; Blüm, Peter; Bock, E; Bogelsbacher, F; de Boer, Wim; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Bonnevaux, Alain; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouhali, Othmane; Braunschweig, Wolfgang; Brom, Jean-Marie; Butz, Erik; Chabanat, Eric; Chabert, Eric Christian; Clerbaux, Barbara; Contardo, Didier; De Callatay, Bernard; Dehm, Philip; Delaere, Christophe; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Dewulf, Jean-Paul; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Didierjean, Francois; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Dragicevic, Marko; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Esser, Hans; Estre, Nicolas; Fahrer, Manuel; Fernández, J; Florins, Benoit; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Flügge, Günter; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Freudenreich, Klaus; Frey, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Furgeri, Alexander; Giraud, Noël; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goorens, Robert; Graehling, Philippe; Grégoire, Ghislain; Gregoriev, E; Gross, Laurent; Hansel, S; Haroutunian, Roger; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Hermanns, Thomas; Heydhausen, Dirk; Heyninck, Jan; Hosselet, J; Hrubec, Josef; Jahn, Dieter; Juillot, Pierre; Kaminski, Jochen; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kaussen, Gordon; Keutgen, Thomas; Klanner, Robert; König, Stefan; Kosbow, M; Krammer, Manfred; Ledermann, Bernhard; Lemaître, Vincent; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Linn, Alexander; Lounis, Abdenour; Lübelsmeyer, Klaus; Lumb, Nicholas; Maazouzi, Chaker; Mahmoud, Tariq; Michotte, Daniel; Militaru, Otilia; Mirabito, Laurent; Müller, Thomas; Neukermans, Lionel; Ollivetto, C; Olzem, Jan; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Pandoulas, Demetrios; Pein, Uwe; Pernicka, Manfred; Perriès, Stephane; Piaseki, C; Pierschel, Gerhard; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Poettgens, Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Rouby, Xavier; Sabellek, Andreas; Schael, Stefan; Schirm, Norbert; Schleper, Peter; Schultz von Dratzig, Arndt; Siedling, Rolf; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stahl, Achim; Steck, Pia; Steinbruck, G; Stoye, Markus; Strub, Roger; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teyssier, Daniel; Theel, Andreas; Trocmé, Benjamin; Udo, Fred; Van der Donckt, M; Van der Velde, C; Van Hove, Pierre; Vanlaer, Pascal; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Staa, Rolf; Vanzetto, Sylvain; Weber, Markus; Weiler, Thomas; Weseler, Siegfried; Wickens, John; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; De Wolf, Eddi A; Zhukov, Valery; Zoeller, Marc Henning

    2009-01-01

    The silicon strip tracker of the CMS experiment has been completed and was inserted into the CMS detector in late 2007. The largest sub system of the tracker are its end caps, comprising two large end caps (TEC) each containing 3200 silicon strip modules. To ease construction, the end caps feature a modular design: groups of about 20 silicon modules are placed on sub-assemblies called petals and these self-contained elements are then mounted onto the TEC support structures. Each end cap consists of 144 such petals, which were built and fully qualified by several institutes across Europe. From

  7. Reception Test of Petals for the End Cap TEC+ of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, R; Klein, Katja; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Adler, Volker; Adolphi, Roman; Ageron, Michel; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Atz, Bernd; Barvich, Tobias; Baulieu, Guillaume; Beaumont, Willem; Beissel, Franz; Bergauer, Thomas; Berst, Jean-Daniel; Blüm, Peter; Bock, E; Bogelsbacher, F; de Boer, Wim; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Bonnevaux, Alain; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouhali, Othmane; Braunschweig, Wolfgang; Brom, Jean-Marie; Butz, Erik; Chabanat, Eric; Chabert, Eric Christian; Clerbaux, Barbara; Contardo, Didier; De Callatay, Bernard; Dehm, Philip; Delaere, Christophe; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Dewulf, Jean-Paul; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Didierjean, Francois; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Dragicevic, Marko; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Esser, Hans; Estre, Nicolas; Fahrer, Manuel; Fernández, J; Florins, Benoit; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Flügge, Günter; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Freudenreich, Klaus; Frey, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Furgeri, Alexander; Giraud, Noël; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goorens, Robert; Graehling, Philippe; Grégoire, Ghislain; Gregoriev, E; Gross, Laurent; Hansel, S; Haroutunian, Roger; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Hermanns, Thomas; Heydhausen, Dirk; Heyninck, Jan; Hosselet, J; Hrubec, Josef; Jahn, Dieter; Juillot, Pierre; Kaminski, Jochen; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kaussen, Gordon; Keutgen, Thomas; Klanner, Robert; König, Stefan; Kosbow, M; Krammer, Manfred; Ledermann, Bernhard; Lemaître, Vincent; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Linn, Alexander; Lounis, Abdenour; Lübelsmeyer, Klaus; Lumb, Nicholas; Maazouzi, Chaker; Mahmoud, Tariq; Michotte, Daniel; Militaru, Otilia; Mirabito, Laurent; Müller, Thomas; Neukermans, Lionel; Ollivetto, C; Olzem, Jan; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Pandoulas, Demetrios; Pein, Uwe; Pernicka, Manfred; Perriès, Stephane; Piaseki, C; Pierschel, Gerhard; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Poettgens, Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Rouby, Xavier; Sabellek, Andreas; Schael, Stefan; Schirm, Norbert; Schleper, Peter; Schultz von Dratzig, Arndt; Siedling, Rolf; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stahl, Achim; Steck, Pia; Steinbruck, G; Stoye, Markus; Strub, Roger; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teyssier, Daniel; Theel, Andreas; Trocmé, Benjamin; Udo, Fred; Van der Donckt, M; Van der Velde, C; Van Hove, Pierre; Vanlaer, Pascal; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Staa, Rolf; Vanzetto, Sylvain; Weber, Markus; Weiler, Thomas; Weseler, Siegfried; Wickens, John; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; De Wolf, Eddi A; Zhukov, Valery; Zoeller, Marc Henning

    2009-01-01

    The silicon strip tracker of the CMS experiment has been completed and was inserted into the CMS detector in late 2007. The largest sub system of the tracker are its end caps, comprising two large end caps (TEC) each containing 3200 silicon strip modules. To ease construction, the end caps feature a modular design: groups of about 20 silicon modules are placed on sub-assemblies called petals and these self-contained elements are then mounted onto the TEC support structures. Each end cap consists of 144 such petals, which were built and fully qualified by several institutes across Europe. From

  8. Status and Commissioning of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmüller, O L

    2007-01-01

    After a brief overview of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, the status of construction and installation is described in the first part of the note. The second part of the document is devoted to a discussion of the general commissioning strategy of the CMS experiment, with a particular emphasis on trigger, calibration and alignment. Aspects of b-physics, as well as examples for early physics with CMS are also presented. CMS will be ready for data taking in time for the first collisions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in late 2007.

  9. CMS data and workflow management system

    CERN Document Server

    Fanfani, A; Bacchi, W; Codispoti, G; De Filippis, N; Pompili, A; My, S; Abbrescia, M; Maggi, G; Donvito, G; Silvestris, L; Calzolari, F; Sarkar, S; Spiga, D; Cinquili, M; Lacaprara, S; Biasotto, M; Farina, F; Merlo, M; Belforte, S; Kavka, C; Sala, L; Harvey, J; Hufnagel, D; Fanzago, F; Corvo, M; Magini, N; Rehn, J; Toteva, Z; Feichtinger, D; Tuura, L; Eulisse, G; Bockelman, B; Lundstedt, C; Egeland, R; Evans, D; Mason, D; Gutsche, O; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Dagenhart, D W; Afaq, A; Guo, Y; Kosyakov, S; Lueking, L; Sekhri, V; Fisk, I; McBride, P; Bauerdick, L; Bakken, J; Rossman, P; Wicklund, E; Wu, Y; Jones, C; Kuznetsov, V; Riley, D; Dolgert, A; van Lingen, F; Narsky, I; Paus, C; Klute, M; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Piedra-Gomez, J; Miller, M; Mohapatra, A; Lazaridis, C; Bradley, D; Elmer, P; Wildish, T; Wuerthwein, F; Letts, J; Bourilkov, D; Kim, B; Smith, P; Hernandez, J M; Caballero, J; Delgado, A; Flix, J; Cabrillo-Bartolome, I; Kasemann, M; Flossdorf, A; Stadie, H; Kreuzer, P; Khomitch, A; Hof, C; Zeidler, C; Kalini, S; Trunov, A; Saout, C; Felzmann, U; Metson, S; Newbold, D; Geddes, N; Brew, C; Jackson, J; Wakefield, S; De Weirdt, S; Adler, V; Maes, J; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Hammad, G; Pukhaeva, N; Kurca, T; Semneniouk, I; Guan, W; Lajas, J A; Teodoro, D; Gregores, E; Baquero, M; Shehzad, A; Kadastik, M; Kodolova, O; Chao, Y; Ming Kuo, C; Filippidis, C; Walzel, G; Han, D; Kalinowski, A; Giro de Almeida, N M; Panyam, N

    CMS expects to manage many tens of peta bytes of data to be distributed over several computing centers around the world. The CMS distributed computing and analysis model is designed to serve, process and archive the large number of events that will be generated when the CMS detector starts taking data. The underlying concepts and the overall architecture of the CMS data and workflow management system will be presented. In addition the experience in using the system for MC production, initial detector commissioning activities and data analysis will be summarized.

  10. Chlorophyll modulation of sea surface temperature in the Arabian Sea in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to estimate biological heating rate and investigate the biological modulation of the sea surface temperature (SST) in a bulk mixed layer model...

  11. Fourier transform infrared phase-modulated ellipsometry for in situ diagnostics of plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirafuji, T [International Innovation Center, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Motomura, H [Department of Electronics, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Katsura 615-8510 (Japan); Tachibana, K [Department of Electronics, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Katsura 615-8510 (Japan)

    2004-03-21

    Applicability of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to an in situ diagnostics tool of plasma-surface interactions is described. After a brief review of conventional reflection absorption spectroscopy (RAS) and phase-modulated RAS (PMRAS), our FTIR phase-modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry (PMSE) is described in detail. The FTIR PMSE is constructed by insertion of a grid polarizer as an analyser in front of an infrared detector in addition to the conventional set-up of PMRAS. This simple change brings about a higher sensitivity than that of conventional PMRAS, which enables us to detect chemical species generated on (or removed from) the top surface layer during plasma processing. This feature is demonstrated by the fact that our FTIR PMSE can be applied to surface diagnostics during reactive ion etching processes such as for Si, SiO{sub 2}/Si, SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2}/photo-resist and low-dielectric-constant films. (topical review)

  12. The CMS workload management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquilli, M.; Evans, D.; Foulkes, S.; Hufnagel, D.; Mascheroni, M.; Norman, M.; Maxa, Z.; Melo, A.; Metson, S.; Riahi, H.; Ryu, S.; Spiga, D.; Vaandering, E.; Wakefield, S.; Wilkinson, R.

    2012-12-01

    CMS has started the process of rolling out a new workload management system. This system is currently used for reprocessing and Monte Carlo production with tests under way using it for user analysis. It was decided to combine, as much as possible, the production/processing, analysis and T0 codebases so as to reduce duplicated functionality and make best use of limited developer and testing resources. This system now includes central request submission and management (Request Manager); a task queue for parcelling up and distributing work (WorkQueue) and agents which process requests by interfacing with disparate batch and storage resources (WMAgent).

  13. CMS magnet Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The CMS magnet system consists of the superconducting coil, the magnet yoke (barrel and endcap), the vacuum tank and ancillaries such as cryogenics and power supply. The axial magnetic field is 4 Tesla, the yoke diameter is 14 m across flats, the axial yoke length including endcaps is 21.6 m and the total mass is about 12000 tons. It will be the largest superconducting magnet in the world in term of energy stored into it: 2.7 GJ (large enough to melt 18 tonnes of gold).

  14. CMS Object—Oriented Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.Innocente; E.Meschi; 等

    2001-01-01

    The CMS OO reconstruction program-ORCA-has been used since 1999 to produce large samples of reconstructed Monte-Carlo events for detector optimization,trigger and physics studies,The events are stored in several Objectivity federations at CERN,in the US,Italy and other countries.To perform their studies physicists use different event samples ranging from complete datasets of TByte size to only a few events out of these datasets.We describe the implementation of these requirements in the ORCA software and the way collctions of events are accessed for reading,writing or copying.

  15. Heavy flavour production at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Three recent results in heavy flavour production at the CMS experiment are addressed in this report. Measurements of the differential production cross sections of B hadron and quarkonium states in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV are presented. These are important tools to investigate heavy-quark production mechanisms in QCD. The dependences on transverse momentum and rapidity are investigated and comparisons with theory expectations and among different collision energies are provided. Also the new observation of $\\Upsilon(1S)\\Upsilon(1S)$ production is reported.

  16. V+jets from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hortiangtham, Apichart

    2016-01-01

    The production of vector bosons (V = W, Z or $\\gamma$) in association with jets is a stringent test of perturbative QCD and is a background process in searches for new physics. Total and differential cross-section measurements of vector bosons produced in association with jets (and heavy flavour quarks) are presented. The data have been recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and are compared to next-to leading order calculations and event simulations that devise matrix element calculations interfaced with parton showers.

  17. B hadron properties at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Heredia De La Cruz, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of B hadron properties are crucial to improve or constrain models based on non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics, which provide predictions of mass, lifetime, cross section, polarization, and branching ratios (among several other properties) of B hadrons. Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_s$ and properties of rare B decays also provide many opportunities to search for new physics. This article presents some B hadron property results obtained by CMS using Run~I (2011-2012) data, and prospects for the Run~II (2015-2017) data taking period.

  18. Dark matter search in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Vartak, Adish

    2017-01-01

    The dark matter search program at the LHC covers a wide range of final states and targets a variety of possible interactions between dark matter and standard model particles. A summary of the dark matter searches performed at the CMS experiment, using proton-proton collision data collected at a center of energy of 13 TeV, is presented.Searches performed in various final states are described, and results interpreted in terms of several dark matter models are presented. These results are also compared to the results from direct and indirect dark matter searches.

  19. Electroweak precision measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2017-01-01

    An overview of recent results on electroweak precision measurements from the CMS Collaboration is presented. Studies of the weak boson differential transverse momentum spectra, Z boson angular coefficients, forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan lepton pairs and charge asymmetry of W boson production are made in comparison to the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo generators and theoretical predictions. The results show a good agreement with the Standard Model. As a proof of principle for future W mass measurements, a W-like analysis of the Z boson mass is performed.

  20. CMS Barrel Pixel Detector Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Hörmann, C; Horisberger, Roland Paul; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Robmann, P; Rohe, T; Streuli, S

    2007-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device of the CMS experiment at the LHC. It is built from two independent sub devices, the pixel barrel and the end disks. The barrel consists of three concentric layers around the beam pipe with mean radii of 4.4, 7.3 and 10.2 cm. There are two end disks on each side of the interaction point at 34.5 cm and 46.5 cm. This article gives an overview of the pixel barrel detector, its mechanical support structure, electronics components, services and its expected performance.

