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Sample records for cms level-1 trigger

  1. The Level-1 Global Muon Trigger for the CMS Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Sakulin, H; Taurok, Anton

    2003-01-01

    The three independent Level-1 muon trigger systems in CMS deliver up to 16 muon candidates per bunch crossing, each described by transverse momentum, direction, charge and quality. The Global Muon Trigger combines these measurements in order to find the best four muon candidates in the entire detector and attaches bits from the calorimeter trigger to denote calorimetric isolation and confirmation. A single-board logic design is presented: via a special front panel and a custom back plane more...

  2. The CMS Level-1 trigger for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, A.

    2018-02-01

    During LHC Run II the centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions has increased from 8 TeV up to 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity has progressed towards 2 × 1034 cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under these conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 trigger is designed to improve performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing. The trigger design, implementation and commissioning are summarised, and performance results are described.

  3. The CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Track Finder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ero, J.; Wulz, C.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Guiducci, L.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sphicas, P.; Triossi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The design and performance of the upgraded CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) is presented. Monte Carlo simulation data as well as cosmic ray data from a CMS muon detector slice test have been used to study in detail the performance of the new track finder. The design architecture is based on twelve MP7 cards each of which uses a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and can receive and transmit data at 10 Gbps from 72 input and 72 output fibers. According to the CMS Trigger Upgrade TDR the BMTF receives trigger primitive data which are computed using both RPC and DT data and transmits data from a number of muon candidates to the upgraded Global Muon Trigger. Results from detailed studies of comparisons between the BMTF algorithm results and the results of a C++ emulator are also presented. The new BMTF will be commissioned for data taking in 2016

  4. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre; Cadamuro, Luca; Davignon, Olivier; Romanteau, Thierry; Strebler, Thomas; Cepeda, Maria Luisa; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Wardle, Nicholas; Aggleton, Robin Cameron; Ball, Fionn Amhairghen; Brooke, James John; Newbold, David; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Smith, D; Taylor, Joseph Ross; Fountas, Konstantinos; Baber, Mark David John; Bundock, Aaron; Breeze, Shane Davy; Citron, Matthew; Elwood, Adam Christopher; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory Michiel; Laner Ogilvy, Christian; Penning, Bjorn; Rose, A; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Tapper, Alexander; Durkin, Timothy John; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Williams, Thomas Stephen; Dasu, Sridhara Rao; Dodd, Laura Margaret; Klabbers, Pamela Renee; Levine, Aaron; Ojalvo, Isabel Rose; Ruggles, Tyler Henry; Smith, Nicholas Charles; Smith, Wesley; Svetek, Ales; Forbes, R; Tikalsky, Jesra Lilah; Vicente, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Results from the completed Phase 1 Upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger are presented. The upgrade was completed in two stages, with the first running in 2015 for proton and Heavy Ion collisions and the final stage for 2016 data taking. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and has been used by CMS to collect over 43 fb-1 of data since the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Run II. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT), which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The trigger processors are instrumented with Xilinx Virtex-7 690 FPGAs and 10 Gbps optical links. The TMT architecture is flexible and the number of trigger p...

  5. Interconnection test framework for the CMS level-1 trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.; Magrans de Abril, M.; Wulz, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring System is a software package designed to configure, monitor and test the Level-1 Trigger System of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. It is a large and distributed system that runs over 50 PCs and controls about 200 hardware units. The objective of this paper is to describe and evaluate the architecture of a distributed testing framework - the Interconnection Test Framework (ITF). This generic and highly flexible framework for creating and executing hardware tests within the Level-1 Trigger environment is meant to automate testing of the 13 major subsystems interconnected with more than 1000 links. Features include a web interface to create and execute tests, modeling using finite state machines, dependency management, automatic configuration, and loops. Furthermore, the ITF will replace the existing heterogeneous testing procedures and help reducing both maintenance and complexity of operation tasks. (authors)

  6. A Level 1 Tracking Trigger for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The LHC machine is planned to be upgraded in the next decade in order to deliver a luminosity about 5 to 10 times larger than the design one of $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. In this scenario, a novel tracking system for the CMS experiment is required to be conceived and built. The main requirements on the CMS tracker are presented. Particular emphasis will be given to the challenging capability of the tracker to provide useful information for the Level 1 hardware trigger, complementary to the muon system and calorimeter ones. Different approaches based on pattern hit correlation within closely placed sensors are currently under evaluation, making use of either strips or macro-pixels. A proposal to optimize the data flow at the front-end ASIC and develop a tracking algorithm to provide tracks at Level 1 will be presented.

  7. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUSHITA, Takashi; CMS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41 fb-1 with a peak luminosity of 1.5 × 1034 cm-2s-1 and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implementation of more algorithms at a time than previously possible, allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the available trigger bandwidth. Algorithms for a trigger menu, including topological requirements on multi-objects, can be realised in the Global Trigger using the newly developed trigger menu specification grammar. Analysis-like trigger algorithms can be represented in an intuitive manner and the algorithms are translated to corresponding VHDL code blocks to build a firmware. The grammar can be extended in future as the needs arise. The experience of implementing trigger menus on the upgraded Global Trigger system will be presented.

  8. Run 2 Upgrades to the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Kreis, B.; Cavanaugh, R.; Mishra, K.; Rivera, R.; Uplegger, L.; Apanasevich, L.; Zhang, J.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Foudas, C.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Romanteau, T.; Sauvan, J.B.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Barbieri, R.; Cali, I.A.; Innocenti, G.M.; Lee, Y.J.; Roland, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Northup, M.; Tran, B.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Forbes, R.; Gorski, T.; Klabbers, P.; Levine, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Ruggles, T.; Smith, N.; Smith, W.; Svetek, A.; Tikalsky, J.; Vicente, M.

    2016-01-21

    The CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger is being upgraded in two stages to maintain performance as the LHC increases pile-up and instantaneous luminosity in its second run. In the first stage, improved algorithms including event-by-event pile-up corrections are used. New algorithms for heavy ion running have also been developed. In the second stage, higher granularity inputs and a time-multiplexed approach allow for improved position and energy resolution. Data processing in both stages of the upgrade is performed with new, Xilinx Virtex-7 based AMC cards.

  9. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41~fb$^{-1}$ with a peak luminosity of 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS \\mbox{Level-1} trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implemen...

  10. CMS Level-1 Upgrade Calorimeter Trigger Prototype Development

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, Pamela Renee

    2013-01-01

    As the LHC increases luminosity and energy, it will become increasingly difficult to select interesting physics events and remain within the readout bandwidth limitations. An upgrade to the CMS Calorimeter Trigger implementing more complex algorithms is proposed. It utilizes AMC cards with Xilinx FPGAs running in micro-TCA crate with card interconnections via crate backplanes and optical links operating at up to 10 Gbps. Prototype cards with Virtex-6 and Virtex-7 FPGAs have been built and software frameworks for operation and monitoring developed. The physics goals, hardware architectures, and software will be described in this talk. More details can be found in a separate poster at this conference.

  11. The CMS Trigger Supervisor: Control and Hardware Monitoring System of the CMS Level-1 Trigger at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ildefons Magrans de Abril

    2008-01-01

    The experiments CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) at the LargeHadron Collider (LHC) are the greatest exponents of the rising complexity in High Energy Physics (HEP) datahandling instrumentation. Tens of millions of readout channels, tens of thousands of hardware boards and thesame order of connections are figures of merit. However, the hardware volume is not the only complexitydimension, the unprecedented large number of research institutes and scientists that form the internationalcollaborations, and the long design, development, commissioning and operational phases are additional factorsthat must be taken into account.The Level-1 (L1) trigger decision loop is an excellent example of these difficulties. This system is based on apipelined logic destined to analyze without deadtime the data from each LHC bunch crossing occurring every25_ns, using special coarsely segmented trigger data from the detectors. The L1 trigger is responsible forreducing the rate of accepted crossings to...

  12. The Architecture of the CMS Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Magrans de Abril, Marc; Hammer, Josef; Hartl, Christian; Xie, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    The architecture of the Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring system for the CMS experiment is presented. This system has been installed and commissioned on the trigger online computers and is currently used for data taking at the LHC. This is a medium-size distributed system that runs over 40 PCs and 200 processes that control about 4000 electronic boards. It has been designed to handle the trigger configuration and monitoring during data taking as well as all communications with the main run control of CMS. Furthermore its design has foreseen the provision of the software infrastructure for detailed testing of the trigger system during beam down time.

  13. Architecture of a Level 1 Track Trigger for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heintz, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    The luminosity goal for the Super-LHC is 1035/cm2/s. At this luminosity the number of proton-proton interactions in each beam crossing will be in the hundreds. This will stress many components of the CMS detector. One system that has to be upgraded is the trigger system. To keep the rate at which the level 1 trigger fires manageable, information from the tracker has to be integrated into the level 1 trigger. Current design proposals foresee tracking detectors that perform on-detector filtering to reject hits from low-momentum particles. In order to build a trigger system, the filtered hit data from different layers and sectors of the tracker will have to be transmitted off the detector and brought together in a logic processor that generates trigger tracks within the time window allowed by the level 1 trigger latency. I will describe a possible architecture for the off-detector logic that accomplishes this goal.

  14. Performance of the CMS Level-1 Trigger during Commissioning with Cosmic Ray Muons and LHC beams

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; 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Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Level-1 trigger was used to select cosmic ray muons and LHC beam events during data-taking runs in 2008, and to estimate the level of detector noise. This paper describes the trigger components used, the algorithms that were executed, and the trigger synchronisation. Using data from extended cosmic ray runs, the muon, electron/photon, and jet triggers have been validated, and their performance evaluated. Efficiencies were found to be high, resolutions were found to be good, and rates as expected.

  15. The CMS Level-1 tau lepton and Vector Boson Fusion triggers for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Amendola, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds that were used in LHC Run I for the more challenging luminosity conditions experienced during Run II. The upgrades to the calorimetry trigger will be described along with performance data. The algorithms for the selection of final states with tau leptons, both for precision measurements and for searches of new physics beyond the Standard Model, will be described in detail. The implementation of the first dedicated Vector Boson Fusion trigger algorithm will be presented as well, along with its performance on benchmark physics signals.

  16. The architecture of the CMS Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring System using UML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magrans de Abril, Marc; Ghabrous Larrea, Carlos; Lazaridis, Christos; Da Rocha Melo, Jose L; Hammer, Josef; Hartl, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The architecture of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring software system is presented. This system has been installed and commissioned on the trigger online computers and is currently used for data taking. It has been designed to handle the trigger configuration and monitoring during data taking as well as all communications with the main run control of CMS. Furthermore its design has foreseen the provision of the software infrastructure for detailed testing of the trigger system during beam down time. This is a medium-size distributed system that runs over 40 PCs and 200 processes that control about 4000 electronic boards. The architecture of this system is described using the industry-standard Universal Modeling Language (UML). This way the relationships between the different subcomponents of the system become clear and all software upgrades and modifications are simplified. The described architecture has allowed for frequent upgrades that were necessary during the commissioning phase of CMS when the trigger system evolved constantly. As a secondary objective, the paper provides a UML usage example and tries to encourage the standardization of the software documentation of large projects across the LHC and High Energy Physics community.

  17. The architecture of the CMS Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring System using UML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrans de Abril, Marc; Da Rocha Melo, Jose L.; Ghabrous Larrea, Carlos; Hammer, Josef; Hartl, Christian; Lazaridis, Christos

    2011-12-01

    The architecture of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring software system is presented. This system has been installed and commissioned on the trigger online computers and is currently used for data taking. It has been designed to handle the trigger configuration and monitoring during data taking as well as all communications with the main run control of CMS. Furthermore its design has foreseen the provision of the software infrastructure for detailed testing of the trigger system during beam down time. This is a medium-size distributed system that runs over 40 PCs and 200 processes that control about 4000 electronic boards. The architecture of this system is described using the industry-standard Universal Modeling Language (UML). This way the relationships between the different subcomponents of the system become clear and all software upgrades and modifications are simplified. The described architecture has allowed for frequent upgrades that were necessary during the commissioning phase of CMS when the trigger system evolved constantly. As a secondary objective, the paper provides a UML usage example and tries to encourage the standardization of the software documentation of large projects across the LHC and High Energy Physics community.

  18. A level-1 track trigger for CMS with double stack detectors and long barrel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, E

    2012-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC machine is planned to deliver luminosities 5 to 10 times larger than the design one of 1 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 . A novel tracking system for the CMS experiment must be designed and built. One main aspect of the current activities consists in understanding the capabilities that different designs such a tracker would have to provide for the Level 1 hardware trigger to complement the muon and calorimeter information. Data rate reduction at hardware level consists in both reducing multiple hits from a single track and rejection of low p t tracks. Pattern-based hit correlation of properly built clusters of hits would provide quality Level 1 primitives to the hardware trigger. These can be combined together in a projective geometry to perform a rough tracking to be implemented online, returning rough p t , direction, and vertex information for a candidate track. The benchmark results from simulations within the official CMS framework are presented for one particular layout based on barrel trigger layers, emphasizing the flexibility of this tool for the design and test of different tracking strategies at level 1 to be compared with the developments in trigger architectures implementation.

  19. Level-1 track trigger for the upgrade of the CMS detector at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ahuja, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) studies proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. With the LHC colliding proton bunches every 25 nanoseconds, the volume and rate of raw data produced by the detector are much larger than what can be read out, recorded, and reconstructed. Therefore, an efficient trigger system is required to identify events of interest in real time and to reduce the rate of events to a manageable level for later software reconstruction. The CMS trigger system consists of two processing stages, a level-1 (L1) hardware trigger and a high level software trigger. The current L1 trigger decision relies solely on calorimetric and muon system information. During the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) era, the instantaneous luminosity of the collider is expected to increase by approximately an order of magnitude, resulting in a significantly larger number of collisions per bunch crossing than observed in the current run. In order to preserve ...

  20. Data analysis at the CMS level-1 trigger: migrating complex selection algorithms from offline analysis and high-level trigger to the trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wulz, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    With ever increasing luminosity at the LHC, optimum online data selection is becoming more and more important. While in the case of some experiments (LHCb and ALICE) this task is being completely transferred to computer farms, the others -- ATLAS and CMS -- will not be able to do this in the medium-term future for technological, detector-related reasons. Therefore, these experiments pursue the complementary approach of migrating more and more of the offline and high-level trigger intelligence into the trigger electronics. The presentation illustrates how the level-1 trigger of the CMS experiment and in particular its concluding stage, the so-called ``Global Trigger", take up this challenge.

  1. Upgrade of the cathode strip chamber level 1 trigger optical links at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K; Liu, J; Matveev, M; Padley, P; Madorsky, A

    2012-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the CMS experiment's Level 1 Trigger system for the endcap Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) has 180 optical links to transmit Level 1 trigger primitives from 60 peripheral crates to the CSC Track Finder (CSCTF) which reconstructs muon candidates. Currently there is a limit of 3 trigger primitives per crate serving a cluster of 9 chambers. With the anticipated LHC luminosity increase up to 10 35 cm −2 s −1 at full energy of 7 TeV/beam the Muon Port Card (MPC), which transmits the primitives, the receiver in the CSCTF (Sector Processor) and the optical transmission system itself need to be upgraded. At the same time it is very desirable to preserve all the old optical links intact for compatibility with the present Track Finder during transition period. We present here the results of our efforts in the past two years to upgrade the MPC board, including the hardware developments, data transmission tests and latency measurements.

  2. SWATCH Common software for controlling and monitoring the upgraded CMS Level-1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Lazaridis, Christos; Bunkowski, Karol; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dirkx, Glenn; Ghabrous Larrea, Carlos; Lingemann, Joschka; Kreczko, Lukasz; Thea, Alessandro; Williams, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN restarted in 2015 with a higher centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase significantly in the coming years. An upgraded Level-1 trigger system is being deployed in the CMS experiment in order to maintain the same efficiencies for searches and precision measurements as those achieved in the previous run. This system must be controlled and monitored coherently through software, with high operational efficiency.The legacy system is composed of approximately 4000 data processor boards, of several custom application-specific designs. These boards are organised into several subsystems; each subsystem receives data from different detector systems (calorimeters, barrel/endcap muon detectors), or with differing granularity. These boards have been controlled and monitored by a medium-sized distributed system of over 40 computers and 200 processes. Only a small fraction of the control and monitoring software was common between the different s...

  3. Boosted decision trees in the CMS Level-1 endcap muon trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Low, Jia Fu; Busch, Elena Laura; Carnes, Andrew Mathew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei; Kotov, Khristian; Madorsky, Alexander; Rorie, Jamal Tildon; Scurlock, Bobby; Shi, Wei; Acosta, Darin Edward

    2017-01-01

    The first implementation of Boosted Decision Trees (BDTs) inside a Level-1 trigger system at the LHC is presented. The Endcap Muon Track Finder (EMTF) at CMS uses BDTs to infer the momentum of muons in the forward region of the detector, based on 25 different variables. Combinations of these variables are evaluated offline using regression BDTs, whose output is stored in 1.2 GB look-up tables (LUTs) in the EMTF hardware. These BDTs take advantage of complex correlations between variables, the inhomogeneous magnetic field, and non-linear effects such as inelastic scattering to distinguish high-momentum signal muons from the overwhelming low-momentum background. The LUTs are used to turn the complex BDT evaluation into a simple look-up operation in fixed low latency. The new momentum assignment algorithm has reduced the trigger rate by a factor of 3 at the 25 GeV trigger threshold with respect to the legacy system, with further improvements foreseen in the coming year.

  4. Electronics for CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger System Phase-1 and HL LHC Upgrades Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Madorsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    To accommodate high-luminosity LHC operation at 13 TeV collision energy, the CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger system had to be significantly modified. To provide the best track reconstruction, the trigger system must now import all available trigger primitives generated by Cathode Strip Chambers and by certain other subsystems, such as Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). In addition to massive input bandwidth, this also required significant increase in logic and memory resources.To satisfy these requirements, a new Sector Processor unit has been designed. It consists of three modules. The Core Logic module houses the large FPGA that contains the track-finding logic and multi-gigabit serial links for data exchange. The Optical module contains optical receivers and transmitters; it communicates with the Core Logic module via a custom backplane section. The Pt Lookup Table (PTLUT) module contains 1 GB of low-latency memory that is used to assign the final Pt to reconstructed muon tracks. The µTCA architecture (ado...

  5. Electronics for CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger System Phase-1 and HL LHC upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorsky, A.

    2017-07-01

    To accommodate high-luminosity LHC operation at a 13 TeV collision energy, the CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger system had to be significantly modified. To provide robust track reconstruction, the trigger system must now import all available trigger primitives generated by the Cathode Strip Chambers and by certain other subsystems, such as Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). In addition to massive input bandwidth, this also required significant increase in logic and memory resources. To satisfy these requirements, a new Sector Processor unit has been designed. It consists of three modules. The Core Logic module houses the large FPGA that contains the track-finding logic and multi-gigabit serial links for data exchange. The Optical module contains optical receivers and transmitters; it communicates with the Core Logic module via a custom backplane section. The Pt Lookup table (PTLUT) module contains 1 GB of low-latency memory that is used to assign the final Pt to reconstructed muon tracks. The μ TCA architecture (adopted by CMS) was used for this design. The talk presents the details of the hardware and firmware design of the production system based on Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA family. The next round of LHC and CMS upgrades starts in 2019, followed by a major High-Luminosity (HL) LHC upgrade starting in 2024. In the course of these upgrades, new Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors and more RPC chambers will be added to the Endcap Muon system. In order to keep up with all these changes, a new Advanced Processor unit is being designed. This device will be based on Xilinx UltraScale+ FPGAs. It will be able to accommodate up to 100 serial links with bit rates of up to 25 Gb/s, and provide up to 2.5 times more logic resources than the device used currently. The amount of PTLUT memory will be significantly increased to provide more flexibility for the Pt assignment algorithm. The talk presents preliminary details of the hardware design program.

  6. Track Finding for the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    James, Thomas Owen

    2017-01-01

    A new tracking system is under development for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), located at CERN. It includes a silicon tracker that will correlate clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, for the rejection of hits from low transverse momentum tracks. This will allow tracker data to be read out to the Level-1 trigger at 40\\,MHz. The Level-1 track-finder must be able to identify tracks with transverse momentum above 2--3\\,$\\mathrm{GeV}/c$ within latency constraints. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are identified using a Hough Transform, and then refined with a Kalman Filter. Both steps are fully implemented in FPGA firmware. A hardware system built from MP7 MicroTCA processing cards has been assembled, which demonstrates a realistic slice of the track finder in order to help gauge the performance and requirements for a final system.

  7. Common software for controlling and monitoring the upgraded CMS Level-1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Codispoti, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider restarted in 2015 with a higher centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase significantly in the coming years. An upgraded Level-1 trigger system was deployed in the CMS experiment in order to maintain the same efficiencies for searches and precision measurements as those achieved in 2012. This system must be controlled and monitored coherently through software, with high operational efficiency.The legacy system was composed of a large number of custom data processor boards; correspondingly, only a small fraction of the software was common between the different subsystems. The upgraded system is composed of a set of general purpose boards, that follow the MicroTCA specification, and transmit data over optical links, resulting in a more homogeneous system. The associated software is based on generic components corresponding to the firmware blocks that are shared across different cards, regardless of the role that the card plays in the system. ...

  8. A Level 1 Tracking Trigger for the CMS Experiment at the LHC Phase 2 Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The second decade of Large Hadron Collider operations, from about 2020 onwards, envisages a remarkable increase in collider instantaneous luminosity, one order of magnitude above the project one. This luminosity increase presents several challenges to the LHC experiments. The present tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment must be replaced with a system providing excellent tracking quality at higher luminosities, as well as Tracking Trigger inputs to the existing “Level 0” CMS trigger system at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. The minimal requirements for a Tracking Trigger would be the capability to confirm the presence of high-pT tracks associated with Calorimeter and/or Muon Level 0 triggers. The ability to provide eective isolation criteria may also be required, and would in any case substantially improve the Trigger performance. Maintaining the data rates generated by Tracking Trigger inputs within a manageable bandwidth requires sensor modules able to locally sparsify the data. Measuring...

  9. Concepts and design of the CMS high granularity calorimeter Level-1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has chosen a novel high granularity calorimeter for the forward region as part of its planned upgrade for the high luminosity LHC. The calorimeter will have a fine segmentation in both the transverse and longitudinal directions and will be the first such calorimeter specifically optimised for particle flow reconstruction to operate at a colliding beam experiment. The high granularity results in around six million readout channels in total and so presents a significant challenge in terms of data manipulation and processing for the trigger; the trigger data volumes will be an order of magnitude above those currently handled at CMS. In addition, the high luminosity will result in an average of 140 to 200 interactions per bunch crossing, giving a huge background rate in the forward region that needs to be efficiently reduced by the trigger algorithms. Efficient data reduction and reconstruction algorithms making use of the fine segmentation of the detector have been simulated and evaluated. The...

  10. Installation and Commissioning of the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071552; Aggleton, Robin Cameron; Baber, Mark David John; Barbieri, Richard Alexander; Belknap, Donald Austin; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Brooke, James John; Bundock, Aaron; Cali, Ivan Amos; Cepeda, Maria Luisa; Dasgupta, Sudeshna; da Silva, J.C; Dasu, Sridhara Rao; Durkin, Timothy John; Fobes, Robert William; Ghabrous Larrea, Carlos; Gorski, Thomas; Grimes, Mark; Guilbaud, Maxime; Guo, Z; Hall, Geoffrey; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Iles, Gregory Michiel; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ives, Sarah Joanne; Jones, John; Kreis, Benjamin Jonah; Lee, Y; Li, W; Lucas, Christopher; Lucas, Robyn Elizabeth; Marrouche, Jad; Newbold, David; Northup, Michael; Oljavo, I; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Rivera, Ryan Allen; Roland, Christof; Rose, A; Sankey, D; Smith, Wesley; Svetek, Ales; Tapper, Alexander; Thea, Alessandro; Tikalsky, Jesra Lilah; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vicente, Marcelo; Williams, Thomas Stephen; Wyslouch, Boleslaw

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is currently installing upgrades to their Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run 2 to ensure that the trigger thresholds can stay low, and physics data collection will not be compromised. The electronics will be upgraded in two stages. Stage-1 for 2015 will upgrade some electronics and links from copper to optical in the existing calorimeter trigger so that the algorithms can be improved and we do not lose valuable data before stage-2 can be fully installed by 2016. Stage-2 will fully replace the calorimeter trigger at CMS with a micro-TCA and optical link system. It requires that the updates to the calorimeter back-ends, the source of the trigger primitives, be completed. The new systemâ??s boards will utilize Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGAs and have hundreds of high-speed links operating at up to 10 Gbps to maximize data throughput. The integration, commissioning, and installation of stage-1 in 2015 will be described, as well as the integration and parallel installation of th...

  11. Level-1 trigger selection of electrons and photons with CMS for LHC Run-II.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088114

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The first, hardware-level trigger (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all subdetectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its center of mass energy to 13 or 14 TeV, and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme in this intense environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be upgraded. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture in particular has been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds even in presence of more demanding conditions (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of $\\tau$ leptons. This design benefits from recent $\\mu$TCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorit...

  12. A level-1 pixel based track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present feasibility studies to investigate the performances and interest of a Level-1 trigger based on pixels. The Level-1 (real-time) pixel based tracking trigger is a novel trigger system that is based on the real-time track reconstruction algorithms able to cope with very high rates and high flux of data in a very harsh environment. The pixel detector has an especially crucial role in precisely identifying the primary vertex of the rare physics events from the large pile-up (PU) of events. The goal of adding the pixel information already at the real-time level of the selection is to help reducing the total level-1 trigger rate while keeping an high selection capability. This is quite an innovative and challenging objective for the experiments upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC).

  13. A level-1 pixel based track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We present feasibility studies to investigate the performance and interest of a Level-1 trigger based on pixels. The Level-1 (real-time) pixel based tracking trigger is a novel trigger system that is based on real-time track reconstruction algorithms able to cope with very high rates and high flux of data in a very harsh environment. The pixel detector has an especially crucial role in precisely identifying the primary vertex of rare physics events from the large pile-up of events. The goal of adding the pixel information already at the real-time level of the selection is to help reducing the total Level-1 trigger rate while keeping a high selection capability. This is quite an innovative and challenging objective for the upgrade of the experiments for the High Luminosity LHC.

  14. Optimization of algorithms of Level 1 Trigger in Overlap region in CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pijanowski, Karol Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    CMS has recently upgraded the L1 muon trigger. The Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) is using data from three types of muon detectors in barrel-endcap transition region to find muon tracks and estimate their transverse momentum. The goal is to decrease rate of events produced by OMTF and maintain high efficiency in detection of muons with high transverse momentum. In order to achieve this the change in OMTF algorithm has been proposed. Until now algorithm was based on a similar principle as the "naive Bayesian classifier" and it was not taking into account the correlation between the detector hits, but only probability of matching them to a given transverse momentum hypothesis. The addition of the correlation has decreased the rate of events around the threshold, but it has also affected efficiency above the threshold. In addition it has not affected the rate produced by low transverse momentum muons, which gives the highest contribution to overall rate.

  15. Proposed FPGA based tracking for a Level-1 track trigger at CMS for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver a luminosity in excess of $5\\times10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$/s. The high event rate places stringent requirements on the trigger system. A key component of the CMS upgrade for the HL-LHC is a track trigger system which will identify tracks with transverse momenta above 2 GeV already at the first-level trigger within 5 $\\mu$s. This presentation will discuss a proposed track finding and fitting based on the tracklet based approach implemented on FPGAs. Tracklets are formed from pairs of hits in nearby layers in the detector and used in a road search. Summary Fast pattern recognition in Silicon trackers for triggering has often made use of Associative Memories for the pattern recognition step. We propose an alternative approach to solving the pattern recognition and track fitting problem for the upgraded CMS tracker for the HL-LHC operation. We make use of the trigger primitives,stubs, from the tracker. The stubs are formed from pairs of hits in sensors separated r...

  16. Design Considerations for an Upgraded Track-Finding Processor in the Level-1 Endcap Muon Trigger of CMS for SLHC operations

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Furic, I; Gartner, J; Di Giovanni, G P; Hammar, A; Kotov, K; Madorsky, A; Matveev, M; Padley, P; Uvarov, L; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    The conceptual design for a Level-1 muon track-finder trigger for the CMS endcap muon system is proposed that can accommodate the increased particle occupancy and system constraints of the proposed SLHC accelerator upgrade and the CMS detector upgrades. A brief review of the architecture of the current track-finder for LHC trigger operation is given, with potential bottlenecks indicated for SLHC operation. The upgraded track-finding processors described here would receive as many as two track segments detected from every cathode strip chamber comprising the endcap muon system, up to a total of 18 per 60° azimuthal sector. This would dramatically improve the efficiency of the track reconstruction in a high occupancy environment over the current design. However, such an improvement would require significantly higher bandwidth and logic resources. We propose to use the fastest available serial links, running asynchronously to the machine clock to use their full bandwidth. The work of creating a firmware model f...

  17. CMS Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    During its second run of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will deliver a peak instantaneous luminosity that may reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realized by a two-level trigger system the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has been through a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT go through big improvements; in particular, new appr...

  18. Data analysis at Level-1 Trigger level

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, Johannes; Aradi, Gregor; Bergauer, Herbert; Jeitler, Manfred; Wulz, Claudia; Apanasevich, Leonard; Winer, Brian; Puigh, Darren Michael

    2017-01-01

    With ever increasing luminosity at the LHC, optimum online data selection is getting more and more important. While in the case of some experiments (LHCb and ALICE) this task is being completely transferred to computer farms, the others - ATLAS and CMS - will not be able to do this in the medium-term future for technological, detector-related reasons. Therefore, these experiments pursue the complementary approach of migrating more and more of the offline and High-Level Trigger intelligence into the trigger electronics. This paper illustrates how the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS experiment and in particular its concluding stage, the Global Trigger, take up this challenge.

  19. Design Considerations for an Upgraded Track-Finding Processor in the Level-1 Endcap Muon Trigger of CMS for SLHC Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Madorsky, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    D. Acosta, M. Fisher, I. Furic, J. Gartner, G.P. Di Giovanni, A. Hammar, K. Kotov, A. Madorsky, D. Wang University of Florida/Physics, POB 118440, Gainesville, FL, USA, 32611 L. Uvarov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia M. Matveev, P. Padley Rice University, MS 61, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX, USA, 77005 The conceptual design for a Level-1 muon track-finder trigger for the CMS endcap muon system is proposed that can accommodate the increased particle occupancy and system constraints of the proposed SLHC accelerator upgrade and the CMS detector upgrades. A brief review of the architecture of the current track-finder for LHC trigger operation is given, with potential bottlenecks indicated for SLHC operation. The upgraded track-finding processors described here would receive as many as two track segments detected from every cathode strip chamber comprising the endcap muon system, up to a total of 18 per 60 degree azimuthal sector. This would dramatically improve the efficiency of the ...

  20. Level-1 $\\tau$ trigger performance in 2017 data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In 2017, the LHC achieved an instantaneous luminosity of 2.06x10$^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, and a peak average pile-up of more than 50. This document describes the performance of the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger for $\\tau$ leptons using 40.9 fb$^{-1}$ of 2017 data. Details of the Level-1 trigger algorithms can be found in CMS-DP-2015-009. The previous Level-1 $\\tau$ performance report can be found in CMS-DP-2017-022.

  1. Trigger processing using reconfigurable logic in the CMS calorimeter trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooke, J J; Cussans, D G; Heath, G P; Maddox, A J; Newbold, D M; Rabbetts, P D

    2001-04-01

    We present the design of the Global Calorimeter Trigger processor for the CMS detector at LHC. This is a fully pipelined processor system which collects data from all the CMS calorimeters and produces summary information used in forming the Level-1 trigger decision for each event. The design in based on the use of state-of-the-art reconfigurable logic devices (FPGAs) and fast data links. We present the results of device testing using a low-latency pipelined sort algorithm, which demonstrate that an FPGA can be used to perform processing previously foreseen to require custom ASICs. Our design approach results in a powerful, flexible and compact processor system.

  2. The CMS High Level Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Afaq, A; Bauer, G; Biery, K; Boyer, V; Branson, J; Brett, A; Cano, E; Carboni, A; Cheung, H; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; Dagenhart, W; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Gulmini, M; Gutiérrez-Mlot, E; Gutleber, J; Jacobs, C; Kim, J C; Klute, M; Kowalkowski, J; Lipeles, E; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, I; Tsirigkas, D; Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The CMS Data Acquisition (DAQ) System relies on a purely software driven High Level Trigger (HLT) to reduce the full Level-1 accept rate of 100 kHz to approximately 100 Hz for archiving and later offline analysis. The HLT operates on the full information of events assembled by an event builder collecting detector data from the CMS front-end systems. The HLT software consists of a sequence of reconstruction and filtering modules executed on a farm of O(1000) CPUs built from commodity hardware. This paper presents the architecture of the CMS HLT, which integrates the CMS reconstruction framework in the online environment. The mechanisms to configure, control, and monitor the Filter Farm and the procedures to validate the filtering code within the DAQ environment are described.

  3. The CMS Barrel Muon trigger upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triossi, A.; Sphicas, P.; Bellato, M.; Montecassiano, F.; Ventura, S.; Ruiz, J.M. Cela; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Tobar, A. Navarro; Fernandez, I. Redondo; Ferrero, D. Redondo; Sastre, J.; Ero, J.; Wulz, C.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Loukas, N.; Mallios, S.; Paradas, E.; Guiducci, L.; Masetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during Phase1 will impose tighter constraints for rate reduction in order to maintain high efficiency in the CMS Level1 trigger system. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that concentrates the information from different subdetectors: Drift Tubes, Resistive Plate Chambers and Outer Hadron Calorimeter. It arranges the slow optical trigger links from the detector chambers into faster links (10 Gbps) that are sent in multiple copies to the track finders. Results from collision runs, that confirm the satisfactory operation of the trigger system up to the output of the barrel track finder, will be shown.

  4. ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has introduced and recently commissioned a completely new hardware sub-system of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). L1Topo consist of two AdvancedTCA blades mounting state-of-the-art FPGA processors, providing high input bandwidth (up to 4 Gb/s) and low latency data processing (200 ns). L1Topo is able to select collision events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger will be presented. These results demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for a rate reduction without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-pT leptons, including H->tau tau and J/Psi->mu mu. In addition to describing the L1Topo trigger system, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a powerful tool to validate and optimize...

  5. Level-1 muon trigger performance with the full 2017 dataset

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This document describes the performance of the CMS Level-1 Muon Trigger with the full dataset of 2017. Efficiency plots are included for each track finder (TF) individually and for the system as a whole. The efficiency is measured to be greater than 90% for all track finders.

  6. The CMS High-Level Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covarelli, R.

    2009-01-01

    At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the 'High-Level Trigger'(HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, τ leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

  7. The CMS High-Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Covarelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the "High-Level Trigger" (HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, tau leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

  8. The CMS High-Level Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarelli, R.

    2009-12-01

    At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the "High-Level Trigger" (HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, τ leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

  9. Upgrade of the CMS Global Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred; Rabady, Dinyar; Sakulin, Hannes; Stahl, Achim

    2015-01-01

    The increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity for Run-II of the Large Hadron Collider poses new challenges for the trigger systems of the experiments. To keep triggering with a similar performance as in Run-I, the CMS muon trigger is currently being upgraded. The new algorithms will provide higher resolution, especially for the muon transverse momentum and will make use of isolation criteria that combine calorimeter with muon information already in the level-1 trigger. The demands of the new algorithms can only be met by upgrading the level-1 trigger system to new powerful FPGAs with high bandwidth I/O. The processing boards will be based on the new μTCA standard. We report on the planned algorithms for the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT) which sorts and removes duplicates from boundaries of the muon trigger sub-systems. Furthermore, it determines how isolated the muon candidates are based on calorimetric energy deposits. The μGMT will be implemented using a processing board that features a larg...

  10. Upgrade of the CMS Global Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Lingemann, Joschka; Sakulin, Hannes; Jeitler, Manfred; Stahl, Achim

    2015-01-01

    The increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity for Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider pose new challenges for the trigger systems of the experiments. To keep triggering with a similar performance as in Run 1, the CMS muon trigger is currently being upgraded. The new algorithms will provide higher resolution, especially for the muon transverse momentum and will make use of isolation criteria that combine calorimeter with muon information already in the level-1 trigger. The demands of the new algorithms can only be met by upgrading the level-1 trigger system to new powerful FPGAs with high bandwidth I/O. The processing boards will be based on the new microTCA standard. We report on the planned algorithms for the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (GMT) which combines information from the muon trigger sub-systems and assigns the isolation variable. The upgraded GMT will be implemented using a Master Processor 7 card, built by Imperial College, that features a large Xilinx Virtex 7 FPGA. Up to 72 optical links at...

  11. CMS High Level Trigger Timing Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Clint

    2015-01-01

    The two-level trigger system employed by CMS consists of the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, which is implemented using custom-built electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a farm of commercial CPUs running a streamlined version of the offline CMS reconstruction software. The operational L1 output rate of 100 kHz, together with the number of CPUs in the HLT farm, imposes a fundamental constraint on the amount of time available for the HLT to process events. Exceeding this limit impacts the experiment's ability to collect data efficiently. Hence, there is a critical need to characterize the performance of the HLT farm as well as the algorithms run prior to start up in order to ensure optimal data taking. Additional complications arise from the fact that the HLT farm consists of multiple generations of hardware and there can be subtleties in machine performance. We present our methods of measuring the timing performance of the CMS HLT, including the challenges of making such measurements. Results for the performance of various Intel Xeon architectures from 2009-2014 and different data taking scenarios are also presented. (paper)

  12. Tracking at High Level Trigger in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabili- ties of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a stream- lined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable out- put rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Track reconstruction algorithms are widely used in the HLT, for the reconstruction of the physics objects as well as in the identification of b-jets and ...

  13. The ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00371751; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC will collide protons in the ATLAS detector with increasing luminosity through 2016, placing stringent operational and physical requirements to the ATLAS trigger system in order to reduce the 40 MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, while not rejecting interesting physics events. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency smaller than 2.5 μs. It consists of a calorimeter trigger, muon trigger and a central trigger processor. During the LHC shutdown after the Run 1 finished in 2013, the Level-1 trigger system was upgraded including hardware, firmware and software updates. In particular, new electronics modules were introduced in the real-time data processing path: the Topological Processor System (L1Topo). It consists of a single AdvancedCTA shelf equipped with two Level-1 topological processor blades. They receive real-time information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, which...

  14. The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achenbach, R; Andrei, V; Adragna, P; Apostologlou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J P; Asman, B; Bohm, C; Ay, C; Bauss, B; Bendel, M; Dahlhoff, A; Eckweiler, S; Booth, J R A; Thomas, P Bright; Charlton, D G; Collins, N J; Curtis, C J

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger uses reduced-granularity information from all the ATLAS calorimeters to search for high transverse-energy electrons, photons, τ leptons and jets, as well as high missing and total transverse energy. The calorimeter trigger electronics has a fixed latency of about 1 μs, using programmable custom-built digital electronics. This paper describes the Calorimeter Trigger hardware, as installed in the ATLAS electronics cavern

  15. The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achenbach, R; Andrei, V [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Adragna, P [Physics Department, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Apostologlou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J P [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Asman, B; Bohm, C [Fysikum, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Ay, C; Bauss, B; Bendel, M; Dahlhoff, A; Eckweiler, S [Institut fuer Physik, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Booth, J R A; Thomas, P Bright; Charlton, D G; Collins, N J; Curtis, C J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: e.eisenhandler@qmul.ac.uk (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger uses reduced-granularity information from all the ATLAS calorimeters to search for high transverse-energy electrons, photons, {tau} leptons and jets, as well as high missing and total transverse energy. The calorimeter trigger electronics has a fixed latency of about 1 {mu}s, using programmable custom-built digital electronics. This paper describes the Calorimeter Trigger hardware, as installed in the ATLAS electronics cavern.