  1. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Deldicque, C; Ero, J; Frühwirth, R; Jeitler, Manfred; Kastner, K; Köstner, S; Neumeister, N; Porth, M; Padrta P; Rohringer, H; Sakulinb, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Walzel, G; Wulz, C E; Lowette, S; Van De Vyver, B; De Lentdecker, G; Vanlaer, P; Delaere, C; Lemaître, V; Ninane, A; van der Aa, O; Damgov, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampen, T; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lehti, S; Nysten, J; Tuominiemi, J; Busson, P; Todorov, T; Schwering, G; Gras, P; Daskalakis, G; Sfyrla, A; Barone, M; Geralis, T; Markou, C; Zachariadou, K; Hidas, P; Banerjee, S; Mazumdara, K; Abbrescia, M; Colaleoa, A; D'Amato, N; De Filippis, N; Giordano, D; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Silvestris, L; Zito, G; Arcelli, S; Bonacorsi, D; Capiluppi, P; Dallavalle, G M; Fanfani, A; Grandi, C; Marcellini, S; Montanari, A; Odorici, F; Travaglini, R; Costa, S; Tricomi, A; Ciulli, a V; Magini, N; Ranieri, R; Berti, L; Biasotto, M; Gulminia, M; Maron, G; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L; Bellato, M; Gasparini, U; Lacaprara, S; Parenti, A; Ronchese, P; Vanini, S; Zotto, S; Ventura P L; Perugia; Benedetti, D; Biasini, M; Fano, L; Servoli, L; Bagliesi, a G; Boccali, T; Dutta, S; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Palla, F; Segneri, G; Starodumov, A; Tenchini, R; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Amapane, a N; Bertolino, F; Cirio, R; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Pac, Y; Joo, K; Kim, S B; Suwon; Choi, Y I; Yu, I T; Cho, K; Chung, J; Ham, S W; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, W; CKim, J; Oh, S K; Park, H; Ro, S R; Son, D C; Suh, J S; Aftab, Z; Hoorani, H; Osmana, A; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, K; Kazana, M; Królikowski, J; Kudla, I; Pietrusinski, M; Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Zabolotny, W M; Zalipska, J; Zych, P; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Almeida, C; Almeida, N; Da Silva, J C; Santos, M; Teixeira, I; Teixeira, J P; Varelaa, J; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Konoplyanikov, V F; Urkinbaev, A R; Toropin, A; Gavrilov, V; Kolosov, V; Krokhotin, A; Oulianov, A; Stepanov, N; Kodolova, O L; Vardanyan, I; Ilic, J; Skoro, G P; Albajar, C; De Troconiz, J F; Calderón, A; López-Virto, M A; Marco, R; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Vila, I; Cucciarelli, S; Konecki, M; Ashby, S; Barney, D; Bartalini, P; Benetta, R; Brigljevic, V; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Cittolin, S; Della Negra, M; de Roeck, A; Favre, P; Frey, A; Funk, W; Futyan, D; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Innocente, V; Jacobs, C; Jank, W; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Larsen, H; Lenzi, M; Magrans, I; Mannelli, M; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Mirabito, L; Murray, S J; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Palomares-Espiga, C; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Reynaud, S; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schwick, C; Sguazzoni, G; Sinanis, N; Sphicas, P; Spiropulu, M; Strandlie, A; Taylor, B G; Van Vulpen, I; Wellisch, J P; Winkler, M; Villigen; Kotlinski, D; Zurich; Prokofiev, K; Speer, T; Dumanoglu, I; Bristol; Bailey, S; Brooke, J J; Cussans, D; Heath, G P; Machin, D; Nash, S J; Newbold, D; Didcot; Coughlan, A; Halsall, R; Haynes, W J; Tomalin, I R; Marinelli, N; Nikitenko, A; Rutherford, S; Seeza, C; Sharif, O; Antchev, G; Hazen, E; Rohlf, J; Wu, S; Breedon, R; Cox, P T; Murray, P; Tripathi, M; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Kreuzer, P; Lindgren, M; Mumford, J; Schlein, P E; Shi, Y; Tannenbaum, B; Valuev, V; Von der Mey, M; Andreevaa, I; Clare, R; Villa, S; Bhattacharya, S; Branson, J G; Fisk, I; Letts, J; Mojaver, M; Paar, H P; Trepagnier, E; Litvine, V; Shevchenko, S; Singh, S; Wilkinson, R; Aziz, S; Bowden, M; Elias, J E; Graham, G; Green, D; Litmaath, M; Los, S; O'Dell, V; Ratnikova, N; Suzuki, I; Wenzel, H; Acosta, D; Bourilkov, D; Korytov, A; Madorsky, A; Mitselmakher, G; Rodríguez, J L; Scurlock, B; Abdullin, S; Baden, D; Eno, S; Grassi, T; Kunori, S; Pavlon, S; Sumorok, K; Tether, S; Cremaldi, L M; Sanders, D; Summers, D; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Fisher,W C; Mans6, J; Stickland, D P; Tully, C; Wildish, T; Wynhoff, S; Padley, B P; Chumney, P; Dasu, S; Smith, W H; CMS Trigger Data Acquisition Group

    2006-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN the proton bunches cross at a rate of 40MHz. At the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment the original collision rate is reduced by a factor of O (1000) using a Level-1 hardware trigger. A subsequent factor of O(1000) data reduction is obtained by a software-implemented High Level Trigger (HLT) selection that is executed on a multi-processor farm. In this review we present in detail prototype CMS HLT physics selection algorithms, expected trigger rates and trigger performance in terms of both physics efficiency and timing.

  2. Removal of a section of the CMS beam pipe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Over recent weeks, members of the TE-VSC group have been removing seven components of the beam pipe located at the heart of the CMS detector. The delicate operations involved have been performed in several stages as the detector opening work has progressed.   Of the seven components concerned, only the central vacuum pipe will be replaced. The other six will be stored in a special radiation-shielded area on the surface and subsequently reinstalled ready for the resumption of machine operation. The video below, which was filmed on 15 May, shows one of the seven components of the vacuum pipe - the HFCT2, located to the right of the interaction point – being brought up from the CMS cavern to the surface by the transport team at Point 5.

  3. Impact of helium ion energy modulation on tungsten surface morphology and nano-tendril growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, G. M.

    2017-06-01

    Time-modulated helium (He) ion energy (e.g. V Bias  =  -50  +  25·sin(2πf RF · t), f RF  =  13.56 MHz) is demonstrated to strongly affect the development of tungsten (W) surface morphology that results from He plasma irradiation in the DIONISOS linear plasma experiment. Nano-tendril bundles (NTBs), which appear as isolated ‘islands’ of nano-tendrils, can rapidly grow on an otherwise smooth W surface. This is in contrast to previously seen full-surface coverage of nano-tendril growth known as ‘fuzz’. When tall NTBs form, less than 15% of the surface contains nano-tendrils. The NTB surface coverage changes with growth conditions and the total volume of nano-tendrils in the NTBs is observed to be up to a factor of 16 larger than when fuzz is grown. This indicates that long-range W surface transport underlies nano-tendril formation. Surface temperature 870-1220 K, the DC bias potential  -30 to  -70 V, and the ion flux density 4.4  ×  1021-1.1  ×  1022 He · m-2 · s-1 are varied in the experiments. NTBs form at similar conditions as fuzz with the critical difference being the RF modulation of the ion energy bombarding the W, another indication of the importance of W surface transport. Mass loss measurements indicate net erosion with a yield of 1-8  ×  10-4 W/He when NTBs form; erosion that is not attributable to chemical or physical sputtering by He or impurities in the plasma. The erosion is correlated to the NTB growth, based on post-exposure inspection by electron microscopy indicating that NTBs are prone to loss from the surface. NTB growth is compared to the empirical growth-erosion model of fuzz, showing NTBs grow up to a factor of 100 times taller than the expected fuzz layer depth under DC bias conditions. Insights into nano-tendril growth provided by this new growth regime are discussed. Strategies to mitigate W fuzz growth may inadvertently result in rapid localized nano-tendril bundle

  4. Neural network surface acoustic wave RF signal processor for digital modulation recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalov, Dimitar; Kalinin, Victor

    2002-09-01

    An architecture of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) processor based on an artificial neural network is proposed for an automatic recognition of different types of digital passband modulation. Three feed-forward networks are trained to recognize filtered and unfiltered binary phase shift keying (BPSK) and quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signals, as well as unfiltered BPSK, QPSK, and 16 quadrature amplitude (16QAM) signals. Performance of the processor in the presence of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) is simulated. The influence of second-order effects in SAW devices, phase, and amplitude errors on the performance of the processor also is studied.

  5. Angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer for refractive index sensing with enhanced detection resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Li, Li; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2017-01-01

    We design and manufacture an angle modulated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometer with high detection resolution for refractive index sensing. The presented SPR spectrometer is based on a five-layer Kretchmann configuration. To enhance the sensitivity and resolution of the SPR spectrometer, we introduce a reference beam into the system, which has improved the stability of the system by nearly one order of magnitude. Numerical simulation and experimental study are presented and the results show that a sensitivity of 85 degrees/RIU (refractive index unit) and a good repeatability (standard deviation=3.7×10-6 RIU) have been achieved.

  6. Surface acoustic wave modulation of a coherently driven quantum dot in a pillar microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, B.; Bennett, A. J.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Lee, J. P.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Mitchell, T. A.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ford, C. J. B.; Shields, A. J.

    2017-07-01

    We report the efficient coherent photon scattering from a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a pillar microcavity. We show that a surface acoustic wave can periodically modulate the energy levels of the quantum dot but has a negligible effect on the cavity mode. The scattered narrow-band laser is converted into a pulsed single-photon stream, displaying an anti-bunching dip characteristic of single-photon emission. Multiple phonon sidebands are resolved in the emission spectrum, due to the absorption and emission of vibrational quanta in each scattering event.

  7. Verification steps for the CMS event-builder software

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The CMS event-builder software is used to assemble event fragments into complete events at 100 kHz. The data originates at the detector front-end electronics, passes through several computers and is transported from the underground to the high-level trigger farm on the surface. I will present the testing and verifications steps a new software version has to pass before it is deployed in production. I will discuss the current practice and possible improvements.

  8. CMS completes major part of 3-D puzzle

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The assembly of CMS in the giant SX5 surface building at Cessy has reached an important turning point. The magnet return yoke - whose red 'wheels' and 'disks' dominate the scene within the building - is completely assembled, including the central part that supports the huge outer shell of the solenoid vacuum tank. Now the focus is shifting towards installing the coil and sub-detectors within this structure..

  9. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  10. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces.

  11. Binary Pseudo-Random Gratings and Arrays for Calibration of Modulation Transfer Functions of Surface Profilometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Samuel K.; Anderson, Erik D.; Cambie, Rossana; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Stover, John C.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-09-11

    A technique for precise measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF), suitable for characterization of a broad class of surface profilometers, is investigated in detail. The technique suggested in [Proc. SPIE 7077-7, (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)]is based on use of binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays as standard MTF test surfaces. Unlike most conventional test surfaces, BPR gratings and arrays possess white-noise-like inherent power spectral densities (PSD), allowing the direct determination of the one- and two-dimensional MTF, respectively, with a sensitivity uniform over the entire spatial frequency range of a profiler. In the cited work, a one dimensional realization of the suggested method based on use of BPR gratings has been demonstrated. Here, a high-confidence of the MTF calibration technique is demonstrated via cross comparison measurements of a number of two dimensional BPR arrays using two different interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer. We also present the results of application of the experimentally determined MTF correction to the measurement taken with the MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope of the surface roughness of a super-polished test mirror. In this particular case, without accounting for the instrumental MTF, the surface rms roughness over half of the instrumental spatial frequency bandwidth would be underestimated by a factor of approximately 1.4.

  12. Biophysical insights into how surfaces, including lipid membranes, modulate protein aggregation related to neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Burke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD, associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and nonspecific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (subcellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes.

  13. US CMS Tier-2 computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincon, NE 68588-0111 (United States)], E-mail: kenbloom@unl.edu

    2008-07-15

    The CMS computing model relies heavily on the use of 'Tier-2' computing centers. At LHC startup, the typical Tier-2 center in the United States will have 1 MSpecInt2K of CPU resources, 200 TB of disk for data storage, and a WAN connection of 10 Gbit/s. These centers will be the primary sites for the production of large-scale simulation samples and for the hosting of experiment data for user analysis ? an interesting mix of experiment-controlled and user-controlled tasks. As a result, there are a wide range of services that must be deployed and commissioned at these centers, which are responsible for tasks such as dataset transfer, management of datasets, hosting of jobs submitted through Grid interfaces, and several varieties of monitoring. We discuss the development of the seven CMS Tier-2 computing centers in the United States, with a focus on recent operational performance and preparations for the start of data-taking in 2008.

  14. VNR CMS Pixel detector replacement

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Joel Butler, spokesperson of the CMS collaboration explains how a team from many different partner institutes installed a new detector in CMS. This detector is the silicon pixel detector and they’ve been working on it for about five years, to replace one of our existing detectors. This detectors measures particles closer to the beam than any of the other components of this huge detector behind me. It gives us the most precise picture of tracks as they come out of the collisions and expand and travel through the detector. This particular device has twice as many pixels, 120 million, as opposed to about 68 million in the old detector and it can take data faster and pump it out to the analysis more quickly. 00’53’’ Images of the descent, insertion and installation of first piece of the Pixel detector on Tue Feb 28. Images of the descent, insertion and installation of second piece of the Pixel and the two cylinders being joined.

  15. Top Mass Measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Duda, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Given the big cross section for \\ttbar production in proton-proton collisions at 14\\TeV, the LHC with its high luminosity will be, among others,a top factory, allowing a precision measurement of the top quark mass. Based on a detailed simulation of the CMS detector, the following top mass reconstruction accuracies are possible in the respective final states with the present knowledge of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Delta m_t (di-leptonic, 1fbinv) = pm 1.5 (stat) pm 2.9 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (semi-leptonic, 1fbinv) = pm 0.7 (stat) pm 1.9 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (fully hadronic, 1fbinv) = pm 0.6(stat) pm 4.2 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (di-leptonic}, 10 fbinv) = pm 0.5 (stat) pm 1.1 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (semi-leptonic, 10 fbinv) = pm 0.2 (stat) pm 1.1 (syst.) GeVcc Delta m_t (JPsi, 20 fbinv) = pm 1.2 (stat) pm 1.5 (syst.) GeVcc A combined top mass accuracy of mathcal O (1GeVcc) for 10-20fbinv of well-understood CMS data will be feasible.

  16. CMS: Beyond all possible expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After having retraced the entire Standard Model up to the Top, the CMS collaboration is ready to go further and continue the success of what Guido Tonelli – its spokesperson – defines as a ‘magic year’. Things evolve fast at CMS, but scientists have taken up the challenge and are ready for the future.   ‘Enthusiasm’ is the word that best describes the feeling one gets when talking to Guido Tonelli. “In just a few months we have rediscovered the Standard Model and have gone even further by producing new results for cross-sections, placing new limits on the creation of heavy masses, making studies on the excited states of quarks, and seeking new resonances. We could not have expected so much such a short space of time. It’s fantastic”, he says. “We went through the learning phase very smoothly. Our detector was very quickly ready to do real physics and we were able to start to produce results almost ...

  17. Highlights from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz Maestre, Juan

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the status and some recent results of the CMS experiment at the LHC. The performance of the detector is assessed using a luminosity of $\\approx 5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ recorded in the first part of the 2017 data-taking period. Run~2 physics studies use data collected at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $36~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Highlights from studies in the Higgs sector are the first observation of its decay into tau leptons by a single experiment, the most precise measurement of its mass, $\\mathrm{m_H} = 125.26 \\pm 0.21~\\mathrm{GeV}$ and a first search for the $\\mathrm{H}\\to\\mathrm{b\\overline{b}}$ decay in a phase space region that is sensitive to the gluon-fusion production mechanism. In the electroweak sector, CMS provides the currently most precise measurement of the effective weak mixing angle at the LHC: $\\sin\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.23101\\pm 0.00052$, using an integrated luminosity of $\\approx 20~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqr...

  18. CMS computing upgrade and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez Calama, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The distributed Grid computing infrastructure has been instrumental in the successful exploitation of the LHC data leading to the discovery of the Higgs boson. The computing system will need to face new challenges from 2015 on when LHC restarts with an anticipated higher detector output rate and event complexity, but with only a limited increase in the computing resources. A more efficient use of the available resources will be mandatory. CMS is improving the data storage, distribution and access as well as the processing efficiency. Remote access to the data through the WAN, dynamic data replication and deletion based on the data access patterns, and separation of disk and tape storage are some of the areas being actively developed. Multi-core processing and scheduling is being pursued in order to make a better use of the multi-core nodes available at the sites. In addition, CMS is exploring new computing techniques, such as Cloud Computing, to get access to opportunistic resources or as a means of using wit...

  19. Progress on CMS detector lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    It was an amazing engineering challenge - the lowering of the first hugeendcap disc (YE+3) of the CMS detector slowly and carefully 100 metres underground. The spectacular descent took place on 30 November and was documented by a film crew from Reuters news group. The uniquely shaped slice is 16 m high, about 50 cm thick, and weighs 400 tonnes. It is one of 15 sections that make up the complete CMS detector. The solid steel structure of the disc forms part of the magnet return yoke and is equipped on both sides with muon chambers. A special gantry crane lowered the element, with just 20 cm of leeway between the edges of the detector and the walls of the shaft! On 12 December, a further section of the detector (YE+2) containing the cathode strip chamber made the 10-hour journey underground. This piece is 16 m high and weighs 880 tonnes. There are now four sections of the detector in the experimental cavern, with a further 11 to follow. The endcap disc YE+3 (seen in the foreground) begins its journey down the ...

  20. Design Considerations for Exterior and Interior Configurations of Surface Habitat Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannova, O.

    Planning for long-duration lunar and Mars exploration missions must provide appropriate human support accommodations to optimize crew comfort, health, morale, performance and safety. Important requirements to make planetary exploration missions successful are to create habitats and facilities offering the maximum possible space and volume for human and mission needs, minimize site preparation and module assembly time and offer on-site equipment readiness in the fewest number of launches. The paper addresses two general types of habitat structures: vertical and horizontal. Both of these approaches offer special advantages, but also impose special planning considerations to optimize benefits. Goals are to maximize habitability, crew safety, spatial efficiency, functional versatility and EVA access/egress from the surface. While complying with the strictly constrained diameter and length dimensions imposed by Earth launch vehicles, landing limitations and surface mobility restrictions. Illustrative concepts are presented showing examples of interior layouts, functional areas and equipment systems.

  1. Design and construction of a compact module of surfaces treatment by thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188 D, Santiago (Chile); Feugeas, J.; Clausse, A.; Bruzzone, H. [Red Interinstitucional de Plasmas Densos y Magnetizados (PLADEMA) (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    Research on surfaces treatment by thermal shock is currently being pursued at The Institute of Physics of the University of Rosario (IFUR), using plasma focus systems. Thus, the effect of the thermal shock, due to the incidence of highly energetic, short duration, plasma beams, on metallic surfaces, offers interesting possibilities for application in steels, increasing their resistance to the wear and microhardness. This work addresses the design and construction of a compact plasma focus module (30x30xl00 cm{sup 3}), generating pulses of ions, with a duration of 200 to 500 nanoseconds and an emission frequency under 10 Hz. The energy deposited is 10 J at a fluence of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} per pulse. (Author)

  2. Alignment of the CMS Silicon Tracker -- and how to improve detectors in the future

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinwort, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The complex system of the CMS all-silicon Tracker, with 15\\,148 silicon strip and 1440 silicon pixel modules, requires sophisticated alignment procedures. In order to achieve an optimal track-parameter resolution, the position and orientation of its modules need to be determined with a precision of few micrometers. The alignment of pixels modules is crucial for the analyses requiring a precise vertex reconstruction. The aligned geometry is based on the analysis of several million reconstructed tracks recorded during the commissioning of the CMS experiment, both with cosmic rays and with the first proton-proton collisions. Statistical precision of the alignment of the module with respect to the particle trajectories to less than 10 microns has been achieved. The results have been validated by several data-driven studies (track fit self-consistency, track residuals in overlapping module regions, and track parameter resolution) and compared with predictions obtained from a detailed detector simulation.

  3. Results from combined CMS-TOTEM data

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Sercan

    2016-01-01

    The combined data taking of the CMS and TOTEM experiments allows to characterize hadronic final states in an extremely wide pseudo-rapidity range and opens up a window to a rich diffractive/forward physics program. In this paper, the trigger strategy of the common data taking is described, and the physics results from combined CMS-TOTEM data is presented.

  4. Set of CMS posters in Spanish

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena; Rao, Achintya

    2014-01-01

    14 A0 posters in English to be printed locally or displayed online. Purpose: science fairs, exhibitions, preparatory material for the CMS virtual visits, etc. Themes: CMS detector, sub-detectors, construction, lowering and installation, collaboration and physics. Available in many languages.

  5. Set of CMS posters in Greek

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena; Petrilli, Achille

    2015-01-01

    14 A0 posters in English to be printed locally or displayed online. Purpose: science fairs, exhibitions, preparatory material for the CMS virtual visits, etc. Themes: CMS detector, sub-detectors, construction, lowering and installation, collaboration and physics. Available in many languages.

  6. Set of CMS posters in English

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena; Rao, Achintya

    2014-01-01

    14 A0 posters in English to be printed locally or displayed online. Purpose: science fairs, exhibitions, preparatory material for the CMS virtual visits, etc. Themes: CMS detector, sub-detectors, construction, lowering and installation, collaboration and physics. Available in many languages.

  7. Jim Virdee, the new spokesperson of CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Jim Virdee and Michel Della Negra. On 21 June Tejinder 'Jim'Virdee was elected by the CMS collaboration as its new spokesperson, his 3-year term of office beginning in January 2007. He will take over from Michel Della Negra, who has been CMS spokesperson since its formalization in 1992. Three distinguished physicists stood as candidates for this election: Dan Green from Fermilab, programme manager of the US-CMS collaboration and coordinator of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter project; Jim Virdee from Imperial College London and CERN, deputy spokesperson of CMS since 1993; Gigi Rolandi from the University of Trieste and CERN, ex-Aleph spokesperson and currently involved in the preparations of the physics analyses to be done with CMS. On the early evening of 21 June, 141 of the 142 members of the CMS collaboration board, some represented by proxies, took part in a secret ballot. After two rounds of voting Jim Virdee was elected as spokesperson with a clear majority. Jim thanked the CMS collaboration 'for putting conf...

  8. General Alignment Concept of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lampen, T

    2006-01-01

    Efficient and accurate track reconstruction requires proper alignment of the tracking devices used. Here we describe the general alignment strategy envisaged for the CMS experiment. The hardware alignment devices of CMS are presented as well as the different track based alignment approaches.

  9. Iron Blocks of CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke.

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On the occasion of presenting the CMS Award 2000 to Deggendorfer Werft und Eisenbau GmbH the delivered blocks were inspected at CERN Point 5. From left to right: H. Gerwig (CERN, CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke Coordinator), G. Waurick (CERN), F. Leher (DWE, Project Engineer) and W. Schuster (DWE, Project Manager).

  10. The status of the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment was completely assembled in the fall of 2008 after a decade of design, construction and installation. During the last two years, cosmic ray data were taken on a regular basis. These data have enabled CMS to align the detector components, both spatially and temporally. Initial use of muons has also established the relative alignment of the CMS tracking and muon systems. In addition, the CMS calorimetry has been crosschecked with test beam data, thus providing an initial energy calibration of CMS calorimetry to about 5%. The CMS magnet has been powered and field mapped. The trigger and data acquisition systems have been installed and run at full speed. The tiered data analysis system has been exercised at full design bandwidth for Tier0, Tier1 and Tier2 sites. Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector has been constructed at a detailed geometric level and has been tuned to test beam and other production data to provide a realistic model of the CMS detector prior to first collisions.

  11. The status of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment was completely assembled in the fall of 2008 after a decade of design, construction and commissioning. During the last two years cosmic ray data were taken on a regular basis. These data have enabled CMS to align the detector components, both spatially and temporally. Initial alignment using muons has established the relative alignment of the CMS tracking and muon systems. In addition, the CMS calorimetry has been crosschecked with test beam data thus providing an initial energy calibration of CMS calorimetry to about 5 per cent. The CMS magnet has been powered and field mapped. The trigger and data acquisition systems have been installed and run at full speed. The tiered data analysis system has been exercised at full design bandwidth for Tier0, Tier1 and Tier2 sites. Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector has been constructed at a detailed geometric level and has been tuned to test beam and other production data to provide a realistic model of the CMS detector.

  12. Final Technical Report CMS fast optical calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, David R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States)

    2012-07-12

    This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

  13. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false CMS. 500.109 Section 500.109 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level...

  14. Double modulation pyrometry: A radiometric method to measure surface temperatures of directly irradiated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamias, Dimitrios; Alxneit, Ivo; Wokaun, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The design, implementation, calibration, and assessment of double modulation pyrometry to measure surface temperatures of radiatively heated samples in our 1 kW imaging furnace is presented. The method requires that the intensity of the external radiation can be modulated. This was achieved by a rotating blade mounted parallel to the optical axis of the imaging furnace. Double modulation pyrometry independently measures the external radiation reflected by the sample as well as the sum of thermal and reflected radiation and extracts the thermal emission as the difference of these signals. Thus a two-step calibration is required: First, the relative gains of the measured signals are equalized and then a temperature calibration is performed. For the latter, we transfer the calibration from a calibrated solar blind pyrometer that operates at a different wavelength. We demonstrate that the worst case systematic error associated with this procedure is about 300 K but becomes negligible if a reasonable estimate of the sample's emissivity is used. An analysis of the influence of the uncertainties in the calibration coefficients reveals that one (out of the five) coefficient contributes almost 50% to the final temperature error. On a low emission sample like platinum, the lower detection limit is around 1700 K and the accuracy typically about 20 K. Note that these moderate specifications are specific for the use of double modulation pyrometry at the imaging furnace. It is mainly caused by the difficulty to achieve and maintain good overlap of the hot zone with a diameter of about 3 mm Full Width at Half Height and the measurement spot both of which are of similar size.

  15. SKIROC2_CMS an ASIC for testing CMS HGCAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, J.; Callier, S.; Coko, D.; Dulucq, F.; de La Taille, C.; Raux, L.; Sculac, T.; Thienpont, D.

    2017-02-01

    SKIROC2_CMS is a chip derived from CALICE SKIROC2 that provides 64 channels of low noise charge preamplifiers optimized for 50 pF pin diodes and 10 pC dynamic range. They are followed by high gain and low gain 25 ns shapers, a 13-deep 40 MHz analog memory used as a waveform sampler at 40 MHz. and 12-bit ADCs. A fast shaper followed by discriminator and TDC provide timing information to an accuracy of 50 ps, in order to test TOT and TOA techniques at system level and in test-beam. The chip was sent to fabrication in January 2016 in AMS SiGe 0,35 μm and was received in May. It was tested in the lab during the summer and will be mounted on sensors for beam-tests in the fall.

  16. Phosphorylation and chronic agonist treatment atypically modulate GABAB receptor cell surface stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Pitcher, Julie A; Scott, Mark G H; Calver, Andrew R; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J; Couve, Andrés

    2004-03-26

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. The dynamic control of the cell surface stability of GABA(B) receptors is likely to be of fundamental importance in the modulation of receptor signaling. Presently, however, this process is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that GABA(B) receptors are remarkably stable at the plasma membrane showing little basal endocytosis in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. In addition, we show that exposure to baclofen, a well characterized GABA(B) receptor agonist, fails to enhance GABA(B) receptor endocytosis. Lack of receptor internalization in neurons correlates with an absence of agonist-induced phosphorylation and lack of arrestin recruitment in heterologous systems. We also demonstrate that chronic exposure to baclofen selectively promotes endocytosis-independent GABA(B) receptor degradation. The effect of baclofen can be attenuated by activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or co-stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, we show that increased degradation rates are correlated with reduced receptor phosphorylation at serine 892 in GABA(B)R2. Our results support a model in which GABA(B)R2 phosphorylation specifically stabilizes surface GABA(B) receptors in neurons. We propose that signaling pathways that regulate cAMP levels in neurons may have profound effects on the tonic synaptic inhibition by modulating the availability of GABA(B) receptors.

  17. Last crystals for the CMS chandelier

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    In March, the last crystals for CMS’s electromagnetic calorimeter arrived from Russia and China. Like dedicated jewellers crafting an immense chandelier, the CMS ECAL collaborators are working extremely hard to install all the crystals before the start-up of the LHC. One of the last CMS end-cap crystals, complete with identification bar code. Lead tungstate crystals mounted onto one section of the CMS ECAL end caps. Nearly 10 years after the first production crystal arrived at CERN in September 1998, the very last shipment has arrived. These final crystals will be used to complete the end-caps of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) at CMS. All in all, there are more than 75,000 crystals in the ECAL. The huge quantity of CMS lead tungstate crystals used in the ECAL corresponds to the highest volume ever produced for a single experiment. The excellent quality of the crystals, both in ter...

  18. Upgrade of the trigger system of CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Various parts of the CMS trigger and in particular the Level-1 hardware trigger will be upgraded to cope with increasing luminosity, using more selective trigger conditions at Level-1 and improving the reliability of the system. Many trigger subsystems use FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the electronics and will benefit from developments in this technology, allowing much more logic into a single FPGA chip, thus reducing the number of chips, electronic boards and interconnections and in this way improving reliability. A number of subsystems plan to switch from the old VME bus to the new microTCA crate standard. Using similar approaches, identical modules and common software whereever possible will reduce costs and manpower requirements and improve the serviceability of the whole trigger system. The computer-farm based High-Level Trigger will not only be extended by using increasing numbers of more powerful PCs but there are also concepts for making it more robust and the software easier to maintain, ...

  19. The CMS Tracker Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Masetti, Lorenzo; Shah, S Y; Stringer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker Detector Control System is a distributed software which ensures the safe and coherent operation of the detector, by controlling approximate to 2000 power supplies for the silicon modules and by monitoring-more than 1000 environmental sensors. In this paper we first present the architecture of the control system and the characteristics of the controlled hardware, then we discuss some general strategies adopted in the implementation. We propose a method to give an effective representation for the state of a large but homogeneous system, stressing the necessity to provide the user with some quantitative information and presenting an effective algorithm to keep this information updated in real time. We also present the advantages of a new approach for the automatic analysis and recovery from error conditions via a wizard that relieves the experts from unnecessary and time-wasting work. The tracker was chosen as a use-case in a framework for automatic 3D GUI prototyping: some prelimin...