  16. The ATLAS Level-1 Trigger Timing Setup

    CERN Document Server

    Spiwoks, R; Ellis, Nick; Farthouat, P; Gällnö, P; Haller, J; Krasznahorkay, A; Maeno, T; Pauly, T; Pessoa-Lima, H; Resurreccion-Arcas, I; Schuler, G; De Seixas, J M; Torga-Teixeira, R; Wengler, T

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC will be exposed to proton-proton collisions at a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. In order to reduce the data rate, a three-level trigger system selects potentially interesting physics. The first trigger level is implemented in electronics and firmware. It aims at reducing the output rate to less than 100 kHz. The Central Trigger Processor combines information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors and makes the final Level-1-Accept decision. It is a central element in the timing setup of the experiment. Three aspects are considered in this article: the timing setup with respect to the Level-1 trigger, with respect to the expriment, and with respect to the world.

  17. The CMS Barrel Muon Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Triossi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during Phase 1 will impose several constrains for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that concentrates the information from different subdetectors DT, RPC and HO. It arranges and fan-out the slow optical trigger links from the detector chambers into faster links (10 Gbps) that are sent to the track finders. Results, from collision runs, that confirm the satisfactory operation of the trigger system up to the output of the barrel track finder, will be shown. SUMMARY: In view of the increase of luminosity during phase 1 upgrade of LHC, the muon trigger chain of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment underwent considerable improvements. The muon detector was designed for preserving the complementarity and redundancy of three separate muon detection systems, Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC), Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC), until ...

  18. The Trigger System of the CMS Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Felcini, Marta

    2008-01-01

    We give an overview of the main features of the CMS trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system. Then, we illustrate the strategies and trigger configurations (trigger tables) developed for the detector calibration and physics program of the CMS experiment, at start-up of LHC operations, as well as their possible evolution with increasing luminosity. Finally, we discuss the expected CPU time performance of the trigger algorithms and the CPU requirements for the event filter farm at start-up.

  19. Tau lepton trigger and identification at CMS in Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Davignon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In the context of LHC Run-2, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector was upgraded. In particular, the CMS trigger system and particle reconstruction were improved. The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated trigger system composed of a Level-1 trigger, instrumented by custom-designed hardware boards, and software layers called High-Level-Triggers (HLT). A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance has been installed and is now used to maintain the thresholds used in LHC Run-1 in the more challenging conditions experienced during Run-2. Optimized software selection techniques have also been developed at the HLT. The hadronic $\\tau$ reconstruction algorithm has been modified to better account for the $\\pi^0$(s) from $\\tau$ decays. In addition, improvements to discriminators against QCD-induced jets and electrons were also developed. The results of these improvements are presented and the validation of the $\\tau$ identification performance is shown.

  20. Data-driven performance evaluation method for CMS RPC trigger ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... hardware-implemented algorithm, which performs the task of combining and merging information from muon ... Figure 1 shows the comparison of efficiencies obtained with the two methods containing .... [3] The CMS Collaboration, The trigger and data acquisition project, Volume 1, The Level 1. Trigger ...

  1. CMS Triggers for the LHC Startup

    CERN Document Server

    Nhan Nguyen, Chi

    2009-01-01

    The LHC will collide proton beams at a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. At the design luminosity of $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ each crossing results in an average of about 20 inelastic pp events. The CMS trigger system is designed to reduce the input rate to about 100 Hz. This task is carried out in two steps, namely the Level-1 (L1) and the High-Level trigger (HLT). The L1 trigger is built of customized fast electronics and is designed to reduce the rate to 100 kHz. The HLT is implemented in a filter farm running on hundreds of CPUs and is designed to reduce the rate by another factor of ~1000. It combines the traditional L2 and L3 trigger components in a novel way and allows the coherent tuning of the HLT algorithms to accommodate multiple physics channels. We will discuss the strategies for optimizing triggers covering the experiment`s early physics program.

  2. The CMS trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2018-01-01

    During its second period of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will reach a peak instantaneous luminosity of approximately 2$\\times 10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}s^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realised by a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm.\\\\ In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has undergone a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT went through big improvements; in particular, new ap...

  3. Progress on the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Eric Eisenhandler

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) has recently passed a number of major hurdles. The various electronic modules that make up the trigger are either in full production or are about to be, and preparations in the ATLAS pit are well advanced. L1Calo has three main subsystems. The PreProcessor converts analogue calorimeter signals to digital, associates the rather broad trigger pulses with the correct proton-proton bunch crossing, and does a final calibration in transverse energy before sending digital data streams to the two algorithmic trigger processors. The Cluster Processor identifies and counts electrons, photons and taus, and the Jet/Energy-sum Processor looks for jets and also sums missing and total transverse energy. Readout drivers allow the performance of the trigger to be monitored online and offline, and also send region-of-interest information to the Level-2 Trigger. The PreProcessor (Heidelberg) is the L1Calo subsystem with the largest number of electronic modules (124), and most of its fu...

  4. A Time-Multiplexed Track-Trigger architecture for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Geoffrey; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Rose, A

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Tracker under development for the High Luminosity LHC includes an outer tracker based on ``PT-modules'' which will provide track stubs based on coincident clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, aiming to reject low transverse momentum track hits before data transmission to the Level-1 trigger. The tracker data will be used to reconstruct track segments in dedicated processors before onward transmission to other trigger processors which will combine tracker information with data originating from the calorimeter and muon detectors, to make the final L1 trigger decision. The architecture for processing the tracker data is still an open question. One attractive option is to explore a Time Multiplexed design similar to one which is currently being implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger as part of the Phase I trigger upgrade. The Time Multiplexed Trigger concept is explained, the potential benefits of applying it for processing future tracker data are described and a possible design based on cur...

  5. The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Mahout, G; Moye, T H; Staley, R J; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Achenbach, R; Hanke, P; Kluge, E E; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Nix, O; Penno, K; Schmitt, K; Ay, Cc; Bauss, B; Dahlhoff, A; Jakobs, K; Mahboubi, K; Schäfer, U; Trefzger, T M; Eisenhandler, E F; Landon, M; Moyse, E; Thomas, J; Apostoglou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Bohm, C; Hellman, S; Hidvégi, A; Silverstein, S; RT 2003 13th IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference

    2004-01-01

    The architecture of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger system (L1Calo) is presented. Common approaches have been adopted for data distribution, result merging, readout, and slow control across the three different subsystems. A significant amount of common hardware is utilized, yielding substantial savings in cost, spares, and development effort. A custom, high-density backplane has been developed with data paths suitable for both the em/tt cluster processor (CP) and jet/energy-summation processor (JEP) subsystems. Common modules also provide interfaces to VME, CANbus and the LHC Timing, Trigger and Control system (TTC). A common data merger module (CMM) uses FPGAs with multiple configurations for summing electron/photon and tau/hadron cluster multiplicities, jet multiplicities, or total and missing transverse energy. The CMM performs both crate- and system-level merging. A common, FPGA-based readout driver (ROD) is used by all of the subsystems to send input, intermediate and output data to the data acquis...

  6. Concept of the CMS Trigger Supervisor

    CERN Document Server

    Magrans de Abril, Ildefons; Varela, Joao

    2006-01-01

    The Trigger Supervisor is an online software system designed for the CMS experiment at CERN. Its purpose is to provide a framework to set up, test, operate and monitor the trigger components on one hand and to manage their interplay and the information exchange with the run control part of the data acquisition system on the other. The Trigger Supervisor is conceived to provide a simple and homogeneous client interface to the online software infrastructure of the trigger subsystems. This document specifies the functional and non-functional requirements, design and operational details, and the components that will be delivered in order to facilitate a smooth integration of the trigger software in the context of CMS.

  7. Operation and Monitoring of the CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger Hardware

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, P

    2008-01-01

    The electronics for the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) have been produced, tested, and installed. The RCT hardware consists of one clock distribution crate and 18 double-sided crates containing custom boards, ASICs, and backplanes. The RCT receives 8-bit energies and a data quality bit from the HCAL and ECAL Trigger Primitive Generators (TPGs) and sends it to the CMS Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) after processing. Integration tests with the TPG and GCT subsystems have been successful. Installation is complete and the RCT is integrated into the Level-1 Trigger chain. Data taking has begun using detector noise, cosmic rays, proton-beam debris, and beamhalo muons. The operation and configuration of the RCT is a completely automated process. The tools to monitor, operate, and debug the RCT are mature and will be described in detail, as well as the results from data taking with the RCT.

  8. Level-1 jets and energy sums trigger performance with part of the 2017 dataset

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the first long shutdown, the LHC has restarted at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The LHC is expected to achieve an instantaneous luminosity larger than $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ and an average peak number of pile-up interactions of at least 40. The CMS Level-1 trigger architecture has undergone a full upgrade in order to maintain and improve the trigger performance under these new conditions. It will allow CMS to keep the trigger rate under control and to avoid a significant increase in trigger thresholds that would have a negative impact on the CMS physics programme. This note includes studies of the performance of the jets and energy sums as defined in the calorimeter trigger upgrade.

  9. Trigger Algorithms for Alignment and Calibration at the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Perez Tomei, Thiago Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The data needs of the Alignment and Calibration group at the CMS experiment are reasonably different from those of the physics studies groups. Data are taken at CMS through the online event selection system, which is implemented in two steps. The Level-1 Trigger is implemented on custom-made electronics and dedicated to analyse the detector information at a coarse-grained scale, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is implemented as a series of software algorithms, running in a computing farm, that have access to the full detector information. In this paper we describe the set of trigger algorithms that is deployed to address the needs of the Alignment and Calibration group, how it fits in the general infrastructure of the HLT, and how it feeds the Prompt Calibration Loop (PCL), allowing for a fast turnaround for the alignment and calibration constants.

  10. Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger starts firing

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephen Hillier

    2007-01-01

    L1Calo is one of the major components of ATLAS First Level trigger, along with the Muon Trigger and Central Trigger Processor. It forms all of the first-level calorimeter-based triggers, including electron, jet, tau and missing ET. The final system consists of over 250 custom designed 9U VME boards, most containing a dense array of FPGAs or ASICs. It is subdivided into a PreProcessor, which digitises the incoming trigger signals from the Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters, and two separate processor systems, which perform the physics algorithms. All of these are highly flexible, allowing the possibility to adapt to beam conditions and luminosity. All parts of the system are read out through Read-Out Drivers, which provide monitoring data and Region of Interest (RoI) information for the Level-2 trigger. Production of the modules is now essentially complete, and enough modules exist to populate the full scale system in USA15. Installation is proceeding rapidly - approximately 90% of the final modules are insta...

  11. CMS Calorimeter Trigger Phase I upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klabbers, P; Gorski, T; Bachtis, M; Dasu, S; Fobes, R; Grothe, M; Ross, I; Smith, W H; Compton, K; Farmahini-Farahani, A; Gregerson, A; Seemuth, D; Schulte, M

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for the Phase-1 upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) calorimeter trigger system composed of FPGAs and Multi-GBit/sec links that adhere to the μTCA crate Telecom standard. The upgrade calorimeter trigger will implement algorithms that create collections of isolated and non-isolated electromagnetic objects, isolated and non-isolated tau objects and jet objects. The algorithms are organized in several steps with progressive data reduction. These include a particle cluster finder that reconstructs overlapping clusters of 2x2 calorimeter towers and applies electron identification, a cluster overlap filter, particle isolation determination, jet reconstruction, particle separation and sorting.

  12. Level-1 pixel based tracking trigger algorithm for LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the tracking system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It precisely determines the interaction point (primary vertex) of the events and the possible secondary vertexes due to heavy flavours ($b$ and $c$ quarks); it is part of the overall tracking system that allows reconstructing the tracks of the charged particles in the events and combined with the magnetic field to measure their impulsion. The pixel detector allows measuring the tracks in the region closest to the interaction point. The Level-1 (real-time) pixel based tracking trigger is a novel trigger system that is currently being studied for the LHC upgrade. An important goal is developing real-time track reconstruction algorithms able to cope with very high rates and high flux of data in a very harsh environment. The pixel detector has an especially crucial role in precisely identifying the primary vertex of the rare physics events from the large pile-up (P...

  13. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved trac...

  14. Towards a Level-1 Tracking Trigger for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    De Santo, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for the high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider, ATLAS is planning a trigger upgrade that will enable the experiment to use tracking information already at the first trigger level. This will provide enhanced background rejection power at trigger level while preserving much needed flexibility for the trigger system. The status and current plans for the new ATLAS Level-1 tracking trigger are presented.

  15. Tools for Trigger Rate Monitoring at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Geoffrey; Wightman, Andrew Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2017, we expect the LHC to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of roughly $2.0 \\times 10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ to the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, with about 60 simultaneous proton-proton collisions (pileup) per event. In these challenging conditions, it is important to be able to intelligently monitor the rate at which data are being collected (the trigger rate). It is not enough to simply look at the trigger rate; it is equally important to compare the trigger rate with expectations. We present a set of software tools that have been developed to accomplish this. The tools include a real-time component - a script that monitors the rates of individual triggers during data-taking, and activates an alarm if rates deviate significantly from expectation. Fits are made to previously collected data and extrapolated to higher pileup. The behavior of triggers as a function of pileup is then monitored as data are collected - plots are automatically produced on an hourly basis and uploaded to a web area...

  16. A demonstrator for a level-1 trigger system based on MicroTCA technology and 5Gb/s optical links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foudas, C; Hall, G; Iles, G; Marrouche, J; Rose, A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Frazier, R; Newbold, D [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jones, J [Weathertop, Claverton Down Road, Bath BA2 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    A demonstrator for the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger system has been designed, manufactured, tested and a time-multiplexed trigger implemented. The prototype card uses the AMC double width form factor, 5Gb/s links and a Xilinx XC5VTX150T or XC5VTX240T FPGA. A possible implementation of such a trigger architecture in CMS is described.

  17. Triggering on electrons and photons with CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabi Alexandre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the year 2011, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has operated with an instantaneous luminosity that has risen continually to around 4 × 1033cm−2s−1. With this prodigious high-energy proton collisions rate, efficient triggering on electrons and photons has become a major challenge for the LHC experiments. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 106. The first level (L1 is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger (HLT combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In this intense hadronic environment, the L1 electron/photon trigger provides a powerful tool to select interesting events. It is based upon information from the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL, a high-resolution detector comprising 75848 lead tungstate (PbWO4 crystals in a “barrel” and two “endcaps”. The performance as well as the optimization of the electron/photon trigger are presented.

  18. Upgrade of the CMS Tracker with tracking trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbaneo, D

    2011-01-01

    The planned upgrades of the LHC and its injector chain are expected to allow operation at luminosities around or above 5 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 sometimes after 2020, to eventually reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb −1 at the end of that decade. In order to fully exploit such operating conditions and the delivered luminosity, CMS needs to upgrade its tracking detectors and substantially improve its trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R and D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. Some of the options considered are reviewed, discussing their potential advantages and disadvantages.

  19. Study of the RPC Level-1 trigger efficiency in the compact muon solenoid at LHC with cosmic ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, A.O.M., E-mail: oiorio@cern.ch

    2012-01-01

    We report a study of the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) Level-1 (L1) trigger system efficiency in the Barrel of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector of LHC in the same region covered also by the DT trigger system. The method used to study the efficiency exploits the independency of the CMS Drift Tube (DT) and RPC trigger systems. Muon tracks in the event are triggered and reconstructed using the Drift Tube subsystem only, and for each of them we search for a compatible RPC L1 trigger object. We discuss in detail the method and the results of the performance obtained with cosmic ray data taken in 2008-2009.

  20. Commissioning the ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 central trigger is a critical part of ATLAS operation. It receives the 40 MHz bunch clock from the LHC and distributes it to all sub-detectors. It initiates their read-out by forming the Level-1 Accept decision, which is based on information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors and a variety of additional trigger inputs from detectors in the forward region. It also provides trigger summary information to the data acquisition system and the Level-2 trigger system. In this paper, we present the completion of the installed central trigger system, its performance during cosmic-ray data taking and the experience gained with triggering on the first LHC beams.

  1. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Document Server

    Spiwoks, Ralf; Ellis, Nick; Farthouat, P; Gällnö, P; Haller, J; Krasznahorkay, A; Maeno, T; Pauly, T; Pessoa-Lima, H; Resurreccion-Arcas, I; Schuler, G; De Seixas, J M; Torga-Teixeira, R; Wengler, T

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger Processor (CTP) combines information from calorimeter and muon trigger processors and makes the final Level-1 Accept (L1A) decision on the basis of lists of selection criteria (trigger menus). In addition to the event-selection decision, the CTP also provides trigger summary information to the Level-2 trigger and the data acquisition system. It further provides accumulated and bunch-by-bunch scaler data for monitoring of the trigger, detector and beam conditions. The CTP is presented and results are shown from tests with the calorimeter adn muon trigger processors connected to detectors in a particle beam, as well as from stand-alone full-system tests in the laboratory which were used to validate the CTP.

  2. The ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger performance in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00120419; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 trigger is the first event rate reducing step in the ATLAS detector trigger system, with an output rate of up to 100 kHz and decision latency smaller than 2.5 μs. During the LHC shutdown after Run 1, the Level-1 trigger system was upgraded at hardware, firmware and software levels. In particular, a new electronics sub-system was introduced in the real-time data processing path: the Level-1 Topological trigger system. It consists of a single electronics shelf equipped with two Level-1 Topological processor blades. They receive real-time information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, which is processed to measure angles between trigger objects, invariant masses or other kinematic variables. Complementary to other requirements, these measurements are taken into account in the final Level-1 trigger decision. The system was installed and commissioning started in 2015 and continued during 2016. As part of the commissioning, the decisions from individual algorithms were simulated and compar...

  3. Feasibility studies of a Level-1 Tracking Trigger for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, M; Brenner, R; Konstantinidis, N; Sutton, M

    2009-01-01

    The existing ATLAS Level-1 trigger system is seriously challenged at the SLHC's higher luminosity. A hardware tracking trigger might be needed, but requires a detailed understanding of the detector. Simulation of high pile-up events, with various data-reduction techniques applied will be described. Two scenarios are envisaged: (a) regional readout - calorimeter and muon triggers are used to identify portions of the tracker; and (b) track-stub finding using special trigger layers. A proposed hardware system, including data reduction on the front-end ASICs, readout within a super-module and integrating regional triggering into all levels of the readout system, will be discussed.

  4. Beam Test of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Mahout, G; Moye, T H; Staley, R J; Thomas, J P; Typaldos, D; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Achenbach, R; Föhlisch, F; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Kluge, E E; Mahboubi, K; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Rühr, F; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Ay, C; Bauss, B; Belkin, A; Rieke, S; Schäfer, U; Tapprogge, T; Trefzger, T; Weber, GA; Eisenhandler, E F; Landon, M; Apostologlou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Mirea, A; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Sankey, D P C; Bohm, C; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Silverstein, S

    2005-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimter Trigger consists of a Preprocessor (PP), a Cluster Processor (CP), and a Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP). The CP and JEP receive digitised trigger-tower data from the Preprocessor and produce Region-of-Interest (RoIs) and trigger multiplicities. The latter are sent in real time to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP) where the Level-1 decision is made. On receipt of a Level-1 Accept, Readout Driver Modules (RODs), provide intermediate results to the data acquisition (DAQ) system for monitoring and diagnostic purpose. RoI information is sent to the RoI builder (RoIB) to help reduce the amount of data required for the Level-2 Trigger The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System at the test beam consisted of 1 Preprocessor module, 1 Cluster Processor Module, 1 Jet/Energy Module and 2 Common Merger Modules. Calorimeter energies were sucessfully handled thourghout the chain and trigger object sent to the CTP. Level-1 Accepts were sucessfully produced and used to drive the readout path. Online diagno...

  5. The ATLAS Level-1 Muon to Central Trigger Processor Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Berge, D; Farthouat, P; Haas, S; Klofver, P; Krasznahorkay, A; Messina, A; Pauly, T; Schuler, G; Spiwoks, R; Wengler, T; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The Muon to Central Trigger Processor Interface (MUCTPI) is part of the ATLAS Level-1 trigger system and connects the output of muon trigger system to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). At every bunch crossing (BC), the MUCTPI receives information on muon candidates from each of the 208 muon trigger sectors and calculates the total multiplicity for each of six transverse momentum (pT) thresholds. This multiplicity value is then sent to the CTP, where it is used together with the input from the Calorimeter trigger to make the final Level-1 Accept (L1A) decision. In addition the MUCTPI provides summary information to the Level-2 trigger and to the data acquisition (DAQ) system for events selected at Level-1. This information is used to define the regions of interest (RoIs) that drive the Level-2 muontrigger processing. The MUCTPI system consists of a 9U VME chassis with a dedicated active backplane and 18 custom designed modules. The design of the modules is based on state-of-the-art FPGA devices and special ...

  6. Triggering on New Physics with the CMS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Tulika [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    The BU CMS group led by PI Tulika Bose has made several significant contributions to the CMS trigger and to the analysis of the data collected by the CMS experiment. Group members have played a leading role in the optimization of trigger algorithms, the development of trigger menus, and the online operation of the CMS High-Level Trigger. The group’s data analysis projects have concentrated on a broad spectrum of topics that take full advantage of their strengths in jets and calorimetry, trigger, lepton identification as well as their considerable experience in hadron collider physics. Their publications cover several searches for new heavy gauge bosons, vector-like quarks as well as diboson resonances.

  7. The Topological Processor for the future ATLAS Level-1 Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Kahra, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS is an experiment on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), located at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. By 2015 the LHC instantaneous luminosity will be increased from $10^{34}$ up to $3\\cdot 10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2} \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. This places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1kHz while at the same time, selecting those events that contain interesting physics events. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 100kHz and decision latency of less than $2.5 \\mu \\mathrm{s}$. It is composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, the Muon Trigger and the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). In 2014, there will be a new electronics module: the Topological Processor (L1Topo). The L1Topo will make it possible, for the first time, to use detailed information from subdetectors in a single Level-1 module. This allows the determi...

  8. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of 2 with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the double amount of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to 3 different sub-detector combinations. In this contribution, we give an overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis of the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are m...

  9. Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Wessels, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) of the ATLAS experiment has been operating well since the start of LHC data taking, and played a major role in the Higgs boson discovery. To face the new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the LHC proton beam energy and luminosity, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo. The initial upgrade phase in 2013-14 includes substantial improvements to the analogue and digital signal processing to allow more sophisticated digital filters for energy and timing measurement, as well as compensate for pile-up and baseline shifting effects. Two existing digital algorithm processor subsystems will receive substantial hardware and firmware upgrades to increase the real-time data path bandwidth, allowing topological information to be transmitted and processed at Level-1. An entirely new subsystem, the Level-1 Topological Processor, will receive real-time data from both the upgraded L1Calo and Level-1 Muon Trigger to perform trigger algorithms based on entire event topolo...

  10. Digital Filtering Performance in the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Hadley, D R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is a hardware-based system designed to identify high-pT jets, elec- tron/photon and tau candidates, and to measure total and missing ET in the ATLAS Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters. It is a pipelined processor system, with a new set of inputs being evaluated every 25ns. The overall trigger decision has a latency budget of 2µs, including all transmission delays. The calorimeter trigger uses about 7200 reduced granularity analogue signals, which are first digitized at the 40 MHz LHC bunch-crossing frequency, before being passed to a digital Finite Impulse Re- sponse (FIR) filter. Due to latency and chip real-estate constraints, only a simple 5-element filter with limited precision can be used. Nevertheless, this filter achieves a significant reduction in noise, along with improving the bunch-crossing assignment and energy resolution for small signals. The context in which digital filters are used for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is presented, before descr...

  11. Digital Filter Performance for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Hadley, D R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is a hardware-based system designed to identify high-pT jets, electron/photon and tau candidates, and to measure total and missing ET in the ATLAS Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters. It is a pipelined processor system, with a new set of inputs being evaluated every 25ns. The overall trigger decision has a latency budget of 2µs, including all transmission delays. The calorimeter trigger uses about 7200 reduced granularity analogue signals, which are first digitized at the 40 MHz LHC bunch-crossing frequency, before being passed to a digital Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filter. Due to latency and chip real-estate constraints, only a simple 5-element filter with limited precision can be used. Nevertheless this filter achieves a significant reduction in noise, along with improving the bunch-crossing assignment and energy resolution for small signals. The context in which digital filters are used for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger will be presented, before describing ...

  12. Overview and performance of the ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Damp, Johannes Frederic; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC provided proton-proton collisions to the ATLAS experiment with high luminosity (up to 2.06x10^34), placing stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS trigger system in order to reduce the 40 MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, while not rejecting interesting physics events. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5 μs. An important role is played by its newly commissioned component: the L1 topological trigger (L1Topo). This innovative system consists of two blades designed in AdvancedTCA form factor, mounting four individual state-of-the-art processors, and providing high input bandwidth and low latency data processing. Up to 128 topological trigger algorithms can be implemented to select interesting events by applying kinematic and angular requirements on electromagnetic clusters, jets, muons and total energy. This results in a significantly...

  13. ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger: Initial Timing and Energy Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Childers, J T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger identifies high-pT objects in the Liquid Argon and Tile Calorimeters with a fixed latency of ~2.0 µs using a hardware-based, pipelined system built with custom electronics. The Preprocessor Module conditions and digitizes about 7200 pre-summed analogue signals from the calorimeters at the LHC bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, and performs bunch-crossing identification (BCID) and deposited energy measurement for each input signal. This information is passed to further processors for object classification and total energy calculation, and the results used to make the Level-1 trigger decision for the ATLAS detector. The BCID and energy measurement in the trigger depend on precise timing adjustment to achieve correct sampling of the input signal peak. Test pulses from the calorimeters were analysed to derive the initial timing and energy calibration, and first data from the LHC restart in autumn 2009 and early 2010 were used for validation and further optimization. The res...

  14. ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger: Status and Development

    CERN Document Server

    Bracinik, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger seeds all the calorimeter-based triggers in the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The inputs to the system are analogue signals of reduced granularity, formed by summing cells from both the ATLAS Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters. Several stages of analogue then digital processing, largely performed in FPGAs, refine these signals via configurable and flexible algorithms into identified physics objects, for example electron, tau or jet candidates. The complete processing chain is performed in a pipelined system at the LHC bunch-crossing frequency, and with a fixed latency of about 1us. The first LHC run from 2009-2013 provided a varied and challenging environment for first level triggers. While the energy and luminosity were below the LHC design, the pile-up conditions were similar to the nominal conditions. The physics ambitions of the experiment also tested the performance of the Level-1 system while keeping within the rate limits set by detector readout. This presentation will ...

  15. Using the CMS high level trigger as a cloud resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colling, David; Huffman, Adam; Bauer, Daniela; McCrae, Alison; Cinquilli, Mattia; Gowdy, Stephen; Coarasa, Jose Antonio; Ozga, Wojciech; Chaze, Olivier; Lahiff, Andrew; Grandi, Claudio; Tiradani, Anthony; Sgaravatto, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The CMS High Level Trigger is a compute farm of more than 10,000 cores. During data taking this resource is heavily used and is an integral part of the experiment's triggering system. However, outside of data taking periods this resource is largely unused. We describe why CMS wants to use the HLT as a cloud resource (outside of data taking periods) and how this has been achieved. In doing this we have turned a single-use cluster into an agile resource for CMS production computing. While we are able to use the HLT as a production cloud resource, there is still considerable further work that CMS needs to carry out before this resource can be used with the desired agility. This report, therefore, represents a snapshot of this activity at the time of CHEP 2013.

  16. A Time-Multiplexed Track-Trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    A new CMS Tracker is under development for operation at the High Luminosity LHC from 2025. It includes an outer tracker based on special modules of two different types which will construct track stubs using spatially coincident clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, to reject low transverse momentum track hits and reduce the data volume before data transmission to the Level-1 trigger. The tracker data will be used to reconstruct track segments in dedicated processors before onward transmission to other trigger processors which will combine tracker information with data originating from the calorimeter and muon detectors, to make the final L1 trigger decision. The architecture for processing the tracker data outside the detector is under study, using several alternative approaches. One attractive possibility is to exploit a Time Multiplexed design similar to the one which is currently being implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger as part of the Phase I trigger upgrade. The novel Time Multiplexed Trig...

  17. Precision Timing of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Davygora, Yuriy; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is one of the main elements of the first-stage online selection of LHC collision events measured at the ATLAS experiment. Using 7168 pre-summed trigger tower signals from the Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters as input, the hardware-based system identifies high-pT objects and determines the total and missing transverse energy sums within a fixed latency of 2.5 us. The Preprocessor system digitizes the analogue calorimeter signals at the LHC bunch-crossing frequency of 40MHz and provides bunch-crossing identification and energy measurement. Prerequisite for high stability and accuracy of this procedure is a timing synchronization at the nanosecond level of the signals which belong to the same collision event. The synchronization of the trigger tower signals was first established in the analysis of beam splash events in November 2009 and then refined and sustained with data from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV, recorded at the LHC in 2010 and 201...

  18. Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072874

    2014-01-01

    The Level-1 calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) operated successfully during the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Facing the new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the LHC beam energy and luminosity, and from the experience of the previous running, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo. The initial upgrade phase in 2013-14 includes substantial improvements to the analogue and digital signal processing to cope with baseline shifts due to signal pile-up. Additionally a newly introduced system will receive real-time data from both the upgraded L1Calo and L1Muon trigger to perform trigger algorithms based on entire event topologies. During the second upgrade phase in 2018-19 major parts of L1Calo will be rebuilt in order to exploit a tenfold increase in the available calorimeter data granularity compared to that of the current system. The contribution gives an overview of the existing system and the lessons learned during the first period of LHC data taking. Based on these, the...

  19. Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Felix; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Level-1 calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) operated successfully during the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Based on the lessons learned , a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo to face the new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the LHC beam energy and luminosity. The initial upgrade phase in 2013-14 includes substantial improvements to the analogue and digital signal processing to cope with baseline shifts due to signal pile-up. Additionally a newly introduced system will receive real-time data from both the upgraded L1Calo and L1Muon trigger to perform trigger algorithms based on entire event topologies. During the second upgrade phase in 2018-19 major parts of L1Calo will be rebuilt in order to exploit a tenfold increase in the available calorimeter data granularity compared to that of the current system. In this contribution we present the lessons learned during the first period of LHC data taking. Based on these we discuss the expected performance improvements tog...

  20. Development of a Level-1 Track and Vertex Finder for the Phase II CMS experiment upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00414391; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire

    The High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade to the Large Hadron Collider will operate at an increased instantaneous luminosity, up to seven times the design value, in order to collect an integrated luminosity of $3,000$\\,fb$^{-1}$ in the decade following 2025. Proton bunches at the HL-LHC will cross every $25$\\,ns, producing an average of 140-200 pile-up proton-proton collisions per crossing. A new tracking detector is under development for use by the CMS experiment at the HL-LHC. A crucial requirement of this upgrade is to provide the ability to reconstruct charged particle tracks with transverse momentum above $2$--$3$\\,GeV within $4\\,\\upmu$s to be used in the Level-1 (L1) trigger decision. This thesis presents one of the main proposals for the final L1 Track Finding system, which exploits a fully time-multiplexed architecture based on high-speed FPGA electronics. The developed track finding algorithm makes use of the Hough Transform technique to identify track candidates, followed by a track fitting stage. Sever...

  1. Tracking in the trigger from the CDF experience to CMS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, F

    2007-01-01

    Precise tracking information in the online selection of interesting physics events is extremely beneficial at hadron colliders. The CDF experiment at the Tevatron, has shown for the first time the impact of the tracking in triggers, allowing to achieve unprecedented precision in B-physics measurements. The CMS experiment at LHC will largely make use of tracking information at high level trigger, after the Level-1 acceptance. The increased luminosity of the Super-LHC collider will impose to CMS a drastic revision of the Level-1 trigger strategy, incorporating the tracker information at the first stage of the selection. After a review of the CDF and CMS approaches we will discuss several possible Level-1 tracker based concepts for the upgraded CMS detector at Super-LHC. One approach is based on associative memories, which has already been demonstrated in CDF. It makes use of binary readout in the front end electronics, followed by transfer of the full granularity data off detector using optical links to dedicat...

  2. Local Trigger Electronics for the CMS Drift Tubes Muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglini, R

    2003-01-01

    In the CMS detector in preparation for the CERN LHC collider, the Drift Tubes Muon Chambers are equipped with mini-crates hosting custom electronics for fast data processing and local trigger generation. In particular the Trigger Server of a DTC consists of Track Sorter Slave ASICs and a Track Sorter Master system. The trigger electronics boards are in production, to be ready for the muon detector installation in the CMS barrel starting at the end of 2003.In this work, the performance of the Trigger Server will be discussed, on the basis both of high-statistics tests with predefined patterns and of test beam data collected at CERN, where a DTC was exposed to a muon beam having an LHC-like bunch structure. Finally, some system performance expectations, concerning radiation tolerance and signal transmission issues during LHC running, will be also discussed.

  3. L1 track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade using AM chips and FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    Fedi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    The increase of luminosity at the HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information in CMS's Level-1 trigger system to maintain an acceptable trigger rate when selecting interesting events, despite the order of magnitude increase in minimum bias interactions. To meet the latency requirements, dedicated hardware has to be used. This paper presents the results of tests of a prototype system (pattern recognition mezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for the CMS experiment, combining the power of both associative memory custom ASICs and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. The mezzanine uses the latest available associative memory devices (AM06) and the most modern Xilinx Ultrascale FPGAs. The results of the test for a complete tower comprising about 0.5 million patterns is presented, using as simulated input events traversing the upgraded CMS detector. The paper shows the performance of the pattern matching, track finding and track fitting, along with the latency...

  4. Calibration for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter-Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehlisch, F.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes developments and tests that are necessary to operate the Pre-Processor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for data acquisition. The major tasks of Pre-Processor comprise the digitizing, time-alignment and the calibration of signals that come from the ATLAS calorimeter. Dedicated hardware has been developed that must be configured in order to fulfill these tasks. Software has been developed that implements the register-model of the Pre-Processor Modules and allows to set up the Pre-Processor. In order to configure the Pre-Processor in the context of an ATLAS run, user-settings and the results of calibration measurements are used to derive adequate settings for registers of the Pre-Processor. The procedures that allow to perform the required measurements and store the results into a database are demonstrated. Furthermore, tests that go along with the ATLAS installation are presented and results are shown. (orig.)

  5. Calibration for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter-Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehlisch, F.

    2007-12-19

    This thesis describes developments and tests that are necessary to operate the Pre-Processor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for data acquisition. The major tasks of Pre-Processor comprise the digitizing, time-alignment and the calibration of signals that come from the ATLAS calorimeter. Dedicated hardware has been developed that must be configured in order to fulfill these tasks. Software has been developed that implements the register-model of the Pre-Processor Modules and allows to set up the Pre-Processor. In order to configure the Pre-Processor in the context of an ATLAS run, user-settings and the results of calibration measurements are used to derive adequate settings for registers of the Pre-Processor. The procedures that allow to perform the required measurements and store the results into a database are demonstrated. Furthermore, tests that go along with the ATLAS installation are presented and results are shown. (orig.)

  6. Design and performance of the upgrade of the CMS L1 muon trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079102

    2016-01-01

    After the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) LHC will run at a center of mass energy of 13TeV, providing CMS with proton collisions at an expected luminosity which is almost double the LHC design value of $10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$, and almost three times the peak luminosity reached during Run1 of $7.7\\cdot10^{33} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$. The higher luminosity and center of mass energy of the LHC will raise the Level 1 (L1) muon trigger rate by almost a factor six for a given muon transverse momentum $\\text{p}_{\\text{T}}$ threshold. It is therefore necessary to increase the muon ($\\text{p}_{\\text{T}}$) threshold to keep the trigger rate below 100 kHz, the maximum sustainable rate for the CMS detectors. An increase of the L1 trigger thresholds implies a lowering of the efficiency in detecting signals from new physics. The CMS muon trigger is upgraded using custom designed AMC boards, with more powerful FPGAs and larger memories. The upgraded CMS muon trigger system implements pattern recognition and MVA (Bo...

  7. The CMS High Level Trigger System: Experience and Future Development

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Bowen, Matthew; Branson, James G; Bukowiec, Sebastian; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa, J A; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Flossdorf, Alexander; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, R; Hartl, Christian; Hegeman, Jeroen; Holzner, André; Y L Hwong; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, R K; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Polese, Giovanni; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Shpakov, Dennis; Simon, M; Spataru, A C; Sumorok, Konstanty

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC features a two-level trigger system. Events accepted by the first level trigger, at a maximum rate of 100 kHz, are read out by the Data Acquisition system (DAQ), and subsequently assembled in memory in a farm of computers running a software high-level trigger (HLT), which selects interesting events for offline storage and analysis at a rate of order few hundred Hz. The HLT algorithms consist of sequences of offline-style reconstruction and filtering modules, executed on a farm of 0(10000) CPU cores built from commodity hardware. Experience from the operation of the HLT system in the collider run 2010/2011 is reported. The current architecture of the CMS HLT, its integration with the CMS reconstruction framework and the CMS DAQ, are discussed in the light of future development. The possible short- and medium-term evolution of the HLT software infrastructure to support extensions of the HLT computing power, and to address remaining performance and maintenance issues, are discussed.

  8. Studies of scintillator-based muon triggers in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuch, Florian

    2017-03-16

    The CMS experiment at the LHC will face challenges due to upgrades and improvements of the LHC in future. Especially, the upgrade towards the high luminosity LHC in 2025 with a foreseen center of mass energy of 14 TeV, an instantaneous luminosity of O(10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and the concurrent aging of and radiation damage to the detectors will have an impact on the fast CMS trigger system and the CMS sub-detectors. Especially, the impact on the CMS muon system - and more particular on the drift tube (DT) system - is of vital interest. In order to respond to these challenges the performance of the DT system as part of the L1 muon trigger and the use of a scintillator-based muon trigger as supportive detector are analyzed in this thesis. First, the concept of such a scintillator-based muon trigger, the Muon Track fast Tag (MTT), as support for the DT trigger system, is presented. The conducted related R and D is described. Exploiting the similarity of the MTT concept and the existing hadron outer calorimeter (HO), studies are presented that evaluate the impact of the challenges on the L1 Trigger as well as the potential of the HO detector as a possible response to these challenges. It is shown that the HO detector can be of help in case of DT detector failures and it is able to improve the muon recognition of the DT detector in the L1 Trigger. The reduction of L1 muon ambiguities with the HO detector is found to be not feasible. The results, that were obtained using HO, are extrapolated towards the MTT concept. The MTT concept is rated as valuable backup solution that, however, will not increase the benefit above the HO detector in the presented application scenarios. After a summary of the performed analyses, the conclusion is drawn, that the HO detector should be included into the L1 Trigger decision. The initiated upgrade process of the HO integration into the L1 muon trigger, that was motivated by these studies, is presented. The preceding upgrade of HO

  9. Implementation of FPGA-based Level-1 Tracking at CMS for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves, Jorge Enrique

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for track reconstruction is presented to be used in the all-hardware first level of the CMS trigger. The application of the approach is intended for the upgraded all-silicon tracker, which is to be installed for the High Luminosity era of the LHC (HL-LHC). The upgraded LHC machine is expected to deliver a luminosity on the order of $5\\times10^{34} $cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. This expected luminosity means there would be about 125 pileup events in each bunch crossing at a frequency of 40 MHz. To keep the CMS trigger rate at a manageable level under these conditions, it is necessary to make quick decisions on the events that will be processed. The timing estimates for the algorithm are expected to be below 5 $\\mu$s, well within the requirements of the L1 trigger at CMS for track identification. The algorithm is integer-based, allowing it to be implemented on an FPGA. Currently we are working on a demonstrator hardware implementation using a Xilinx Virtex 6 FPGA. Results from simulations in C++ and Verilo...

  10. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Amstutz, Christian; Weber, Marc; Palla, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows \\mbox{co-simulation} with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g.~VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  11. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amstutz, C.; Weber, M.; Magazzù, G.; Palla, F.

    2015-01-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows co-simulation with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g. VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system

  12. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, C.; Magazzù, G.; Weber, M.; Palla, F.

    2015-03-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows co-simulation with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g. VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  13. The LHCb vertex locator and level-1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, H

    2000-01-01

    LHCb will study CP violation and other rare phenomena in B-decays with a forward detector at the LHC. One of the challenges is to design a fast and efficient trigger. The design of the silicon Vertex Locator (VELO) has been driven by the requirements of one of the most selective triggers of the experiment. The VELO trigger is designed to work at an input rate of 1 MHz. The requirements and implementation of the VELO and the associated trigger are summarised, followed by a description of an upgrade which improves the trigger performance significantly. (3 refs).

  14. Internal interface for RFC muon trigger electronics at CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Pietrusinski, Michall

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes design and practical realization of an internal communication layer referred to as the Internal Interface (II). The system was realized for the RFC Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment. Fully automatic implementation of the communication layer is realized in the FPGA chips and in the control software. The methodology of implementation was presented in the description form of the interface structure from the sides of hardware and software. The examples of the communication layer realizations were given for the RFC Muon Trigger.

  15. Simulation and Validation of the ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, Pepijn Johannes; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recently commissioned a new component of its first-level trigger: the L1 topological trigger. This system, using state-of-the-art FPGA processors, makes it possible to reject events by applying topological requirements, such as kinematic criteria involving clusters, jets, muons, and total transverse energy. The data recorded using the L1Topological trigger demonstrates that this innovative trigger strategy allows for an improved rejection rate without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several relevant physics processes leading to low-$p_T$ leptons, including $H\\to{}\\tau{}\\tau{}$ and $J/\\Psi\\to{}\\mu{}\\mu{}$. In addition, an accurate simulation of the L1Topological trigger is used to validate and optimize the performance of this trigger. To reach such an accuracy, this simulation must take into account the fact that the firmware algorithms are executed on a FPGA architecture, while the simulation is executed on a floating point architecture.

  16. Towards a Level-1 tracking trigger for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cerri, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The future plans for the LHC accelerator allow, through a schedule of phased upgrades, an increase in the average instantaneous luminosity by a factor 5 with respect to the original design luminosity. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC will be able to maximise the physics potential from this higher luminosity only if the detector, trigger and DAQ infrastructure are adapted to handle the sustained increase in particle production rates. In this paper the changes expected to be required to the ATLAS detectors and trigger system to fulfill the requirement for working in such high luminosity scenario are described. The increased number of interactions per bunch crossing will result in higher occupancy in the detectors and increased rates at each level of the trigger system. The trigger selection will improve the selectivity partly from increased granularity for the sub detectors and the consequent higher resolution. One of the largest challenges will be the provision of tracking information at the first trigger level...

  17. The new Global Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fulcher, Jonathan Richard; Rabady, Dinyar Sebastian; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    For the 2016 physics data runs the L1 trigger system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment underwent a major upgrade to cope with the increasing instantaneous luminosity of the CERN LHC whilst maintaining a high event selection efficiency for the CMS physics program. Most subsystem specific trigger processor boards were replaced with powerful general purpose processor boards, conforming to the MicroTCA standard, whose tasks are performed by firmware on an FPGA of the Xilinx Virtex 7 family. Furthermore, the muon trigger system moved from a subsystem centered approach, where each of the three muon detector systems provides muon candidates to the Global Muon Trigger (GMT), to a region based system, where muon track finders (TFs) combine information from the subsystems to generate muon candidates in three detector regions, that are then sent to the upgraded GMT. The upgraded GMT receives up to 108 muons from the processors of the muon TFs in the barrel, overlap, and endcap detector regions. The muons are...

  18. The CMS calorimeter trigger upgrade for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre of mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2e34 cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular the L1 calorimeter Trigger hardware and architecture will be modified. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of tau leptons. This can only be achieved by designing an updated trigger architecture based on the recent microTCA technology. Racks can be equipped with fast optical links and latest...

  19. First results on the performance of the CMS global calorimeter trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Foudas, C; Jones, J; Rose, A; Stettler, M; Sidiropoulos, G; Tapper, A; Brooke, J; Frazier, R; Heath, G; Hansen, M; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The CMS Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) uses data from the CMS calorimeters to compute a number kinematical quantities which characterize the LHC event. The GTC output is used by the Global Trigger (GT) along with data from the Global Muon Trigger (GMT) to produce the Level-1 Accept (L1A) decision. The design for the current GCT system commenced early in 2006. After a rapid development phase all the different GCT components have been produced and a large fraction of them have been installed at the CMS electronics cavern (USC-55). There the GCT system has been under test since March 2007. This paper reports results from tests which took place at the USC-55. Initial tests aimed to test the integrity of the GCT data and establish that the proper synchronization had been achieved both internally within GCT as well as with the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) which provides the GCT input data and with GT which receives the GCT results. After synchronization and data integrity had been established, Monte Carlo E...

  20. Towards a Level-1 Tracking Trigger for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    De Santo, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Plans for a physics-driven upgrade of the LHC foresee staged increases of the accelerator's average instantaneous luminosity, of up to a factor of five compared to the original design. In order to cope with the sustained luminosity increase, and the resulting higher detector occupancy and particle interaction rates, the ATLAS experiment is planning phased upgrades of the trigger system and of the DAQ infrastructure. In the new conditions, maintaining an adequate signal acceptance for electro-weak processes will pose unprecedented challenges, as the default solution to cope with the higher rates would be to increase thresholds on the transverse momenta of physics objects (leptons, jets, etc). Therefore the possibility to apply fast processing at the first trigger level in order to use tracking information as early as possible in the trigger selection represents a most appealing opportunity, which can preserve the ATLAS trigger's selectivity without reducing its flexibility. Studies to explore the feasibility o...

  1. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieri, D.

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25 ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5 μs. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate . Goal of this new track trigger will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the “MP7”, which is a μTCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough transform technique are currently under investigation: one utilizes a systolic array to represent the Hough space, while the other exploits a pipelined approach. (paper)

  2. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090481

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25\\,ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5\\,$\\mu$s. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new \\textit{track trigger} will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the ``MP7'', which is a $\\mu$TCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough tran...

  3. A time-multiplexed track-trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G., E-mail: g.hall@imperial.ac.uk

    2016-07-11

    A new CMS Tracker is under development for operation at the High Luminosity LHC from 2025. It includes an outer tracker based on special modules of two different types which will construct track stubs using spatially coincident clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, to reject low transverse momentum track hits and reduce the data volume before data transmission to the Level-1 trigger. The tracker data will be used to reconstruct track segments in dedicated processors before onward transmission to other trigger processors which will combine tracker information with data originating from the calorimeter and muon detectors, to make the final L1 trigger decision. The architecture for processing the tracker data outside the detector is under study, using several alternative approaches. One attractive possibility is to exploit a Time Multiplexed design similar to the one which is currently being implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger as part of the Phase I trigger upgrade. The novel Time Multiplexed Trigger concept is explained, the potential benefits for processing future tracker data are described and a feasible design based on currently existing hardware is outlined.

  4. Conceptual investigations of a trigger extension for muons from pp collisions in the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    As of 2023, the Large Hadron Collider can provide its experiments with five to ten times more luminosity than the current design value of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . This upgrade will allow for the measurement of physics processes with very small cross sections. However, at these high luminosities, due to the pileup interactions, the detector occupancy will be very high. This will cause, on the one hand, a systematic increase of the trigger rates for single muons. On the other hand, amplified by the limited momentum resolution of the muon system, mismeasurements of the transverse momenta of muons will be dominant in the high momentum regime. In this region, the trigger rate distribution will saturate and the rate limitation with a transverse momentum threshold will be difficult. Furthermore, the quality of the single muon trigger at Level 1 will be decreased due to coincident particle transitions causing ambiguities in the innermost muon chambers. In 2007, a concept called Muon Track fast Tag (MTT) was introduced to address these trigger challenges. The studies, performed in this thesis, are divided into three parts. Concerning the MTT proposal, the main part deals with conceptual investigations on the possible trigger extension for muons from proton proton collisions in the CMS experiment. Thereby, the focus lies on the fundamental question of the muon detection capability of a scintillator system with SiPM readout. Such a system is the Hadron Outer calorimeter of CMS which is used for studies to answer this question. In the second part, the integration of the MTT system in the geometry description of the CMS detector is outlined. Thereby, it is written as a technical recipe which allows the understanding of the implementation of a new detector system in the CMS detector description. The last part of this thesis focuses on the Geant 4 simulations of the first MTT prototype. In this part, together with the simulation setup, selected results are introduced.

  5. Commissioning and validation of the ATLAS Level-1 topological trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)788741; The ATLAS collaboration; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recently commissioned a new hardware component of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). This innovative system, using state-of-the-art FPGA processors, selects events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Since the first-level trigger is a synchronous pipelined system, such requirements are applied within a latency of 200ns. We will present the first results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger; these demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for a rate reduction without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-$P_{T}$ leptons, including $H\\to{}\\tau{}\\tau{}$ and $J/\\Psi\\to{}\\mu{}\\mu{}$. In addition, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a powerful tool to validate and optimize the performance of this new trigger system. To reach ...

  6. Upgrade of the global muon trigger at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00282545; Sakulin, Hannes

    2016-09-14

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is one of two general purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the particle physics research laboratory in Geneva (CERN). As such it allows a broad array of physics analyses from precision measurements of the standard model of particle physics to searches for exotic new particles. A series of upgrades and maintenance procedures took place in the first shut down from 2013 to 2015. The aim was to prepare the LHC for the collision energy of 13 TeV and further increase its luminosity. During this shut down also upgrades of the CMS experiment were installed.Due to the high rate of collisions at the LHC, it is impossible to record all such events. In order to reduce the event rate to a manageable level, a trigger system is deployed that selects interesting events. At the CMS experiment this system is divided into two levels: A first hardware based system that is optimised for speed and a second that is software based and applies more time consuming and preci...

  7. Data analysis to evaluate the CPPF system in CMS trigger phase-I upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade system consists of several layers of electronics with a large number of homogeneous cards based on the Micro-TCA(uTCA) standard. The CPPF(Concentration Pre-Processing and Fan-out)system belongs to one of the electronic layers, covering the Muon RPC (Resistive plate chambers) Overlap and Endcap region, and provides preprocessing algorithm for track finding. It includes, in hardware, eight specially designed CPPF cards, one generic CMS card called AMC13, one commercial MCH card, and a Micro-TCA Shelf. Its functionality is realized with five firmware modules: TTC module, optical input module, optical output module, readout module, and a CORE module for cluster finding and transformation. In addition to the firmware functionality, online software is needed for controlling and monitoring each individual CPPF module and the whole CPPF system. This presentation will discuss the data analysis to evaluate the system.

  8. Operation and performance of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter and Level-1 Topological Triggers in Run 2 at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Kate; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In Run 2 at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the ATLAS detector uses a two-level trigger system to reduce the event rate from the nominal collision rate of 40 MHz to the event storage rate of 1 kHz, while preserving interesting physics events. The first step of the trigger system, Level-1, reduces the event rate to 100 kHz with a latency of less than 2.5 μs. One component of this system is the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo), which uses coarse-granularity information from the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters to identify regions of interest corresponding to electrons, photons, taus, jets, and large amounts of transverse energy and missing transverse energy. In this talk, we will discuss the improved performance of the L1Calo system in the challenging, high-luminosity conditions provided by the LHC in Run 2. As the LHC exceeds its design luminosity, it is becoming even more critical to reduce event rates while preserving physics. A new feature of the ATLAS trigger system for Run 2 is the Level-1 Top...

  9. L1 track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade using AM chips and FPGAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The increase of luminosity at the HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information in CMS's Level-1 trigger system to maintain an acceptable trigger rate when selecting interesting events, despite the order of magnitude increase in minimum bias interactions. To meet the latency requirements, dedicated hardware has to be used. This paper presents the results of tests of a prototype system (pattern recognition ezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for the CMS experiment, combining the power of both associative memory custom ASICs and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. The mezzanine uses the latest available associative memory devices (AM06) and the most modern Xilinx Ultrascale FPGAs. The results of the test for a complete tower comprising about 0.5 million patterns is presented, using as simulated input events traversing the upgraded CMS detector. The paper shows the performance of the pattern matching, track finding and track fitting, along with the latency and processing time needed. The pT resolution over pT of the muons measured using the reconstruction algorithm is at the order of 1% in the range 3-100 GeV/c.

  10. Electronics and triggering challenges for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A.

    2018-02-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL), presently being designed by the CMS collaboration to replace the CMS endcap calorimeters for the High Luminosity phase of LHC, will feature six million channels distributed over 52 longitudinal layers. The requirements for the front-end electronics are extremely challenging, including high dynamic range (0.2 fC-10 pC), low noise (~2000 e- to be able to calibrate on single minimum ionising particles throughout the detector lifetime) and low power consumption (~20 mW/channel), as well as the need to select and transmit trigger information with a high granularity. Exploiting the intrinsic precision-timing capabilities of silicon sensors also requires careful design of the front-end electronics as well as the whole system, particularly clock distribution. The harsh radiation environment and requirement to keep the whole detector as dense as possible will require novel solutions to the on-detector electronics layout. Processing the data from the HGCAL imposes equally large challenges on the off-detector electronics, both for the hardware and incorporated algorithms. We present an overview of the complete electronics architecture, as well as the performance of prototype components and algorithms.

  11. Electronics and triggering challenges for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanov, Artur

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL), presently being designed by the CMS collaboration to replace the CMS endcap calorimeters for the High Luminosity phase of LHC, will feature six million channels distributed over 52 longitudinal layers. The requirements for the front-end electronics are extremely challenging, including high dynamic range (0-10 pC), low noise (~2000e- to be able to calibrate on single minimum ionising particles throughout the detector lifetime) and low power consumption (~10mW/channel), as well as the need to select and transmit trigger information with a high granularity. Exploiting the intrinsic precision-timing capabilities of silicon sensors also requires careful design of the front-end electronics as well as the whole system, particularly clock distribution. The harsh radiation environment and requirement to keep the whole detector as dense as possible will require novel solutions to the on-detector electronics layout. Processing all the data from the HGCAL imposes equally large ch...

  12. Intercalibration of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Using Jet Trigger Events

    CERN Document Server

    Futyan, David

    2004-01-01

    This note describes a strategy for rapidly obtaining electromagnetic calorimeter crystal intercalibration at LHC start-up in the absence of test beam precalibration of the complete detector. In the case of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) Electromagnetic Calorimeter, the limit on the precision to which crystals can be intercalibrated in phi using fully simulated jet trigger events, and assuming complete ignorance of the distribution of material in front of the calorimeter, is determined as a function of the pseudorapidity eta. The value of the limit has been found to be close to 1.5% in the barrel and between 3.0% and 1.0% for the fiducial region of the endcaps. The precision is limited by the inhomogeneity of tracker material. With increasing knowledge of the material distribution in the tracker, the attainable precision of the method will increase, with the potential of providing rapid and repeated calibration of the calorimeter.

  13. The ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger Design and Operation in Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, Olga; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Trigger system performs initial event selection using data from calorimeters and the muon spectrometer to reduce the LHC collision event rate down to about 100 kHz. Trigger decisions from the different sub-systems are combined in the Central Trigger Processor for the final Level-1 decision. A new FPGAs-based AdvancedTCA sub-system was introduced to calculate in real time complex kinematic observables: the Topological Processor System. It was installed during the shutdown and commissioning started in 2015 and continued during 2016. The design and operation of the Level-1 Topological Trigger in Run-2 will be illustrated.

  14. The Level-1 Tile-Muon Trigger in the Tile Calorimeter upgrade program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal provides highly-segmented energy measurements for incident particles. Information from TileCal's outermost radial layer can assist in muon tagging in the Level-1 Muon Trigger by rejecting fake muon triggers due to slow charged particles (typically protons) without degrading the efficiency of the trigger. The main activity of the Tile-Muon Trigger in the ATLAS Phase-0 upgrade program was to install and to activate the TileCal signal processor module for providing trigger inputs to the Level-1 Muon Trigger. This report describes the Tile-Muon Trigger, focusing on the new detector electronics such as the Tile Muon Digitizer Board (TMDB) that receives, digitizes and then provides the signal from eight TileCal modules to three Level-1 muon endcap Sector-Logic Boards.

  15. Instrumentation of a Level-1 Track Trigger at ATLAS with Double Buffer Front-End Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The increased collision rate and pile-up produced at the HLLHC requires a substantial upgrade of the ATLAS level-1 trigger in order to maintain a broad physics reach. We show that tracking information can be used to control trigger rates, and describe a proposal for how this information can be extracted within a two-stage level-1 trigger design that has become the baseline for the HLLHC upgrade. We demonstrate that, in terms of the communication between the external processing and the tracking detector frontends, a hardware solution is possible that fits within the latency constraints of level-1.

  16. The Phase-1 Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Endcap Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Akatsuka, Shunichi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Proceedings for RealTime 2018, 9th -15th June 2018 @ Williamsburg, Virginia, USA, on Phase-1 Upgrade of the Level-1 Endcap Muon trigger. The deadline for this document to the conference side is June 24th, 2018.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger and Phase-1 Upgrade of Level-1 Endcap Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Mizukami, Atsushi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment utilises a trigger system to efficiently record interesting events. It consists of first-level and high-level triggers. The first-level trigger is implemented with custom-built hardware to reduce the event rate from 40 MHz to100 kHz. Then the software-based high-level triggers refine the trigger decisions reducing the output rate down to 1 kHz. Events with muons in the final state are an important signature for many physics topics at the LHC. An efficient trigger on muons and a detailed understanding of its performance are required. Trigger efficiencies are, for example, obtained from the muon decay of Z boson, with a Tag&Probe method, using proton-proton collision data collected in 2016 at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The LHC is expected to increase its instantaneous luminosity to $3\\times10^{34} \\rm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ after the phase-1 upgrade between 2018-2020. The upgrade of the ATLAS trigger system is mandatory to cope with this high-luminosity. In the phase-1 upgrade, new det...

  18. L1 track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade using AM chips and FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedi Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of luminosity at the HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information in CMS’s Level-1 trigger system to maintain an acceptable trigger rate when selecting interesting events, despite the order of magnitude increase in minimum bias interactions. To meet the latency requirements, dedicated hardware has to be used. This paper presents the results of tests of a prototype system (pattern recognition ezzanine as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for the CMS experiment, combining the power of both associative memory custom ASICs and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA devices. The mezzanine uses the latest available associative memory devices (AM06 and the most modern Xilinx Ultrascale FPGAs. The results of the test for a complete tower comprising about 0.5 million patterns is presented, using as simulated input events traversing the upgraded CMS detector. The paper shows the performance of the pattern matching, track finding and track fitting, along with the latency and processing time needed. The pT resolution over pT of the muons measured using the reconstruction algorithm is at the order of 1% in the range 3-100 GeV/c.

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  1. Physics performances with the new ATLAS Level-1 Topological trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00414333; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system aims at reducing the 40 MHz proton-proton collision event rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, preserving events valuable for physics analysis. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system, with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5 micro seconds. It is composed of the calorimeter trigger, muon trigger and central trigger processor. During the last upgrade, a new electronics element was introduced to Level-1: The Topological Processor System. It will make it possible to use detailed realtime information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, processed in individual state of the art FPGA processors to determine angles between jets and/or leptons and calculate kinematic variables based on lists of selected/sorted objects. More than one hundred VHDL algorithms are producing trigger outputs to be incorporated into the central trigger processor. This information will be essential to improve background reject...

  2. Upgrading the Interface and Developer Tools of the Trigger Supervisor Software Framework of the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097518; Karsmakers, Peter

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Trigger Supervisor (TS) is a software framework that has been designed to handle the CMS Level-1 trigger setup, configuration and monitoring during data taking as well as all communications with the main run control of CMS. The interface consists of a web-based GUI rendered by a back-end C++ framework (AjaXell) and a front-end JavaScript framework (Dojo). These provide developers with the tools they need to to write their own custom control panels. However, currently there is much frustration with this framework given the age of the Dojo library and the various hacks needed to implement modern use cases. The task at hand is to renew this library and its developer tools, updating it to use the newest standards and technologies, while maintaining full compatibility with legacy code. This document describes the requirements, development process, and changes to this framework that were included in the upgrade from v2.x to v3.x. Keywords: CERN, CMS, L1 Trigger, C++, Polymer, Web Com...

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Level-1 muon barrel trigger during the Run 2 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00404546; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range |η| < 1.05 for a total surface of more than 4000 m 2 and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates according to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 μs. The measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking are here presented.

  4. ATLAS Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger robustness study at X5 test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mattia, A; Nisati, A; Pastore, F C; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; Aielli, G; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Liberti, B; Santonico, R

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the Level-1 Barrel Muon Trigger performance as expected with the current configuration of the RPC detectors, as designed for the Barrel Muon Spectrometer of ATLAS. Results of a beam test performed at the X5-GIF facility at CERN are presented in order to show the trigger efficiency with different conditions of RPC detection efficiency and several background rates. Small RPC chambers with part of the final trigger electronics are used, while the trigger coincidence logic is applied off-line using a detailed simulation model. copy 2003 Published by Esevier B.V. 3 Refs.

  5. Drift Tubes Trigger System of the CMS Experiment at LHC : Commissioning and Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Battilana, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis the performances of the CMS Drift Tubes Local Trigger System of the CMS detector are studied. CMS is one of the general purpose experiments that will operate at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Results from data collected during the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla (CRAFT) commissioning exercise, a globally coordinated run period where the full experiment was involved and configured to detect cosmic rays crossing the CMS cavern, are presented. These include analyses on the precision and accuracy of the trigger reconstruction mechanism and measurement of the trigger efficiency. The description of a method to perform system synchronization is also reported, together with a comparison of the outcomes of trigger electronics and its software emulator code.

  6. The Phase-1 Upgrade of the 
ATLAS Level-1 Endcap Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Akatsuka, Shunichi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Talk slides for RealTime 2018, 9th -15th June 2018 @ Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. Time slot 20 min. (probably 15 min. presentation + 5 min. discussion). This talk is on Phase-1 Upgrade of the Level-1 Endcap Muon trigger. The first part of this presentation describes the overview of the ATLAS trigger system, muon trigger in Run 2 and the Phase-1 Upgrade, and the strategy of phase-1 upgrade. Then in the following few pages, the physics algorithm of the Run 3 muon trigger and its performance is described. The main focus of this talk is on the implementation of the trigger logic to the FPGA. The key component of the trigger part implementation is described, using a schematic diagram and a simulation output screenshot.

  7. Instrumentation of a Level-1 Track Trigger in the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boisvert, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded in order to reach an instantaneous luminosity of $L=5 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. A challenge for the detectors will be to cope with the excessive rate of events coming into the trigger system. In order to maintain the capability of triggering on single lepton objects with momentum thresholds of $p_T 25$ GeV, the ATLAS detector is planning to use tracking information at the Level-1 (hardware) stage of the trigger system. Two options are currently being studied: a L0/L1 trigger design using a double buffer front-end architecture and a single hardware trigger level which uses trigger layers in the new tracker system. Both options are presented as well as results from simulation studies.

  8. The Topological Processor for the future ATLAS Level-1 Trigger: from design to commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is located at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. It is designed to measure decay properties of highly energetic particles produced in the protons collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC has a beam collision frequency of 40 MHz, and thus requires a trigger system to efficiently select events, thereby reducing the storage rate to a manageable level of about 400 Hz. Event triggering is therefore one of the extraordinary challenges faced by the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5 s. It is primarily composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, Muon Trigger, the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). Due to the increase in the LHC instantaneous luminosity up 3 x 10^34/cm2 s from 2015 onwards, a new element will be included in the Level-1 Trigger scheme: the Topological Processor (L1Topo). The L1Topo receives data in a specialized format from the ...

  9. Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 trigger with an FPGA based Topological Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, R; The ATLAS collaboration; Buescher, V; Degele, R; Kiese, P; Maldaner, S; Reiss, A; Schaefer, U; Simioni, E; Tapprogge, S; Urrejola, P

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is located at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. It is designed to measure decay properties of high energetic particles produced in the protons collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC has a proton collision at a frequency of 40 MHz, and thus requires a trigger system to efficiently select events down to a manageable event storage rate of about 400Hz. Event triggering is therefore one of the extraordinary challenges faced by the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5$\\mu$s. It is primarily composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, Muon Trigger, the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). Due to the increase in the LHC instantaneous luminosity up to 3$\\times$10$^{34}$ cm$^{−2}$ s$^{−1}$ from 2015 onwards, a new element will be included in the Level-1 Trigger scheme: the Topological Processor (L1Topo). The L1Topo receives data in a dedicate...

  10. L1Track: A fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware-based ATLAS trigger stage (“Level 1”) will have to provide a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and high accuracy tracking information in time for the decision taking process. In this context, the feasibility of potential approaches aimed at providing low-latency high-quality tracking at Level 1 is discussed. - Highlights: • HL-LH requires highly performing event selection. • ATLAS is studying the implementation of tracking at the very first trigger level. • Low latency and high-quality seem to be achievable with dedicated hardware and adequate detector readout architecture.

  11. Development of the new trigger processor board for the ATLAS Level-1 endcap muon trigger for Run-3

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00525035; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the LHC will be increased by up to a factor of three with respect to the original design value at Run-3 (starting 2021). The ATLAS Level-1 end-cap muon trigger in LHC Run-3 will identify muons by combining data from the Thin-Gap Chamber detector (TGC) and the New Small Wheel (NSW), which is a new detector and will be able to operate in a high background hit rate at Run-3, to suppress the Level-1 trigger rate. In order to handle data from both TGC and NSW, a new trigger processor board has been developed. The board has a modern FPGA to make use of Multi-Gigabit transceiver technology. The readout system for trigger data has also been designed with TCP/IP instead of a dedicated ASIC. This letter presents the electronics and its firmware of the ATLAS Level-1 end-cap muon trigger processor board for LHC Run-3.

  12. Development of a level-1 trigger and timing system for the Double Chooz neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhold, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of the mixing angle θ 13 is the goal of several running and planned experiments. The experiments are either accelerator based (super)beam experiments (e.g. MINOS, T2K, Nova) or reactor anti-neutrino disappearance experiments (e.g. Daya Bay, RENO or Double Chooz). In order to measure or constrain θ 13 with the Double Chooz experiment the overall systematic errors have to be controlled at the one-percent or sub-percent level. The limitation of the systematic errors is achieved through various means and techniques. E.g. the experiment consists of two identical detectors at different baselines, which allow to make a differential anti-neutrino flux measurement, where basically only relative normalisation errors remain. The requirements on the systematic errors put also strong constraints on the quality of all components and materials used for both detectors, most prominently on the stability and radiopurity of the scintillator, the photomultiplier tubes, the vessels containing the detector liquids and the shielding against ambient radioactivity. The readout electronics, trigger and data acquisition system have to operate reliably as an integrated and highly efficient whole over several years. The trigger is provided by the Level-1 Trigger and Timing System, which is the subject of this thesis. It has to provide a highly efficient trigger (at the 0.1% level) for neutrino-induced events as well as for several types of background events. Its decision is realized in hardware and based on energy depositions in the muon veto and the target region. The Level-1 Trigger and Timing System furthermore provides a common System Clock and an absolute timestamp for each event. The Level-1 Trigger and Timing System consists of two types of VME modules, several Trigger Boards and a Trigger Master Board, which have been custom-designed and developed in the electronics workshop of our institute for this experiment and purpose, starting in 2005. In this thesis all

  13. Development of a level-1 trigger and timing system for the Double Chooz neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, Bernd

    2009-02-25

    The measurement of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} is the goal of several running and planned experiments. The experiments are either accelerator based (super)beam experiments (e.g. MINOS, T2K, Nova) or reactor anti-neutrino disappearance experiments (e.g. Daya Bay, RENO or Double Chooz). In order to measure or constrain {theta}{sub 13} with the Double Chooz experiment the overall systematic errors have to be controlled at the one-percent or sub-percent level. The limitation of the systematic errors is achieved through various means and techniques. E.g. the experiment consists of two identical detectors at different baselines, which allow to make a differential anti-neutrino flux measurement, where basically only relative normalisation errors remain. The requirements on the systematic errors put also strong constraints on the quality of all components and materials used for both detectors, most prominently on the stability and radiopurity of the scintillator, the photomultiplier tubes, the vessels containing the detector liquids and the shielding against ambient radioactivity. The readout electronics, trigger and data acquisition system have to operate reliably as an integrated and highly efficient whole over several years. The trigger is provided by the Level-1 Trigger and Timing System, which is the subject of this thesis. It has to provide a highly efficient trigger (at the 0.1% level) for neutrino-induced events as well as for several types of background events. Its decision is realized in hardware and based on energy depositions in the muon veto and the target region. The Level-1 Trigger and Timing System furthermore provides a common System Clock and an absolute timestamp for each event. The Level-1 Trigger and Timing System consists of two types of VME modules, several Trigger Boards and a Trigger Master Board, which have been custom-designed and developed in the electronics workshop of our institute for this experiment and purpose, starting in 2005. In

  14. ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Subsystem Tests of a Prototype Cluster Processor Module

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Apostologlou, P; Ay, C; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Brawn, I P; Bohm, C; Dahlhoff, A; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Eisenhandler, E F; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Hanke, P; Hellman, S; Hidévgi, A; Hillier, S J; Jakobs, K; Kluge, E E; Landon, M; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Moye, T H; Mills, D; Moyse, E; Nix, O; Penno, K; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Schmitt, K; Schäfer, U; Silverstein, S; Staley, R J; Thomas, J; Trefzger, T M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; 9th Workshop On Electronics For LHC Experiments - LECC 2003

    2003-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger consists of a Preprocessor (PP), a Cluster Processor (CP), and a Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP). The CP and JEP receive digitised trigger-tower data from the Preprocessor and produce trigger multiplicity and Region-of-Interest (RoI) information. The trigger will also provide intermediate results to the data acquisition (DAQ) system for monitoring and diagnostic purposes by using Readout Driver (ROD) Modules. The CP Modules (CPM) are designed to find isolated electron/photon and hadron/tau clusters in overlapping windows of trigger towers. Each pipelined CPM processes 8-bit data from a total of 128 trigger towers at each LHC crossing. Four full-specification prototypes of CPMs have been built and results of complete tests on individual boards will be presented. These modules were then integrated with other modules to build an ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger subsystem test bench. Realtime data were exchanged between modules, and time-slice readout data were tagged and transferr...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  16. Level-1 trigger rate from beam halo muons in the end-cap

    CERN Document Server

    Robins, S

    1998-01-01

    Previous detectors at $p$-$\\bar{p}$ machines have experienced problems with high muon trigger rates in the forward region due to muons produced in interactions between the beam and the machine. The se `beam halo' muons typically have a very small angle to the beam direction, and are dominated by muons of several GeV energy and at low radius relative to the beam line. The response of the ATLA S end-cap muon trigger to them has been investigated using a complete simulation of both the LHC machine components and the ATLAS detector and trigger. It is seen that the total flux of such muon s in the end-cap trigger counters is $\\sim$ 60 kHz, in high luminosity LHC running, and the acceptance of the Level-1 end-cap muon trigger to these particles is $\\sim$1\\%. The overall Level-1 trig ger rate from such muons will be small compared to rates from the products of the $p$-$p$ collision. The total rates from low- and high-\\pt triggers at 6 and 20 GeV are 250 and 16 Hz respectively. Whilst these rates are negligible in co...

  17. The Level-1 Tile-Muon Trigger in the Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Program

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhov, Andrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The TileCal provides highly-segmented energy measurements for incident particles. Information from TileCal's last radial layer can assist in muon tagging using Level-1 muon trigger. It can help in the rejection of fake muon triggers arising from background radiation (slow charged particles - protons) without degrading the efficiency of the trigger. The TileCal main activity for Phase-0 upgrade ATLAS program (2013-2014) was the activation of the TileCal third layer signal for assisting the muon trigger at 1.0<|η|<1.3 (Tile-Muon Trigger). This report describes the Tile-Muon Trigger at TileCal upgrade activities, focusing on the new on-detector electronics such as Tile Muon Digitizer Board (TMDB) to provide (receive and digitize) the signal from eight TileCal modules to three Level-1 muon endcap sector logic blocks.

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  19. Instrumentation of a Level-1 Track Trigger at ATLAS with Double Buffer Front-End Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Around 2021 the Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded to provide instantaneous luminosities 5x10^34, leading to excessive rates from the ATLAS Level-1 trigger. We describe a double-buffer front-end architecture for the ATLAS tracker replacement which should enable tracking information to be used in the Level-1 decision. This will allow Level-1 rates to be controlled whilst preserving high efficiency for single lepton triggers at relatively low transverse momentum thresholds pT ~25 GeV, enabling ATLAS to remain sensitive to physics at the electroweak scale. In particular, a potential hardware solution for the communication between the upgraded silicon barrel strip detectors and the external processing within this architecture will be described, and discrete event simulations used to demonstrate that this fits within the tight latency constraints.

  20. Simulation of dynamic pile-up corrections in the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narrias-Villar, Daniel; Wessels, Martin; Brandt, Oleg [Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is a crucial part of the ATLAS trigger effort to select only relevant physics events out of the large number of interactions at the LHC. In Run II, in which the LHC will double the centre-of-mass energy and further increase the instantaneous luminosity, pile-up is a limiting key factor for triggering and reconstruction of relevant events. The upgraded L1Calo Multi-Chip-Modules (nMCM) will address this problem by applying dynamic pile-up corrections in real-time, of which a precise simulation is crucial for physics analysis. Therefore pile-up effects are studied in order to provide a predictable parametrised baseline correction for the Monte Carlo simulation. Physics validation plots, such as trigger rates and turn-on curves are laid out.

  1. The new Level-1 Topological Trigger for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00047907; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the ATLAS experiment records high-energy proton collision to investigate the properties of fundamental particles. These collisions take place at a 40 MHz, and the ATLAS trigger system selects the interesting ones, reducing the rate to 1 kHz, allowing for their storage and subsequent offline analysis. The ATLAS trigger system is organized in two levels, with increasing degree of details and of accuracy. The first level trigger reduces the event rate to 100 kHz with a decision latency of less than 2.5 micro seconds. It is composed of the calorimeter trigger, muon trigger and central trigger processor. A new component of the first-level trigger was introduced in 2015: the Topological Processor (L1Topo). It allows to use detailed real-time information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon systems, to compute advanced kinematic quantities using state of the art FPGA processors, and to select interesting events based on several com...

  2. Prototype of a file-based high-level trigger in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G; Darlea, G-L; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Bawej, T; Chaze, O; Coarasa, J A; Deldicque, C; Dobson, M; Dupont, A; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Hartl, C; Hegeman, J; Masetti, L; Behrens, U; Branson, J; Cittolin, S; Holzner, A; Erhan, S

    2014-01-01

    The DAQ system of the CMS experiment at the LHC is upgraded during the accelerator shutdown in 2013/14. To reduce the interdependency of the DAQ system and the high-level trigger (HLT), we investigate the feasibility of using a file-system-based HLT. Events of ∼1 MB size are built at the level-1 trigger rate of 100 kHz. The events are assembled by ∼50 builder units (BUs). Each BU writes the raw events at ∼2GB/s to a local file system shared with Q(10) filter-unit machines (FUs) running the HLT code. The FUs read the raw data from the file system, select Q(1%) of the events, and write the selected events together with monitoring meta-data back to a disk. This data is then aggregated over several steps and made available for offline reconstruction and online monitoring. We present the challenges, technical choices, and performance figures from the prototyping phase. In addition, the steps to the final system implementation will be discussed.

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  4. Performances of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon barrel trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta|<1.05$ for a total surface of more than $4000\\ m^2$ and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 $\\mu s$. The detailed measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking is here presented.

  5. Optimisation of the level-1 calorimeter trigger at ATLAS for Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchek, Stanislav [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) is a central part of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger system, designed to identify jet, electron, photon, and hadronic tau candidates, and to measure their transverse energies, as well total transverse energy and missing transverse energy. The optimisation of the jet energy resolution is an important part of the L1Calo upgrade for Run II. A Look-Up Table (LUT) is used to translate the electronic signal from each trigger tower to its transverse energy. By optimising the LUT calibration we can achieve better jet energy resolution and better performance of the jet transverse energy triggers, which are vital for many physics analyses. In addition, the improved energy calibration leads to significant improvements of the missing transverse energy resolution. A new Multi-Chip Module (MCM), as a part of the L1Calo upgrade, provides two separate LUTs for jets and electrons/photons/taus, allowing to optimise jet transverse energy and missing transverse energy separately from the electromagnetic objects. The optimisation is validated using jet transverse energy and missing transverse energy triggers turn-on curves and rates.

  6. Instrumentation of a Level-1 Track Trigger in the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boisvert, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges in particle physics experiments at hadron colliders is to build detector systems that can take advantage of the future luminosity increase that will take place during the next decade. More than 200 simultaneous collisions will be recorded in a single event which will make the task to extract the interesting physics signatures harder than ever before. Not all events can be recorded hence a fast trigger system is required to select events that will be stored for further analysis. In the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) two different architectures for accommodating a level-1 track trigger are being investigated. The tracker has more readout channels than can be readout in time for the trigger decision. Both architectures aim for a data reduction of 10-100 in order to make readout of data possible in time for a level-1 trigger decision. In the first architecture the data reduction is achieved by reading out only parts of the detector seeded by a high rate pre-trigger ...

  7. Data-driven performance evaluation method for CMS RPC trigger ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    level triggers, to handle the large stream of data produced in collision. The information transmitted from the three muon subsystems (DT, CSC and RPC) are collected by the Global Muon Trigger (GMT) Board and merged. A method for evaluating ...

  8. Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger with event topology information

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, Eduard; The ATLAS collaboration; Bauss, B; Büscher, V; Jakobi, K; Kaluza, A; Kahra, C; Reiss, A; Schäffer, J; Schulte, A; Simon, M; Tapprogge, S; Vogel, A; Zinser, M; Palka, M

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2015 will collide proton beams with increased luminosity from \\unit{10^{34}} up to \\unit{3 \\times 10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}}. ATLAS is an LHC experiment designed to measure decay properties of high energetic particles produced in the protons collisions. The higher luminosity places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1kHz while at the same time, selecting those events with valuable physics meaning. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 100kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5$\\mu s$. It is composed of the Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo), the Muon Trigger (L1Muon) and the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). In 2014, there will be a new electronics element in the chain: the Topological Processor System (L1Topo system).\\\\ The L1Topo system consist of a single AdvancedTCA shelf equipped with three L1Topo processor ...