  20. A novel photo-grafting of acrylamide onto carboxymethyl starch. 1. Utilization of CMS-g-PAAm in easy care finishing of cotton fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Manal A

    2016-11-05

    The photosensitized grafting of vinyl monomers onto a range of polymeric substrates has been the subject of particular interest in the recent past. Carboxymethyl starch (CMS)-poly acrylamide (PAAm) graft copolymer (CMS-g-PAAm) with high graft yield was successfully prepared by grafting of acrylamide onto CMS using UV irradiation in the presence of the water soluble 4-(trimethyl ammoniummethyl) benzophenone chloride photoinitiator. CMS-g-PAAm with nitrogen content of 8.3% and grafting efficiency up to 98.9% was obtained using 100% AAm, a material: liquor ratio of 1:14 and 1% photinitiator at 30°C for 1h of UV irradiation. The synthesis of CMS-g-PAAm was confirmed by FTIR and Nitrogen content (%). Surface morphology of CMS and surface morphological changes of CMS after grafting with AAm were studied using SEM. Thermal properties of both CMS and CMS-g-PAAm were studied using TGA and DSC. To impart easy care finishing to cotton fabrics, aqueous formulations of: CMS-g-PAAm, dimethylol dihydroxy ethylene urea (DMDHEU), CMS-g-PAAm-DMDHEU mixture or methylolated CMS-g-PAAm were used. Cotton fabrics were padded in these formulations, squeezed to a wet pick up 100%, dried at 100°C for 5min, cured at 150°C for 5min, washed at 50°C for 10min and air-dried. CRA (crease recovery angle) of untreated fabrics and fabrics finished with a mixture of 2% CMS-g-PAAm and 10% DMDHEU or methylolated CMS-g-PAAm (10% formaldehyde) were: 136°, 190°, 288° respectively. Increasing the number of washing cycles up to five cycles results in an insignificant decrease in the CRA and a significant decrease in RF (releasable formaldehyde) of finished fabric samples. The morphologies of the finished and unfinished cotton fabrics were performed by SEM.

  1. First CMS awards ceremony of 2003 to honour its top suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Each year CMS holds an awards ceremony to honour its top suppliers. This year 12 companies are receiving awards for their outstanding performances, eight the Gold Award and four the most prestigious award, the Crystal Award. The main ceremony will take place on 24 February during CMS week at CERN. However, one of the recipients of the Gold Award, the Snezhinsk All-Russian Institute of Scientific Research for Technical Physics (VNIITF) of the Russian Federal Nuclear Centre (RFNC) has already received its award. Felicitas Pauss, Vice-Chairman of the CMS Collaboration Board, hands a Gold Award for best CMS supplier to Professor Georgy Rykovanov, Director of Russia's RFNC-VNIITF Institute.The CMS Collaboration took the opportunity of the visit to CERN of the Director of the VNIITF and his deputy to make the award. which the Institute has received for its exceptional performance in the assembly of steel plates for the CMS's forward hadronic calorimeter. This calorimeter consists of two sets of 18 wedge-shape modul...

  2. FERMI multi-chip module

    CERN Multimedia

    This FERMI multi-chip module contains five million transistors. 25 000 of these modules will handle the flood of information through parts of the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC. To select interesting events for recording, crucial decisions are taken before the data leaves the detector. FERMI modules are being developed at CERN in partnership with European industry.

  3. Study of the CMS Phase 1 Pixel Pilot Blade Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system. It was replaced in March 2017 with an upgraded one, called the Phase 1 upgrade detector. During Long Shutdown 1, a third disk was inserted into the present forward pixel detector with eight prototype blades constructed using a new digital read-out chip architecture and a prototype readout chain. Testing the performance of these pilot modules enabled us to gain experience with the Phase 1 upgrade modules. In this document, the data reconstruction with the pilot system is presented. The hit finding efficiency and residual of these new modules is also shown, and how these observables were used to adjust the timing of the pilot blades.

  4. Controlling Gel Structure to Modulate Cell Adhesion and Spreading on the Surface of Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huizhen; Gao, Meng; Ren, Ying; Lou, Ruyun; Xie, Hongguo; Yu, Weiting; Liu, Xiudong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-08-03

    The surface properties of implanted materials or devices play critical roles in modulating cell behavior. However, the surface properties usually affect cell behaviors synergetically so that it is still difficult to separately investigate the influence of a single property on cell behavior in practical applications. In this study, alginate-chitosan (AC) microcapsules with a dense or loose gel structure were fabricated to understand the effect of gel structure on cell behavior. Cells preferentially adhered and spread on the loose gel structure microcapsules rather than on the dense ones. The two types of microcapsules exhibited nearly identical surface positive charges, roughness, stiffness, and hydrophilicity; thus, the result suggested that the gel structure was the principal factor affecting cell behavior. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the overall percentage of positively charged amino groups was similar on both microcapsules. The different gel structures led to different states and distributions of the positively charged amino groups of chitosan, so we conclude that the loose gel structure facilitated greater cell adhesion and spreading mainly because more protonated amino groups remained unbound and exposed on the surface of these microcapsules.

  5. Modulation of apoptotic pathways of macrophages by surface-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqin Jiang

    Full Text Available Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs often involve improving their hydrophilicity and dispersion in biological media by modifying them through noncovalent or covalent functionalization. However, the potential adverse effects of surface-functionalized CNTs have not been well characterized. In this study, we functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs via carboxylation, to produce MWCNTs-COOH, and via poly (ethylene glycol linking, to produce MWCNTs-PEG. We used these functionalized MWCNTs to study the effect of surface functionalization on MWCNTs-induced toxicity to macrophages, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Our results revealed that MWCNTs-PEG were less cytotoxic and were associated with less apoptotic cell death of macrophages than MWCNTs-COOH. Additionally, MWCNTs-PEG induced less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS involving less activation of NADPH oxidase compared with MWCNTs-COOH, as evidenced by membrane translocation of p47(phox and p67(phox in macrophages. The less cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of MWCNTs-PEG compared with MWCNTs-COOH resulted from the lower cellular uptake of MWCNTs-PEG, which resulted in less activation of oxidative stress-responsive pathways, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and nuclear factor (NF-κB. These results demonstrate that surface functionalization of CNTs may alter ROS-mediated cytotoxic and apoptotic response by modulating apoptotic signaling pathways. Our study thus provides new insights into the molecular basis for the surface properties affecting CNTs toxicity.

  6. Surface transfer doping induced effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Du; Han, Cheng; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Shu; Liu, Yiyang; Lin, Jiadan; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Ping Hu, Wen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Black phosphorus, a fast emerging two-dimensional material, has been configured as field effect transistors, showing a hole-transport-dominated ambipolar characteristic. Here we report an effective modulation on ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus transistors through in situ surface functionalization with caesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), respectively. Cs2CO3 is found to strongly electron dope black phosphorus. The electron mobility of black phosphorus is significantly enhanced to ~27 cm2 V-1 s-1 after 10 nm Cs2CO3 modification, indicating a greatly improved electron-transport behaviour. In contrast, MoO3 decoration demonstrates a giant hole-doping effect. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterization reveals significant surface charge transfer occurring at the dopants/black phosphorus interfaces. Moreover, the surface-doped black phosphorus devices exhibit a largely enhanced photodetection behaviour. Our findings coupled with the tunable nature of the surface transfer doping scheme ensure black phosphorus as a promising candidate for further complementary logic electronics.

  7. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, S; Loarer, T; Pocheau, C; Roche, H; Gauthier, E; Aumeunier, M-H; Le Niliot, C; Rigollet, F; Courtois, X; Jouve, M; Balorin, C; Moncada, V

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ∼ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ∼ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  8. Display of cell surface sites for fibronectin assembly is modulated by cell adherence to (1F3 and C-terminal modules of fibronectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jielin Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibronectin-null cells assemble soluble fibronectin shortly after adherence to a substrate coated with intact fibronectin but not when adherent to the cell-binding domain of fibronectin (modules (7F3-(10F3. Interactions of adherent cells with regions of adsorbed fibronectin other than modules (7F3-(10F3, therefore, are required for early display of the cell surface sites that initiate and direct fibronectin assembly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify these regions, coatings of proteolytically derived or recombinant pieces of fibronectin containing modules in addition to (7F3-(10F3 were tested for effects on fibronectin assembly by adherent fibronectin-null fibroblasts. Pieces as large as one comprising modules (2F3-(14F3, which include the heparin-binding and cell adhesion domains, were not effective in supporting fibronectin assembly. Addition of module (1F3 or the C-terminal modules to modules (2F3-(14F3 resulted in some activity, and addition of both (1F3 and the C-terminal modules resulted in a construct, (1F3-C, that best mimicked the activity of a coating of intact fibronectin. Constructs (1F3-C V0, (1F3-C V64, and (1F3-C Delta(V(15F3(10F1 were all able to support fibronectin assembly, suggesting that (1F3 through (11F1 and/or (12F1 were important for activity. Coatings in which the active parts of (1F3-C were present in different proteins were much less active than intact (1F3-C. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that (1F3 acts together with C-terminal modules to induce display of fibronectin assembly sites on adherent cells.

  9. The CMS Modular Track Finder Boards, MTF6 and MTF7

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, Darin Edward; Carnes, Andrew Mathew; Carver, Matthew Robert; Curry, David Alexander; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Madorsky, Alexander; Matveev, Mikhail; Padley, Paul; Rank, Douglas; Reeves, C; Scurlock, Bobby; Wang, S

    2013-01-01

    To satisfy these requirements, a new Sector Processor unit for muon track finding is being designed. This unit follows the micro-TCA standard recently adopted by CMS. It consists of three modules. The Core Logic module houses the large FPGA that contains the processing logic and multi-gigabit serial links for data exchange. The Optical module contains optical receivers and transmitters; it communicates with the Core Logic module via a custom backplane section. The Look-up Table module contains a large amount of low-latency memory that is us...

  10. Performance and Mechanical Tolerances Achieved with a Full Size Prototype of a CMS Barrel Muon Drift Tubes Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, Siegfried; Benettoni, Massimo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Berdugo, Javier; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; Conti, Enrico; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Daniel, Manuel; De Giorgi, Marco; De Min, Alberto; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanin, Claudio; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giantin, R; Grandi, Claudio; Guaita, Paola; Guerzoni, Marco; Ladrón de Guevara, Pedro; Lippi, Ivano; Marcellini, Stefano; Martinelli, Roberto; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Mocholí-Mocholí, J; Montanari, Alessandro; Montanari, Christian; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Reithler, Hans; Romero, Luciano; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Schwarthoff, Hubert; Sondermann, Volker; Tano, Valeria; Teykal, Helmut; Tutas, Joerg; Van den Hirtz, J; Wagner, H; Wegner, Martin; Willmott, Carlos

    1998-01-01

    The barrel muon chambers of the CMS experiment are made assembling 3 independent modules ( SuperLayers) which together measure the impact point and the angles theta and phi. Each SuperLayer consists of four layers of rectangular Drift Tubes. MB96 is a full size prototype of the smallest CMS Barrel Muon Chamber ( MB1) built in early 1997 at the Legnaro INFN laboratory and tested in summer 1997 at the CERN CMS test beam facility. The performance of the prototype and the mechanical tolerances achieved in the construction are presented.

  11. Silicon strip detector qualification for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaußen, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the four experiments being installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is located at the european organization for nuclear research CERN in Geneva. This proton-proton collider will explore a new energy regime of up to 14TeV center-of-mass energy. To provide the best spatial resolution for the particle trajectory reconstruction and a very fast readout, the inner tracking system of CMS is build up of silicon detectors with a pixel tracker in the center surrounded by a strip tracker. The silicon strip tracker consists of so-called modules representing the smallest detection unit of the tracking device. These modules are mounted on higher-level structures called shells in the tracker inner barrel (TIB), rods in the tracker outer barrel (TOB), disks in the tracker inner disks (TID) and petals in the tracker end caps (TEC). The entire strip tracker spans an active area of about 198m2 and consists of approximately 16000 modules. Before the silicon sensors were assembl...

  12. Fundamental Studies of Adhesion of Dust to PV Module Surfaces: Chemical and Physical Relationships at the Microscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.; Diniz, Antonia Sonia A. C.; Maia, Cristiana Brasil; Viana, Marcelo Machado; Costa, Suellen C.; Brito, Pedro P.; Campos, Claudio Dias; Neto, Lauro V. Macheto; de Morais Hanriot, Sergio; de Oliveira Cruz, Leila R.

    2016-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module soiling is a growing area of concern for performance and reliability. This paper provides evaluations of the fundamental interactions of dust/soiling particles with several PV module surfaces. The purpose is to investigate the basic mechanisms involving the chemistry, morphology, and resulting particle adhesion to the first photon-incident surface. The evaluation and mapping of the chemistry and composition of single dust particles collected from operating PV module surfaces are presented. The first correlated direct measurements of the adhesive force of individual grains from field-operating collectors on identical PV module glass are reported, including correlations with specific compositions. Special microscale atomic force microscopy techniques are adapted to determine the force between the particle and the module glass surface. Results are presented for samples under dry and moisture-exposed conditions, confirming the effects of cementation for surfaces having soluble mineral and/or organic concentrations. Additionally, the effects of hydrocarbon fuels on the enhanced bonding of soiling particles to surfaces are determined for samples from urban and highly trafficked regions. Comparisons between glass and dust-mitigating superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic coatings are presented. Potential limitations of this proximal probe technique are discussed in terms of results and initial proof-of-concept experiments.

  13. Production of the CMS Tracker End Cap sub-structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fontaine, Jean-Charles

    2007-01-01

    The production and qualification of the 288 petals needed to build both CMS Tracker End Caps (TECs) is summarized. There will be first a description of a petal, integrating many components, the most important ones being the silicon modules. The organization of the production, involving 7 Institutes all over Europe, will then be explained. The petal assembly and testing procedure will be quickly described. The quality assurance put in place at each production step has resulted in a very high petal quality, as some overall plots will attest. Finally some details about part failures will be given.

  14. CMS Forward Pixel Upgrade Electronics and System Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Hannsjorg Artur

    2016-01-01

    This note discusses results of electronics and system testing of the CMS forward pixel (FPIX) detector upgrade for Phase 1. The FPIX detector is comprised of four stand-alone half cylinders, each of which contains frontend readout electronic boards, power regulators, cables and fibers in addition to the pixel modules. All of the components undergo rigorous testing and quality assurance before assembly into the half cylinders. Afterwards, we perform full system tests on the completely assembled half cylinders, including calibrations at final operating temperatures, characterization of the realistic readout chain, and system grounding and noise studies. The results from all these tests are discussed.