  9. The performance of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger with LHC collision data

    CERN Document Server

    Bracinik, J

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger is a hardware-based system designed to identify high-E$_T$ jets, electron/photon and $ au$ candidates and to measure total and missing E$_T$ in the ATLAS calorimeters. After more than two years of commissioning in situ with calibration data and cosmic rays, the system has now been used extensively to select the most interesting proton-proton collision events. Fine tuning of timing and energy calibration has been carried out in 2010 to improve the trigger response to physics objects. In these proceedings, an analysis of the performance of the level-1 calorimeter trigger is presented, along with the techniques used to achieve these results.

  10. Performance of ATLAS RPC Level-1 Muon trigger during the 2015 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Corradi, Massimo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Its input stage consists of an array of processors receiving the full granularity of data from Resistive Plate Chambers in the central area of the ATLAS detector ("Barrel"). The trigger efficiency and the level of synchronisation of its elements with the rest of ATLAS and the LHC clock are crucial figures of this system: many parameters of the constituent RPC detector and the trigger electronics have to be constantly and carefully checked to assure a correct functioning of the Level-1 selection. Notwithstanding the complexity of such a large array of integrated RPC detectors, the ATLAS Level-1 system has resumed operations successfully after the past 2 year shutdown, with levels similar to those of Run 1. We present the inclusive monitoring of the RPC+L1 system that we have developed to characterise the behaviour of the system, using reconstructed muons in events selected by...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  12. The Phase-1 Upgrade for the Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Vincenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC makes use of Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors. The on-detector trigger electronics modules are able to identify muons with predefined transverse momentum values (pT) by executing a coincidence logic on signals coming from the various detector layers. On-detector trigger boards then transfer trigger data to the off-detector electronics. A complex trigger system processes the incoming data by combining trigger information from the barrel and the endcap regions, and providing the combined muon candidate to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). For almost a decade, the Level-1 Trigger system operated very well, despite the challenging requirements on trigger efficiency and performance, and the continuously increasing LHC luminosity. In order to cope with these constraints, various upgrades for the full trigger system were already deployed, and others have been designed to be installed in the next years. Most of the upgrades to the trigger system...

  13. The ATLAS Level-1 Trigger System with 13TeV nominal LHC collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Helary, Louis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 (L1) Trigger system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) plays a key role in the ATLAS detector data-taking. It is a hardware system that selects in real time events containing physics-motivated signatures. Selection is purely based on calorimetry energy depositions and hits in the muon chambers consistent with muon candidates. The L1 Trigger system has been upgraded to cope with the more challenging run-II LHC beam conditions, including increased centre-of-mass energy, increased instantaneous luminosity and higher levels of pileup. This talk summarises the improvements, commissioning and performance of the L1 ATLAS Trigger for the LHC run-II data period. The acceptance of muon triggers has been improved by increasing the hermiticity of the muon spectrometer. New strategies to obtain a better muon trigger signal purity were designed for certain geometrically difficult transition regions by using the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. Algorithms to reduce noise spikes in muon trig...

  14. Using the pixel detector for fast triggering in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    De Mattai, M

    2006-01-01

    The Standard Model of fundamental interactions (SM) has been extensively tested in many particle experiments during the last 25 years and it has proven to be extremely successful up to the energy scale typical of the weak force. Nevertheless, there is still no experimental evidence of the Higgs boson, one of the key components of the SM, responsible for the breaking of the electroweak symmetry and for the masses of the fermions and of the weak bosons. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to provide the first proton on proton collision in 2008 at the center of mass energy of 14 Tev, an energy one order of magnitude higher than the regime explored so far. The CMS experiment is an omni-purpose experiment that will operate at the LHC, it will give insight into Standard Model physics and search for physics beyond the Standard Model. In this work we consider the usage of pixel detector information in the reconstruction of hadronic jets in events collected by the CMS detector under high luminosity running co...

  15. Fine Synchronization of the CMS Muon Drift-Tube Local Trigger using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; 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    2010-01-01

    The CMS experiment uses self-triggering arrays of drift tubes in the barrel muon trigger to perform the identification of the correct bunch crossing. The identification is unique only if the trigger chain is correctly synchronized. In this paper, the synchronization performed during an extended cosmic ray run is described and the results are reported. The random arrival time of cosmic ray muons allowed several synchronization aspects to be studied and a simple method for the fine synchronization of the Drift Tube Local Trigger at LHC to be developed.

  16. Commissioning of the CMS High-Level Trigger with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS High-Level Trigger (HLT) is responsible for ensuring that data samples with potentially interesting events are recorded with high efficiency and good quality. This paper gives an overview of the HLT and focuses on its commissioning using cosmic rays. The selection of triggers that were deployed is presented and the online grouping of triggered events into streams and primary datasets is discussed. Tools for online and offline data quality monitoring for the HLT are described, and the operational performance of the muon HLT algorithms is reviewed. The average time taken for the HLT selection and its dependence on detector and operating conditions are presented. The HLT performed reliably and helped provide a large dataset. This dataset has proven to be invaluable for understanding the performance of the trigger and the CMS experiment as a whole.

  17. Commissioning of the CMS High-Level Trigger with cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The CMS High-Level Trigger (HLT) is responsible for ensuring that data samples with potentially interesting events are recorded with high efficiency and good quality. This paper gives an overview of the HLT and focuses on its commissioning using cosmic rays. The selection of triggers that were deployed is presented and the online grouping of triggered events into streams and primary datasets is discussed. Tools for online and offline data quality monitoring for the HLT are described, and the operational performance of the muon HLT algorithms is reviewed. The average time taken for the HLT selection and its dependence on detector and operating conditions are presented. The HLT performed reliably and helped provide a large dataset. This dataset has proven to be invaluable for understanding the performance of the trigger and the CMS experiment as a whole.

  18. The CMS Electromagnetic Trigger: commissioning and performance toward the start of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) has been designed to precisely measure electron and photon energy. It is made of 75848 lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ) crystals and its characteristics have been optimized for the search of the Higgs boson in its two photons decay mode. In view of the high interaction rate at the Large Hadron Collider (Lhc), CMS implements a sophisticated online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10 6 . In the intense hadronic environment, the ECAL trigger system provides a powerful tool to select interesting physics events which may contain electrons or photons in their final states. Comic ray data recorded by the CMS experiment have been analyzed in order to estimate the ECAL trigger performance in terms of efficiency.

  19. Performances of the ATLAS RPC Level-1 Muon trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Its input stage consists of an array of processors receiving the full granularity of data from Resistive Plate Chambers in the central area of the ATLAS detector ("Barrel"). The RPCs, placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS detector, are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range |η|<1.05 for a total surface of more than 4000 m2 and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 μs. We illustrate the selections, strategy and validation for an unbiased determination of the efficiency and timing of the RPC and the L1 from data; and show the results w...

  20. Operation and Performance of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter and Topological Triggers in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Sebastian Mario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In Run 2 at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the ATLAS detector uses a two-level trigger system to reduce the event rate from the nominal collision rate of 40 MHz to the event storage rate of 1 kHz, while preserving interesting physics events. The first step of the trigger system, Level-1, reduces the event rate to 100 kHz within a latency of less than $2.5$ $\\mu\\text{s}$. One component of this system is the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo), which uses coarse-granularity information from the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters to identify regions of interest corresponding to electrons, photons, taus, jets, and large amounts of transverse energy and missing transverse energy. In these proceedings, we discuss improved features and performance of the L1Calo system in the challenging, high-luminosity conditions provided by the LHC in Run 2. A new dynamic pedestal correction algorithm reduces pile-up effects and the use of variable thresholds and isolation criteria for electromagnetic objects allows for opt...

  1. The Digital Algorithm Processors for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Silverstein, S

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger identifies high-ET jets, electrons/photons and hadrons and measures total and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Two subsystems – the Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP) and the Cluster Processor(CP) – process data from every crossing, and report feature multiplicities and energy sums to the ATLAS Central Trigger Processor, which produces a Level-1 Accept decision. Locations and types of identified features are read out to the Level-2 Trigger as regions-of-interest, and quality-monitoring information is read out to the ATLAS data acquisition system. The JEP and CP subsystems share a great deal of common infrastructure, including a custom backplane, several common hardware modules, and readout hardware. Some of the common modules use FPGAs with selectable firmware configurations based on the location in the system. This approach saved substantial development effort and provided a uniform model for software development. We pre...

  2. The Digital Algorithm Processors for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Silverstein, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger identifies high-ET jets, electrons/photons and hadrons and measures total and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Two subsystems – the Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP) and the Cluster Processor(CP) – process data from every crossing, and report feature multiplicities and energy sums to the ATLAS Central Trigger Processor, which produces a Level-1 Accept decision. Locations and types of identified features are read out to the Level-2 Trigger as regions-of-interest, and quality-monitoring information is read out to the ATLAS data acquisition system. The JEP and CP subsystems share a great deal of common infrastructure, including a custom backplane, several common hardware modules, and readout hardware. Some of the common modules use FPGAs with selectable firmware configurations based on the location in the system. This approach saved substantial development effort and provided a uniform model for software development. We pre...

  3. ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger hardware: initial timing and energy calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Childers, JT; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger identifies high-pT objects in the Liquid Argon and Tile Calorimeters with a fixed latency of up to 2.4 microseconds using a hardware-based, pipelined system built with custom electronics. The Preprocessor Module conditions and digitizes about 7200 pre-summed analogue signals from the calorimeters at the LHC bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, and performs bunch-crossing identification (BCID) and deposited energy measurement for each input signal. This information is passed to further processors for object classification and total energy calculation, and the results are used to make the Level-1 trigger decision for the ATLAS detector. The BCID and energy measurement in the trigger depend on precise timing adjustments to achieve correct sampling of the input signal peak. Test pulses from the calorimeters were analysed to derive the initial timing and energy calibration, and first data from the LHC restart in autumn 2009 and early 2010 were used for validation and further op...

  4. ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger hardware: initial timing and energy calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childers, J T

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger identifies high-pT objects in the Liquid Argon and Tile Calorimeters with a fixed latency of up to 2.5μs using a hardware-based, pipelined system built with custom electronics. The Preprocessor Module conditions and digitizes about 7200 pre-summed analogue signals from the calorimeters at the LHC bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, and performs bunch-crossing identification (BCID) and deposited energy measurement for each input signal. This information is passed to further processors for object classification and total energy calculation, and the results are used to make the Level-1 trigger decision for the ATLAS detector. The BCID and energy measurement in the trigger depend on precise timing adjustments to achieve correct sampling of the input signal peak. Test pulses from the calorimeters were analysed to derive the initial timing and energy calibration, and first data from the LHC restart in autumn 2009 and early 2010 were used for validation and further optimization. The results from these calibration measurements are presented.

  5. From the physical model to the electronic system - OMTF Trigger for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bluj, Michael; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Drabik, Pawel; Górski, Maciej; Kalinowski, A; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof; Konecki, Marcin; Miętki, Pawel; Okliński, Wojciech; Olszewski, Michal; Poźniak, Krzysztof; Zabołotny, Wojiech M; Zawistowski, Krystian; Żarnecki, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the development of the Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) trigger for the CMS experiment at CERN. The transition from the data produced by the physical model to the algorithm suitable for practical implementation is shown. The paper also concentrates on the problems related to the necessity of continuous adaptation of the algorithm to the changing operating conditions of the detector

  6. Digital signal integrity and stability in the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, R; Aharrouche, M; Andrei, V; Åsman, B; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bendel, M; Bohm, C; Booth, J R A; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I P; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Curtis, C J; Davis, A O; Eckweiler, S; Eisenhandler, E F; Faulkner, P J W; Fleckner, J; Föhlisch, F; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Goringer, C; Groll, M; Hadley, D R; Hanke, P; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Hillier, S J; Johansen, M; Kluge, E E; Kühl, T; Landon, M; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Moa, T; Morris, J D; Müller, F; Neusiedl, A; Ohm, C; Oltmann, B; Perera, V J O; Prieur, D P F; Qian, W; Rieke, S; Rühr, F; Sankey, D P C; Schäfer, U; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Silverstein, S; Sjölin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stockton, M C; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Wessels, M; Wildt, M

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 calorimeter trigger is a hardware-based system with the goal of identifying high-pT objects and to measure total and missing ET in the ATLAS calorimeters within an overall latency of 2.5 microseconds. This trigger system is composed of the Preprocessor which digitises about 7200 analogue input channels and two digital processors to identify high-pT signatures and to calculate the energy sums. The digital part consists of multi-stage, pipelined custom-built modules. The high demands on connectivity between the initial analogue stage and digital part and between the custom-built modules are presented. Furthermore the techniques to establish timing regimes and verify connectivity and stable operation of these digital links will be described.

  7. Pre-Production Validation of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, R; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Belkin, A; Bohm, C; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Eisenhandler, E F; Föhlisch, F; Gee, C N P; Geweniger, C; Gillman, A R; Hanke, P; Hellman, S; Hidvégi, A; Hillier, S J; Kluge, E E; Landon, M; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Meier, K; Mirea, A; Moye, T H; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Rieke, S; Rühr, F; Sankey, D P C; Schäfer, U; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Silverstein, S; Staley, R J; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Trefzger, T; Typaldos, D; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, G A; Weber, P; 14th IEEE - NPSS Real Time Conference 2005 Nuclear Plasma Sciences Society

    2005-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is a major part of the first stage of event selection for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It is a digital, pipelined system with several stages of processing, largely based on FPGAs, which perform programmable algorithms in parallel with a fixed latency to process about 300 Gbyte/s of input data. The real-time output consists of counts of different types of trigger objects and energy sums. Prototypes of all module types have been undergoing intensive testing before final production during 2005. Verification of their correct operation has been performed standalone and in the ATLAS test-beam at CERN. Results from these investigations will be presented, along with a description of the methodology used to perform the tests.

  8. Recent experience and future evolution of the CMS High Level Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gerry; Branson, James; Bukowiec, Sebastian Czeslaw; Chaze, Olivier; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Hartl, Christian; Holzner, Andre Georg; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Franciscus; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius; Nunez Barranco Fernandez, Carlos; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Polese, Giovanni; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Spataru, Andrei Cristian; Stoeckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC uses a two-stage trigger system, with events flowing from the first level trigger at a rate of 100 kHz. These events are read out by the Data Acquisition system (DAQ), assembled in memory in a farm of computers, and finally fed into the high-level trigger (HLT) software running on the farm. The HLT software selects interesting events for offline storage and analysis at a rate of a few hundred Hz. The HLT algorithms consist of sequences of offline-style reconstruction and filtering modules, executed on a farm of 0(10000) CPU cores built from commodity hardware. Experience from the 2010-2011 collider run is detailed, as well as the current architecture of the CMS HLT, and its integration with the CMS reconstruction framework and CMS DAQ. The short- and medium-term evolution of the HLT software infrastructure is discussed, with future improvements aimed at supporting extensions of the HLT computing power, and addressing remaining performance and maintenance issues.

  9. The data path of the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger preprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, George Victor

    2010-10-27

    The PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger provides digital values of transverse energy in real-time to the subsequent object-finding processors. The input comprises more than 7000 analogue signals of reduced granularity from the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 trigger decision must be verified. For this, the PreProcessor transmits copies of the real-time digital data to the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. In addition, the PreProcessor system provides a standard VMEbus interface to the computing infrastructure of the experiment, on which configuration data is loaded and control or monitoring data are read out. A dedicated system that ensures both the transfer of event data to storage in ATLAS and the data transfer over the VME was implemented on the 124 modules of the PreProcessor system in the form of a ''Readout Manager''. The ''Field Programmable Gate Array'' (FPGA) is located on each module. The rst part of this work describes the algorithms developed to meet the functionality of the Readout Manager. The second part deals with the tests that were carried out to ensure the proper functionality of the modules before they were installed at CERN in the ATLAS cavern. (orig.)

  10. A binary link tracker for the BaBar level 1 trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, A.; Chen, H.K.; Dao, K.

    1999-01-01

    The BaBar detector at PEP-II will operate in a high-luminosity e + e - collider environment near the Υ(4S) resonance with the primary goal of studying CP violation in the B meson system. In this environment, typical physics events of interest involve multiple charged particles. These events are identified by counting these tracks in a fast first level (Level 1) trigger system, by reconstructing the tracks in real time. For this purpose, a Binary Link Tracker Module (BLTM) was designed and fabricated for the BaBar Level 1 Drift Chamber trigger system. The BLTM is responsible for linking track segments, constructed by the Track Segment Finder Modules (TSFM), into complete tracks. A single BLTM module processes a 360 MBytes/s stream of segment hit data, corresponding to information from the entire Drift Chamber, and implements a fast and robust algorithm that tolerates high hit occupancies as well as local inefficiencies of the Drift Chamber. The algorithms and the necessary control logic of the BLTM were implemented in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), using the VHDL hardware description language. The finished 9U x 400 mm Euro-format board contains roughly 75,000 gates of programmable logic or about 10,000 lines of VHDL code synthesized into five FPGAs

  11. The data path of the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger preprocessor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, George Victor

    2010-01-01

    The PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger provides digital values of transverse energy in real-time to the subsequent object-finding processors. The input comprises more than 7000 analogue signals of reduced granularity from the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 trigger decision must be verified. For this, the PreProcessor transmits copies of the real-time digital data to the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. In addition, the PreProcessor system provides a standard VMEbus interface to the computing infrastructure of the experiment, on which configuration data is loaded and control or monitoring data are read out. A dedicated system that ensures both the transfer of event data to storage in ATLAS and the data transfer over the VME was implemented on the 124 modules of the PreProcessor system in the form of a ''Readout Manager''. The ''Field Programmable Gate Array'' (FPGA) is located on each module. The rst part of this work describes the algorithms developed to meet the functionality of the Readout Manager. The second part deals with the tests that were carried out to ensure the proper functionality of the modules before they were installed at CERN in the ATLAS cavern. (orig.)

  12. The data path of the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger preprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, George Victor

    2010-10-27

    The PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger provides digital values of transverse energy in real-time to the subsequent object-finding processors. The input comprises more than 7000 analogue signals of reduced granularity from the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 trigger decision must be verified. For this, the PreProcessor transmits copies of the real-time digital data to the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. In addition, the PreProcessor system provides a standard VMEbus interface to the computing infrastructure of the experiment, on which configuration data is loaded and control or monitoring data are read out. A dedicated system that ensures both the transfer of event data to storage in ATLAS and the data transfer over the VME was implemented on the 124 modules of the PreProcessor system in the form of a ''Readout Manager''. The ''Field Programmable Gate Array'' (FPGA) is located on each module. The rst part of this work describes the algorithms developed to meet the functionality of the Readout Manager. The second part deals with the tests that were carried out to ensure the proper functionality of the modules before they were installed at CERN in the ATLAS cavern. (orig.)

  13. Slice Test Results of the ATLAS Barrel Muon Level-1 Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Alviggi, M G; Bocci, V; Brambilla, Elena; Canale, V; Caprio, M A; Cardarelli, R; Cataldi, G; De Asmundis, R; Della Volpe, D; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Distante, L; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Iengo, P; Nisati, A; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Perrino, R; Petrolo, E; Primavera, M; Salamon, A; Santonico, R; Sekhniaidze, G; Severi, M; Spagnolo, S; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; 9th Workshop On Electronics For LHC Experiments - LECC 2003

    2003-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment makes use of the Resistive Plate Chambers detectors for particle tracking in the barrel region. The level-1 muon trigger system has to measure and discriminate muon transverse momentum, perform a fast and coarse tracking of the muon candidates, associate them to the bunch crossing corresponding to the event of interest, measure the second coordinate in the non-bending projection. The on-detector electronics first collects front-end signals coming from the two inner RPC stations on the low-pT PAD boards, each one covering a region of DetaxDphi=0.2x0.2, and hosting four Coincidence Matrix ASICs. Each CMA performs the low-pT trigger algorithm and data readout on a region of DetaxDphi=0.2x0.1. Data coming from the four CMAs are assembled by the low-pT PAD logic. Each low-pT PAD board sends data to the corresponding high-pT PAD boards, located on the outer RPC station. Four CMA on each board make use of the low-pT trigger result and of the front-end signals coming from...

  14. Level-3 Calorimetric Resolution available for the Level-1 and Level-2 CDF Triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Canepa, A.; Liu, T.; Cortiana, G.; Flanagan, G.; Frisch, H.; Krop, D.; Pilcher, C.; Rusu, V.; Cavaliere, V.; Greco, V.; Giannetti, P.; Piendibene, M.; Sartori, L.; Vidal, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    As the Tevatron luminosity increases sophisticated selections are required to be efficient in selecting rare events among a very huge background. To cope with this problem, CDF has pushed the offline calorimeter algorithm reconstruction resolution up to Level 2 and, when possible, even up to Level 1, increasing efficiency and, at the same time, keeping under control the rates. The CDF Run II Level 2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on a simple algorithm that was used in Run I. This system has worked well for Run II at low luminosity. As the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitation due to this simple algorithm starts to become clear: some of the most important jet and MET (Missing ET) related triggers have large growth terms in cross section at higher luminosity. In this paper, we present an upgrade of the Level 2 Calorimeter system which makes the calorimeter trigger tower information available directly to a CPU allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be impleme...

  15. The design of a fast Level-1 track trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of ATLAS.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00413032; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high/luminosity upgrade of the LHC will increase the rate of the proton-proton collisions by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the initial LHC-design. The ATLAS experiment will upgrade consequently, increasing its robustness and selectivity in the expected high radiation environment. In particular, the earliest, hardware based, ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will require higher rejection power, still maintaining efficient selection on many various physics signatures. The key ingredient is the possibility of extracting tracking information from the brand new full-silicon detector and use it for the process. While fascinating, this solution poses a big challenge in the choice of the architecture, due to the reduced latency available at this trigger level (few tens of micro-seconds) and the high expected working rates (order of MHz). In this paper, we review the design possibilities of such a system in a potential new trigger and readout architecture, and present the performance resulting from a d...

  16. The Topological Processor for the future ATLAS Level-1 Trigger: from design to commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to measure decay properties of high energetic particles produced in the proton-proton collisions. During its first run, the LHC collided proton bunches at a frequency of 20 MHz, and therefore the detector required a Trigger system to efficiently select events down to a manageable event storage rate of about 400 Hz. By 2015 the LHC instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 3$\\times$$10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$: this represent an unprecedented challenge faced by the ATLAS Trigger system. To cope with the higher event rate and efficiently select relevant events from physics point of view, a new element will be included in the Level-1 Trigger scheme after 2015: the Topological Processor (L1Topo).\\\\ The L1Topo system, currently developed at CERN, will consist initially of an ATCA crate and two L1Topo modules. A high density opto-electroconverter (AVAGO miniPOD) drives up to 1.6 Tb/s of data from the calorimeter and muon detectors into two high end ...

  17. The Topological Processor for the future ATLAS Level-1 Trigger: from design to commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00226165

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at LHC will require a Trigger system to efficiently select events down to a manageable event storage rate of about 400 Hz. By 2015 the LHC instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 3 x 10^34 cm-2s-1, this represents an unprecedented challenge faced by the ATLAS Trigger system. To cope with the higher event rate and efficiently select relevant events from a physics point of view, a new element will be included in the Level-1 Trigger scheme after 2015: the Topological Processor (L1Topo). The L1Topo system, currently developed at CERN, will consist initially of an ATCA crate and two L1Topo modules. A high density opto-electroconverter (AVAGO miniPOD) drives up to 1.6 Tb/s of data from the calorimeter and muon detectors into two high-end FPGA (Virtex7-690), to be processed in about 200 ns. The design has been optimized to guarantee excellent signal in- tegrity of the high-speed links and low latency data transmission on the Real Time Data Path (RTDP). The L1Topo receives data in a standa...

  18. Performance of the CMS Jets and Missing Transverse Energy Trigger at LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Nachtman, Jane; Dordevic, Milos; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Kirschenmann, Henning; Zhang, Fengwangdong

    2017-01-01

    In preparation for collecting proton-proton collisions from the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and rate of 40MHz with increasing instantaneous luminosity, the CMS collaboration prepared an array of triggers utilizing jets and missing transverse energy for searches for new physics at the energy frontier as well as for SM precision measurements. The CMS trigger system must be able to sift through the collision events in order to extract events of interest at a rate of 1kHz, applying sophisticated algorithms adapted for fast and effective operation. Particularly important is the calibration of the trigger objects, as corrections to the measured energy may be substantial. Equally important is the development of improved reconstruction algorithms to mitigate negative effects due to high numbers of overlapping proton-proton collisions and increased levels of beam-related effects. Work by the CMS collaboration on upgrading the high-level trigger for jets and missing transverse energy for the upgraded LHC o...

  19. Upgrade of the PreProcessor System for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Khomich, A

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger is a hardware-based pipelined system designed to identify high-pT objects in the ATLAS calorimeters within a fixed latency of 2.5\\,us. It consists of three subsystems: the PreProcessor which conditions and digitizes analogue signals and two digital processors. The majority of the PreProcessor's tasks are performed on a dense Multi-Chip Module(MCM) consisting of FADCs, a time-adjustment and digital processing ASICs, and LVDS serialisers designed and implemented in ten years old technologies. An MCM substitute, based on today's components (dual channel FADCs and FPGA), is being developed to profit from state-of-the-art electronics and to enhance the flexibility of the digital processing. Development and first test results are presented.

  20. A configurable tracking algorithm to detect cosmic muon tracks for the CMS-RPC based technical trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rajan, R T; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Ranieri, A; Abbrescia, M; Guida, R; Iaselli, G; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Roselli, G; Trentadue, R; Tupputi, b, S; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, e, A; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Polese, G; Sciacca, C; Baesso, g, P; Belli, G; Necchi, M; Ratti, S P; Pagano, D; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Dimitrov, A; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Bunkowski, K; Kierzkowski, K; Konecki, M; Kudla, I; Pietrusinski, M; Pozniak, K

    2009-01-01

    In the CERN CMS experiment at LHC Collider special trigger signals called Technical Triggers will be used for the purpose of test and calibration. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) based Technical Trigger system is a part of the CMS muon trigger system and is designed to detect cosmic muon tracks. It is based on two boards, namely RBC (RPC Balcony Collector) and TTU (Technical Trigger Unit). The proposed tracking algorithm (TA) written in VHDL and implemented in the TTU board detects single or multiple cosmic muon tracks at every bunch crossing along with their track lengths and corresponding chamber coordinates. The TA implementation in VHDL and its preliminary simulation results are presented.

  1. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, a...

  2. Performance of the CMS drift-tube chamber local trigger with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; 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Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the Local Trigger based on the drift-tube system of the CMS experiment has been studied using muons from cosmic ray events collected during the commissioning of the detector in 2008. The properties of the system are extensively tested and compared with the simulation. The effect of the random arrival time of the cosmic rays on the trigger performance is reported, and the results are compared with the design expectations for proton-proton collisions and with previous measurements obtained with muon beams.

  3. Performance and upgrade of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter trigger for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online trigger selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The level one (L1) trigger is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the high-level trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In the near future the LHC will increase its centre of mass energy to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times 10^{34}\\,\\textrm{cm}^{-2}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this challenging environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular the L1 calorimeter Trigger hardware and architecture will be changed. The aim is to maintain the current thresholds and improve the performance. This programme will be achieved by using $\\mu$TCA (Advanced Mezzanine Card) architecture with fast optical links and latest generation FPGAs. Sophisticated object reconstruction al...

  4. Results from a complete simulation study of the RPC based muon trigger system for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G. E-mail: giacomo.bruno@pv.infn.it; Guida, R.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F

    2001-04-01

    The performance of the Resistive Plate Chambers-based muon trigger of the CMS detector has been studied by means of a full simulation of the system under realistic operating conditions. Requirements on the performance of the chambers are deduced.

  5. Electronic system of the RPC Muon Trigger in CMS experiment at LHC accelerator (Elektroniczny system trygera mionowego RPC w eksperymencie CMS akceleratora LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bialkowska, H

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents implementation of distributed, multichannel electronic measurement system for RPC - based Muon Trigger in the CMS experiment at LHC. The introduction shortly describes the research aims of LHC and shows the metrological requirements for CMS - good spatial and time resolution, and possibility to estimate multiple physical parameters from registered collisions of particles. Further the paper describes RPC Muon Trigger consisting of 200 000 independent channels for position measurement. The first part of the paper presents the functional structure of the system in the context of requirements put by the CMS experiment, like global triggering system and data acquisition. The second part describes the hardware solutions used in particular parts of the RPC detector measuremnt system and shows some test results. The paper has a digest and overview nature.

  6. Physics performances with the new ATLAS Level-1 Topological trigger in the LHC High-Luminosity Era

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00414333; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system aim at reducing the 40 MHz protons collision event rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, preserving events with valuable physics meaning. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system, with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5 micro seconds. It is composed of the calorimeter trigger, muon trigger and central trigger processor. During the last upgrade, a new electronics element was introduced to Level-1: L1Topo, the Topological Processor System. It will make it possible to use detailed realtime information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, processed in individual state of the art FPGA processors to determine angles between jets and/or leptons and calculate kinematic variables based on lists of selected/sorted objects. Over hundred VHDL algorithms are producing trigger outputs to be incorporated into the central trigger processor. Such information will be essential to improve background rejection and ...

  7. The Phase-1 Upgrade for the Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Vincenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC makes use of Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors. The on-detector trigger electronics modules are able to identify muons with predefined transverse momentum values (pT) by executing a coincidence logic on signals coming from the various detector layers. Then, on-detector trigger boards transfer trigger data to the off-detector electronics. A complex trigger system processes the incoming data by combining trigger information from the Barrel and the End-cap regions, and by providing the combined muon candidate to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). For almost a decade, the Level-1 Trigger system has been operating very well, despite the challenging requirements on trigger efficiency and performance, and the continuously increasing LHC luminosity. In order to cope with these constraints, various upgrades for the full trigger system were already deployed, and others have been designed to be installed in the next years. Most of the upgrades to the...

  8. Associative Memory pattern matching for L1 track trigger for the HL-LHC CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Fedi, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will deliver a luminosity of up to $5 × 10^{34}cm^{−2}s^{−1}$, with an average of about 140 overlapping proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing. These extreme pileup conditions place stringent requirements on the trigger system to be able to cope with the resulting event rates. A key component of the CMS upgrade for HL-LHC is a track trigger system, able to identify tracks with transverse momenta above 2 GeV/c already at the first-level trigger. We present here the status of the implementation of a prototype system, based on the combination of Associative Memory custom ASIC and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, with the purpose to demonstrate the concept based on state-of-the-art technologies, and to direct the efforts of the necessary R&D toward a final system.

  9. Electronics and triggering challenges for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Borg, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is presently being designedto replace the CMS endcap calorimeters for the HighLuminosity phase at LHC. It will feature six million silicon sensor channelsand 52 longitudinal layers. The requirements for the frontendelectronics include a 0.3 fC-10 pC dynamic range, low noise (2000 e-) and low power consumption (10 mW /channel).In addition, the HGCAL will perform 50 ps resolution time of arrivalmeasurements to combat the effect of the large number of interactions taking placeat each bunch crossing, and will transmit both triggered readoutfrom on-detector buffer memory and reduced resolution real-time trigger data.We present the challenges related to the frontend electronics, data transmissionand off-detector trigger preprocessing that must be overcome, and the designconcepts currently being pursued.

  10. The Phase-1 Upgrade for the Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Vincenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Barrel Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment is based on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors. The on-detector trigger electronics identifies muons with specific values of transverse momentum (pT), by using coincidences between different layers of detectors. Trigger data is then transferred from on-detector to the off-detector trigger electronics boards. Data is processed by a complex system, which combines trigger data from the Barrel and the End-cap regions, and provides the combined muon candidate to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). The system has been performing very well for almost a decade. However, in order to cope with continuously increasing LHC luminosity and more demanding requirements on trigger efficiency and performance, various upgrades for the full trigger system were already deployed, and others are foreseen in the next years. Most of the trigger upgrades are based on state-of-the-art technologies and allow designing more complex trigger menus, increasing processing power and da...

  11. An R&D programme on alternative technologies for the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, G; Bohm, C; Engström, M; Hellman, S; Holmgren, S O; Johansson, E; Yamdagni, N; Zhao, X; Sundblad, R; Ödmark, A; Bodo, P; Elderstig, H; Hentzell, H; Lindgren, S; Tober, M; Johansson, H; Svensson, C; Yuan, J R; Mohktari, M; Ellis, Nick

    1995-01-16

    This note describes a first-level calorimeter trigger processor designed to take advantage of new possibilities that arise as a consequence of modern design techniques and components such as optical interconnections, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and multi-chip modules (MCMs). The design is homogeneous down to the trigger cell level. This means that no boundary effects occur due to the system partitioning. The construction presented relies mainly on two different types of highly complex ASICs for processing and an MCM for opto-electrical conversion of input data. The trigger processor performs electron/photon identification, jet detection and missing ET calculations for the central first-level trigger and region of interest (RoI) selection for the second-level trigger. Exploring the possibilities given by advanced technologies leads to a first-level trigger architecture with advantages over more traditional designs, allowing, for example, higher precision calculations. Remaining degrees of ...

  12. Optimization, Synchronization, Calibration and Diagnostic of the RPC PAC Muon Trigger System for the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bunkowski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid is one of the four experiments that will analyse the results of the collisions of the protons accelerated by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The collisions of proton bunches occur in the middle of the CMS detector every 25 ns, i.e. with a frequency of 40 MHz. Such a high collision frequency is needed because the probability of interesting processes, which we hope to discover at the LHC (such as production of Higgs bosons or supersymmetric particles) is very small. The objects that are the results of the proton-proton collisions are detected and measured by the CMS detector. Out of each bunch crossing the CMS produces about 1 MB of data; 40 millions of bunch collisions per second give the data stream of 40 terabytes (1013) per second. Such a stream of data is practically not possible to record on mass storage, therefore the first stage of the analysis of the detector data is performed in real time by the dedicated trigger system. Its task is to select potentially interesting events (...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  14. Design and Development of a Graphical Setup Software for the CMS Global Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Glaser, P; Bergauer, H; Padrta, M; Taurok,A; Wulz, C E

    2006-01-01

    The CMS experiment at CERNs Large Hadron Collider will search for new physics at high energies. Its trigger system is an essential component in the selection process of potentially interesting events. The Global Trigger is the final stage of the first-level selection process. It is implemented as a complex electronic system containing logic devices, which need to be programmed according to physics requirements. It has to reject or accept events for further processing based on coarse measurements of particle properties such as energies, momenta and location. Algorithms similar to the ones used in the physics analysis are executed in parallel during the event selection process. A graphical setup program to define these algorithms and to subsequently configure the hardware has been developed. The design and implementation of the program, guided by the principal requirements of flexibility, quality assurance, platform-independence and extensibility, are described.

  15. Tracking and Level-1 triggering in the forward region of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at sLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, B; Dubbert, J; Kroha, H; Richter, R; Schwegler, P

    2012-01-01

    In the endcap region of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer (η > 1) precision tracking and Level-1 triggering are performed by different types of chambers. Monitored Drift Tube chambers (MDT) and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) are used for precision tracking, while Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) form the Level-1 muon trigger, selecting muons with high transverse momentum (p T ). When by 2018 the LHC peak luminosity of 10 34 cm −2 s −1 will be increased by a factor of ∼ 2 and by another factor of ∼ 2–2.5 in about a decade from now (''SLHC''), an improvement of both systems, precision tracking and Level-1 triggering, will become mandatory in order to cope with the high rate of uncorrelated background hits (''cavern background'') and to stay below the maximum trigger rate for the muon system, which is in the range of 10–20 % of the 100 kHz rate, allowed for ATLAS. For the Level-1 trigger of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer this means a stronger suppression of sub-threshold muons in the high-p T trigger as well as a better rejection of tracks not coming from the primary interaction point. Both requirements, however, can only be fulfilled if spatial resolution and angular pointing accuracy of the trigger chambers, in particular of those in the Inner Station of the endcap, are improved by a large factor. This calls for a complete replacement of the currrently used TGC chambers by a new type of trigger chambers with better performance. In parallel, the precision tracking chambers must be replaced by chambers with higher rate capability to be able to cope with the intense cavern background. In this article we present concepts to decisively improve the Level-1 trigger with newly developed trigger chambers, being characterized by excellent spatial resolution, good time resolution and sufficiently short latency. We also present new types of precision chambers, designed to maintain excellent tracking efficiency and spatial resolution in the presence of high levels of uncorrelated

  16. Control, Test and Monitoring Software Framework for the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, R; Aharrouche, M; Andrei, V; Åsman, B; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bendel, M; Bohm, C; Booth, J R A; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I P; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Curtis, C J; Davis, A O; Eckweiler, S; Eisenhandler, E F; Faulkner, P J W; Fleckner, J; Föhlisch, F; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Goringer, C; Groll, M; Hadley, D R; Hanke, P; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Hillier, S J; Johansen, M; Kluge, E E; Kühl, T; Landon, M; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Moa, T; Morris, J D; Müller, F; Neusiedl, A; Ohm, C; Oltmann, B; Perera, V J O; Prieur, D P F; Qian, W; Rieke, S; Rühr, F; Sankey, D P C; Schäfer, U; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Silverstein, S; Sjölin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stockton, M C; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Wessels, M; Wildt, M

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger is a hardware-based system designed to identify high-pT jets, electron/photon and tau candidates and to measure total and missing ET in the ATLAS calorimeters. The complete trigger system consists of over 300 customdesignedVME modules of varying complexity. These modules are based around FPGAs or ASICs with many configurable parameters, both to initialize the system with correct calibrations and timings and to allow flexibility in the trigger algorithms. The control, testing and monitoring of these modules requires a comprehensive, but well-designed and modular, software framework, which we will describe in this paper.

  17. Performance of ATLAS RPC Level-1 muon trigger during the 2015 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00001854; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    RPCs are used in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC for muon trigger in the barrel region, which corresponds to |eta|<1.05. The status of the barrel trigger system during the 2015 data taking is presented, including measurements of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance. The RPC system has been active in more than 99.9% of the ATLAS data taking, showing very good reliability. The RPC detector efficiencies were close to Run-1 and to design value. The trigger efficiency for the high-pT thresholds used in single-muon triggers has been approximately 4% lower than in Run 1, mostly because of chambers disconnected from HV due to gas leaks. Two minor upgrades have been performed in preparation of Run 2 by adding the so-called feet and elevator chambers to increase the system acceptance. The feet chambers have been commissioned during 2015 and are included in the trigger since the last 2015 runs. Part of the elevator chambers are still in commissioning phase and will probably need a replacement ...

  18. Towards a Level-1 tracking trigger for the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, T A D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    At the high luminosity HL-LHC, upwards of 160 individual proton-proton interactions (pileup) are expected per bunch-crossing at luminosities of around $5\\times10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. A proposal by the ATLAS collaboration to split the ATLAS first level trigger in to two stages is briefly detailed. The use of fast track finding in the new first level trigger is explored as a method to provide the discrimination required to reduce the event rate to acceptable levels for the read out system while maintaining high efficiency on the selection of the decay products of electroweak bosons at HL-LHC luminosities. It is shown that available bandwidth in the proposed new strip tracker is sufficiency for a region of interest based track trigger given certain optimisations, further methods for improving upon the proposal are discussed.

  19. General programmable Level-1 trigger with 3D-Flow assembly system for calorimeters of different sizes and event rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosetto, D.