  15. Modulating semiconductor surface electronic properties by inorganic peptide-binders sequence design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmor, Maayan; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2012-12-19

    The use of proteins and peptides as part of biosensors and electronic devices has been the focus of intense research in recent years. However, despite the fact that the interface between the bioorganic molecules and the inorganic matter plays a significant role in determining the properties of such devices, information on the electronic properties of such interfaces is sparse. In this work, we demonstrate that the identity and position of single amino acid in short inorganic binding protein-segments can significantly modulate the electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces on which they are bound. Specifically, we show that the introduction of tyrosine or tryptophan, both possessing an aromatic side chain which higher occupied molecular orbitals are positioned in proximity to the edge of GaAs valence band, to the sequence of a peptide that binds to GaAs (100) results in changes of both the electron affinity and surface potential of the semiconductor. These effects were found to be more pronounced than the effects induced by the same amino acids once bound on the surface in a head-tail configuration. Furthermore, the relative magnitude of each effect was found to depend on the position of the modification in the sequence. This sequence dependent behavior is induced both indirectly by changes in the peptide surface coverage, and directly, probably, due to changes in the orientation and proximity of the tyrosine/tryptophan side group with respect to the surface due to the preferred conformation the peptide adopts on the surface. These studies reveal that despite the use of short protein oligomers and aiming at a non-natural-electronic task, the well-known relations between the proteins' structure and function is preserved. Combining the ability to tune the electronic properties at the interface with the ability to direct the growth of inorganic materials makes peptides promising building blocks for the construction of novel hybrid electronic devices and biosensors.

  16. Constraining nuclear PDFs with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chapon, Emilien

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear parton distribution functions are essential to the understanding of proton-lead collisions. We will review several measurements from CMS that are particularly sensitive to nPDFs. W and Z bosons are medium-blind probes of the initial state of the collisions, and we will present the measurements of their production cross sections in pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV, and as well a asymmetries with an increased sensitivity to nPDFs. We will also report measurements of charmonium production, including the nuclear modification factor of J/psi and psi(2S) in pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV, though other cold nuclear matter effects may also be at play in those processes. At last, we will present measurements of the pseudo-rapidity of dijets in pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV.

  17. OVAL: the CMS Testing Robot

    CERN Document Server

    Chamont, D

    2003-01-01

    Oval is a testing tool which help developers to detect unexpected changes in the behavior of their software. It is able to automatically compile some test programs, to prepare on the fly the needed configuration files, to run the tests within a specified Unix environment, and finally to analyze the output and check expectations. Oval does not provide utility code to help writing the tests, therefore it is quite independant of the programming/scripting language of the software to be tested. It can be seen as a kind of robot which apply the tests and warn about any unexpected change in the output. Oval was developed by the LLR laboratory for the needs of the CMS experiment, and it is now recommended by the CERN LCG project.

  18. CMS Planning and Scheduling System

    CERN Document Server

    Kotamaki, M

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the procedures and the system to build and maintain the schedules needed to manage time, resources, and progress of the CMS project. The system is based on the decomposition of the project into work packages, which can be each considered as a complete project with its own structure. The system promotes the distribution of the decision making and responsibilities to lower levels in the organisation by providing a state-of-the-art system to formalise the external commitments of the work packages without limiting their ability to modify their internal schedules to best meet their commitments. The system lets the project management focus on the interfaces between the work packages and alerts the management immediately if a conflict arises. The proposed system simplifies the planning and management process and eliminates the need for a large, centralised project management system.

  19. V+jets from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fengwangdong

    2016-01-01

    This document is dedicated to recent results on the measurements of a vector boson production associated with jets (V+jets) using CMS detector experiment, with a central proton-proton (pp) collision energy of respectively 8 TeV (RunI) and 13 TeV (RunII). The vector boson can be a W boson, Z boson, or photon. The jets are of any flavor, as well as the ones containing heavy flavor quarks, such as bottom(b) quarks. The inclusive cross sections of V+jets processes and differential cross sections as a function of various kinematic observables are presented and compared to several theoretical predictions. In general, the comparison between theoretical calculations and measurement are crucial for improving modeling and precision on QCD dynamics.

  20. Rare B decays at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linwei

    2017-01-01

    The flavour changing neutral current decays can be interesting probes for searching for New Physics. Angular distributions of the decay $\\mathrm{B}^0 \\to \\mathrm{K}^{*0} \\mu^ +\\mu^-$ are studied using a sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $20.5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. An angular analysis is performed to determine $P_1$ and $P_5'$, where $P_5'$ is of particular interest due to recent measurements that indicate a potential discrepancy with the standard model. Based on a sample of 1397 signal events, $P_1$ and $P_5'$ angular parameters are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass squared. The measurements are in agreement with standard model predictions.

  1. The CMS Silicon Tracker Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Castello, R

    2008-01-01

    The alignment of the Strip and Pixel Tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, with its large number of independent silicon sensors and its excellent spatial resolution, is a complex and challenging task. Besides high precision mounting, survey measurements and the Laser Alignment System, track-based alignment is needed to reach the envisaged precision.\\\\ Three different algorithms for track-based alignment were successfully tested on a sample of cosmic-ray data collected at the Tracker Integration Facility, where 15\\% of the Tracker was tested. These results, together with those coming from the CMS global run, will provide the basis for the full-scale alignment of the Tracker, which will be carried out with the first \\emph{p-p} collisions.

  2. The CMS Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffels, M.; Guo, Y.; Kuznetsov, V.; Magini, N.; Wildish, T.

    2014-06-01

    The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Data Booking Service (DBS), a metadata catalog; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this contribution we will discuss the use of both Oracle and NoSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

  3. Testbeam and Laboratory Characterization of CMS 3D Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Bubna, M; Krzywda, A; Koybasi, O; Arndt, K; Bortoletto, D; Shipsey, I; Bolla, G; Kok, A; Hansen, T -E; Hansen, T A; Jensen, G U; Brom, J M; Boscardin, M; Chramowicz, J; Cumalat, J; Betta, G F Dalla; Dinardo, M; Godshalk, A; Jones, M; Krohn, M D; Kumar, A; Lei, C M; Moroni, L; Perera, L; Povoli, M; Prosser, A; Rivera, R; Solano, A; Obertino, M M; Kwan, S; Uplegger, L; Via, C D; Vigani, L; Wagner, S

    2014-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device in CMS, reconstructing interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The sensors located in the innermost layers of the pixel detector must be upgraded for the ten-fold increase in luminosity expected with the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) phase. As a possible replacement for planar sensors, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to its good performance after high radiation fluence. In this paper, we report on pre- and post- irradiation measurements for CMS 3D pixel sensors with different electrode configurations. The effects of irradiation on electrical properties, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution of 3D sensors are discussed. Measurements of various test structures for monitoring the fabrication process and studying the bulk and surface properties, such as MOS capacitors, planar and gate-controlled diodes are also presented.

  4. The helium cryogenic plant for the CMS superconducting magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Perinic, G; Dagut, F; Dauguet, P; Hirel, P

    2002-01-01

    A new helium refrigeration plant with a cooling capacity of 800 W at 4.45 K, 4500 W between 60 K and 80 K, and 4 g/s liquefaction simultaneously has been designed and is presently being constructed by Air Liquide for CERN. The refrigeration plant will provide the cooling power for the cool down and the operation of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) superconducting coil whose cold mass weighs 225 t. The refrigeration plant will at first be installed in a surface building for the tests of the superconducting magnet. On completion of the tests the cold box will be moved to its final underground position next to the CMS experimental cavern. This paper presents the process design, describes the main components and explains their selection. (4 refs).

  5. DC-DC conversion powering for the CMS tracker at SLHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feld, L., E-mail: Lutz.Feld@cern.c [RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstrasse 14, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Jussen, R.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Sammet, J. [RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstrasse 14, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    A tracker powering scheme based on DC-DC converters close to the detector modules can supply more power through thinner cables. This will allow to satisfy the increased power demands of tracking systems at the SLHC. This article describes the development of DC-DC converters for upgrades of the CMS pixel and tracking systems and addresses system integration issues.

  6. DC-DC Conversion Powering for the CMS Tracker at SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    A tracker powering scheme based on DC-DC converters close to the detector modules can supply more power through thinner cables. This will allow to satisfy the increased power demands of tracking systems at the SLHC. This article describes the development of DC-DC converters for upgrades of the CMS pixel and tracking systems and addresses system integration issues.

  7. A DC-DC Conversion Powering Scheme for the CMS Phase-1 Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz Werner; Marcel Friedrichs; Richard Hensch; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Sammet, Jan Domenik; Wlochal, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The powering scheme of the CMS pixel detector will be described, and the performance of prototype DC-DC buck converters will be presented, including power efficiency, system tests with DC-DC converters and pixel modules, thermal management, reliability at low temperature, and studies of potential frequency locking betwe...

  8. The Biological Function of the Prion Protein: A Cell Surface Scaffold of Signaling Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The prion glycoprotein (PrPC) is mostly located at the cell surface, tethered to the plasma membrane through a glycosyl-phosphatydil inositol (GPI) anchor. Misfolding of PrPC is associated with the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), whereas its normal conformer serves as a receptor for oligomers of the β-amyloid peptide, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). PrPC is highly expressed in both the nervous and immune systems, as well as in other organs, but its functions are controversial. Extensive experimental work disclosed multiple physiological roles of PrPC at the molecular, cellular and systemic levels, affecting the homeostasis of copper, neuroprotection, stem cell renewal and memory mechanisms, among others. Often each such process has been heralded as the bona fide function of PrPC, despite restricted attention paid to a selected phenotypic trait, associated with either modulation of gene expression or to the engagement of PrPC with a single ligand. In contrast, the GPI-anchored prion protein was shown to bind several extracellular and transmembrane ligands, which are required to endow that protein with the ability to play various roles in transmembrane signal transduction. In addition, differing sets of those ligands are available in cell type- and context-dependent scenarios. To account for such properties, we proposed that PrPC serves as a dynamic platform for the assembly of signaling modules at the cell surface, with widespread consequences for both physiology and behavior. The current review advances the hypothesis that the biological function of the prion protein is that of a cell surface scaffold protein, based on the striking similarities of its functional properties with those of scaffold proteins involved in the organization of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Those properties are: the ability to recruit spatially restricted sets of binding molecules involved in specific signaling

  9. Standard Specification for Steel Blades Used with the Photovoltaic Module Surface Cut Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This specification specifies the recommended physical characteristics of the steel blades required for the surface cut test described in ANSI/UL 1703 (Section 24) and IEC 61730-2 (Paragraph 10.3). 1.2 ANSI/UL 1703 and IEC 61730-2 are standards for photovoltaic module safety testing. 1.3 This standard provides additional fabrication details for the surface cut test blades that are not provided in ANSI/UL 1703 or IEC 61730-2. Surface cut test blades that have out-of-tolerance corner radii or burrs are known to cause erroneous test results, either passes or failures. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. The Silicon Wheel of CMS-SiB1 Milestone Report

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Barrel Detector is a subsystem of the CMS Tracker and consists of seven wheels. For the SiB1-Milestone, that was completed in Summer 1997, one of these wheels has been built and equipped with 14 working silicon microstrip detector modules and 112 dummy modules. The working modules consist of two detectors glued together each one having 1024 strips with a pitch of 50 micron that are read out by eight PreMux 128 Chips. In the dummy modules the Readout Electronics have been substituted by resistors simulating the heat load. The dummy silicon sensors have fiducial marks and were alligned with a precision of 5 micron. The supporting wheel structure is made out of carbon fiber and incorporates all services. The assembly precision of the support structure was better than 100 micron.

  11. Interview with Jim Virdee, CMS Spokesperson

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    Questions : 1. How does it feel to be Spokesperson of a large worldwide collaboration as CMS at the very moment when the LHC is going to produce the first data? 2. Is your detector ready for data taking? 3. Did you take advantage of the long shut down? 4. What can you expect to find at the initial energy at 3.5 TeV? 5. What was CMS designed for and why do you have the word Muon in the acronym? 6. What is going to happen in the CMS control room on collision day?

  12. CMS AS A WEB PROGRAMMING LEARNING TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran T Lovreković

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses how some of Knowledge Management postulates can be applied in the training of students for Web Programming. CMS is a most vital part of every web applications. Because of that, it is suggested that professor should give students lessons about some as simple as possible CMS in detail, and after that allow them to change, upgrade, and improve this CMS in a several steps, throw their own work and consultations and discussion with teacher and other students. Some of possible requirements for students work are givent in this paper, too.

  13. Hamamatsu APD for CMS ECAL: quality insurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailleux, D.; Britvitch, I.; Deiters, K.; Egeland, R.; Gilbert, B.; Grahl, J.; Ingram, Q.; Kuznetsov, A.; Lester, E.; Musienko, Y.; Renker, D.; Reucroft, S.; Rusack, R.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Singovski, A. E-mail: Alexander.Singovski@cern.ch; Swain, J

    2004-02-01

    The Hamamatsu Photonics S8148 large area Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) were designed for the crystal electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS setup at LHC in a close collaboration of Hamamatsu Photonics and CMS APD group (PSI, Northeastern University and University of Minnesota). All essential parameters of these devices are controlled by the producer and are fairly stable during the mass production, except the radiation hardness. To insure 99.9% reliability of APDs in the radiation hard environment of LHC, the CMS APD group had to invent a dedicated screening procedure. The details of this procedure and some results of the screening are discussed.

  14. Hamamatsu APD for CMS ECAL Quality insurance

    CERN Document Server

    Bailleux, D; Deiters, K; Egeland, R; Gilbert, B; Grahl, J; Ingram, Q; Kuznetsov, A; Lester, E; Musienko, Y; Renker, D; Reucroft, S; Rusack, R W; Sakhelashvili, T M; Singovsky, A V; Swain, J D

    2004-01-01

    The Hamamatsu Photonics S8148 large area Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) were designed for the crystal electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS setup at LHC in a close collaboration of Hamamatsu Photonics and CMS APD group (PSI, Northeastern University and University of Minnesota). All essential parameters of these devices are controlled by the producer and are fairly stable during the mass production, except the radiation hardness. To insure 99.9% reliability of APDs in the radiation hard environment of LHC, the CMS APD group had to invent a dedicated screening procedure. The details of this procedure and some results of the screening are discussed.

  15. The CMS Masterclass and Particle Physics Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecire, Kenneth [Notre Dame U.; Bardeen, Marjorie [Fermilab; McCauley, Thomas [Notre Dame U.

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Masterclass enables high school students to analyse authentic CMS data. Students can draw conclusions on key ratios and particle masses by combining their analyses. In particular, they can use the ratio of W^+ to W^- candidates to probe the structure of the proton, they can find the mass of the Z boson, and they can identify additional particles including, tentatively, the Higgs boson. In the United States, masterclasses are part of QuarkNet, a long-term program that enables students and teachers to use cosmic ray and particle physics data for learning with an emphasis on data from CMS.

  16. The CMS Masterclass and Particle Physics Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecire, Kenneth; Bardeen, Marjorie; McCauley, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The CMS Masterclass enables high school students to analyse authentic CMS data. Students can draw conclusions on key ratios and particle masses by combining their analyses. In particular, they can use the ratio of W+ to W- candidates to probe the structure of the proton, they can find the mass of the Z boson, and they can identify additional particles including, tentatively, the Higgs boson. In the United States, masterclasses are part of QuarkNet, a long-term program that enables students and teachers to use cosmic ray and particle physics data for learning with an emphasis on data from CMS.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection using surface plasmon resonance modulated by telecommunication wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Yu; Lu, Shao-Hsi; Tsai, I-Fang; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ho, Hsin-Tsung

    2013-12-27

    A surface plasmon resonance sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is developed using repeatable telecommunication wavelength modulation based on optical fiber communications laser wavelength and stability. MTB DNA concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL were successfully demonstrated to have the same spectral half-width in the dip for optimum coupling. The sensitivity was shown to be -0.087 dB/(μg/mL) at all applied telecommunication wavelengths and the highest sensitivity achieved was 115 ng/mL without thiolated DNA immobilization onto a gold plate, which is better than the sensor limit of 400 ng/mL possible with commercial biosensor equipment.