    1992-12-01

    Experience demonstrates that fine tuning on the trigger of an experiment is often achieved only after running the experiment and analyzing the first data acquired. It is desirable that identification and, consequently, selection of interesting events be made on a more refined identification of particles. Use of an innovative parallel-processing system architecture together with an instruction set allows identification of objects (particles) among the data coming from a calorimeter in a programmable manner, utilizing the information related to their shape in two- or three-dimensional form, rather than applying only a programmable threshold proportional to their energy. The architecture is flexible, allowing execution of simple algorithms as well as complex pattern recognition algorithms. It is scalable in the sense that the same hardware can be used for small or large calorimeters having a slow or fast event rate. The simple printed circuit board (accommodating 16 x 3D-Flow processors) on a 4 in. x 4 in. board described herein uses the same hardware to build a large Level-1 programmable trigger (by interconnecting many boards in a matrix array) and is capable of implementing simple or complex pattern recognition algorithms at different event input rates (by cascading boards one on top of another). With the same hardware one can build low-cost, programmable Level-1 triggers for a small and low-event-rate calorimeter, or high-performance, programmable Level-1 triggers for a large calorimeter capable of sustaining up to 60 million events per second

  20. ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger : Commissioning and Validation in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)788741; The ATLAS collaboration; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recently commissioned a new hardware component of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). This innovative system, using state-of-the-art FPGA processors, selects events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Since the first-level trigger is a synchronous pipelined system, such requirements are applied within a latency of 200ns. We will present the first results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger; these demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for a rate reduction without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-$P_{T}$ leptons, including $H\\to{}\\tau{}\\tau{}$ and $J/\\Psi\\to{}\\mu{}\\mu{}$. In addition, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a powerful tool to validate and optimize the performance of this new trigger system. To reach ...

  1. RPCs as trigger detector for the ATLAS experiment performances, simulation and application to the level-1 di-muon trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, A; Di Ciaccio, A

    2005-01-01

    In the muon spectrometer different detectors are used to provide trigger functionality and precision momentum measurements. In the pseudorapidity range |eta|<1 the first level muon trigger is based on Resistive Plate Chambers, gas ionization detectors which are characterized by a fast response and an excellent time resolution (<1.5ns). The working principles of the Resistive Plate Chambers will be illustrated in chapter 3. Given the long time of operation expected for the ATLAS experiment (~10 years), ageing phenomena have been carefully studied, in order to ensure stable long-term operation of all the subdetectors. Concerning Resistive Plate Chambers, a very extensive ageing test has been performed at CERN's Gamma Irradiation Facility on three production chambers. The results of this test are presented in chapter 4. One of the most commonly used gases in RPCs operation is C2H2F4, which during the gas discharge can produce fluorine ions. Being F one of the most aggressive elements in nature, the presenc...

  2. Triggering and W-Polarisation Studies with CMS at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Marrouche, Jad

    2010-01-01

    Results from studies on the commissioning of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) of the CMS experiment are presented. Event-by-event comparisons of the hardware with a bit-level software emulation are used to achieve 100% agreement for all trigger quantities. In addition, a missing energy trigger based on jets is motivated using a simulation study, and consequently implemented and commissioned in the GCT. Furthermore, a templated-fit method for measuring the polarisation of W bosons at the LHC in the Helicity Frame is developed, and validated in simulation. An analysis of the first 3.2/pb of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV LHC data in the muon channel yields values of (fL − fR)+ = 0.347 ± 0.070, f0+ = 0.240 ± 0.176, and (fL − fR)− = 0.097 ± 0.088, f0− = 0.262 ± 0.196 for positive and negative charges respectively. The errors quoted are statistical. A preliminary systematic study is also presented.

  3. L1 track triggering with associative memory for the CMS HL-LHC tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabes, D.

    2014-01-01

    One of the proposed solutions currently under study in Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration [1] to reconstruct tracks at the first level trigger (L1) for the High Luminosity - Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is based on the usage of Associative Memory [2] (AM) chips. The tracker information is first reduced to suppress low p T tracks and sent to boards equipped with AM chips. Each AM compares the tracker information with pre-calculated expectations (pattern matching) in a very short time (order of a μs), therefore providing a solution to the challenging computational problem of pattern recognition in a very busy environment. Associated to fast track fit methods, like the Hough transform, the AM approach should be able to fulfil the very demanding requirements of L1 tracking. The proposed architecture for the AM-based L1 track reconstruction system will be presented, together with the latest results obtained using a complete software emulation of this system

  4. A compact pre-processor system for the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, U

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describ es the researc h whose aim is to dev elop a compact Pre-Pro cessor system for the A TLAS Lev el-1 Calorimeter T rigger. Con tributions to the p erformance and the arc hitecture of the Pre-Pro cessor w ere made. A demonstrator Multi-Chip Mo dule (PPrD- MCM) w as dev elop ed and assem bled whic h p erforms most of the prepro cessing of four analogue trigger-to w er signals. The prepro cessing includes digitisation to 8-bit precision, iden ti cation of the corresp onding bunc h-crossing in time (BCID), calibration of the transv erse energy , readout of ra w trigger data, and high-sp eed serial data transmission to the trigger pro cessors. The demonstrator Multi-Chip Mo dule has a size of 15.9 cm 2 and it consists of 9 dies. The MCM w as designed with a smallest feature size of 100 m and it w as fabricated in a laminated MCM-L pro cess o ered b yW urth Elektronik. A Flip-Chip in terconnection ASIC (Finco) w as dev elop ed for the PPrD-MCM and fabricated in a 0.8 m BiCMOS- pro cess o ered b ...

  5. Commissioning and Validation of the ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has introduced and recently commissioned a completely new hardware sub-system of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). L1Topo consist of two AdvancedTCA blades mounting state-of-the-art FPGA processors, providing high input bandwidth (up to 4 Gb/s) and low latency data processing (200 ns). L1Topo is able to select collision events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger will be presented. These results demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for rate reduction with minimal efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-$p_T$ leptons, including $H\\rightarrow\\tau \\tau$ and $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\mu \\mu$. In addition to describing the L1Topo trigger system, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a pow...

  6. Results from a complete simulation study of the RPC based muon trigger system for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Altieri, S; Bruno, G; Guida, R; Merlo, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vitulo, P; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F

    2001-01-01

    The performance of the Resistive Plate Chambers-based muon trigger of the CMS detector has been studied by means of a full simulation of the system under realistic operating conditions. Requirements on the performance of the chambers are deduced. (6 refs).

  7. Programmable level-1 trigger with 3D-Flow processor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosetto, D.

    1994-01-01

    The 3D-Flow parallel processing system is a new concept in processor architecture, system architecture, and assembly architecture. Compared to the electronics used in present systems, this approach reduces the cost and complexity of the hardware and allows easy assembly, disassembly, incremental upgrading, and maintenance of different interconnection topologies. The 3D-Flow parallel-processing system benefits high energy physics (HEP) by allowing: (1) common less costly hardware to be used in different experiments. (2) new uses of existing installations. (3) tuning of trigger based on the first analyzed data, and (4) selection of desired events directly from raw data. The goal of this parallel-processing architecture is to acquire multiple data in parallel (up to 100 million frames per second) and to process them at high speed, accomplishing digital filtering on the input data, pattern recognition (particle identification), data moving, and data formatting. The main features of the system are its programmability, scalability, high-speed communication, and low cost. The compactness of the 3D-Flow parallel-processing system in concert with the processor architecture allows processor interconnections to be mapped into the geometry of sensors (detectors in HEP) without large interconnection signal delay, enabling real-time pattern recognition. The overall 3D-Flow project has passed a major design review at Fermilab (Reviewers included experts in computers, triggering, system assembly, and electronics)

  8. An FPGA-based track finder for the L1 trigger of the CMS experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cieri, Davide; Harder, Kristian; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Brooke, Jim; Clement, Emyr; Newbold, Dave; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Hobson, Peter; Morton, Alexander Davide; Reid, Ivan; Hall, Geoff; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas Owen; Matsushita, Takashi; Pesaresi, Mark; Rose, Andrew William; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alex; Uchida, Kirika; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Ardila-Perez, Luis; Balzer, Matthias; Caselle, Michele; Sander, Oliver; Schuh, Thomas; Weber, Marc

    2017-01-01

    A new tracking detector is under development for use by the CMS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). A crucial component of this upgrade will be the ability to reconstruct within a few microseconds all charged particle tracks with transverse momentum above 3 GeV, so they can be used in the Level-1 trigger decision. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are reconstructed using a projective binning algorithm based on the Hough Transform followed by a track fitting based on the linear regression technique. A hardware demonstrator using MP7 processing boards has been assembled to prove the entire system, from the output of the tracker readout boards to the reconstruction of tracks with fitted helix parameters. It successfully operates on one eighth of the tracker solid angle at a time, processing events taken at 40 MHz, each with up to 200 superimposed proton-proton interactions, whilst satisfying latency constraints. T...

  9. An FPGA based track finder for the L1 trigger of the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tomalin, Ian; Ball, Fionn Amhairghen; Balzer, Matthias Norbert; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brooke, James John; Caselle, Michele; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Clement, Emyr John; Dutta, Suchandra; Hall, Geoffrey; Harder, Kristian; Hobson, Peter; Iles, Gregory Michiel; James, Thomas Owen; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos; Matsushita, Takashi; Morton, Alexander; Newbold, David; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Pozzobon, Nicola; Reid, Ivan; Rose, A. W; Sander, Oliver; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Schuh, Thomas; Skinnari, Louise; Summers, Sioni Paris; Tapper, Alexander; Thea, Alessandro; Uchida, Kirika; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Viret, Sebastien; Weber, M; Aggleton, Robin Cameron

    2017-12-14

    A new tracking detector is under development for use by the CMS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). A crucial requirement of this upgrade is to provide the ability to reconstruct all charged particle tracks with transverse momentum above 2-3 GeV within 4$\\mu$s so they can be used in the Level-1 trigger decision. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are reconstructed using a projective binning algorithm based on the Hough Transform, followed by a combinatorial Kalman Filter. A hardware demonstrator using MP7 processing boards has been assembled to prove the entire system functionality, from the output of the tracker readout boards to the reconstruction of tracks with fitted helix parameters. It successfully operates on one eighth of the tracker solid angle acceptance at a time, processing events taken at 40 MHz, each with up to 200 superimposed proton-proton interactions, whilst satisfying the latency requirement. ...

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  11. Towards a Level-1 tracking trigger for the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, T A D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ability to apply fast processing that can take account of the properties of the tracks that are being reconstructed will enhance the rejection, while retaining high efficiency for events with desired signatures, such as high momentum leptons or multiple jets. Studies to understand the feasibility of such a system have begun, and proceed in two directions: a fast readout for high granularity silicon detectors, and a fast pattern recognition algorithm to be applied just after the Front-End readout for specific sub detectors. Both existing, and novel technologies can offer solutions. The aim of these studies is to determine the parameter space to which this system must be adapted. The status of ongoing tests on specific hardware components crucial for this system, both to increase the ATLAS physics potential and fully satisfy the trigger requirements at very high luminosities are discussed.

  12. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabady, Dinyar; Ero, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Fulcher, Jonathan; Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHC's Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF), as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer: the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT). Both the BMTF and μGMT have been implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-7 card utilizing the microTCA architecture. While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the μGMT is an almost complete re-development due to the re-organization of the underlying systems from track-finders for a specific detector to regional track finders covering a given area of the whole detector. Additionally the μGMT calculates a muon's isolation using energy information received from the calorimeter trigger. This information is added to the muon objects forwarded to the global decision layer, the so-called Global Trigger. - Highlights: • Presented upgraded Global Muon Trigger and Barrel Muon Track Finder systems. • Upgraded system moves from sub-detector centric view to geometric-view. • To improve trigger performance. • Common hardware improves maintainability and increases development speed. • Use of

  13. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabady, Dinyar, E-mail: dinyar.rabady@cern.ch [Institute of High Energy Physics Vienna (HEPHY), Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Ero, Janos [Institute of High Energy Physics Vienna (HEPHY), Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Flouris, Giannis [University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Fulcher, Jonathan [CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos [University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth [CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-02-11

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHC's Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF), as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer: the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT). Both the BMTF and μGMT have been implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-7 card utilizing the microTCA architecture. While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the μGMT is an almost complete re-development due to the re-organization of the underlying systems from track-finders for a specific detector to regional track finders covering a given area of the whole detector. Additionally the μGMT calculates a muon's isolation using energy information received from the calorimeter trigger. This information is added to the muon objects forwarded to the global decision layer, the so-called Global Trigger. - Highlights: • Presented upgraded Global Muon Trigger and Barrel Muon Track Finder systems. • Upgraded system moves from sub-detector centric view to geometric-view. • To improve trigger performance. • Common hardware improves maintainability and increases development speed. • Use of

  14. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080489; Flouris, Gianis; Fulcher, Jonathan; Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis,Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHCs Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer.An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger ($\\mu$GMT). B...

  15. Operation and Performance of a new microTCA-based CMS Calorimeter Trigger in LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, Pamela Renee

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently increasing the instantaneous luminosity for p-p collisions. In LHC Run 2, the center-of-mass energy has gone from 8 to 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity will approximately double for proton collisions. This will make it even more challenging to trigger on interesting events since the number of interactions per crossing (pileup) and the overall trigger rate will be significantly larger than in LHC Run 1. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has installed the second stage of a two-stage upgrade to the Calorimeter Trigger to ensure that the trigger rates can be controlled and the thresholds kept low, so that physics data will not be compromised. The stage-1, which replaced the original CMS Global Calorimeter Trigger, operated successfully in 2015. The completely new stage-2 has replaced the entire calorimeter trigger in 2016 with AMC form-factor boards and optical links operating in a microTCA chassis. It required that updates to the calorimet...

  16. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  17. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Rabady, Dinyar; Carlin, Roberto; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Marco; Erö, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Sphicas, Paris; Triossi, Andrea; Venturi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance of the LHC during its Run-1 also in Run-2, the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade was the re-organisation of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes, the cathode strip chambers, and the resistive plate chambers were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems, to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged already at the track-finding level. This also required the development of a new system to sort as well as cancel-out the muon tracks found by each system. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (µGMT). While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the µGMT i...

  18. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Battilana, Carlo; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Ero, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Fountas, Konstantinos; Fulcher, Jonathan Richard; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Rabady, Dinyar Sebastian; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Triossi, Andrea; Venturi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance of the LHC during its Run-1 also in Run-2, the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade was the re-organisation of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes, the cathode strip chambers, and the resistive plate chambers were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems, to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged already at the track-finding level. This also required the development of a new system to sort as well as cancel-out the muon tracks found by each system. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger ($\\mu$GMT). While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the $\\m...

  19. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Rabady, Dinyar; Carlin, Roberto; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Marco; Erö, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Sphicas, Paris; Triossi, Andrea; Venturi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance of the LHC during its Run-1 also in Run-2, the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade was the re-organisation of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes, the cathode strip chambers, and the resistive plate chambers were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems, to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged already at the track-finding level. This also required the development of a new system to sort as well as cancel-out the muon tracks found by each system. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (µGMT). While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the µGMT i...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  1. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  2. A mixed signal multi-chip module with high speed serial output links for the ATLAS Level-1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, U

    2000-01-01

    We have built and tested a mixed signal multi-chip module (MCM) to be used in the Level-1 Pre-Processor system for the Calorimeter Trigger of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The MCM performs high speed digital signal processing on four analogue input signals. Results are transmitted serially at a serial data rate of 800 MBd. Nine chips of different technologies are mounted on a four layer Cu substrate. ADC converters and serialiser chips are the major consumers of electrical power on the MCM, which amounts to 9 W for all dies. Special cut-out areas are used to dissipate heat directly to the copper substrate. In this paper we report on design criteria, chosen MCM technology for substrate and die mounting, experiences with the MCM operation and measurement results. (4 refs).

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  5. Associative Memory Pattern Matching for the L1 Track Trigger of CMS at the HL-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedi, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will deliver a luminosity of up to 5 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 , with an average of about 140 overlapping proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing. These extreme pileup conditions place stringent requirements on the trigger system to be able to cope with the resulting event rates. A key component of the CMS upgrade for HL-LHC is a track trigger system, able to identify tracks with transverse momenta above 2 GeV/c already at the first-level trigger. We present here the status of the implementation of a prototype system, based on the combination of Associative Memory custom ASIC and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, with the purpose to demonstrate the concept based on state-of-the-art technologies, and to direct the efforts of the necessary R&D toward a final system

  6. CBC2: A CMS microstrip readout ASIC with logic for track-trigger modules at HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G., E-mail: g.hall@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Braga, D.; Jones, L.; Murray, P.; Prydderch, M. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Abbaneo, D.; Blanchot, G.; Honma, A.; Kovacs, M.; Vasey, F. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-11-21

    The CBC2 is the latest version of the CMS Binary Chip ASIC for readout of the upgraded CMS Tracker at the High Luminosity LHC. It is designed in 130 nm CMOS with 254 input channels and will be bump-bonded to a substrate to which sensors will be wire-bonded. The CBC2 is designed to instrument double layer modules, consisting of two overlaid silicon microstrip sensors with aligned microstrips, in the outer tracker. It incorporates logic to identify L1 trigger primitives in the form of “stubs”: high transverse-momentum track candidates which are identified within the low momentum background by selecting correlated hits between two closely separated microstrip sensors. The first prototype modules have been assembled. The performance of the chip in recent laboratory tests is briefly reported and the status of module construction described.

  7. CBC3: a CMS microstrip readout ASIC with logic for track-trigger modules at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Prydderch, Mark Lyndon; Bell, Stephen Jean-marc; Key-Charriere, M; Jones, Lawrence; Auzinger, Georg; Borg, Johan; Hall, Geoffrey; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Raymond, David Mark; Uchida, Kirika; Goldstein, Joel; Seif El Nasr, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The CBC3 is the latest version of the CMS Binary Chip ASIC for readout of the outer radial region of the upgraded CMS Tracker at HL-LHC. This 254-channel, 130nm CMOS ASIC is designed to be bump-bonded to a substrate to which sensors will be wire-bonded. It will instrument double-layer 2S-modules, consisting of two overlaid silicon microstrip sensors with aligned microstrips. On-chip logic identifies first level trigger primitives from high transverse-momentum tracks by selecting correlated hits in the two sensors. Delivered in late 2016, the CBC3 has been under test for several months, including X-ray irradiations and SEU testing. Results and performance are reported.

  8. The CMS electron and photon trigger for the LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Beschi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    to optimally reconstruct the electromagnetic trigger objects. The performance of the new trigger system will be presented, based on proton-proton collision data collected in Run II. The selection techniques used to trigger efficiently will be presented, along with the strategies employed to guarantee efficient triggering for new resonances and other new physics signals invo...

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  10. FPGA-based algorithms for the new trigger system for the phase 2 upgrade of the CMS drift tubes detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cela-Ruiz, J.-M.

    2017-01-01

    The new luminosity conditions imposed after the LHC upgrade will require a dedicated upgrade of several subdetectors. To cope with the new requirements, CMS drift tubes subdetector electronics will be redesigned in order to achieve the new foreseen response speed. In particular, it is necessary to enhance the first stage of the trigger system (L1A). In this document we present the development of a software algorithm, based on the mean timer paradigm, capable of reconstructing muon trajectories and rejecting spurious signals. It has been initially written in C++ programming language, but designed with its portability to a FPGA VHDL code in mind.

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  14. Heavy Stable Charged Particles at LHC with the CMS detector: search and results for a trigger implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Mocellin, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The work done during Summer Student programme dealt with the study and the implementation of a new 2BX algorithm for the L1 Muon Barrel Trigger to extend the acceptance for slow-moving particles. Initially, a study was done to understand the possible improvements in the trigger efficiency for an algorithm considering two consecutive bunch crossings (BX) at a time instead of one. The algorithm was then defined and tested for the final hardware implementation with a new concept of testbench. Finally it was implemented in the TwinMux, a data concentrator which combines the Drift Tubes and Resistive Plate Chambers primitives giving as output the so-called superprimitives, to take advantage of the different performances of the two CMS muon subdetectors.

  15. ATLAS level-1 jet trigger rates and study of the ATLAS discovery potential of the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in b-jet decay channels

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, Kambiz

    2001-01-01

    The response of the ATLAS calorimeters to electrons, photons and hadrons, in terms of the longitudinal and lateral shower development, is parameterized using the GEANT package and a detailed detector description (DICE). The parameterizations are implemented in the ATLAS Level-1 (LVL1) Calorimeter Trigger fast simulation package which, based on an average detector geometry, simulates the complete chain of the LVL1 calorimeter trigger system. In addition, pile-up effects due to multiple primary interactions are implemented taking into account the shape and time history of the trigger signals. An interface to the fast physics simulation package (ATLFAST) is also developed in order to perform ATLAS physics analysis, including the LVL1 trigger effects, in a consistent way. The simulation tools, the details of the parameterization and the interface are described. The LVL1 jet trigger thresholds corresponding to the current trigger menus are determined within the framework of the fast simulation, and the LVL1 jet tr...

  16. A proposed Drift Tubes-seeded muon track trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070813; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    The LHC program at 13 and 14 TeV, after the observation of the candidate SM Higgs boson, will help clarify future subjects of study and shape the needed tools. Any upgrade of the LHC experiments for unprecedented luminosities, such as the High Luminosity-LHC ones, must then maintain the acceptance on electroweak processes that can lead to a detailed study of the properties of the candidate Higgs boson. The acceptance of the key lepton, photon and hadron triggers should be kept such that the overall physics acceptance, in particular for low-mass scale processes, can be the same as the one the experiments featured in 2012.In such a scenario, a new approach to early trigger implementation is needed. One of the major steps will be the inclusion of high-granularity tracking sub-detectors, such as the CMS Silicon Tracker, in taking the early trigger decision. This contribution can be crucial in several tasks, including the confirmation of triggers in other subsystems, and the improvement of the on-line momentum mea...

  17. Using modern software tools to design, simulate and test a Level 1 trigger sub-system for the D Zero Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angstadt, R.; Borcherding, F.; Johnson, M.E.; Moreira, L.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a system which uses a commercial spreadsheet program and commercial hardware on an IBM PC to develop and test a track finding system for the D Zero Level 1 scintillating Fiber Trigger. The trigger system resides in a VME crate. This system allows the user to generate test input, write the pattern to the hardware simulate the results in software, read the hardware result: compare the results and inform the user of any differences

  18. Aging study for resistive plate chambers of the CMS muon trigger detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; Iaselli, G; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Altieri, S; Belli, G; Bruno, G; Guida, R; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vitulo, P

    2003-01-01

    A long-term aging test of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was carried out with an intense gamma **1**3**7Cs source. The detector was operated in avalanche mode and had the bakelite surface treated with linseed oil. After the irradiation the estimated dose, charge and fluence were approximately equal to the expected values after 10 years of operation in the CMS barrel region. During and after the irradiation, the RPC performance was monitored with cosmic muons and showed no relevant aging effects. Moreover, no variation of the bakelite resistance was observed.

  19. Aging study for resistive plate chambers of the CMS muon trigger detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G. E-mail: gabriella.pugliese@ba.infn.it; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Guida, R.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P

    2003-12-01

    A long-term aging test of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was carried out with an intense gamma {sup 137}Cs source. The detector was operated in avalanche mode and had the bakelite surface treated with linseed oil. After the irradiation the estimated dose, charge and fluence were approximately equal to the expected values after 10 years of operation in the CMS barrel region. During and after the irradiation, the RPC performance was monitored with cosmic muons and showed no relevant aging effects. Moreover, no variation of the bakelite resistance was observed.

  20. Development of the jet Feature EXtractor (jFEX) for the ATLAS Level 1 calorimeter trigger upgrade at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00547698; The ATLAS collaboration; Brogna, Andrea Salvatore; Buescher, Volker; Degele, Reinhold; Herr, Holger; Kahra, Christian; Rave, Stefan; Rocco, Elena; Schaefer, Uli; Vieira De Souza, Julio; Tapprogge, Stefan; Bauss, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the enhanced luminosity delivered by the Large Hadron Collider from 2021 onwards, the ATLAS experiment has planned several upgrades. The first level trigger based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit fine-granularity readout using a new system of Feature EXtractors (FEXs, FPGA-based trigger boards), each optimized to trigger on different physics objects. This contribution is focused on the jet FEX. The main challenges of such a board are the input bandwidth of up to 3.1 Tbps, dense routing of high-speed signals and power consumption. The design, PCB simulations and results of integrated tests of a prototype are shown in this document.

  1. A demonstration of a Time Multiplexed Trigger for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, R; Newbold, D [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Fayer, S; Hall, G; Hunt, C; Iles, G; Rose, A [Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    A novel approach to first-level hardware triggering in the LHC experiments has been studied and a prototype system built. Calorimeter trigger primitive data ( {approx} 5 Tb/s) are re-organised and time-multiplexed so that a single processing node (FPGA) may access the data corresponding to the entire detector for a given bunch crossing. This provides maximal flexibility in the construction of new trigger algorithms, which will be an important factor in ensuring adequate trigger performance at the very high levels of background expected at the upgraded LHC. A test system that incorporates all the key technologies for a final system and demonstrates the time-multiplexing and algorithm performance is presented.

  2. Implementation and synchronisation of the First Level Global Trigger for the CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taurok, A.; Bergauer, H.; Padrta, M.

    2001-01-01

    The hardware implementation of the First Level Global Trigger for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is described. Special emphasis is given to the algorithm logic and the synchronisation procedure. Up to 128 different trigger algorithms are calculated in parallel by the Global Trigger (GT) for every beam crossing taking place at 25 ns intervals. Already, at the first trigger level the GT is able to select complex topological event configurations by performing fast calculations. The electronics is based on VME and relies completely on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) technology. The electronic circuits are optimised for speed by exploiting, to a great extent, the small look-up tables provided in the FPGA chips

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  4. Development of the detector control system for the ATLAS Level-1 trigger and measurement of the single top production cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Christopher J

    This thesis discusses the development of the Detector Control System (DCS) for the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger. Microcontroller code has been developed to read out slow controls data from the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger modules into the wider DCS. Back-end software has been developed for archiving this data. A Finite State Machine (FSM) has also been developed to offer remote access to the L1 Trigger hardware from the ATLAS Control Room. This Thesis also discusses the discovery potential for electroweak single top production during early running. Using Monte Carlo data some of the major systematics are discussed. A potential upper limit on the production cross section is calculated to be 45.2 pb. If the Standard Model prediction is assumed, a measured signal could potentially have a significance of up to 2.23¾ using 200 pb−1 of data.

  5. Upgrade of the Level-1 muon trigger of the ATLAS detector in the barrel-endcap transition region with RPC chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a project for the upgrade of the Level-1 muon trigger in the barrel-endcap transition region (1.01) caused by charged particles originating from secondary interactions downstream of the interaction point. After the LHC phase-1 upgrade, forseen for 2018, the Level-1 muon trigger rate would saturate the allocated bandwidth unless new measures are adopted to improve the rejection of fake triggers. ATLAS is going to improve the trigger selectivity in the region |$\\eta$|>1.3 with the addition of the New Small Wheel detector as an inner trigger plane. To obtain a similar trigger selectivity in the barrel-endcap transition region 1.0<|$\\eta$|<1.3, it is proposed to add new RPC chambers at the edge of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer. These chambers will be based on a three layer structure with thinner gas gaps and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standard and a new low-profile light-weight mechanical structure that will allow the installation in the limited available spa...

  6. The design and simulated performance of a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Martensson, Mikael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC will face a fivefold increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing relative to the ongoing Run 2. This will require a proportional improvement in rejection power at the earliest levels of the detector trigger system, while preserving good signal efficiency. One critical aspect of this improvement will be the implementation of precise track reconstruction, through which sharper trigger turn-on curves can be achieved, and b-tagging and tau-tagging techniques can in principle be implemented. The challenge of such a project comes in the development of a fast, custom electronic device integrated in the hardware based first trigger level of the experiment. This article will discuss the requirements, architecture and projected performance of the system in terms of tracking, timing and physics, based on detailed simulations. Studies are carried out using data from the strip subsystem only or both strip and pixel subsystems.

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  8. The ATLAS level-1 trigger: Status of the system and first results from cosmic-ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aielli, G [Universita degli Studi di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN Roma II, Rome (Italy); Andrei, V; Achenbach, R [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Adragna, P [Physics Department, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, S [INFN Bologna and Universita degli Studi di Bologna (Italy); Ask, S [CERN, PH Department (Switzerland); Barnett, B M [CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bauss, B [Institut fuer Physik, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bellagamba, L [INFN Bologna and Universita degli Studi di Bologna (Italy); Ben Ami, S [Technion Israel Institute of Technology (Israel); Bendel, M [Institut fuer Physik, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Benhammou, Y [Tel Aviv University (Israel); Berge, D. [CERN, PH Department (Switzerland)], E-mail: David.Berge@cern.ch; Bianco, M [Universita degli Studi di Lecce and INFN Lecce (Italy); Biglietti, M G [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN Napoli (Italy); Bohm, C [Fysikum, University of Stockholm, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Booth, J R.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Boscherini, D [INFN Bologna and Universita degli Studi di Bologna (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. At the design luminosity of 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} there are on average 23 collisions per bunch crossing. A three-level trigger system will select potentially interesting events in order to reduce the readout rate to about 200 Hz. The first trigger level is implemented in custom-built electronics and makes an initial fast selection based on detector data of coarse granularity. It has to reduce the rate by a factor of 10{sup 4} to less than 100 kHz. The other two consecutive trigger levels are in software and run on PC farms. We present an overview of the first-level trigger system and report on the current installation status. Moreover, we show analysis results of cosmic-ray data recorded in situ at the ATLAS experimental site with final or close-to-final hardware.

  9. The ATLAS level-1 trigger: Status of the system and first results from cosmic-ray data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aielli, G.; Andrei, V.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Antonelli, S.; Ask, S.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bellagamba, L.; Ben Ami, S.; Bendel, M.; Benhammou, Y.; Berge, D.; Bianco, M.; Biglietti, M.G.; Bohm, C.; Booth, J.R.A.; Boscherini, D.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. At the design luminosity of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 there are on average 23 collisions per bunch crossing. A three-level trigger system will select potentially interesting events in order to reduce the readout rate to about 200 Hz. The first trigger level is implemented in custom-built electronics and makes an initial fast selection based on detector data of coarse granularity. It has to reduce the rate by a factor of 10 4 to less than 100 kHz. The other two consecutive trigger levels are in software and run on PC farms. We present an overview of the first-level trigger system and report on the current installation status. Moreover, we show analysis results of cosmic-ray data recorded in situ at the ATLAS experimental site with final or close-to-final hardware

  10. The design and simulated performance of a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Martensson, Mikael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the high-luminosity LHC will face a five-fold increase in the number of interactions per collision relative to the ongoing Run 2. This will require a proportional improvement in rejection power at the earliest levels of the detector trigger system, while preserving good signal efficiency. One critical aspect of this improvement will be the implementation of precise track reconstruction, through which sharper trigger turn-on curves can be achieved, and b-tagging and tau-tagging techniques can in principle be implemented. The challenge of such a project comes in the development of a fast, custom electronic device integrated in the hardware-based first trigger level of the experiment, with repercussions propagating as far as the detector read-out philosophy. This talk will discuss the requirements, architecture and projected performance of the system in terms of tracking, timing and physics, based on detailed simulations. Studies are carried out comparing two detector geometries and using...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  12. A Pattern Recognition Mezzanine based on Associative Memory and FPGA technology for Level 1 Track Triggers for the HL-LHC upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalotti, D.; Alunni, L.; Bilei, G.M.; Fanò, L.; Servoli, L.; Storchi, L.; Placidi, P.; Spiezia, A.; Biesuz, N.; Fedi, G.; Magazzù, G.; Palla, F.; Rossi, E.; Citraro, S.; Crescioli, F.

    2016-01-01

    The increment of luminosity at HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information at Level-1 trigger system for the experiments in order to maintain an acceptable trigger rate for selecting interesting events despite the one order of increased magnitude in the minimum bias interactions. In order to extract the track information in the required latency (∼ 5–10 μ s depending on the experiment), a dedicated hardware processor needs to be used. We here propose a prototype system (Pattern Recognition Mezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for HL-LHC experiments, combining the power of both Associative Memory custom ASIC and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices

  13. FF-EMU: a radiation tolerant ASIC for the distribution of timing, trigger and control signals in the CMS End-Cap Muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campagnari, C; Costantino, N; Magazzù, G; Tongiani, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    A radiation tolerant integrated circuit for the distribution of clock, trigger and control signals in the Front-End electronics of the CMS End-Cap Muon detector has been developed in the IBM CMOS 130nm technology. The circuit houses transmitter and receiver interfaces to serial links implementing the FF-LYNX protocol that allows the integrated transmission of triggers and data frames with different latency constraints. Encoder and decoder modules associate signal transitions to FF-LYNX frames. The system and the ASIC architecture and behavior and the results of test and characterization of the ASIC prototypes will be presented.

  14. CMS Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzynski, L.

    2007-01-01

    The status of the construction and installation of CMS detector is reviewed. The 4T magnet is cold since end of February 2006. Its commissioning up to the nominal field started in July 2006 allowing a Cosmic Challenge in which elements of the final detector are involved. All big mechanical pieces equipped with muons chambers have been assembled in the surface hall SX5. Since mid July the detector is closed with commissioned HCAL, two ECAL supermodules and representative elements of the silicon tracker. The trigger system as well as the DAQ are tested. After the achievement of the physics TDR, CMS is now ready for the promising signal hunting. (author)

  15. The Level-1 Calorimeter Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) Boosted Object Trigger for the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00235957; The ATLAS collaboration; Stark, Giordon; Miller, David

    2016-01-01

    The Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) module is a planned component of the Level 1 online trigger system for the ATLAS experiment planned for installation during the Phase I upgrade in 2018. This unique single electronics board with multiple high speed processors will receive coarse-granularity information from all the ATLAS calorimeters enabling the identification in real time of large-radius jets for capturing Lorentz-boosted objects such as top quarks, Higgs, $Z$ and $W$ bosons. The gFEX architecture also facilitates the calculation of global event variables such as missing transverse energy, centrality for heavy ion collisions, and event-by-event pile-up energy density. Details of the electronics architecture that provides these capabilities are presented, along with results of tests of the prototype systems now available. The status of the firmware algorithm design and implementation as well as monitoring capabilities are also presented.

  16. Luminosity, beam monitoring and triggering for the CMS experiment and measurement of the total inelastic cross-section at √s = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Alan James

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, situated on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring is a multi-purpose detector designed to search for new physics phenomena, make precise measurements of known processes at previously untapped energies and look for hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. During the initial low luminosity stages, the Beam Scintillation Counter (BSC) sub-detector was vital in providing accurate and efficient ( 98%) triggering of beam halo and minimum bias events and helped in the commissioning of the CMS detector. This thesis is given in three parts. The first section describes the design and implementation of the BSC and the commissioning of the system before and during the early operation of the LHC. Analysis of the technical triggers it provided, using early low pile-up data in shown to demonstrate that the goal of providing an efficient trigger for low luminosities was achieved. Demonstrations of its use beyond its intended design are also shown, which helped drive the need for an...

  17. The Development of the Global Feature eXtractor (gFEX) for ATLAS Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Shaochun; The ATLAS collaboration; Chen, Hucheng

    2018-01-01

    During the ATLAS Phase-I upgrade, the gFEX will be designed to maintain the trigger acceptance against the increasing luminosity for the ATLAS Level-1 calorimeter trigger system. The gFEX is designed to identify patterns of energy associated with the hadronic decays of high momentum Higgs, W, & Z bosons, top quarks, and exotic particles in real time at the LHC crossing rate. The prototype v1 and v2 have been designed and fully tested in 2015 and 2016 respectively. With the lessons learned, a pre-production board with three UltraScale+ FPGAs and one ZYNQ UltraScale+, and 35 MiniPODs are implemented in an ATCA module. This board will receive coarse-granularity (0.2x0.2) information from the entire ATLAS calorimeters on up to 300 optical fibers and each FPGA has 24 links to the L1Topo at the speed up to 12.8 Gb/s.

  18. Online Event Selection at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Konecki, M

    2004-01-01

    Triggering in the high-rate environment of the LHC is a challenging task. The CMS experiment has developed a two-stage trigger system. The Level-1 Trigger is based on custom hardware devices and is designed to reduce the 40 MHz LHC bunch-crossing rate to a maximum event rate of ~100 kHz. The further reduction of the event rate to O(100 Hz), suitable for permanent storage, is performed in the High-Level Trigger (HLT) which is based on a farm of commercial processors. The methods used for object identification and reconstruction are presented. The CMS event selection strategy is discussed. The performance of the HLT is also given.

  19. Implementation of a level 1 trigger system using high speed serial (VXS) techniques for the 12GeV high luminosity experimental programs at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, C.; Raydo, B.; Dong, H.; Gupta, A.; Barbosa, F.J.; Wilson, J.; Taylor, W.M.; Jastrzembski, E.; Abbott, D.

    2009-01-01

    We will demonstrate a hardware and firmware solution for a complete fully pipelined multi-crate trigger system that takes advantage of the elegant high speed VXS serial extensions for VME. This trigger system includes three sections starting with the front end crate trigger processor (CTP), a global Sub-System Processor (SSP) and a Trigger Supervisor that manages the timing, synchronization and front end event readout. Within a front end crate, trigger information is gathered from each 16 Channel, 12 bit Flash ADC module at 4 nS intervals via the VXS backplane, to a Crate Trigger Processor (CTP). Each Crate Trigger Processor receives these 500 MB/S VXS links from the 16 FADC-250 modules, aligns skewed data inherent of Aurora protocol, and performs real time crate level trigger algorithms. The algorithm results are encoded using a Reed-Solomon technique and transmission of this Level 1 trigger data is sent to the SSP using a multi-fiber link. The multi-fiber link achieves an aggregate trigger data transfer rate to the global trigger at 8 Gb/s. The SSP receives and decodes Reed-Solomon error correcting transmission from each crate, aligns the data, and performs the global level trigger algorithms. The entire trigger system is synchronous and operates at 250 MHz with the Trigger Supervisor managing not only the front end event readout, but also the distribution of the critical timing clocks, synchronization signals, and the global trigger signals to each front end readout crate. These signals are distributed to the front end crates on a separate fiber link and each crate is synchronized using a unique encoding scheme to guarantee that each front end crate is synchronous with a fixed latency, independent of the distance between each crate. The overall trigger signal latency is <3 uS, and the proposed 12GeV experiments at Jefferson Lab require up to 200KHz Level 1 trigger rate.

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  1. Novel Trigger-Capable Modules for the Future CMS Tracking Detector and Inclusive Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment’s outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the $p_T$–module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using $p_T$ –module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In...

  2. Level-1 E/Gamma performance on 2017 data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In $2017$, the LHC achieved an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with an average peak number of pile-up interactions of over $50$. This document includes studies of the performance of the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for electrons and photons. The plots are made using the full dataset of $2017$ with $41.3$ $fb^{-1}$.