  18. 26 April 2012 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador A. Dékány, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Hungary to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area and surface building with Collaboration Deputy Spokespersom T. Camporesi; accompanied by M. Bajko, Technology Department. International Relations Office Adviser R. Voss also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    26 April 2012 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador A. Dékány, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Hungary to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area and surface building with Collaboration Deputy Spokespersom T. Camporesi; accompanied by M. Bajko, Technology Department. International Relations Office Adviser R. Voss also present.

  19. Modulating protein behaviors on responsive surface by external electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yun, E-mail: xieyunxx@gdpu.edu.cn; Pan, Yufang; Zhang, Rong; Liang, Ying; Li, Zhanchao

    2015-01-30

    Graphical abstract: The adsorption of Cyt c on phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayers (N atoms of the choline groups are colored in blue while the P atoms of the phosphate groups in orange). - Highlights: • PC-SAM could sensitively adjust its charge distribution to applied electric fields. • Adsorption of Cyt c on the PC-SAM is promoted or retarded as the charge distribution of the SAM changes. • Orientations of Cyt c on the PC-SAM are regulated by the structural changes of the SAM. • The structural changes of the SAM cause little deformation in Cyt c. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the modulation of protein behaviors on the electrically responsive zwitterionic phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayers (PC-SAMs). Results show that PC-SAMs could sensitively respond to the applied electric fields and exhibit three states with different charge distributions, namely both the negatively charged phosphate groups and the positively charged choline groups are exposed to the solution in the absence of electric fields (state 1), phosphate groups exposed in the presence of positive electric fields (state 2), and choline groups exposed in the presence of negative electric fields (state 3). Under state 1, the adsorption of Cyt c on the PC-SAM is reversible and the orientations of Cyt c are randomly distributed. Under state 2, the adsorption of Cyt c is enhanced due to the electrostatic attractions between the exposed phosphate groups and the positively charged protein; when adsorbed on the PC-SAMs, Cyt c tends to adopt the orientation with the heme plane perpendicular to the surface plane, and the percentage of this orientation increases as the field strength rises up. Under state 3, the adsorption of Cyt c is retarded because of the electrostatic repulsions between the exposed choline groups and the protein; however, if the gaps between PC chains are large enough, Cyt c could insert into the PC-SAM and access the

  20. Assembly of the CMS HF (hadron forward) calorimeter, April 2003 to June 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The forward calorimeters (HF) of the CMS hadron calorimeter system are located 11.2 m from the interaction point. Each HF module is composed by 18 wedges, made of steel absorbers and radiation-hard quartz fibers. The photogallery shows the wedges (Figs. 1-3, April 2003), the assembly of one HF module (Figs. 4-9, May and June 2004) and the assembly of the other (Figs. 10-11, June 2005)

  1. Life@CMS: Combining Higgs search data with ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    2011-01-01

    First combined results from the CMS and ATLAS Higgs search at the LHC. Including exclusive footage from internal CMS meetings. For more information, visit: http://cms.web.cern.ch/news/atlas-and-cms-combine-summer-11-search-limits-standard-model-higgs

  2. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  3. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  4. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may review any new... experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding whether the...

  5. Results of the First Performance Tests of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adzic, Petar; Almeida, Carlos; Almeida, Nuno; Anagnostou, Georgios; Anfreville, Marc; Anicin, Ivan; Antunovic, Zeljko; Asimidis, Asimakis; Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Barney, David; Barone, Luciano; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Ken W; Benetta, Robert; Bercher, Michel; Beteva, B; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhardwa, A; Biino, Cristina; Bimbot, Stephane; Bloch, Philippe; Blyth, Simon; Bonesini, Maurizio; Bordalo, Paula; Bornheim, Adolf; Bourotte, Jean; Britton, David; Brown, Robert M; Brunelière, Renaud; Busson, Philippe; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cavallari, Francesca; Chamont, David; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Charlot, Claude; Chen, E Augustine; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, David J A; Collard, Caroline; Combaret, Christophe; Costantini, Silvia; Da Silva, J C; Dafinei, Ioan; Daskalakis, Georgios; Davatz, Giovanna; De Min, Alberto; Deiters, Konrad; Dejardin, Marc; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Depasse, Pierre; Descamp, J; Dewhirst, Guy; Dhawan, Satish; Diemoz, Marcella; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Drndarevic, Snezana; Dupanloup, Michel; Dzelalija, Mile; Ehlers, Jan; El-Mamouni, H; Peisert, Anna; Evangelou, Ioannis; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Fay, Jean; Ferri, Federico; Flower, Paul S; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaillac, Anne-Marie; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gascon-Shotkin, S; Geerebaert, Yannick; Gentit, François-Xavier; Ghezzi, Alessio; Gilly, Jean; Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Grahl, James; Gras, Philippe; Greenhalgh, Justin; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hamel De Montechenault, G; Hansen, Magnus; Heath, Helen F; Hill, Jack; Hobson, Peter R; Holmes, Daniel; Holzner, André; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Ille, Bernard; Ingram, Quentin; Jain, Adarsh; Janot, Patrick; Jarry, Patrick; Karar, M A; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, Bruce W; Kloukinas, Kostas; Koblitz, Birger; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Korjik, M; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krpic, Dragomir; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Lemaire, Marie-Claude; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lin, Willis; Lintern, A L; Lister, Alison; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; MacKay, Catherine Kirsty; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Manthos, Nikolaos; Markou, Athanasios; Mathez, Hervé; Matveev, Viktor; Maurelli, Georges; Menichetti, Ezio; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Montecchi, Marco; Mur, Michel; Musienko, Yuri; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Neal, Homer; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Newman, Harvey B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Organtini, Giovanni; Paganini, Pascal; Paganoni, Marco; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Pastrone, Nadia; Pauss, Felicitas; Poilleux, Patrick; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Puzovic, Jovan; Ragazzi, Stefano; Ramos, Sergio; Rander, John; Ravat, Olivier; Raymond, M; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Regnault, Nicolas; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Reynaud, Michel; Reynaud, Serge; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Rykaczewski, Hans; Sakhelashvili, Tariel; Salerno, Roberto; Santos, Marcelino; Schinzel, Dietrich; Seez, Christopher; Semeniouk, Igor; Sempere-Roldan, P; Sharif, Omar; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Shevchenko, Sergey; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Sidiropoulos, Georgios; Sillou, Daniel; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Yves; Sirunyan, Albert M; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sproston, Martin; Suter, Henry; Swain, John; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Takahashi, Maiko; Tapper, Robert J; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teixeira, Isabel; Teixeira, Joao Paulo; Teller, Olivier; Triantis, Frixos A; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Udriot, Stève; Ueno, Koji; Uzunian, Andrey; Van Vulpen, Ivo; Varela, Joao; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Verrecchia, Patrice; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Viertel, Gert; Virdee, Tejinder; Wang, Minzu; Williams, Jennifer C; Yaselli, Ignacio; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zeller, Michael E; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Performance tests of some aspects of the CMS ECAL were carried out on modules of the "barrel" sub-system in 2002 and 2003. A brief test with high energy electron beams was made in late 2003 to validate prototypes of the new Very Front End electronics. The final versions of the monitoring and cooling systems, and of the high and low voltage regulation were used in these tests. The results are consistent with the performance targets including those for noise and overall energy resolution, required to fulfil the physics programme of CMS at the LHC.

  6. CMS rewards eight of its suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    At the third awards ceremony to honour its top suppliers, the CMS collaboration presented awards to eight firms. Seven of them are involved in the manufacture of the magnet. The winners of the third CMS suppliers' awards visit the assembly site for the detector. Unsurprisingly, the CMS magnet was once again in the limelight at the third awards ceremony in honour of the collaboration's top suppliers. 'Unsurprisingly', because this magnet, which must produce an intense field of 4 Tesla inside an enormous volume (12 metres in diameter and 13 metres in length) is the detector's key component. As a result, many firms are involved in its construction. The CMS suppliers' awards are an annual event aimed at rewarding the exceptional efforts of certain companies. Firms are only eligible once they have delivered at least 50% of their supplies. This year, the collaboration honoured eight firms at a ceremony held on Monday 4 March in the main auditorium. Seven of th...

  7. CMS in historic accord with China

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Following signature of the CMS Memorandum of Understanding, Research Director of Collider Programmes Roger Cashmore (left) shakes hands with Professor WANG Naiyan, Vice-President of the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  8. HB+ inserted into the CMS Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2006-01-01

    The first half of the barrel hadron calorimeter (HB+) has been inserted into the superconducting solenoid of CMS, in preparation for the magnet test and cosmic challenge. The operation went smoothly, lasting a couple of days.

  9. Predicting dataset popularity for the CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Li, T.; Giommi, L.; Bonacorsi, D.; Wildish, T.

    2016-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN relies on its computing infrastructure to stay at the frontier of High Energy Physics, searching for new phenomena and making discoveries. Even though computing plays a significant role in physics analysis we rarely use its data to predict the system behavior itself. A basic information about computing resources, user activities and site utilization can be really useful for improving the throughput of the system and its management. In this paper, we discuss a first CMS analysis of dataset popularity based on CMS meta-data which can be used as a model for dynamic data placement and provide the foundation of data-driven approach for the CMS computing infrastructure.

  10. The CMS "Higgs Boson Goose Game" Poster

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    Building and operating the CMS Detector is a complicated endeavour! Now, more than 20 years after the detector was conceived, the CMS Bologna group proposes to follow the steps of this challenging project by playing "The Higgs Boson Goose Game", illustrating CMS activities and goals. The concept of the game is inspired by the traditional "Game of the Goose". The underlying idea is that the progress of building and operating a detector at the LHC is similar to the progress of the pawns on the game board: it is fast at times, bringing rewards and satisfaction, while sometimes unexpected problems cause delays or even a step back requiring CMS scientists to use all of their skill and creativity to devise new solutions.

  11. Award for the best CMS thesis

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 CMS PhD Thesis Award for has been presented to Giacomo Luca Bruno for his thesis defended at the University of Pavia in Italy and entitled "The RPC detectors and the muon system for the CMS experiment at the LHC". His work was supervised by Sergio P. Ratti from the University of Pavia. Since April 2002, Giacomo has been employed as a research fellow by CERN's EP Division. He continues to work on CMS in the areas of data acquisition and physics reconstruction and selection. Last Monday he received a commemorative engraved plaque from Lorenzo Foà, chairman of the CMS Collaboration Board. He will also receive expenses paid to an international physics conference to present his thesis results. Giacomo Luca Bruno with Lorenzo Foà

  12. Results from CMS on Higgs boson physics

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurri, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    A selection of measurements and results of Higgs physics obtained by the CMS experiment are presented, obtained with proton collision data collected in 2015 and 2016 at the center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  13. Predicting dataset popularity for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00005122; Li, Ting; Giommi, Luca; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Wildish, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN relies on its computing infrastructure to stay at the frontier of High Energy Physics, searching for new phenomena and making discoveries. Even though computing plays a significant role in physics analysis we rarely use its data to predict the system behavior itself. A basic information about computing resources, user activities and site utilization can be really useful for improving the throughput of the system and its management. In this paper, we discuss a first CMS analysis of dataset popularity based on CMS meta-data which can be used as a model for dynamic data placement and provide the foundation of data-driven approach for the CMS computing infrastructure.

  14. The CMS Higgs Boson Goose Game

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallo, Francesca Romana

    2015-01-01

    Building and operating the CMS Detector is a complicated endeavour! Now, more than 20 years after the detector was conceived, the CMS Bologna group proposes to follow the steps of this challenging project by playing The Higgs Boson Goose Game, illustrating CMS activities and goals.The concept of the game is inspired by the traditional Game of the Goose. The underlying idea is that the progress of building and operating a detector at the LHC is similar to the progress of the pawns on the game board it is fast at times, bringing rewards and satisfaction, while sometimes unexpected problems cause delays or even a step back requiring CMS scientists to use all of their skill and creativity to devise new solutions.

  15. Particle Flow at CMS and the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Ballin, J A C

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes hadron reconstruction at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The focus is on the particle flow reconstruction of these objects. This thesis revisits the subject of the CMS calorimeters' non-linear response to hadrons. Data from testbeam experiments conducted in 2006 & 2007 is compared with simulations and substantial differences are found. A particle flow calibration to correct the energy response of the testbeam data is evaluated. The reconstructed jet response is found to change by ~ 5% when a data-driven calibration is used in place of the calibration derived from simulation. Collision data taken at the early stage of CMS' commissioning is also presented. The hadron response in data is determined to be compatible with testbeam results presented in this thesis. This thesis also details the use of neural networks to improve the energy measurement of hadrons at CMS. The networks are implemented in a functional and concurrent ...

  16. CMS Innovation Center - Data and Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Innovation Center maintains an expanding portfolio supporting the development and testing of innovative health care payment and service delivery models. As...

  17. Operation, calibration and performance of the CMS silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Focardi, Ettore

    2011-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering an area close to 200 m$^2$ and consisting of 15 148 silicon strip and 1440 silicon pixel modules. The use of tracker data in physics analysis requires fine-grained monitoring and calibration procedures. Results from timing studies, threshold optimization, calibration of gains and Lorentz angle determination are shown and the impact on resolution and dE/dx measurements is discussed. In order to achieve an optimal track-parameter resolution, the position and orientation of its modules need to be determined with a precision of few micro meters and an accurate representation of the distribution of material in the tracker is needed. Results of the alignment of the full tracker are presented, based on the analysis of several million reconstructed tracks recorded during the commissioning of the CMS experiment with cosmic rays and the first proton-proton collisions. They have been validated by several data-driven studies and compared with prediction...

  18. CMS inaugurates its high-tech visitor centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The new Building SL53 on CERN’s Cessy site in France is ready to welcome the thousands of visitors (30,000 in 2013) who come to learn about CMS each year. It boasts low energy consumption and the possibility, in the future, of being heated by recycling the heat given off by the detector.   The new Building SL53 at CERN’s Cessy site in France will be inaugurated on 24 May 2014. “Constructed by the GS Department and the firm Dimensione, the building meets the operational requirements of the CMS experiment, which require the uninterrupted use of its infrastructure,” explains Martin Gastal, the member of the collaboration in charge of the project. Its 560 m2 surface area features a meeting room, eight offices, an open space for CMS users, a rest area with a kitchen, sanitary facilities including showers, and a conference room in which to receive visitors. “The new conference room on the ground floor can accommodate 50 people,&am...

  19. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  20. Bubble induced flow field modulation for pool boiling enhancement over a tubular surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathi, P. A.; Joshi, I. M.; Jaikumar, A.; Emery, T. S.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of using a strategically placed enhancement feature to modify the trajectory of bubbles nucleating on a horizontal tubular surface to increase both the critical heat flux (CHF) and the heat transfer coefficient (HTC). The CHF on a plain tube is shown to be triggered by a local dryout at the bottom of the tube due to vapor agglomeration. To mitigate this effect and delay CHF, the nucleating bubble trajectory is modified by incorporating a bubble diverter placed axially at the bottom of the tube. The nucleating bubble at the base of the diverter experiences a tangential evaporation momentum force (EMF) which causes the bubble to grow sideways away from the tube and avoid localized bubble patches that are responsible for CHF initiation. High speed imaging confirmed the lateral displacement of the bubbles away from the diverter closely matched with the theoretical predictions using EMF and buoyancy forces. Since the EMF is stronger at higher heat fluxes, bubble displacement increases with heat flux and results in the formation of separate liquid-vapor pathways wherein the liquid enters almost unobstructed at the bottom and the vapor bubble leaves sideways. Experimental results yielded CHF and HTC enhancements of ˜60% and ˜75%, respectively, with the diverter configuration when compared to a plain tube. This work can be used for guidance in developing enhancement strategies to effectively modulate the liquid-vapor flow around the heater surface at various locations to enhance HTC and CHF.