  3. Novel trigger-capable modules for the future CMS tracking detector and inclusive top quark pair production cross section at √(s)=13 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, Ali

    2017-07-01

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the p_T-module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using p_T-module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In the second part of this thesis, the measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is addressed. The measurement is performed using 2.2 fb"-"1 of data collected by the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Results are shown in the eμ di-lepton channel, and for the first time at such energy, in the ee and μμ channels. With an improved treatment of systematic uncertainties, the results in all three channels are found to be in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  4. Novel trigger-capable modules for the future CMS tracking detector and inclusive top quark pair production cross section at √(s)=13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harb, Ali

    2017-07-15

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the p{sub T}-module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using p{sub T}-module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In the second part of this thesis, the measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is addressed. The measurement is performed using 2.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Results are shown in the eμ di-lepton channel, and for the first time at such energy, in the ee and μμ channels. With an improved treatment of systematic uncertainties, the results in all three channels are found to be in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Method for a top quark mass measurement with the ATLAS detector at LHC: Study of the ATLAS level-1 electromagnetic calorimeter trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzin, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC (CERN) is designed to study the Standard Model, with the precise measurement of its parameters and the search of the Higgs boson, and the physics beyond the Standard Model with the search of new particles predicted by several theories such as Supersymmetry. The top quark is distinguished in the Standard Model by its mass close to the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking and is therefore a good probe to study physics beyond the Standard Model. A precise measurement of the top quark mass is also required to constrain the mass of the Higgs boson via the radiative corrections to the W boson propagator what would be a test of consistency of the standard Model if the Higgs boson is discovered. The first part of this thesis presents the theoretical aspects of the top quark mass. The second part is devoted to the calibration of the ATLAS level-1 electromagnetic calorimeter trigger, and more specifically to the processing of the analogue signal coming form the calorimeter. The performances of this system with cosmic muons and first LHC collisions are also described. At last, the third part describes the methods for a top quark mass measurement which have been developed in the lepton plus jets and dilepton channels. (author) [fr

  6. The development of Global Feature eXtractor (gFEX) - the ATLAS calorimeter Level 1 trigger for ATLAS at High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)759889; The ATLAS collaboration; Begel, Michael; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Kai; Lanni, Francesco; Takai, Helio; Wu, Weihao

    2017-01-01

    As part of the ATLAS Phase-I Upgrade, the gFEX is designed to help maintain the ATLAS Level-1 trigger acceptance rate with the increasing LHC luminosity. The gFEX identifies patterns of energy associated with the hadronic decays of high momentum Higgs, W, & Z bosons, top quarks, and exotic particles in real time at the 40MHz LHC bunch crossing rate. The prototype v1 and v2 were designed and fully tested in 2015 and 2016 respectively. A pre-production gFEX board has been manufactured, which is an ATCA module consisting of three UltraScale+ FPGAs and one ZYNQ UltraScale+, and 35 MiniPODs are implemented in an ATCA module. This board receives coarse-granularity (0.2x0.2) information from the entire ATLAS calorimeters on up to 300 optical fibers and 96 links to the L1Topo at the speed up to 12.8 Gb/s.

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  10. CMS Factsheet

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena; Rao, Achintya

    2016-01-01

    CMS Factsheets: containing facts about the CMS collaboration and detector. Printed copies of the English version are available from the CMS Secretariat. Responsible for translations: English only - E.Gibney (updated 2015)

  11. Geometrical Acceptance Analysis for RPC PAC Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Eunsung

    2010-01-01

    The CMS(Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of the four experiments that will analyze the collision results of the protons accelerated by the Large Hardron Collider(LHC) at CERN(Conseil Europen pour la Recherche Nuclaire). In case of the CMS experiment, the trigger system is divided into two stages : The Level-1 Trigger and High Level Trigger. The RPC(Resistive Plate Chamber) PAC(PAttern Comparator) Trigger system, which is a subject of this thesis, is a part of the Level-1 Muon Trigger System. Main task of the PAC Trigger is to identify muons, measures transverse momenta and select the best muon candidates for each proton bunch collision occurring every 25 ns. To calculate the value of PAC Trigger efficiency for triggerable muon, two terms of different efficiencies are needed ; acceptance efficiency and chamber efficiency. Main goal of the works described in this thesis is obtaining the acceptance efficiency of the PAC Trigger in each logical cone. Acceptance efficiency is a convolution of the chambers geometry an...

  12. Upgrade of the CSC Endcap Muon Port Card at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, M; Padley, P

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Port Card (MPC) provides optical transmission of Level 1 Trigger primitives from 60 Endcap peripheral crates to the Track Finder (TF) crate within the CMS Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) sub-detector at the CMS experiment at CERN. The system has been in operation since 2008 and comprises 180 1.6 Gbps optical links. The proposed Super-LHC (SLHC) upgrade implies higher data volumes to be transmitted through the trigger chain and more sophisticated trigger algorithms. We expect to upgrade the MPC boards within the next few years to accommodate these requirements. The paper presents the first results of simulation and prototyping with the goal of improving the sorting algorithms and using parallel 12-channel optical links and a more powerful Virtex-5 FPGA.

  13. CMS Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohammad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: CMS Collaboration is an international scientific collaboration located at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland, dedicated in carried out research on experimental particle physics. Consisting of 179 institutions from 41 countries from all around the word, CMS Collaboration host a general purpose detector for example the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) for members in CMS Collaboration to conduct experiment from the collision of two proton beams accelerated to a speed of 8 TeV in the LHC ring. In this paper, we described how the CMS detector is used by the scientist in CMS Collaboration to reconstruct the most basic building of matter. (author)

  14. CMS Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Center for Strategic Planning produces an annual CMS Statistics reference booklet that provides a quick reference for summary information about health...

  15. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted.   CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat a...

  16. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natu...

  17. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natur...

  18. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and ...

  19. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of em¬pl...

  20. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the na...

  1. Study of the electronic trigger system for HL-LHC project and search for new physics in top anti-top invariant mass spectrum with CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaupere, N.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes my thesis work within the CMS experiment of the LHC collider. It presents both subjects on which I worked: a detector subject and a data analysis subject. The first subject, detector, is situated within the framework of the HL-LHC project which plans an increase by a factor five of the instantaneous luminosity. Such an increase and the preservation of the high level trigger (HLT) system, generate new constraints on the CMS detector. This is particularly true for the electronic trigger (L1) system. The CMS collaboration intends to implant this within tracker detector. Two methods are proposed: the stub modules method and the associative memory method. However, associative memory method requires a clever pre-selection of electric signals to be usable. The cluster width method is jointly proposed by Fabrizio Palla's team (Pisa) and by Didier Contardo's team (IPNL) to pre-select electric signals. The optimization of this method, in particular geometrical parameters of modules and thresholds applied for the electric signals pre-selection, is the result of my own work. It is detailed throughout the part III of this manuscript. The second subject concerns the analysis of data collected by CMS during 2011. This analysis has for objective to look for new particles in the spectre of anti-top top invariant mass. Due to its big mass, close to the electroweak symmetry breaking energy, the top quark plays an important role in numerous extensions of the Standard Model. The observation of narrow resonances in the spectre could be the sign of new particles. The analysis is subdivided into three parts, the selection of top anti-top events, the reconstruction of top anti-top invariant mass and a statistical study to quantify the presence of new physics. The results of this work are limits on the cross-section production of new particles. They are presented in the part IV of this manuscript. (author)

  2. CMS 2006 - CMS France days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huss, D.; Dobrzynski, L.; Virdee, J.; Boudoule, G.; Fontaine, J.C.; Faure, J.L.; Paganini, P.; Mathez, H.; Gross, L.; Charlot, C.; Trunov, A.; Patois, Y.; Busson, P.; Maire, M.; Berthon, U.; Todorov, T.; Beaudette, F.; Sirois, Y.; Baffioni, S.; Beauceron, S.; Delmeire, E.; Agram, J.L.; Goerlach, U.; Mangeol, D.; Salerno, R.; Bloch, D.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Blaha, J.; Drobychev, G.; Gras, P.; Hagenauer, M.; Denegri, D.; Lounis, A.; Faccio, F.; Lecoq, J.

    2006-01-01

    These CMS talks give the opportunity for all the teams working on the CMS (Compact Muon Spectrometer) project to present the status of their works and to exchange ideas. 5 sessions have been organized: 1) CMS status and perspectives, 2) contributions of the different laboratories, 3) software and computation, 4) physics with CMS (particularly the search for the Higgs boson), and 5) electronic needs. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  3. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the ICMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS Management – CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management – CB – MB – FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through Indico. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2008 Annual Reviews are posted in Indico. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral student upon completion of their theses.  Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and name of their first employer. The Notes, Conference Reports and Theses published si...

  4. CMS Connect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcas, J.; Bockelman, B.; Gardner, R., Jr.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Aftab Khan, F.; Lannon, K.; Larson, K.; Letts, J.; Marra Da Silva, J.; Mascheroni, M.; Mason, D.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Tiradani, A.

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment collects and analyzes large amounts of data coming from high energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. This involves a huge amount of real and simulated data processing that needs to be handled in batch-oriented platforms. The CMS Global Pool of computing resources provide +100K dedicated CPU cores and another 50K to 100K CPU cores from opportunistic resources for these kind of tasks and even though production and event processing analysis workflows are already managed by existing tools, there is still a lack of support to submit final stage condor-like analysis jobs familiar to Tier-3 or local Computing Facilities users into these distributed resources in an integrated (with other CMS services) and friendly way. CMS Connect is a set of computing tools and services designed to augment existing services in the CMS Physics community focusing on these kind of condor analysis jobs. It is based on the CI-Connect platform developed by the Open Science Grid and uses the CMS GlideInWMS infrastructure to transparently plug CMS global grid resources into a virtual pool accessed via a single submission machine. This paper describes the specific developments and deployment of CMS Connect beyond the CI-Connect platform in order to integrate the service with CMS specific needs, including specific Site submission, accounting of jobs and automated reporting to standard CMS monitoring resources in an effortless way to their users.

  5. Using MaxCompiler for High Level Synthesis of Trigger Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, Sioni Paris; Sanders, P.

    2017-01-01

    Firmware for FPGA trigger applications at the CMS experiment is conventionally written using hardware description languages such as Verilog and VHDL. MaxCompiler is an alternative, Java based, tool for developing FPGA applications which uses a higher level of abstraction from the hardware than a hardware description language. An implementation of the jet and energy sum algorithms for the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger has been written using MaxCompiler to benchmark against the VHDL implementation in terms of accuracy, latency, resource usage, and code size. A Kalman Filter track fitting algorithm has been developed using MaxCompiler for a proposed CMS Level-1 track trigger for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade. The design achieves a low resource usage, and has a latency of 187.5 ns per iteration.

  6. Using MaxCompiler for the high level synthesis of trigger algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, S.; Rose, A.; Sanders, P.

    2017-01-01

    Firmware for FPGA trigger applications at the CMS experiment is conventionally written using hardware description languages such as Verilog and VHDL. MaxCompiler is an alternative, Java based, tool for developing FPGA applications which uses a higher level of abstraction from the hardware than a hardware description language. An implementation of the jet and energy sum algorithms for the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger has been written using MaxCompiler to benchmark against the VHDL implementation in terms of accuracy, latency, resource usage, and code size. A Kalman Filter track fitting algorithm has been developed using MaxCompiler for a proposed CMS Level-1 track trigger for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade. The design achieves a low resource usage, and has a latency of 187.5 ns per iteration.

  7. Using MaxCompiler for the high level synthesis of trigger algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, S.; Rose, A.; Sanders, P.

    2017-02-01

    Firmware for FPGA trigger applications at the CMS experiment is conventionally written using hardware description languages such as Verilog and VHDL. MaxCompiler is an alternative, Java based, tool for developing FPGA applications which uses a higher level of abstraction from the hardware than a hardware description language. An implementation of the jet and energy sum algorithms for the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger has been written using MaxCompiler to benchmark against the VHDL implementation in terms of accuracy, latency, resource usage, and code size. A Kalman Filter track fitting algorithm has been developed using MaxCompiler for a proposed CMS Level-1 track trigger for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade. The design achieves a low resource usage, and has a latency of 187.5 ns per iteration.

  8. The design of a flexible Global Calorimeter Trigger system for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooke, J J [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Cussans, D G [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Frazier, R J E [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Galagedera, S B [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Heath, G P [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Huckvale, B J [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Nash, S J [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Newbold, D M [H.H. Wills Physics Lab, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Shah, A A [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    We have developed a novel design of triggering system as part of the pipelined hardware Level-1 trigger logic for the CMS experiment at LHC. The Global Calorimeter Trigger is the last element in the processing of calorimeter data, and provides most of the input to the final Level-1 decision. We present the detailed functional requirements for this system. Our design meets the requirements using generic, configurable Trigger Processing Modules built from commercial programmable logic and high-speed serial data links. We describe the hardware, firmware and software components of this solution. CMS has chosen an alternative solution to build the final trigger system; we discuss the implications of our experiences for future development projects along similar lines.

  9. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in Run II and feasibility study of a track-trigger for Phase 2 with the CMS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00403260; Fanò, Livio; Romeo, Francesco

    This thesis intends to present the salient anspects of the research work carried forward in collaboration with the CMS experiment group, during my PhD. The LHC accelerator and CMS detector main features are illustrated in the first chapter. The second chapter regards the CMS tracker subdetector status, performances, and future perspectives. The crucial role of the tracker in the HL(High Luminosity)-LHC era, starting from 2020, is here introduced. Once clarified the technological context and the principles of work of the machines, where the proton collisions take place, and thanks to which the particles can be revealed, a specific data anlysis of the 2015 data collected by CMS will be shown. First, the current state of the searches of new physics, focusing on heavy neutrinos and leptoquarks, is illustrated in chapter 3, where the basis for a new search are provided. An original model is proposed (chapter 4), that leads a new experimental analysis, whose strategy and results are examined in chapter 5. This is a...

  10. Tau Leptons: A tool for studying SM and BSM physics at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic tau identification and trigger was an essential ingredient to the discovery and characterization of the Higgs boson at the LHC in Run I. Since the early stages of data taking, CMS invested in a number of advancements in the Tau ID and Trigger. In Run II, with the opportunity of the trigger upgrade, significant developments were made in the Level 1 trigger algorithms including deployment of tower level information. Concerning Offline Tau ID, several improvements were made regarding the reconstruction of energetic pi0s in tau decays and exploiting the lifetime information. In addition, new reconstruction techniques were introduced for identifying boosted tau pairs that are essential for boosted Z and H reconstruction. The excellent performance of the Tau Reconstruction and identification at CMS has enabled many important analyses in Run II including Higgs measurements, searches for Beyond Standard Model particles and precision measurements.

  11. The CMS Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacorsi, D.

    2007-01-01

    The CMS experiment at LHC has developed a baseline Computing Model addressing the needs of a computing system capable to operate in the first years of LHC running. It is focused on a data model with heavy streaming at the raw data level based on trigger, and on the achievement of the maximum flexibility in the use of distributed computing resources. The CMS distributed Computing Model includes a Tier-0 centre at CERN, a CMS Analysis Facility at CERN, several Tier-1 centres located at large regional computing centres, and many Tier-2 centres worldwide. The workflows have been identified, along with a baseline architecture for the data management infrastructure. This model is also being tested in Grid Service Challenges of increasing complexity, coordinated with the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid community

  12. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  13. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  14. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  15. Status and commissioning of the CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulz, C.-E.

    2008-05-01

    The construction status of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and strategies for commissioning the subdetectors, the magnet, the trigger and the data acquisition are described. The first operations of CMS as a unified system, using either cosmic rays or test data, and the planned activities until the startup of the LHC are presented.

  16. Status and Commissioning of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The construction status of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and strategies for commissioning the subdetectors, the magnet, the trigger and the data acquisition are described. The first operations of CMS as a unified system, using either cosmic rays or test data, and the planned activities until the startup of the LHC are presented.

  17. Status and commissioning of the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulz, C-E

    2008-01-01

    The construction status of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and strategies for commissioning the subdetectors, the magnet, the trigger and the data acquisition are described. The first operations of CMS as a unified system, using either cosmic rays or test data, and the planned activities until the startup of the LHC are presented

  18. Development and validation of the Overlap Muon Track Finder for the CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, J.; Mietki, P.; Zawistowski, K.; Żarnecki, G.

    2016-09-01

    Present article is a description of the authors contribution in upgrade and analysis of performance of the Level-1 Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment. The authors are students of University of Warsaw and Gdansk University of Technology. They are collaborating with the CMS Warsaw Group. This article summarises students' work presented during the Students session during the Workshop XXXVIII-th IEEE-SPIE Joint Symposium Wilga 2016. In the first section the CMS experiment is briefly described and the importance of the trigger system is explained. There is also shown basic difference between old muon trigger strategy and the upgraded one. The second section is devoted to Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF). This is one of the crucial components of the Level-1 Muon Trigger. The algorithm of OMTF is described. In the third section there is discussed one of the event selection aspects - cut on the muon transverse momentum pT . Sometimes physical muon with pT bigger than a certain threshold is unnecessarily cut and physical muon with lower pT survives. To improve pT selection modified algorithm was proposed and its performance was studied. One of the features of the OMTF is that one physical muon often results in several muon candidates. The Ghost-Buster algorithm is designed to eliminate surplus candidates. In the fourth section this algorithm and its performance on different data samples are discussed. In the fifth section Local Data Acquisition System (Local DAQ) is briefly described. It supports initial system commissioning. The test done with OMTF Local DAQ are described. In the sixth section there is described development of web application used for the control and monitoring of CMS electronics. The application provides access to graphical user interface for manual control and the connection to the CMS hierarchical Run Control.

  19. Searches for Supersymmetry with compressed mass spectra using monojet events with the CMS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Robyn Elizabeth; Worm, Steve

    2015-01-01

    A novel search for supersymmetric particles in events with one high transverse momentum jet and large missing transverse energy is performed using an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data collected using the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. By using events with an energetic radiated jet, sensitivity to supersymmetric models with compressed mass spectra is gained where the decay products have very low energy. Standard Model background estimates are evaluated with the use of data control samples. No excess over Standard Model expectations is observed, and limits are placed on third generation squark production at the 95% confidence level using supersymmetric simplified models. The development of a Level 1 trigger algorithm to reconstruct jets in the Phase 1 Upgrade of the CMS detector is presented. Utilising the full granularity of the CMS calorimeter and time-multiplexed-trigger technology, a new algorithm with increased flexibility and resolution is presented. It is possible t...

  20. CMS overview

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071615

    2016-01-01

    Most recent CMS data related to the high-density QCD are presented for pp and PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV and pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV. The PbPb collision is essential to understand collective behavior and the final-state effects for the detailed characteristics of hot, dense partonic matter, whereas the pPb collision provides the critical information on the initial-state effects including the modification of the parton distribution function in cold nuclei. This paper highlights some of recent heavy-ion related results from CMS.

  1. CMS computing on grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Wen; Sun Gongxing

    2007-01-01

    CMS has adopted a distributed system of services which implement CMS application view on top of Grid services. An overview of CMS services will be covered. Emphasis is on CMS data management and workload Management. (authors)

  2. CERN Open Days CMS Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Themes: 1) You are here (location P5, Cessy) 2) CERN 3) LHC 4) CMS Detector 5) Magnet 6) Subdetectors (Tracker, ECAL, HCAL, Muons) 7) Trigger and Data Acquisition 8) Collaboration 9) Site Geography 10) Construction 11) Lowering and Installation 12) Physics

  3. Measurement of jet production in association with a Z boson at the LHC and jet energy correction calibration at high level trigger in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00366572; FAVART, Laurent

    2017-06-30

    This PhD dissertation presents the measurement of the cross section of jet production in association with a Z boson in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider in CERN, with a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV in 2012 and of 13 TeV in 2015. The data used for this analysis were collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, with an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 in 2012 and of 2.25 fb-1 in 2015. The differential cross section is measured as a function of jet multiplicity, jet transverse momentum and rapidity, and the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. The rapidity correlations between the Z boson and jets are also measured benefiting from the large statistics of data taken in 2012. All distributions of measured observables are obtained after correcting detector effects using unfolding approach, and the results of two leptonic decaying channels of Z boson are combined. Coming along with the systematic and statistical uncertainties, the measurement is compared to different theoretical pr...

  4. Search for the Higgs boson decaying into $\\tau$ lepton pairs with the Matrix Element Method and $\\tau$ trigger optimization in the CMS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083962; Beaudette, Florian; Beaudette, Florian

    2016-01-01

    I performed my thesis work in Particle Physics at the laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet of the Ecole Polytechnique. I have been involved in the analysis of the data produced in the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (CERN) and collected by the CMS experiment. Particle physics is a scientific field which is currently undergoing very important breakthroughs. The discovery of the Higgs boson is a major step forward as the mass of vector bosons are explained through their interactions with the corresponding field. I worked on the newly discovered heavy boson analysis. As its direct coupling to fermions remained to be exhibited, I focused on the search for the Higgs boson decaying in tau lepton pairs. The Higgs decay into tau pairs is the most promising decay channel to measure the couplings between the Standard Model Higgs boson and the fermions. Indeed, this decay channel benefits from a large expected event rate compared to the other leptonic decay modes. The Higgs boson decaying to tau lepton ana...

  5. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  6. Performance of the HLT muon reconstruction used in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreres Sole, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) generates millions of collision per second. These collisions take place inside the detector, which should read out the data and store it for further analysis. However, there is no possible way of storing all the data generated at the LHC and, if it was, not all the events are interesting for further analysis since the majority of them are low-momenta events. Therefore, detectors need a trigger system to select which events are interested for further analysis and store them. In order to achieve that, the CMS trigger system is a two-level system composed by the Level1 and the High Level Trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the collision rate at the LHC (30GHz) to what is stored and analyzed offline (around 1KHz). When a collision takes place, the Level1 trigger performs a fast readout of the detector. From the information of the detector, basic quantities are created and a pure hardware decision is taken on whether the event should be accepted or not. The Level1 reduces...

  7. VIPRAM_L1CMS: a 2-Tier 3D Architecture for Pattern Recognition for Track Finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, J. R. [Fermilab; Joshi, Joshi,S. [Northwestern U.; Liu, Liu, [Fermilab; Olsen, J. [Fermilab; Shenai, A. [Fermilab

    2017-06-15

    In HEP tracking trigger applications, flagging an individual detector hit is not important. Rather, the path of a charged particle through many detector layers is what must be found. Moreover, given the increased luminosity projected for future LHC experiments, this type of track finding will be required within the Level 1 Trigger system. This means that future LHC experiments require not just a chip capable of high-speed track finding but also one with a high-speed readout architecture. VIPRAM_L1CMS is 2-Tier Vertically Integrated chip designed to fulfill these requirements. It is a complete pipelined Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (PRAM) architecture including pattern recognition, result sparsification, and readout for Level 1 trigger applications in CMS with 15-bit wide detector addresses and eight detector layers included in the track finding. Pattern recognition is based on classic Content Addressable Memories with a Current Race Scheme to reduce timing complexity and a 4-bit Selective Precharge to minimize power consumption. VIPRAM_L1CMS uses a pipelined set of priority-encoded binary readout structures to sparsify and readout active road flags at frequencies of at least 100MHz. VIPRAM_L1CMS is designed to work directly with the Pulsar2b Architecture.

  8. The CMS dataset bookkeeping service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, A.; Dolgert, A.; Guo, Y.; Jones, C.; Kosyakov, S.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lueking, L.; Riley, D.; Sekhri, V.

    2008-07-01

    The CMS Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) has been developed to catalog all CMS event data from Monte Carlo and Detector sources. It provides the ability to identify MC or trigger source, track data provenance, construct datasets for analysis, and discover interesting data. CMS requires processing and analysis activities at various service levels and the DBS system provides support for localized processing or private analysis, as well as global access for CMS users at large. Catalog entries can be moved among the various service levels with a simple set of migration tools, thus forming a loose federation of databases. DBS is available to CMS users via a Python API, Command Line, and a Discovery web page interfaces. The system is built as a multi-tier web application with Java servlets running under Tomcat, with connections via JDBC to Oracle or MySQL database backends. Clients connect to the service through HTTP or HTTPS with authentication provided by GRID certificates and authorization through VOMS. DBS is an integral part of the overall CMS Data Management and Workflow Management systems.

  9. The CMS dataset bookkeeping service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afaq, A; Guo, Y; Kosyakov, S; Lueking, L; Sekhri, V [Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Dolgert, A; Jones, C; Kuznetsov, V; Riley, D [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The CMS Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) has been developed to catalog all CMS event data from Monte Carlo and Detector sources. It provides the ability to identify MC or trigger source, track data provenance, construct datasets for analysis, and discover interesting data. CMS requires processing and analysis activities at various service levels and the DBS system provides support for localized processing or private analysis, as well as global access for CMS users at large. Catalog entries can be moved among the various service levels with a simple set of migration tools, thus forming a loose federation of databases. DBS is available to CMS users via a Python API, Command Line, and a Discovery web page interfaces. The system is built as a multi-tier web application with Java servlets running under Tomcat, with connections via JDBC to Oracle or MySQL database backends. Clients connect to the service through HTTP or HTTPS with authentication provided by GRID certificates and authorization through VOMS. DBS is an integral part of the overall CMS Data Management and Workflow Management systems.

  10. The CMS dataset bookkeeping service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afaq, A; Guo, Y; Kosyakov, S; Lueking, L; Sekhri, V; Dolgert, A; Jones, C; Kuznetsov, V; Riley, D

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) has been developed to catalog all CMS event data from Monte Carlo and Detector sources. It provides the ability to identify MC or trigger source, track data provenance, construct datasets for analysis, and discover interesting data. CMS requires processing and analysis activities at various service levels and the DBS system provides support for localized processing or private analysis, as well as global access for CMS users at large. Catalog entries can be moved among the various service levels with a simple set of migration tools, thus forming a loose federation of databases. DBS is available to CMS users via a Python API, Command Line, and a Discovery web page interfaces. The system is built as a multi-tier web application with Java servlets running under Tomcat, with connections via JDBC to Oracle or MySQL database backends. Clients connect to the service through HTTP or HTTPS with authentication provided by GRID certificates and authorization through VOMS. DBS is an integral part of the overall CMS Data Management and Workflow Management systems

  11. The CMS dataset bookkeeping service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afaq, Anzar; Dolgert, Andrew; Guo, Yuyi; Jones, Chris; Kosyakov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Lueking, Lee; Riley, Dan; Sekhri, Vijay

    2007-01-01

    The CMS Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) has been developed to catalog all CMS event data from Monte Carlo and Detector sources. It provides the ability to identify MC or trigger source, track data provenance, construct datasets for analysis, and discover interesting data. CMS requires processing and analysis activities at various service levels and the DBS system provides support for localized processing or private analysis, as well as global access for CMS users at large. Catalog entries can be moved among the various service levels with a simple set of migration tools, thus forming a loose federation of databases. DBS is available to CMS users via a Python API, Command Line, and a Discovery web page interfaces. The system is built as a multi-tier web application with Java servlets running under Tomcat, with connections via JDBC to Oracle or MySQL database backends. Clients connect to the service through HTTP or HTTPS with authentication provided by GRID certificates and authorization through VOMS. DBS is an integral part of the overall CMS Data Management and Workflow Management systems

  12. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  13. CMS Wallet Card

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Wallet Card is a quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. The CMS Wallet Card is available for each year from 2004...

  14. CMS Fast Facts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has developed a new quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. CMS Fast Facts includes summary information on total program...

  15. The LHCb trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolko, I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes progress in the development of the LHCb trigger system since the letter of intent. The trigger philosophy has significantly changed, resulting in an increase of trigger efficiency for signal B events. It is proposed to implement a level-1 vertex topology trigger in specialised hardware. (orig.)

  16. Optimization through neuron network of the potentiality of Higgs discovery in the CMS detector via H {yields} ZZ{sup *} {yields} 4e{sup {+-}}, and study of the triggering primitives of the electromagnetic calorimeter; Optimisation par reseaux de neurones du potentiel de decouverte du boson de Higgs dans le canal H {yields} ZZ{sup *} {yields} 4e{sup {+-}} sur le detecteur CMS, et etude des primitives de declenchement du calorimetre electromagnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bimbot, St

    2006-10-15

    The first chapter presents the theoretical background on which the Higgs mechanism is based within the framework of the standard model. The second chapter reviews the past and present attempts aiming at the discovery of the Higgs boson. The specific features of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and of one of its detector: the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) detector are given in the third chapter. The author details the track detector and the ECAL electronic calorimeter that are key components of CMS in the detection of the Higgs boson via the following decay channel: H {yields} ZZ{sup *} {yields} 2e{sup +}2e{sup -} (where Z and Z{sup *} represents the Z{sup O} boson in a real state and in a virtual state respectively). The chapters 4 and 5 are dedicated to the calibration of the ECAL calorimeter via the use of an electron beam and to the triggering system. The data analysis that will lead to the reconstruction of the events detected by CMS is presented in the chapter 6. The last chapter is devoted to the optimization of the extraction of the Higgs boson signal from an abundant background noise. (A.C.)

  17. The CMS Outer Tracker for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dierlamm, Alexander Hermann

    2018-01-01

    The LHC is planning an upgrade program, which will bring the luminosity to about $5-7\\times10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2026, with a goal of an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 Upgrade. The current CMS Tracker is already running beyond design specifications and will not be able to cope with the HL-LHC radiation conditions. CMS will need a completely new Tracker in order to fully exploit the highly demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Outer Tracker system is designed to provide robust tracking as well as Level-1 trigger capabilities using closely spaced modules composed of silicon macro-pixel and/or strip sensors. Research and development activities are ongoing to explore options and develop module components and designs for the HL-LHC environment. The design choices for the CMS Outer Tracker Upgrade are discussed along with some highlig...

  18. Upgrades of the CMS Outer Tracker for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067159

    2016-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about 5×1034cm$^{−2}$s$^{−1}$ around 2028, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{−1}$ in the following decade. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 upgrade. The current CMS Outer Tracker, already running close to its design limits, will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions and CMS will need a completely new device, in order to fully exploit the highly demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also L1 trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D; activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS Outer Tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D; activities.

  19. The CMS Tracker upgrade for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ahuja, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about 5 $\\times$ $10^{34} $cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2028, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 upgrade. The current CMS Outer Tracker, already running beyond design specifications, and CMS Phase1 Pixel Detector will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions and CMS will need completely new devices, in order to fully exploit the high-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Outer Tracker should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R$\\&$D activities are ongoing to explore options both for the Outer Tracker, and for the pixel Inner Tracker. Solutions are being developed that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the Tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights...

  20. Probing the Higgs coupling to the top quark at the LHC in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Strebler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This thesis reports a study of the Higgs boson production in association with top quarks√and decaying into τ leptons in proton-proton (pp) collisions at s = 13 TeV recorded withthe CMS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC).This work has been carried out in the context of the Run 2 of the LHC, marked byan increase in the center-of-mass energy from 8 to 13 TeV together with an increase inthe instantaneous luminosity of the collisions with respect to Run 1. To cope with thisnew data-taking conditions, CMS had initiated a full upgrade of the Level-1 trigger systemachieved by 2016. This new system and in particular the new Level-1 electron and photonalgorithm have successfully contributed to a large number of CMS results using Run 2data. The commissioning of this new system and its performance measured in the firstdata collected with this new trigger are presented in details.An original analysis technique based on the Matrix Element Method optimized for the¯search of the ttH, H → τ τ process is...

  1. SUSY searches in early CMS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricomi, A

    2008-01-01

    In the first year of data taking at LHC, the CMS experiment expects to collect about 1 fb -1 of data, which make possible the first searches for new phenomena. All such searches require however the measurement of the SM background and a detailed understanding of the detector performance, reconstruction algorithms and triggering. The CMS efforts are hence addressed to designing a realistic analysis plan in preparation to the data taking. In this paper, the CMS perspectives and analysis strategies for Supersymmetry (SUSY) discovery with early data are presented

  2. DT Local Trigger performance in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Local Trigger system of the CMS Drift Tube chambers (DT) was checked applying similar methods as in the LHC Run 1 (2012). The main variables shown in this note are the trigger efficiency, the trigger quality and the fraction of trigger ghosts. The performance was found to be comparable or better than in Run 1.

  3. The selective read-out processor for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Girão de Almeida, Nuño Miguel; Faure, Jean Louis; Gachelin, Olivier; Gras, Philippe; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Mur, Michel; Varela, João

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the selective read-out processor (SRP) proposed for the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at LHC (CERN). The aim is to reduce raw ECAL data to a level acceptable by the CMS data acquisition (DAQ) system. For each positive level 1 trigger, the SRP is guided by trigger primitive generation electronics to identify ECAL regions with energy deposition satisfying certain programmable criteria. It then directs the ECAL read-out electronics to apply predefined zero suppression levels to the crystal data, depending whether the crystals fall within these regions or not. The main challenges for the SRP are some 200 high speed (1.6 Gbit/s) I/O channels, asynchronous operation at up to 100 kHz level 1 trigger rate, a 5- mu s real-time latency requirement and a need to retain flexibility in choice of selection algorithms. The architecture adopted for the SRP is based on modern parallel optic pluggable modules and high density field programmable gate array ...

  4. CMS Web-Based Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badgett, William [Fermilab; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio [Fermilab; Maeshima, Kaori [Fermilab; Soha, Aron [Fermilab; Sulmanas, Balys [Fermilab; Wan, Zongru [Kansas State U.

    2010-01-01

    With the growth in size and complexity of High Energy Physics experiments, and the accompanying increase in the number of collaborators spread across the globe, the importance of widely relaying timely monitoring and status information has grown. To this end, we present online Web Based Monitoring solutions from the CMS experiment at CERN. The web tools developed present data to the user from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging system to relational databases. We provide the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimentalist, with data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. We also present some examples of how this system has been used during CMS commissioning and early beam collision running at the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Status and future prospects of the Muon Drift Tubes system of CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Masetti, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. During the first Long Shutdown of LHC (LS1) a number of improvements and upgrades were implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during phase 1 will impose several constraints for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system.In order to exploit the muon detector redundancy, a new trigger system has been designed. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that combines the primitives information from different subdetectors DT, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HO).Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several improvements will be implemented. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope wi...

  6. Status and future prospects of the Muon Drift Tubes System of CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    A key component of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is its muon system. The tracking and triggering of muons in the central part relies on Drift Tube (DT) chambers. In 2013 and 2014 a number of improvements and upgrades were implemented, in particular concerning the readout and trigger electronics. The increase of luminosity expected by LHC will impose several constraints for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system. In order to exploit the muon detector redundancy, a new trigger system has been designed. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that combines the primitives information from different subdetectors: DT, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HO). Regarding the long term operation of the DT system, in order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, several improvements will be implemented. The in-chamber local electronics will be modified to cope with the new rate and radiation environment. This paper will present, along with the main system improvements implemented in the system, the first performance results from data collected at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy during 2016, confirming the satisfactory operation of both DT performance and the TwinMux system. A review of the present status and plans for the DT system upgrades will be also described.

  7. CMS brochure (English version)

    CERN Document Server

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which has started up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  8. CMS Program Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Enterprise Data and Analytics has developed CMS Program Statistics, which includes detailed summary statistics on national health care, Medicare...

  9. CMS Drug Spending

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has released several information products that provide spending information for prescription drugs in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The CMS Drug Spending...

  10. CMS Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  11. CMS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.

  12. CMS Records Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Records Schedule provides disposition authorizations approved by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for CMS program-related records...

  13. Study of long-term sustained operation of gaseous detectors for the high rate environment in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00366989; Sharma, Archana

    The muon system of CMS aims to provide an efficient and fast identification of the muons produced in the proton-proton collisions. However, the forward region of the end-caps is only instrumented with Cathode Strip Chambers. This lack of redundancy will be problematic after the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), for which the increase of the background rate would degrade the Level-1 trigger performance and thus the selection of interesting physics channels. The goal of the CMS muon upgrade is to maintain the L1 trigger rate with maximum selection efficiency in order to fully exploit the HL-LHC. The CMS GEM Collaboration has proposed to instrument the vacant high-eta region of the muon end-caps with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, called GE1/1 chambers. The Ph.D. subject proposed by the CMS GEM Collaboration aims to demonstrate that the GE1/1 technology is the most suitable choice for the upgrade of the muon end-caps. Three main research projects were conducted in this context. The first pro...

  14. CMS-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward...marching, finite-difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction... CMS -Wave can be used in either on a half- or full-plane mode, with primary waves propagating from the seaward boundary toward shore. It can

  15. CMS 2006 - CMS France days; CMS 2006 les journees CMS FRANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huss, D.; Dobrzynski, L.; Virdee, J.; Boudoule, G.; Fontaine, J.C.; Faure, J.L.; Paganini, P.; Mathez, H.; Gross, L.; Charlot, C.; Trunov, A.; Patois, Y.; Busson, P.; Maire, M.; Berthon, U.; Todorov, T.; Beaudette, F.; Sirois, Y.; Baffioni, S.; Beauceron, S.; Delmeire, E.; Agram, J.L.; Goerlach, U.; Mangeol, D.; Salerno, R.; Bloch, D.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Blaha, J.; Drobychev, G.; Gras, P.; Hagenauer, M.; Denegri, D.; Lounis, A.; Faccio, F.; Lecoq, J

    2006-07-01

    These CMS talks give the opportunity for all the teams working on the CMS (Compact Muon Spectrometer) project to present the status of their works and to exchange ideas. 5 sessions have been organized: 1) CMS status and perspectives, 2) contributions of the different laboratories, 3) software and computation, 4) physics with CMS (particularly the search for the Higgs boson), and 5) electronic needs. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  16. CMS Central Hadron Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Howard S.

    2001-01-01

    We present a description of the CMS central hadron calorimeter. We describe the production of the 1996 CMS hadron testbeam module. We show the results of the quality control tests of the testbeam module. We present some results of the 1995 CMS hadron testbeam.

  17. CMS Comic Book Brochure

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    To raise students' awareness of what the CMS detector is, how it was constructed and what it hopes to find. Titled "CMS Particle Hunter," this colorful comic book style brochure explains to young budding scientists and science enthusiasts in colorful animation how the CMS detector was made, its main parts, and what scientists hope to find using this complex tool.

  18. Implementation of the data acquisition system for the Overlap Modular Track Finder in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zabolotny, Wojciech; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian Pawel; Dobosz, Jakub; Doroba, Krzysztof; Pawel Drabik; Gorski, Maciej; Kalinowski, Artur; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof Zdzislaw; Konecki, Marcin Andrzej; Oklinski, Wojciech; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof Tadeusz; Zawistowski, Krystian

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment is currently undergoing the upgrade of its trigger, including the Level-1 muon trigger. In the barrel-endcap transition region the Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) combines data from three types of detectors (RPC, DT, and CSC) to find the muon candidates.To monitor the operation of the OMTF, it is important to receive the data which were the basis for the trigger decision. This task must be performed by the Data Acquisition (OMTF DAQ) system.The new MTCA technology applied in the updated trigger allows implementation of the OMTF DAQ together with the OMTF trigger in the MTF7 board. Further concentration of data is performed by standard AMC13 boards.The proposed data concentration methodology assumes parallel filtering and queuing of data arriving from all input links (24 RPC, 30 CSC, and 6 DT). The data are waiting for the trigger decision in the input buffers. The triggered data are then converted into the intermediate 72-bit format and put into the sorter queues. The block responsible for...

  19. CMS Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new "CMS Centre" is being established on the CERN Meyrin site by the CMS collaboration. It will be a focal point for communications, where physicists will work together on data quality monitoring, detector calibration, offline analysis of physics events, and CMS computing operations. Construction of the CMS Centre begins in the historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room, Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. TThe LHC@FNAL Centre, in operation at Fermilab in the US, will work very closely with the CMS Centre, as well as the CERN Control Centre. (Photo Fermilab)The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Contro...