  1. Surface Modification With Zinc and Zn-Ni Alloy Compositionally Modulated Multilayer Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Jing-yin; LIANG Guo-zheng; XIN Wen-li; WANG Wei-kang

    2006-01-01

    Zinc and Zn-Ni alloy compositionally modulated multilayer (CMM) coatings were electrodeposited on to a steel substrate by the successive deposition of zinc and Zn-Ni alloy sublayers from dual baths. The coated samples were evaluated in terms of the surface appearance, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, as well as corrosion resistance. The microstructural characteristics that were examined using the field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) confirmed the layered structure, grain refinement of the zinc and Zn-Ni alloy CMM coatings, and revealed the existence of microcracks caused by the internal stress in the thick Zn-Ni alloy sublayers. The corrosion resistance that was evaluated by means of the salt spray test shows that the zinc and Zn-Ni alloy CMM coatings were more corrosion-resistant than the monolithic coatings of zinc or Zn-Ni alloy of the same thickness. The possible reasons for the better protective performance of Zn-Ni/Zn CMM coatings were given on the basis of the analysis on the micrographic features of zinc and Zn-Ni alloy CMM coatings after the corrosion test. A probable corrosion mechanism of zinc and Zn-Ni alloy CMM coatings was also proposed.

  2. File level provenance tracking in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.D.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Tanenbaum, W.; /Fermilab; Riley, D.S.; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2009-05-01

    The CMS off-line framework stores provenance information within CMS's standard ROOT event data files. The provenance information is used to track how each data product was constructed, including what other data products were read to do the construction. We will present how the framework gathers the provenance information, the efforts necessary to minimize the space used to store the provenance in the file and the tools that will be available to use the provenance.

  3. File Level Provenance Tracking in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, C D; Paterno, M; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Tanenbaum, W; Riley, D S

    2009-01-01

    The CMS off-line framework stores provenance information within CMS's standard ROOT event data files. The provenance information is used to track how each data product was constructed, including what other data products were read to do the construction. We will present how the framework gathers the provenance information, the efforts necessary to minimise the space used to store the provenance in the file and the tools that will be available to use the provenance.

  4. File level provenance tracking in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C D; Kowalkowski, J; Paterno, M; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Tanenbaum, W [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 500, Batavia IL 60510-5011 (United States); Riley, D S, E-mail: cdj@fnal.go [Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The CMS off-line framework stores provenance information within CMS's standard ROOT event data files. The provenance information is used to track how each data product was constructed, including what other data products were read to do the construction. We will present how the framework gathers the provenance information, the efforts necessary to minimise the space used to store the provenance in the file and the tools that will be available to use the provenance.

  5. Diffractive and Exclusive Processes at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the CMS results on diffractive and exclusive production.Measurements of inclusive single and double diffractive production are discussedas well as measurements of the diffractive production at a hard scale. Measurementsof charged particle multiplicities for single diffractive enhanced data sample and studies of central diffractive jet production were perfrmed in a collaboration with the TOTEM experiment. CMS results on cross section measurements for exclusive dilepton and WW production are also presented.

  6. CMS Virtual Visit - Researchers Night in Portugal

    CERN Multimedia

    Abreu, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Researchers Night at Planetarium Calouste Gulbenkian - Ciência Viva Centre in Lisbon. Organised by researchers from LIP (Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas) and including CMS Virtual Visit during which André David Tinoco Mendes and José Rasteiro da Silva, based at Cessy, France, "virtually" discussed science and technology behind the CMS detector with the audience in Lisbon.

  7. Track and Vertex Reconstruction in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W

    2006-01-01

    The CMS experiment relies on a Silicon pixel and micro-strip tracker for the reconstruction of tracks and vertices of charged particles in the harsh environment of proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC at CERN. An outline of the basic track and vertex reconstruction algorithms used in CMS is given and their performance is described. Results of more advanced algorithms like the Gaussian Sum Filter for electron reconstruction and robust vertex fitters are shown.

  8. Giant CMS magnet goes underground at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists of the US CMS collaboration joined colleagues around the world in announcing today (February 28) that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun the momentous journey into its experimental cavern 100 meters underground. A huge gantry crne is slowly lowering the CMS detector's preassembled central section into place in the Large Hadron Collider accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland." (1 page)

  9. The CMS Journey to LHC Physics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    A history of construction, encompassing the R&D and challenges faced over the last decade and a half, will be recalled using selected examples. CMS is currently in the final stages of installation and commissioning is gathering pace. After a short status report of where CMS stands today some of the expected (great) physics to come will be outlined. * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  10. Comparison of photovoltaic cell temperatures in modules operating with exposed and enclosed back surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, D.; Simon, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Four different photovoltaic module designs were tested to determine the cell temperature of each design. The cell temperatures were compared to those obtained on identical design, using the same nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) concept. The results showed that the NOCT procedure does not apply to the enclosed configurations due to continuous transient conditions. The enclosed modules had higher cell temperatures than the open modules, and insulated modules higher than the uninsulated. The severest performance loss - when translated from cell temperatures - 17.5 % for one enclosed, insulated module as a compared to that module mounted openly.

  11. CMS Grid Activities in Europe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Grandi; L.Berti; 等

    2001-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN LHC collider is producing large amounts of simulated data in order to provide an adequate statistic for the Trigger System design.These productions are performed in a distributed environment,prototyping the hierarchical model of LHC computing centers developed by MONARC.A GRID approach is being used for interconnecting the Regional Centers.The main issues which are currently addressed are:automatic submission of data production requests to available productioin sites,data transfer among production sites,“best-replica” location and submission of enduser analysis job to the appropriate Regional Center,In each production site different hardware configurations are being tested and exploited.Furthermore robust job submission systems.which are also able to provide the needed bookkeeping of the produced data are being developed.BOSS(Batch Object Submission System)is an interface to the local computing center scheduling system that has been developed in order to allow recording in a relational database of information produced by the jobe running on the batch facilities A summary of the current activites and a plan for the use of DataGrid PM9 tools are presented.

  12. The CMS Condition Database system

    CERN Document Server

    Govi, Giacomo Maria; Ojeda-Sandonis, Miguel; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Sipos, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The Condition Database plays a key role in the CMS computing infrastructure. The complexity of the detector and the variety of the sub-systems involved are setting tight requirements for handling the Conditions. In the last two years the collaboration has put an effort in the re-design of the Condition Database system, with the aim to improve the scalability and the operability for the data taking starting in 2015. The re-design has focused in simplifying the architecture, using the lessons learned during the operation of the previous data-taking period. In the new system the relational features of the database schema are mainly exploited to handle the metadata ( Tag and Interval of Validity ), allowing for a limited and controlled set of queries. The bulk condition data ( Payloads ) are stored as unstructured binary data, allowing the storage in a single table with a common layout for all of the condition data types. In this presentation, we describe the full architecture of the system, including the serv...

  13. CMS prepares for new challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    One of the world’s largest physics experiments has just had a change in leadership. This is a chance for the collaboration to take stock of the tremendous work done for LS1 and to prepare for the challenges that lie ahead.   From left to right: Kerstin Borras, Tiziano Camporesi and Paris Sphicas. “The keyword is teamwork. That’s the only way you can effectively manage a large number of extremely talented and motivated people,” says Tiziano Camporesi who took the reins of the CMS collaboration at the beginning of the year. The recipe might seem easier on paper than in practice. However, given his 28 years at CERN, two of which he spent as the head of the DELPHI collaboration, Camporesi has extensive experience in managing large scientific collaborations and success in this respect is well within his reach: “I have learned many lessons from the past and I believe that building consensus is instrumental to successful leadership.” The C...

  14. Virtual Data in CMS Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Arbree, A; Bourilkov, D; Cavanaugh, R J; Graham, G; Rodríguez, J; Wilde, M; Zhao, Y

    2003-01-01

    The use of virtual data for enhancing the collaboration between large groups of scientists is explored in several ways: - by defining ``virtual'' parameter spaces which can be searched and shared in an organized way by a collaboration of scientists in the course of their analysis - by providing a mechanism to log the provenance of results and the ability to trace them back to the various stages in the analysis of real or simulated data - by creating ``check points'' in the course of an analysis to permit collaborators to explore their own analysis branches by refining selections, improving the signal to background ratio, varying the estimation of parameters, etc. - by facilitating the audit of an analysis and the reproduction of its results by a different group, or in a peer review context. We describe a prototype for the analysis of data from the CMS experiment based on the virtual data system Chimera and the object-oriented data analysis framework ROOT. The Chimera system is used to chain together several s...

  15. Heavy ion results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Milosevic, Jovan

    2016-01-01

    Two- and multi-particle angular correlations in pp, pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC energies are presented as a function of centrality, charged-particle multiplicity and transverse momentum ($p_{T}$). The data were collected using the CMS detector. The Fourier coefficents in PbPb collisions are measured over an extended $p_{T}$ range up to 100 GeV/c. These $v_{n}$ measurements at high-$p_{T}$ are complementary to the $R_{AA}$ measurements. The elliptic flow of charged and strange particles and the triangular flow of charged particles in pp collisions is measured using the two-particle correlations. A clear mass ordering effect is observed for low-$p_{T}$ $v_{2}$ values. For the first time, in 13 TeV pp collisions, the $v_{2}$ is extracted from four- and six-particle correlations, and is comparable to the $v_{2}$ from two-particle correlations. This supports the collective nature of the long-range correlations in high-multiplicity pp collisions. A Principle Component Analysis (PCA) of two-particle correlati...

  16. Virtual data in CMS analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Arbree et al.

    2003-10-01

    The use of virtual data for enhancing the collaboration between large groups of scientists is explored in several ways: by defining ''virtual'' parameter spaces which can be searched and shared in an organized way by a collaboration of scientists in the course of their analysis; by providing a mechanism to log the provenance of results and the ability to trace them back to the various stages in the analysis of real or simulated data; by creating ''check points'' in the course of an analysis to permit collaborators to explore their own analysis branches by refining selections, improving the signal to background ratio, varying the estimation of parameters, etc.; by facilitating the audit of an analysis and the reproduction of its results by a different group, or in a peer review context. We describe a prototype for the analysis of data from the CMS experiment based on the virtual data system Chimera and the object-oriented data analysis framework ROOT. The Chimera system is used to chain together several steps in the analysis process including the Monte Carlo generation of data, the simulation of detector response, the reconstruction of physics objects and their subsequent analysis, histogramming and visualization using the ROOT framework.

  17. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, VI; Sarycheva, L I; Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Amapane, N; Gerwig, H; Andreev, V; Cure, B; Mulders, M; Loveless, R; Karimaki, V; Popescu, S; Herve, A

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field ...

  18. Distributed computing grid experiences in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, Julia; Barrass, T; Bonacorsi, D; Bunn, Julian; Capiluppi, P; Corvo, M; Darmenov, N; De Filippis, N; Donno, F; Donvito, G; Eulisse, G; Fanfani, A; Fanzago, F; Filine, A; Grandi, C; Hernández, J M; Innocente, V; Jan, A; Lacaprara, S; Legrand, I; Metson, S; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Pierro, A; Silvestris, L; Steenberg, C; Stockinger, H; Taylor, Lucas; Thomas, M; Tuura, L; Van Lingen, F; Wildish, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The CMS experiment is currently developing a computing system capable of serving, processing and archiving the large number of events that will be generated when the CMS detector starts taking data. During 2004 CMS undertook a large scale data challenge to demonstrate the ability of the CMS computing system to cope with a sustained data- taking rate equivalent to 25% of startup rate. Its goals were: to run CMS event reconstruction at CERN for a sustained period at 25 Hz input rate; to distribute the data to several regional centers; and enable data access at those centers for analysis. Grid middleware was utilized to help complete all aspects of the challenge. To continue to provide scalable access from anywhere in the world to the data, CMS is developing a layer of software that uses Grid tools to gain access to data and resources, and that aims to provide physicists with a user friendly interface for submitting their analysis jobs. This paper describes the data challenge experience with Grid infrastructure ...

  19. Guido Tonelli elected next CMS spokesperson

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Guido Tonelli has been elected as the next CMS spokesperson. He will take over from Jim Virdee on January 1, 2010, and will head the collaboration through the first crucial year of data-taking. Guido Tonelli, CMS spokesperson-elect, into the CMS cavern. "It will be very tough and there will be enormous pressure," explains Guido Tonelli, CMS spokesperson-elect. "It will be the first time that CMS will run for a whole year so it is important to go through the checklist to be able to take good quality data." Tonelli, who is currently CMS Deputy spokesperson, will take over from Jim Virdee on January 1, 2010 – only a few months into CMS’s first full year of data-taking. "The collisions will probably be different to our expectations. So it’s going to take the effort of the entire collaboration worldwide to be ready for this new phase." Born in Italy, Tonelli originally studied at the University of Pisa, where he is now a Professo...

  20. DC-DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Lutz; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R&D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  1. DC-DC Powering for the CMS Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz Werner; Marcel Friedrichs; Richard Hensch; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David Michael; Sammet, Jan Domenik; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R and D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  2. DC–DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feld, Lutz, E-mail: Lutz.Feld@rwth-aachen.de; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-21

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC–DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC–DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R and D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC–DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC–DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  3. Structure and function analysis of the CMS/CIN85 protein family identifies actin-bundling properties and heterotypic-complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Gabriel; Soni, Shefali; Oswald, Duane J; Toselli, Paul A; Kirsch, Kathrin H

    2007-07-15

    Members of the CMS/CIN85 protein family participate in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and play a crucial role in maintaining the kidney filtration barrier. The CMS protein structure includes three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and a proline-rich (PR) region that is connected by a 'linker' sequence to a coiled-coil (CC) domain. We show that CMS is a component of special actin-rich adhesion structures--podosomes--and demonstrate specific actin-binding properties of CMS. We have found that the entire C-terminal half of CMS is necessary for efficient binding to filamentous actin (F-actin). CMS and CIN85 can crosslink F-actin into bundles, a function that depends on the PR region and the CC domain. Removal of these domains reduces migration. CMS can also form heterotypic complexes with CIN85. CIN85 is expressed as multiple isoforms that share the CC domain, suggesting that heterotypic interactions with CMS provides a mechanism to regulate CMS binding to F-actin and thus for modulating dynamic rearrangements of the cytoskeleton.