  20. CMS offline web tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metson, S; Newbold, D; Belforte, S; Kavka, C; Bockelman, B; Dziedziniewicz, K; Egeland, R; Elmer, P; Eulisse, G; Tuura, L; Evans, D; Fanfani, A; Feichtinger, D; Kuznetsov, V; Lingen, F van; Wakefield, S

    2008-01-01

    We describe a relatively new effort within CMS to converge on a set of web based tools, using state of the art industry techniques, to engage with the CMS offline computing system. CMS collaborators require tools to monitor various components of the computing system and interact with the system itself. The current state of the various CMS web tools is described along side current planned developments. The CMS collaboration comprises of nearly 3000 people from all over the world. As well as its collaborators, its computing resources are spread all over globe and are accessed via the LHC grid to run analysis, large scale production and data transfer tasks. Due to the distributed nature of collaborators effective provision of collaborative tools is essential to maximise physics exploitation of the CMS experiment, especially when the size of the CMS data set is considered. CMS has chosen to provide such tools over the world wide web as a top level service, enabling all members of the collaboration to interact with the various offline computing components. Traditionally web interfaces have been added in HEP experiments as an afterthought. In the CMS offline we have decided to put web interfaces, and the development of a common CMS web framework, on an equal footing with the rest of the offline development. Tools exist within CMS to transfer and catalogue data (PhEDEx and DBS/DLS), run Monte Carlo production (ProdAgent) and submit analysis (CRAB). Effective human interfaces to these systems are required for users with different agendas and practical knowledge of the systems to effectively use the CMS computing system. The CMS web tools project aims to provide a consistent interface to all these tools

  1. CMS offline web tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metson, S; Newbold, D [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Belforte, S; Kavka, C [INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Bockelman, B [University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Dziedziniewicz, K [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Egeland, R [University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Elmer, P [Princeton (United States); Eulisse, G; Tuura, L [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Evans, D [Fermilab MS234, Batavia, IL (United States); Fanfani, A [Universita degli Studi di Bologna (Italy); Feichtinger, D [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Kuznetsov, V [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Lingen, F van [California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States); Wakefield, S [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    We describe a relatively new effort within CMS to converge on a set of web based tools, using state of the art industry techniques, to engage with the CMS offline computing system. CMS collaborators require tools to monitor various components of the computing system and interact with the system itself. The current state of the various CMS web tools is described along side current planned developments. The CMS collaboration comprises of nearly 3000 people from all over the world. As well as its collaborators, its computing resources are spread all over globe and are accessed via the LHC grid to run analysis, large scale production and data transfer tasks. Due to the distributed nature of collaborators effective provision of collaborative tools is essential to maximise physics exploitation of the CMS experiment, especially when the size of the CMS data set is considered. CMS has chosen to provide such tools over the world wide web as a top level service, enabling all members of the collaboration to interact with the various offline computing components. Traditionally web interfaces have been added in HEP experiments as an afterthought. In the CMS offline we have decided to put web interfaces, and the development of a common CMS web framework, on an equal footing with the rest of the offline development. Tools exist within CMS to transfer and catalogue data (PhEDEx and DBS/DLS), run Monte Carlo production (ProdAgent) and submit analysis (CRAB). Effective human interfaces to these systems are required for users with different agendas and practical knowledge of the systems to effectively use the CMS computing system. The CMS web tools project aims to provide a consistent interface to all these tools.

  2. Towards a Level-1 tracking trigger for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070911; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Among the upgrades for the High-Luminosity LHC era, the ATLAS collaboration is studying and developing the availability of inner detector tracking information at the first level of its three- tiered event selection chain. This will provide additional flexibility and rejection power: essential ingredients in order to cope with the demanding conditions of the upgraded LHC, as well as with unforeseen bandwidth constraints. The current state of the feasibility and performances studies is discussed.

  3. Physics with CMS and Electronic Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlf, James W. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The current funding is for continued work on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as part of the Energy Frontier experimental program. The current budget year covers the first year of physics running at 13 TeV (Run 2). During this period we have concentrated on commisioning of the μTCA electronics, a new standard for distribution of CMS trigger and timing control signals and high bandwidth data aquistiion as well as participating in Run 2 physics.

  4. CMS MANANGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs; status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08; preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratulate CMS Management and the Detector Groups for the...

  5. International Masterclass at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, M

    2012-01-01

    The CMS collaboration welcomed a class of French high school students to the CERN facility in Meyrin, Switzerland on the 12 of March, 2012. Students spent the day meeting with physicists, hearing talks, asking questions, and participating in a hands-on exercise using real data collected by the CMS experiment on the Large Hadron Colider. Talks and other resources are available here: http://ippog-dev.web.cern.ch/resources/2012/ippog-international-masterclass-2012-cms

  6. A pattern recognition mezzanine based on associative memory and FPGA technology for L1 track triggering at HL-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alunni, L.; Biesuz, N.; Bilei, G.M.; Citraro, S.; Crescioli, F.; Fanò, L.; Fedi, G.; Magalotti, D.; Magazzù, G.; Servoli, L.; Storchi, L.; Palla, F.; Placidi, P.; Papi, A.; Piadyk, Y.; Rossi, E.; Spiezia, A.

    2016-01-01

    The increase of luminosity at HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information at Level-1 trigger system for the experiments to maintain an acceptable trigger rate to select interesting events despite the one order of magnitude increase in the minimum bias interactions. To extract in the required latency the track information a dedicated hardware has to be used. We present the tests of a prototype system (Pattern Recognition Mezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for HL-LHC ATLAS and CMS experiments, combining the power of both Associative Memory custom ASIC and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices.

  7. A pattern recognition mezzanine based on associative memory and FPGA technology for L1 track triggering at HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni, L.; Biesuz, N.; Bilei, G. M.; Citraro, S.; Crescioli, F.; Fanò, L.; Fedi, G.; Magalotti, D.; Magazzù, G.; Servoli, L.; Storchi, L.; Palla, F.; Placidi, P.; Papi, A.; Piadyk, Y.; Rossi, E.; Spiezia, A.

    2016-07-01

    The increase of luminosity at HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information at Level-1 trigger system for the experiments to maintain an acceptable trigger rate to select interesting events despite the one order of magnitude increase in the minimum bias interactions. To extract in the required latency the track information a dedicated hardware has to be used. We present the tests of a prototype system (Pattern Recognition Mezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for HL-LHC ATLAS and CMS experiments, combining the power of both Associative Memory custom ASIC and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices.

  8. A pattern recognition mezzanine based on associative memory and FPGA technology for L1 track triggering at HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alunni, L. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Biesuz, N. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Bilei, G.M. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Citraro, S. [Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Crescioli, F. [LPNHE, Paris (France); Fanò, L. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Fedi, G., E-mail: giacomo.fedi@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Magalotti, D. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); UNIMORE, Modena (Italy); Magazzù, G. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Servoli, L.; Storchi, L. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Palla, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Placidi, P. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); DIEI, Perugia (Italy); Papi, A. [INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Piadyk, Y. [LPNHE, Paris (France); Rossi, E. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Spiezia, A. [IHEP (China)

    2016-07-11

    The increase of luminosity at HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information at Level-1 trigger system for the experiments to maintain an acceptable trigger rate to select interesting events despite the one order of magnitude increase in the minimum bias interactions. To extract in the required latency the track information a dedicated hardware has to be used. We present the tests of a prototype system (Pattern Recognition Mezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for HL-LHC ATLAS and CMS experiments, combining the power of both Associative Memory custom ASIC and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices.

  9. Dataset definition for CMS operations and physics analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoni, Giovanni; Compact Muon Solenoid Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Data recorded at the CMS experiment are funnelled into streams, integrated in the HLT menu, and further organised in a hierarchical structure of primary datasets and secondary datasets/dedicated skims. Datasets are defined according to the final-state particles reconstructed by the high level trigger, the data format and the use case (physics analysis, alignment and calibration, performance studies). During the first LHC run, new workflows have been added to this canonical scheme, to exploit at best the flexibility of the CMS trigger and data acquisition systems. The concepts of data parking and data scouting have been introduced to extend the physics reach of CMS, offering the opportunity of defining physics triggers with extremely loose selections (e.g. dijet resonance trigger collecting data at a 1 kHz). In this presentation, we review the evolution of the dataset definition during the LHC run I, and we discuss the plans for the run II.

  10. Dataset definition for CMS operations and physics analyses

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051291

    2016-01-01

    Data recorded at the CMS experiment are funnelled into streams, integrated in the HLT menu, and further organised in a hierarchical structure of primary datasets, secondary datasets, and dedicated skims. Datasets are defined according to the final-state particles reconstructed by the high level trigger, the data format and the use case (physics analysis, alignment and calibration, performance studies). During the first LHC run, new workflows have been added to this canonical scheme, to exploit at best the flexibility of the CMS trigger and data acquisition systems. The concept of data parking and data scouting have been introduced to extend the physics reach of CMS, offering the opportunity of defining physics triggers with extremely loose selections (e.g. dijet resonance trigger collecting data at a 1 kHz). In this presentation, we review the evolution of the dataset definition during the first run, and we discuss the plans for the second LHC run.

  11. Performance of the CMS 2S $p_T$ module prototype using CBC2 readout at beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar

    2017-01-01

    As the LHC will enter into its high luminosity phase\\,(HL-LHC), operating at a luminosity of $5\\rm{\\mbox{-}}7.5\\times10^{34}~\\rm cm^{-2}\\rm s^{-1}$, the CMS experiment will replace the Run 2 tracker with a new one which will be able to sustain the increased number of collisions per bunch crossing, which can be as high as 200. The tracker information will be used in the Level-1 trigger to reject low $p_T$ tracks. In this paper, the performance of the modules of the proposed outer tracker in test beams is reported.

  12. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067159

    2016-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  13. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzmann, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  14. The fast tracker processor for hadron collider triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Annovi, A; Bardi, A; Carosi, R; Dell'Orso, Mauro; D'Onofrio, M; Giannetti, P; Iannaccone, G; Morsani, E; Pietri, M; Varotto, G

    2001-01-01

    Perspectives for precise and fast track reconstruction in future hadron collider experiments are addressed. We discuss the feasibility of a pipelined highly parallel processor dedicated to the implementation of a very fast tracking algorithm. The algorithm is based on the use of a large bank of pre-stored combinations of trajectory points, called patterns, for extremely complex tracking systems. The CMS experiment at LHC is used as a benchmark. Tracking data from the events selected by the level-1 trigger are sorted and filtered by the Fast Tracker processor at an input rate of 100 kHz. This data organization allows the level-2 trigger logic to reconstruct full resolution tracks with transverse momentum above a few GeV and search for secondary vertices within typical level-2 times. (15 refs).

  15. The fast tracker processor for hadronic collider triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Annovi, A; Bardi, A; Carosi, R; Dell'Orso, Mauro; D'Onofrio, M; Giannetti, P; Iannaccone, G; Morsani, F; Pietri, M; Varotto, G

    2000-01-01

    Perspective for precise and fast track reconstruction in future hadronic collider experiments are addressed. We discuss the feasibility of a pipelined highly parallelized processor dedicated to the implementation of a very fast algorithm. The algorithm is based on the use of a large bank of pre-stored combinations of trajectory points (patterns) for extremely complex tracking systems. The CMS experiment at LHC is used as a benchmark. Tracking data from the events selected by the level-1 trigger are sorted and filtered by the Fast Tracker processor at a rate of 100 kHz. This data organization allows the level-2 trigger logic to reconstruct full resolution traces with transverse momentum above few GeV and search secondary vertexes within typical level-2 times. 15 Refs.

  16. Auger Physicists visit CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Visit at CERN P5 CMS in the experimental cavern Alan Watson, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Leeds; Jim Cronin, Nobel Laureate, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Chicago; Jim Virdee, CMS Former Spokesperson, Imperial College; Jim Matthews, Auger Co-Spokesperson, Louisiana State University

  17. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The Agendas and Minutes of the Management Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 The Agendas and Minutes of the Collaboration Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174

  18. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    The Agendas and Minutes of the Management Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223  The Agendas and Minutes of the Collaboration Board meetings are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 

  19. CMS Experiment Data Processing at RDMS CMS Tier 2 Centers

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, V; Korenkov, V; Tikhonenko, E; Shmatov, S; Zhiltsov, V; Ilyin, V; Kodolova, O; Levchuk, L

    2012-01-01

    Russia and Dubna Member States (RDMS) CMS collaboration was founded in the year 1994 [1]. The RDMS CMS takes an active part in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Collaboration [2] at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [3] at CERN [4]. RDMS CMS Collaboration joins more than twenty institutes from Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) member states. RDMS scientists, engineers and technicians were actively participating in design, construction and commissioning of all CMS sub-detectors in forward regions. RDMS CMS physics program has been developed taking into account the essential role of these sub-detectors for the corresponding physical channels. RDMS scientists made large contribution for preparation of study QCD, Electroweak, Exotics, Heavy Ion and other physics at CMS. The overview of RDMS CMS physics tasks and RDMS CMS computing activities are presented in [5-11]. RDMS CMS computing support should satisfy the LHC data processing and analysis requirements at the running phase of the CMS experime...

  20. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included  shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs;  status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08;   preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratulate C...

  1. CMS MANAGEMENT MEETINGS

    CERN Multimedia

    Jim Virdee

    Management Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Management Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=223 Collaboration Board Agendas and minutes of meetings of the Collaboration Board are accessible to CMS members at: http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=174 LHCC: Feedback from the CMS Referees, LHCC 97 February 25, 2009. The CMS LHCC referees met with representatives of CMS on 17-2-09, to review progress since the last November minireview. The main topics included  shutdown construction, maintenance and repairs;  status of the preshower detector; commissioning and physics analysis results from cosmic ray running and CSA08;   preparations for physics, off line analysis, computing, and data distribution. TOTEM management and the TOTEM referees then joined us for a joint session to examine the readiness of the TOTEM detector. Detector construction, maintenance, and repairs. The referees congratula...

  2. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, N.; Fabbri, F.; Montanari, A.; Torromeo, G.; Dabrowski, A.E.; Orfanelli, S.; Grassi, T.; Hughes, E.; Mans, J.; Rusack, R.; Stifter, K.; Stickland, D.P.

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few nanosecond resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and receives data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is read out via IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed in real time and published to CMS and the LHC, providing online feedback on the beam quality. A dedicated calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate short triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the system. The electronics has been in operation since the first LHC beams of Run II and has served as the first demonstration of the new QIE10, Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA and high-speed 5 Gbps link with LHC data

  3. Commissioning of the upgraded CSC Endcap Muon Port Cards at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K.; Liu, J.; Matveev, M.; Michlin, B.; Padley, P.; Rorie, J.; Madorsky, A.

    2016-01-01

    There are 180 1.6 Gbps optical links from 60 Muon Port Cards (MPC) to the Cathode Strip Chamber Track Finder (CSCTF) in the original system. Before the upgrade each MPC was able to provide up to three trigger primitives from a cluster of nine CSC chambers to the Level 1 CSCTF. With an LHC luminosity increase to 10 35 cm −2 s −1 at full energy of 7 TeV/beam, the simulation studies suggest that we can expect two or three times more trigger primitives per bunch crossing from the front-end electronics. To comply with this requirement, the MPC, CSCTF, and optical cables need to be upgraded. The upgraded MPC allows transmission of up to 18 trigger primitives from the peripheral crate. This feature would allow searches for physics signatures of muon jets that require more trigger primitives per trigger sector. At the same time, it is very desirable to preserve all the old optical links for compatibility with the older Track Finder during transition period at the beginning of Run 2. Installation of the upgraded MPC boards and the new optical cables has been completed at the CMS detector in the summer of 2014. We describe the final design of the new MPC mezzanine FPGA, its firmware, and results of tests in laboratory and in situ with the old and new CSCTF boards

  4. A VME-based readout system for the CMS Preshower sub-detector

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G; Bialas, W; Da Silva, J C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Reynaud, S; Sidiropoulos, G; Snoeys, W; Vichoudis, P

    2007-01-01

    The CMS preshower is a fine grain detector that comprises 4288 silicon sensors, each containing 32 strips. The raw data are transferred from the detector to the counting room via 1208 optical fibres. Each fibre carries a 600-byte data packet per event. The maximum average level-1 trigger rate of 100 kHz results in a total data flow of ~72 GB/s from the preshower. For the readout of the preshower, 56 links to the CMS DAQ have been reserved, each having a bandwidth of 200 MB/s (2 kB/event). The total available downstream bandwidth of GB/s necessitates a reduction in the data volume by a factor of at least 7. A modular VME-based system is currently under development. The main objective of each VME board in this system is to acquire on-detector data from at least 22 optical links, perform on-line data reduction and pass the concentrated data to the CMS DAQ. The principle modules that the system is based on are being developed in collaboration with the TOTEM experiment.

  5. Radiation background with the CMS RPCs at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Costantini, Silvia; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J.W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.K.; Park, S.K.; Pant, L.M.; Mohanty, A.K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W.V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J.P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J.C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M.I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O.M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H.S.; Morales, M.I.P.; Bernardino, S.C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.; Kim, M.S.

    2015-05-28

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are employed in the CMS experiment at the LHC as dedicated trigger system both in the barrel and in the endcap. This note presents results of the radiation background measurements performed with the 2011 and 2012 proton-proton collision data collected by CMS. Emphasis is given to the measurements of the background distribution inside the RPCs. The expected background rates during the future running of the LHC are estimated both from extrapolated measurements and from simulation.

  6. CMS analysis school model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S; Bloom, K; Shipsey, I; Cavanaugh, R; Klima, B; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J; Narain, M; Palla, F; Rolandi, G; Schörner-Sadenius, T

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  7. CMS Analysis School Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, S. [Nebraska U.; Shipsey, I. [Purdue U.; Cavanaugh, R. [Illinois U., Chicago; Bloom, K. [Nebraska U.; Chan, Kai-Feng [Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; D' Hondt, J. [Vrije U., Brussels; Klima, B. [Fermilab; Narain, M. [Brown U.; Palla, F. [INFN, Pisa; Rolandi, G. [CERN; Schörner-Sadenius, T. [DESY

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  8. CMS tracker visualization tools

    CERN Document Server

    Zito, G; Osborne, I; Regano, A

    2005-01-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  9. CMS tracker visualization tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennea, M.S. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Osborne, I. [Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Regano, A. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Zito, G. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy)]. E-mail: giuseppe.zito@ba.infn.it

    2005-08-21

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  10. CMS tracker visualization tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennea, M.S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-01-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking

  11. CMS brochure (English version)

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which has started up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.CMS est la plus lourde des expériences du LHC, l'accélérateur de particules le plus puissant au monde qui a été mis en service en 2008. Les détecteurs de cette expérience polyvalente sont placés autour d'un puissant aimant supraconducteur.

  12. CMS brochure (French version)

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CMS is the heaviest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which has started up in 2008. A multi-purpose detector, CMS is composed of several systems built around a powerful superconducting magnet.CMS est la plus lourde des expériences du LHC, l'accélérateur de particules le plus puissant au monde qui a été mis en service en 2008. Les détecteurs de cette expérience polyvalente sont placés autour d'un puissant aimant supraconducteur.

  13. CMS Higgs boson results

    CERN Document Server

    Bluj, Michal Jacek

    2018-01-01

    In this report we review recent Higgs boson results obtained with pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=\\,$13 TeV recorded by the CMS detector in 2016 for an integrated luminosity of 35.9fb$^{\\text{-1}}$. The 2016 data allowed the observation of the $H \\to \\tau\\tau$ and $H \\to WW$ decays with high significance. We also present a combined measurement based on a full set of CMS analyses performed with 2016 data. These results are compatible with the standard model predictions with precision of several measurements exceeding results from combination of ATLAS and CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012.

  14. Data Scouting in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Dustin James

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the CMS collaboration introduced Data Scouting as a way to produce physics results with events that cannot be stored on disk, due to resource limits in the data acquisition and offline infrastructure. The viability of this technique was demonstrated in 2012, when 18 fb$^{-1}$ of collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV were collected. The technique is now a standard ingredient of CMS and ATLAS data-taking strategy. In this talk, we present the status of data scouting in CMS and the improvements introduced in 2015 and 2016, which promoted data scouting to a full-fledged, flexible discovery tool for the LHC Run II.

  15. Riccardo Ranieri (left) receives the 2003 CMS Thesis Award from Lorenzo Foà, the chairperson of the CMS collaboration board, at the awards ceremony

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    2003 CMS Thesis Award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri for his PhD thesis "Trigger selection of WH -> mu.nu bb (bar) with CMS". Ranieri received his PhD from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini.

  16. CMS Space Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-06-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  17. CMS Financial Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This section contains the annual CMS financial statements as required under the Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-576). The CFO Act marked a major...

  18. CMS Statistics Reference Booklet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The annual CMS Statistics reference booklet provides a quick reference for summary information about health expenditures and the Medicare and Medicaid health...

  19. CMS Space Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratnikova, N. [Fermilab; Huang, C.-H. [Fermilab; Sanchez-Hernandez, A. [CINVESTAV, IPN; Wildish, T. [Princeton U.; Zhang, X. [Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2014-01-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  20. CMS cavern inspection robot

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Robots which are immune to the CMS cavern environment, wirelessly controlled: -One actuated by smart materials (Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites and Macro Fiber Composites) -One regular brushed DC rover -One servo-driven rover -Stair-climbing robot

  1. Prototypdetektoren für das geplante Upgradeprojekt 'Muon Track Fast Tag' am CMS-Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, Simon; Stahl, Achim

    Upgrading the muon system will be one of the major challenges for the CMS experiment atthe projected high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) with an expected instantaneous luminosityof L = 1035 /(cm2 · s). Most importantly, the muon trigger rate has to be reduced inorder to keep the level 1 trigger rate inside the reserved bandwidth. Another concernthat has to be dealt with is the rising number of ambiguities in the muon chambers dueto simultaneously traversing muons, so-called ghost hits. With the Muon Track fast Tag(MTT), a new detector subsystem between the CMS solenoid and the first muon stationis proposed to solve these problems. An implementation of the MTT system based on fastplastic scintillators read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is under development atthe Physics Institute III of RWTH Aachen University.In this thesis, results of prototype detectors with 100 × 100 × 5 mm3 scintillator-tilesand dual SiPM-readout are presented. All studies have been done with cosmic muons andfocus on parameter optimi...

  2. The Upgrade of the CMS RPC System during the First LHC Long Shutdown

    CERN Document Server

    Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Zaganidis, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Assran, Y.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M.; Colafranceschi, S.; Felli, F.; Piccolo, D.; Saviano, G.; Carrillo, C.; Berzano, U.; Gabusi, M.; Vitulo, P.; Kang, M.; Lee, K.S.; Park, S.K.; Shin, S.; Sharma, A.

    2012-01-01

    The CMS muon system includes in both the barrel and endcap region Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). They mainly serve as trigger detectors and also improve the reconstruction of muon parameters. Over the years, the instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider gradually increases. During the LHC Phase 1 (~first 10 years of operation) an ultimate luminosity is expected above its design value of 10^34/cm^2/s at 14 TeV. To prepare the machine and also the experiments for this, two long shutdown periods are scheduled for 2013-2014 and 2018-2019. The CMS Collaboration is planning several detector upgrades during these long shutdowns. In particular, the muon detection system should be able to maintain a low-pT threshold for an efficient Level-1 Muon Trigger at high particle rates. One of the measures to ensure this, is to extend the present RPC system with the addition of a 4th layer in both endcap regions. During the first long shutdown, these two new stations will be equipped in the region |eta|<1.6 with...

  3. Identification and Filtering of Uncharacteristic Noise in the CMS Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; 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    2010-01-01

    Commissioning studies of the CMS hadron calorimeter have identified sporadic uncharacteristic noise and a small number of malfunctioning calorimeter channels. Algorithms have been developed to identify and address these problems in the data. The methods have been tested on cosmic ray muon data, calorimeter noise data, and single beam data collected with CMS in 2008. The noise rejection algorithms can be applied to LHC collision data at the trigger level or in the offline analysis. The application of the algorithms at the trigger level is shown to remove 90% of noise events with fake missing transverse energy above 100 GeV, which is sufficient for the CMS physics trigger operation.

  4. The CMS Electronic Logbook

    CERN Multimedia

    Bukowiec, S; Beccati, B; Behrens, U; Biery, K; Branson, J; Cano, E; Cheung, H; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; Coarasa Perez, J A; Deldicque, C; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Hatton, D; Hwong, Y L; Loizides, C; Ma, F; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Meyer, A; Mommsen, R K; Moser, R; O’Dell, V; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Racz, A; Raginel, O; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Shpakov, D; Simon, M; Sumorok, K; Sungho Yoon, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS ELogbook (ELog) is a collaborative tool, which provides a platform to share and store information about various events or problems occurring in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN during operation. The ELog is based on a Model–View–Controller (MVC) software architectural pattern and uses an Oracle database to store messages and attachments. The ELog is developed as a pluggable web component in Oracle Portal in order to provide better management, monitoring and security.

  5. Forward physics with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Grothe, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Forward physics with CMS at the LHC covers a wide range of physics subjects, including very low-x_Bj QCD, underlying event and multiple interactions characteristics, gamma-mediated processes, shower development at the energy scale of primary cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere, diffraction in the presence of a hard scale and even MSSM Higgs discovery in central exclusive production. Selected feasibility studies to illustrate the forward physics potential of CMS are presented.

  6. CMS geometry through 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, I; Brownson, E; Eulisse, G; Jones, C D; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Lange, D J

    2014-01-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  7. First test of a CMS DT chamber equipped with full electronics in a muon beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    A CMS DT chamber of MB3 type, equipped with the final version of a minicrate (containing all on-chamber trigger and readout electronics), was tested in a muon beam for the first time. The beam was bunched in 25 ns spills, allowing an LHC-like response of the chamber trigger. This test confirmed the excellent performance of the trigger design.

  8. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The milestone workshops on LHC experiments in Aachen in 1990 and at Evian in 1992 provided the first sketches of how LHC detectors might look. The concept of a compact general-purpose LHC experiment based on a solenoid to provide the magnetic field was first discussed at Aachen, and the formal Expression of Interest was aired at Evian. It was here that the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) name first became public. Optimizing first the muon detection system is a natural starting point for a high luminosity (interaction rate) proton-proton collider experiment. The compact CMS design called for a strong magnetic field, of some 4 Tesla, using a superconducting solenoid, originally about 14 metres long and 6 metres bore. (By LHC standards, this warrants the adjective 'compact'.) The main design goals of CMS are: 1 - a very good muon system providing many possibilities for momentum measurement (physicists call this a 'highly redundant' system); 2 - the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter consistent with the above; 3 - high quality central tracking to achieve both the above; and 4 - an affordable detector. Overall, CMS aims to detect cleanly the diverse signatures of new physics by identifying and precisely measuring muons, electrons and photons over a large energy range at very high collision rates, while also exploiting the lower luminosity initial running. As well as proton-proton collisions, CMS will also be able to look at the muons emerging from LHC heavy ion beam collisions. The Evian CMS conceptual design foresaw the full calorimetry inside the solenoid, with emphasis on precision electromagnetic calorimetry for picking up photons. (A light Higgs particle will probably be seen via its decay into photon pairs.) The muon system now foresaw four stations. Inner tracking would use silicon microstrips and microstrip gas chambers, with over 10 7 channels offering high track finding efficiency. In the central CMS barrel, the tracking elements are

  9. Evacuation drill at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont-Sagorin and Christoph Schaefer

    2012-01-01

    Training personnel, including evacuation guides and shifters, checking procedures, improving collaboration with the CERN Fire Brigade: the first real-life evacuation drill at CMS took place on Friday 3 February from 12p.m. to 3p.m. in the two caverns located at Point 5 of the LHC.   CERN personnel during the evacuation drill at CMS. Evacuation drills are required by law and have to be organized periodically in all areas of CERN, both above and below ground. The last drill at CMS, which took place in June 2007, revealed some desiderata, most notably the need for a public address system. With this equipment in place, it is now possible to broadcast audio messages from the CMS control room to the underground areas.   The CMS Technical Coordination Team and the GLIMOS have focused particularly on preparing collaborators for emergency situations by providing training and organizing regular safety drills with the HSE Unit and the CERN Fire Brigade. This Friday, the practical traini...

  10. Level 1 - level 2 interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneham, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Plant Damage States (PDS) are the starting point for the level 2 analysis. A PDS is group of core damage sequences that are expected to have similar severe accident progressions. In this paper an overview of Level 1/Level 2 interface, example PDS parameters, example PDS definitions using codes and example Bridge Tree are presented. PDS frequency calculation (identification of sequences for each PDS in level 1,split some CD sequences which have different level 2 progressions), code calculations providing support for grouping decisions and timings as well as PDS frequencies and definitions input to level 2 are also discussed

  11. CMS tracker towards the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alunni Solestizi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In sight of the incoming new LHC era (High Luminosity - LHC), characterized by a jump forward in the precision boundary and in the event rate, all the CMS sub-detector are developing and studying innovative strategies of trigger, pattern recognition, event timing and so on. A crucial aspect will be the online event selection: a totally new paradigm is needed, given the huge amount of events. In this picture the most granular and innermost sub-detector, the tracker, will play a decisive role. The phase-2 tracker will be involved in the L1 Trigger and, taking advantage of both the Associative Memories and the FPGA, it can ensure a trigger decision in proper time and with satisfactory performances.

  12. A Front-End Readout Architecture for the CMS Barrel Muon Detector: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, P.; Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J.M.; Marin, J.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Pablos, J.L. de; Romero, L.; Willmot, C.

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study of a possible architecture for the CMS barrel muon detector readout electronics is presented. some aspects of system reliability are discussed. Values for the required FIFO's to store data during the first level trigger latency are given

  13. Distributed Analysis in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Fanfani, Alessandra; Sanches, Jose Afonso; Andreeva, Julia; Bagliesi, Giusepppe; Bauerdick, Lothar; Belforte, Stefano; Bittencourt Sampaio, Patricia; Bloom, Ken; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Brew, Chris; Calloni, Marco; Cesini, Daniele; Cinquilli, Mattia; Codispoti, Giuseppe; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Dong, Liang; Dongiovanni, Danilo; Donvito, Giacinto; Dykstra, David; Edelmann, Erik; Egeland, Ricky; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Evans, Dave; Fanzago, Federica; Farina, Fabio; Feichtinger, Derek; Fisk, Ian; Flix, Josep; Grandi, Claudio; Guo, Yuyi; Happonen, Kalle; Hernandez, Jose M; Huang, Chih-Hao; Kang, Kejing; Karavakis, Edward; Kasemann, Matthias; Kavka, Carlos; Khan, Akram; Kim, Bockjoo; Klem, Jukka; Koivumaki, Jesper; Kress, Thomas; Kreuzer, Peter; Kurca, Tibor; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Letts, James; Linden, Tomas; Lueking, Lee; Maes, Joris; Magini, Nicolo; Maier, Gerhild; McBride, Patricia; Metson, Simon; Miccio, Vincenzo; Padhi, Sanjay; Pi, Haifeng; Riahi, Hassen; Riley, Daniel; Rossman, Paul; Saiz, Pablo; Sartirana, Andrea; Sciaba, Andrea; Sekhri, Vijay; Spiga, Daniele; Tuura, Lassi; Vaandering, Eric; Vanelderen, Lukas; Van Mulders, Petra; Vedaee, Aresh; Villella, Ilaria; Wicklund, Eric; Wildish, Tony; Wissing, Christoph; Wurthwein, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment expects to manage several Pbytes of data each year during the LHC programme, distributing them over many computing sites around the world and enabling data access at those centers for analysis. CMS has identified the distributed sites as the primary location for physics analysis to support a wide community with thousands potential users. This represents an unprecedented experimental challenge in terms of the scale of distributed computing resources and number of user. An overview of the computing architecture, the software tools and the distributed infrastructure is reported. Summaries of the experience in establishing efficient and scalable operations to get prepared for CMS distributed analysis are presented, followed by the user experience in their current analysis activities.

  14. The Latest from CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CMS is on track to be ready for physics one month in advance of the LHC restart. The final installations are being completed and tests are being run to ensure that the experiment is as well prepared as possible to exploit sustained LHC operation throughout 2010. Physics week in Bologna, Italy, was a valuable time for CMS collaborators to discuss preparations for numerous physics analyses, as well as the performance of the detector during the recent data-taking period with cosmics (CRAFT 09). During this five-week exercise, more than 300 million cosmic events were recorded with the magnetic field on. This large data-set is being used to further improve the sub-detector alignment, calibration and performance whilst awaiting p-p collisions. Meanwhile, in the experimental cavern, Wolfram Zeuner, Deputy Technical Coordinator of CMS, reports "We are now very nearly closed up again. We are just doing the final clean-up work and are ready t...

  15. CMS analysis operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, J; Maier, G; Spiga, D; Calloni, M; Colling, D; Fanzago, F; D'Hondt, J; Maes, J; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Klem, J; Letts, J; Padhi, S; Sarkar, S

    2010-01-01

    During normal data taking CMS expects to support potentially as many as 2000 analysis users. Since the beginning of 2008 there have been more than 800 individuals who submitted a remote analysis job to the CMS computing infrastructure. The bulk of these users will be supported at the over 40 CMS Tier-2 centres. Supporting a globally distributed community of users on a globally distributed set of computing clusters is a task that requires reconsidering the normal methods of user support for Analysis Operations. In 2008 CMS formed an Analysis Support Task Force in preparation for large-scale physics analysis activities. The charge of the task force was to evaluate the available support tools, the user support techniques, and the direct feedback of users with the goal of improving the success rate and user experience when utilizing the distributed computing environment. The task force determined the tools needed to assess and reduce the number of non-zero exit code applications submitted through the grid interfaces and worked with the CMS experiment dashboard developers to obtain the necessary information to quickly and proactively identify issues with user jobs and data sets hosted at various sites. Results of the analysis group surveys were compiled. Reference platforms for testing and debugging problems were established in various geographic regions. The task force also assessed the resources needed to make the transition to a permanent Analysis Operations task. In this presentation the results of the task force will be discussed as well as the CMS Analysis Operations plans for the start of data taking.

  16. Electronics and Calibration system for the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolò; Fabbri, Franco L; Finkel, Alexey; Orfanelli, Stella; Loos, R; Montanari, Alessandro; Rusack, R; Stickland, David P

    2014-01-01

    In the context of increasing luminosity of LHC, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the cavern of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The readout chain of this detector will make use of many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics will record bunch-by-bunch histograms, which will be published to CMS and the LHC using the newly designed CMS beam instrumentation specific DAQ. A calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate triggered pulses of...

  17. Luminosity measurement and beam condition monitoring at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The BRIL system of CMS consists of instrumentation to measure the luminosity online and offline, and to monitor the LHC beam conditions inside CMS. An accurate luminosity measurement is essential to the CMS physics program, and measurement of the beam background is necessary to ensure safe operation of CMS. In expectation of higher luminosity and denser proton bunch spacing during LHC Run II, many of the BRIL subsystems are being upgraded and others are being added to complement the existing measurements. The beam condition monitor (BCM) consists of several sets of diamond sensors used to measure online luminosity and beam background with a single-bunch-crossing resolution. The BCM also detects when beam conditions become unfavorable for CMS running and may trigger a beam abort to protect the detector. The beam halo monitor (BHM) uses quartz bars to measure the background of the incoming beams at larger radii. The pixel luminosity telescope (PLT) consists of telescopes of silicon sensors designed to provide a CMS online and offline luminosity measurement. In addition, the forward hadronic calorimeter (HF) will deliver an independent luminosity measurement, making the whole system robust and allowing for cross-checks of the systematics. Data from each of the subsystems will be collected and combined in the BRIL DAQ framework, which will publish it to CMS and LHC. The current status of installation and commissioning results for the BRIL subsystems are given.

  18. Model of CMS Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Breuker

    1999-01-01

    A full scale CMS tracker mock-up exposed temporarily in the hall of building 40. The purpose of the mock-up is to study the routing of services, assembly and installation. The people in front are only a small fraction of the CMS tracker collaboration. Left to right : M. Atac, R. Castaldi, H. Breuker, D. Pandoulas,P. Petagna, A. Caner, A. Carraro, H. Postema, M. Oriunno, S. da Mota Silva, L. Van Lancker, W. Glessing, G. Benefice, A. Onnela, M. Gaspar, G. M. Bilei

  19. Automating the CMS DAQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G; Darlea, G-L; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Bawej, T; Chaze, O; Coarasa, J A; Deldicque, C; Dobson, M; Dupont, A; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Hartl, C; Hegeman, J; Masetti, L; Behrens, U; Branson, J; Cittolin, S; Holzner, A; Erhan, S

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  20. CMS Comic Book

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Karl Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Titled "CMS Particle Hunter," this colorful comic book style brochure explains to young budding scientists and science enthusiasts in colorful animation how the CMS detector was made, its main parts, and what scientists hope to find using this complex tool. Book invites young students to get involved in particle physics themselves to join the adventure. Written by Dave Barney and Aline Guevera. Layout and drawings by Eric Paiharey and Frederic Vignaux. Available in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Year Produced: 2006. Update: September 2013.

  1. Performance of the CMS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Andre, Jean-Marc Olivier; Branson, James; Brummer, Philipp Maximilian; Chaze, Olivier; Cittolin, Sergio; Contescu, Cristian; Craigs, Benjamin Gordon; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Deldicque, Christian; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dobson, Marc; Doualot, Nicolas; Erhan, Samim; Fulcher, Jonathan Richard; Gigi, Dominique; Gladki, Maciej Szymon; Glege, Frank; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Hegeman, Jeroen Guido; Holzner, Andre Georg; Janulis, Mindaugas; Jimenez Estupinan, Raul; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Franciscus; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius; Morovic, Srecko; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Petrova, Petia; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Schwick, Christoph; Simelevicius, Dainius; Zejdl, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The data acquisition system (DAQ) of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) assembles events at a rate of 100 kHz. It transports event data at an aggregate throughput of ~100 GB/s to the high-level trigger (HLT) farm. The CMS DAQ system has been completely rebuilt during the first long shutdown of the LHC in 2013/14. The new DAQ architecture is based on state-of-the-art network technologies for the event building. For the data concentration, 10/40 Gb/s Ethernet technologies are used together with a reduced TCP/IP protocol implemented in FPGA for a reliable transport between custom electronics and commercial computing hardware. A 56 Gb/s Infiniband FDR CLOS network has been chosen for the event builder. We report on the performance of the event builder system and the steps taken to exploit the full potential of the network technologies.

  2. The CMS Tracker Readout Front End Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Foudas, C.; Ballard, D.; Church, I.; Corrin, E.; Coughlan, J.A.; Day, C.P.; Freeman, E.J.; Fulcher, J.; Gannon, W.J.F.; Hall, G.; Halsall, R.N.J.; Iles, G.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Noy, M.; Pearson, M.; Raymond, M.; Reid, I.; Rogers, G.; Salisbury, J.; Taghavi, S.; Tomalin, I.R.; Zorba, O.

    2004-01-01

    The Front End Driver, FED, is a 9U 400mm VME64x card designed for reading out the Compact Muon Solenoid, CMS, silicon tracker signals transmitted by the APV25 analogue pipeline Application Specific Integrated Circuits. The FED receives the signals via 96 optical fibers at a total input rate of 3.4 GB/sec. The signals are digitized and processed by applying algorithms for pedestal and common mode noise subtraction. Algorithms that search for clusters of hits are used to further reduce the input rate. Only the cluster data along with trigger information of the event are transmitted to the CMS data acquisition system using the S-LINK64 protocol at a maximum rate of 400 MB/sec. All data processing algorithms on the FED are executed in large on-board Field Programmable Gate Arrays. Results on the design, performance, testing and quality control of the FED are presented and discussed.

  3. The CMS experiment puts physics onto the menu

    CERN Document Server

    Leonidopoulos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    CMS has addressed the challenge of identifying in real time different kinds of 
physics at the LHC – from the "bread and butter" of Standard Model processes to 
signals of new particles – with triggers served up according to a carefully designed menu.

  4. Quality control tests for the CMS Barrel RPCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Guida, R.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Trentadue, R.; Cavallo, N.; Fabozzi, F.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Polese, G.; Sciacca, C.; Belli, G.; Necchi, M.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Anguelov, T.; Genchev, V.; Panev, B.; Piperov, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vankov, P.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.

    2006-01-01

    An RPC based system will be employed for the CMS muon first level trigger. Severe quality controls and certification have been established all along the entire production chain. Procedures are briefly described and results for the acceptance percentage are given for the second part of the single gaps and double gaps production. Summary results are also reported for the full sets of tested chambers

  5. CERN Researchers' Night @ CMS + TOTEM

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Young researchers' shifter training at CMS; • Introduction talk with discussion, • CMS control room shadowing the shifters • TOTEM control room introduction and discusson • Scientific poster work shop and presentation • Science Art installations ‘Faces of CMS’ & ‘Science Cloud’ • CMS Shift diploma presentation

  6. Final descent for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    The 15th and last section of the CMS detector was lowered on Tuesday 22 January. The YE-1 endcap (1430 tonnes) began its 100-metre descent at 7 am and arrived gently on the floor of the experiment hall at 5.30 pm.

  7. Exclusive Production at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    I briefly introduce so-called central exclusive production. I mainly focus on the example analyses that have been performed in the CMS experiment at CERN. I conclude with ideas and perspectives for future work that will be done during Run 2 of the LHC. I pay special attention to the ultraperipheral collisions.

  8. Exotica in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072123

    2015-01-01

    Selected results on exotica searches with the CMS detector are presented. The main topics are dark matter, boosted objects, long-lived particles and classic narrow resonance searches. Most of the analyses were performed with data recorded at at centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, but first results obtained at 13 TeV are also shown.

  9. CMS SEES FIRST COLLISIONS

    CERN Multimedia

      A very special moment.  On 23rd November, 19:40 we recorded our first collisions with 450GeV beams well centred in CMS.   If you have any comments / suggestions please contact Karl Aaron GILL (Editor)

  10. New Management for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As of January 2010, Guido Tonelli becomes the new CMS Spokesperson with a two-year term of office. A Professor of General Physics at the University of Pisa, Italy, and a CERN Staff Member since January 2010, Tonelli had already been appointed as Deputy Spokesperson under the previous management. He has taken over from Jim Virdee, who was CMS Spokesperson from January 2007 to December 2009. Guido Tonelli, new CMS spokesperson At the same time as Tonelli becomes Spokesperson, two new Deputies, Albert De Roeck and Joe Incandela, as well as a whole new set of Coordinators, are also starting their terms of office. ”With the first data-taking run we have shown that CMS is an excellent experiment. The next challenge will be to transform CMS into a discovery machine with a view to making it synonymous with scientific excellence. This will be very tough but, again, the winning element will be the focus and coherent effort of the whole collaboration. On my side I'll do my best but I will need...

  11. CMS Achieves New Milestone

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In a year highlighted by the discovery of a new, Higgs-like boson, we must remember that CMS has had a tremendous year overall, with many physics results that have pushed our envelope of knowledge further. As of this week, we have published 200 papers. Congratulations to everyone involved!

  12. CMS General Poster 2009 : to raise awareness of CMS, the CMS detector, its parts and people

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS outreach

    2012-01-01

    A poster which is identical to the two inside pages of the CMS brochure. The poster contains an image of a cross section of the CMS detector, explanation of detector parts, the aims of the CMS experiment and numbers of scientists and institutions associated with the experiment.

  13. CMS computing support at JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, I.; Koren'kov, V.; Lavrent'ev, A.; Pose, R.; Tikhonenko, E.

    1998-01-01

    Participation of JINR specialists in the CMS experiment at LHC requires a wide use of computer resources. In the context of JINR activities in the CMS Project hardware and software resources have been provided for full participation of JINR specialists in the CMS experiment; the JINR computer infrastructure was made closer to the CERN one. JINR also provides the informational support for the CMS experiment (web-server http://sunct2.jinr.dubna.su). Plans for further CMS computing support at JINR are stated

  14. 42 CFR 405.874 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.874 Section... Part B Program § 405.874 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's enrollment...

  15. Search for Hadronic Resonances in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Many models of new physics involve colored particles predicted to decay into hadronic final states. We present the results of searches for new heavy resonances in final states with up to 8 jets. Dedicated techniques have been developed to take advantage of the boosted topology and identify W and Z bosons. We also discuss a trigger strategy to extend the dijet search well below 1 TeV. These results are based on pp collision data collected with the CMS detector in 2011 and 2012.

  16. Simulation of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiiska, R; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Dimitrov, A; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Ocampo, A; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Verwilligen, P; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Shopova, M; Sultanov, G; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Xue, Z; Ge, Y; Li, Q; Qian, S; Avila, C; Chaparro, L F; Gomez, J P; Moreno, B Gomez; Oliveros, A F Osorio; Sanabria, J C; Assran, Y; Sharma, A; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Pugliese, G; Loddo, F; Calabria, C; Maggi, M; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Piccolo, D; Carrillo, C; Iorio, O; Buontempo, S; Paolucci, P; Vitulo, P; Berzano, U; Gabusi, M; Kang, M; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Shin, S; Kim, M S; Seo, H; Goh, J; Choi, Y; Shoaib, M

    2013-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon subsystem contributes significantly to the formation of the trigger decision and reconstruction of the muon trajectory parameters. Simulation of the RPC response is a crucial part of the entire CMS Monte Carlo software and directly influences the final physical results. An algorithm based on the parametrization of RPC efficiency, noise, cluster size and timing for every strip has been developed. Experimental data obtained from cosmic and proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV have been used for determination of the parameters. A dedicated validation procedure has been developed. A good agreement between the simulated and experimental data has been achieved.

  17. CMS OnlineWeb-Based Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Zongru; Chakaberia, Irakli; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2012-01-01

    For large international High Energy Physics experiments, modern web technologies make the online monitoring of detector status, data acquisition status, trigger rates, luminosity, etc., accessible for the collaborators anywhere and anytime. This helps the collaborating experts monitor the status of the experiment, identify the problems, and improve data-taking efficiency. We present the Web-Based Monitoring project of the CMS experiment at the LHC of CERN. The data sources are relational databases and various messaging systems. The project provides a vast amount of in-depth information including real time data, historical trend, and correlations, in a user friendly way.

  18. Trigger finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digit; Trigger finger release; Locked finger; Digital flexor tenosynovitis ... cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  19. Status and performance of the CMS muon system in Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera Mora, Andres Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The CMS muon system has played a key role for many physics results obtained from the LHC Run1 and Run2 data. During the Long Shutdown (2013-2014), as well as during the last year-end technical stop (2015-2016), significant consolidation and upgrades have been carried out on the muon detectors and on the Level-1 (L1) muon trigger. The algorithms for muon reconstruction and identification have also been improved for both the High-Level Trigger (HLT) and the offline reconstruction. Results of the performance of muon detectors, reconstruction and trigger, obtained using data collected at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy during the 2015 and 2016 LHC runs, are presented. Comparison of simulation with experimental data is also discussed where relevant. The system's state of the art is also shown, as well the improvements foreseen to achieve excellent overall quality of muon reconstruction in the high-luminosity conditions expected during Run2.

  20. The JET level-1 software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullen, P.A.; Farthing, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The complex nature of the JET machine requires a large amount of control parameter preparation, selection and validation before a pulse may be started. Level-1 is defined as the centralized, cross-subsystem control of JET. Before it was introduced over 10 years ago, the Session Leader (SL) who is responsible for specifying the parameter settings for a JET pulse, had virtually no software available to help him except for a simple editor used for the creation of control waveforms. Most of the required parameter settings were calculated by hand and then passed on either verbally or via hand-written forms. These parameters were then set by a large number of people - Local Unit Responsible Officers (LUROs) and CODAS Duty Officers (CDOs) using a wide selection of dedicated software. At this time the Engineer in Charge (EiC) would largely depend on the LUROs to inform him that conditions were ready. He never set control parameters personally and had little or no software available to him to see what many of the settings were. The first implementation of Level-1 software went some way towards improving the task of pulse schedule preparation in that the SL could specify his requirements via a computer interface and store them in a database for later use. At that time the maximum number of parameters that could be handled was 500. (author)

  1. Commissioning and integration testing of the DAQ system for the CMS GEM upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin

    2017-01-01

    The CMS muon system will undergo a series of upgrades in the coming years to preserve and extend its muon detection capabilities during the High Luminosity LHC.The first of these will be the installation of triple-foil GEM detectors in the CMS forward region with the goal of maintaining trigger rates and preserving good muon reconstruction, even in the expected harsh environment.In 2017 the CMS GEM project is looking to achieve a major milestone in the project with the installation of 5 super-chambers in CMS; this exercise will allow for the study of services installation and commissioning, and integration with the rest of the subsystems for the first time. An overview of the DAQ system will be given with emphasis on the usage during chamber quality control testing, commissioning in CMS, and integration with the central CMS system.

  2. CMS conditions data access using FroNTier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Barry; Johns Hopkins U.; Dykstra, David; Lueking, Lee; Wicklund, Eric; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC has established an infrastructure using the FroNTier framework to deliver conditions (i.e. calibration, alignment, etc.) data to processing clients worldwide. FroNTier is a simple web service approach providing client HTTP access to a central database service. The system for CMS has been developed to work with POOL which provides object relational mapping between the C++ clients and various database technologies. Because of the read only nature of the data, Squid proxy caching servers are maintained near clients and these caches provide high performance data access. Several features have been developed to make the system meet the needs of CMS including careful attention to cache coherency with the central database, and low latency loading required for the operation of the online High Level Trigger. The ease of deployment, stability of operation, and high performance make the FroNTier approach well suited to the GRID environment being used for CMS offline, as well as for the online environment used by the CMS High Level Trigger (HLT). The use of standard software, such as Squid and various monitoring tools, make the system reliable, highly configurable and easily maintained. We describe the architecture, software, deployment, performance, monitoring and overall operational experience for the system

  3. CMS conditions data access using FroNTier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, B; Dykstra, D; Lueking, L; Wicklund, E

    2008-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC has established an infrastructure using the FroNTier framework to deliver conditions (i.e. calibration, alignment, etc.) data to processing clients worldwide. FroNTier is a simple web service approach providing client HTTP access to a central database service. The system for CMS has been developed to work with POOL which provides object relational mapping between the C++ clients and various database technologies. Because of the read only nature of the data, Squid proxy caching servers are maintained near clients and these caches provide high performance data access. Several features have been developed to make the system meet the needs of CMS including careful attention to cache coherency with the central database, and low latency loading required for the operation of the online High Level Trigger. The ease of deployment, stability of operation, and high performance make the FroNTier approach well suited to the GRID environment being used for CMS offline, as well as for the online environment used by the CMS High Level Trigger. The use of standard software, such as Squid and various monitoring tools, makes the system reliable, highly configurable and easily maintained. We describe the architecture, software, deployment, performance, monitoring and overall operational experience for the system

  4. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in center-of-mass energy, a new energy frontier has been opened by the Large Hadron Collider. More than 25 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=13 TeV have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS experiments during 2016. This enormous dataset can be used to test the Standard Model in a complete new regime with tremendous precision and it has the potential to unveil new physics or set strong bounds on it. In this talk some of the most recent results made public by the CMS Collaboration will be presented. The focus will mainly be on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, with particular emphasis on searches for dark matter candidates.

  5. Highlights from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Autermann, Christian

    2018-01-01

    This article summarizes the latest highlights from the CMS experiment as presented at the Lepton Photon conference 2017 in Guangzhou, China. A selection of the latest physics results, the latest detector upgrades, and the current detector status are discussed. CMS has analyzed the full dataset of proton-proton collision data delivered by the LHC in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of $13$\\,TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $40$\\,fb$^{-1}$. The leap in center-of-mass energy and in luminosity with respect to the $7$ and $8$\\,TeV runs enabled interesting and relevant new physics results. A new silicon pixel tracking detector was installed during the LHC shutdown 2016/17 and has successfully started operation.

  6. Higgs searches with CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The excellent performances of the LHC in the 2011 run are setting the grounds for the final chase of the Higgs boson. The CMS experiment is recording high quality data that are being thoroughly scrutinized. Several decay channels are investigated to probe the entire possible Higgs mass spectrum, from 110 to 600 GeV/c^2. The study of the first 1.5/fb of collected data places already tight limits and excludes large fractions of the Higgs mass range, leaving however still open the search in the theoretically favored low mass region. In this seminar we will report on the diverse CMS analyses that yield to such results describing the experimental challenges that each had to meet.

  7. Electronics for the CMS muon drift tube chambers the read-out minicrate

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Oller, Juan Carlos; Willmott, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    On the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experimentat the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory, the drift tube chambers are responsible for muon detection and precise momentum measurement. In this paper the first level of the read out electronics for these drift tube chambers is described. These drift tube chambers will be located inside the muon barrel detector in the so-called minicrates (MCs), attached to the chambers. The read out boards (ROBs) are the main component of this first level data acquisition system, and they are responsible for the time digitalization related to Level 1 Accept (L1A) trigger of the incoming signals from the front-end electronics, followed by a consequent data merging to the next stages of the data acquisition system. ROBs' architecture and functionality have been exhaustively tested, as well as their capability of operation beyond the expected environmental conditions inside the CMS detector. Due to the satisfactory results obtained, final production of ROBs and their a...

  8. Monitoring the CMS strip tracker readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mersi, S; Bainbridge, R; Cripps, N; Fulcher, J; Wingham, M; Baulieu, G; Bel, S; Delaere, C; Drouhin, F; Mirabito, L; Cole, J; Giassi, A; Gross, L; Hahn, K; Nikolic, M; Tkaczyk, S

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker at the LHC comprises a sensitive area of approximately 200 m 2 and 10 million readout channels. Its data acquisition system is based around a custom analogue front-end chip. Both the control and the readout of the front-end electronics are performed by off-detector VME boards in the counting room, which digitise the raw event data and perform zero-suppression and formatting. The data acquisition system uses the CMS online software framework to configure, control and monitor the hardware components and steer the data acquisition. The first data analysis is performed online within the official CMS reconstruction framework, which provides many services, such as distributed analysis, access to geometry and conditions data, and a Data Quality Monitoring tool based on the online physics reconstruction. The data acquisition monitoring of the Strip Tracker uses both the data acquisition and the reconstruction software frameworks in order to provide real-time feedback to shifters on the operational state of the detector, archiving for later analysis and possibly trigger automatic recovery actions in case of errors. Here we review the proposed architecture of the monitoring system and we describe its software components, which are already in place, the various monitoring streams available, and our experiences of operating and monitoring a large-scale system

  9. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  10. Higgs physics at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzner, André G., E-mail: andre.georg.holzner@cern.ch [University of California at San Diego (United States); Collaboration: on behalf of the CMS collaboration

    2016-12-15

    This article reviews recent measurements of the properties of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson using data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC: its mass, width and couplings to other SM particles. We also summarise highlights from searches for new physical phenomena in the Higgs sector as they are proposed in many extensions of the SM: flavour violating and invisible decay modes, resonances decaying into Higgs bosons and searches for additional Higgs bosons.

  11. Dibosons from CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martelli Arabella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is here presented the diboson production cross section measured by the CMS collaboration in pp collisions data at √s = 7 TeV. Wγ and Zγ results from 2010 analyses (36 pb−1 are presented together with 2011 first measurements of WW, WZ and ZZ final states obtained using 1.1 fb−1. Results obtained with 2010 data are also interpreted in term of anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  12. CMS lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    These crystals are made from lead tungstate, a crystal that is as clear as glass yet with nearly four times the density. They have been produced in Russia to be used as scintillators in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the CMS experiment, part of the LHC project at CERN. When an electron, positron or photon passes through the calorimeter it will cause a cascade of particles that will then be absorbed by these scintillating crystals, allowing the particle's energy to be measured.

  13. The CMS superconducting solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The huge solenoid that will generate the magnetic field for the CMS experiment at the LHC is shown stored in the assembly hall above the experimental cavern. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. It weighs 220 tonnes and will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field, storing enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  14. The RPC system for the CMS experiment at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G. E-mail: giacomo.bruno@cern.ch; Guida, R.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P

    2003-08-01

    The CMS detector at the LHC has a redundant muon system. Two independent muon systems are used in the L1 trigger. One of them is based on wire chambers, the other on RPC detectors. Properly combining the answers of the two systems results in a highly efficient L1 trigger with high flexibility from the point of view of rate control. Simulation results show, however, that the RPC system suffers from false triggers caused by coincidence of spurious hits. System improvements, which could avoid oiling the chambers, are possible. RPCs have also proved to be very useful for muon track reconstruction.

  15. The CMS conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, I L; Marti, H P; Neuenschwander, J; Smith, R P; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Calvo, A; Campi, D; Curé, B; Desirelli, Alberto; Favre, G; Riboni, P L; Sgobba, Stefano; Tardy, T; Sequeira-Lopes-Tavares, S

    2000-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments, which are being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN, the design field of the CMS magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 13 m and the aperture is 6 m. This high magnetic field is achieved by means of a 4 layer, 5 modules superconducting coil. The coil is wound from an Al-stabilized Rutherford type conductor. The nominal current of the magnet is 20 kA at 4.5 K. In the CMS coil the structural function is ensured, unlike in other existing Al-stabilized thin solenoids, both by the Al-alloy reinforced conductor and the external former. In this paper the retained manufacturing process of the 50-km long reinforced conductor is described. In general the Rutherford type cable is surrounded by high purity aluminium in a continuous co-extrusion process to produce the Insert. Thereafter the reinforcement is joined by Electron Beam Welding to the pure Al of the insert, before being machined to the final dimensions. During the...

  16. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagliesi, M.G., E-mail: mg.bagliesi@pi.infn.i [University of Siena and INFN Pisa (Italy); Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N. [University of Siena and INFN Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5{mu}s. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  17. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, M.G.; Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.

    2010-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5μs. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  18. CMS endcap RPC gas gap production for upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S K; Choi, S; Hong, B; Jeng, Y Gun; Kang, M; Lee, K S; Sim, K-S; Colaleo, A; Pugliese, G; Loddo, F; Calabria, C; Maggi, M; Verwillingen, P; Berzano, U; Carrillo, C; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Shopova, M

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment will install a RE4 layer of 144 new Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) on the existing york YE3 at both endcap regions to trigger high momentum muons from the proton-proton interaction. In this paper, we present the detailed procedures used in the production of new RPC gas gaps adopted in the CMS upgrade. Quality assurance is enforced as ways to maintain the same quality of RPC gas gaps as the existing 432 endcap RPC chambers that have been operational since the beginning of the LHC operation. (technical report)

  19. LHC-rate beam test of CMS pixel barrel modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdmann, W.; Hoermann, Ch.; Kotlinski, D.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H. Chr.; Gabathuler, K.; Bertl, W.; Meier, B.; Langenegger, U.; Trueeb, P.; Rohe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Modules for the CMS pixel barrel detector have been operated in a high rate pion beam at PSI in order to verify under LHC-like conditions the final module design for the production. The test beam provided charged particle rates up to 10 8 cm -2 s -1 over the full module area. Bunch structure and randomized high trigger rates simulated realistic operation. A four layer telescope made of single pixel readout chip assemblies provided tracking needed for the determination of the modules hit reconstruction efficiency. The performance of the modules has been shown to be adequate for the CMS pixel barrel

  20. Design and Performance of the CMS Pixel Detector Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C; Erdmann, W; Hörmann, C; Horisberger, R P; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Hoermann, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The readout chip for the CMS pixel detector has to deal with an enormous data rate. On-chip zero suppression is inevitable and hit data must be buffered locally during the latency of the first level trigger. Dead-time must be kept at a minimum. It is dominated by contributions coming from the readout. To keep it low an analog readout scheme has been adopted where pixel addresses are analog coded. We present the architecture of the final CMS pixel detector readout chip with special emphasis on the analog readout chain. Measurements of its performance are discussed.

  1. Feasibility study of $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\phi \\rightarrow$ 4K with L1 Tracks at the CMS Phase-II Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Rajarshi

    2017-01-01

    $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\phi \\rightarrow$ 4 Kaons is an important physics process to study during the LHC Phase-II which is expected to start in 2024. In this process, the CP violating weak phase arises due to the CP violation of the $B_s - \\bar{B_s}$ mixing and the gluonic penguin decay of b $\\rightarrow$ s$\\bar s$s. The penguin decay of the b-quark makes it a rare process also. The CMS experiment is planning to include tracker information at Level-1 Trigger to keep event rate manageable in the high luminosity regime of the LHC PhaseII. The aim of the present study is to understand whether CMS will be able to trigger on the $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\phi \\rightarrow$ 4 Kaons events and be competitive with LHCb during LHC PhaseII. We shall discuss about signal efficiency and event rate both at the trigger as well as physics analysis levels and also look at several ways of optimization of efficiency and event rate.

  2. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  3. 2017 B-Physics trigger efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The performance of the trigger used to select B-Physics decay channels in CMS is presented for data collected in 2017, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $9.8\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $13\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$.

  4. Data concentrator card and test system for the CMS ECAL readout

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, N; Alemany, R; Cardoso, N; Varela, J

    2003-01-01

    The Data Concentrator Card (DCC) is part of the Off-Detector (OD) Electronics sub-system of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter. The DCC is responsible for crystal and trigger data collection from the Front-End system and from the ECAL Trigger system respectively.

  5. The D0 calorimeter trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, J.

    1992-12-01

    The D0 calorimeter trigger system consists of many levels to make physics motivated trigger decisions. The Level-1 trigger uses hardware techniques to reduce the trigger rate from ∼ 100kHz to 200Hz. It forms sums of electromagnetic and hadronic energy, globally and in towers, along with finding the missing transverse energy. A minimum energy is set on these energy sums to pass the event. The Level-2 trigger is a set of software filters, operating in a parallel-processing microvax farm which further reduces the trigger rate to a few Hertz. These filters will reject events which lack electron candidates, jet candidates, or missing transverse energy in the event. The performance of these triggers during the early running of the D0 detector will also be discussed

  6. CMS silicon tracker developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civinini, C.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.D.R.; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; Focardi, E.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Frey, A.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Honma, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B. Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Surrow, B.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Yahong, Li; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    2002-01-01

    The CMS Silicon tracker consists of 70 m 2 of microstrip sensors which design will be finalized at the end of 1999 on the basis of systematic studies of device characteristics as function of the most important parameters. A fundamental constraint comes from the fact that the detector has to be operated in a very hostile radiation environment with full efficiency. We present an overview of the current results and prospects for converging on a final set of parameters for the silicon tracker sensors

  7. 4l at CMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-15

    Nov 15, 2012 ... 79, No. 5. — journal of ... CL on the cross-section × branching ratio for a SM Higgs boson with SM like decays exclude cross-sections ... leptons reconstruction, identification, isolation, triggers and skimming compatible with.

  8. CMS Software and Computing Ready for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    In Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider, software and computing was a strategic strength of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. The timely processing of data and simulation samples and the excellent performance of the reconstruction algorithms played an important role in the preparation of the full suite of searches used for the observation of the Higgs boson in 2012. In Run 2, the LHC will run at higher intensities and CMS will record data at a higher trigger rate. These new running conditions will provide new challenges for the software and computing systems. Over the two years of Long Shutdown 1, CMS has built upon the successes of Run 1 to improve the software and computing to meet these challenges. In this presentation we will describe the new features in software and computing that will once again put CMS in a position of physics leadership.

  9. The CMS detector magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Hervé, A

    2000-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is a general-purpose detector designed to run in mid-2005 at the highest luminosity at the LHC at CERN. Its distinctive features include a 6 m free bore diameter, 12.5 m long, 4 T superconducting solenoid enclosed inside a 10,000 tonne return yoke. The magnet will be assembled and tested on the surface by the end of 2003 before being transferred by heavy lifting means to a 90 m deep underground experimental area. The design and construction of the magnet is a `common project' of the CMS Collaboration. It is organized by a CERN based group with strong technical and contractual participation by CEA Saclay, ETH Zurich, Fermilab Batavia IL, INFN Geneva, ITEP Moscow, University of Wisconsin and CERN. The return yoke, 21 m long and 14 m in diameter, is equivalent to 1.5 m of saturated iron interleaved with four muon stations. The yoke and the vacuum tank are being manufactured. The indirectly-cooled, pure- aluminium-stabilized coil is made up from five modules internally wound with four ...

  10. Hadron correlations in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, Charles Felix

    2012-01-01

    The measurements of the anisotropic flow of single particles and particle pairs have provided some of the most compelling evidence for the creation of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) in relativistic heavy ion collisions, first at RHIC, and more recently at the LHC. Using PbPb collision data taken in the 2010 and 2011 heavy ion runs at the LHC, the CMS experiment has investigated a broad scope of these flow phenomena. The $v_2$ elliptic flow coefficient has been extracted with four different methods to cross-check contributions from initial state fluctuations and non-flow correlations. The measurements of the $v_2$ elliptic anisotropy have been extended to a transverse momentum of 60 GeV/c, which will enable the placement of new quantitative constraints on parton energy loss models as a function of path length in the sQGP medium. Additionally, for the first time at the LHC, the CMS experiment has extracted precise elliptic anisotropy coefficients for the neutral $\\pi$ meson ($\\pi^0$) in the c...

  11. The CMS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Brigljevic, V; Cano, E; Cittolin, Sergio; Csilling, Akos; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Jacobs, C; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Larsen, H; Magrans de Abril, Ildefons; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schwick, C; Sphicas, Paris; ODell, V; Suzuki, I; Berti, L; Maron, G; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L; Ninane, A; Erhan, S; Bhattacharya, S; Branson, J G

    2003-01-01

    The data acquisition system of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider will employ an event builder which will combine data from about 500 data sources into full events at an aggregate throughput of 100 GByte/s. Several architectures and switch technologies have been evaluated for the DAQ Technical Design Report by measurements with test benches and by simulation. This paper describes studies of an EVB test-bench based on 64 PCs acting as data sources and data consumers and employing both Gigabit Ethernet and Myrinet technologies as the interconnect. In the case of Ethernet, protocols based on Layer-2 frames and on TCP/IP are evaluated. Results from ongoing studies, including measurements on throughput and scaling are presented. The architecture of the baseline CMS event builder will be outlined. The event builder is organised into two stages with intelligent buffers in between. The first stage contains 64 switches performing a first level of data concentration by building super-fragments from fragmen...

  12. CMS tracker observes muons

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A computer image of a cosmic ray traversing the many layers of the TEC+ silicon sensors. The first cosmic muon tracks have been observed in one of the CMS tracker endcaps. On 14 March, a sector on one of the two large tracker endcaps underwent a cosmic muon run. Since then, thousands of tracks have been recorded. These data will be used not only to study the tracking, but also to exercise various track alignment algorithms The endcap tested, called the TEC+, is under construction at RWTH Aachen in Germany. The endcaps have a modular design, with silicon strip modules mounted onto wedge-shaped carbon fibre support plates, so-called petals. Up to 28 modules are arranged in radial rings on both sides of these plates. One eighth of an endcap is populated with 18 petals and called a sector. The next major step is a test of the first sector at CMS operating conditions, with the silicon modules at a temperature below -10°C. Afterwards, the remaining seven sectors have to be integrated. In autumn 2006, TEC+ wil...

  13. CMS Tracker Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Model of the tracking detector for the CMS experiment at the LHC. This object is a mock-up of an early design of the CMS Tracker mechanics. It is a segment of a “Wheel” to support Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) detector modules on the outer layers and silicon-strip detector modules in the innermost layers. The particularity of that design is that modules are organised in spirals, along which power and optical cables and cooling pipes were planned to be routed. Some of such spirals are illustrated in the mock-up by the colors of the modules. With the detector development it became, however, evident that the silicon detectors would need to be operated in LHC experiments in cold temperatures, while the MSGC could stay in normal room-temperature. That split in two temperatures lead to separating those two detector types by a thermal barrier and therefore jeopardizing the idea of using common, vertical Wheels with services arranged along spirals.

  14. CMS ready for winding up

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    End of October, the last lengths of conductor for the CMS superconducting solenoid have been produced. This is another large sub-project of the CMS Magnet being successfully finished, after completion of the Yoke last year (see Bulletin 43/2002).

  15. Opportunistic resource usage in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzer, Peter; Hufnagel, Dirk; Dykstra, D; Gutsche, O; Tadel, M; Sfiligoi, I; Letts, J; Wuerthwein, F; McCrea, A; Bockelman, B; Fajardo, E; Linares, L; Wagner, R; Konstantinov, P; Blumenfeld, B; Bradley, D

    2014-01-01

    CMS is using a tiered setup of dedicated computing resources provided by sites distributed over the world and organized in WLCG. These sites pledge resources to CMS and are preparing them especially for CMS to run the experiment's applications. But there are more resources available opportunistically both on the GRID and in local university and research clusters which can be used for CMS applications. We will present CMS' strategy to use opportunistic resources and prepare them dynamically to run CMS applications. CMS is able to run its applications on resources that can be reached through the GRID, through EC2 compliant cloud interfaces. Even resources that can be used through ssh login nodes can be harnessed. All of these usage modes are integrated transparently into the GlideIn WMS submission infrastructure, which is the basis of CMS' opportunistic resource usage strategy. Technologies like Parrot to mount the software distribution via CVMFS and xrootd for access to data and simulation samples via the WAN are used and will be described. We will summarize the experience with opportunistic resource usage and give an outlook for the restart of LHC data taking in 2015.

  16. CMS Data Analysis School Model

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, Sudhir; Cavanaugh, R; Bloom, K; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J; Klima, B; Narain, M; Palla, F; Rolandi, G; Schörner-Sadenius, T

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the  concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Center), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe , CMS is trying to  engage the collaboration discovery potential and maximize the physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents of CMS, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the caree...

  17. The CMS tracker calibration workflow: Experience with cosmic ray data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosali, Simone

    2010-01-01

    During the second part of 2008 a CMS commissioning was performed with the acquisition of cosmic events in global runs. Cosmic rays detected in the muon chambers were used to trigger the readout of all CMS subdetectors in the general data acquisition system. A total of about 300M of tracks were collected by the CMS Muon Chambers with a 3.8T magnetic field produced by the CMS superconducting solenoid, 6M of which pointing to the tracker region and reconstructed by the Si-Strip Tracker (SST) detectors. Other 1M of cosmic tracks were collected with the magnetic field off. Using the cosmic data available it was possible to validate the performances of the CMS tracker calibration workflows. In this paper the adopted calibration workflow is described. In particular, the three main calibration workflows requested for the low level reconstruction of the SST, i.e. gain calibration, Lorentz angle calibration and bad components identification, are described. The results obtained using cosmic tracks for these three calibration workflows are also presented.

  18. Study of the impact of environmental parameters on the operation of CMS RPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Assran, Yasser

    2011-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is a general purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. The muon system of the CMS experiment relies on Drift Tubes (DT), Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). RPCs are dedicated for the first level muon trigger and they are characterized by bakelite electrodes delimited in a specialized gas volume filled with operational gas mixture. This analysis has been done for the RPC chambers installed in CMS experiment at CERN. The Currents of CMS RPCs chambers are analyzed as a function of environmental parameters such as Temperature, Humidity and pressure, which are important for the operation of the muon detector system. A novel Neural Network approach has been used to analyze the data and to build a model using experimental measurements and combining the results of the simulations. Data from RPC Chambers in CMS experiment are taken and compared to the results from neural Network.

  19. CMS Partial Releases Model, Tools, and Applications. Online and Framework-Light Releases

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Christopher D; Meschi, Emilio; Shahzad Muzaffar; Andreas Pfeiffer; Ratnikova, Natalia; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Software project CMSSW embraces more than a thousand packages organized in subsystems for analysis, event display, reconstruction, simulation, detector description, data formats, framework, utilities and tools. The release integration process is highly automated by using tools developed or adopted by CMS. Packaging in rpm format is a built-in step in the software build process. For several well-defined applications it is highly desirable to have only a subset of the CMSSW full package bundle. For example, High Level Trigger algorithms that run on the Online farm, and need to be rebuilt in a special way, require no simulation, event display, or analysis packages. Physics analysis applications in Root environment require only a few core libraries and the description of CMS specific data formats. We present a model of CMS Partial Releases, used for preparation of the customized CMS software builds, including description of the tools used, the implementation, and how we deal with technical challenges, suc...

  20. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 5 - CMS: CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: Come to LHC's Point 5 and visit the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that discovered the Higgs boson ! Descend 100 metres underground and take a walk in the cathedral-sized cavern housing the 14,000-tonne CMS detector. Ask Higgs hunters and other scientists just about anything, be it questions about their work, particle physics or the engineering challenges of building CMS.  On surface no restricted access  Point 5 will be abuzz all day long with activities for all ages, including literally "cool" cryogenics shows featuring the world's fastest ice-cream maker, dance performances, and much more.

  1. CMS Tracker Visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Mennea, Maria Santa; Zito, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    To provide improvements in the performance of existing tracker data visualization tools in IGUANA, a 2D visualisation software has been developed, using the object oriented paradigm and software engineering techniques. We have designed 2D graphics objects and some of them have been implemented. The access to the new objects is made in ORCA plugin of IGUANA CMS. A new tracker object oriented model has been designed for developing these 2D graphics objects. The model consists of new classes which represent all its components (layers, modules, rings, petals, rods).The new classes are described here. The last part of this document contains a user manual of the software and will be updated with new releases.

  2. The CMS silicon tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focardi, E.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Frey, A.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Honma, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Leubelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B.Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Rizzo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Surrow, B.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Yahong, Li; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Silicon microstrip Tracker of the CMS experiment at LHC. It consists of a barrel part with 5 layers and two endcaps with 10 disks each. About 10 000 single-sided equivalent modules have to be built, each one carrying two daisy-chained silicon detectors and their front-end electronics. Back-to-back modules are used to read-out the radial coordinate. The tracker will be operated in an environment kept at a temperature of T=-10 deg. C to minimize the Si sensors radiation damage. Heavily irradiated detectors will be safely operated due to the high-voltage capability of the sensors. Full-size mechanical prototypes have been built to check the system aspects before starting the construction

  3. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    Kaestli, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7~TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  4. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the luminosity delivered by the LHC is pivotal for several key physics analyses. During the first three years of running, tremendous steps forwards have been made in the comprehension of the subtleties related to luminosity monitoring and calibration, which led to an unprecedented accuracy at a hadron collider. The detectors and corresponding algorithms employed to estimate online and offline the luminosity in CMS are described. Details are given concerning the procedure based on the Van der Meer scan technique that allowed a very precise calibration of the luminometers from the determination of the LHC beams parameters. What is being prepared in terms of detector and online software upgrades for the next LHC run is also summarized.

  5. CMS hadronic forward calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Tests of quartz fiber prototypes, based on the detection of Cherenkov light from showering particles, demonstrate a detector possessing all of the desirable characteristics for a forward calorimeter. A prototype for the CMS experiment consists of 0.3 mm diameter fibers embedded in a copper matrix. The response to high energy (10-375 GeV) electrons, pions, protons and muons, the light yield, energy and position resolutions, and signal uniformity and linearity, are discussed. The signal generation mechanism gives this type of detector unique properties, especially for the detection of hadronic showers: Narrow, shallow shower profiles, hermeticity and extremely fast signals. The implications for measurements in the high-rate, high-radiation LHC environment are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Electroweak Results from CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    We present recent CMS measurements on electroweak boson production including single, double, and triple boson final states. Electroweak processes span many orders of magnitude in production cross section. Measurements of high-rate processes provide stringent tests of the standard model. In addition, rare triboson proceses and final states produced through vector boson scattering are newly accessible with the large integrated luminosity provided by the LHC. If new physics lies just beyond the reach of the LHC, its effects may manifest as enhancements to the high energy kinematics in mulitboson production. We present limits on new physics signatures using an effective field theory which models these modifications as modifications of electroweak gauge couplings. Since electroweak measurements will continue to benefit from the increasing integrated luminosity provided by the LHC, the future prospects of electroweak physics are discussed.

  7. CMS computing model evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, C; Bonacorsi, D; Colling, D; Fisk, I; Girone, M

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Computing Model was developed and documented in 2004. Since then the model has evolved to be more flexible and to take advantage of new techniques, but many of the original concepts remain and are in active use. In this presentation we will discuss the changes planned for the restart of the LHC program in 2015. We will discuss the changes planning in the use and definition of the computing tiers that were defined with the MONARC project. We will present how we intend to use new services and infrastructure to provide more efficient and transparent access to the data. We will discuss the computing plans to make better use of the computing capacity by scheduling more of the processor nodes, making better use of the disk storage, and more intelligent use of the networking.

  8. Rivet usage at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radziej, Markus; Hebbeker, Thomas; Sonnenschein, Lars [III. Phys. Inst. A, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In this talk an overview of Rivet and its usage at the CMS experiment is presented. Rivet stands for ''Robust Independent Validation of Experiment and Theory'' and is used for optimizing and validating Monte Carlo event generators. By using the results of published analyses, distributions of the simulation can be compared to experimental measurements (corrected for detector effects). This gives insight into the agreement on the particle-level. Starting off with an introduction to the Rivet environment, the purpose of this tool in modern particle physics is explained. Before taking a closer look at the analysis structure, the software necessary to get comparisons is outlined. Analysis implementations are discussed using code examples, showcasing the powerful framework that Rivet provides. A few selected final distributions displaying both Monte Carlo generated events and recorded data are presented, showing the potential to perform particle-level comparisons.

  9. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00575876

    2011-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  10. Verification steps for the CMS event-builder software

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The CMS event-builder software is used to assemble event fragments into complete events at 100 kHz. The data originates at the detector front-end electronics, passes through several computers and is transported from the underground to the high-level trigger farm on the surface. I will present the testing and verifications steps a new software version has to pass before it is deployed in production. I will discuss the current practice and possible improvements.

  11. Upgrade of the CMS hardron calorimeter for an upgraded LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Jake

    2012-01-01

    The CMS barrel and endcap hadron calorimeters (Hcal) upgrading the current photo-sensors are hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) to meet the demands of the upgraded luminosity of the LHC. A key aspect of the Hcal upgrade is to add longitudinal segmentation to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at L1 trigger. The increased segmentation can be achieved by replacing the HPD's with multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. The upgraded electron...

  12. Trigger Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a bent position. People whose work or hobbies require repetitive gripping actions are at higher risk ... developing trigger finger include: Repeated gripping. Occupations and hobbies that involve repetitive hand use and prolonged gripping ...

  13. Debugging data transfers in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, G; Belforte, S; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bonacorsi, D; Fisk, I; Flix, J; Hernandez, J; D'Hondt, J; Maes, J; Kadastik, M; Klem, J; Kodolova, O; Kuo, C-M; Letts, J; Magini, N; Metson, S; Piedra, J; Pukhaeva, N; Tuura, L

    2010-01-01

    The CMS experiment at CERN is preparing for LHC data taking in several computing preparation activities. In early 2007 a traffic load generator infrastructure for distributed data transfer tests was designed and deployed to equip the WLCG tiers which support the CMS virtual organization with a means for debugging, load-testing and commissioning data transfer routes among CMS computing centres. The LoadTest is based upon PhEDEx as a reliable, scalable data set replication system. The Debugging Data Transfers (DDT) task force was created to coordinate the debugging of the data transfer links. The task force aimed to commission most crucial transfer routes among CMS tiers by designing and enforcing a clear procedure to debug problematic links. Such procedure aimed to move a link from a debugging phase in a separate and independent environment to a production environment when a set of agreed conditions are achieved for that link. The goal was to deliver one by one working transfer routes to the CMS data operations team. The preparation, activities and experience of the DDT task force within the CMS experiment are discussed. Common technical problems and challenges encountered during the lifetime of the taskforce in debugging data transfer links in CMS are explained and summarized.

  14. Commissioning and Performance of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker with Cosmic Ray Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y