  4. Ebola virus glycoproteins induce global surface protein down-modulation and loss of cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Graham; Wool-Lewis, Rouven J; Baribaud, Frédéric; Netter, Robert C; Bates, Paul

    2002-03-01

    The Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein (GP) derived from the pathogenic Zaire subtype mediates cell rounding and detachment from the extracellular matrix in 293T cells. In this study we provide evidence that GPs from the other pathogenic subtypes, Sudan and Côte d'Ivoire, as well as from Reston, a strain thought to be nonpathogenic in humans, also induced cell rounding, albeit at lower levels than Zaire GP. Sequential removal of regions of potential O-linked glycosylation at the C terminus of GP1 led to a step-wise reduction in cell detachment without obviously affecting GP function, suggesting that such modifications are involved in inducing the detachment phenotype. While causing cell rounding and detachment in 293T cells, Ebola virus GP did not cause an increase in cell death. Indeed, following transient expression of GP, cells were able to readhere and continue to divide. Also, the rounding effect was not limited to 293T cells. Replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing Ebola virus GP induced the loss of cell adhesion in a range of cell lines and primary cell types, including those with proposed relevance to Ebola virus infection in vivo, such as endothelial cells and macrophages. In both transfected 293T and adenovirus-infected Vero cells, a reduction in cell surface expression of adhesion molecules such as integrin beta1 concurrent with the loss of cell adhesion was observed. A number of other cell surface molecules, however, including major histocompatibility complex class I and the epidermal growth factor receptor, were also down-modulated, suggesting a global mechanism for surface molecule down-regulation.

  5. Possible fabrication techniques and welding specifications for the external cylinder of the CMS coil

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, M; Desirelli, Alberto; Favre, G; Losasso, M; Sequeira-Lopes-Tavares, S; Sgobba, Stefano; Tardy, T; Levesy, B; Reytier, M

    2000-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments, which are being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN. The design field of the CMS magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free aperture is 6 m in diameter. This is achieved with a 4 layer and 5 module superconducting Al- stabilized coil energized at a nominal current of 20 kA at 4.5 K. In the CMS coil the structural function is ensured, unlike in other existing Al-stabilized thin solenoids, both by the Al-alloy reinforced conductor and the external cylinder. The calculated stress level in the cylinder at operating conditions is particularly severe. In this paper the different possible fabrication techniques are assessed and compared and a possible welding specification for this component is given. (9 refs).

  6. Operational experience with the CMS pixel detector in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Karancsi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector was repaired successfully, calibrated and commissioned for the second run of Large Hadron Collider during the first long shutdown between 2013 and 2015. The replaced pixel modules were calibrated separately and show the expected behavior of an un-irradiated detector. In 2015, the system performed very well with an even improved spatial resolution compared to 2012. During this time, the operational team faced various challenges including the loss of a sector in one half shell which was only partially recovered. In 2016, the detector is expected to withstand instantaneous luminosities beyond the design limits and will need a combined effort of both online and offline teams in order to provide the high quality data that is required to reach the physics goals of CMS. We present the operational experience gained during the second run of the LHC and show the latest performance results of the CMS pixel detector.

  7. CMS-Wave Model: Part 4. An Automated Procedure for CMS-Wave in Resource-Demanding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    user’s manual for CMS -Wave are available (Lin et al. 2008, 2006; Demirbilek et al. 2007). CMS -Wave is part of the Coastal Modeling System developed...at the same level as the subfolders. Figure 2 shows the contents of the Visser_1991 example subfolder, including two CMS -Wave simulations, named as...and the surrounding area (red line denotes the CMS domain). The Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) was applied to evaluate current and sedimentation

  8. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-5, Surface Cleaning Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasel, Ed; Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes cleaning activities which typically apply to construction, maintenance, and modification activities at the nuclear power plant site. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3)…

  9. Observations of Bathymetry-Induced Ocean Roughness Modulation in In-situ Surface Slope Measurements and Coincident Airborne SAR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommenginger, C.P.; Robinson, I.S.; Willoughby, J.; Greidanus, H.S.F.; Taylor, V.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical results from a field experiment in the southern North Sea have demonstrated the possibility to detect bathymetry-induced sea surface roughness modulation in the coastal zone using high frequency in-situ slope measurements provided by the Towed Laser Slopemeter. A strong correlation between

  10. LHC collision event at CMS showing two high energy photons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->GammaGamma candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which two high energy photons (dashed orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  11. LHC collision event at CMS showing four high energy electrons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->ZZ->4e candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy electrons (orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  12. CMS Young Researchers Award 2013 and Fundamental Physics Scholars Award from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena

    2014-01-01

    Photo 2: CMS Fundamental Physics Scholars (FPSs) 1st prize: Joosep Pata, from Estonian National Institue of Chemical Physics and Biophysics / Photo 1 and 3: CMS Young Researchers Award. From left to right: Guido Tonelli, Colin Bernet, Andre David, Oliver Gutsche, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Andrea Petrucci, Joe Incandela and Jim Virdee

  13. LHC collision event at CMS showing four high energy muons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->ZZ->4mu candidate being created CMS . Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy muons (light blue lines) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  14. Transcriptome sequencing and de novo analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility and maintenance in JA-CMS cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yang

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS is the failure to produce functional pollen, which is inherited maternally. And it is known that anther development is modulated through complicated interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genes in sporophytic and gametophytic tissues. However, an unbiased transcriptome sequencing analysis of CMS in cotton is currently lacking in the literature. This study compared differentially expressed (DE genes of floral buds at the sporogenous cells stage (SS and microsporocyte stage (MS (the two most important stages for pollen abortion in JA-CMS between JA-CMS and its fertile maintainer line JB cotton plants, using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform. A total of 709 (1.8% DE genes including 293 up-regulated and 416 down-regulated genes were identified in JA-CMS line comparing with its maintainer line at the SS stage, and 644 (1.6% DE genes with 263 up-regulated and 381 down-regulated genes were detected at the MS stage. By comparing the two stages in the same material, there were 8 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated DE genes in JA-CMS line and 29 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated DE genes in JB maintainer line at the MS stage. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate 7 randomly selected DE genes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes involved in reduction-oxidation reactions and alpha-linolenic acid metabolism were down-regulated, while genes pertaining to photosynthesis and flavonoid biosynthesis were up-regulated in JA-CMS floral buds compared with their JB counterparts at the SS and/or MS stages. All these four biological processes play important roles in reactive oxygen species (ROS homeostasis, which may be an important factor contributing to the sterile trait of JA-CMS. Further experiments are warranted to elucidate molecular mechanisms of these genes that lead to CMS.

  15. Transcriptome sequencing and de novo analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility and maintenance in JA-CMS cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Han, Jinfeng; Huang, Jinling

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is the failure to produce functional pollen, which is inherited maternally. And it is known that anther development is modulated through complicated interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genes in sporophytic and gametophytic tissues. However, an unbiased transcriptome sequencing analysis of CMS in cotton is currently lacking in the literature. This study compared differentially expressed (DE) genes of floral buds at the sporogenous cells stage (SS) and microsporocyte stage (MS) (the two most important stages for pollen abortion in JA-CMS) between JA-CMS and its fertile maintainer line JB cotton plants, using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform. A total of 709 (1.8%) DE genes including 293 up-regulated and 416 down-regulated genes were identified in JA-CMS line comparing with its maintainer line at the SS stage, and 644 (1.6%) DE genes with 263 up-regulated and 381 down-regulated genes were detected at the MS stage. By comparing the two stages in the same material, there were 8 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated DE genes in JA-CMS line and 29 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated DE genes in JB maintainer line at the MS stage. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate 7 randomly selected DE genes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes involved in reduction-oxidation reactions and alpha-linolenic acid metabolism were down-regulated, while genes pertaining to photosynthesis and flavonoid biosynthesis were up-regulated in JA-CMS floral buds compared with their JB counterparts at the SS and/or MS stages. All these four biological processes play important roles in reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis, which may be an important factor contributing to the sterile trait of JA-CMS. Further experiments are warranted to elucidate molecular mechanisms of these genes that lead to CMS.

  16. Thick-to-Thin Filament Surface Distance Modulates Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Drosophila Flight Muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Miller, Mark S. (IIT); (Vermont); (BU)

    2012-09-19

    The demembranated (skinned) muscle fiber preparation is widely used to investigate muscle contraction because the intracellular ionic conditions can be precisely controlled. However, plasma membrane removal results in a loss of osmotic regulation, causing abnormal hydration of the myofilament lattice and its proteins. We investigated the structural and functional consequences of varied myofilament lattice spacing and protein hydration on cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle, using x-ray diffraction to compare the lattice spacing of dissected, osmotically compressed skinned fibers to native muscle fibers in living flies. Osmolytes of different sizes and exclusion properties (Dextran T-500 and T-10) were used to differentially alter lattice spacing and protein hydration. At in vivo lattice spacing, cross-bridge attachment time (t{sub on}) increased with higher osmotic pressures, consistent with a reduced cross-bridge detachment rate as myofilament protein hydration decreased. In contrast, in the swollen lattice, t{sub on} decreased with higher osmotic pressures. These divergent responses were reconciled using a structural model that predicts t{sub on} varies inversely with thick-to-thin filament surface distance, suggesting that cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment are modulated more by myofilament lattice geometry than protein hydration. Generalizing these findings, our results suggest that cross-bridge cycling rates slow as thick-to-thin filament surface distance decreases with sarcomere lengthening, and likewise, cross-bridge cycling rates increase during sarcomere shortening. Together, these structural changes may provide a mechanism for altering cross-bridge performance throughout a contraction-relaxation cycle.

  17. Somatostatin actions via somatostatin receptors on the ocular surface are modulated by inflammatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsel, Ivonne; Mentlein, Rolf; Sel, Saadettin; Diebold, Yolanda; Bräuer, Lars; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Paulsen, Friedrich P

    2009-05-01

    Recent investigations support the presence of human somatostatin (SS) in the excretory system of the human lacrimal gland. To get deeper insights into a possible role of SS at the ocular surface and in the lacrimal apparatus, we investigated the distribution pattern of SS and its receptors 1-5 (SSTR1-5) by means of RT-PCR, real-time RT-PCR, Western blot and immunodot blot analysis as well as immunohistochemistry in lacrimal gland, tear fluid, conjunctiva, cornea, nasolacrimal duct epithelium, and conjunctival (HCjE) and corneal (HCE) epithelial cell lines. Cell culture experiments with HCjE and HCE were performed to analyze a possible impact of SS and inflammatory mediators on the regulation of SSTR. The results confirmed the presence of SS in lacrimal gland and tear fluid, whereas it was absent at the protein level in all other tissues and cell lines investigated. Expression of SSTR1, -2, and -5 was detectable in lacrimal gland, conjunctiva, cornea, and nasolacrimal ducts. HCjE expressed only hSSTR1 and -2, and HCE revealed only SSTR2. SSTR3 and -4 were not detected in any of the analyzed samples or cell lines. In vitro on cultured immortalized HCjE cells SS leads to a concentration-dependent down-regulation of SSTR1 mRNA but does not affect SSTR2 mRNA expression. Relative expression of SSTR1 and -2 is differentially modulated by proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial components, suggesting that the expression of both receptors is immunomodulated. Our data support an autocrine and paracrine role of SS in the lacrimal system and at the ocular surface and implicate a role of SS in corneal immunology.

  18. Nanofiber orientation and surface functionalization modulate human mesenchymal stem cell behavior in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolambkar, Yash M; Bajin, Mehmet; Wojtowicz, Abigail; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; García, Andrés J; Guldberg, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun nanofiber meshes have emerged as a new generation of scaffold membranes possessing a number of features suitable for tissue regeneration. One of these features is the flexibility to modify their structure and composition to orchestrate specific cellular responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of nanofiber orientation and surface functionalization on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) migration and osteogenic differentiation. We used an in vitro model to examine hMSC migration into a cell-free zone on nanofiber meshes and mitomycin C treatment to assess the contribution of proliferation to the observed migration. Poly (ε-caprolactone) meshes with oriented topography were created by electrospinning aligned nanofibers on a rotating mandrel, while randomly oriented controls were collected on a stationary collector. Both aligned and random meshes were coated with a triple-helical, type I collagen-mimetic peptide, containing the glycine-phenylalanine-hydroxyproline-glycine-glutamate-arginine (GFOGER) motif. Our results indicate that nanofiber GFOGER peptide functionalization and orientation modulate cellular behavior, individually, and in combination. GFOGER significantly enhanced the migration, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on nanofiber meshes. Aligned nanofiber meshes displayed increased cell migration along the direction of fiber orientation compared to random meshes; however, fiber alignment did not influence osteogenic differentiation. Compared to each other, GFOGER coating resulted in a higher proliferation-driven cell migration, whereas fiber orientation appeared to generate a larger direct migratory effect. This study demonstrates that peptide surface modification and topographical cues associated with fiber alignment can be used to direct cellular behavior on nanofiber mesh scaffolds, which may be exploited for tissue regeneration.

  19. Graphene Oxide Modulates B Cell Surface Phenotype and Impairs Immunoglobulin Secretion in Plasma Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohai; Xu, Shengmin; Chen, Shaopeng; Fan, Huadong; Luo, Xun; Yang, Xiaoyao; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Hang; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2016-04-01

    Since discovery, graphene oxide (GO) has been used in all aspects of human life and revealed promising applications in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the potential risks of GO were always being revealed. Although GO was found to induce immune cell death and innate immune response, little is known regarding its toxicity to the specific adaptive immune system that is crucial for protecting against exotic invasion. The B-cell mediated adaptive immune system, which composed of highly specialized cells (B and plasma cell) and specific immune response (antibody response) is the focus in our present study. Using diverse standard immunological techniques, we found that GO modulated B cell surface phenotype, both costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86 and especially CD40) and antigen presenting molecules (both classical and nonclassical) under the condition without causing cell death. Meanwhile, the terminal differentiated immunoglobulin (Ig) secreting plasma cell was affected by GO, which displayed a less secretion of Ig and more severe ER stress caused by the retention of the secreted form of Ig in cell compartment. The combined data reveal that GO has a particular adverse effect to B cell and the humoral immunity, directly demonstrating the potential risk of GO to the specific adaptive immunity.

  20. The cell surface receptor Slamf6 modulates innate immune responses during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Boaz; Wang, Guoxing; Liao, Gongxian; Halibozek, Peter J; Keszei, Marton; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Bhan, Atul K; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-09-01

    The homophilic cell surface receptors CD150 (Slamf1) and CD352 (Slamf6) are known to modulate adaptive immune responses. Although the Th17 response was enhanced in Slamf6(-/-) C57BL/6 mice upon oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium, the pathologic consequences are indistinguishable from an infection of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Using a reporter-based binding assay, we show that Slamf6 can engage structures on the outer cell membrane of several Gram(-) bacteria. Therefore, we examined whether Slamf6, like Slamf1, is also involved in innate responses to bacteria and regulates peripheral inflammation by assessing the outcome of C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the pathology and immune responses in the lamina propria of C. rodentium-infected Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice were markedly reduced as compared with those of Rag(-/-) mice. Infiltration of inflammatory phagocytes into the lamina propria was consistently lower in Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice than in Rag(-/-) animals. Concomitant with the reduced systemic translocation of the bacteria was an enhanced production of IL-22, suggesting that Slamf6 suppresses a mucosal protective program. Furthermore, administering a mAb (330) that inhibits bacterial interactions with Slamf6 to Rag(-/-) mice ameliorated the infection compared with a control antibody. We conclude that Slamf6-mediated interactions of colonic innate immune cells with specific Gram(-) bacteria reduce mucosal protection and enhance inflammation, contributing to lethal colitis that is caused by C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice.