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Sample records for clusters producing high

  1. An Effective Method of Producing Small Neutral Carbon Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhu-Hong; CHEN Cheng-Chu; HSU Yen-Chu

    2007-01-01

    An effective method of producing small neutral carbon clusters Cn (n = 1-6) is described. The small carbon clusters (positive or negative charge or neutral) are formed by plasma which are produced by a high power 532nm pulse laser ablating the surface of the metal Mn rod to react with small hydrocarbons supplied by a pulse valve, then the neutral carbon clusters are extracted and photo-ionized by another laser (266nm or 355nm) in the ionization region of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The distributions of the initial neutral carbon clusters are analysed with the ionic species appeared in mass spectra. It is observed that the yield of small carbon clusters with the present method is about 10 times than that of the traditional widely used technology of laser vaporization of graphite.

  2. Clustering high dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2012-01-01

    High-dimensional data, i.e., data described by a large number of attributes, pose specific challenges to clustering. The so-called ‘curse of dimensionality’, coined originally to describe the general increase in complexity of various computational problems as dimensionality increases, is known...... to render traditional clustering algorithms ineffective. The curse of dimensionality, among other effects, means that with increasing number of dimensions, a loss of meaningful differentiation between similar and dissimilar objects is observed. As high-dimensional objects appear almost alike, new approaches...

  3. Deuterium cluster jet produced at moderate backing pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbin Wang; Tianshu Wen; Yingling He; Chunye Jiao; Shuanggen Zhang; Xiangxian Wang; Fangfang Ge; Hongjie Liu; Guoquan Ni; Xiangdong Yang; Yuqiu Gu; Xianlun Wen; Weimin Zhou; Guangchang Wang

    2006-01-01

    @@ A deuterium cluster jet produced in the supersonic expansion into vacuum of deuterium gas at liquid nitrogen temperature and moderate backing pressures are studied by Rayleigh scattering techniques. The experimental results show that deuterium clusters can be created at moderate gas backing pressures ranging from 8 to 23 bar, and a maximum average cluster size of 350 atoms per cluster is estimated. The temporal evolution of the cluster jet generated at the backing pressure of 20 bar demonstrates a two-plateau structure. The possible mechanism responsible for this structure is discussed. The former plateau with higher average atom and cluster densities is more suitable for the general laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  4. High Dimensional Data Clustering Using Fast Cluster Based Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan.P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Feature selection involves identifying a subset of the most useful features that produces compatible results as the original entire set of features. A feature selection algorithm may be evaluated from both the efficiency and effectiveness points of view. While the efficiency concerns the time required to find a subset of features, the effectiveness is related to the quality of the subset of features. Based on these criteria, a fast clustering-based feature selection algorithm (FAST is proposed and experimentally evaluated in this paper. The FAST algorithm works in two steps. In the first step, features are divided into clusters by using graph-theoretic clustering methods. In the second step, the most representative feature that is strongly related to target classes is selected from each cluster to form a subset of features. Features in different clusters are relatively independent; the clustering-based strategy of FAST has a high probability of producing a subset of useful and independent features. To ensure the efficiency of FAST, we adopt the efficient minimum-spanning tree (MST using the Kruskal‟s Algorithm clustering method. The efficiency and effectiveness of the FAST algorithm are evaluated through an empirical study. Index Terms—

  5. Searches for High Redshift Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, M

    1996-01-01

    High redshift galaxy clusters have traditionally been a fruitful place to study galaxy evolution. I review various search strategies for finding clusters at z > 1. Most efforts to date have concentrated on the environments of distant AGN. I illustrate these with data on the cluster around 3C 324 (z=1.2) and other, more distant systems, and discuss possibilities for future surveys with large telescopes.

  6. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzyna Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS. It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to ~ 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  7. Atomistic Simulation of He Clustering and Defects Produced in Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ti-Jiang; WANG Yue-Xia; PAN Zheng-Ying; JIANG Xiao-Mei; ZHOU Liang; ZHU Jing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the molecular dynamics method, the stability of small He-vacancy clusters is studied under the condition of the high He and low vacancy densities. The result shows that there is a competition between He atoms detrapped and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) emitted during the clustering of He atoms. When the He number is above a critical value of 9, the SIA emission is predominant. The SIA emission can result in deep capture of He atoms since the binding energy of He to a He-vacancy cluster is increased with the number of SIAs created. The cluster thus grows up. In addition, more SIAs are created when the temperature is elevated. The average volume of a He atom is increased. The cluster expansion takes place at high temperature.

  8. The Highly Polarized Open Cluster Trumpler 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Carlos; Baume, Gustavo; Vazquez, Ruben; Niemela, Virpi; Cerruti, Miguel Angel

    2000-10-01

    We have carried out multicolor linear polarimetry (UBVRI) of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster Trumpler 27. Our data show a high level of polarization in the stellar light with a considerable dispersion, from P=4% to P=9.5%. The polarization vectors of the cluster members appear to be aligned. Foreground polarization was estimated from the data of some nonmember objects, for which two different components were resolved: the first one associated with a dust cloud close to the Sun producing Pλmax=1.3% and θ=146°, and a second component, the main source of polarization for the cluster members, originating in another dust cloud, which polarizes the light in the direction of θ=29.5d. From a detailed analysis, we found that the two components have associated values EB-V0.75 for the other. Due the difference in the orientation of both polarization vectors, almost 90° (180° at the Stokes representation), the first cloud (θ~146°) depolarizes the light strongly polarized by the second one (θ~29.5d). Based on observations obtanined at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between CONICET and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina.

  9. The highly polarized open cluster Trumpler 27

    CERN Document Server

    Feinstein, C; Vázquez, R A; Niemela, V S; Cerruti, M A; Feinstein, Carlos; Baume, Gustavo; Vazquez, Ruben; Niemela, Virpi; Cerruti, Miguel Angel

    2000-01-01

    We have carried out multicolor linear polarimetry (UBVRI) of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster Trumpler 27. Our data show a high level of polarization in the stellar light with a considerable dispersion, from $P = 4%$ to $P = 9.5%$. The polarization vectors of the cluster members appear to be aligned. Foreground polarization was estimated from the data of some non-member objects, for which two different components were resolved: the first one associated with a dust cloud close to the Sun producing $P_{\\lambda max}=1.3%$ and $\\theta=146$ degrees, and a second component, the main source of polarization for the cluster members, originated in another dust cloud, which polarizes the light in the direction of $\\theta= 29.5$ degrees. From a detailed analysis, we found that the two components have associated values $E_{B-V} 0.75$ for the other. Due the difference in the orientation of both polarization vectors, almost 90 degrees (180 degrees at the Stokes representation), the first cloud ($\\theta \\...

  10. Cluster size dependence of high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Goh, S. J.; van der Slot, P. J. M.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Boller, K.-J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from noble gas clusters in a supersonic gas jet. To identify the contribution of harmonic generation from clusters versus that from gas monomers, we measure the high-order harmonic output over a broad range of the total atomic number density in the jet (from 3×1016 to 3 × 1018 {{cm}}-3) at two different reservoir temperatures (303 and 363 K). For the first time in the evaluation of the harmonic yield in such measurements, the variation of the liquid mass fraction, g, versus pressure and temperature is taken into consideration, which we determine, reliably and consistently, to be below 20% within our range of experimental parameters. By comparing the measured harmonic yield from a thin jet with the calculated corresponding yield from monomers alone, we find an increased emission of the harmonics when the average cluster size is less than 3000. Using g, under the assumption that the emission from monomers and clusters add up coherently, we calculate the ratio of the average single-atom response of an atom within a cluster to that of a monomer and find an enhancement of around 100 for very small average cluster size (∼200). We do not find any dependence of the cut-off frequency on the composition of the cluster jet. This implies that HHG in clusters is based on electrons that return to their parent ions and not to neighboring ions in the cluster. To fully employ the enhanced average single-atom response found for small average cluster sizes (∼200), the nozzle producing the cluster jet must provide a large liquid mass fraction at these small cluster sizes for increasing the harmonic yield. Moreover, cluster jets may allow for quasi-phase matching, as the higher mass of clusters allows for a higher density contrast in spatially structuring the nonlinear medium.

  11. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, S. B., E-mail: samuel.emery@navy.mil; Little, B. K. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, 2306 Perimeter Rd., Eglin AFB, Florida 32542 (United States); Xin, Y. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Ridge, C. J.; Lindsay, C. M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, 2306 Perimeter Rd., Eglin AFB, Florida 32542 (United States); Buszek, R. J. [ERC Inc., Edwards AFB, California 93524 (United States); Boatz, J. A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace System Directorate, Edwards AFB, California 93524 (United States); Boyle, J. M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Technology Division, Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  12. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 percent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  13. Highly Charged Clusters of Fullerenes: Charge Mobility and Appearance Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manil, B.; Maunoury, L.; Huber, B. A.; Jensen, J.; Schmidt, H. T.; Zettergren, H.; Cederquist, H.; Tomita, S.; Hvelplund, P.

    2003-11-01

    Clusters of fullerenes (C60,C70)n are produced in a gas aggregation source and are multiply ionized in collisions with highly charged Xe20+,30+ ions. Their stabilities and decay processes are analyzed with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fullerene clusters in charge states up to q=5 have been observed and appearance sizes are found to be as small as napp=5, 10, 21, and 33 for q=2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The analysis of the multicoincident fragmentation spectra indicates a high charge mobility. This is in contrast to charge localization effects which have been reported for Arq+n rare gas clusters. Clusters of fullerenes are found to be conducting when multiply charged.

  14. Clustering high dimensional data using RIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Nazrina [School of Quantitative Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010 Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Clustering may simply represent a convenient method for organizing a large data set so that it can easily be understood and information can efficiently be retrieved. However, identifying cluster in high dimensionality data sets is a difficult task because of the curse of dimensionality. Another challenge in clustering is some traditional functions cannot capture the pattern dissimilarity among objects. In this article, we used an alternative dissimilarity measurement called Robust Influence Angle (RIA) in the partitioning method. RIA is developed using eigenstructure of the covariance matrix and robust principal component score. We notice that, it can obtain cluster easily and hence avoid the curse of dimensionality. It is also manage to cluster large data sets with mixed numeric and categorical value.

  15. A catalogue of high redshift clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Juncosa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant clusters of galaxies provide a powerful method to study the formation and evolution of galaxies and large scale structure of the Universe. However, the number of known clusters at high redshift (z > 0.5 is still limited. As a preparatory work for detailed studies with GTC, we are building a cata- logue of such objects analyzing public deep wide optical and near-IR surveys. In a region of ~9 square degrees, ~100 new clusters (~ 60 of them at z > 0.5 have been detected.

  16. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, N; Mohr, J J; Benson, B A; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Chiu, I; Crawford, T M; de Haan, T; Dietrich, J P; Gangkofner, C; Holzapfel, W L; McDonald, M; Rapetti, D; Reichardt, C L

    2016-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; $\\langle z \\rangle = 0.14$) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. ...

  17. Characterization of MnWO4 with flower-like clusters produced using spray pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somchai THONGTEM; Surangkana WANNAPOP; Titipun THONGTEM

    2009-01-01

    MnWO4 (huebnerite) with flower-like clusters of nano-plates was produced from the solutions containing MnCl2·4H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O by the 300℃ spray pyrolysis. The phase was detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and is in accordance with the results characterized using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The flower-like clusters of nano-plates were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM and TEM), and their parallel lattice planes using a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Vibration spectra of the huebnerite structured products were characterized using Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers. Their photoluminescence (PL) emissions are in the same spectral region at 405-412 nm.

  18. High-Performance Broadcasting Algorithms on Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒继武; 魏英霞; 王鼎兴

    2004-01-01

    In many clusters connected by high-speed communication networks, the exact structure of the underlying communication network and the latency difference between different sending and receiving pairs may be ignored when they broadcast, such as in the approach adopted by the broadcasting method in MPICH,a widely used MPI implementation. However, the underlying network cluster topologies are becoming more and more complicated and the performance of traditional broadcasting algorithms, such as MPICH's MPI_Bcast, is far from good. This paper analyzed the impact of communication latencies and the underlying topologies on the performance of broadcasting algorithms for multilevel clusters. A multilevel model was developed for broadcasting in clusters with complicated topologies, which divides the cluster topology into many levels based on the underlying topology. The multilevel model was used to develop a new broadcast algorithm,MLM broadcast-2 (MLMB-2), that adapts to a wide range of clusters. Comparison of the performance of the counterpart MPI operation MPI_Bcast and MLMB-2 shows that MLMB-2 outperforms MPl_Bcast by decreasing the broadcast running time by 60%-90%.

  19. Neutral cluster debris dynamics in droplet-based laser-produced plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Duane; Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Abhari, Reza

    2016-05-01

    The neutral cluster debris dynamics of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma is studied experimentally and analytically. Experiments were done imaging the debris with a high-speed shadowgraph system and using image processing to determine the droplet debris mean radial velocity \\overline{V} dependence on laser pulse irradiance E e. The data shows a power law dependence between the mean radial debris velocity and the incident irradiance giving \\overline{V}\\propto E\\text{e}n with n≈ 0.65 . A scaled analytical model was derived modeling the plasma ablation pressure on the droplet surface as the primary momentum exchange mechanism between the unablated droplet material and the laser pulse. The relationship between droplet debris trajectory and the droplet alignment with the laser was quantified analytically. The derived analytical model determines that the neutral cluster debris trajectory for an ablated droplet is a function of the laser profile f L, the droplet diameter D and the axial misalignment h between the laser axis and the droplet center. The analytical calculations from these models were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This analysis has practical significance for understanding ablated droplet debris, droplet deformation by laser pulsing, and droplet breakup from very short timescale shocks.

  20. Oxidation of nanostructured Ti films produced by low energy cluster beam deposition: An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Monica de, E-mail: desimone@tasc.infm.it [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Snidero, Elena [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, c/o Laboratorio TASC Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Bongiorno, Gero [Fondazione Filarete, v.le Ortles 22/4, 20139 Milano (Italy); Giorgetti, Luca [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Dip. di Oncologia Sperimentale, Via Adamello 16, 20139, Milano (Italy); Amati, Matteo [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    We used in-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the oxidation process of a cluster-assembled metallic titanium film exposed to molecular oxygen at room temperature. The nanostructured film has been grown on a Si(111) substrate, in ultra high vacuum conditions, by coupling a supersonic cluster beam deposition system with an XPS experimental chamber. Our results show that upon in-situ oxygen exposure Ti{sup 3+} is the first oxidation state observed, followed by Ti{sup 4+}, whereas Ti{sup 2+} is practically absent during the whole process. Our results compare well with the existing literature on Ti films produced using other techniques.

  1. CABOSFV algorithm for high dimensional sparse data clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sen Wu; Xuedong Gao

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm, Clustering Algorithm Based On Sparse Feature Vector (CABOSFV), was proposed for the high dimensional clustering of binary sparse data. This algorithm compresses the data effectively by using a tool 'Sparse Feature Vector', thus reduces the data scale enormously, and can get the clustering result with only one data scan. Both theoretical analysis and empirical tests showed that CABOSFV is of low computational complexity. The algorithm finds clusters in high dimensional large datasets efficiently and handles noise effectively.

  2. Electron attachment to oxygen clusters studied with high energy resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejcik, S.; Stampfli, P.; Stamatovic, A.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    1999-08-01

    Highly monochromatized electrons (with energy distributions of less than 30 meV FWHM) are used in a crossed beam experiments to investigate electron attachment to oxygen clusters (O2)n at electron energies from approximately zero eV up to several eV. At energies close to zero the attachment cross section for the reaction (O2)n+e→(O2)m- (for m=1, 2, and 3) rises strongly with decreasing electron energy compatible with s-wave electron capture to (O2)n. Peaks in the oxygen attachment cross sections present at higher energies (≈80 meV, 193 meV, 302 meV) can be ascribed to vibrational levels of the anion populated by attachment of an electron to a single oxygen molecule within the target cluster via a direct Franck-Condon transition from the ground vibrational state v=0 to a vibrational excited state v'=7,8,9,… of the anion produced. The vibrational structures observed here for the first time can be quantitatively accounted for by model calculations using a microscopic model to examine the attachment of an electron to an oxygen molecule inside a cluster. This involves (i) molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the structure of neutral clusters prior to the attachment process and (ii) calculation of the solvation energy of an oxygen anion in the cluster from the electrostatic polarization of the molecules of the cluster. The occurrence of this polarization energy at the surface of larger clusters explains the appearance of an s-wave capturing cross section at 0 eV and the slightly smaller spacings (compared to the monomer case) between the peaks at finite energy, as observed experimentally. The relative transition probabilities from the ground state of the neutral oxygen molecule to the different vibrational levels of the anion are obtained by calculating the corresponding Franck-Condon factors thereby resulting in a reasonable theoretical fit to the observed yields of negatively charged oxygen molecules and clusters.

  3. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the biosynthesis gene cluster of putrescine-producing Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladero, Victor; Rattray, Fergal P; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2011-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a prokaryotic microorganism with great importance as a culture starter and has become the model species among the lactic acid bacteria. The long and safe history of use of L. lactis in dairy fermentations has resulted in the classification of this species as GRAS (General Regarded As Safe) or QPS (Qualified Presumption of Safety). However, our group has identified several strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris that are able to produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. Putrescine is a biogenic amine that confers undesirable flavor characteristics and may even have toxic effects. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed of a putative regulatory gene, aguR, followed by the genes (aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC) encoding the catabolic enzymes. These genes are transcribed as an operon that is induced in the presence of agmatine. In some strains, an insertion (IS) element interrupts the transcription of the cluster, which results in a non-putrescine-producing phenotype. Based on this knowledge, a PCR-based test was developed in order to differentiate nonproducing L. lactis strains from those with a functional AGDI cluster. The analysis of the AGDI cluster and their flanking regions revealed that the capacity to produce putrescine via the AGDI pathway could be a specific characteristic that was lost during the adaptation to the milk environment by a process of reductive genome evolution.

  4. HIGH PERFORMANCE PHOTOGRAMMETRIC PROCESSING ON COMPUTER CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Adrov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Most cpu consuming tasks in photogrammetric processing can be done in parallel. The algorithms take independent bits as input and produce independent bits as output. The independence of bits comes from the nature of such algorithms since images, stereopairs or small image blocks parts can be processed independently. Many photogrammetric algorithms are fully automatic and do not require human interference. Photogrammetric workstations can perform tie points measurements, DTM calculations, orthophoto construction, mosaicing and many other service operations in parallel using distributed calculations. Distributed calculations save time reducing several days calculations to several hours calculations. Modern trends in computer technology show the increase of cpu cores in workstations, speed increase in local networks, and as a result dropping the price of the supercomputers or computer clusters that can contain hundreds or even thousands of computing nodes. Common distributed processing in DPW is usually targeted for interactive work with a limited number of cpu cores and is not optimized for centralized administration. The bottleneck of common distributed computing in photogrammetry can be in the limited lan throughput and storage performance, since the processing of huge amounts of large raster images is needed.

  5. Chromatic $k$-Mean Clustering in High Dimensional Space

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Hu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study a new type of clustering problem, called {\\em Chromatic Clustering}, in high dimensional space. Chromatic clustering seeks to partition a set of colored points into groups (or clusters) so that no group contains points with the same color and a certain objective function is optimized. In this paper, we focus on $k$-mean clustering, and investigate its hardness and approximation solutions. The additional coloring requirement destroys some key properties used in existing $k$-mean clustering techniques (for the ordinary clustering problem), and significantly complicates the problem. There is no FPTAS for the chromatic clustering problem, even if $k=2$. Based on several new geometric observations and an interesting sphere peeling approach, we show that a near linear time (on $n$ and $d$) $(1+\\epsilon)$-approximation is, however, still achievable for the chromatic clustering problem.

  6. Dynamic Clustering Of High Speed Data Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chandrika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of clustering data streams. A data stream can roughly be thought of as a transient, continuously increasing sequence of time-stamped data. In order to maintain an up-to-date clustering structure, it is necessary to analyze the incoming data in an online manner, tolerating but a constant time delay. The purpose of this study is to analyze the working of popular algorithms on clustering data streams and make a comparative analysis.

  7. Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Bernard

    For a long time, the small number of clusters at z > 0.3 in the Abell survey catalogue and simulations of the standard CDM formation of large scale structures provided a paradigm where clusters were considered as young merging structures. At earlier times, loose concentrations of galaxy clumps were mostly anticipated. Recent observations broke the taboo. Progressively we became convinced that compact and massive clusters at z = 1 or possibly beyond exist and should be searched for.

  8. Evaluating Clustering in Subspace Projections of High Dimensional Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Günnemann, Stephan; Assent, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Clustering high dimensional data is an emerging research field. Subspace clustering or projected clustering group similar objects in subspaces, i.e. projections, of the full space. In the past decade, several clustering paradigms have been developed in parallel, without thorough evaluation and co...... and create a common baseline for future developments and comparable evaluations in the field. For repeatability, all implementations, data sets and evaluation measures are available on our website....

  9. A High-Order CFS Algorithm for Clustering Big Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fanyu Bu; Zhikui Chen; Peng Li; Tong Tang; Ying Zhang

    2016-01-01

    With the development of Internet of Everything such as Internet of Things, Internet of People, and Industrial Internet, big data is being generated. Clustering is a widely used technique for big data analytics and mining. However, most of current algorithms are not effective to cluster heterogeneous data which is prevalent in big data. In this paper, we propose a high-order CFS algorithm (HOCFS) to cluster heterogeneous data by combining the CFS clustering algorithm and the dropout deep learn...

  10. Background X-ray Radiation Fields Produced by Young Embedded Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred; Holden, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Most star formation in our galaxy occurs within embedded clusters, and these background environments can affect the star and planet formation processes occurring within them. In turn, young stellar members can shape the background environment and thereby provide a feedback mechanism. This work explores one aspect of stellar feedback by quantifying the background X-ray radiation fields produced by young stellar objects. Specifically, the distributions of X-ray luminosities and X-ray fluxes produced by cluster environments are constructed as a function of cluster membership size $N$. Composite flux distributions, for given distributions of cluster sizes $N$, are also constructed. The resulting distributions are wide and the X-ray radiation fields are moderately intense, with the expected flux levels exceeding the cosmic and galactic X-ray backgrounds by factors of $\\sim10-1000$ (for energies 0.2 -- 15 keV). For circumstellar disks that are geometrically thin and optically thick, the X-ray flux from the backgrou...

  11. High-energy neutrinos from sources in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays can be accelerated in clusters of galaxies, by mega-parsec scale shocks induced by accretion of gas during the formation of large-scale structure, or by powerful sources harbored in clusters. Once accelerated, the highest energy particles leave the cluster via almost rectilinear trajectories, while lower energy ones can be confined by the cluster magnetic field up to cosmological time and interact with the intracluster gas. Using a realistic model of the baryon distribution and the turbulent magnetic field in clusters, we studied the propagation and hadronic interaction of high-energy protons in the intracluster medium. We report the cumulative cosmic ray and neutrino spectra generated by galaxy clusters including embedded sources, and demonstrate that clusters can contribute a significant fraction of the observed IceCube neutrinos above 30 TeV while remaining undetected in high-energy cosmic rays and $\\gamma$ rays for reasonable choices of parameters and source scenarios.

  12. Clustering effects in 48Cr composite nuclei produced via 24Mg + 24Mg reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinausero M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of studying clustering effects in N=Z light nuclei, an experiment was carried out to get information on the properties of the 48Cr composite nuclei produced via the 24Mg +24Mg reaction. In particular, the study regards the 48Cr at 60 MeV of excitation energy where a resonance with a narrow width (170 KeV has been found by measuring the elastic and anelastic channels. To determine the deformation of this state, evaporative Light Charged Particles (LCP are measured and compared to the Statistical Model (SM predictions, which are very sensitive to nuclear deformation. The experiment was performed at LNL using the 8ĒLP apparatus to select LCPs and a Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC system to detect the Evaporation Residues (ER. Preliminary results on the measurements of ER – LCP and LCP – LCP angular correlations are presented which indicate the presence of a very large deformation.The analysis will proceed with the extraction of the LCP energy spectra and with the angular correlations for high multiplicity channels to determine the deformation.

  13. Variability in the sxt Gene Clusters of PSP Toxin Producing Aphanizomenon gracile Strains from Norway, Spain, Germany and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballot, Andreas; Cerasino, Leonardo; Hostyeva, Vladyslava; Cirés, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin production has been detected worldwide in the cyanobacterial genera Anabaena, Lyngbya, Scytonema, Cuspidothrix and Aphanizomenon. In Europe Aphanizomenon gracile and Cuspidothrix issatschenkoi are the only known producers of PSP toxins and are found in Southwest and Central European freshwater bodies. In this study the PSP toxin producing Aphanizomenon sp. strain NIVA-CYA 851 was isolated from the Norwegian Lake Hillestadvannet. In a polyphasic approach NIVA-CYA 851 was morphologically and phylogenetically classified, and investigated for toxin production. The strain NIVA-CYA 851 was identified as A. gracile using 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and was confirmed to produce neosaxitoxin, saxitoxin and gonyautoxin 5 by LC-MS. The whole sxt gene clusters (circa 27.3 kb) of four A. gracile strains: NIVA-CYA 851 (Norway); NIVA-CYA 655 & NIVA-CYA 676 (Germany); and UAM 529 (Spain), all from latitudes between 40° and 59° North were sequenced and compared with the sxt gene cluster of reference strain A. gracile NH-5 from the USA. All five sxt gene clusters are highly conserved with similarities exceeding 99.4%, but they differ slightly in the number and presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions/deletions (In/Dels). Altogether 178 variable sites (44 SNPs and 4 In/Dels, comprising 134 nucleotides) were found in the sxt gene clusters of the Norwegian, German and Spanish strains compared to the reference strain. Thirty-nine SNPs were located in 16 of the 27 coding regions. The sxt gene clusters of NIVA-CYA 851, NIVA-CYA 655, NIVA-CYA 676 and UAM 529, were characterized by 15, 16, 19 and 23 SNPs respectively. Only the Norwegian strain NIVA-CYA 851 possessed an insertion of 126 base pairs (bp) in the noncoding area between the sxtA and sxtE genes and a deletion of 6 nucleotides in the sxtN gene. The sxtI gene showed the highest variability and is recommended as the best genetic marker for further phylogenetic studies

  14. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  15. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-01-24

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  16. Noble Gas Clusters and Nanoplasmas in High Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Aladi, M; Rácz, P; Földes, I B

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of high harmonic generation from noble gas clusters of xenon atoms in a gas jet. Harmonic spectra were investigated as a function of backing pressure, showing spectral shifts due to the nanoplasma electrons in the clusters. At certain value of laser intensity this process may oppose the effect of the well-known ionization-induced blueshift. In addition, these cluster-induced harmonic redshifts may give the possibility to estimate cluster density and cluster size in the laser-gas jet interaction range.

  17. Galaxy Merger Candidates in High-redshift Cluster Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, A. G.; Webb, T. M. A.; Nantais, J.; DeGroot, A.; Wilson, G.; Muzzin, A.; Yee, H. K. C.; Foltz, R.; Noble, A. G.; Demarco, R.; Tudorica, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Lidman, C.; Perlmutter, S.; Hayden, B.; Boone, K.; Surace, J.

    2017-07-01

    We compile a sample of spectroscopically and photometrically selected cluster galaxies from four high-redshift galaxy clusters (1.59contamination from interlopers, {11.0}-5.6+7.0 % of the cluster members are involved in potential mergers, compared to {24.7}-4.6+5.3 % of the field galaxies. We see no evidence of merger enhancement in the central cluster environment with respect to the field, suggesting that galaxy-galaxy merging is not a stronger source of galaxy evolution in cluster environments compared to the field at these redshifts.

  18. High Energy Gamma-rays from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sitarek, W B J

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that specific globular clusters can contain up to a hundred of millisecond pulsars. These pulsars can accelerate leptons at the shock waves originated in collisions of the pulsar winds and/or inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Energetic leptons diffuse gradually through the globular cluster comptonizing stellar and microwave background radiation. We calculate the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray spectra for different models of injection of leptons and parameters of the globular clusters assuming reasonable, of the order of 1%, efficiency of energy conversion from the pulsar winds into the relativistic leptons. It is concluded that leptons accelerated in the globular cluster cores should produce well localized $\\gamma$-ray sources which are concentric with these globular clusters. The results are shown for four specific globular clusters (47 Tuc, Ter 5, M13, and M15), in which significant population of millisecond pulsars have been already discovered. We argue that the best candidates, which might be potenti...

  19. Improving the Performance of K-Means Clustering For High Dimensional Data Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Prabhu,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clustering high dimensional data is the cluster analysis of data with anywhere from a few dozen to many thousands of dimensions. Multiple dimensions are hard to think in, impossible to visualize, and, due to the exponential growth of the number of possible values with each dimension, impossible to enumerate. Hence to improve the efficiency and accuracy of mining task on high dimensional data, the data must be preprocessed by efficient dimensionality reduction methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA.Cluster analysis in high-dimensional data as the process of fast identification and efficient description of clusters. The clusters have to be of high quality with regard to a suitably chosen homogeneity measure. K-means is a well known partitioning based clustering technique that attempts to find a user specified number of clusters represented by their centroids. There is a difficulty in comparing quality of the clusters produced Different initial partitions can result in different final clusters. Hence in this paper we proposed to use the Principal component Analysis method to reduce the data set from high dimensional to low dimensional. The new method is used to find the initial centroids to make the algorithm more effective and efficient. By comparing the result of original and proposed method, it wasfound that the results obtained from proposed method are more accurate.

  20. Structure and reactivity of Pd-Pt clusters produced by laser vaporization of bulk alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, J. L.; Cadrot, A. M.; Lianos, L.; Renouprez, A. J.

    Pd-Pt nanoclusters are obtained by the focusing of an Nd:YAG laser onto rods of alloys. The aggregates, which are produced by plasma cooling via short helium bursts synchronized with the laser pulses, are collected on amorphous carbon or silicon substrates, in a UHV chamber. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments show that the diameters of the clusters range between 1.5 and 4.5 nm, and analytical microscopy indicates that they have the same composition as the vaporized rods. Low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) also shows that the surface of the obtained clusters is Pd enriched: the Pd concentration in the first atomic layer is found to be equal to 38% for a Pd17Pt83 rod composition and 87% for the Pd65 Pt35 alloy. The catalytic activity of these clusters in the hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to butenes and butane is measured in static mode, with mass spectrometry detection. The reactivity of the bimetallic clusters is explained by the atomic local order and low-coordination sites considered as ``hot sites''.

  1. An ecohealth assessment of poultry production clusters (PPCs) for the livelihood and biosecurity improvement of small poultry producers in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libin; Basuno, Edi; Nguyen, Tuan; Aengwanich, Worapol; Ilham, Nyak; Li, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Poultry production cluster (PPC) programs are key strategies in many Asian countries to engage small commercial poultry producers in high-value production chains and to control infectious poultry diseases. This study assessed the multiple impacts of PPCs through a transdisciplinary ecohealth approach in four Asian countries, and drew the implications for small producers to improve their livelihoods and reduce the risk of spreading infectious diseases in the poultry sector. The data collection combined both quantitative and qualitative methods. It comprised: formal structured household survey questionnaires, measuring the biosecurity level of poultry farms with a biosecurity score card; and key informant interviews. Descriptive statistics were used to process the quantitative data and a content analysis was used to process the qualitative data. This research found that poultry farms in clusters do not necessarily have better economic performance than those outside PPCs. Many farmers in PPCs only consider them to be an advantage for expanding the scale of their poultry operations and improving household incomes, and they are less concerned about-and have limited capacities to-enhancing biosecurity and environmental management. We measured the biosecurity level of farms in PPCs through a 14-item checklist and found that biosecurity is generally very low across all sample sites. The increased flies, mosquitoes, rats, and smells in and around PPCs not only pollute the environment, but also cause social conflicts with the surrounding communities. This research concluded that a poultry cluster, mainly driven by economic objectives, is not necessarily a superior model for the control of infectious diseases. The level of biosecurity in PPCs was found to be low. Given the intensity of poultry operations in PPCs (farms are densely packed into clusters), and the close proximity to residential areas of some PPCs, the risk of spreading infectious diseases, in fact, increases

  2. High-Redshift Clusters form NVSS: The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S; Rawlings, S; Hill, G J

    2003-02-11

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z {approx} 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targeted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  3. High-redshift clusters from NVSS The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, S; Hill, G J; Croft, Steve; Rawlings, Steve; Hill, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z ~ 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targetted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  4. Evaluating Clustering in Subspace Projections of High Dimensional Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Günnemann, Stephan; Assent, Ira

    2009-01-01

    of the clustering result. Finally, in typical publications authors have limited their analysis to their favored paradigm only, while paying other paradigms little or no attention. In this paper, we take a systematic approach to evaluate the major paradigms in a common framework. We study representative clustering......Clustering high dimensional data is an emerging research field. Subspace clustering or projected clustering group similar objects in subspaces, i.e. projections, of the full space. In the past decade, several clustering paradigms have been developed in parallel, without thorough evaluation...... and comparison between these paradigms on a common basis. Conclusive evaluation and comparison is challenged by three major issues. First, there is no ground truth that describes the "true" clusters in real world data. Second, a large variety of evaluation measures have been used that reflect different aspects...

  5. Functional Clustering Algorithm for High-Dimensional Proteomics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halima Bensmail

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustering proteomics data is a challenging problem for any traditional clustering algorithm. Usually, the number of samples is largely smaller than the number of protein peaks. The use of a clustering algorithm which does not take into consideration the number of features of variables (here the number of peaks is needed. An innovative hierarchical clustering algorithm may be a good approach. We propose here a new dissimilarity measure for the hierarchical clustering combined with a functional data analysis. We present a specific application of functional data analysis (FDA to a high-throughput proteomics study. The high performance of the proposed algorithm is compared to two popular dissimilarity measures in the clustering of normal and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1-infected patients samples.

  6. Electron motion enhanced high harmonic generation in xenon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Na; Bai, Ya; Peng, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clusters presents an isolated system that models the bulk materials whose mechanism of HHG remains uncertain, and a promising medium to produce HHG beyond the limited conversion efficiency for gaseous atoms. Here we reveal that the oscillation of collective electron motion within clusters develops after the interaction of intense laser fields, and it significantly enhances the harmonic dipole and increases the quantum phase of the harmonics. Experimentally, the phase matching conditions of HHG from nanometer xenon clusters and atoms are distinguished, which confirms the enhanced internal field that was proposed theoretically a decade ago. The separation of HHG from atoms and clusters allows the determination of the amplitude of the HHG for clusters to be 5 orders higher, corresponding to 4 times higher conversion efficiency for atomic response. The finding provides an insight on the HHG mechanism of bulk materials and a means by which an efficient coherent X-ray source can be developed.

  7. Stable, fertile, high polyhydroxyalkanoate producing plants and methods of producing them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohmert-Tatarev, Karen; McAvoy, Susan; Peoples, Oliver P.; Snell, Kristi D.

    2015-08-04

    Transgenic plants that produce high levels of polyhydroxybutyrate and methods of producing them are provided. In a preferred embodiment the transgenic plants are produced using plastid transformation technologies and utilize genes which are codon optimized. Stably transformed plants able to produce greater than 10% dwt PHS in tissues are also provided.

  8. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Carriera, Laura H.

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  9. Gene cluster analysis for the biosynthesis of elgicins, novel lantibiotics produced by paenibacillus elgii B69

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has promoted the exploration of novel antibacterial materials. As a result, many researchers are undertaking work to identify new lantibiotics because of their potent antimicrobial activities. The objective of this study was to provide details of a lantibiotic-like gene cluster in Paenibacillus elgii B69 and to produce the antibacterial substances coded by this gene cluster based on culture screening. Results Analysis of the P. elgii B69 genome sequence revealed the presence of a lantibiotic-like gene cluster composed of five open reading frames (elgT1, elgC, elgT2, elgB, and elgA. Screening of culture extracts for active substances possessing the predicted properties of the encoded product led to the isolation of four novel peptides (elgicins AI, AII, B, and C with a broad inhibitory spectrum. The molecular weights of these peptides were 4536, 4593, 4706, and 4820 Da, respectively. The N-terminal sequence of elgicin B was Leu-Gly-Asp-Tyr, which corresponded to the partial sequence of the peptide ElgA encoded by elgA. Edman degradation suggested that the product elgicin B is derived from ElgA. By correlating the results of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analyses of elgicins AI, AII, and C, these peptides are deduced to have originated from the same precursor, ElgA. Conclusions A novel lantibiotic-like gene cluster was shown to be present in P. elgii B69. Four new lantibiotics with a broad inhibitory spectrum were isolated, and these appear to be promising antibacterial agents.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Cory R.; Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zeimann, Gregory R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, MC 220-6, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John, E-mail: cwagner@astro.queensu.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.1} M {sub ☉}) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift (1.0 < z < 1.5) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red-sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 μm data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at 1 < z < 1.5. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in 1 < z < 1.5 clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from z ∼ 1.5 → 1.25. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming (SFR ≥ 26 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at z ≳ 1.25, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs—likely mergers, at least among the most massive—were both recent and gas-rich.

  11. Producing a highly concentrated coal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokudzu, K.; Atsudzima, T.; Kiyedzuka, Y.

    1983-06-03

    Coal from wet and dry grinding is loaded into a mixer with a mixer arm with the acquisition of a highly concentrated suspension. Foamers (for instance, alkylbenzolsulfonate) and foam stabilizers (for instance diethanolamide of lauric acid) are added in a ratio of 10 to (2 to 5). The high fluidity of the suspension is maintained by injecting air into the suspension and an 80 percent concentration of the suspension is achieved.

  12. New Clustering Method in High-Dimensional Space Based on Hypergraph-Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-bin; WANG Shu-jing; SONG Han-tao

    2006-01-01

    To overcome the limitation of the traditional clustering algorithms which fail to produce meanirigful clusters in high-dimensional, sparseness and binary value data sets, a new method based on hypergraph model is proposed. The hypergraph model maps the relationship present in the original data in high dimensional space into a hypergraph. A hyperedge represents the similarity of attribute-value distribution between two points. A hypergraph partitioning algorithm is used to find a partitioning of the vertices such that the corresponding data items in each partition are highly related and the weight of the hyperedges cut by the partitioning is minimized. The quality of the clustering result can be evaluated by applying the intra-cluster singularity value.Analysis and experimental results have demonstrated that this approach is applicable and effective in wide ranging scheme.

  13. A multistage mathematical approach to automated clustering of high-dimensional noisy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alexander; Keselman, Michael D.; Gibb, Leif G.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    A critical problem faced in many scientific fields is the adequate separation of data derived from individual sources. Often, such datasets require analysis of multiple features in a highly multidimensional space, with overlap of features and sources. The datasets generated by simultaneous recording from hundreds of neurons emitting phasic action potentials have produced the challenge of separating the recorded signals into independent data subsets (clusters) corresponding to individual signal-generating neurons. Mathematical methods have been developed over the past three decades to achieve such spike clustering, but a complete solution with fully automated cluster identification has not been achieved. We propose here a fully automated mathematical approach that identifies clusters in multidimensional space through recursion, which combats the multidimensionality of the data. Recursion is paired with an approach to dimensional evaluation, in which each dimension of a dataset is examined for its informational importance for clustering. The dimensions offering greater informational importance are given added weight during recursive clustering. To combat strong background activity, our algorithm takes an iterative approach of data filtering according to a signal-to-noise ratio metric. The algorithm finds cluster cores, which are thereafter expanded to include complete clusters. This mathematical approach can be extended from its prototype context of spike sorting to other datasets that suffer from high dimensionality and background activity. PMID:25831512

  14. Star Formation in High-Redshift Cluster Ellipticals

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Cory R; Snyder, Gregory F; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Stanford, S A; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Stern, Daniel; Zeimann, Gregory R; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter R M; Mancone, Conor L; Moustakas, John

    2014-01-01

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive ($M_{\\star}>10^{10.1}M_{\\odot}$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift ($1.0 < z < 1.5$) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 $\\mu$m data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local Universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at $1 < z < 1.5$. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in $1 < z < 1.5$ clusters. We find that new ETGs are l...

  15. Formation and Stability of High-Spin Alkali Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C. P.; Claas, P.; Schumacher, D.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2004-01-01

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, vanderWaals like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  16. A High-Order CFS Algorithm for Clustering Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyu Bu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Internet of Everything such as Internet of Things, Internet of People, and Industrial Internet, big data is being generated. Clustering is a widely used technique for big data analytics and mining. However, most of current algorithms are not effective to cluster heterogeneous data which is prevalent in big data. In this paper, we propose a high-order CFS algorithm (HOCFS to cluster heterogeneous data by combining the CFS clustering algorithm and the dropout deep learning model, whose functionality rests on three pillars: (i an adaptive dropout deep learning model to learn features from each type of data, (ii a feature tensor model to capture the correlations of heterogeneous data, and (iii a tensor distance-based high-order CFS algorithm to cluster heterogeneous data. Furthermore, we verify our proposed algorithm on different datasets, by comparison with other two clustering schemes, that is, HOPCM and CFS. Results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in clustering heterogeneous data.

  17. Evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game on highly clustered community networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yong-Kui; Li Zhi; Chen Xiao-Jie; Wang Long

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game on a highly clustered community network in which the clustering coefficient and the community size can be tuned. It finds that the clustering coefficient in such a degreehomogeneous network inhibits the emergence of cooperation for the entire range of the payoff parameter. Moreover,it finds that the community size can also have a marked influence on the evolution of cooperation, with a larger community size leading to not only a lower cooperation level but also a smaller threshold of the payoff parameter above which cooperators become extinct.

  18. Globular Cluster Streams as Galactic High-Precision Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Küpper, A H W; Bonaca, A; Johnston, K V; Hogg, D W; Kroupa, P; Santiago, B X

    2015-01-01

    Tidal streams of globular clusters are ideal tracers of the Galactic gravitational potential. Compared to the few known, complex and diffuse dwarf-galaxy streams, they are kinematically cold, have thin morphologies and are abundant in the halo of the Milky Way. Their coldness and thinness in combination with potential epicyclic substructure in the vicinity of the stream progenitor turns them into high-precision scales. With the example of Palomar 5, we demonstrate how modeling of a globular cluster stream allows us to simultaneously measure the properties of the disrupting globular cluster, its orbital motion, and the gravitational potential of the Milky Way.

  19. A new method for measuring ion clusters produced by charged particles in nanometre track sections of DNA size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszona, S.; Kula, J.; Marjanska, S.

    2000-06-01

    A new method is presented for measuring the frequency distribution of ion clusters, formed in nanometre sections of track, by charged particles. The simulated nanometer-size sites are produced in a device, called the Jet Counter. It consists of a pulse-operated valve which injects an expanding jet of nitrogen gas into an interaction chamber. The resulting distributions of ion clusters produced by alpha particle tracks (from 241Am) in sections ranging from 2 to around 10 nm at unit density in nitrogen gas have been measured. Analysis of the experimental results confirm that the primary ionisation distributions produced in the nanometer sections comply with the Poisson distribution. The ionisation cluster distributions produced in the 2-10 nm track-segments are the first ever to be determined experimentally.

  20. A new method for measuring ion clusters produced by charged particles in nanometre track sections of DNA size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pszona, S. E-mail: pszona@ipj.gov.pl; Kula, J.; Marjanska, S

    2000-06-11

    A new method is presented for measuring the frequency distribution of ion clusters, formed in nanometre sections of track, by charged particles. The simulated nanometer-size sites are produced in a device, called the Jet Counter. It consists of a pulse-operated valve which injects an expanding jet of nitrogen gas into an interaction chamber. The resulting distributions of ion clusters produced by alpha particle tracks (from {sup 241}Am) in sections ranging from 2 to around 10 nm at unit density in nitrogen gas have been measured. Analysis of the experimental results confirm that the primary ionisation distributions produced in the nanometer sections comply with the Poisson distribution. The ionisation cluster distributions produced in the 2-10 nm track-segments are the first ever to be determined experimentally.

  1. ON THE ORIGIN OF HIGH-ALTITUDE OPEN CLUSTERS IN THE MILKY WAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.; Peimbert, A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510, México, D.F., México (Mexico); Velazquez, H., E-mail: lamartinez@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 877, 22860 Ensenada, B.C., México (Mexico)

    2016-01-20

    We present a dynamical study of the effect of the bar and spiral arms on the simulated orbits of open clusters in the Galaxy. Specifically, this work is devoted to the puzzling presence of high-altitude open clusters in the Galaxy. For this purpose we employ a very detailed observationally motivated potential model for the Milky Way and a careful set of initial conditions representing the newly born open clusters in the thin disk. We find that the spiral arms are able to raise an important percentage of open clusters (about one-sixth of the total employed in our simulations, depending on the structural parameters of the arms) above the Galactic plane to heights beyond 200 pc, producing a bulge-shaped structure toward the center of the Galaxy. Contrary to what was expected, the spiral arms produce a much greater vertical effect on the clusters than the bar, both in quantity and height; this is due to the sharper concentration of the mass on the spiral arms, when compared to the bar. When a bar and spiral arms are included, spiral arms are still capable of raising an important percentage of the simulated open clusters through chaotic diffusion (as tested from classification analysis of the resultant high-z orbits), but the bar seems to restrain them, diminishing the elevation above the plane by a factor of about two.

  2. Detection of high risk campylobacteriosis clusters at three geographic levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Weisent

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and many other developed countries. Understanding the spatial distribution of this disease and identifying high-risk areas is vital to focus resources for prevention and control measures. In addition, determining the appropriate scale for geographical analysis of surveillance data is an area of concern to epidemiologists and public health officials. The purpose of this study was to (i compare standardized risk estimates for campylobacteriosis in Tennessee over three distinct geographical scales (census tract, zip code and county subdivision, and (ii identify and investigate high-risk spatial clustering of campylobacteriosis at the three geographical scales to determine if clustering is scale dependent. Significant high risk clusters (P <0.05 were detected at all three spatial scales. There were overlaps in regions of high-risk and clusters at all three geographic levels. At the census tract level, spatial analysis identified smaller clusters of finer resolution and detected more clusters than the other two levels. However, data aggregation at zip code or county subdivision yielded similar findings. The importance of this line of research is to create a framework whereby economically efficient disease control strategies become more attainable through improved geographical precision and risk detection. Accurate identification of disease clusters for campylobacteriosis can enable public health personnel to focus scarce resources towards prevention and control programmes on the most at-risk populations. Consistent results at multiple spatial levels highlight the robustness of the geospatial techniques utilized in this study. Furthermore, analyses at the zip code and county subdivision levels can be useful when address level information (finer resolution data are not available. These procedures may also be used to help identify regionally specific risk factors for

  3. Embedded star clusters as sources of high-energy cosmic rays: Modelling and constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Gilles; Komin, Nukri; Lamanna, Fabien Krayzeland Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars are mainly found in stellar associations. These massive star clusters occur in the heart of giant molecular clouds. The strong stellar wind activity in these objects generates large bubbles and induces collective effects that could accelerate particles up to high energy and produce gamma rays. The best way to input an acceleration origin to the stellar wind interaction in massive stellar cluster is to observe young massive star clusters in which no supernova explosion has occurred yet. This work aims to constrain the part of stellar wind mechanical energy that is converted into energetic particles using the sensitivity of the ongoing Fermi/LAT instrument. This work further provides detailed predictions of expected gamma-ray fluxes in the view of the on-set of the next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. A one-zone model where energetic particles are accelerated by repeated interactions with strong supersonic shocks occurring in massive star clusters was developed. The particl...

  4. Identification of a new diterpene biosynthetic gene cluster that produces O-methylkolavelool in Herpetosiphon aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Chiaki; Oshima, Misaki; Kurashima, Nodoka; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2015-03-23

    Diterpenoids are usually found in plants and fungi, but are rare in bacteria. We have previously reported new diterpenes, named tuberculosinol and isotuberculosinol, which are generated from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene products Rv3377c and Rv3378c. No homologous gene was found at that time, but we recently found highly homologous proteins in the Herpetosiphon aurantiacus ATCC 23779 genome. Haur_2145 was a class II diterpene cyclase responsible for the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate into kolavenyl diphosphate. Haur_2146, homologous to Rv3378c, synthesized (+)-kolavelool through the nucleophilic addition of a water molecule to the incipient cation formed after the diphosphate moiety was released. Haur_2147 afforded (+)-O-methylkolavelool from (+)-kolavelool, so this enzyme was an O-methyltransferase. This new diterpene was indeed detected in H. aurantiacus cells. This is the first report of the identification of a (+)-O-methylkolavelool biosynthetic gene cluster.

  5. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Michelle A; Alanjary, Mohammad M; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R; Ziemert, Nadine; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites.

  6. HIGH-Z X-RAY AGN CLUSTERING & COSMOLOGICAL INFERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plionis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the angular clustering of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN in di erent ux-limited sub- samples of the Chandra Deep Field North (CDF-N and South (CDF-S surveys. We nd a strong dependence of the clustering strength on the sub-sample ux-limit, a fact which explains most of the disparate clustering results of di erent XMM and Chandra surveys. At high ux-limits the clustering length increases considerably; for example, at fx;limit 1015 erg s-1 cm-2, we obtain r0 ' 17 5 and 18 3 h-1 Mpc, for the CDF-N and CDF-S, respectively. The ux-limit dependence translates into a luminosity dependent X-ray AGN clustering. Applying the standard formalism relating the theoretical CDM model clustering to the data in a at cosmology (for w =-1 and h = 0:72, we nd: m ' 0:28 0:03 and 8 ' 0:75 0:03; while utilizing also the SN Ia Hubble relation (for 8 = 0:75 and h = 0:72, we nd: m ' 0:26 0:04 and w = 0:9 0:1

  7. Seeding high-redshift QSOs by collisional runaway in primordial star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Harley; Sijacki, Debora; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2015-08-01

    We study how runaway stellar collisions in high-redshift, metal-poor star clusters form very massive stars (VMSs) that can directly collapse to intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). We follow the evolution of a pair of neighbouring high-redshift mini-haloes with high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES combined with the non-equilibrium chemistry package KROME. The first collapsing mini-halo is assumed to enrich the central nuclear star cluster (NSC) of the other to a critical metallicity, sufficient for Population II (Pop. II) star formation at redshift z ≈ 27. Using the spatial configuration of the flattened, asymmetrical gas cloud forming in the core of the metal-enriched halo, we set the initial conditions for simulations of an initially non-spherical star cluster with the direct summation code NBODY6 which are compared to about 2000 NBODY6 simulations of spherical star clusters for a wide range of star cluster parameters. The final mass of the VMS that forms depends strongly on the initial mass and initial central density of the NSC. For the initial central densities suggested by our RAMSES simulations, VMSs with mass >400 M⊙ can form in clusters with stellar masses of ≈104 M⊙, and this can increase to well over 1000 M⊙ for more massive and denser clusters. The high probability we find for forming a VMS in these mini-haloes at such an early cosmic time makes collisional runaway of Pop. II star clusters a promising channel for producing large numbers of high-redshift IMBHs that may act as the seeds of supermassive black holes.

  8. A Cluster in the Making: ALMA Reveals the Initial Conditions for High-mass Cluster Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Longmore, S. N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Bastian, N.; Contreras, Y.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  9. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW, 1710 (Australia); Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Jackson, J. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Alves, J. F. [University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Bally, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 8030 (United States); Foster, J. B. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101 New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Garay, G. [Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Kruijssen, J. M. D. [Max-Planck Institut fur Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Testi, L. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Walsh, A. J., E-mail: Jill.Rathborne@csiro.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  10. Spectroscopy of moderately high-redshift RCS-1 clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbank, David G; Blindert, K; Ellingson, E; Gladders, M D; Yee, H K C

    2007-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of 11 moderately high-redshift (z~0.7- 1.0) clusters from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-1). We find excellent agreement between the red-sequence estimated redshift and the spectroscopic redshift, with a scatter of 10% at z>0.7. At the high-redshift end (z>~0.9) of the sample, we find two of the systems selected are projections of pairs of comparably rich systems, with red-sequences too close to discriminate in (R-z') colour. In one of these systems, the two components are close enough to be physically associated. For a subsample of clusters with sufficient spectroscopic members, we examine the correlation between B_gcR (optical richness) and the dynamical mass inferred from the velocity dispersion. We find these measurements to be compatible, within the relatively large uncertainties, with the correlation established at lower redshift for the X-ray selected CNOC1 clusters and also for a lower redshift sample of RCS-1 clusters. Confirmation of this and calibra...

  11. Subcascade formation and defect cluster size scaling in high-energy collision events in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; Sand, A. E.; Nordlund, K.; Luneville, L.; Simeone, D.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    It has been recently established that the size of the defects created under ion irradiation follows a scaling law (Sand A. E. et al., EPL, 103 (2013) 46003; Yi X. et al., EPL, 110 (2015) 36001). A critical constraint associated with its application to phenomena occurring over a broad range of irradiation conditions is the limitation on the energy of incident particles. Incident neutrons or ions, with energies exceeding a certain energy threshold, produce a complex hierarchy of collision subcascade events, which impedes the use of the defect cluster size scaling law derived for an individual low-energy cascade. By analyzing the statistics of subcascade sizes and energies, we show that defect clustering above threshold energies can be described by a product of two scaling laws, one for the sizes of subcascades and the other for the sizes of defect clusters formed in subcascades. The statistics of subcascade sizes exhibits a transition at a threshold energy, where the subcascade morphology changes from a single domain below the energy threshold, to several or many sub-domains above the threshold. The number of sub-domains then increases in proportion to the primary knock-on atom energy. The model has been validated against direct molecular-dynamics simulations and applied to W, Fe, Be, Zr and sixteen other metals, enabling the prediction of full statistics of defect cluster sizes with no limitation on the energy of cascade events. We find that populations of defect clusters produced by the fragmented high-energy cascades are dominated by individual Frenkel pairs and relatively small defect clusters, whereas the lower-energy non-fragmented cascades produce a greater proportion of large defect clusters.

  12. Peripheral collisions of highly charged ions with metal clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Cheng-Jun; Hu Bi-Tao; Luo Xian-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the dynamical classical over-barrier model,the soft collisions between slow highly charged ions(SHCIs)Ar17+ and the large copper clusters under large impact parameters have been studied in this paper.We present the dominant mechanism of the electron transfer between SHCls and a large metal cluster by computational simulation.The evolution of the occupation of projectile ions,KLχ satellite lines,X-ray yields,Auger electron spectrum and scattering angles are provided.

  13. Effects of gene disruptions in the nisin gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis on nisin production and producer immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ra, Runar; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Saris, Per E.J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1999-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The chromosomally located gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG is required for biosynthesis, development of immunity, and regulation of gene expression. In-frame deletions in the nisB and nisT genes, and disruption of

  14. High-Energy Ions Emitted from Ar Clusters Irradiated by Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong; LEI An-Le; NI Guo-Quan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the energy spectra of Ar ions emitted from Ar clusters irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses. The Ar clusters were produced in the adiabatic expansion of Ar gas into vacuum at high backing pressures. The laser peak intensity was about 2×106 W/cm2 with a pulse duration of 45 fs. The maximum and the average energies of Ar ions are 0.2 MeV and 15kev at a backing pressure of 2. S MPa, respectively. They are almost independent of the backing pressures in the range of 0.6 to 4.5 MPa.

  15. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, R de la Fuente; Bidin, C Moni; Carraro, G; Costa, E

    2013-01-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI pass-bands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue, and high resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decypher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically,...

  16. Embedded star clusters as sources of high-energy cosmic rays . Modelling and constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, G.; Marcowith, A.; Komin, N.; Krayzel, F.; Lamanna, G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Massive stars are mainly found in stellar associations. These massive star clusters occur in the heart of giant molecular clouds. The strong stellar wind activity in these objects generates large bubbles and induces collective effects that could accelerate particles up to high energy and produce γ-rays. The best way to input an acceleration origin to the stellar wind interaction in massive stellar cluster is to observe young massive star clusters in which no supernova explosion has occurred yet. Aims: This work aims to constrain the part of stellar wind mechanical energy that is converted into energetic particles using the sensitivity of the ongoing Fermi-LAT instrument. This work further provides detailed predictions of expected γ-ray fluxes in the view of the on-set of the next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Methods: A one-zone model where energetic particles are accelerated by repeated interactions with strong supersonic shocks occurring in massive star clusters was developed. The particle escape from the star cluster and subsequent interaction with the surrounding dense material and magnetic fields of the HII region was computed. We applied this model to a selection of eight embedded star clusters constricted by existing observations. We evaluated the γ-ray signal from each object, combining both leptonic and hadronic contributions. We searched for these emissions in the Fermi-LAT observations in the energy range from 3 to 300 GeV and compared them to the sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Results: No significant γ-ray emission from these star clusters has been found. Less than 10% of stellar wind luminosities are supplied to the relativistic particles. Some clusters even show acceleration efficiency of less than 1%. The CTA would be able to detect γ-ray emission from several clusters in the case of an acceleration efficiency of close to one percent.

  17. Mass distribution of cluster ions produced from laser ablation of metal-composite-oxides Y-M-Cu-O (M = Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhaoyang; Wang Chunru; Huang Rongbin; Zheng Lansun [Xiamen Univ. (China). Dept. of Chem.

    1995-09-01

    Laser ablation of YMCuO metal-composite-oxides (M = Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg) in high vacuum produced cluster ions with various sizes and compositions. Mass spectra of the cluster ions were recorded by a home-built time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer and the mass distributions were analyzed by a statistical model. For YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) high-Tc superconducting samples, six series of cluster ions were observed. Replacement of barium in the metal-composite-oxide sample with other alkaline earth metal, such as strontium, calcium, or magnesium, not only removed the superconductivity, but also changed the compositions and distributions of the laser generated cluster ions. For instance, copper was only found in the compositions of cluster ions generated from YBCO sample. From comparison of the experimental results, interactions among components of the metal-composite-oxides and the function of alkaline earth metal in superconducting material were discussed. (orig.) 19 refs.

  18. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for High Energy Density Science

    2016-10-12

    We propose to expand our recent studies on the interactions of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses with atomic and molecular clusters. The work described follows directly from work performed under BES support for the past grant period. During this period we upgraded the THOR laser at UT Austin by replacing the regenerative amplifier with optical parametric amplification (OPA) using BBO crystals. This increased the contrast of the laser, the total laser energy to ~1.2 J , and decreased the pulse width to below 30 fs. We built a new all reflective XUV harmonic beam line into expanded lab space. This enabled an increase influence by a factor of 25 and an increase in the intensity by a factor of 50. The goal of the program proposed in this renewal is to extend this class of experiments to available higher XUV intensity and a greater range of wavelengths. In particular we plan to perform experiments to confirm our hypothesis about the origin of the high charge states in these exploding clusters, an effect which we ascribe to plasma continuum lowering (ionization potential depression) in a cluster nano-­plasma. To do this we will perform experiments in which XUV pulses of carefully chosen wavelength irradiate clusters composed of only low-Z atoms and clusters with a mixture of this low-­Z atom with higher Z atoms. The latter clusters will exhibit higher electron densities and will serve to lower the ionization potential further than in the clusters composed only of low Z atoms. This should have a significant effect on the charge states produced in the exploding cluster. We will also explore the transition of explosions in these XUV irradiated clusters from hydrodynamic expansion to Coulomb explosion. The work proposed here will explore clusters of a wider range of constituents, including clusters from solids. Experiments on clusters from solids will be enabled by development we performed during the past grant period in which we constructed and

  19. Producing Ceramic High Tc Superconductors for Strong Current Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xun Jin; Yuan-Chang Guo; Xue-Kei Fu; Shi-Xue Dou

    2000-01-01

    @@ Strong current and large-scale application is the most important prospect of high Tc superconductors (HTS).Practical HTS samples, both in forms of wire and bulk, have been produced with high critical currents operated at economic cryogenic temperatures, and studied for engineering applications with various prototype devices. The applicable HTS materials produced are introduced in this paper with regard to processing, characterization and application.

  20. Boron Clusters as Highly Stable Magnesium-Battery Electrolytes**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tyler J; Mohtadi, Rana; Arthur, Timothy S; Mizuno, Fuminori; Zhang, Ruigang; Shirai, Soichi; Kampf, Jeff W

    2014-01-01

    Boron clusters are proposed as a new concept for the design of magnesium-battery electrolytes that are magnesium-battery-compatible, highly stable, and noncorrosive. A novel carborane-based electrolyte incorporating an unprecedented magnesium-centered complex anion is reported and shown to perform well as a magnesium-battery electrolyte. This finding opens a new approach towards the design of electrolytes whose likelihood of meeting the challenging design targets for magnesium-battery electrolytes is very high. PMID:24519845

  1. Identification and activation of novel biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining in the kirromycin producer Streptomyces collinus Tü 365.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftime, Dumitrita; Kulik, Andreas; Härtner, Thomas; Rohrer, Sabrina; Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Streptomycetes are prolific sources of novel biologically active secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical potential. S. collinus Tü 365 is a Streptomyces strain, isolated 1972 from Kouroussa (Guinea). It is best known as producer of the antibiotic kirromycin, an inhibitor of the protein biosynthesis interacting with elongation factor EF-Tu. Genome Mining revealed 32 gene clusters encoding the biosynthesis of diverse secondary metabolites in the genome of Streptomyces collinus Tü 365, indicating an enormous biosynthetic potential of this strain. The structural diversity of secondary metabolisms predicted for S. collinus Tü 365 includes PKS, NRPS, PKS-NRPS hybrids, a lanthipeptide, terpenes and siderophores. While some of these gene clusters were found to contain genes related to known secondary metabolites, which also could be detected in HPLC-MS analyses, most of the uncharacterized gene clusters are not expressed under standard laboratory conditions. With this study we aimed to characterize the genome information of S. collinus Tü 365 to make use of gene clusters, which previously have not been described for this strain. We were able to connect the gene clusters of a lanthipeptide, a carotenoid, five terpenoid compounds, an ectoine, a siderophore and a spore pigment-associated gene cluster to their respective biosynthesis products.

  2. On the Origin of High-Altitude Open Clusters in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Medina, L A; Moreno, E; Peimbert, A; Velazquez, H

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical study of the effect of the bar and spiral arms on the simulated orbits of open clusters in the Galaxy. Specifically, this work is devoted to the puzzling presence of high-altitude open clusters in the Galaxy. For this purpose we employ a very detailed observationally motivated potential model for the Milky Way and a careful set of initial conditions representing the newly born open clusters in the thin disk. We find that the spiral arms are able to raise an important percentage of open clusters (about one-sixth of the total employed in our simulations, depending on the structural parameters of the arms) above the Galactic plane to heights beyond 200 pc, producing a bulge-shaped structure toward the center of the Galaxy. Contrary to what was expected, the spiral arms produce a much greater vertical effect on the clusters than the bar, both in quantity and height; this is due to the sharper concentration of the mass on the spiral arms, when compared to the bar. When a bar and spiral arms ...

  3. Distributions of Short-Lived Radioactive Nuclei Produced by Young Embedded Stellar Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred C; Holden, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Most star formation in the Galaxy takes place in clusters, where the most massive members can affect the properties of other constituent solar systems. This paper considers how clusters influence star formation and forming planetary systems through nuclear enrichment from supernova explosions, where massive stars deliver short-lived radioactive nuclei (SLRs) to their local environment. The decay of these nuclei leads to both heating and ionization, and thereby affects disk evolution, disk chemistry, and the accompanying process of planet formation. Nuclear enrichment can take place on two spatial scales: [1] Within the cluster itself ($\\ell\\sim1$pc), the SLRs are delivered to the circumstellar disks associated with other cluster members. [2] On the next larger scale ($\\ell\\sim2-10$pc), SLRs are injected into the background molecular cloud; these nuclei provide heating and ionization to nearby star-forming regions, and to the next generation of disks. For the first scenario, we construct the expected distribut...

  4. Cluster size dependence of high-order harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Y; Bastiaens, H M J; van der Slot, P J M; Biedron, S G; Milton, S V; Boller, K -J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from noble gas clusters in a supersonic gas jet. To identify the contribution of harmonic generation from clusters versus that from gas monomers, we measure the high-order harmonic output over a broad range of the total atomic number density in the jet (from 3x10^{16} cm^{-3} to 3x10^{18} cm^{-3}) at two different reservoir temperatures (303 K and 363 K). For the first time in the evaluation of the harmonic yield in such measurements, the variation of the liquid mass fraction, g, versus pressure and temperature is taken into consideration, which we determine, reliably and consistently, to be below 20% within our range of experimental parameters. Based on measurements with a thin jet where significant variations in reabsorption and the phase matching conditions can be neglected, we conclude that atoms in the form of small clusters (average cluster size < 1000 atoms) provide the same higher-order nonlinear response as single-atoms. This implies that HHG in ...

  5. Swarm v2: highly-scalable and high-resolution amplicon clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, Frédéric; Rognes, Torbjørn; Quince, Christopher; de Vargas, Colomban; Dunthorn, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Previously we presented Swarm v1, a novel and open source amplicon clustering program that produced fine-scale molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs), free of arbitrary global clustering thresholds and input-order dependency. Swarm v1 worked with an initial phase that used iterative single-linkage with a local clustering threshold (d), followed by a phase that used the internal abundance structures of clusters to break chained OTUs. Here we present Swarm v2, which has two important novel features: (1) a new algorithm for d = 1 that allows the computation time of the program to scale linearly with increasing amounts of data; and (2) the new fastidious option that reduces under-grouping by grafting low abundant OTUs (e.g., singletons and doubletons) onto larger ones. Swarm v2 also directly integrates the clustering and breaking phases, dereplicates sequencing reads with d = 0, outputs OTU representatives in fasta format, and plots individual OTUs as two-dimensional networks.

  6. High Radio Frequency Properties and Variability of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, M T; Geach, J E; Grainge, K J B; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Hovatta, T; Karim, A; McNamara, B R; Rumsey, C; Russell, H R; Salomé, P; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Benford, D J; Fabian, A C; Readhead, A C S; Sadler, E M; Saunders, R D E

    2015-01-01

    We consider the high radio frequency (15 GHz - 353 GHz) properties and variability of 35 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs). These are the most core-dominated sources drawn from a parent sample of more than 700 X-ray selected clusters, thus allowing us to relate our results to the general population. We find that >6.0% of our parent sample (>15.1% if only cool-core clusters are considered) contain a radio-source at 150 GHz of at least 3mJy (~1x10^23 W/Hz at our median redshift of z~0.13). Furthermore, >3.4% of the BCGs in our parent sample contain a peaked component (Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum, GPS) in their spectra that peaks above 2 GHz, increasing to >8.5% if only cool-core clusters are considered. We see little evidence for strong variability at 15 GHz on short (week-month) time-scales although we see variations greater than 20% at 150 GHz over 6-month times-frames for 4 of the 23 sources with multi-epoch observations. Much more prevalent is long-term (year-decade time-scale) variability, with average annua...

  7. One_dimensional chains of gold clusters on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of gold nanoclusters on thesurface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in ultrahigh vacuum. Studies of ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy revealed that the size distribution of gold clusters was very narrow and quasi-one-dimensional chains of gold nanoclusters of approximately 2 nm diameter were produced after being annealed at 74℃. Unlike the results obtained by previous workers, these chains of gold clusters were not formed along steps on the substrate surface, and some of them could even go across monoatomic steps. The orientation of chains of gold clusters was also dependent on the size of gold nanoclusters. These results suggest the viability of a new route to the creation of ordered nanoscale structures.

  8. Construction of acetoin high-producing Bacillus subtilis strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Tian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the construction and selection of a high-producing mutant, Bacillus subtilis HB-32, with enhanced acetoin yield and productivity. The mutant was obtained by the protoplast fusion of a Bacillus subtilis mutant TH-49 (Val− producing acetoin and Bacillus licheniformis AD-30 producing α-acetolactate decarboxylase, with the fusogen polyethylene glycol and after the regeneration and selection, etc. of the fusant. The acetoin production reached 49.64 g/L, which is an increase of 61.8% compared to that of B. subtilis strain TH-49. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was performed to determine the mutagenic and protoplast fusion effects and the genomic changes in the acetoin high-producing strain compared to the parent strains at the molecular level. The constructed strain was shown to be promising for large-scale acetoin production. Future studies should focus on the application of the mutant strain in practice.

  9. A Framework for Evaluation and Exploration of Clustering Algorithms in Subspaces of High Dimensional Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    In high dimensional databases, traditional full space clustering methods are known to fail due to the curse of dimensionality. Thus, in recent years, subspace clustering and projected clustering approaches were proposed for clustering in high dimensional spaces. As the area is rather young, few c...

  10. High Energy Neutrino Emission Induced by Ultrahigh Energy Nuclei in Cluster Accretion Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke; Olinto, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Accretion shocks in clusters of galaxies can potentially accelerate protons to above 1017 eV and nuclei to ultrahigh energies. High energy neutrinos are produced when these cosmic rays interact with baryons of the massive cluster, or with CMB photons during their extragalactic propagation. In light of the recent IceCube discovery of TeV-PeV neutrinos, we calculate the neutrino emissions from accretion shocks, using a complete numerical propagation method and calibrated based on precision ΛCDM simulation. We pin down the uncertainty and degeneracy in source parameters by taking into account the cosmological evolution of cluster mass, density profiles, velocity dispersions, along with the gravitational gas accretion rates. We find that the neutrino spectrum is distinct from E-2 after considering the cluster mass function which impact both maximum energy and luminosity of the accelerated cosmic rays. We compare the cumulative neutrino flux to sensitivities of the existing and future high energy neutrino observatories. We also discuss the implication of our results on the scenario of cluster accretion shocks being the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

  11. Efficient Construction of High-Dimensional Cluster State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIAO Da-Sheng; ZHANG Yong-Sheng; ZHOU Xiang-Fa; GUO Guang-Can

    2008-01-01

    We present a scheme for effciently constructing high-dimensional cluster state using probabilistic entangling quantum gates. It is shown that the required computational overhead scales effciently both with 1/P and n even if all the entangling quantum gates only succeed with an arbitrary small probability, where p is the success probability of the entangling quantum gate and n is the number of qubits in the computation.

  12. Boron Clusters as Highly Stable Magnesium-Battery Electrolytes**

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Tyler J; Mohtadi, Rana; Arthur, Timothy S.; Mizuno, Fuminori; Zhang, Ruigang; Shirai, Soichi; Kampf, Jeff W.

    2014-01-01

    Boron clusters are proposed as a new concept for the design of magnesium-battery electrolytes that are magnesium-battery-compatible, highly stable, and noncorrosive. A novel carborane-based electrolyte incorporating an unprecedented magnesium-centered complex anion is reported and shown to perform well as a magnesium-battery electrolyte. This finding opens a new approach towards the design of electrolytes whose likelihood of meeting the challenging design targets for magnesium-battery electro...

  13. High Speed White Dwarf Asteroseismology with the Herty Hall Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Aaron; Kim, A.

    2012-01-01

    Asteroseismology is the process of using observed oscillations of stars to infer their interior structure. In high speed asteroseismology, we complete that by quickly computing hundreds of thousands of models to match the observed period spectra. Each model on a single processor takes five to ten seconds to run. Therefore, we use a cluster of sixteen Dell Workstations with dual-core processors. The computers use the Ubuntu operating system and Apache Hadoop software to manage workloads.

  14. Characterization of a cryogenically cooled high-pressure gas jet for laser/cluster interaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. A.; Ditmire, T.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    1998-11-01

    We have developed and carried out detailed characterization of a cryogenically cooled (34-300 K), high-pressure (55 kTorr) solenoid driven pulsed valve that has been used to produce dense jets of atomic clusters for high intensity laser interaction studies. Measurements including Rayleigh scattering and short pulse interferometry show that clusters of controlled size, from a few to >104 atoms/cluster can be produced from a broad range of light and heavy gases, at average atomic densities up to 4×1019 atoms/cc. Continuous temperature and pressure control of the valve allows us to vary mean cluster size while keeping the average atomic density constant, and we find that many aspects of the valves behavior are consistent with ideal gas laws. However, we also show that effects including the build up of flow on milliseconds time scales, the cooling of gas flowing into the valve, and condensation of gas inside the valve body at temperatures well above the liquefaction point need to be carefully characterized in order to decouple the operation of the jet from the laser interaction physics.

  15. Identification and activation of novel biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining in the kirromycin producer Streptomyces collinus Tü 365

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftime, Dumitrita; Kulik, Andreas; Härtner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Streptomycetes are prolific sources of novel biologically active secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical potential. S. collinus Tü 365 is a Streptomyces strain, isolated 1972 from Kouroussa (Guinea). It is best known as producer of the antibiotic kirromycin, an inhibitor of the protein biosynth...... of a lanthipeptide, a carotenoid, five terpenoid compounds, an ectoine, a siderophore and a spore pigment-associated gene cluster to their respective biosynthesis products....

  16. Boron clusters as highly stable magnesium-battery electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tyler J; Mohtadi, Rana; Arthur, Timothy S; Mizuno, Fuminori; Zhang, Ruigang; Shirai, Soichi; Kampf, Jeff W

    2014-03-17

    Boron clusters are proposed as a new concept for the design of magnesium-battery electrolytes that are magnesium-battery-compatible, highly stable, and noncorrosive. A novel carborane-based electrolyte incorporating an unprecedented magnesium-centered complex anion is reported and shown to perform well as a magnesium-battery electrolyte. This finding opens a new approach towards the design of electrolytes whose likelihood of meeting the challenging design targets for magnesium-battery electrolytes is very high. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Distributions of short-lived radioactive nuclei produced by young embedded star clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Fred C. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Fatuzzo, Marco [Physics Department, Xavier University, Cincinatti, OH 45255 (United States); Holden, Lisa [Department of Mathematics, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY 41099 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Most star formation in the Galaxy takes place in clusters, where the most massive members can affect the properties of other constituent solar systems. This paper considers how clusters influence star formation and forming planetary systems through nuclear enrichment from supernova explosions, where massive stars deliver short-lived radioactive nuclei (SLRs) to their local environment. The decay of these nuclei leads to both heating and ionization, and thereby affects disk evolution, disk chemistry, and the accompanying process of planet formation. Nuclear enrichment can take place on two spatial scales: (1) within the cluster itself (ℓ ∼ 1 pc), the SLRs are delivered to the circumstellar disks associated with other cluster members. (2) On the next larger scale (ℓ ∼ 2-10 pc), SLRs are injected into the background molecular cloud; these nuclei provide heating and ionization to nearby star-forming regions and to the next generation of disks. For the first scenario, we construct the expected distributions of radioactive enrichment levels provided by embedded clusters. Clusters can account for the SLR mass fractions inferred for the early Solar Nebula, but typical SLR abundances are lower by a factor of ∼10. For the second scenario, we find that distributed enrichment of SLRs in molecular clouds leads to comparable abundances. For both the direct and distributed enrichment processes, the masses of {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe delivered to individual circumstellar disks typically fall in the range 10-100 pM {sub ☉} (where 1 pM {sub ☉} = 10{sup –12} M {sub ☉}). The corresponding ionization rate due to SLRs typically falls in the range ζ{sub SLR} ∼ 1-5 × 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. This ionization rate is smaller than that due to cosmic rays, ζ{sub CR} ∼ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1}, but will be important in regions where cosmic rays are attenuated (e.g., disk mid-planes).

  18. Functionally graded materials produced with high power lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, JTM; Ocelík, Vašek; Chandra, T; Torralba, JM; Sakai, T

    2003-01-01

    In this keynote paper two examples will be present of functionally graded materials produced with high power Nd:YAG lasers. In particular the conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of A18Si and Ti6Al4V alloys are presented. The formation of

  19. Screening cluster A and cluster B personality disorders in Chinese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Cai, Lin; Wang, Qin; Wang, Mengcheng; Yi, Jinyao; Yao, Shuqiao

    2013-04-17

    Personality disorders (PDs) during adolescence may, in addition to increasing risk for violent behaviors and suicide, also increase risk for elevated PD traits in adulthood. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of Cluster A and Cluster B PD traits and their relationships to demographic variables in Chinese high school students. A cohort of 3,552 students from eight high schools completed the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ (PDQ-4+) and MacArthur Scale of Subjective Social Status-youth version (SSSy) questionnaires. Boys scored higher than girls on the paranoid, schizotypal, antisocial, and narcissistic PDs. Freshmen and sophomores scored higher than juniors on schizoid, borderline, and antisocial PDs. Children in single-child families scored higher than nonsingletons on the paranoid and antisocial PDs. Students from single-parent households scored higher than students from double-parent households on the schizotypal and antisocial PDs, and students with remarried parents scored higher than students from double-parent households on the borderline and antisocial PDs. Students who had low perception of social status in the society ladder scored higher than those with a high perceived status on the schizoid and borderline PDs, but scored lower on the histrionic PD; students with a low subjective social status in the school community ladder scored higher scores than those with a high perceived status on the paranoid, schizoid, borderline, and antisocial PDs, but scored lower on the histrionic PD. Gender, grade, family structure, and subjective social status may affect the development of PDs. Longitudinal studies and studies of the full scope of PDs are needed to fully elucidate the impact of demographic variables on PD prevalence rates in adolescence and adulthood.

  20. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales.

  1. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.

    1985-08-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references.

  2. Cluster observes formation of high-beta plasma blobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Late in a sequence of four moderate substorms on 26 July 2001, Cluster observed periods of a few minutes durations of high-beta plasma events (B<10nT, β=2-30, connected with dipolarizations of the magnetic field. Cluster was located near 02:45 MLT, at R=19RE and at about 5°N GSM. These events began late in the recovery phase of the second and about 5min before onset of the third substorm and lasted for three hours, way beyond the recovery phase of the fourth substorm. The most remarkable observation is that the onset coincided with the arrival of energetic (E~7keV O+ ions and energetic electrons obviously from the ionosphere, which tended to dominate the plasma composition throughout the remaining time. The magnetic flux and plasma transport is continuously directed equatorward and earthward, with oscillatory east-west movements superposed. Periods of the order of 5-10min and strong correlations between the magnetic elevation angle and log β (correlation coefficient 0.78 are highly reminiscent of the high-beta plasma blobs discovered with Equator-S and Geotail between 9 and 11RE in the late night/early morning sector (Haerendel et al., 1999.

    We conclude that Cluster observed the plasma blob formation in the tail plasma sheet, which seems to occur predominantly in the recovery and post-recovery phases of substorms. This is consistent with the finding of Equator-S and Geotail. The origin is a pulsed earthward plasma transport with velocity amplitudes of only several tens of km/s.

  3. Producing titanium-niobium alloy by high energy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkeev, Yu. P., E-mail: sharkeev@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M. G., E-mail: golkoski@mail.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Akademika Lavrentiev Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Glukhov, I. A., E-mail: gia@ispms.tsc.ru; Eroshenko, A. Yu., E-mail: eroshenko@ispms.tsc.ru; Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Bataev, V. A., E-mail: bataev@vadm.ustu.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The research is involved in producing a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer on titanium substrate by high energy beam method, as well as in examining their structures and mechanical properties. Applying electron-beam cladding it was possible to produce a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer of several millimeters, where the niobium concentration was up to 40% at. and the structure itself could be related to martensite quenching structure. At the same time, a significant microhardness increase of 3200-3400 MPa was observed, which, in its turn, is connected with the formation of martensite structure. Cladding material of Ti-Nb composition could be the source in producing alloys of homogeneous microhardness and desired concentration of alloying niobium element.

  4. PC Cluster Machine Equipped with High-Speed Communication Software

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, M

    2004-01-01

    A high performance Beowulf (PC cluster) machine installed with Linux operating system and MPI (Message Passing Interface) for interprocessor communications has been constructed using Gigabit Ethernet and the communication software GAMMA (Genoa Active Message Machine), instead of the standard TCP/IP protocol. Fast C/Fortran compilers have been exploited with the GAMMA communication libraries. This method has eliminated large communication overhead of TCP/IP and resulted in significant increase in the computational performance of real application programs including the first-principle molecular dynamics simulation code. (Keywords: non TCP/IP, active messages, small latency, fast C/Fortran compilers, materials science, first-principle molecular dynamics)

  5. Identification and role analysis of an intermediate produced by a polygenic mutant of Monascus pigments cluster in Monascus ruber M7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Zhou, Youxiang; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Mingming; Xie, Nana; Lei, Ming; Liu, Qingpei; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2016-08-01

    Monascus pigments (Mps) are a group of azaphilonic secondary metabolites produced by Monascus spp. via a polyketide pathway. A mutant deleted an about 30 kb region of Mps gene cluster from Monascus ruber M7 was isolated previously, which produces a high amount of a light yellow pigment. The current study revealed that the mutant named ΔMpigJ-R lost proximate eight genes of the Mps gene cluster in M. ruber M7 through genetic analysis at DNA and RNA levels. The produced light yellow material was identified as a benzaldehyde derivative named as 6-(4-hydroxy-2-oxopentyl)-3-methyl-2, 4-dioxocyclohexane carb-aldehyde (M7PKS-1) by FT-IR, NMR, and MS. The sodium acetate-1-(13)C feeding experiment indicated that M7PKS-1 was a product produced from polyketide pathway. Finally, the feeding of M7PKS-1 helped to induce and regain Mps production of the mutants (ΔMpigA and ΔMpigE) which were previously unable to biosynthesize Mps and proved that M7PKS-1 was an initial intermediate of Mps. The results in this study provide a line of action to unveil Monascus pigments biosynthesis pathway.

  6. Possibilistic Exponential Fuzzy Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiatichai Treerattanapitak; Chuleerat Jaruskulchai

    2013-01-01

    Generally,abnormal points (noise and outliers) cause cluster analysis to produce low accuracy especially in fuzzy clustering.These data not only stay in clusters but also deviate the centroids from their true positions.Traditional fuzzy clustering like Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) always assigns data to all clusters which is not reasonable in some circumstances.By reformulating objective function in exponential equation,the algorithm aggressively selects data into the clusters.However noisy data and outliers cannot be properly handled by clustering process therefore they are forced to be included in a cluster because of a general probabilistic constraint that the sum of the membership degrees across all clusters is one.In order to improve this weakness,possibilistic approach relaxes this condition to improve membership assignment.Nevertheless,possibilistic clustering algorithms generally suffer from coincident clusters because their membership equations ignore the distance to other clusters.Although there are some possibilistic clustering approaches that do not generate coincident clusters,most of them require the right combination of multiple parameters for the algorithms to work.In this paper,we theoretically study Possibilistic Exponential Fuzzy Clustering (PXFCM) that integrates possibilistic approach with exponential fuzzy clustering.PXFCM has only one parameter and not only partitions the data but also filters noisy data or detects them as outliers.The comprehensive experiments show that PXFCM produces high accuracy in both clustering results and outlier detection without generating coincident problems.

  7. Cluster Formation during Expansion of Hot and Compressed Nuclear Matter Produced in Central Collisions of Au on Au at 250 A MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, M.; Herrmann, N.; Legrand, I.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Reisdorf, W.; Buta, A.; Freifelder, R.; Jeong, S. C.; Krämer, M.; Moisa, D.; Schüll, D.; Simion, V.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I. M.; Berger, L.; Blaich, Th.; Boussange, S.; Čaplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Donà, R.; Dupieux, P.; Erö, J.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Guillaume, G.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Kuhn, C.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Mösner, J.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Morel, P.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Rami, F.; Ramillien, V.; Sadchikov, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Smolyankin, S.; Tezkratt, R.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.

    1995-06-01

    Complete distributions of the light and intermediate mass fragments ( Z = 1-6) produced within the polar angular range 1∘<=Θlab<=30∘ in highly central collisions of 250 A MeV Au + Au are presented. The results of this measurement and a model analysis are used to study the expansion and clustering of the hot and compressed transient state formed in central collisions of such a heavy system. The influence of the initial conditions on the final observables is discussed.

  8. Cluster formation during expansion of hot and compressed nuclear matter produced in central collisions of Au on Au at 250{ital A} MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovici, M.; Herrmann, N.; Legrand, I.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Reisdorf, W.; Buta, A.; Freifelder, R.; Jeong, S.C.; Kraemer, M.; Moisa, D.; Schuell, D.; Simion, V.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Wessels, J.P.; Wienold, T.; Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.M.; Berger, L.; Blaich, T.; Boussange, S.; Caplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J.P.; Dona, R.; Dupieux, P.; Eroe, J.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Guillaume, G.; Hoelbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Kuhn, C.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Moesner, J.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Morel, P.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Rami, F.; Ramillien, V.; Sadchikov, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Smolyankin, S.; Tezkratt, R.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M.A.; Wagner, P.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.V. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)]|[Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary)]|[Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire/IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand (France)]|[Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany)]|[Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Kurchatov Institute for Atomic Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Rossendorf (Germany)]|[Centre de Recherches Nucleaires/Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)]|[Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)]|[Laboratori Nationali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); (FOPI Collaboration)

    1995-06-19

    Complete distributions of the light and intermediate mass fragments ({ital Z}=1--6) produced within the polar angular range 1{sup {circ}}{le}{Theta}{sub lab}{le}30{sup {circ}} in highly central collisions of 250{ital A} MeV Au+Au are presented. The results of this measurement and a model analysis are used to study the expansion and clustering of the hot and compressed transient state formed in central collisions of such a heavy system. The influence of the initial conditions on the final observables is discussed.

  9. Substitutions of short heterologous DNA segments of intragenomic or extragenomic origins produce clustered genomic polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Klaus; Lunnan, Asbjørn; Hülter, Nils;

    2016-01-01

    In a screen for unexplained mutation events we identified a previously unrecognized mechanism generating clustered DNA polymorphisms such as microindels and cumulative SNPs. The mechanism, short-patch double illegitimate recombination (SPDIR), facilitates short single-stranded DNA molecules...... to invade and replace genomic DNA through two joint illegitimate recombination events. SPDIR is controlled by key components of the cellular genome maintenance machinery in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi. The source DNA is primarily intragenomic but can also be acquired through horizontal...... gene transfer. The DNA replacements are nonreciprocal and locus independent. Bioinformatic approaches reveal occurrence of SPDIR events in the gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and in the human genome....

  10. Formation of Compact Clusters from High Resolution Hybrid Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Mark L A; Gray, William J

    2013-01-01

    The early Universe hosted a large population of small dark matter `minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse the minihalo gas. Gray & Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically-symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reactions, and then cools to form dense chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters will be observable with the next generation of telesc...

  11. High maltose-producing. cap alpha. -amylase of Penicillium expansum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, E.M.; Kelly, C.T.; Fogarty, W.M.

    1989-05-01

    An ..cap alpha..-amylase capable of producing exceptionally high levels of maltose (74%) from starch has been identified from a strain of Penicillium expansum. The enzyme is produced extracellularly and was purified to homogeneity by starch adsorption and Sephadex gel filtration chromatography. P. expansum ..cap alpha..-amylase has a pH optimum of 4.5 and is stable in the pH range of 3.6-6.0. Other properties include a temperature optimum of 60/sup 0/C, a molecular weight of 69 000 and and isoelectrtic point of 3.9. The most outstanding feature of the P. expansum enzyme is its ability to yield 14% more maltose and 17.1% less maltotriose than a currently used commercial enzyme. This may be partly explained by the greater affinity of this new enzyme for maltotriose (K/sub m/=0.76 mM) relative to the commercial enzyme, Fungamyl (K/sub m/=2.9 mM). The enzyme reported here is unique among fungal ..cap alpha..-amylases in being able to produce such high levels of maltose and its physicochemical properties suggest that it has potential for commercial development.

  12. Scalable Clustering of High-Dimensional Data Technique Using SPCM with Ant Colony Optimization Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thenmozhi Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of high-dimensional data techniques are emerging, according to data noisy and poor quality challenges. This paper has been developed to cluster data using high-dimensional similarity based PCM (SPCM, with ant colony optimization intelligence which is effective in clustering nonspatial data without getting knowledge about cluster number from the user. The PCM becomes similarity based by using mountain method with it. Though this is efficient clustering, it is checked for optimization using ant colony algorithm with swarm intelligence. Thus the scalable clustering technique is obtained and the evaluation results are checked with synthetic datasets.

  13. Very high coercivity magnetic stripes produced by particle rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, R.B.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a current research program at Sandia National Laboratories whereby magnetic stripes are produced through the use of a new particle rotation technology. This new process allows the stripes to be produced in bulk and then held in a latent state so that they may be encoded at a later date. Since particle rotation is less dependent on the type of magnetic particle used, very high coercivity particles could provide a way to increase both magnetic tamper-resistance and accidental erasure protection. This research was initially funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Safeguard and Security as a portion of their Science and Technology Base Development, Advanced Security Concepts program. Current program funding is being provided by Sandia National Laboratories as part of their Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  14. Heterologous expression of Avermectins biosynthetic gene cluster by construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library of the producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Deng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Avermectins, a group of polyketide natural products, are widely used as anthelmintics in agriculture. Metabolic engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis were extensively employed to improve Avermectins production and create novel Avermectin derivatives, including Ivermectin and Doramectin. It is labor intensive and time cost to genetically manipulate Avermectins producer Streptomyces avermitilis in vivo. Cloning and heterologous expression of Avermectins biosynthetic gene cluster will make it possible to tailor the cluster in vitro. We constructed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC library of S. avermitilis ATCC 31267 with inserted DNA fragments ranged from 100 to 130 Kb. Five recombinant BAC clones which carried the Avermectins biosynthetic gene cluster ave (81 Kb in size were screened out from the library. Then, ave was hetero-expressed in S. lividans. Three Avermectin components, A2a, B1a and A1a were detected from the cell extracts of recombinant strains. It will facilitate the development of Avermectin derivatives by polyketide synthase domain swapping and provide functional element for Avermectins synthetic biology study.

  15. Swarm v2: highly-scalable and high-resolution amplicon clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Mahé

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previously we presented Swarm v1, a novel and open source amplicon clustering program that produced fine-scale molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs, free of arbitrary global clustering thresholds and input-order dependency. Swarm v1 worked with an initial phase that used iterative single-linkage with a local clustering threshold (d, followed by a phase that used the internal abundance structures of clusters to break chained OTUs. Here we present Swarm v2, which has two important novel features: (1 a new algorithm for d = 1 that allows the computation time of the program to scale linearly with increasing amounts of data; and (2 the new fastidious option that reduces under-grouping by grafting low abundant OTUs (e.g., singletons and doubletons onto larger ones. Swarm v2 also directly integrates the clustering and breaking phases, dereplicates sequencing reads with d = 0, outputs OTU representatives in fasta format, and plots individual OTUs as two-dimensional networks.

  16. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  17. Development of High Cordycepin-Producing Cordyceps militaris Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Naru; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Inmyoung; Seo, Young-Su

    2017-03-01

    Cordyceps militaris, known as Dong-Chong-Xia-Cao, produces the most cordycepin among Cordyceps species and can be cultured artificially. For these reasons, C. militaris is widely used as herb or functional food in the East Asia. In this study, we developed a new strain of C. militaris that produces higher cordycepin content than parent strains through mating-based sexual reproduction. Twenty parent strains were collected and identified as C. militaris based on internal trasncrived spacer and rDNA sequences. Seven single spores of MAT 1-1 idiomorph and five single spores of MAT 1-2 idiomorph were isolated from 12 parent strains. When 35 combinations were mated on the brown rice medium with the isolated single spores, eight combinations formed a stroma with a normal perithecia and confirmed mated strains. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that mated strain KSP8 produced the most cordycepin in all the media among all the tested strains. This result showed due to genetic recombination occurring during the sexual reproduction of C. militaris. The development of C. militaris strain with increased cordycepin content by this approach can help not only to generate new C. militaris strains, but also to contribute to the health food or medicine industry.

  18. Hydrophilic carbon clusters as therapeutic, high capacity antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Errol L. G.; Duong, MyLinh T.; Bitner, Brittany R.; Marcano, Daniela C.; Tour, James M.; Kent, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a hallmark of several acute and chronic human pathologies. While many antioxidants have been investigated, the majority have demonstrated poor efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we discuss limitations of current antioxidants and describe a new class of nanoparticle antioxidants, poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized hydrophilic carbon clusters (PEG-HCCs). PEG-HCCs show high capacity to annihilate ROS such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, show no reactivity toward nitric oxide, and can be functionalized with targeting moieties without loss of activity. Given these properties, we propose that PEG-HCCs offer an exciting new area of study for treatment of numerous ROS-induced human pathologies. PMID:25175886

  19. Collision of highly charged ion with clusters. Simulation study for electronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, Kazuhiro [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Collision of highly charged ion with cluster, for example, collision of C{sub 60}-Ar{sup 8+} at E=80 KeV, was simulated by the time-dependence Kohn-Shame equation. The distribution of electron densities and the self-consistent potential were obtained. A part of C{sub 60} potential curve became depressed by the Coulomb force of ion, so that the saddle point was produced on the potential. The behavior of electron transfer on the saddle point was agreed with the classical barrier model. Time-dependent density functional method was explained. (S.Y.)

  20. Clusters of small eruptive flares produced by magnetic reconnection in the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Archontis, V

    2015-01-01

    We report on the formation of small solar flares produced by patchy magnetic reconnection between interacting magnetic loops. A three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical experiment was performed, where a uniform magnetic flux sheet was injected into a fully developed convective layer. The gradual emergence of the field into the solar atmosphere results in a network of magnetic loops, which interact dynamically forming current layers at their interfaces. The formation and ejection of plasmoids out of the current layers leads to patchy reconnection and the spontaneous formation of several small (size ? 1-2Mm) flares. We find that these flares are short-lived (30 s - 3 min) bursts of energy in the range O(10^25 - 10^27) ergs, which is basically the nanoflare-microflare range. Their persistent formation and co-operative action and evolution leads to recurrent emission of fast EUV/X-ray jets and considerable plasma heating in the active corona.

  1. High performance computing: Clusters, constellations, MPPs, and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, Jack; Sterling, Thomas; Simon, Horst; Strohmaier, Erich

    2003-06-10

    Last year's paper by Bell and Gray [1] examined past trends in high performance computing and asserted likely future directions based on market forces. While many of the insights drawn from this perspective have merit and suggest elements governing likely future directions for HPC, there are a number of points put forth that we feel require further discussion and, in certain cases, suggest alternative, more likely views. One area of concern relates to the nature and use of key terms to describe and distinguish among classes of high end computing systems, in particular the authors use of ''cluster'' to relate to essentially all parallel computers derived through the integration of replicated components. The taxonomy implicit in their previous paper, while arguable and supported by some elements of our community, fails to provide the essential semantic discrimination critical to the effectiveness of descriptive terms as tools in managing the conceptual space of consideration. In this paper, we present a perspective that retains the descriptive richness while providing a unifying framework. A second area of discourse that calls for additional commentary is the likely future path of system evolution that will lead to effective and affordable Petaflops-scale computing including the future role of computer centers as facilities for supporting high performance computing environments. This paper addresses the key issues of taxonomy, future directions towards Petaflops computing, and the important role of computer centers in the 21st century.

  2. Searching for Cool Core Clusters at High redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Joana S; Tozzi, Paolo; Boehringer, Hans; Ettori, Stefano; Bignamini, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the detection of Cool Cores (CCs) in the distant galaxy cluster population, with the purpose of measuring the CC fraction out to redshift 0.7 0.7, and should also be related with the shorter age of distant clusters, implying less time to develop a cool core.

  3. Highly dynamically evolved intermediate-age open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Andrés E.; Dias, Wilton S.; Sampedro, Laura M.

    2017-04-01

    We present a comprehensive UBVRI and Washington CT1T2 photometric analysis of seven catalogued open clusters, namely: Ruprecht 3, 9, 37, 74, 150, ESO 324-15 and 436-2. The multiband photometric data sets in combination with 2MASS photometry and Gaia astrometry for the brighter stars were used to estimate their structural parameters and fundamental astrophysical properties. We found that Ruprecht 3 and ESO 436-2 do not show self-consistent evidence of being physical systems. The remained studied objects are open clusters of intermediate age (9.0 ≤ log(t yr-1) ≤ 9.6), of relatively small size (rcls ∼ 0.4-1.3 pc) and placed between 0.6 and 2.9 kpc from the Sun. We analysed the relationships between core, half-mass, tidal and Jacoby radii as well as half-mass relaxation times to conclude that the studied clusters are in an evolved dynamical stage. The total cluster masses obtained by summing those of the observed cluster stars resulted to be ∼10-15 per cent of the masses of open clusters of similar age located closer than 2 kpc from the Sun. We found that cluster stars occupy volumes as large as those for tidally filled clusters.

  4. Accelerating high-dimensional clustering with lossless data reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaqish, Bahjat F; O'Brien, Jonathon J; Hibbard, Jonathan C; Clowers, Katie J

    2017-09-15

    For cluster analysis, high-dimensional data are associated with instability, decreased classification accuracy and high-computational burden. The latter challenge can be eliminated as a serious concern. For applications where dimension reduction techniques are not implemented, we propose a temporary transformation which accelerates computations with no loss of information. The algorithm can be applied for any statistical procedure depending only on Euclidean distances and can be implemented sequentially to enable analyses of data that would otherwise exceed memory limitations. The method is easily implemented in common statistical software as a standard pre-processing step. The benefit of our algorithm grows with the dimensionality of the problem and the complexity of the analysis. Consequently, our simple algorithm not only decreases the computation time for routine analyses, it opens the door to performing calculations that may have otherwise been too burdensome to attempt. R, Matlab and SAS/IML code for implementing lossless data reduction is freely available in the Appendix. obrienj@hms.harvard.edu.

  5. On the accuracy of the high redshift cluster luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Roberto P; Barrientos, Luis F

    2008-01-01

    We study the reliability of the statistical background subtraction method for computing the Ks-band luminosity function of cluster galaxies at z~1 using mock Red-sequence Cluster Survey cluster catalogues constructed from GALFORM semi-analytic galaxies. The underlying cluster luminosity function in the mocks are compatible with recent estimates at z~1 by several authors. We simulate different samples where the number of clusters with Ks-band photometry goes from 5 to a maximum of 50, in order to find the most suitable observational sample to carry out this study; the current observational status in the nIR wavelength range has been reached using 5 real clusters at z~1. We compute the composite luminosity function for several samples of galaxy clusters with masses 1.5x10^14 M_sun assuming a flux limited, complete sample of galaxies down to Ks=21.0 magnitudes. We find that the Schechter fit parameters Ks* and alpha for a sample of galaxies with no redshift information are rather poorly constrained if both param...

  6. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  7. High-Intensity Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Rare Gas Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林亚风; 钟钦; 曾淳; 陈哲

    2001-01-01

    With a 45 fs multiterawatt 790 nm laser system and jets of argon and krypton atomic clusters, a study of the interaction of fs intense laser pulses with large size rare gas dusters was conducted. The maximum laser intensity of about 7 × 1016 W/cm2 and dusters composed of thousands of atoms which were determined through Rayleigh scattering measurements were involved inthe experiments. On the one hand, the results indicate that the interaction is strongly cluster size dependent. The stronger the interaction, the larger the clusters are. On the other hand, a saturation followed by a drop of the energy of ions ejected from the interaction will occur when the laser intensity exceeds a definite value for clusters of a certain size.

  8. CLUSTERING AND PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES AROUND HIGH REDSHIFT RADIO SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Bornancini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the clustering properties of galaxies in the eld 0:5 < z < 1:5 Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS radio sources selected from SUMSS and NVSS surveys. We nd a comoving correlation length of r0 = 14:0+.- 2:8 h-1 Mpc. We compare our ndings with those obtained in a cosmological N-body simulation populated with GALFORM semi-analytic galaxies. We nd that clusters of galaxies with masses in the range M = 1013:4-14:2 h-1 M have a cluster-galaxy cross-correlation amplitude comparable to those found between USS hosts and galaxies. These results suggest that distant radio galaxies are excellent tracers of galaxy overdensities and pinpoint the progenitors of present day rich clusters of galaxies.

  9. Highly dynamically evolved intermediate-age open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Piatti, Andrés E; Sampedro, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive UBVRI and Washington CT1T2 photometric analysis of seven catalogued open clusters, namely: Ruprecht 3, 9, 37, 74, 150, ESO 324-15 and 436-2. The multi-band photometric data sets in combination with 2MASS photometry and Gaia astrometry for the brighter stars were used to estimate their structural parameters and fundamental astrophysical properties. We found that Ruprecht 3 and ESO 436-2 do not show self-consistent evidence of being physical systems. The remained studied objects are open clusters of intermediate-age (9.0 < log(t yr-1) < 9.6), of relatively small size (r_cls ~ 0.4 - 1.3 pc) and placed between 0.6 and 2.9 kpc from the Sun. We analized the relationships between core, half-mass, tidal and Jacoby radii as well as half-mass relaxation times to conclude that the studied clusters are in an evolved dynamical stage. The cluster masses obtained by summing those of the observed cluster stars resulted to be ~ 10-15 per cent of the masses of open clusters of similar age locat...

  10. CFSBC:Clustering in High-Dimensional Space Based on Closed Frequent Item Set

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Wei-wei; SUN Zhi-hui

    2004-01-01

    Clustering in high-dimensional space is an important domain in data mining.It is the process of discovering groups in a high-dimensional dataset, in such way, that the similarity between the elements of the same cluster is maximum and between different clusters is minimal.Many clustering algorithms are not applicable to high-dimensional space for its sparseness and decline properties.Dimensionality reduction is an effective method to solve this problem.The paper proposes a novel clustering algorithm CFSBC based on closed frequent itemsets derived from association rule mining, which can get the clustering attributes with high efficiency.The algorithm has several advantages.First, it deals effectively with the problem of dimensionality reduction.Second, it is applicable to different kinds of attributes.Third, it is suitable for very large data sets.Experiment shows that the proposed algorithm is effective and efficient.

  11. Using Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Cluster for Supporting Fine-Grained Parallel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Beowulf cluster made of COTS PCs (featuring dual processor Xeon’s) interconnected via a Gigabit Ethernet Network and a Myrinet network [Boden 1995...AFRL-IF-RS-TR-2006-313 Final Technical Report October 2006 USING HETEROGENEOUS HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CLUSTER FOR SUPPORTING...GRANT NUMBER FA8750-05-1-0130 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE USING HETEROGENEOUS HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CLUSTER FOR SUPPORTING FINE-GRAINED PARALLEL

  12. A light hydrocarbon fuel processor producing high-purity hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Daniel G.; Taylor, Kyle; Mason, Dylan

    This paper discusses the design process and presents performance data for a dual fuel (natural gas and LPG) fuel processor for PEM fuel cells delivering between 2 and 8 kW electric power in stationary applications. The fuel processor resulted from a series of design compromises made to address different design constraints. First, the product quality was selected; then, the unit operations needed to achieve that product quality were chosen from the pool of available technologies. Next, the specific equipment needed for each unit operation was selected. Finally, the unit operations were thermally integrated to achieve high thermal efficiency. Early in the design process, it was decided that the fuel processor would deliver high-purity hydrogen. Hydrogen can be separated from other gases by pressure-driven processes based on either selective adsorption or permeation. The pressure requirement made steam reforming (SR) the preferred reforming technology because it does not require compression of combustion air; therefore, steam reforming is more efficient in a high-pressure fuel processor than alternative technologies like autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX), where the combustion occurs at the pressure of the process stream. A low-temperature pre-reformer reactor is needed upstream of a steam reformer to suppress coke formation; yet, low temperatures facilitate the formation of metal sulfides that deactivate the catalyst. For this reason, a desulfurization unit is needed upstream of the pre-reformer. Hydrogen separation was implemented using a palladium alloy membrane. Packed beds were chosen for the pre-reformer and reformer reactors primarily because of their low cost, relatively simple operation and low maintenance. Commercial, off-the-shelf balance of plant (BOP) components (pumps, valves, and heat exchangers) were used to integrate the unit operations. The fuel processor delivers up to 100 slm hydrogen >99.9% pure with thermal efficiency is

  13. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G T; Romero, S A; Santos, A D

    2010-03-01

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  14. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, G. T.; Romero, S. A.; Santos, A. D. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  15. High-performance dynamic quantum clustering on graphics processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittek, Peter, E-mail: peterwittek@acm.org [Swedish School of Library and Information Science, University of Boras, Boras (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    Clustering methods in machine learning may benefit from borrowing metaphors from physics. Dynamic quantum clustering associates a Gaussian wave packet with the multidimensional data points and regards them as eigenfunctions of the Schroedinger equation. The clustering structure emerges by letting the system evolve and the visual nature of the algorithm has been shown to be useful in a range of applications. Furthermore, the method only uses matrix operations, which readily lend themselves to parallelization. In this paper, we develop an implementation on graphics hardware and investigate how this approach can accelerate the computations. We achieve a speedup of up to two magnitudes over a multicore CPU implementation, which proves that quantum-like methods and acceleration by graphics processing units have a great relevance to machine learning.

  16. High-resolution re-simulations of massive DM halos and the Fundamental Plane of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzoni, B; Ciotti, L

    2002-01-01

    Pure N-body high-resolution re-simulations of 13 massive dark matter halos in a Lambda-CDM cosmology are presented. The resulting sample is used to investigate the physical origin of the Fundamental Plane, ``Faber-Jackson'', and ``Kormendy'' relations observed for nearby galaxy clusters. In particular, we focus on the role of dissipationless hierarchical merging in establishing or modifying these relations. Contrarily to what found in the case of the Faber-Jackson and Kormendy relations for galaxies (see Londrillo, Nipoti and Ciotti, this conference), dissipationless merging on cluster scales produces scaling relations remarkably similar to the observed ones. This suggests that gas dissipation plays a minor role in the formation of galaxy clusters, and the hierarchical merger scenario is not at odd with the observed regularity of these systems.

  17. Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe; Tillotson, Thomas; Hrubesh, Lawrence; Simpson, Randall

    2007-05-01

    Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

  18. Cluster Decay of the High-lying excited states in $^{14}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Z Y; Li, Z H; Lin, C J; Li, Q T; Ge, Y C; Lou, J L; Jiang, W; Li, J; Yang, Z H; Feng, J; Li, P J; Chen, J; Liu, Q; Zang, H L; Yang, B; Zhang, Y; Chen, Z Q; Liu, Y; Sun, X H; Ma, J; Jia, H M; Xu, X X; Yang, L; Ma, N R; Sun, L J

    2016-01-01

    A cluster-transfer experiment of $^9\\rm{Be}(^9\\rm{Be},^{14}\\rm{C}\\rightarrow\\alpha+^{10}\\rm{Be})\\alpha$ at an incident energy of 45 MeV was carried out in order to investigate the molecular structure in high-lying resonant states in $^{14}$C. This reaction is of extremely large $Q$-value, making it an excellent case to select the reaction mechanism and the final states in outgoing nuclei. The high-lying resonances in $^{14}$C are reconstructed for three sets of well discriminated final states in $^{10}$Be. The results confirm the previous decay measurements with clearly improved decay-channel selections and show also a new state at 23.5(1) MeV. The resonant states at 22.4(3) and 24.0(3) MeV decay primarily into the typical molecular states at about 6 MeV in $^{10}$Be, indicating a well developed cluster structure in these high-lying states in $^{14}$C. Further measurements of more states of this kind are suggested.

  19. Cluster decay of the high-lying excited states in 14C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z. Y.; Ye, Y. L.; Li, Z. H.; Lin, C. J.; Li, Q. T.; Ge, Y. C.; Lou, J. L.; Jiang, W.; Li, J.; Yang, Z. H.; Feng, J.; Li, P. J.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.; Zang, H. L.; Yang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, Z. Q.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X. H.; Ma, J.; Jia, H. M.; Xu, X. X.; Yang, L.; Ma, N. R.; Sun, L. J.

    2016-11-01

    A cluster-transfer experiment of 9Be(9Be,14C → α+10Be)α at an incident energy of 45 MeV was carried out in order to investigate the molecular structure in high-lying resonant states in 14C. This reaction is of extremely large Q-value, making it an excellent case to select the reaction mechanism and the final states in outgoing nuclei. The high-lying resonances in 14C are reconstructed for three sets of well discriminated final states in 10Be. The results confirm the previous decay measurements with clearly improved decay-channel selections and also show a new state at 23.5(1) MeV. The resonant states at 22.4(3) and 24.0(3) MeV decay primarily into the typical molecular states at about 6 MeV in 10Be, indicating a well developed cluster structure in these high-lying states in 14C. Further measurements of more states of this kind are suggested. Supported by the 973 Program of China (2013 CB834402) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275011, 11535004)

  20. Functionally graded materials produced with high power lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Pei, Y.T.; Kumar, A; Chung, YW; Moore, JJ; Doll, GL; Yatsui, K; Misra, DS

    2002-01-01

    With a well-controlled laser melt injection (LMI) process, for the first time the feasibility is demonstrated to produce SiC particles (SiCp) reinforced Ti6Al4V functionally graded materials (FGMs). SiCp are injected just behind the laser beam into the extended part of the laser melt pool that is fo

  1. Quantifying the Earthquake Clustering that Independent Sources with Stationary Rates (as Included in Current Risk Models) Can Produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Nyst, M.; Apel, E. V.; Muir-Wood, R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent Canterbury earthquake sequence (CES) renewed public and academic awareness concerning the clustered nature of seismicity. Multiple event occurrence in short time and space intervals is reminiscent of aftershock sequences, but aftershock is a statistical definition, not a label one can give an earthquake in real-time. Aftershocks are defined collectively as what creates the Omori event rate decay after a large event or are defined as what is taken away as "dependent events" using a declustering method. It is noteworthy that depending on the declustering method used on the Canterbury earthquake sequence, the number of independent events varies a lot. This lack of unambiguous definition of aftershocks leads to the need to investigate the amount of clustering inherent in "declustered" risk models. This is the task we concentrate on in this contribution. We start from a background source model for the Canterbury region, in which 1) centroids of events of given magnitude are distributed using a latin-hypercube lattice, 2) following the range of preferential orientations determined from stress maps and focal mechanism, 3) with length determined using the local scaling relationship and 4) rates from a and b values derived from the declustered pre-2010 catalog. We then proceed to create tens of thousands of realizations of 6 to 20 year periods, and we define criteria to identify which successions of events in the region would be perceived as a sequence. Note that the spatial clustering expected is a lower end compared to a fully uniform distribution of events. Then we perform the same exercise with rates and b-values determined from the catalog including the CES. If the pre-2010 catalog was long (or rich) enough, then the computed "stationary" rates calculated from it would include the CES declustered events (by construction, regardless of the physical meaning of or relationship between those events). In regions of low seismicity rate (e.g., Canterbury before

  2. The XMM Cluster Survey: The build up of stellar mass in Brightest Cluster Galaxies at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Stott, J P; Sahlen, M; Hilton, M; Lloyd-Davies, E; Capozzi, D; Hosmer, M; Liddle, A R; Mehrtens, N; Miller, C J; Romer, A K; Stanford, S A; Viana, P T P; Davidson, M; Hoyle, B; Kay, S T; Nichol, R C

    2010-01-01

    We present deep J and Ks band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z=0.8-1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru Telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at ~9e11MSol since z~1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar ma...

  3. The microbiota of high-moisture mozzarella cheese produced with different acidification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidone, Angela; Zotta, Teresa; Matera, Attilio; Ricciardi, Annamaria; De Filippis, Francesca; Ercolini, Danilo; Parente, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota of high-moisture Mozzarella cheese made from cow's milk and produced with different acidification methods was evaluated at the end of refrigerated storage by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The cheeses were clearly separated on the basis of the acidification methods. Cheeses produced with the addition of starters were dominated by Streptococcus thermophilus, but a variety of lactic acid bacteria and spoilage microorganisms appeared at low levels (0.01-1%). Cheeses produced by direct addition of citric acid were dominated by a diverse microbiota, including both lactic acid bacteria and psychrotrophic γ-proteobacteria. For five brands the acidification system was not declared on the label: the microbiota was dominated by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (S. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus helveticus) but a variety of other subdominant lactic acid bacteria, psychrotrophs and Enterobacteriaceae were present, with a diversity comparable or higher to cheeses produced by direct acid addition. This led to the conclusion that undefined starters were used for acidification. Both ordination methods and network analysis were used for the representation of beta-diversity: matrix cluster analysis, principal coordinate analysis and OTU networks uncovered different aspects of the microbial community structure. For three cheese brands both biological replicates (cheeses from different lots) and technical replicates (replicate cheeses from the same lot) were analyzed. Repeatability was acceptable for OTUs appearing at frequencies >1%, but was low otherwise. A linear mixed model showed that the starter system was responsible for most differences related to dairies, while difference due to psychrotrophic contaminants was more related to lot-to-lot variability.

  4. C3 as the dominant carbon cluster in high pressure discharges in graphite hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Sohail Ahmad; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Khan, Sabih-ud-Din; Khalid, Rahila; Aleem, Abid; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2007-03-01

    Results are presented that have been obtained while operating the graphite hollow cathode duoplasmatron ion source in dual mode under constant discharge current. This dual mode operation enabled us to obtain the mass and emission spectra simultaneously. In mass spectra C3 is the main feature but C4 and C5 are also prominent, whereas in emission spectra C2 is also there and its presence shows that it is in an excited state rather than in an ionic state. These facts provide evidence that C3 is produced due to the regeneration of a soot forming sequence and leave it in ionic state. C3 is a stable molecule and the only dominant species among the carbon clusters that survives in a regenerative sooting environment at high-pressure discharges.

  5. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Troy J.; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    2010-10-05

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  6. Methodology for Clustering High-Resolution Spatiotemporal Solar Resource Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getman, Dan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lopez, Anthony [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dyson, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we introduce a methodology to achieve multiple levels of spatial resolution reduction of solar resource data, with minimal impact on data variability, for use in energy systems modeling. The selection of an appropriate clustering algorithm, parameter selection including cluster size, methods of temporal data segmentation, and methods of cluster evaluation are explored in the context of a repeatable process. In describing this process, we illustrate the steps in creating a reduced resolution, but still viable, dataset to support energy systems modeling, e.g. capacity expansion or production cost modeling. This process is demonstrated through the use of a solar resource dataset; however, the methods are applicable to other resource data represented through spatiotemporal grids, including wind data. In addition to energy modeling, the techniques demonstrated in this paper can be used in a novel top-down approach to assess renewable resources within many other contexts that leverage variability in resource data but require reduction in spatial resolution to accommodate modeling or computing constraints.

  7. Ultrafine grained high density manganese zinc ferrite produced using polyol process assisted by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudisson, T.; Beji, Z.; Herbst, F.; Nowak, S. [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75205 Paris (France); Ammar, S., E-mail: ammarmer@univ-paris-diderot.fr [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75205 Paris (France); Valenzuela, R. [D2MC, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis of Mn–Zn ferrite (MZFO) nanoparticles (NPs) by the polyol process and their consolidation by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique at relatively low temperature and short time, namely 500 °C for 10 min. NPs were obtained as perfectly epitaxied aggregated nanoclusters forming a kind of spherical pseudo-single-crystals of about 40 nm in size. The results on NPs consolidation by SPS underlined the importance of this clustering on the grain growth mechanism. Grain growth proceeds by coalescing nanocrystalline aggregates into single grain of almost the same average size, thus leading to a high density ceramic. Due to magnetic exchange interactions between grains, the produced ceramic does not exhibit thermal relaxation whereas their precursor polyol-made NPs are superparamagnetic. - Highlights: • Textured Mn–Zn ferrite nano-aggregates were produced in polyol. • Dense ceramic was obtained by SPS starting from these particles at 500 °C for 10 min. • The grain growth was driven by coalescence leading to nanometer-sized grains. • The 300 K-magnetic properties of the ceramic are typical of a soft magnet. • Its magnetization is very close to that of bulk despite its ultrafine grain size.

  8. EGRET upper limits on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, O; Sreekumar, P; Mattox, J R

    2003-01-01

    We report EGRET upper limits on the high-energy gamma-ray emission from clusters of galaxies. EGRET observations between 1991 and 2000 were analyzed at positions of 58 individual clusters from a flux-limited sample of nearby X-ray bright galaxy clusters. Subsequently, a coadded image from individual galaxy clusters has been analyzed using an adequately adapted diffuse gamma-ray foreground model. The resulting 2 sigma upper limit for the average cluster is \\~ 6 x 10^{-9} cm^{-2} s^{-1} for E > 100 MeV. Implications of the non--detection of prominent individual clusters and of the general inability to detect the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters as a class of gamma-ray emitters are discussed. We compare our results with model predictions on the high-energy gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters as well as with recent claims of an association between unidentified or unresolved gamma-ray sources and Abell clusters of galaxies and find these contradictory.

  9. Constraining omega from X-ray properties of clusters of galaxies at high redshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadat, R.; Blanchard, A.; Oukbir, J.

    1997-01-01

    Properties of high redshift clusters are a fundamental source of information for cosmology. It has been shown by Oukbir and Blanchard (1997) that the combined knowledge of the redshift distribution of X-ray clusters of galaxies and the luminosity-temperature correlation, L-X - T-X, provides a pow...

  10. High rate deposition system for metal-cluster/SiO x C y H z -polymer nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, T.; Rehders, S.; Schürmann, U.; Strunskus, T.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Faupel, F.

    2013-06-01

    A system for deposition of nanocomposite materials consisting of a SiO x C y H z -polymer matrix and Ag nanoclusters is presented. Ag nanoclusters with sizes between 2 and 20 nm are produced in a gas aggregation cluster source and are deposited through a focused beam at a high rate. This cluster source is presented in detail and the characteristics of the produced nanoclusters are shown. Simultaneously, a SiO x C y H z -polymer matrix is grown from the precursor hexamethyldisiloxane in an RF plasma. The beam of clusters is deposited into the growing polymer, forming the composite material. This process allows the rapid deposition of composite material with varying metal nanocluster concentrations and properties. Since the cluster generation is separated from the matrix growth, the properties of both can be controlled independently. In this study, we present two types of nanocomposite samples, in the first the Ag nanoclusters are homogeneously distributed in the matrix, in the second type the Ag nanoclusters form a layer which is covered by the matrix. These samples are investigated using transmission electron micrography to determine the morphology. Furthermore, the optical properties are probed using optical transmission spectroscopy and the plasmonic resonance behavior is discussed.

  11. Reactions of Laser Ablated Metal Plasma with Molecular Alcohol Beams: Dependence of the Produced Cluster Ion Species on the Beam Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Dong-Mei; LI Hai-Yang; ZHANG Shu-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The gas phase reactions of metal plasma with alcohol clusters were studied by time of flight mass spectrometry(TOFMS) using laser ablation-molecular beam (LAMB) method. The significant dependence of the product cluster ions on the molecular beam conditions was observed. When the plasma acted on the low density parts of the pulsed molecular beam, the metal-alcohol complexes M+An (M=Cu, Al, Mg, Ni and A=C2H5OH, CH3OH) were the dominant products, and the sizes of product ion clusters were smaller. While the plasma acted on the high density part of the beam, however, the main products turned to be protonated alcohol clusters H+An and, as the reactions of plasma with methanol were concerned, the protonated water-methanol complexes H3O+(CH3OH)n with a larger size(n≤ 12 for ethanol and n≤24 for methanol). Similarly, as the pressure of the carrier helium gas was varied from1 × 105 to 5 × 105 Pa, the main products were changed from M+An to H+An and the sizes of the clusters also increased. The changes in the product clusters were attributed to the different formation mechanism of the output ions,that is, the M+An ions came from the reaction of metal ion with alcohol clusters, while H+An mainly from collisional reaction of electron with alcohol clusters.

  12. On the Survival of High-Altitude Open Clusters within the Milky Way Galaxy Tides

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Medina, L A; Peimbert, A; Moreno, E

    2016-01-01

    It is a common assumption that high-altitude open clusters live longer compared with clusters moving close to the Galactic plane. This is because at high altitudes, open clusters are far from the disruptive effects of in-plane substructures, such as spiral arms, molecular clouds and the bar. However, an important aspect to consider in this scenario is that orbits of high-altitude open clusters will eventually cross the Galactic plane, where the vertical tidal field of the disk is strong. In this work we simulate the interaction of open clusters with the tidal field of a detailed Milky Way Galactic model at different average altitudes and galactocentric radii. We find that the life expectancy of clusters decreases as the maximum orbital altitude increases and reaches a minimum at altitudes of approximately 600 pc. Clusters near the Galactic plane live longer because they do not experience strong vertical tidal shocks from the Galactic disk; then, for orbital altitudes higher than 600 pc, clusters start again t...

  13. Slow dynamics and high variability in balanced cortical networks with clustered connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2012-11-01

    Anatomical studies demonstrate that excitatory connections in cortex are not uniformly distributed across a network but instead exhibit clustering into groups of highly connected neurons. The implications of clustering for cortical activity are unclear. We studied the effect of clustered excitatory connections on the dynamics of neuronal networks that exhibited high spike time variability owing to a balance between excitation and inhibition. Even modest clustering substantially changed the behavior of these networks, introducing slow dynamics during which clusters of neurons transiently increased or decreased their firing rate. Consequently, neurons exhibited both fast spiking variability and slow firing rate fluctuations. A simplified model shows how stimuli bias networks toward particular activity states, thereby reducing firing rate variability as observed experimentally in many cortical areas. Our model thus relates cortical architecture to the reported variability in spontaneous and evoked spiking activity.

  14. Producing high fidelity single photons with optimal brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Laiho, K; Silberhorn, Ch

    2009-01-01

    Parametric down-conversion (PDC) offers the possibility to control the fabrication of non-Gaussian states such as Fock states. However, in conventional PDC sources energy and momentum conservation introduce strict frequency and photon number correlations, which impact the fidelity of the prepared state. In our work we optimize the preparation of single-photon Fock state from the emission of waveguided PDC via spectral filtering. We study the effect of correlations via photon number resolving detection and quantum interference. Our measurements show how the reduction of mixness due to filtering can be evaluated. Interfering the prepared photon with a coherent state we establish an experimentally measured fidelity of the produced target state of 78%.

  15. Coincidence spectroscopy of high-lying Rydberg states produced in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Lemell, Christoph; Yoshida, Shuhei; Nagele, Stefan; Maurer, Raffael; Baltuška, Andrius; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the detection of high-lying Rydberg states produced in strong laser fields with coincidence spectroscopy. Electron emission after the interaction of strong laser pulses with atoms and molecules is measured together with the parent ions in coincidence measurements. These electrons originate from high-lying Rydberg states with quantum numbers from n ˜20 up to n ≲120 formed by frustrated field ionization. Ionization rates are retrieved from the measured ionization signal of these Rydberg states. Simulations show that both tunneling ionization by a weak dc field and photoionization by blackbody radiation contribute to delayed electron emission on the nano- to microsecond scale. Furthermore, the dependence of the Rydberg-state production on the ellipticity of the driving laser field indicates that such high-lying Rydberg states are populated through electron recapture. The present experiment provides detailed quantitative information on Rydberg production in strong-field interaction.

  16. Cyanobacteria produce a high variety of hepatotoxic peptides in lichen symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Ulla; Fewer, David P; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rikkinen, Jouko

    2012-04-10

    Lichens are symbiotic associations between fungi and photosynthetic algae or cyanobacteria. Microcystins are potent toxins that are responsible for the poisoning of both humans and animals. These toxins are mainly associated with aquatic cyanobacterial blooms, but here we show that the cyanobacterial symbionts of terrestrial lichens from all over the world commonly produce microcystins. We screened 803 lichen specimens from five different continents for cyanobacterial toxins by amplifying a part of the gene cluster encoding the enzyme complex responsible for microcystin production and detecting toxins directly from lichen thalli. We found either the biosynthetic genes for making microcystins or the toxin itself in 12% of all analyzed lichen specimens. A plethora of different microcystins was found with over 50 chemical variants, and many of the variants detected have only rarely been reported from free-living cyanobacteria. In addition, high amounts of nodularin, up to 60 μg g(-1), were detected from some lichen thalli. This microcystin analog and potent hepatotoxin has previously been known only from the aquatic bloom-forming genus Nodularia. Our results demonstrate that the production of cyanobacterial hepatotoxins in lichen symbiosis is a global phenomenon and occurs in many different lichen lineages. The very high genetic diversity of the mcyE gene and the chemical diversity of microcystins suggest that lichen symbioses may have been an important environment for diversification of these cyanobacteria.

  17. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF THE W3 GMC: CLUES TO THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS OF HIGH-MASS STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Martin, P. G.; Luong, Q. Nguyen; Roy, A. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Hennemann, M.; Men' shchikov, A.; Andre, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Hill, T.; Minier, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU-CNRS/INSU-Universite Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bontemps, S. [Universite Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Bernard, J.-Ph. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Avenue colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Di Francesco, J.; Fallscheer, C. [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Elia, D.; Pezzuto, S. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Li, J. Z. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2013-04-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for the study of the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have used Herschel data from the HOBYS key program to produce and analyze column density and temperature maps. Two preliminary catalogs were produced by extracting sources from the column density map and from Herschel maps convolved to 500 {mu}m resolution. Herschel reveals that among the compact sources (FWHM < 0.45 pc), W3 East, W3 West, and W3 (OH) are the most massive and luminous and have the highest column density. Considering the unique properties of W3 East and W3 West, the only clumps with ongoing high-mass star formation, we suggest a 'convergent constructive feedback' scenario to account for the formation of a cluster with decreasing age and increasing system/source mass toward the innermost regions. This process, which relies on feedback by high-mass stars to ensure the availability of material during cluster formation, could also lead to the creation of an environment suitable for the formation of Trapezium-like systems. In common with other scenarios proposed in other HOBYS studies, our results indicate that an active/dynamic process aiding in the accumulation, compression, and confinement of material is a critical feature of the high-mass star/cluster formation, distinguishing it from classical low-mass star formation. The environmental conditions and availability of triggers determine the form in which this process occurs, implying that high-mass star/cluster formation could arise from a range of scenarios: from large-scale convergence of turbulent flows to convergent constructive feedback or mergers of filaments.

  18. Physiological characteristics of high yield under cluster planting: photosynthesis and canopy microclimate of cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-ting Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton produces more biomass and economic yield when cluster planting pattern (three plants per hole than in a traditional planting pattern (one plant per hole, even at similar plant densities, indicating that individual plant growth is promoted by cluster planting. The causal factors for this improved growth induced by cluster planting pattern, the light interception, canopy microclimate and photosynthetic rate of cotton were investigated in an arid region of China. The results indicated that the leaf area index and light interception were higher in cluster planting, and significantly different from those in traditional planting during the middle and late growth stages. Cotton canopy humidity at different growth stages was increased but canopy temperatures were reduced by cluster planting. In the later growth stage of cluster planting, the leaf chlorophyll content was higher and the leaf net photosynthetic rate and canopy photosynthetic rate were significantly increased in comparing with traditional planting pattern. We concluded that differences in canopy light interception and photosynthetic rate were the primary factors responsible for increased biomass production and economic yield in cluster planting compared with the traditional planting of cotton.

  19. Shocks and Cool Cores: An ALMA View of Massive Galaxy Cluster Formation at High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kaustuv

    2017-07-01

    These slides present some recent results on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging of galaxy cluster substructures. The advantage of SZ imaging at high redshifts or in the low density cluster outskirts is already well-known. Now with ALMA a combination of superior angular resolution and high sensitivity is available. One example is the first ALMA measurement of a merger shock at z=0.9 in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster. Here comparison between SZ, X-ray and radio data enabled us to put constraints on the shock Mach number and magnetic field strength for a high-z radio relic. Second example is the ALMA SZ imaging of the core region of z=1.4 galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.2-2557. Here ALMA data provide an accurate measurement of the thermal pressure near the cluster center, and from a joint SZ/X-ray analysis we find clear evidence for a reduced core temperature. This result indicate that a cool core establishes itself early enough in the cluster formation history while the gas accumulation is still continuing. The above two ALMA measurements are among several other recent SZ results that shed light on the formation process of massive clusters at high redshifts.

  20. The high-producing dairy cow and its reproductive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, H; Smith, Rf; Royal, Md;

    2007-01-01

    There is evidence that the reproductive performance of dairy cows has declined as milk yields have increased over the last 40 years. Identifying the precise cause(s) of this problem may provide focused solutions. Intensive genetic selection for very high yields has reduced fertility, due mainly t...

  1. A METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH QUALITY SOLENOIDAL FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.; Halbach, K.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive device is described which can be used to provide a highly homogeneous solenoidal magnetic field when the solenoid windings are inadequate. Design considerations and experimental measurements are presented. A field straightness of approximately 10{sup -4} radians has been achieved.

  2. Application of High Performance Liquid Chromatography to Separation of Novel Chiral Tetrahedral Heterometal Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Yi ZHU; Wei Qiang ZHANG; Yu Hua ZHANG; Li Ren CHEN; Yong Min LI

    2003-01-01

    A series of novel chiral tetrahedral heterometal clusters have firstly been separated oncellulose tris-(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) stationary phase by high performance liquid chrom-atography, using hexane as the mobile phase with various alcohols as modifiers.

  3. COMPOSITION OF THE CLUSTERS AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF WHITE VINE SORTS OF GRAPE FOR PRODUCING JUICES OF DIRECT PRESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chausov V. M.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of the study of mechanical composition of grapes and biochemical characteristics of white wine grapes for the production of juice of direct extraction and blending. Thus, the yield of studied grapes ranged from 7.5 to 13.2 t / ha: highest yielding varieties and hybrids of Pervenets Magaracha and Tsitronnyy Magaracha, and the lowest - Chardonnay and Pinot blanc. At an average weight of clusters of varieties were divided into three groups - large clusters (230-243 g in varieties Pervenets Magaracha and Tsitronnyy Magaracha, medium (181-184 g - the varieties Chardonnay and Pinot blanc, small (112-116 g - the varieties Bianca and Viorica. By weight of the 100 berries were divided into four groups - Bianca and Viorica (I, Pervenets Magaracha (II, Chardonnay (III, Pinot blanc and Tsitronnyy Magaracha (IV. Weight of 100 seeds from the largest varieties Pinot blanc and Bianca, and the lowest - in the varieties of Tsitronnyy Magaracha and Chardonnay. The solids content in the juices of these varieties ranged from 19.4 to 21.8%, which corresponded to branded products and higher of commodity varieties. Mass concentration of sugars ranged from 18.4 to 21.3 g / 100 cm3. Titratable acid content in the juice was varied from 0.65 to 0.78 g / 100 cm3. Sugar-acid ratio, defined as the ratio of concentration of sugars and titratable acids ranged from 23.6 to 30. The recommended values for this indicator were within 22-30. According to the results of the tasting, we rated "excellent" the juices from the varieties of Tsitronnyy Magaracha, Viorica (19 points and Bianca (17 points; "good" marks were given to the juices from Pinot blanc, Chardonnay, Pervenets Magaracha: this means that we can get juices of excellent quality from the grape varieties under study with the title of ampelographic variety; in addition, the juice of the grape of varieties Chardonnay, Pinot blanc, Bianca, Pervenets Magaracha due to their potassium content will

  4. Identification and functional analysis of gene cluster involvement in biosynthesis of the cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic pelgipeptin produced by Paenibacillus elgii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chao-Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pelgipeptin, a potent antibacterial and antifungal agent, is a non-ribosomally synthesised lipopeptide antibiotic. This compound consists of a β-hydroxy fatty acid and nine amino acids. To date, there is no information about its biosynthetic pathway. Results A potential pelgipeptin synthetase gene cluster (plp was identified from Paenibacillus elgii B69 through genome analysis. The gene cluster spans 40.8 kb with eight open reading frames. Among the genes in this cluster, three large genes, plpD, plpE, and plpF, were shown to encode non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs, with one, seven, and one module(s, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of the substrate specificity of all nine adenylation domains indicated that the sequence of the NRPS modules is well collinear with the order of amino acids in pelgipeptin. Additional biochemical analysis of four recombinant adenylation domains (PlpD A1, PlpE A1, PlpE A3, and PlpF A1 provided further evidence that the plp gene cluster involved in pelgipeptin biosynthesis. Conclusions In this study, a gene cluster (plp responsible for the biosynthesis of pelgipeptin was identified from the genome sequence of Paenibacillus elgii B69. The identification of the plp gene cluster provides an opportunity to develop novel lipopeptide antibiotics by genetic engineering.

  5. Implementing Simulation Design of Experiments and Remote Execution on a High Performance Computing Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Kennard, R. W. & Stone, L.A. (1969). Computer Aided Desing of Experiments . Tecnometrics, 11(1), 137-148. Kleijnen, J. P. (2003). A user’s guide to the...SIMULATION DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS AND REMOTE EXECUTION ON A HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CLUSTER by Adam J. Peters September 2007 Thesis...Simulation Design of Experiments and Remote Execution on a High Performance Computing Cluster 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam J. Peters 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7

  6. Method for producing highly conformal transparent conducting oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Mane, Anil U.

    2016-07-26

    A method for forming a transparent conducting oxide product layer. The method includes use of precursors, such as tetrakis-(dimethylamino) tin and trimethyl indium, and selected use of dopants, such as SnO and ZnO for obtaining desired optical, electrical and structural properties for a highly conformal layer coating on a substrate. Ozone was also input as a reactive gas which enabled rapid production of the desired product layer.

  7. A high-speed DAQ framework for future high-level trigger and event building clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselle, M.; Ardila Perez, L. E.; Balzer, M.; Dritschler, T.; Kopmann, A.; Mohr, H.; Rota, L.; Vogelgesang, M.; Weber, M.

    2017-03-01

    Modern data acquisition and trigger systems require a throughput of several GB/s and latencies of the order of microseconds. To satisfy such requirements, a heterogeneous readout system based on FPGA readout cards and GPU-based computing nodes coupled by InfiniBand has been developed. The incoming data from the back-end electronics is delivered directly into the internal memory of GPUs through a dedicated peer-to-peer PCIe communication. High performance DMA engines have been developed for direct communication between FPGAs and GPUs using "DirectGMA (AMD)" and "GPUDirect (NVIDIA)" technologies. The proposed infrastructure is a candidate for future generations of event building clusters, high-level trigger filter farms and low-level trigger system. In this paper the heterogeneous FPGA-GPU architecture will be presented and its performance be discussed.

  8. The relation between star formation, morphology and local density in high redshift clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Poggianti, Bianca M; Finn, Rose; Bamford, Steven; De Lucia, Gabriella; Varela, Jesus; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Halliday, Claire; Noll, Stefan; Saglia, Roberto; Zaritsky, Dennis; Best, Philip; Clowe, Douglas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Jablonka, Pascale; Pello, Roser; Rudnick, Gregory; Simard, Luc; von der Linden, Anja; White, Simon

    2008-01-01

    We investigate how the [OII] properties and the morphologies of galaxies in clusters and groups at z=0.4-0.8 depend on projected local galaxy density, and compare with the field at similar redshifts and clusters at low-z. In both nearby and distant clusters, higher-density regions contain proportionally fewer star-forming galaxies, and the average [OII] equivalent width of star-forming galaxies is independent of local density. However, in distant clusters the average current star formation rate (SFR) in star-forming galaxies seems to peak at densities ~15-40 galaxies Mpc^{-2}. At odds with low-z results, at high-z the relation between star-forming fraction and local density varies from high- to low-mass clusters. Overall, our results suggest that at high-z the current star formation (SF) activity in star-forming galaxies does not depend strongly on global or local environment, though the possible SFR peak seems at odds with this conclusion. We find that the cluster SFR normalized by cluster mass anticorrelate...

  9. High strength alumina produced by direct coagulation casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baader, F.H.; Will, J.; Tieche, D. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    Direct Coagulation Casting is a new colloidal forming technique. Double layer stabilized, concentrated alumina suspensions are solidified by shifting the suspensions pH from 4 towards the isoelectric point at 9 using the in situ enzyme-catalyzed decomposition of urea. This reaction minimizes the repulsive forces between the suspended particles. The remaining, attractive Van der Waals forces form a stiff particle network. Suspensions with low viscosities (0.3 Pa*s, 59 vol%) were prepared at pH 4. Deagglomeration of the suspensions by ball milling reduced the agglomerate size below 5 pm. The coagulation kinetics could be influenced either by the urease concentration or by the suspension temperature. Process variables were established, providing long idle times, which allowed additional filtration and degassing steps. Coagulation was followed by drying and sintering, whereby densities of more than 3.97 g/cm{sup 3}, a 4-point bending strength of 685 MPa (HIPed) and a high reliablility (m = 40) for high purity alumina were achieved. DCC has the potential to improve the reliability of alumina components of complex shape, as well as to avoid expensive molding.

  10. K-Profiles: A Nonlinear Clustering Method for Pattern Detection in High Dimensional Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With modern technologies such as microarray, deep sequencing, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, it is possible to measure the expression levels of thousands of genes/proteins simultaneously to unravel important biological processes. A very first step towards elucidating hidden patterns and understanding the massive data is the application of clustering techniques. Nonlinear relations, which were mostly unutilized in contrast to linear correlations, are prevalent in high-throughput data. In many cases, nonlinear relations can model the biological relationship more precisely and reflect critical patterns in the biological systems. Using the general dependency measure, Distance Based on Conditional Ordered List (DCOL that we introduced before, we designed the nonlinear K-profiles clustering method, which can be seen as the nonlinear counterpart of the K-means clustering algorithm. The method has a built-in statistical testing procedure that ensures genes not belonging to any cluster do not impact the estimation of cluster profiles. Results from extensive simulation studies showed that K-profiles clustering not only outperformed traditional linear K-means algorithm, but also presented significantly better performance over our previous General Dependency Hierarchical Clustering (GDHC algorithm. We further analyzed a gene expression dataset, on which K-profile clustering generated biologically meaningful results.

  11. An improved local immunization strategy for scale-free networks with a high degree of clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lingling; Jiang, Guoping; Song, Yurong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The design of immunization strategies is an extremely important issue for disease or computer virus control and prevention. In this paper, we propose an improved local immunization strategy based on node's clustering which was seldom considered in the existing immunization strategies. The main aim of the proposed strategy is to iteratively immunize the node which has a high connectivity and a low clustering coefficient. To validate the effectiveness of our strategy, we compare it with two typical local immunization strategies on both real and artificial networks with a high degree of clustering. Simulations on these networks demonstrate that the performance of our strategy is superior to that of two typical strategies. The proposed strategy can be regarded as a compromise between computational complexity and immune effect, which can be widely applied in scale-free networks of high clustering, such as social network, technological networks and so on. In addition, this study provides useful hints for designing optimal immunization strategy for specific network.

  12. High density THz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tammaro, S; Roy, P; Lampin, J -F; Ducournau, G; Cuisset, A; Hindle, F; Mouret, G

    2014-01-01

    Frequency combs (FC) have radically changed the landscape of frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy investigations extending tremendously the achievable resolution while increasing signal to noise ratio. Initially developed in the visible and near-IR spectral regions, the use of FC has been expanded to mid-IR, extreme ultra-violet and X-ray. Significant effort is presently dedicated to the generation of FC at THz frequencies. One solution based on converting a stabilized optical frequency comb using a photoconductive terahertz emitter, remains hampered by the low available THz power. Another approach is based on active mode locked THz quantum-cascade-lasers providing intense FC over a relatively limited spectral extension. Alternatively, here we show that dense powerful THz FC is generated over one decade of frequency by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). In this mode, the entire ring behaves in a similar fashion to a THz resonator wherein electron bunches emit powerful THz pulses quasi-synch...

  13. Iridate compound produces extraordinarily high coercive magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Vivien; Topping, Craig; Kim, Jae-Wook; Mun, Eun-Deok; Goddard, Paul; Ghannadzadeh, Saman; Luo, Xuan; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Singleton, John

    2014-03-01

    We present a data on an iridate compound that shows an extraordinarily large magnetic hysteresis loop. The coercive magnetic field exceeds 40 Tesla in single-crystal samples. The hysteresis coexists with a linear background, and the total remanent magnetization is about half a Bohr magneton. We will discuss the emergence of these properties from the interplay of spin-orbit coupling, magnetic exchange and possible frustration. The single crystalline material exhibits a magnetic hysteresis loop for one orientation of the magnetic field and a smooth linear increase in the magnetization with field for the other. Measurements were conducted in 65 T short-pulse magnets and the 60 Tesla shaped-pulse magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Lab in Los Alamos. We do not observe any dependence of the magnetic hysteresis on magnetic field sweep rate. Compounds containing Ir4 + have attracted attention recently due to strong spin-orbit coupling that competes with crystal-electric field and exchange interactions. This competition can result in non-Hund's-rule ground states with unusual properties.

  14. The High-Redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Paterno-Mahler, R; Ashby, M L N; Brodwin, M; Wing, J D; Anand, G; Decker, B; Golden-Marx, E

    2016-01-01

    We present 238 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates based on galaxy overdensities in the Spitzer/IRAC imaging of the fields surrounding 646 bent, double-lobed radio sources drawn from the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey. The COBRA sources were chosen as objects in the VLA FIRST survey that lack optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to a limit of $m_r=22$, making them likely to lie at high redshift. This is confirmed by our observations: the redshift distribution of COBRA sources with estimated redshifts peaks near $z=1$, and extends out to $z\\approx3$. Cluster candidates were identified by comparing our sources to a background field and searching for overdensities. Forty-one of these sources are quasars with known spectroscopic redshifts, which may be tracers of some of the most distant clusters known.

  15. ModEx and Seed-Detective: Two novel techniques for high quality clustering by using good initial seeds in K-Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anisur Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present two clustering techniques called ModEx and Seed-Detective. ModEx is a modified version of an existing clustering technique called Ex-Detective. It addresses some limitations of Ex-Detective. Seed-Detective is a combination of ModEx and Simple K-Means. Seed-Detective uses ModEx to produce a set of high quality initial seeds that are then given as input to K-Means for producing the final clusters. The high quality initial seeds are expected to produce high quality clusters through K-Means. The performances of Seed-Detective and ModEx are compared with the performances of Ex-Detective, PAM, Simple K-Means (SK, Basic Farthest Point Heuristic (BFPH and New Farthest Point Heuristic (NFPH. We use three cluster evaluation criteria namely F-measure, Entropy and Purity and four natural datasets that we obtain from the UCI Machine learning repository. In the datasets our proposed techniques perform better than the existing techniques in terms of F-measure, Entropy and Purity. The sign test results suggest a statistical significance of the superiority of Seed-Detective (and ModEx over the existing techniques.

  16. Cluster Forests

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Donghui; Jordan, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by Random Forests (RF) in the context of classification, we propose a new clustering ensemble method---Cluster Forests (CF). Geometrically, CF randomly probes a high-dimensional data cloud to obtain "good local clusterings" and then aggregates via spectral clustering to obtain cluster assignments for the whole dataset. The search for good local clusterings is guided by a cluster quality measure $\\kappa$. CF progressively improves each local clustering in a fashion that resembles the tree growth in RF. Empirical studies on several real-world datasets under two different performance metrics show that CF compares favorably to its competitors. Theoretical analysis shows that the $\\kappa$ criterion is shown to grow each local clustering in a desirable way---it is "noise-resistant." A closed-form expression is obtained for the mis-clustering rate of spectral clustering under a perturbation model, which yields new insights into some aspects of spectral clustering.

  17. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  18. Review- Numerical simulation of chainlike cluster movement of feeble magnetic particles by induced magnetic dipole moment under high magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Ando, Noriyuki Hirota and Hitoshi Wada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the motion of a chainlike cluster of feeble magnetic particles induced by high magnetic field is discussed on the basis of the results of numerical simulations. The simulations were performed on glass particles with a diameter of 0.8 mm; and the viscosity, applied magnetic field and magnetic properties of the surrounding medium were changed. In addition to the magnetic field and the difference in magnetic susceptibility between the particles and the surrounding medium, the obtained results indicate that the viscosity is an essential factor for the formation of the chainlike alignment of feeble magnetic particles. We also carried out simulations using glass particles with a smaller diameter of 0.1 mm. Chainlike clusters were produced similar to those of ferromagnetic particles formed in a ferromagnetic fluid.

  19. Extending the laserspray ionization concept to produce highly charged ions at high vacuum on a time-of-flight mass analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Ren, Yue; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Inutan, Ellen D

    2011-07-15

    A new matrix compound, 2-nitrophloroglucinol, is reported which not only produces highly charged ions similar to electrospray ionization (ESI) under atmospheric pressure (AP) and intermediate pressure (IP) laserspray ionization (LSI) conditions but also the most highly charged ions so far observed for small proteins in mass spectrometry (MS) under high vacuum (HV) conditions. This new matrix extends the compounds that can successfully be employed as matrixes with LSI, as demonstrated on an LTQ Velos (Thermo) at AP, a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) time-of-flight (TOF) SYNAPT G2 (Waters) at IP, and MALDI-TOF Ultraflex, UltrafleXtreme, and Autoflex Speed (Bruker) mass spectrometers at HV. Measurements show that stable multiple charged molecular ions of proteins are formed under all pressure conditions indicating softer ionization than MALDI, which suffers a high degree of metastable fragmentation when multiply charged ions are produced. An important analytical advantage of this new LSI matrix are the potential for high sensitivity equivalent or better than AP-LSI and vacuum MALDI and the potential for enhanced mass selected fragmentation of the abundant highly charged protein ions. A second new LSI matrix, 4,6-dinitropyrogallol, produces abundant multiply charged ions at AP but not under HV conditions. The differences in these similar compounds ability to produce multiply charged ions under HV conditions is believed to be related to their relative ability to evaporate from charged matrix/analyte clusters.

  20. Systematic investigations on high intense cluster-jet beams for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Esperanza; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A high-density cluster-jet target will be one of two planned internal target stations for the PANDA experiment at the antiproton accelerator and storage ring HESR/FAIR. For the investigation of elementary anti pN interactions hydrogen and deuterium are of highest interest as used target material. Cluster-jet targets allow high and constant target densities at the interaction point, i.e. 2 m behind the nozzle, with the possibility of a continuous variation during operation. At the University of Muenster a cluster-jet target prototype was designed, built up and set succesfully into operation. The system is installed in complete PANDA geometry, so that the observed cluster beam characteristics can be directly transferred to the later situation at PANDA. Recent optical investigations on the cluster beam directly behind the nozzle resulted in the observation of distinct density structures when the target is operated at highest densities. The development and installation of a special nozzle tilting system allows for the extraction of these high-intense core beams, leading to a significant improvement of the target density. The performance and achieved densities of cluster beams are presented.

  1. Ion-pair dissociation of highly excited carbon clusters: Size and charge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launoy, Thibaut; Béroff, Karine; Chabot, Marin; Martinet, Guillaume; Le Padellec, Arnaud; Pino, Thomas; Bouneau, Sandra; Vaeck, Nathalie; Liévin, Jacques; Féraud, Géraldine; Loreau, Jérôme; Mahajan, Thejus

    2017-02-01

    We present measurements of ion-pair dissociation (IPD) of highly excited neutral and ionized carbon clusters Cn=2 -5 (q =0 -3 )+. The tool for producing these species was a high-velocity collision between Cn+ projectiles (v =2.25 a.u.) and helium atoms. The setup allowed us to detect in coincidence anionic and cationic fragments, event by event, leading to a direct and unambiguous identification of the IPD process. Compared with dissociation without anion emission, we found typical 10-4 IPD rates, not depending much on the size and charge of the (n ,q ) species. Exceptions were observed for C2+ and, to a lesser extent, C43 + whose IPDs were notably lower. We tentatively interpret IPDs of C2+ and C3+ by using a statistical approach based on the counting of final states allowed by energetic criteria. The model is able to furnish the right order of magnitude for the experimental IPD rates and to provide a qualitative explanation of the lower IPD rate observed in C2+.

  2. High Temperature Membrane with Humidification-Independent Cluster Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2015-07-10

    The objective of this project was to develop high temperature membranes to facilitate the wide-spread deployment of hydrogen fuel cells. High temperature membranes offer significant advantages in PEM system operation, overall capital and operating costs. State-of-the-art Nafion-based membranes are inadequate for the high temperature operation. These conventional membranes become unstable at higher temperatures (90-120°C) and lose their conductivity, particularly at low relative humidity. In this program, alternate materials were developed to enable fabrication of novel high performance composite membranes. FCE’s concept for the multi-component composite membrane, named mC2, has been used in the design of more conductive membranes.

  3. Construction and test of a high power injector of hydrogen cluster ions

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, E W; Hagena, O F; Henkes, P R W; Klingelhofer, R; Moser, H O; Obert, W; Poth, I

    1979-01-01

    A high power injector of hydrogen cluster ions, rated for 1 MV and 100 kW, is described. The injector is split in three separate tanks connected by a 1 MV transfer line. The cluster ion beam source and all its auxiliary equipment is placed at high voltage, insulated by SF/sub 6/ gas at pressure of 4 bar. The main components of the injector are: The cluster ion beam source with integrated helium cryopumps, the CERN type acceleration tube with 750 mm ID, the beam dump designed to handle the mass and energy flux under DC conditions, a 1 MV high voltage terminal for the auxiliary equipment supplied by its 40 kVA power supply with power, and the 1 MV 120 kW DC high voltage generator. This injector is installed in Karlsruhe. Performance tests were carried out successfully. It is intended to use this injector for refuelling experiments at the ASDEX Tokamak. (12 refs).

  4. High Performance Commodity Networking in a 512-CPU Teraflop Beowulf Cluster for Computational Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinski, J; Pen, U L; Loken, C; Martin, P; Dubinski, John; Humble, Robin; Loken, Chris; Martin, Peter; Pen, Ue-Li

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new 512-CPU Beowulf cluster with Teraflop performance dedicated to problems in computational astrophysics. The cluster incorporates a cubic network topology based on inexpensive commodity 24-port gigabit switches and point to point connections through the second gigabit port on each Linux server. This configuration has network performance competitive with more expensive cluster configurations and is scaleable to much larger systems using other network topologies. Networking represents only about 9% of our total system cost of USD$561K. The standard Top 500 HPL Linpack benchmark rating is 1.202 Teraflops on 512 CPUs so computing costs by this measure are $0.47/Megaflop. We also describe 4 different astrophysical applications using complex parallel algorithms for studying large-scale structure formation, galaxy dynamics, magnetohydrodynamic flows onto blackholes and planet formation currently running on the cluster and achieving high parallel performance. The MHD code achieved a sustained speed of...

  5. Users matter : multi-agent systems model of high performance computing cluster users.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, M. J.; Hood, C. S.; Decision and Information Sciences; IIT

    2005-01-01

    High performance computing clusters have been a critical resource for computational science for over a decade and have more recently become integral to large-scale industrial analysis. Despite their well-specified components, the aggregate behavior of clusters is poorly understood. The difficulties arise from complicated interactions between cluster components during operation. These interactions have been studied by many researchers, some of whom have identified the need for holistic multi-scale modeling that simultaneously includes network level, operating system level, process level, and user level behaviors. Each of these levels presents its own modeling challenges, but the user level is the most complex due to the adaptability of human beings. In this vein, there are several major user modeling goals, namely descriptive modeling, predictive modeling and automated weakness discovery. This study shows how multi-agent techniques were used to simulate a large-scale computing cluster at each of these levels.

  6. Too big, too early? Multiple High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: implications

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyle, Ben; Verde, Licia

    2010-01-01

    To date, 15 high-redshift (z>1.0) galaxy clusters with mass measurements have been observed, spectroscopically confirmed and are reported in the literature. These objects should be exceedingly rare in the standard LCDM model. We conservatively approximate the selection functions of these clusters' parent surveys, and quantify the tension between the abundances of massive clusters as predicted by the standard LCDM model and the observed ones. We alleviate the tension considering non-Gaussian primordial perturbations of the local type, characterized by the parameter fnl and derive constraints on fnl arising from the mere existence of these clusters. At the 95% confidence level, fnl>475 with cosmological parameters fixed to their most likely WMAP5 values, or fnl>370 if we marginalize over WMAP5 parameters priors. In combination with fnl constraints from Cosmic Microwave Background and halo bias, this determination implies a scale-dependence of fnl at 3 sigma. Given the assumptions made in the analysis, we expect...

  7. Study of galaxy cluster properties from high-resolution SPH simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yepes, G; Gottlöber, S; Müller, V

    2003-01-01

    We present some of the results of an ongoing collaboration to sudy the dynamical properties of galaxy clusters by means of high resolution adiabatic SPH cosmological simulations. Results from our numerical clusters have been tested against analytical models often used in X-ray observations: $\\beta$ model (isothermal and polytropic) and those based on universal dark matter profiles. We find a universal temperature profile, in agreement with AMR gasdynamical simulations of galaxy clusters. Temperature decreases by a factor 2-3 from the center to virial radius. Therefore, isothermal models (e.g. $\\beta$ model) give a very poor fit to simulated data. Moreover, gas entropy profiles deviate from a power law near the center, which is also in very good agreement with independent AMR simulations. Thus, if future X-ray observations confirm that gas in clusters has an extended isothermal core, then non-adiabatic physics would be required in order to explain it.

  8. Plasmon assisted synthesis of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster/polymer composites for biochemical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J. P.; Mogensen, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is combined with polymer synthesis for rapid fabrication of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster/polymer composites inside microfluidic channels. UV-light assisted synthesis of polymers has been investigated by a number of groups previously [1], however, plasmon assisted synthesis...... has not been presented before. This should allow highly localized fabrication of porous polymers that are defined by the location of the nanoplasmonic metal film. Silver quantum clusters (AgQCs) consisting of 2-10 atoms can be highly fluorescing in the visible wavelength range and possess a greater...

  9. Plasmon assisted synthesis of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster / polymer composites for biochemical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J.P.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2014-01-01

    has not been presented before. This should allow highly localized fabrication of porous polymers that are defined by the location of the nanoplasmonic metal film. Silver quantum clusters (AgQCs) consisting of 2-10 atoms can be highly fluorescing in the visible wavelength range and possess a much......Plasmonics is combined with polymer synthesis for rapid fabrication of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster / polymer composites inside microfluidic channels. UV-light assisted synthesis of polymers has been investigated by a number of groups previously [1], however, plasmon assisted synthesis...

  10. Improving the Eco-Efficiency of High Performance Computing Clusters Using EECluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cocaña-Fernández

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As data and supercomputing centres increase their performance to improve service quality and target more ambitious challenges every day, their carbon footprint also continues to grow, and has already reached the magnitude of the aviation industry. Also, high power consumptions are building up to a remarkable bottleneck for the expansion of these infrastructures in economic terms due to the unavailability of sufficient energy sources. A substantial part of the problem is caused by current energy consumptions of High Performance Computing (HPC clusters. To alleviate this situation, we present in this work EECluster, a tool that integrates with multiple open-source Resource Management Systems to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of clusters by improving their energy efficiency. EECluster implements a dynamic power management mechanism based on Computational Intelligence techniques by learning a set of rules through multi-criteria evolutionary algorithms. This approach enables cluster operators to find the optimal balance between a reduction in the cluster energy consumptions, service quality, and number of reconfigurations. Experimental studies using both synthetic and actual workloads from a real world cluster support the adoption of this tool to reduce the carbon footprint of HPC clusters.

  11. A highly efficient multi-core algorithm for clustering extremely large datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus Johann M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the demand for computational power in computational biology has increased due to rapidly growing data sets from microarray and other high-throughput technologies. This demand is likely to increase. Standard algorithms for analyzing data, such as cluster algorithms, need to be parallelized for fast processing. Unfortunately, most approaches for parallelizing algorithms largely rely on network communication protocols connecting and requiring multiple computers. One answer to this problem is to utilize the intrinsic capabilities in current multi-core hardware to distribute the tasks among the different cores of one computer. Results We introduce a multi-core parallelization of the k-means and k-modes cluster algorithms based on the design principles of transactional memory for clustering gene expression microarray type data and categorial SNP data. Our new shared memory parallel algorithms show to be highly efficient. We demonstrate their computational power and show their utility in cluster stability and sensitivity analysis employing repeated runs with slightly changed parameters. Computation speed of our Java based algorithm was increased by a factor of 10 for large data sets while preserving computational accuracy compared to single-core implementations and a recently published network based parallelization. Conclusions Most desktop computers and even notebooks provide at least dual-core processors. Our multi-core algorithms show that using modern algorithmic concepts, parallelization makes it possible to perform even such laborious tasks as cluster sensitivity and cluster number estimation on the laboratory computer.

  12. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way III. 139 new open clusters at high Galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmeja, S; Piskunov, A E; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Froebrich, D; Scholz, R -D

    2014-01-01

    An earlier analysis of the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalogue revealed an apparent lack of old (> 1 Gyr) open clusters in the solar neighbourhood ( 20{\\deg}. We were looking for stellar density enhancements using a star count algorithm on the 2MASS point source catalogue. To increase the contrast between potential clusters and the field, we applied filters in colour-magnitude space according to typical colour-magnitude diagrams of nearby old open clusters. The subsequent comparison with lists of known objects allowed us to select thus far unknown cluster candidates. For verification they were processed with the standard pipeline used within the MWSC survey for computing cluster membership probabilities and for determining structural, kinematic, and astrophysical parameters. In total we discovered 782 density enhancements, 522 of which were classified as real objects. Among them 139 are new open clusters with ages 8.3 < log (t [yr]) < 9.7, distances d < 3 kpc, and distances from the Galactic plan...

  13. High dimensional model representation (HDMR) with clustering for image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcılı, Ayşegül; Tunga, Burcu

    2017-01-01

    Image retrieval continues to hold an important place in today's extremely fast growing technology. In this field, the accurate image retrieval with high speed is critical. In this study, to achieve this important issue we developed a novel method with the help of High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) philosophy. HDMR is a decomposition method used to solve different scientific problems. To test the performance of the new method we used Columbia Object Image Library (COIL100) and obtained the encouraging results. These results are given in the findings section.

  14. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A. [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C., E-mail: castigna@sissa.it [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  15. Plasmon assisted synthesis of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster/polymer composites for biochemical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J. P.; Mogensen, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    has not been presented before. This should allow highly localized fabrication of porous polymers that are defined by the location of the nanoplasmonic metal film. Silver quantum clusters (AgQCs) consisting of 2-10 atoms can be highly fluorescing in the visible wavelength range and possess a greater......Plasmonics is combined with polymer synthesis for rapid fabrication of highly fluorescing silver quantum cluster/polymer composites inside microfluidic channels. UV-light assisted synthesis of polymers has been investigated by a number of groups previously [1], however, plasmon assisted synthesis...... photostability than organic fluorophores [2]. In this work AgQCs are embedded into the oligoaniline porous matrix and is tested for indirect fluorescence detection of cyanide in a simple microfluidic device (Fig. 1). Imaging of individual silver clusters inside the channel (Fig. 1) is made possible by using 100x...

  16. Relics in galaxy clusters at high radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolaitis, Š.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Hill, V.; Worley, C. C.; de Pascale, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The pattern of chemical abundance ratios in stellar populations of the Milky Way is a fingerprint of the Galactic chemical history. In order to interpret such chemical fossils of Galactic archaeology, chemical evolution models have to be developed. However, despite the complex physics included in the most recent models, significant discrepancies between models and observations are widely encountered. Aims: The aim of this paper is to characterise the abundance patterns of five iron-peak elements (Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) for which the stellar origin and chemical evolution are still debated. Methods: We automatically derived iron peak (Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) and α element (Mg) chemical abundances for 4666 stars, adopting classical LTE spectral synthesis and 1D atmospheric models. Our observational data collection is composed of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios HARPS and FEROS spectra, which were previously parametrised by the AMBRE project. Results: We used the bimodal distribution of the magnesium-to-iron abundance ratios to chemically classify our sample stars into different Galactic substructures: thin disc, metal-poor and high-α metal rich, high-α, and low-α metal-poor populations. Both high-α and low-α metal-poor populations are fully distinct in Mg, Cu, and Zn, but these substructures are statistically indistinguishable in Mn and Ni. Thin disc trends of [Ni/Fe] and [Cu/Fe] are very similar and show a small increase at supersolar metallicities. Also, both thin and thick disc trends of Ni and Cu are very similar and indistinguishable. Yet, Mn looks very different from Ni and Cu. [Mn/Fe] trends of thin and thick discs actually have noticeable differences: the thin disc is slightly Mn richer than the thick disc. The [Zn/Fe] trends look very similar to those of [α/Fe] trends. The typical dispersion of results in both discs is low (≈0.05 dex for [Mg, Mn, and Cu/Fe]) and is even much lower for [Ni/Fe] (≈0.035 dex). Conclusions: It is

  17. A new method to search for high redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Castignani, Gianluca; Celotti, Annalisa; Norman, Colin

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method (Poisson Probability Method, PPM) to search for high redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for Mpc-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. (2009) sample, that are selected within the COSMOS survey, and on the specific dataset used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. i) We use two z~1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z=2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z=1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. ii) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e...

  18. Visualization and unsupervised predictive clustering of high-dimensional multimodal neuroimaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Benson; Soares, Jair C; Hasan, Khader M

    2014-10-30

    Neuroimaging machine learning studies have largely utilized supervised algorithms - meaning they require both neuroimaging scan data and corresponding target variables (e.g. healthy vs. diseased) to be successfully 'trained' for a prediction task. Noticeably, this approach may not be optimal or possible when the global structure of the data is not well known and the researcher does not have an a priori model to fit the data. We set out to investigate the utility of an unsupervised machine learning technique; t-distributed stochastic neighbour embedding (t-SNE) in identifying 'unseen' sample population patterns that may exist in high-dimensional neuroimaging data. Multimodal neuroimaging scans from 92 healthy subjects were pre-processed using atlas-based methods, integrated and input into the t-SNE algorithm. Patterns and clusters discovered by the algorithm were visualized using a 2D scatter plot and further analyzed using the K-means clustering algorithm. t-SNE was evaluated against classical principal component analysis. Remarkably, based on unlabelled multimodal scan data, t-SNE separated study subjects into two very distinct clusters which corresponded to subjects' gender labels (cluster silhouette index value=0.79). The resulting clusters were used to develop an unsupervised minimum distance clustering model which identified 93.5% of subjects' gender. Notably, from a neuropsychiatric perspective this method may allow discovery of data-driven disease phenotypes or sub-types of treatment responders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Seeding High Redshift QSOs by Collisional Runaway in Primordial Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Harley; Haehnelt, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    We study how runaway stellar collisions in high redshift, metal poor star clusters form very massive stars (VMSs) that can directly collapse to intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). We follow the evolution of a pair of two neighboring high-redshift mini-halos which are expected to host central nuclear star clusters (NSCs) with very high resolution, cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. One of the two mini-halos enriches the central NSC of the other mini-halo to a critical metallicity, sufficient for Pop. II star formation at redshift z~27. We then use the spatial configuration of the flattened, asymmetrical gas cloud forming in the RAMSES simulations at the core of the metal enriched halo to set the initial conditions for simulations of an initially non-spherical star cluster with the direct summation code NBODY6 which are compared to about 2000 NBODY6 simulations of spherical star clusters for a wide range of star cluster parameters. In this way we es...

  20. Knowledge spillover and high-tech industry cluster: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shen

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge spillover is one of the incentive forces for companies using more expenditure on R&D to shape cluster. This paper summarizes and reviews academic research literature from three aspects, of which contain the connotation of knowledge spillover in high-tech industry cluster, conduction mode of knowledge spillover effect in high-tech industry and explain factors of knowledge spillover effect. This paper devotes by assembling anterior divergent tributaries of works to assist in illuminating on this prosperous research area, based on previous research, and finally it notes that future research needs to pay attention to several aspects.

  1. Experimental study of fusion neutron and proton yields produced by petawatt-laser-irradiated D2-3He or CD4-3He clustering gases

    CERN Document Server

    Bang, W; Bonasera, A; Quevedo, H J; Dyer, G; Bernstein, A C; Hagel, K; Schmidt, K; Gaul, E; Donovan, M E; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Andreoli, P; Barbarino, M; Kimura, S; Mazzocco, M; Natowitz, J B; Ditmire, T

    2013-01-01

    We report on experiments in which the Texas Petawatt laser irradiated a mixture of deuterium or deuterated methane clusters and helium-3 gas, generating three types of nuclear fusion reactions: D(d, 3He)n, D(d, t)p and 3He(d, p)4He. We measured the yields of fusion neutrons and protons from these reactions and found them to agree with yields based on a simple cylindrical plasma model using known cross sections and measured plasma parameters. Within our measurement errors, the fusion products were isotropically distributed. Plasma temperatures, important for the cross sections, were determined by two independent methods: (1) deuterium ion time-of-flight, and (2) utilizing the ratio of neutron yield to proton yield from D(d, 3He)n and 3He(d, p)4He reactions, respectively. This experiment produced the highest ion temperature ever achieved with laser-irradiated deuterium clusters.

  2. High-throughput screening of high Monascus pigment-producing strain based on digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Meng-lei; Wang, Lan; Yang, Zhi-xia; Chen, Hong-zhang

    2016-04-01

    This work proposed a new method which applied image processing and support vector machine (SVM) for screening of mold strains. Taking Monascus as example, morphological characteristics of Monascus colony were quantified by image processing. And the association between the characteristics and pigment production capability was determined by SVM. On this basis, a highly automated screening strategy was achieved. The accuracy of the proposed strategy is 80.6 %, which is compatible with the existing methods (81.1 % for microplate and 85.4 % for flask). Meanwhile, the screening of 500 colonies only takes 20-30 min, which is the highest rate among all published results. By applying this automated method, 13 strains with high-predicted production were obtained and the best one produced as 2.8-fold (226 U/mL) of pigment and 1.9-fold (51 mg/L) of lovastatin compared with the parent strain. The current study provides us with an effective and promising method for strain improvement.

  3. MCAM: multiple clustering analysis methodology for deriving hypotheses and insights from high-throughput proteomic datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M Naegle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in proteomic technologies continue to substantially accelerate capability for generating experimental data on protein levels, states, and activities in biological samples. For example, studies on receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks can now capture the phosphorylation state of hundreds to thousands of proteins across multiple conditions. However, little is known about the function of many of these protein modifications, or the enzymes responsible for modifying them. To address this challenge, we have developed an approach that enhances the power of clustering techniques to infer functional and regulatory meaning of protein states in cell signaling networks. We have created a new computational framework for applying clustering to biological data in order to overcome the typical dependence on specific a priori assumptions and expert knowledge concerning the technical aspects of clustering. Multiple clustering analysis methodology ('MCAM' employs an array of diverse data transformations, distance metrics, set sizes, and clustering algorithms, in a combinatorial fashion, to create a suite of clustering sets. These sets are then evaluated based on their ability to produce biological insights through statistical enrichment of metadata relating to knowledge concerning protein functions, kinase substrates, and sequence motifs. We applied MCAM to a set of dynamic phosphorylation measurements of the ERRB network to explore the relationships between algorithmic parameters and the biological meaning that could be inferred and report on interesting biological predictions. Further, we applied MCAM to multiple phosphoproteomic datasets for the ERBB network, which allowed us to compare independent and incomplete overlapping measurements of phosphorylation sites in the network. We report specific and global differences of the ERBB network stimulated with different ligands and with changes in HER2 expression. Overall, we offer MCAM as a broadly

  4. MCAM: Multiple Clustering Analysis Methodology for Deriving Hypotheses and Insights from High-Throughput Proteomic Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegle, Kristen M.; Welsch, Roy E.; Yaffe, Michael B.; White, Forest M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies continue to substantially accelerate capability for generating experimental data on protein levels, states, and activities in biological samples. For example, studies on receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks can now capture the phosphorylation state of hundreds to thousands of proteins across multiple conditions. However, little is known about the function of many of these protein modifications, or the enzymes responsible for modifying them. To address this challenge, we have developed an approach that enhances the power of clustering techniques to infer functional and regulatory meaning of protein states in cell signaling networks. We have created a new computational framework for applying clustering to biological data in order to overcome the typical dependence on specific a priori assumptions and expert knowledge concerning the technical aspects of clustering. Multiple clustering analysis methodology (‘MCAM’) employs an array of diverse data transformations, distance metrics, set sizes, and clustering algorithms, in a combinatorial fashion, to create a suite of clustering sets. These sets are then evaluated based on their ability to produce biological insights through statistical enrichment of metadata relating to knowledge concerning protein functions, kinase substrates, and sequence motifs. We applied MCAM to a set of dynamic phosphorylation measurements of the ERRB network to explore the relationships between algorithmic parameters and the biological meaning that could be inferred and report on interesting biological predictions. Further, we applied MCAM to multiple phosphoproteomic datasets for the ERBB network, which allowed us to compare independent and incomplete overlapping measurements of phosphorylation sites in the network. We report specific and global differences of the ERBB network stimulated with different ligands and with changes in HER2 expression. Overall, we offer MCAM as a broadly

  5. Grid-Enabled High Energy Physics Research using a Beowulf Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Akhtar

    2005-04-01

    At Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, we have built a 8-node 25 Gflops Beowulf Cluster with 2.5 TB of disk storage space to carry out grid-enabled, data-intensive high energy physics research for the ATLAS experiment via Grid3. We will describe how we built and configured our Cluster, which we have named the Sphinx Beowulf Cluster. We will describe the results of our cluster benchmark studies and the run-time plots of several parallel application codes. Once fully functional, the Cluster will be part of Grid3[www.ivdgl.org/grid3]. The current ATLAS simulation grid application, models the entire physical processes from the proton anti-proton collisions and detector's response to the collision debri through the complete reconstruction of the event from analyses of these responses. The end result is a detailed set of data that simulates the real physical collision event inside a particle detector. Grid is the new IT infrastructure for the 21^st century science -- a new computing paradigm that is poised to transform the practice of large-scale data-intensive research in science and engineering. The Grid will allow scientist worldwide to view and analyze huge amounts of data flowing from the large-scale experiments in High Energy Physics. The Grid is expected to bring together geographically and organizationally dispersed computational resources, such as CPUs, storage systems, communication systems, and data sources.

  6. SLAM High Resolution Numerical Simulations of the SZ Signatures of Cluster Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Craig L.; Chatzikos, M.; O'Shea, B. W.

    2012-05-01

    I present the results of high resolution simulations of the effects of cluster mergers on SZ observations. Most of the simulations are from the SLAM (Simulation Library of Astrophysical galaxy cluster Mergers) library of 156 binary cluster mergers. These simulations include cluster masses ranging from 1e13 to 2e15 Msun, and mass ratios for the mergers of 1:1 to 10:1. They include four values of the dimensionless angular momentum of the merger (lambda = 0.0, 0.025, 0.05, and 0.075), ranging from head-on mergers to high impact parameter collisions. Many of the SZ features correspond to shocks and/or adiabatic compression events. The effect of these transient SZ features on the use of clusters to measure cosmological parameters in surveys is assessed. Support for this work was provided by Chandra grants TM7-8010X, GO9-0135X, GO9-0148X, GO1-12159A, and GO1-12169X, through NASA Suzaku grants NNX09AH25G and NNX09AH74G, through NASA ADAP grant NNX11AD15G, through NASA ATFP grant #08-ATFP08-0028, through NSF AST grant #0908819, and Michigan State University’s Institute for Cyber-Enabled Research. Computer time was provided by NSF TeraGrid grants TG-AST080001N and TG-AST090040.

  7. Improved Cluster Identification and Visualization in High-Dimensional Data Using Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, N.; Eppstein, M. J.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    A Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) is a type of unsupervised artificial neural network that results in a self-organized projection of high-dimensional data onto a low-dimensional feature map, wherein vector similarity is implicitly translated into topological closeness, enabling clusters to be identified. In recently published work [1], 209 microbial variables from 22 monitoring wells around the leaking Schuyler Falls Landfill in Clinton, NY [2] were analyzed using a multi-stage non-parametric process to explore how microbial communities may act as indicators for the gradient of contamination in groundwater. The final stage of their analysis used a weighted SOM to identify microbial signatures in this high dimensionality data set that correspond to clean, fringe, and contaminated soils. Resulting clusters were visualized with the standard unified distance matrix (U-matrix). However, while the results of this analysis were very promising, visualized boundaries between clusters in the SOM were indistinct and required manual and somewhat arbitrary identification. In this contribution, we introduce (i) a new cluster reinforcement (CR) phase to be run subsequent to traditional SOM training for automatic sharpening of cluster boundaries, and (ii) a new boundary matrix (B-matrix) approach for visualization of the resulting cluster boundaries. The CR-phase differs from standard SOM training in several ways, most notably by using a feature-based neighborhood function rather than a topologically-based neighborhood function. In contrast to the U-matrix, the B-matrix can be directly superimposed on heat maps of the individual features (as output by the SOM) using grid lines whose thickness corresponds to inter-cluster distances. By thresholding the displayed lines, one obtains hierarchical control of the visual level of cluster resolution. We first illustrate the advantages of these methods on a small synthetic test case, and then apply them to the Schuyler Falls landfill

  8. Effectiveness of Heuristic Based Approach on the Performance of Indexing and Clustering of High Dimensional Data

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Data in practical applications (e.g., images, molecular biology, etc) is mostly characterised by high dimensionality and huge size or number of data instances. Though, feature reduction techniques have been successful in reducing the dimensionality for certain applications, dealing with high dimensional data is still an area which has received considerable attention in the research community. Indexing and clustering of high dimensional data are two of the most challenging techniques that have...

  9. Advanced use of high-performance liquid chromatography for synthesis of controlled metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihori, Yoshiki; Matsuzaki, Miku; Uchida, Chihiro; Negishi, Yuichi

    2014-07-21

    Because the synthesis of metal clusters with multiple ligand types results in a distribution of ligands, high-resolution separation of each unique cluster from the mixture is required for precise control of the ligand composition. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography combined with appropriate transitioning of the mobile phase composition is an extremely effective means of separating ligand combinations when working with metal clusters protected by two different types of thiolates. We report herein advanced use of this method. The studies involving Au₂₄Pd(SR₁)₁₈-x(SR₂)x and Au₂₄Pd(SR₁)₁₈-x(SeR₂)x (SR₁, SR₂ = thiolate, SeR₂ = selenolate) revealed the following. (1) In general, an increase in the difference between the polarities of the functional groups incorporated in the two types of ligands improves the separation resolution. A suitable ligand combination for separation can be predicted from the retention times of Au₂₄Pd(SR₁)₁₈ and Au₂₄Pd(SR₂)₁₈, which cause the terminal peaks in a series of peaks. (2) The use of a step-gradient program during the mobile phase substitution results in improved resolution compared to that achievable with the linear gradients applied in prior work. (3) This technique is also useful for the evaluation of the chemical compositions of metal clusters protected by two different types of ligands with similar molecular weights. These findings will provide clear design guidelines for the functionalization of metal clusters via control of the ligand composition, and will also improve our understanding of the high-resolution isolation of metal clusters.

  10. A new experimental setup designed for the investigation of irradiation of nanosystems in the gas phase: A high intensity mass-and-energy selected cluster beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruny, G.; Feil, S.; Fillol, R.; El Farkh, K.; Harb, M. M.; Teyssier, C.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, UMR5822, Universite Lyon 1, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Universite de Lyon, F-69003, Lyon (France) and CNRS/IN2P3, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Eden, S. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University (OU), Walton hall, Milton Keynes, MK76AA (United Kingdom); Ouaskit, S. [Laboratoire de physique de la matiere condensee, Faculte des sciences Ben M' sik, Unite associee au CNRST (URAC 10), B.P.7955, Casablanca (Morocco); Maerk, T. D. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold Franzens Universitaet, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-01-15

    DIAM (Dispositif d'Irradiation d'Agregats Moleculaires) is a new experimental setup devoted to investigate processes induced by irradiation at the nanoscale. The DIAM apparatus is based on a combination of techniques including a particle beam from high-energy physics, a cluster source from molecular and cluster physics, and mass spectrometry form analytical sciences. In this paper, we will describe the first part of the DIAM apparatus that consists of an ExB double spectrometer connected to a cluster ion source based on a continuous supersonic expansion in the presence of ionizing electrons. This setup produces high intensities of energy-and-mass selected molecular cluster ion beams (1000 s of counts s{sup -1}). The performance of the instrument will be shown through measurements of 6-8 keV beams of protonated water clusters, (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +} (n = 0-21) and mixed protonated (or deprotonated) water-pyridine cluster ions: PyrH{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} (n = 0-15), Pyr{sub 2}H{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub n} (n = 0-9), and (Pyr-H){sup +} (H{sub 2}O).

  11. The K Band Luminosity Functions of Galaxies in High Redshift Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, S C

    2004-01-01

    K band luminosity functions (LFs) of three, massive, high redshift clusters of galaxies are presented. The evolution of K*, the characteristic magnitude of the LF, is consistent with purely passive evolution, and a redshift of forma tion z = 1.5-2.

  12. Uniqueness of the Infinite Open Cluster for High-density Percolation on Lattice Sierpinski Carpet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Yuan WU

    2001-01-01

    We prove the uniqueness of infinite open cluster for high-density bond percolation on latticeSierpinski Carpet; forthermorc, an alternative proof of the existence of phase transition of the modelis given. A rescaling technique is developed and used as the main tool of our proofs.

  13. High pressure studies on nanometer sized clusters: Structural, optical, and cooperative properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, S.H.

    1995-05-01

    High-pressure Se EXAFS is used to study pressure-induced structural transformations in CdSe nanocrystals. The transformation is wurtzite to rock salt, at a pressure much higher than in bulk. High-pressure XRD is used to confirm the EXAFS results. Diffraction peak widths indicate that nanocrystals do not fragment upon transformation. Optical absorption correlates with structural transformations and is used to measure transition pressures; transformation pressure increases smoothly as nanocrystal size decreases. Thermodynamics of transformation is modeled using an elevated surface energy in the high-pressure phase. High-pressure study of Si nanocrystals show large increases in transformation pressure in crystallites to 500{angstrom} diameter, and an overall change in crystallite shape upon transformation is seen from XRD line widths. C{sub 60} single crystals were studied using Raman scattering; results provide information about the clusters` rotational state. Optical properties of high-pressure phase CdSe clusters were studied.

  14. Molecular Gas in the Halo Fuels the Growth of a Massive Cluster Galaxy at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Villar-Martin, M; Norris, R P; Ekers, R D; van Moorsel, G A; Dannerbauer, H; Pentericci, L; Miley, G K; Allison, J R; Sadler, E M; Guillard, P; Carilli, C L; Mao, M Y; Rottgering, H J A; De Breuck, C; Seymour, N; Gullberg, B; Ceverino, D; Jagannathan, P; Vernet, J; Indermuehle, B T

    2016-01-01

    The largest galaxies in the Universe reside in galaxy clusters. Using sensitive observations of carbon-monoxide, we show that the Spiderweb Galaxy -a massive galaxy in a distant protocluster- is forming from a large reservoir of molecular gas. Most of this molecular gas lies between the protocluster galaxies and has low velocity dispersion, indicating that it is part of an enriched inter-galactic medium. This may constitute the reservoir of gas that fuels the widespread star formation seen in earlier ultraviolet observations of the Spiderweb Galaxy. Our results support the notion that giant galaxies in clusters formed from extended regions of recycled gas at high redshift.

  15. High-Dimensional Bayesian Clustering with Variable Selection: The R Package bclust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Partovi Nia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The R package bclust is useful for clustering high-dimensional continuous data. The package uses a parametric spike-and-slab Bayesian model to downweight the effect of noise variables and to quantify the importance of each variable in agglomerative clustering. We take advantage of the existence of closed-form marginal distributions to estimate the model hyper-parameters using empirical Bayes, thereby yielding a fully automatic method. We discuss computational problems arising in implementation of the procedure and illustrate the usefulness of the package through examples.

  16. APEnet+: high bandwidth 3D torus direct network for petaflops scale commodity clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Paolucci, P. S.; Rossetti, D.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Simula, F.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.

    2011-12-01

    We describe herein the APElink+ board, a PCIe interconnect adapter featuring the latest advances in wire speed and interface technology plus hardware support for a RDMA programming model and experimental acceleration of GPU networking; this design allows us to build a low latency, high bandwidth PC cluster, the APEnet+ network, the new generation of our cost-effective, tens-of-thousands-scalable cluster network architecture. Some test results and characterization of data transmission of a complete testbench, based on a commercial development card mounting an Altera® FPGA, are provided.

  17. APEnet+: high bandwidth 3D torus direct network for petaflops scale commodity clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ammendola, Roberto; Frezza, Ottorino; Cicero, Francesca Lo; Lonardo, Alessandro; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Rossetti, Davide; Salamon, Andrea; Salina, Gaetano; Simula, Francesco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2011-01-01

    We describe herein the APElink+ board, a PCIe interconnect adapter featuring the latest advances in wire speed and interface technology plus hardware support for a RDMA programming model and experimental acceleration of GPU networking; this design allows us to build a low latency, high bandwidth PC cluster, the APEnet+ network, the new generation of our cost-effective, tens-of-thousands-scalable cluster network architecture. Some test results and characterization of data transmission of a complete testbench, based on a commercial development card mounting an Altera FPGA, are provided.

  18. High resolution infrared spectroscopy of carbon dioxide clusters up to (CO2)13

    OpenAIRE

    Norooz Oliaee, J.; Dehghany, M.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Thirteen specific infrared bands in the 2350 cm−1 region are assigned to carbon dioxide clusters, (CO2)N, with N = 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13. The spectra are observed in direct absorption using a tuneable infrared laser to probe a pulsed supersonic jet expansion of a dilute mixture of CO2 in He carrier gas. Assignments are aided by cluster structure calculations made using two reliable CO2 intermolecular potential functions. For (CO2)6, two highly symmetric isomers are observed, one with S6 ...

  19. Generation of high-fidelity four-photon cluster state and quantum-domain demonstration of one-way quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Kuwashiro, Shin; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-05-30

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme for generating a four-photon entangled cluster state with fidelity over 0.860+/-0.015. We show that the fidelity is high enough to guarantee that the produced state is distinguished from Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger, W, and Dicke types of genuine four-qubit entanglement. We also demonstrate basic operations of one-way quantum computing using the produced state and show that the output state fidelities surpass classical bounds, which indicates that the entanglement in the produced state essentially contributes to the quantum operation.

  20. Interatomic potential to study the formation of NiCr clusters in high Cr ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Bakaev, A.; Olsson, P.; Domain, C.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Posselt, M.

    2017-02-01

    Under irradiation NiSiPCr clusters are formed in high-Cr ferritic martensitic steels as well as in FeCr model alloys. In the literature little is known about the origin and contribution to the hardening of these clusters. In this work we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the stability of small substitutional NiCr-vacancy clusters and interstitial configurations in bcc Fe. Based on DFT data and experimental considerations a ternary potential for the ferritic FeNiCr system was developed. The potential was applied to study the thermodynamic stability of NiCr clusters by means of Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) simulations. The results of our simulations show that Cr and Ni precipitate as separate fractions and suggest only a limited synergetic effect between Ni and Cr. Therefore our results suggest that the NiCrSiP clusters observed in experiments must be the result of other mechanisms than the synergy of Cr and Ni at thermal equilibrium.

  1. Evanescent high pressure during hypersonic cluster-surface impact characterized by the virial theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, A; Levine, R D

    2005-11-15

    Matter under extreme conditions can be generated by a collision of a hypersonic cluster with a surface. The ultra-high-pressure interlude lasts only briefly from the impact until the cluster shatters. We discuss the theoretical characterization of the pressure using the virial theorem and develop a constrained molecular-dynamics procedure to compute it. The simulations show that for rare-gas clusters the pressures reach the megabar range. The contribution to the pressure from momentum transfer is comparable in magnitude and is of the same sign as that ("the internal pressure") due to repulsive interatomic forces. The scaling of the pressure with the reduced mechanical variables is derived and validated with reference to the simulations.

  2. High-speed detection of emergent market clustering via an unsupervised parallel genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hendricks

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We implement a master-slave parallel genetic algorithm with a bespoke log-likelihood fitness function to identify emergent clusters within price evolutions. We use graphics processing units (GPUs to implement a parallel genetic algorithm and visualise the results using disjoint minimal spanning trees. We demonstrate that our GPU parallel genetic algorithm, implemented on a commercially available general purpose GPU, is able to recover stock clusters in sub-second speed, based on a subset of stocks in the South African market. This approach represents a pragmatic choice for low-cost, scalable parallel computing and is significantly faster than a prototype serial implementation in an optimised C-based fourth-generation programming language, although the results are not directly comparable because of compiler differences. Combined with fast online intraday correlation matrix estimation from high frequency data for cluster identification, the proposed implementation offers cost-effective, near-real-time risk assessment for financial practitioners.

  3. Metastable decay of argon clusters after photoionisation at high excess energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steger, H.; Vries, J. de; Kamke, W.; Hertel, I.V. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik)

    1991-08-01

    Recently Maerk and collaborators reported the metastable emission of large fractions from argon and neon cluster ions after electron impact ionisation at high excess energies. The decay was interpreted as the result of an intra-cluster excitation of a metastable state by one of the electrons involved in the ionisation process. Here we report the first direct observation of such a correlated two electron process during photoionisation of argon clusters using synchrotron radiation and the TPEPICO technique. We observe at least two distinct maxima of the metastable TPEPICO spectrum at around 27 eV and 28.5 eV, the former being consistent with the previously reported energetic threshold for electron impact ionisation. (orig.).

  4. Characterization of magnetic Ni clusters on graphene scaffold after high vacuum annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhenjun, E-mail: zzhang1@albany.edu; Matsubayashi, Akitomo, E-mail: norwegianwood.1984@gmail.com; Grisafe, Benjamin, E-mail: bgrisafe@albany.edu; Lee, Ji Ung, E-mail: jlee1@albany.edu; Lloyd, James R., E-mail: JLloyd@sunycnse.com

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic Ni nanoclusters were synthesized by electron beam deposition utilizing CVD graphene as a scaffold. The subsequent clusters were subjected to high vacuum (5−8 x10{sup −7} torr) annealing between 300 and 600 °C. The chemical stability, optical and morphological changes were characterized by X-ray photoemission microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and magnetic measurement. Under ambient exposure, nickel nanoparticles were observed to be oxidized quickly, forming antiferromagnetic nickel oxide. Here, we report that the majority of the oxidized nickel is in non-stoichiometric form and can be reduced under high vacuum at temperature as low as 300 °C. Importantly, the resulting annealed clusters were relatively stable and no further oxidation was detectable after three weeks of air exposure at room temperature. - Highlights: • Random oriented nickel clusters were assembled on monolayer graphene scaffold. • Nickel oxide shell was effectively reduced at moderate temperature. • Coercivity of nickel clusters are greatly improved after high vacuum annealing.

  5. Chemical Abundances of the Highly Obscured Galactic Globular Clusters 2MASS GC02 and Mercer 5

    CERN Document Server

    Penaloza, Francisco; Vasquez, Sergio; Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostin; Zoccali, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We present the first high spectral resolution abundance analysis of two newly discovered Galactic globular clusters, namely Mercer 5 and 2MASS GC02 residing in regions of high interstellar reddening in the direction of the Galactic center. The data were acquired with the Phoenix high-resolution near-infrared echelle spectrograph at Gemini South (R~50000) in the 15500.0 A - 15575.0 A spectral region. Iron, Oxygen, Silicon, Titanium and Nickel abundances were derived for two red giant stars, in each cluster, by comparing the entire observed spectrum with a grid of synthetic spectra generated with MOOG. We found [Fe/H] values of -0.86 +/- 0.12 and -1.08 +/- 0.13 for Mercer 5 and 2MASS GC02 respectively. The [O/Fe], [Si/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] ratios of the measured stars of Mercer 5 follow the general trend of both bulge field and cluster stars at this metallicity, and are enhanced by > +0.3. The 2MASS GC02 stars have relatively lower ratios, but still compatible with other bulge clusters. Based on metallicity and abund...

  6. Development of a high performance parallel computing platform and its use in the study of nanostructures: Clusters, sheets and tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowtham, S.

    Small clusters of gallium oxide, technologically important high temperature ceramic, together with interaction of nucleic acid bases with graphene and small-diameter carbon nanotube are focus of first principles calculations in this work. A high performance parallel computing platform is also developed to perform these calculations at Michigan Tech. First principles calculations are based on density functional theory employing either local density or gradient-corrected approximation together with plane wave and Gaussian basis sets. The bulk Ga2O3 is known to be a very good candidate for fabricating electronic devices that operate at high temperatures. To explore the properties of Ga2O3 at nanoscale, we have performed a systematic theoretical study on the small polyatomic gallium oxide clusters. The calculated results find that all lowest energy isomers of GamO n clusters are dominated by the Ga-O bonds over the metal-metal or the oxygen-oxygen bonds. Analysis of atomic charges suggest the clusters to be highly ionic similar to the case of bulk Ga2O3. In the study of sequential oxidation of these clusters starting from Ga3O, it is found that the most stable isomers display up to four different backbones of constituent atoms. Furthermore, the predicted configuration of the ground state of Ga2O is recently confirmed by the experimental results of Neumark's group. Guided by the results of calculations the study of gallium oxide clusters, performance related challenge of computational simulations, of producing high performance computers/platforms, has been addressed. Several engineering aspects were thoroughly studied during the design, development and implementation of the high performance parallel computing platform, RAMA, at Michigan Tech. In an attempt to stay true to the principles of Beowulf revolution, the RAMA cluster was extensively customized to make it easy to understand, and use - for administrators as well as end-users. Following the results of benchmark

  7. Evolutionary Map of the Universe: Tracing Clusters to High Red-shift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ray P. Norris; EMU Team

    2011-12-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a new radio-telescope being built in Western Australia. One of the key surveys for which it is being built is EMU (Evolutionary Map of the Universe), which will make a deep (∼ 10 Jy/bm rms) radio continuum survey covering the entire sky as far North as +30°. EMU may be compared to the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), except that it will have about 45 times the sensitivity, and five times the resolution. EMU will also have much better sensitivity to diffuse emission than previous large surveys, and is expected to produce a large catalogue of relics, tailed galaxies, and halos, and will increase the number of known clusters by a significant factor. Here we describe the EMU project and its impact on the astrophysics of clusters.

  8. Alpha clustering in $^{28}$Si probed through the identification of high-lying $0^+$ states

    CERN Document Server

    Adsley, P; Cseh, J; Dimitriova, S S; Brummer, J W; Li, K C W; Marin-Lambarri, D J; Lukyanov, K; Kheswa, N Y; Neveling, R; Papka, P; Pellegri, L; Pesudo, V; Pool, L C; Riczu, G; Smit, F D; van Zyl, J J; Zemlyanaya, E

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of nuclear structure in alpha-conjugate nuclei have long been associated with alpha clustering, including the existence of superdeformed bands. In this paper, an alpha-particle inelastic scattering experiment investigating the location of $0^+$ states in $^{28}$Si is reported in an attempt to locate possible cluster states. The results are compared to a semi-microscopic model which shows good agreement with the data, and supports the assignment of a newly discovered $0^+$ state as the band-head of a previously observed superdeformed band in $^{28}$Si

  9. Desalination and reuse of high-salinity shale gas produced water: drivers, technologies, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Devin L; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-03

    In the rapidly developing shale gas industry, managing produced water is a major challenge for maintaining the profitability of shale gas extraction while protecting public health and the environment. We review the current state of practice for produced water management across the United States and discuss the interrelated regulatory, infrastructure, and economic drivers for produced water reuse. Within this framework, we examine the Marcellus shale play, a region in the eastern United States where produced water is currently reused without desalination. In the Marcellus region, and in other shale plays worldwide with similar constraints, contraction of current reuse opportunities within the shale gas industry and growing restrictions on produced water disposal will provide strong incentives for produced water desalination for reuse outside the industry. The most challenging scenarios for the selection of desalination for reuse over other management strategies will be those involving high-salinity produced water, which must be desalinated with thermal separation processes. We explore desalination technologies for treatment of high-salinity shale gas produced water, and we critically review mechanical vapor compression (MVC), membrane distillation (MD), and forward osmosis (FO) as the technologies best suited for desalination of high-salinity produced water for reuse outside the shale gas industry. The advantages and challenges of applying MVC, MD, and FO technologies to produced water desalination are discussed, and directions for future research and development are identified. We find that desalination for reuse of produced water is technically feasible and can be economically relevant. However, because produced water management is primarily an economic decision, expanding desalination for reuse is dependent on process and material improvements to reduce capital and operating costs.

  10. A scientific case for future X-ray Astronomy: Galaxy Clusters at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies at high redshift (z>1) are vitally important to understand the evolution of the large scale structure of the Universe, the processes shaping galaxy populations and the cycle of the cosmic baryons, and to constrain cosmological parameters. After 13 years of operation of the Chandra and XMM-Newton satellites, the discovery and characterization of distant X-ray clusters is proceeding at a slow pace, due to the low solid angle covered so far, and the time-expensive observations needed to physically characterize their intracluster medium (ICM). At present, we know that at z>1 many massive clusters are fully virialized, their ICM is already enriched with metals, strong cool cores are already in place, and significant star formation is ongoing in their most massive galaxies, at least at z>1.4. Clearly, the assembly of a large and well characterized sample of high-z X-ray clusters is a major goal for the future. We argue that the only means to achieve this is a survey-optimized X-ray mission capa...

  11. A study of high-redshift AGN feedback in SZ cluster samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bîrzan, L.; Rafferty, D. A.; Brüggen, M.; Intema, H. T.

    2017-10-01

    We present a study of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback at higher redshifts (0.3 samples of clusters from the South Pole Telescope and Atacama Cosmology Telescope surveys. In contrast to studies of nearby systems, we do not find a separation between cooling flow (CF) clusters and non-CF clusters based on the radio luminosity of the central radio source (cRS). This lack may be due to the increased incidence of galaxy-galaxy mergers at higher redshift that triggers AGN activity. In support of this scenario, we find evidence for evolution in the radio-luminosity function of the cRS, while the lower luminosity sources do not evolve much, the higher luminosity sources show a strong increase in the frequency of their occurrence at higher redshifts. We interpret this evolution as an increase in high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) in massive clusters at z > 0.6, implying a transition from HERG-mode accretion to lower power low-excitation radio galaxy (LERG)-mode accretion at intermediate redshifts. Additionally, we use local radio-to-jet power scaling relations to estimate feedback power and find that half of the CF systems in our sample probably have enough heating to balance cooling. However, we postulate that the local relations are likely not well suited to predict feedback power in high-luminosity HERGs, as they are derived from samples composed mainly of lower luminosity LERGs.

  12. High resolution infrared spectra of NGC 6440 and NGC 6441: two massive Bulge Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Origlia, L; Rich, R M

    2008-01-01

    Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph at Keck II, we have obtained infrared echelle spectra covering the 1.5-1.8 micron range for giant stars in the massive bulge globular clusters NGC6440 and NGC6441. We report the first high dispersion abundance for NGC6440, [Fe/H]=-0.56+/-0.02 and we find [Fe/H]=-0.50+/-0.02 for the blue HB cluster NGC6441. We measure an average $\\alpha$-enhancement of ~+0.3 dex in both clusters, consistent with previous measurements of other metal rich bulge clusters, and favoring the scenario of a rapid bulge formation and chemical enrichment. We also measure very low 12C/13C isotopic ratios (~5+/- 1), suggesting that extra-mixing mechanisms are at work during evolution along the Red Giant Branch also in the high metallicity regime. We also measure Al abundances, finding average [Al/Fe]=0.45+/-0.02 and [Al/Fe]=0.52+/-0.02 in NGC6440 and NGC6441, respectively, and some Mg-Al anti-correlation in NGC6441. We also measure radial velocities vr=-76+/-3 km/s and vr=+14+/-3 km/s and velocity dispersion...

  13. The High-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey: The Spitzer Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno-Mahler, R.; Blanton, E. L.; Brodwin, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Golden-Marx, E.; Decker, B.; Wing, J. D.; Anand, G.

    2017-07-01

    We present 190 galaxy cluster candidates (most at high redshift) based on galaxy overdensity measurements in the Spitzer/IRAC imaging of the fields surrounding 646 bent, double-lobed radio sources drawn from the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey. The COBRA sources were chosen as objects in the Very Large Array FIRST survey that lack optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to a limit of m r = 22, making them likely to lie at high redshift. This is confirmed by our observations: the redshift distribution of COBRA sources with estimated redshifts peaks near z = 1 and extends out to z≈ 3. Cluster candidates were identified by comparing our target fields to a background field and searching for statistically significant (≥slant 2σ ) excesses in the galaxy number counts surrounding the radio sources; 190 fields satisfy the ≥slant 2σ limit. We find that 530 fields (82.0%) have a net positive excess of galaxies surrounding the radio source. Many of the fields with positive excesses but below the 2σ cutoff are likely to be galaxy groups. Forty-one COBRA sources are quasars with known spectroscopic redshifts, which may be tracers of some of the most distant clusters known.

  14. High-intensity femtosecond laser absorption by rare-gas clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李邵辉; 王成; 刘建胜; 王向欣; 朱频频; 李儒新; 倪国权; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    The energy absorption efficiency of high-intensity (~ 1016W/cm2) femtosecond laser pulses in a dense jet of large rare-gas clusters has been measured. Experimental results show that the energy absorption efficiency is strongly dependent on the cluster size and can be higher than 90%. The measurement of the ion energy indicates that the average ion energies of argon and xenon can be as high as 90 and 100keV, respectively. The dependence of the average energy of the ions on the cluster size is also measured. At comparatively low gas backing pressure, the average ion energies of argon and xenon increase with increasing gas backing pressure. The average ion energy of argon becomes saturated gradually with further increase of the gas backing pressure. For xenon, the average ion energy drops a little after the gas backing pressure exceeds 9 bar (3.2×105 atoms/cluster). The result showing the existence of a maximum average ion energy has been interpreted within the framework of the microplasma sphere model.

  15. A High Stellar Velocity Dispersion and ~100 Globular Clusters for the Ultra Diffuse Galaxy Dragonfly 44

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Danieli, Shany; Merritt, Allison; Mowla, Lamiya; Romanowsky, Aaron; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-01-01

    Recently a population of large, very low surface brightness, spheroidal galaxies was identified in the Coma cluster. The apparent survival of these Ultra Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) in a rich cluster suggests that they have very high masses. Here we present the stellar kinematics of Dragonfly 44, one of the largest Coma UDGs, using a 33.5 hr integration with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope. We find a velocity dispersion of 47 km/s, which implies a dynamical mass of M_dyn=0.7x10^10 M_sun within its deprojected half-light radius of r_1/2=4.6 kpc. The mass-to-light ratio is M/L=48 M_sun/L_sun, and the dark matter fraction is 98 percent within the half-light radius. The high mass of Dragonfly 44 is accompanied by a large globular cluster population. From deep Gemini imaging taken in 0.4" seeing we infer that Dragonfly 44 has 94 globular clusters, similar to the counts for other galaxies in this mass range. Our results add to other recent evidence that many UDGs are "failed" galaxies, with the sizes, dark matter conte...

  16. Annealing studies of cluster defects in ion-implanted silicon using high resolution DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gad, M.A. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Evans-Freeman, J.H. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: j.evans-freeman@shu.ac.uk

    2006-12-15

    High resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) has been applied to investigate the annealing behaviour of small cluster defects in n-type Si. The Si was implanted with either Ge or Si, with energies 1500 keV and 850 keV respectively, and doses of 1 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. The low dose ensured that there was a minimum of carrier removal due to deep defect states after implantation. Defect states in the as-implanted samples were attributed to VO pairs, divacancies and very small interstitial cluster defects, after detailed depth profiling. LDLTS of Ge{sup +} and Si{sup +} implanted silicon shows that there are three closely spaced deep levels associated with these clusters, with energies in the region of E {sub c}-400 meV. Samples were then isochronally annealed in very small temperature intervals up to 560 K, in situ in our high temperature measurement cryostat, and the LDLTS re-examined as a function of annealing temperature. A new deeper energy level emerges as the cluster-related signal reduces, and it is suggested that this new trap is a major recombination centre, by comparison with current-voltage data.

  17. Annealing studies of cluster defects in ion-implanted silicon using high resolution DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, M. A.; Evans-Freeman, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    High resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) has been applied to investigate the annealing behaviour of small cluster defects in n-type Si. The Si was implanted with either Ge or Si, with energies 1500 keV and 850 keV respectively, and doses of 1 × 10 10 cm -2. The low dose ensured that there was a minimum of carrier removal due to deep defect states after implantation. Defect states in the as-implanted samples were attributed to VO pairs, divacancies and very small interstitial cluster defects, after detailed depth profiling. LDLTS of Ge + and Si + implanted silicon shows that there are three closely spaced deep levels associated with these clusters, with energies in the region of Ec-400 meV. Samples were then isochronally annealed in very small temperature intervals up to 560 K, in situ in our high temperature measurement cryostat, and the LDLTS re-examined as a function of annealing temperature. A new deeper energy level emerges as the cluster-related signal reduces, and it is suggested that this new trap is a major recombination centre, by comparison with current-voltage data.

  18. Clustering of galaxies in a hierarchical universe - II. Evolution to high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Colberg, Jörg M.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; White, Simon D. M.

    1999-08-01

    In hierarchical cosmologies the evolution of galaxy clustering depends both on cosmological quantities such as Omega, Lambda and P(k), which determine how collapsed structures - dark matter haloes - form and evolve, and on the physical processes - cooling, star formation, radiative and hydrodynamic feedback - which drive the formation of galaxies within these merging haloes. In this paper we combine dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations and semi-analytic models of galaxy formation in order to study how these two aspects interact. We focus on the differences in clustering predicted for galaxies of differing luminosity, colour, morphology and star formation rate, and on what these differences can teach us about the galaxy formation process. We show that a `dip' in the amplitude of galaxy correlations between z=0 and z=1 can be an important diagnostic. Such a dip occurs in low-density CDM models, because structure forms early, and dark matter haloes of mass ~10^12M_solar, containing galaxies with luminosities ~L_*, are unbiased tracers of the dark matter over this redshift range; their clustering amplitude then evolves similarly to that of the dark matter. At higher redshifts, bright galaxies become strongly biased and the clustering amplitude increases again. In high density models, structure forms late, and bias evolves much more rapidly. As a result, the clustering amplitude of L_* galaxies remains constant from z=0 to z=1. The strength of these effects is sensitive to sample selection. The dip becomes weaker for galaxies with lower star formation rates, redder colours, higher luminosities and earlier morphological types. We explain why this is the case, and how it is related to the variation with redshift of the abundance and environment of the observed galaxies. We also show that the relative peculiar velocities of galaxies are biased low in our models, but that this effect is never very strong. Studies of clustering evolution as a function of galaxy

  19. Achieving High Performance Distributed System: Using Grid, Cluster and Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kr Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To increase the efficiency of any task, we require a system that would provide high performance along with flexibilities and cost efficiencies for user. Distributed computing, as we are all aware, has become very popular over the past decade. Distributed computing has three major types, namely, cluster, grid and cloud. In order to develop a high performance distributed system, we need to utilize all the above mentioned three types of computing. In this paper, we shall first have an introduction of all the three types of distributed computing. Subsequently examining them we shall explore trends in computing and green sustainable computing to enhance the performance of a distributed system. Finally presenting the future scope, we conclude the paper suggesting a path to achieve a Green high performance distributed system using cluster, grid and cloud computing

  20. The HST Frontier Fields: Complete High-Level Science Data Products for All 6 Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Borncamp, David; Khandrika, Harish G.; Lucas, Ray A.; Martlin, Catherine; Porterfield, Blair; Sunnquist, Ben; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto J.; Barker, Elizabeth A.; Grogin, Norman A.; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Ogaz, Sara; Robberto, Massimo; Sembach, Kenneth; Flanagan, Kathryn; Mountain, Matt; HST Frontier Fields Team

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program (PI: J. Lotz) is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, making use of the strong lensing amplification by these clusters of distant background galaxies to detect the faintest galaxies currently observable in the high-redshift universe. The entire program has now completed successfully for all 6 clusters, namely Abell 2744, Abell S1063, Abell 370, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223,. Each of these was observed over two epochs, to a total depth of 140 orbits on the main cluster and an associated parallel field, obtaining images in ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W) on both the main cluster and the parallel field in all cases. Full sets of high-level science products have been generated for all these clusters by the team at STScI, including cumulative-depth data releases during each epoch, as well as full-depth releases after the completion of each epoch. These products include all the full-depth distortion-corrected drizzled mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, including corrections for persistence, time-variable sky, and low-level dark current residuals, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The full set of resulting high-level science products and mosaics are publicly delivered to the community via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  1. AN EFFECTIVE MULTI-CLUSTERING ANONYMIZATION APPROACH USING DISCRETE COMPONENT TASK FOR NON-BINARY HIGH DIMENSIONAL DATA SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Arun Shalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustering is a process of grouping elements together, designed in such a way that the elements assigned to similar data points in a cluster are more comparable to each other than the remaining data points in a cluster. During clustering certain difficulties related when dealing with high dimensional data are ubiquitous and abundant. Works concentrated using anonymization method for high dimensional data spaces failed to address the problem related to dimensionality reduction during the inclusion of non-binary databases. In this work we study methods for dimensionality reduction for non-binary database. By analyzing the behavior of dimensionality reduction for non-binary database, results in performance improvement with the help of tag based feature. An effective multi-clustering anonymization approach called Discrete Component Task Specific Multi-Clustering (DCTSM is presented for dimensionality reduction on non-binary database. To start with we present the analysis of attribute in the non-binary database and cluster projection identifies the sparseness degree of dimensions. Additionally with the quantum distribution on multi-cluster dimension, the solution for relevancy of attribute and redundancy on non-binary data spaces is provided resulting in performance improvement on the basis of tag based feature. Multi-clustering tag based feature reduction extracts individual features and are correspondingly replaced by the equivalent feature clusters (i.e. tag clusters. During training, the DCTSM approach uses multi-clusters instead of individual tag features and then during decoding individual features is replaced by corresponding multi-clusters. To measure the effectiveness of the method, experiments are conducted on existing anonymization method for high dimensional data spaces and compared with the DCTSM approach using Statlog German Credit Data Set. Improved tag feature extraction and minimum error rate compared to conventional anonymization

  2. Screening and breeding of high taxol producing fungi by genome shuffling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To apply the fundamental principles of genome shuffling in breeding of taxol-producing fungi, Nodulisporium sylviform was used as starting strain in this work. The procedures of protoplast fusion and genome shuffling were studied. Three hereditarily stable strains with high taxol production were obtained by four cycles of genome shuffling. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of taxol produced was confirmed using thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and LC-MS. A high taxol producing fungus, Nodulisporium sylviform F4-26, was obtained, which produced 516.37 μg/L taxol. This value is 64.41% higher than that of the starting strain NCEU-1 and 31.52%―44.72% higher than that of the parent strains.

  3. Screening and breeding of high taxol producing fungi by genome shuffling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Kai; PING WenXiang; ZHANG LiNa; LIU Jun; LIN Yan; JIN Tao; ZHOU DongPo

    2008-01-01

    To apply the fundamental principles of genome shuffling in breeding of taxol-producing fungi,Nodulisporium sylviform was used as starting strain in this work. The procedures of protoplast fusion and genome shuffling were studied. Three hereditarily stable strains with high taxol production were obtained by four cycles of genome shuffling. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of taxol produced was confirmed using thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and LC-MS. A high taxol producing fungus, Nodulisporlum sylviform F4-26, was obtained,which produced 516.37 μg/L taxol. This value is 64.41% higher than that of the starting strain NCEU-1 and 31.52%-44.72% higher than that of the parent strains.

  4. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: The Type Ia Supernova Rate in High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barbary, K; Amanullah, R; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dawson, K S; Doi, M; Eisenhardt, P; Faccioli, L; Fadeyev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Hattori, T; Hsiao, E; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Lidman, C; Lubin, L; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A L; Stanford, S A; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Yasuda, N

    2010-01-01

    We report a measurement of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at 0.9 0.9 SNe. Finding 8 +/- 1 cluster SNe Ia, we determine a SN Ia rate of 0.50 +0.23-0.19 (stat) +0.10-0.09 (sys) SNuB (SNuB = 10^-12 SNe L_{sun,B}^-1 yr^-1). In units of stellar mass, this translates to 0.36 +0.16-0.13 (stat) +0.07-0.06 (sys) SNuM (SNuM = 10^-12 SNe M_sun^-1 yr^-1). This represents a factor of approximately 5 +/- 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z < 0.2. We parameterize the late-time SN Ia delay time distribution with a power law (proportional to t^s). Under the assumption of a cluster formation redshift of z_f = 3, our rate measurement in combination with lower-redshift cluster SN Ia rates constrains s = -1.31 +0.55-0.40, consistent with measurements of the delay time distribution in the field. This measurement is also consistent with the value of s ~ -1 typically expected for the "double degenerate" SN Ia progenitor scenario, and inconsistent with some models for the "single degenerat...

  5. Enabling Diverse Software Stacks on Supercomputers using High Performance Virtual Clusters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younge, Andrew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grant, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brightwell, Ron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    While large-scale simulations have been the hallmark of the High Performance Computing (HPC) community for decades, Large Scale Data Analytics (LSDA) workloads are gaining attention within the scientific community not only as a processing component to large HPC simulations, but also as standalone scientific tools for knowledge discovery. With the path towards Exascale, new HPC runtime systems are also emerging in a way that differs from classical distributed com- puting models. However, system software for such capabilities on the latest extreme-scale DOE supercomputing needs to be enhanced to more appropriately support these types of emerging soft- ware ecosystems. In this paper, we propose the use of Virtual Clusters on advanced supercomputing resources to enable systems to support not only HPC workloads, but also emerging big data stacks. Specifi- cally, we have deployed the KVM hypervisor within Cray's Compute Node Linux on a XC-series supercomputer testbed. We also use libvirt and QEMU to manage and provision VMs directly on compute nodes, leveraging Ethernet-over-Aries network emulation. To our knowledge, this is the first known use of KVM on a true MPP supercomputer. We investigate the overhead our solution using HPC benchmarks, both evaluating single-node performance as well as weak scaling of a 32-node virtual cluster. Overall, we find single node performance of our solution using KVM on a Cray is very efficient with near-native performance. However overhead increases by up to 20% as virtual cluster size increases, due to limitations of the Ethernet-over-Aries bridged network. Furthermore, we deploy Apache Spark with large data analysis workloads in a Virtual Cluster, ef- fectively demonstrating how diverse software ecosystems can be supported by High Performance Virtual Clusters.

  6. Comparison of clustering methods for high-dimensional single-cell flow and mass cytometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lukas M; Robinson, Mark D

    2016-12-01

    Recent technological developments in high-dimensional flow cytometry and mass cytometry (CyTOF) have made it possible to detect expression levels of dozens of protein markers in thousands of cells per second, allowing cell populations to be characterized in unprecedented detail. Traditional data analysis by "manual gating" can be inefficient and unreliable in these high-dimensional settings, which has led to the development of a large number of automated analysis methods. Methods designed for unsupervised analysis use specialized clustering algorithms to detect and define cell populations for further downstream analysis. Here, we have performed an up-to-date, extensible performance comparison of clustering methods for high-dimensional flow and mass cytometry data. We evaluated methods using several publicly available data sets from experiments in immunology, containing both major and rare cell populations, with cell population identities from expert manual gating as the reference standard. Several methods performed well, including FlowSOM, X-shift, PhenoGraph, Rclusterpp, and flowMeans. Among these, FlowSOM had extremely fast runtimes, making this method well-suited for interactive, exploratory analysis of large, high-dimensional data sets on a standard laptop or desktop computer. These results extend previously published comparisons by focusing on high-dimensional data and including new methods developed for CyTOF data. R scripts to reproduce all analyses are available from GitHub (https://github.com/lmweber/cytometry-clustering-comparison), and pre-processed data files are available from FlowRepository (FR-FCM-ZZPH), allowing our comparisons to be extended to include new clustering methods and reference data sets. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of ISAC.

  7. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-Resolution, Integrated-Light Spectroscopy. II. Expanding the Metallicity Range for Old Clusters and Updated Analysis Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, J E; McWilliam, A

    2016-01-01

    We present abundances of globular clusters in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated light spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the integrated light analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of 7 clusters from our previous publications and results for 5 new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from integrated light spectra agrees to $\\sim$0.1 dex for globular clusters with metallicities as high as [Fe/H]=$-0.3$, but the abundances measured for more metal rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Ca I, Ti I, Ti II, Sc II, V I, Cr I, Mn I, Co I, Ni I, Cu I, Y II, Zr I, Ba II, La II, Nd II, and Eu II. The elements for which the integrated light analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar ...

  8. The High-Mass Stellar Initial Mass Function in M31 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Dolphin, Andrew E; Beerman, Lori C; Williams, Benjamin F; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Rix, Hans-Walter; Hogg, David W; Fouesneau, Morgan; Johnson, Benjamin D; Bell, Eric F; Boyer, Martha L; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kalirai, Jason S; Lewis, Alexia R; Seth, Anil C; Skillman, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    We have undertaken the largest systematic study of the high-mass stellar initial mass function (IMF) to date using the optical color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of 85 resolved, young (4 Myr 2 Msun. For the ensemble of clusters, the distribution of stellar MF slopes is best described by $\\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$ with a very small intrinsic scatter. The data also imply no significant dependencies of the MF slope on cluster age, mass, and size, providing direct observational evidence that the measured MF represents the IMF. This analysis implies that the high-mass IMF slope in M31 clusters is universal with a slope ($\\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$) that is steeper than the canonical Kroupa (+1.30) and Salpeter (+1.35) values. Using our inference model on select Milky Way (MW) and LMC high-mass IMF studies from the literature, we find $\\Gamma_{\\rm MW} \\sim+1.15\\pm0.1$ and $\\Gamma_{\\rm LMC} \\sim+1.3\\pm0.1$, both with intrinsic scatter of ~0.3-0.4 dex. Thus, while the high-mass IMF in the Local Group may be unive...

  9. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  10. Facile synthesis of surfactant-free Au cluster/graphene hybrids for high-performance oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huajie; Tang, Hongjie; Wang, Dan; Gao, Yan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2012-09-25

    Non-Pt noble metal clusters like Au clusters are believed to be promising high performance catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of fuel cells, but they still suffer big problems during the catalysis reactions, such as a large amount of the capping agents being on the surface and easy occurrence of dissolution and aggregation. To overcome these obstacles, here, we present a novel and general strategy to grow ultrafine Au clusters and other metal (Pt, Pd) clusters on the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets without any additional protecting molecule or reductant. Compared with the currently generally adopted nanocatalysts, including commercial Pt/C, rGO sheets, Au nanoparticle/rGO hybrids, and thiol-capped Au clusters of the same sizes, the as-synthesized Au cluster/rGO hybrids display an impressive eletrocatalytic performance toward ORR, for instance, high onset potential, superior methanol tolerance, and excellent stability.

  11. Laserspray ionization, a new atmospheric pressure MALDI method for producing highly charged gas-phase ions of peptides and proteins directly from solid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-02-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols. Laser ablation is known to produce matrix clusters in MALDI provided a threshold energy is achieved. We propose that these clusters (liquid droplets) are highly charged, and under conditions that produce sufficient matrix evaporation, ions are field-evaporated from the droplets similarly to ESI. Because of the multiple charging, advanced mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge range can be used for protein characterization. Thus, using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, low femtomole quantities of proteins produce full-range mass spectra at 100,000 mass resolution with <5-ppm mass accuracy and with 1-s acquisition. Furthermore, the first example of protein fragmentation using electron transfer dissociation with MALDI is presented.

  12. Laserspray Ionization, a New Atmospheric Pressure MALDI Method for Producing Highly Charged Gas-phase Ions of Peptides and Proteins Directly from Solid Solutions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D.; Herath, Thushani N.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols. Laser ablation is known to produce matrix clusters in MALDI provided a threshold energy is achieved. We propose that these clusters (liquid droplets) are highly charged, and under conditions that produce sufficient matrix evaporation, ions are field-evaporated from the droplets similarly to ESI. Because of the multiple charging, advanced mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge range can be used for protein characterization. Thus, using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, low femtomole quantities of proteins produce full-range mass spectra at 100,000 mass resolution with <5-ppm mass accuracy and with 1-s acquisition. Furthermore, the first example of protein fragmentation using electron transfer dissociation with MALDI is presented. PMID:19955086

  13. Hard X-ray and Gamma-ray Emission Induced by Ultra-High Energy Protons in Cluster Accretion Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Sugiyama, N; Inoue, Susumu; Aharonian, Felix A.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2005-01-01

    All sufficiently massive clusters of galaxies are expected to be surrounded by strong accretion shocks, where protons can be accelerated to $\\sim 10^{18}$-$10^{19}$ eV under plausible conditions. Such protons interact with the cosmic microwave background and efficiently produce very high energy electron-positron pairs, which then radiate synchrotron and inverse Compton emission, peaking respectively at hard X-ray and TeV gamma-ray energies. Characterized by hard spectra (photon indices $\\sim 1.5$) and spatial distribution tracing the accretion shock, these can dominate over other nonthermal components depending on the shock magnetic field. HESS and other Cerenkov telescopes may detect the TeV emission from nearby clusters, notwithstanding its extended nature. The hard X-rays may be observable by future imaging facilities such as NeXT, and possibly also by ASTRO-E2/HXD. Such detections will not only provide a clear signature of ultra-high energy proton acceleration, but also an important probe of the accretion...

  14. Analysis of Fiber Clustering in Composite Materials Using High-Fidelity Multiscale Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    A new multiscale micromechanical approach is developed for the prediction of the behavior of fiber reinforced composites in presence of fiber clustering. The developed method is based on a coupled two-scale implementation of the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells theory, wherein both the local and global scales are represented using this micromechanical method. Concentration tensors and effective constitutive equations are established on both scales and linked to establish the required coupling, thus providing the local fields throughout the composite as well as the global properties and effective nonlinear response. Two nondimensional parameters, in conjunction with actual composite micrographs, are used to characterize the clustering of fibers in the composite. Based on the predicted local fields, initial yield and damage envelopes are generated for various clustering parameters for a polymer matrix composite with both carbon and glass fibers. Nonlinear epoxy matrix behavior is also considered, with results in the form of effective nonlinear response curves, with varying fiber clustering and for two sets of nonlinear matrix parameters.

  15. High resolution infrared spectroscopy of carbon dioxide clusters up to (CO2)13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norooz Oliaee, J; Dehghany, M; McKellar, A R W; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N

    2011-07-28

    Thirteen specific infrared bands in the 2350 cm(-1) region are assigned to carbon dioxide clusters, (CO(2))(N), with N = 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13. The spectra are observed in direct absorption using a tuneable infrared laser to probe a pulsed supersonic jet expansion of a dilute mixture of CO(2) in He carrier gas. Assignments are aided by cluster structure calculations made using two reliable CO(2) intermolecular potential functions. For (CO(2))(6), two highly symmetric isomers are observed, one with S(6) symmetry (probably the more stable form), and the other with S(4) symmetry. (CO(2))(13) is also symmetric (S(6)), but the remaining clusters are asymmetric tops with no symmetry elements. The observed rotational constants tend to be slightly (≈2%) smaller than those from the predicted structures. The bands have increasing vibrational blueshifts with increasing cluster size, similar to those predicted by the resonant dipole-dipole interaction model but significantly larger in magnitude.

  16. Clustering and dimensionality reduction for image retrieval in high-dimensional spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Benkrama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The scalability of indexing techniques and image retrieval pose many problems. Indeed, their performance degrades rapidly when the database size increases. In this paper, we propose an efficient indexing method for high-dimensional spaces. We investigate how high-dimensional indexing methods can be used on a partitioned space into clusters to help the design of an efficient and robust CBIR scheme. We develop a new method for efficient clustering is used for structuring objects in the feature space; this method allows dividing the base into data groups according to their similarity, in function of the parameter threshold and vocabulary size. A comparative study is presented between the proposed method and a set of classification methods. The experiments results on the Pascal Visual Object Classes challenges (VOC of 2007 and Caltech-256 dataset show that our method significantly improves the performance. Experimental retrieval results based on the precision/recall measures show interesting results.

  17. Residential High-Rise Clusters as a Contemporary Planning Challenge in Manama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wiedmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the different roots of current residential high-rise clusters emerging in new city districts along the coast of Bahrain’s capital city Manama, and the resulting urban planning and design challenges. Since the local real-estate markets were liberalized in Bahrain in 2003, the population grew rapidly to more than one million inhabitants. Consequently, the housing demand increased rapidly due to extensive immigration. Many residential developments were however constructed for the upper spectrum of the real-estate market, due to speculative tendencies causing a raise in land value. The emerging high-rise clusters are developed along the various waterfronts of Manama on newly reclaimed land. This paper explores the spatial consequences of the recent boom in construction boom and the various challenges for architects and urban planners to enhance urban qualities.

  18. Characterization of Magnetic Ni Clusters on Graphene Scaffold after High Vacuum Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Grisafe, Benjamin; Lee, Ji Ung; Lloyd, James R

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Ni nanoclusters were synthesized by electron beam deposition utilizing CVD graphene as a scaffold. The subsequent clusters were subjected to high vacuum (5-8 x10-7 torr) annealing between 300 and 600 0C. The chemical stability, optical and morphological changes were characterized by X-ray photoemission microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and magnetic measurement. Under ambient exposure, nickel nanoparticles was observed to be oxidized quickly, forming antiferromagnetic nickel oxide. Here, we report that the majority of the oxidized nickel is in non-stoichiometric form and can be reduced under high vacuum at temperature as low as 300 0C. Importantly, the resulting annealed clusters are relatively stable and no further oxidation was detectable after three weeks of air exposure at room temperature.

  19. Effects of carbonyl bond, metal cluster dissociation, and evaporation rates on predictions of nanotube production in high-pressure carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the conformation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO because of its lower bond energy as compared with that of NiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

  20. Achievable capacity design for irregular and clustered high performance mesh networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olwal, TO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available and locations of terminal users [10]. Moreover, typical rural based wireless networks can be described by (i) long single hop links, (ii) limited and unreliable energy sources, and (iii) clustered distribution of Internet users [11]. The main problem... constitutes the need to increase capacity of community owned existing wireless broadband networks so that multimedia services can be delivered to remote and rural areas without losing connectivity [2]. Fig. 1: High Performance Node (HPN) TM [10] Fig. 2...

  1. Modeling High-energy and Very-high-energy gamma-rays from the Terzan 5 Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Kopp, A; Büsching, I

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has recently detected a population of globular clusters (GCs) in high-energy (HE) gamma-rays. Their spectral properties and energetics are consistent with cumulative emission from a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) hosted by these clusters. For example, the HE spectra exhibit fairly hard power-law indices and cutoffs around a few GeV, typical of pulsed spectra measured for the gamma-ray pulsar population. The energetics may be used to constrain the number of visible MSPs in the cluster (N_vis), assuming canonical values for the average gamma-ray efficiency and spin-down power. This interpretation is indeed strengthened by the fact that the first gamma-ray MSP has now been identified in the GC NGC 6624, and this MSP is responsible for almost all of the HE emission from this cluster. On the other hand, it has been argued that the MSPs are also sources of relativistic leptons which may be reaccelerated in shocks originating in collisions of stellar winds in the cluste...

  2. K19 capsular polysaccharide of Acinetobacter baumannii is produced via a Wzy polymerase encoded in a small genomic island rather than the KL19 capsule gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Johanna J; Shneider, Mikhail M; Senchenkova, Sofya N; Shashkov, Alexander S; Siniagina, Maria N; Malanin, Sergey Y; Popova, Anastasiya V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Hall, Ruth M; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-08-01

    Polymerization of the oligosaccharides (K units) of complex capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) requires a Wzy polymerase, which is usually encoded in the gene cluster that directs K unit synthesis. Here, a gene cluster at the Acinetobacter K locus (KL) that lacks a wzy gene, KL19, was found in Acinetobacter baumannii ST111 isolates 28 and RBH2 recovered from hospitals in the Russian Federation and Australia, respectively. However, these isolates produced long-chain capsule, and a wzy gene was found in a 6.1 kb genomic island (GI) located adjacent to the cpn60 gene. The GI also includes an acetyltransferase gene, atr25, which is interrupted by an insertion sequence (IS) in RBH2. The capsule structure from both strains was →3)-α-d-GalpNAc-(1→4)-α-d-GalpNAcA-(1→3)-β-d-QuipNAc4NAc-(1→, determined using NMR spectroscopy. Biosynthesis of the K unit was inferred to be initiated with QuiNAc4NAc, and hence the Wzy forms the β-(1→3) linkage between QuipNAc4NAc and GalpNAc. The GalpNAc residue is 6-O-acetylated in isolate 28 only, showing that atr25 is responsible for this acetylation. The same GI with or without an IS in atr25 was found in draft genomes of other KL19 isolates, as well as ones carrying a closely related CPS gene cluster, KL39, which differs from KL19 only in a gene for an acyltransferase in the QuiNAc4NR synthesis pathway. Isolates carrying a KL1 variant with the wzy and atr genes each interrupted by an ISAba125 also have this GI. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of genes involved in capsule biosynthesis normally found at the KL located elsewhere in A. baumannii genomes.

  3. Characterization of highly proliferative secondary tumor clusters along host blood vessels in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Yang, Wei-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extensive invasion of tumor cells into normal brain tissue, a life‑threatening feature of malignant gliomas. How invasive tumor cells migrate into normal brain tissue and form a secondary tumor structure remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the morphological and phenotypic changes of glioma cells during invasion in a C6 glioma model were investigated. C6 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the right putamen region of adult Sprague‑Dawley rats. The brain tissue sections were then subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining. High magnification views of the tissue sections revealed that C6 cells formed tumor spheroids following implantation and marked invasion was observed shortly after spheroid formation. In the later stages of invasion, certain tumor cells invaded the perivascular space and formed small tumor clusters. These small tumor clusters exhibited certain common features, including tumor cell multilayers surrounding an arteriole, which occurred up to several millimeters away from the primary tumor mass; a high proliferation rate; and similar gene expression profiles to the primary tumor. In conclusion, the present study revealed that invading tumor cells are capable of forming highly proliferative cell clusters along arterioles near the tumor margin, which may be a possible cause of the recurrence of malignant glioma.

  4. High resolution spectroscopic analysis of seven giants in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6723

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas-Arriagada, A; Vásquez, S; Ripepi, V; Musella, I; Marconi, M; Grado, A; Limatola, L

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters associated with the Galactic bulge are important tracers of stellar populations in the inner Galaxy. High resolution analysis of stars in these clusters allows us to characterize them in terms of kinematics, metallicity, and individual abundances, and to compare these fingerprints with those characterizing field populations. We present iron and element ratios for seven red giant stars in the globular cluster NGC~6723, based on high resolution spectroscopy. High resolution spectra ($R\\sim48~000$) of seven K giants belonging to NGC 6723 were obtained with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Photospheric parameters were derived from $\\sim130$ FeI and FeII transitions. Abundance ratios were obtained from line-to-line spectrum synthesis calculations on clean selected features. An intermediate metallicity of [Fe/H]$=-0.98\\pm0.08$ dex and a heliocentric radial velocity of $v_{hel}=-96.6\\pm1.3~km s^{-1}$ were found for NGC 6723. Alpha-element abundances present enhancements of $[O/...

  5. High Performance Computing Based Parallel HIearchical Modal Association Clustering (HPAR HMAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-12

    For many applications, clustering is a crucial step in order to gain insight into the makeup of a dataset. The best approach to a given problem often depends on a variety of factors, such as the size of the dataset, time restrictions, and soft clustering requirements. The HMAC algorithm seeks to combine the strengths of 2 particular clustering approaches: model-based and linkage-based clustering. One particular weakness of HMAC is its computational complexity. HMAC is not practical for mega-scale data clustering. For high-definition imagery, a user would have to wait months or years for a result; for a 16-megapixel image, the estimated runtime skyrockets to over a decade! To improve the execution time of HMAC, it is reasonable to consider an multi-core implementation that utilizes available system resources. An existing imple-mentation (Ray and Cheng 2014) divides the dataset into N partitions - one for each thread prior to executing the HMAC algorithm. This implementation benefits from 2 types of optimization: parallelization and divide-and-conquer. By running each partition in parallel, the program is able to accelerate computation by utilizing more system resources. Although the parallel implementation provides considerable improvement over the serial HMAC, it still suffers from poor computational complexity, O(N2). Once the maximum number of cores on a system is exhausted, the program exhibits slower behavior. We now consider a modification to HMAC that involves a recursive partitioning scheme. Our modification aims to exploit divide-and-conquer benefits seen by the parallel HMAC implementation. At each level in the recursion tree, partitions are divided into 2 sub-partitions until a threshold size is reached. When the partition can no longer be divided without falling below threshold size, the base HMAC algorithm is applied. This results in a significant speedup over the parallel HMAC.

  6. Regenerative Soot-IX: C3 as the dominant, stable carbon cluster in high pressure sooting discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Janjua, Sohail Ahmad; Khan, S D; Khalid, R; Aleem, A; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented that have been obtained while operating the graphite hollow cathode duoplasmatron ion source in dual mode under constant discharge current. This dual mode operation enabled us to obtain the mass and emission spectra simultaneously. In mass spectra C3 is the main feature but C4 and C5 are also prominent, whereas in emission spectra C2 is also there and its presence shows that it is in an excited state rather than in an ionic state. These facts provide evidence that C3 is produced due to the regeneration of a soot forming sequence and leave it in ionic state. C3 is a stable molecule and the only dominant species among the carbon clusters that survives in a regenerative sooting environment at high-pressure discharges.

  7. C{sub 3} as the dominant carbon cluster in high pressure discharges in graphite hollow cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjua, Sohail Ahmad; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Khan, Sabih-ud-Din; Khalid, Rahila; Aleem, Abid; Ahmad, Shoaib [Carbon Based Nanotechnology and Accelerator Laboratory, PINSTECH, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2007-03-07

    Results are presented that have been obtained while operating the graphite hollow cathode duoplasmatron ion source in dual mode under constant discharge current. This dual mode operation enabled us to obtain the mass and emission spectra simultaneously. In mass spectra C{sub 3} is the main feature but C{sub 4} and C{sub 5} are also prominent, whereas in emission spectra C{sub 2} is also there and its presence shows that it is in an excited state rather than in an ionic state. These facts provide evidence that C{sub 3} is produced due to the regeneration of a soot forming sequence and leave it in ionic state. C{sub 3} is a stable molecule and the only dominant species among the carbon clusters that survives in a regenerative sooting environment at high-pressure discharges.

  8. Method for producing high carrier concentration p-Type transparent conducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonan; Yan, Yanfa; Coutts, Timothy J.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Dehart, Clay M.

    2009-04-14

    A method for producing transparent p-type conducting oxide films without co-doping plasma enhancement or high temperature comprising: a) introducing a dialkyl metal at ambient temperature and a saturated pressure in a carrier gas into a low pressure deposition chamber, and b) introducing NO alone or with an oxidizer into the chamber under an environment sufficient to produce a metal-rich condition to enable NO decomposition and atomic nitrogen incorporation into the formed transparent metal conducting oxide.

  9. Assessment of high and low enterotoxin A producing Staphylococcus aureus strains on pork sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeaki, Nikoleta; Cao, Rong; Skandamis, Panagiotis N; Rådström, Peter; Schelin, Jenny

    2014-07-16

    Three Staphylococcus aureus strains representing different alleles of the Siphoviridae prophage-encoded enterotoxin A (SEA) gene, including two high-SEA-producing strains and one low-SEA-producing strain were studied to investigate sea expression and SEA formation on a frankfurter type of sausage. The effect of lactic acid, an antimicrobial compound used as a preservative in food, was also investigated on the same product. All three strains were grown on pork sausages at 15°C for 14days in the presence or absence of lactic acid (1 or 2% v/v). Growth, sea mRNA expression and SEA formation were regularly monitored and compared between non-treated and treated sausages. For all experiments performed, the extracellular SEA formation significantly differed between the high- and low-SEA-producing strains, although growth and viability were overall the same. For the low producer (Sa51), the accumulated amount of extracellular SEA formed after 14days was close to the detection limit (less than 1ng/g) in all conditions; while Sa21 and Sa17, the two high-producing strains, formed 250±25.37ng/g and 750±82.65ng/g in non-treated sausage and 150±75.75ng/g and 300±83.89ng/g when treated with 1% lactic acid, respectively, after 14days. Sausages treated with 2% lactic acid followed the same pattern as above, but with an extended lag phase to 4days and reduced levels of enterotoxin formed for all strains. The difference in the level of SEA between the two high-producing strains is most likely due to the different clonal lineages of the sea-encoded Siphoviridae phages where induction of the prophage potentially could be the reason for higher production of SEA in one of the lines. Furthermore, a prolonged expression of sea gene in the two high-producing strains was observed during the entire incubation period, while the sea expression was under the detection limit in the low-producing strain. This study indicates that the high-SEA-producing strains, especially the strains with the

  10. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm-1 (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ˜0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  11. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng, E-mail: Lai-Sheng-Wang@brown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm{sup −1} (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ∼0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  12. G Clustering Is Important for the Initiation of Transcription-Induced R-Loops In Vitro, whereas High G Density without Clustering Is Sufficient Thereafter▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Deepankar; Lieber, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    R-loops form cotranscriptionally in vitro and in vivo at transcribed duplex DNA regions when the nascent RNA is G-rich, particularly with G clusters. This is the case for phage polymerases, as used here (T7 RNA polymerase), as well as RNA polymerases in bacteria, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, avians, mice, and humans. The nontemplate strand is left in a single-stranded configuration within the R-loop region. These structures are known to form at mammalian immunoglobulin class switch regions, thus exposing regions of single-stranded DNA for the action of AID, a single-strand-specific cytidine deaminase. R-loops form by thread-back of the RNA onto the template DNA strand, and here we report that G clusters are extremely important for the initiation phase of R-loop formation. Even very short regions with one GGGG sequence can initiate R-loops much more efficiently than random sequences. The high efficiencies observed with G clusters cannot be achieved by having a very high G density alone. Annealing of the transcript, which is otherwise disadvantaged relative to the nontemplate DNA strand because of unfavorable proximity while exiting the RNA polymerase, can offer greater stability if it occurs at the G clusters, thereby initiating an R-loop. R-loop elongation beyond the initiation zone occurs in a manner that is not as reliant on G clusters as it is on a high G density. These results lead to a model in which G clusters are important to nucleate the thread-back of RNA for R-loop initiation and, once initiated, the elongation of R-loops is primarily determined by the density of G on the nontemplate DNA strand. Without both a favorable R-loop initiation zone and elongation zone, R-loop formation is inefficient. PMID:19307304

  13. G clustering is important for the initiation of transcription-induced R-loops in vitro, whereas high G density without clustering is sufficient thereafter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Deepankar; Lieber, Michael R

    2009-06-01

    R-loops form cotranscriptionally in vitro and in vivo at transcribed duplex DNA regions when the nascent RNA is G-rich, particularly with G clusters. This is the case for phage polymerases, as used here (T7 RNA polymerase), as well as RNA polymerases in bacteria, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, avians, mice, and humans. The nontemplate strand is left in a single-stranded configuration within the R-loop region. These structures are known to form at mammalian immunoglobulin class switch regions, thus exposing regions of single-stranded DNA for the action of AID, a single-strand-specific cytidine deaminase. R-loops form by thread-back of the RNA onto the template DNA strand, and here we report that G clusters are extremely important for the initiation phase of R-loop formation. Even very short regions with one GGGG sequence can initiate R-loops much more efficiently than random sequences. The high efficiencies observed with G clusters cannot be achieved by having a very high G density alone. Annealing of the transcript, which is otherwise disadvantaged relative to the nontemplate DNA strand because of unfavorable proximity while exiting the RNA polymerase, can offer greater stability if it occurs at the G clusters, thereby initiating an R-loop. R-loop elongation beyond the initiation zone occurs in a manner that is not as reliant on G clusters as it is on a high G density. These results lead to a model in which G clusters are important to nucleate the thread-back of RNA for R-loop initiation and, once initiated, the elongation of R-loops is primarily determined by the density of G on the nontemplate DNA strand. Without both a favorable R-loop initiation zone and elongation zone, R-loop formation is inefficient.

  14. Visible light photooxidative performance of a high-nuclearity molecular bismuth vanadium oxide cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Tucher

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The visible light photooxidative performance of a new high-nuclearity molecular bismuth vanadium oxide cluster, H3[{Bi(dmso3}4V13O40], is reported. Photocatalytic activity studies show faster reaction kinetics under anaerobic conditions, suggesting an oxygen-dependent quenching of the photoexcited cluster species. Further mechanistic analysis shows that the reaction proceeds via the intermediate formation of hydroxyl radicals which act as oxidant. Trapping experiments using ethanol as a hydroxyl radical scavenger show significantly decreased photocatalytic substrate oxidation in the presence of EtOH. Photocatalytic performance analyses using monochromatic visible light irradiation show that the quantum efficiency Φ for indigo photooxidation is strongly dependent on the irradiation wavelength, with higher quantum efficiencies being observed at shorter wavelengths (Φ395nm ca. 15%. Recycling tests show that the compound can be employed as homogeneous photooxidation catalyst multiple times without loss of catalytic activity. High turnover numbers (TON ca. 1200 and turnover frequencies up to TOF ca. 3.44 min−1 are observed, illustrating the practical applicability of the cluster species.

  15. High-resolution CCD spectra of stars in globular clusters. I - Oxygen in M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leep, E. M.; Wallerstein, G.; Oke, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution (0.3 A) CCD spectra obtained at the 200 in. coude spectrograph have been analyzed for the abundances of O, Sc, Fe, and La in four stars in the globular cluster M13. Fe/H abundance is found to be = -1.6, as found by many other observers of this cluster. For three stars O/Fe abundance is found to be = +0.3 + or - 0.1, which is similar to O/Fe ratios in other globular clusters and metal-poor field stars. For star II-67, no oxygen line is visible at 6300 A and O/Fe abundance is found to be not greater than -0.4 (for a high carbon content) and not greater than -0.7 (for a low carbon content). The latter is more likely to be correct. Two possible explanations of the oxygen deficiency in II-67 are discussed: primordial deficiency, and CNO cycling at or above a temperature of 25,000,000 K.

  16. The Open Connectome Project Data Cluster: Scalable Analysis and Vision for High-Throughput Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Randal; Roncal, William Gray; Kleissas, Dean; Lillaney, Kunal; Manavalan, Priya; Perlman, Eric; Berger, Daniel R; Bock, Davi D; Chung, Kwanghun; Grosenick, Logan; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Weiler, Nicholas C; Deisseroth, Karl; Kazhdan, Michael; Lichtman, Jeff; Reid, R Clay; Smith, Stephen J; Szalay, Alexander S; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Vogelstein, R Jacob

    2013-01-01

    We describe a scalable database cluster for the spatial analysis and annotation of high-throughput brain imaging data, initially for 3-d electron microscopy image stacks, but for time-series and multi-channel data as well. The system was designed primarily for workloads that build connectomes- neural connectivity maps of the brain-using the parallel execution of computer vision algorithms on high-performance compute clusters. These services and open-science data sets are publicly available at openconnecto.me. The system design inherits much from NoSQL scale-out and data-intensive computing architectures. We distribute data to cluster nodes by partitioning a spatial index. We direct I/O to different systems-reads to parallel disk arrays and writes to solid-state storage-to avoid I/O interference and maximize throughput. All programming interfaces are RESTful Web services, which are simple and stateless, improving scalability and usability. We include a performance evaluation of the production system, highlighting the effec-tiveness of spatial data organization.

  17. Quantitative determination of gibberellins by high performance liquid chromatography from various gibberellins producing Fusarium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Kirti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Agarwal, Rashmi

    2010-08-01

    High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed for analysis of seven gibberellins, i.e., GA3, GA4, GA7, GA3 methyl ester, GA7 methyl ester 3,13 diacetate, GA7 methyl ester, and fusaric acid, using an isocratic system. Method was used for estimation of gibberellins from different Fusarium strains. Gibberellins were extracted from 28 strains of Fusarium, out of which six strains of Fusarium were isolated from soil of different parts of India and 22 strains were procured from the Indian Type Culture Collection, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. Extracts were analyzed for qualitative and quantitative estimation of gibberellins by thin layer chromatography and HPLC, respectively. On the basis of quantitative analysis of produced gibberellins by HPLC, they were categorized as low, moderate, and high gibberellin producing strain. For the first time, Fusarium solani was also reported as high GA3 producing strain.

  18. Extreme deformations and clusterization at high spin in the A ~ 40 mass region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Debisree; Afanasjev, Anatoli

    2015-10-01

    Recent revival of the interest to the study of superdeformation and clusterization in light nuclei has motivated us to undertake the study of extreme deformations in the A ~ 32 - 50 N ~ Z nuclei. Unfortunately, at spin zero the predicted structures with extreme deformation are located at high excitation energies which prevents their experimental observation. On the other hand, the rotation brings such structures closer to the yrast line and, in principle, makes their observation possible with future generation of facilities such as GRETA. Thus, the systematic study of the extremely deformed structures and clusterization has been performed in the framework of cranked relativistic mean field theory. The major features of such structures, the spins at which they become yrast and the possiblities of their experimental observation will be discussed in this presentation. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Grant DE-FG02-07ER41459.

  19. COSMIC-LAB: Unexpected Results from High-resolution Spectra of AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lapenna, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed at clarifying one of the least studied phases of stellar evolution: the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Recent results obtained for Galactic globular clusters (GCs) suggest that the AGB stage may contain crucial information about the evolutionary history of exotic stars (Beccari et al. 2006) and multiple-populations (Campbell et al. 2013) in the parent cluster. The thesis presents the analysis of a large sample of high-resolution spectra of AGB stars in four Galactic GCs, acquired at the Very Large Telescope (ESO) and the 2.2 meter telescope (MPG). The obtained results provide evidence of a previously unknown physical mechanism affecting the neutral species of some chemical elements in the atmosphere of most AGB stars: because of it, the abundances derived from neutral lines are systematically underestimated, while those measured from ionized lines remain unaffected. Such a behaviour exactly corresponds to what expected in the case of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) conditions i...

  20. Dynamical real-space renormalization group calculations with a highly connected clustering scheme on disordered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcan, D; Erzan, A

    2005-02-01

    We have defined a type of clustering scheme preserving the connectivity of the nodes in a network, ignored by the conventional Migdal-Kadanoff bond moving process. In high dimensions, our clustering scheme performs better for correlation length and dynamical critical exponents than the conventional Migdal-Kadanoff bond moving scheme. In two and three dimensions we find the dynamical critical exponents for the kinetic Ising model to be z=2.13 and z=2.09 , respectively, at the pure Ising fixed point. These values are in very good agreement with recent Monte Carlo results. We investigate the phase diagram and the critical behavior of randomly bond diluted lattices in d=2 and 3 in the light of this transformation. We also provide exact correlation exponent and dynamical critical exponent values on hierarchical lattices with power-law and Poissonian degree distributions.

  1. High-resolution optical imaging of the core of the globular cluster M15 with FastCam

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Sánchez, Anastasio; Villó, Isidro; Rebolo, Rafael; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge A; Oscoz, Alejandro; Hildebrandt, Sergi R; López, Roberto; Rodríguez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution I-band imaging of the core of the globular cluster M15 obtained at the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope with FastCam, a low readout noise L3CCD based instrument. Short exposure times (30 ms) were used to record 200000 images (512 x 512 pixels each) over a period of 2 hours 43 min. The lucky imaging technique was then applied to generate a final image of the cluster centre with FWHM ~ 0".1 and 13" x 13" FoV. We obtained a catalogue of objects in this region with a limiting magnitude of I=19.5. I-band photometry and astrometry are reported for 1181 stars. This is the deepest I-band observation of the M15 core at this spatial resolution. Simulations show that crowding is limiting the completeness of the catalogue. At shorter wavelengths, a similar number of objects has been reported using HST/WFPC observations of the same field. The cross-match with the available HST catalogues allowed us to produce colour-magnitude diagrams where we identify new Blue Straggler star candidates and previo...

  2. A visual method for direct selection of high-producing Pichia pastoris clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, offers the possibility to generate a high amount of recombinant proteins in a fast and easy way to use expression system. Being a single-celled microorganism, P. pastoris is easy to manipulate and grows rapidly on inexpensive media at high cell densities. A simple and direct method for the selection of high-producing clones can dramatically enhance the whole production process along with significant decrease in production costs. Results A visual method for rapid selection of high-producing clones based on mannanase reporter system was developed. The study explained that it was possible to use mannanase activity as a measure of the expression level of the protein of interest. High-producing target protein clones were directly selected based on the size of hydrolysis holes in the selected plate. As an example, the target gene (9elp-hal18 was expressed and purified in Pichia pastoris using this technology. Conclusions A novel methodology is proposed for obtaining the high-producing clones of proteins of interest, based on the mannanase reporter system. This system may be adapted to other microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the selection of clones.

  3. Living with high putrescine: expression of ornithine and arginine biosynthetic pathway genes in high and low putrescine producing poplar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew F; Minocha, Rakesh; Minocha, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Arginine (Arg) and ornithine (Orn), both derived from glutamate (Glu), are the primary substrates for polyamine (PA) biosynthesis, and also play important roles as substrates and intermediates of overall N metabolism in plants. Their cellular homeostasis is subject to multiple levels of regulation. Using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we studied changes in the expression of all genes of the Orn/Arg biosynthetic pathway in response to up-regulation [via transgenic expression of mouse Orn decarboxylase (mODC)] of PA biosynthesis in poplar (Populus nigra × maximowiczii) cells grown in culture. Cloning and sequencing of poplar genes involved in the Orn/Arg biosynthetic pathway showed that they have high homology with similar genes in other plants. The expression of the genes of Orn, Arg and PA biosynthetic pathway fell into two hierarchical clusters; expression of one did not change in response to high putrescine, while members of the other cluster showed a shift in expression pattern during the 7-day culture cycle. Gene expression of branch point enzymes (N-acetyl-Glu synthase, Orn aminotransferase, Arg decarboxylase, and spermidine synthase) in the sub-pathways, constituted a separate cluster from those involved in intermediary reactions of the pathway (N-acetyl-Glu kinase, N-acetyl-Glu-5-P reductase, N-acetyl-Orn aminotransferase, N (2)-acetylOrn:N-acetyl-Glu acetyltransferase, N (2)-acetyl-Orn deacetylase, Orn transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, carbamoylphosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, spermine synthase). We postulate that expression of all genes of the Glu-Orn-Arg pathway is constitutively coordinated and is not influenced by the increase in flux rate through this pathway in response to increased utilization of Orn by mODC; thus the pathway involves mostly biochemical regulation rather than changes in gene expression. We further suggest that Orn itself plays a major role in the

  4. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Schrabback, T; Dietrich, J P; Hoekstra, H; Bocquet, S; Gonzalez, A H; von der Linden, A; McDonald, M; Morrison, C B; Raihan, S F; Allen, S W; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Chiu, I; Desai, S; Foley, R J; de Haan, T; High, F W; Hilbert, S; Mantz, A B; Massey, R; Mohr, J; Reichardt, C L; Saro, A; Simon, P; Stern, C; Stubbs, C W; Zenteno, A

    2016-01-01

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing...

  5. High resolution spectroscopic analysis of seven giants in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6723

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Zoccali, M.; Vásquez, S.; Ripepi, V.; Musella, I.; Marconi, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Globular clusters associated with the Galactic bulge are important tracers of stellar populations in the inner Galaxy. High resolution analysis of stars in these clusters allows us to characterize them in terms of kinematics, metallicity, and individual abundances, and to compare these fingerprints with those characterizing field populations. Aims: We present iron and element ratios for seven red giant stars in the globular cluster NGC 6723, based on high resolution spectroscopy. Methods: High resolution spectra (R ~ 48 000) of seven K giants belonging to NGC 6723 were obtained with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope. Photospheric parameters were derived from ~130 Fe i and Fe ii transitions. Abundance ratios were obtained from line-to-line spectrum synthesis calculations on clean selected features. Results: An intermediate metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.98 ± 0.08 dex and a heliocentric radial velocity of vhel = -96.6 ± 1.3 km s-1 were found for NGC 6723. Alpha-element abundances present enhancements of [O/Fe] = 0.29 ± 0.18 dex, [Mg/Fe] = 0.23 ± 0.10 dex, [Si/Fe] = 0.36 ± 0.05 dex, and [Ca/Fe] = 0.30 ± 0.07 dex. Similar overabundance is found for the iron-peak Ti with [Ti/Fe] = 0.24 ± 0.09 dex. Odd-Z elements Na and Al present abundances of [Na/Fe] = 0.00 ± 0.21 dex and [Al/Fe] = 0.31 ± 0.21 dex, respectively. Finally, the s-element Ba is also enhanced by [Ba/Fe] = 0.22 ± 0.21 dex. Conclusions: The enhancement levels of NGC 6723 are comparable to those of other metal-intermediate bulge globular clusters. In turn, these enhancement levels are compatible with the abundance profiles displayed by bulge field stars at that metallicity. This hints at a possible similar chemical evolution with globular clusters and the metal-poor of the bulge going through an early prompt chemical enrichment.

  6. CLUSTER: A high-frequency H-mode coupled cavity linac for low and medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaldi, Ugo [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: Ugo.Amaldi@cern.ch; Citterio, Alessandro; Crescenti, Massimo; Giuliacci, Arianna; Tronci, Cesare; Zennaro, Riccardo [TERA Foundation, Via Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy)

    2007-09-11

    An innovative linear accelerating structure is proposed which is particularly suited for low-current hadrontherapy applications but can also conveniently substitute the conventional proton linacs at present considered for Accelerator Driven Systems and neutrino and muon factories. Its two main features are compactness and good power efficiency at low-medium beam velocities (0.05{<=}{beta}{<=}0.5). The first is achieved through a high working frequency and a consequent high accelerating gradient, the second is obtained by coupling several H-mode cavities together. The structure was dubbed CLUSTER for 'Coupled-cavity Linac USing Transverse Electric Radial field'. To compare the performance of this structure with other hadrontherapy linac designs involving high frequencies, a conceptual study has been performed for an operating frequency of 3 GHz. Moreover, a proof of principle has been obtained through RF measurements on a prototype operating at 1 GHz. An accelerator complex using a CLUSTER linac is also considered for protontherapy purposes. This total accelerator complex, called 'cyclinac', uses a commercial cyclotron as an injector to a high-frequency and high-gradient linac.

  7. Presence of high-risk clones of OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii (ST79) and SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST277) in environmental water samples in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turano, Helena; Gomes, Fernando; Medeiros, Micheli; Oliveira, Silvane; Fontes, Lívia C; Sato, Maria I Z; Lincopan, Nilton

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the presence of hospital-associated high-risk lineages of OXA-23-producing ST79 Acinetobacter baumannii and SPM-1-producing ST277 Pseudomonas aeruginosa in urban rivers in Brazil. These findings indicate that urban rivers can act as reservoirs of clinically important multidrug-resistant bacteria, which constitute a potential risk to human and animal health.

  8. Electron Attachment to Oxygen and Nitric-Oxide Clusters with High Energy Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheier, P.; Senn, G.; Stampfli, P.; Mńrk, T. D.; Chu, Y.; Matejcik, S.; Stamatovic, A.; Illenberger, E.

    Highly monochrornatized electrons (with energy distributions of less than 15 meV FWHM) are used in a crossed beams experiment to investigate electron attachment to oxygen clusters (O2)n and nitric-oxide clusters (NO)n at electron energies from approximately zero eV up to several eV. At energies close to zero the attachment cross section for the reaction (X)n + e → X- (for X=O2 and NO, respectively) rises strongly with decreasing electron energy compatible with s-wave electron capture to Xn. Peaks in the oxygen attachment cross sections present at higher energies (80 meV, 193 meV,…) can be ascribed to vibrational levels of the anion. The vibrational spacings observed can be quantitatively accounted for by model calculations. In contrast, peaks at higher energies (220 meV, 440 meV,…) in the dissociative attachment cross sections for NOn are due to direct excitation of the vibrational levels in neutral NO prior to localization of the excess charge in the cluster (vibrational autoscavenging).

  9. Clusters of Factors Identify A High Prevalence of Pregnancy Involvement Among US Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2015-08-01

    The study purpose was to use recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to identify factors that, when clustered, are associated with a high prevalence of pregnancy involvement among US adolescent males. The National Survey of Family Growth is a nationally representative survey of individuals 15-44 years old. RPA was done for the 2002 and 2006-2010 cycles to identify factors which, when combined, identify adolescent males with the highest prevalence of pregnancy involvement. Pregnancy-involvement prevalence among adolescent males was 6 %. Two clusters of adolescent males have the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence, at 84-87 %. In RPA, the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence (87 %) was seen in adolescent males who ever HIV tested, had >4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment of 4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment ≥11th grade, were >17 years old, and had their first contraceptive education ≥10th grade, had a pregnancy-involvement prevalence of 84 %. Pregnancy-prevention efforts among adolescent males who have been involved in a pregnancy may need to target risk factors identified in clusters with the highest pregnancy prevalence to prevent subsequent pregnancies in these adolescent males and improve their future outcomes.

  10. A Numerical Method to Study Highly Correlated Nanostructures: The Logarithmic Discretization Embedded Cluster Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, E.; Chiappe, G.; Busser, C.; Davidovich, M.; Martins, G.; H-Meisner, F.; Dagotto, E.

    2008-03-01

    A numerical algorithm to study transport properties of highly correlated local structures is proposed. The method, dubbed the Logarithmic Discretization Embedded Cluster Approximation (LDECA), consists of diagonalizing a finite cluster containing the many-body terms of the Hamiltonian and embedding it into the rest of the system, combined with Wilson's ideas of a logarithmic discretization of the representation of the Hamiltonian. LDECA's rapid convergence eliminates finite-size effects commonly present in the embedding cluster approximation (ECA) method. The physics associated with both one embedded dot and a string of two dots side-coupled to leads is discussed. In the former case, our results accurately agree with Bethe ansatz (BA) data, while in the latter, the results are framed in the conceptual background of a two-stage Kondo problem. A diagrammatic expansion provides the theoretical foundation for the method. It is argued that LDECA allows for the study of complex problems that are beyond the reach of currently available numerical methods.

  11. Constraining the high redshift formation of black hole seeds in nuclear star clusters with gas inflows

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, Alessandro; Devecchi, Bernadetta; Galanti, Giorgio; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we explore a possible route of black hole seed formation that appeal to a model by Davies, Miller & Bellovary who considered the case of the dynamical collapse of a dense cluster of stellar black holes subjected to an inflow of gas. Here, we explore this case in a broad cosmological context. The working hypotheses are that (i) nuclear star clusters form at high redshifts in pre-galactic discs hosted in dark matter halos, providing a suitable environment for the formation of stellar black holes in their cores, (ii) major central inflows of gas occur onto these clusters due to instabilities seeded in the growing discs and/or to mergers with other gas-rich halos, and that (iii) following the inflow, stellar black holes in the core avoid ejection due to the steepening to the potential well, leading to core collapse and the formation of a massive seed of $<~ 1000\\, \\rm M_\\odot$. We simulate a cosmological box tracing the build up of the dark matter halos and there embedded baryons, and explore...

  12. The evolution of the Galactic metallicity gradient from high-resolution spectroscopy of open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Magrini, Laura; Randich, Sofia; Galli, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    Open clusters offer a unique possibility to study the time evolution of the radial metallicity gradients of several elements in our Galaxy, because they span large intervals in age and Galactocentric distance, and both quantities can be more accurately derived than for field stars. We re-address the issue of the Galactic metallicity gradient and its time evolution by comparing the empirical gradients traced by a sample of 45 open clusters with a chemical evolution model of the Galaxy. At variance with previous similar studies, we have collected from the literature only abundances derived from high--resolution spectra. The clusters have distances $7 < RGC<22$ kpc and ages from $\\sim 30$ Myr to 11 Gyr. We also consider the $\\alpha$-elements Si, Ca, Ti, and the iron-peak elements Cr and Ni. The data for iron-peak and $\\alpha$-elements indicate a steep metallicity gradient for R_GC<12$ kpc and a plateau at larger radii. The time evolution of the metallicity distribution is characterized by a uniform incr...

  13. GalICS V Low and high order clustering in mock SDSS's

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, J P; Budavari, T; Colombi, S; Devriendt, J E G; Guiderdoni, B; Pan, J; Szalay, A S; Szapudi, I

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged] We use mock catalogues based on the GALICS model (Hatton et al. 03) to explore the nature of galaxy clustering observed in the SDSS. We measure low and high order angular clustering statistic from these mock catalogues, after selecting galaxies the same way as for observations, and compare them directly to estimates from SDSS data. Note that we also present measurements of S3-S5 on the SDSS DR1. We find that our model is in general good agreement with observations in the scale/luminosity range where we can trust the predictions. This range is found to be limited (i) by the size of the dark matter simulation used -- which introduces finite volume effects at large scales -- and by the mass resolution of this simulation -- which introduces incompleteness at apparent magnitudes fainter than $r\\sim 20$. We then focus on the small scale clustering properties of galaxies and investigate the behaviour of three different prescriptions for positioning galaxies within haloes of dark matter. We show that galax...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF A NEW BACILLUS-STEAROTHERMOPHILUS ISOLATE - A HIGHLY THERMOSTABLE ALPHA-AMYLASE-PRODUCING STRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIND, RD; BUITELAAR, RM; EGGINK, G; HUIZING, HJ; DIJKHUIZEN, L

    A novel strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from samples of a potato-processing industry. Compared to known alpha-amylases from other B. stearothermophilus strains, the isolate was found to produce a highly thermostable alpha-amylase. The half-time of inactivation of this

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF A NEW BACILLUS-STEAROTHERMOPHILUS ISOLATE - A HIGHLY THERMOSTABLE ALPHA-AMYLASE-PRODUCING STRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIND, RD; BUITELAAR, RM; EGGINK, G; HUIZING, HJ; DIJKHUIZEN, L

    1994-01-01

    A novel strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from samples of a potato-processing industry. Compared to known alpha-amylases from other B. stearothermophilus strains, the isolate was found to produce a highly thermostable alpha-amylase. The half-time of inactivation of this alpha-amylas

  16. Characterization of a new Bacillus stearothermophilus isolate : a highly thermostable α-amylase-producing strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, R.D.; Buitelaar, R.M.; Eggink, G.; Huizing, H.J.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from samples of a potato-processing industry. Compared to known α-amylases from other B. stearothermophilus strains, the isolate was found to produce a highly thermostable α-amylase. The half-time of inactivation of this α-amylase was 5.1 h

  17. Isolation and characterization of a novel, highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asker, Dalal

    2017-09-18

    A high throughput screening approach for astaxanthin-producing bacteria led to the discovery of a novel highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium (strain N-5). Phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and phenotypic metabolic testing indicated it belongs to the genus Brevundimonas. Therefore, it was designated as Brevundimonas sp. strain N-5. To identify and quantify carotenoids produced by strain N-5, HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS methods were used. The culture conditions including media, shaking and time had significant effects on cell growth and carotenoids production including astaxanthin. The total carotenoids were ~601.2 µg g-1 dry cells including a remarkable amount (364.6 µg g-1 dry cells) of optically pure astaxanthin (3S, 3'S) isomer, with high selectivity (~60.6%) under medium aeration conditions. Notably, increasing the culture aeration enhanced astaxanthin production up to 85% of total carotenoids. This is the first report that describes a natural, highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium.

  18. Highly toxinogenic but avirulent Park-Williams 8 strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae does not produce siderophore.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, L. M.; Holmes, R K

    1985-01-01

    The highly toxinogenic Park-Williams 8 strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae grows slowly in vitro and is avirulent. C. diphtheriae Park-Williams 8 is defective in iron uptake and does not produce the corynebacterial siderophore corynebactin. Addition of partially purified corynebactin stimulated iron uptake and growth of iron-deprived C. diphtheriae Park-Williams 8 cells.

  19. Acceleration and radiation of ultra-high energy protons in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vannoni, G; Gabici, S; Kelner, S R; Prosekin, A

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are believed to be capable to accelerate protons at accretion shocks to energies exceeding 10^18 eV. At these energies, the losses caused by interactions of cosmic rays with photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) become effective and determine the maximum energy of protons and the shape of the energy spectrum in the cutoff region. The aim of this work is the study of the formation of the energy spectrum of accelerated protons at accretion shocks of galaxy clusters and of the characteristics of their broad band emission. The proton energy distribution is calculated self-consistently via a time-dependent numerical treatment of the shock acceleration process which takes into account the proton energy losses due to interactions with the CMBR. We calculate the energy distribution of accelerated protons, as well as the flux of broad-band emission produced by secondary electrons and positrons via synchrotron and inverse Compton scattering processes. We find that the downstre...

  20. Monitoring the cluster of high-risk mortality areas in the southwest of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Buxó-Pujolràs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by a previous study showing a striking geographical mortality clustering, not attributable to chance, in the south-western region of Spain in 1987-1995, the authors have conducted an ecological study of time trends in all-cause mortality risk between 1987-1995 and 1996-2004 in 2,218 small areas of Spain. To identify high-risk areas, age-adjusted relative risks for each area, stratified by sex and time period, were computed using a Bayesian approach. Areas of high-risk in both periods, or in the second period only, were identified. Annual excess mortality and percentage of people living in these high-risk areas, again stratified by sex and time period, were estimated. The cluster of high mortality risk areas identified in the southwest of Spain during 1987-1995 persisted in the period 1996-2004 with an increase in the number of highrisk areas and in annual excess of mortality. These increases showed a gender difference, being more pronounced in women.

  1. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Owocki, S P; Townsend, R D

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the primary CCD (ACIS-S3). All but five have near-IR or optical counterparts and about one-fourth are variable. Notable high-mass stellar detections are sigma Ori AB, the magnetic B star sigma Ori E, and the B5V binary HD 37525. Most of the other detections have properties consistent with lower mass K or M-type stars. We present the first X-ray spectrum of the unusual infrared source IRS1 located 3.3 arc-sec north of sigma Ori AB, which is likely an embedded T Tauri star whose disk/envelope is being photoevaporated by sigma Or...

  2. Cluster Effects during High Pressure Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection into Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAOLianghua; FENGBeibin; DONGJiafu; LIWenzhong; FENGZhen; HONGWenyu; LIBo

    2001-01-01

    When we speak of clusters, we have in mind entities which have neither the well-defined compositions, geometries, and strong bonds of conventional molecules northe boundary-independent properties of bulk matter. For example, an aggregate of a few atoms held together by Van der Waals forces constitutes a cluster. But clusters need not be weakly bound, several metal atoms bound together also constitute a cluster. Clusters need not be composed of a single kind of chemical entity, either atomic or molecular,

  3. Properties of the open cluster Tombaugh 1 from high resolution spectroscopy and uvbyCaH$\\beta$ photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, João V Sales; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J; Bidin, Christian Moni; Costa, Edgardo; Twarog, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Open clusters can be the key to deepen our knowledge on various issues involving the structure and evolution of the Galactic disk and details of stellar evolution because a cluster's properties are applicable to all its members. However the number of open clusters with detailed analysis from high resolution spectroscopy and/or precision photometry imposes severe limitation on studies of these objects. To expand the number of open clusters with well-defined chemical abundances and fundamental parameters, we investigate the poorly studied, anticenter open cluster Tombaugh 1. Using precision uvbyCaH$\\beta$ photometry and high resolution spectroscopy, we derive the cluster's properties and, for the first time, present detailed abundance analysis of 10 potential cluster stars. Using radial position from the cluster center and multiple color indices, we have isolated a sample of unevolved probable, single-star members of Tombaugh 1. The weighted photometric metallicity from $m_1$ and $hk$ is [Fe/H] = -0.10 $\\pm$ 0....

  4. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrabback, T.; et al.

    2016-11-11

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the mass-concentration relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.

  5. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. II. Expanding the Metallicity Range for Old Clusters and Updated Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ∼0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = ‑0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na i, Mg i, Al i, Si i, Ca i, Ti i, Ti ii, Sc ii, V i, Cr i, Mn i, Co i, Ni i, Cu i, Y ii, Zr i, Ba ii, La ii, Nd ii, and Eu ii. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe i, Ca i, Si i, Ni i, and Ba ii. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg i and Zr i. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. Graphdiyne oxides as excellent substrate for electroless deposition of Pd clusters with high catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hetong; Yu, Ping; Wang, Yuexiang; Han, Guangchao; Liu, Huibiao; Yi, Yuanping; Li, Yuliang; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-04-29

    Graphdiyne (GDY), a novel kind of two-dimensional carbon allotrope consisting of sp- and sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, is found to be able to serve as the reducing agent and stabilizer for electroless deposition of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles owing to its low reduction potential and highly conjugated electronic structure. Furthermore, we observe that graphdiyne oxide (GDYO), the oxidation form of GDY, can be used as an even excellent substrate for electroless deposition of ultrafine Pd clusters to form Pd/GDYO nanocomposite that exhibits a high catalytic performance toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The high catalytic performance is considered to benefit from the rational design and electroless deposition of active metal catalysts with GDYO as the support.

  7. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays clustering, GUT scale and neutrino masses

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z

    2002-01-01

    The clustering of ultra high energy (above 5\\cdot 10^{19} eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) suggests that they might be emitted by compact sources. We present a statistical analysis on the source density based on the multiplicities. The propagation of UHECR protons is studied in detail. The UHECR spectrum is consistent with the decay of GUT scale particles and/or with the Z-burst. The predicted GUT mass is m_X=10^b GeV, where b=14.6_{-1.7}^{+1.6}. Our neutrino mass prediction depends on the origin of the power part of the spectrum: m_\

  8. The HST Frontier Fields: High-Level Science Data Products for the First 4 Completed Clusters, and Latest Data on the Remaining Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto J.; Barker, Elizabeth A.; Borncamp, David; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Khandrika, Harish G.; Lucas, Ray A.; Ogaz, Sara; Porterfield, Blair; Grogin, Norman A.; Robberto, Massimo; Flanagan, Kathryn; Mountain, Matt; HST Frontier Fields Team

    2016-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, making use of the strong lensing amplification by these clusters of distant background galaxies to detect the faintest galaxies currently observable in the high-redshift universe. The first four of these clusters are now complete, namely Abell 2744, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223, with each of these having been observed over two epochs, to a total depth of 140 orbits on the main cluster and an associated parallel field, using ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W). The remaining two clusters, Abell 370 and Abell S1063, are currently in progress. Full sets of high-level science products have been generated for all these clusters by the team at STScI, including a total of 24 separate cumulative-depth data releases during each epoch, as well as full-depth version 1.0 releases at the end of each completed epoch. These products include all the full-depth distortion-corrected mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, including corrections for persistence, time-variable sky, and low-level dark current residuals, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The resulting high-level science products are delivered via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to the community on a rapid timescale to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  9. The HST Frontier Fields: High-Level Science Data Products for the First 4 Completed Clusters, and for the Last 2 Clusters Currently in Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto J.; Barker, Elizabeth A.; Borncamp, David; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Khandrika, Harish G.; Lucas, Ray A.; Ogaz, Sara; Porterfield, Blair; Sunnquist, Ben; Grogin, Norman A.; Robberto, Massimo; Sembach, Kenneth; Flanagan, Kathryn; Mountain, Matt; HST Frontier Fields Team

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program (PI: J. Lotz) is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, making use of the strong lensing amplification by these clusters of distant background galaxies to detect the faintest galaxies currently observable in the high-redshift universe. The first four of these clusters are now complete, namely Abell 2744, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223, with each of these having been observed over two epochs, to a total depth of 140 orbits on the main cluster and an associated parallel field, using ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W). The remaining two clusters, Abell 370 and Abell S1063, are currently in progress, with the first epoch for each having been completed. Full sets of high-level science products have been generated for all these clusters by the team at STScI, including cumulative-depth v0.5 data releases during each epoch, as well as full-depth version 1.0 releases after the completion of each epoch. These products include all the full-depth distortion-corrected mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, including corrections for persistence, time-variable sky, and low-level dark current residuals, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The full set of resulting high-level science products are publicly delivered to the community via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the

  10. Highly oil-producing microalgae selected through directed-evolution on a microfludic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestler, Troy; Estevez-Torres, Andre; Lambert, Guillaume; Austin, Robert H.

    2009-03-01

    Some species of photosynthetic microalgae produce signi?cant amounts of oil which can be easily converted to diesel fuel. However, as it stands today, biodiesel is signi?cantly more expensive than fossil fuels. We wish to improve the oil yield and production rate of a single species of microalgae through directed evolution. We propose to utilize our microfabication technology to create microhabitats to control the nutrient environment of the species, monitor oil production through Raman Spectroscopy, and punish colonies of algae which have low oil yield. We believe this process will produce a mutant species with a high oil yield.

  11. A high performance 3D cluster-based test of unsmoothed fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanjie; Nickerson, Lisa D; Xiong, Jinhu; Zou, Qihong; Fan, Yang; Ma, Yajun; Shi, Tingqi; Ge, Jianqiao; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Cluster-size tests (CST) based on random field theory have been widely adopted in fMRI data analysis to detect brain activation. However, most existing approaches can be used appropriately only when the image is highly smoothed in the spatial domain. Unfortunately, spatial smoothing degrades spatial specificity. Recently, a threshold-free cluster enhancement technique was proposed which does not require spatial smoothing, but this method can be used only for group level analysis. Advances in imaging technology now yield high quality high spatial resolution imaging data in single subjects and an inference approach that retains the benefits of greater spatial resolution is called for. In this work, we present a new CST with a correction for voxelation to address this problem. The theoretical formulation of the new approach based on Gaussian random fields is developed to estimate statistical significance using 3D statistical parametric maps without assuming spatial smoothness. Simulated phantom and resting-state fMRI experimental data are then used to compare the voxelation-corrected procedure to the widely used standard random field theory. Unlike standard random field theory approaches, which require heavy spatial smoothing, the new approach has a higher sensitivity for localizing activation regions without the requirement of spatial smoothness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High Resolution HDS/SUBARU chemical abundances of the young stellar cluster Palomar 1

    CERN Document Server

    Monaco, L; Correnti, M; Bonifacio, P; Geisler, D

    2010-01-01

    Context. Palomar\\,1 is a peculiar globular cluster (GC). It is the youngest Galactic GC and it has been tentatively associated to several of the substructures recently discovered in the Milky Way (MW), including the Canis Major (CMa) overdensity and the Galactic Anticenter Stellar Structure (GASS). Aims. In order to provide further insights into its origin, we present the first high resolution chemical abundance analysis for one red giant in Pal\\,1. Methods. We obtained high resolution (R=30000) spectra for one red giant star in Pal\\,1 using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted at the SUBARU telescope. We used ATLAS-9 model atmospheres coupled with the SYNTHE and WIDTH calculation codes to derive chemical abundances from the measured line equivalent widths of 18 among $\\alpha$, Iron-peak, light and heavy elements. Results. The Palomar~1 chemical pattern is broadly compatible to that of the MW open clusters population and similar to disk stars. It is, instead, remarkably different from that of the Sa...

  13. 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 a high redshift cluster discovered by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Cagnoni, I; Kim, D W; Mazzotta, P; Huang, J S; Celotti, A

    2001-01-01

    We report the detection of 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 as an arcminute scale extended X-ray source with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra observation and R and K band imaging strongly support the identification of 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 as a high redshift cluster of galaxies, most probably at z=0.85 +- 0.15, with an inferred temperature kT =10 (+4;-3) keV and an unabsorbed luminosity (in a r=120" aperture) of 1.3 (+0.16;-0.14) x 1e45 erg/s (0.5-10 keV). This indication of redshift is also supported by the K and R band imaging, and is in agreement with the spectroscopic redshift of 0.89 found by Ebeling et al. (2001). The surface brightness profile is consistent with a beta-model with beta=0.770 +- 0.025, rc=(18.1 +-0.9)" (corresponding to 101 +- 5 kpc at z=0.89), and S(0)=1.02 +- 0.08 counts/arcsec**2. 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 was selected as an extreme X-ray loud source with FX/FV>60; this selection method, thanks to the large area sampled, seems to be a highly efficient method for finding luminous high z clusters of galaxi...

  14. Pyrosequencing-based analysis reveals a novel capsular gene cluster in a KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate identified in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Pablo Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important virulence factor of Klebsiella pneumoniae is the production of capsular polysaccharide (CPS, a thick mucus layer that allows for evasion of the host's defense and creates a barrier against antibacterial peptides. CPS production is driven mostly by the expression of genes located in a locus called cps, and the resulting structure is used to distinguish between different serotypes (K types. In this study, we report the unique genetic organization of the cps cluster from K. pneumoniae Kp13, a clinical isolate recovered during a large outbreak of nosocomial infections that occurred in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Results A pyrosequencing-based approach showed that the cps region of Kp13 (cpsKp13 is 26.4 kbp in length and contains genes common, although not universal, to other strains, such as the rmlBADC operon that codes for L-rhamnose synthesis. cpsKp13 also presents some unique features, like the inversion of the wzy gene and a unique repertoire of glycosyltransferases. In silico comparison of cpsKp13 RFLP pattern with 102 previously published cps PCR-RFLP patterns showed that cpsKp13 is distinct from the C patterns of all other K serotypes. Furthermore, in vitro serotyping showed only a weak reaction with capsular types K9 and K34. We confirm that K9 cps shares common genes with cpsKp13 such as the rmlBADC operon, but lacks features like uge and Kp13-specific glycosyltransferases, while K34 capsules contain three of the five sugars that potentially form the Kp13 CPS. Conclusions We report the first description of a cps cluster from a Brazilian clinical isolate of a KPC-producing K. pneumoniae. The gathered data including K-serotyping support that Kp13’s K-antigen belongs to a novel capsular serotype. The CPS of Kp13 probably includes L-rhamnose and D-galacturonate in its structure, among other residues. Because genes involved in L-rhamnose biosynthesis are absent in humans, this pathway may represent

  15. Highly Conductive Graphene and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Thin Films Produced From Aqueous Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bart; Guin, Tyler; Sarwar, Owais; John, Alyssa; Paton, Keith R; Coleman, Jonathan N; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-09-27

    Rapid, large-scale exfoliation of graphene in water has expanded its potential for use outside niche applications. This work focuses on utilizing aqueous graphene dispersions to form thin films using layer-by-layer processing, which is an effective method to produce large-area coatings from water-based solutions of polyelectrolytes. When layered with polyethyleneimine, graphene flakes stabilized with cholate are shown to be capable of producing films thinner than 100 nm. High surface coverage of graphene flakes results in electrical conductivity up to 5500 S m(-1) . With the relative ease of processing, the safe, cost effective nature of the ingredients, and the scalability of the deposition method, this system should be industrially attractive for producing thin conductive films for a variety of electronic and antistatic applications.

  16. Model-based Clustering of High-Dimensional Data in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouveyron, C.

    2016-05-01

    The nature of data in Astrophysics has changed, as in other scientific fields, in the past decades due to the increase of the measurement capabilities. As a consequence, data are nowadays frequently of high dimensionality and available in mass or stream. Model-based techniques for clustering are popular tools which are renowned for their probabilistic foundations and their flexibility. However, classical model-based techniques show a disappointing behavior in high-dimensional spaces which is mainly due to their dramatical over-parametrization. The recent developments in model-based classification overcome these drawbacks and allow to efficiently classify high-dimensional data, even in the "small n / large p" situation. This work presents a comprehensive review of these recent approaches, including regularization-based techniques, parsimonious modeling, subspace classification methods and classification methods based on variable selection. The use of these model-based methods is also illustrated on real-world classification problems in Astrophysics using R packages.

  17. Cluster consensus of high-order multi-agent systems with switching topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bo; Sun, Fuchun; Li, Hongbo; Chen, Yao; Xi, Jianxiang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the cluster consensus problems of generic linear multi-agent systems with switching topologies. Sufficient criteria for cluster consensus, which generalise the results in existing literatures, are derived for both state feedback and observer-based control schemes. By using an averaging method, it is shown that cluster consensus can be achieved when the union of the acyclic topologies contains a directed spanning tree within each cluster frequently enough. We also provide a principle to construct digraphs with inter-cluster cyclic couplings that promote cluster consensus regardless of the magnitude of inter-agent coupling weights. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  18. High emergence of ESBL-producing E. coli cystitis: Time to get smarter in Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon eCantas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Widespread prevalence of extended-spectrum βeta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-producing E. coli limits the infection therapeutic options and is a growing global health problem. In this study our aim was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the E. coli in hospitalized and out- patients in Cyprus. Results: During the period 2010-2014, 389 strains of E. coli were isolated from urine samples of hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. ESBL-producing E. coli, was observed in 53% of hospitalized and 44% in out-patients, latest one being in 2014. All ESBL-producing E. coli remained susceptible to amikacin, carbapenems except ertapenem (in-patients= 6%, out-patients= 11%. Conclusions: High emerging ESBL-producing E. coli from urine samples in hospitalized and out-patients is an extremely worrisome sign of development of untreatable infections in the near future on the island. We therefore emphasize the immediate need for establishment of optimal therapy guidelines based on the country specific surveillance programs. The need for urgent prescription habit changes and ban of over-the-counter sale of antimicrobials at each segment of healthcare services is also discussed in this research.

  19. High Emergence of ESBL-Producing E. coli Cystitis: Time to Get Smarter in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantas, Leon; Suer, Kaya; Guler, Emrah; Imir, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Widespread prevalence of extended-spectrum βeta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-producing E. coli) limits the infection therapeutic options and is a growing global health problem. In this study our aim was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the E. coli in hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. During the period 2010-2014, 389 strains of E. coli were isolated from urine samples of hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. ESBL-producing E. coli, was observed in 53% of hospitalized and 44% in out-patients, latest one being in 2014. All ESBL-producing E. coli remained susceptible to amikacin, carbapenems except ertapenem (in-patients = 6%, out-patients = 11%). High emerging ESBL-producing E. coli from urine samples in hospitalized and out-patients is an extremely worrisome sign of development of untreatable infections in the near future on the island. We therefore emphasize the immediate need for establishment of optimal therapy guidelines based on the country specific surveillance programs. The need for new treatment strategies, urgent prescription habit changes and ban of over-the-counter sale of antimicrobials at each segment of healthcare services is also discussed in this research.

  20. Polarized Th2 like cells, in the absence of Th0 cells, are responsible for lymphocyte produced IL-4 in high IgE-producer schistosomiasis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares-Silveira Alda

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human resistance to re-infection with S. mansoni is correlated with high levels of anti-soluble adult worm antigens (SWAP IgE. Although it has been shown that IL-4 and IL-5 are crucial in establishing IgE responses in vitro, the active in vivo production of these cytokines by T cells, and the degree of polarization of Th2 vs. Th0 in human schistosomiasis is not known. To address this question, we determined the frequency of IL-4 and IFN-γ or IL-5 and IL-2 producing lymphocytes from schistosomiasis patients with high or low levels of IgE anti-SWAP. Results Our analysis showed that high and low IgE-producers responded equally to schistosomiasis antigens as determined by proliferation. Moreover, patients from both groups displayed similar percentages of circulating lymphocytes. However, high IgE-producers had an increased percentage of activated CD4+ T cells as compared to the low IgE-producers. Moreover, intracellular cytokine analysis, after short-term stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs, showed that IgE high-producers display an increase in the percentage of T lymphocytes expressing IL-4 and IL-5 as compared to IgE low-responders. A coordinate control of the frequency of IL-4 and IL-5 producing lymphocytes in IgE high, but not IgE low-responders, was observed. Conclusions High IgE phenotype human schistosomiasis patients exhibit a coordinate regulation of IL-4 and IL-5 producing cells and the lymphocyte derived IL-4 comes from true polarized Th2 like cells, in the absence of measurable Th0 cells as measured by co-production of IL-4 and IFN-γ.

  1. Extractive Fermentation of Sugarcane Juice to Produce High Yield and Productivity of Bioethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofiqah, U.; Widjaja, T.; Altway, A.; Bramantyo, A.

    2017-04-01

    Ethanol production by batch fermentation requires a simple process and it is widely used. Batch fermentation produces ethanol with low yield and productivity due to the accumulation of ethanol in which poisons microorganisms in the fermenter. Extractive fermentation technique is applied to solve the microorganism inhibition problem by ethanol. Extractive fermentation technique can produce ethanol with high yield and productivity. In this process raffinate still, contains much sugar because conversion in the fermentation process is not perfect. Thus, to enhance ethanol yield and productivity, recycle system is applied by returning the raffinate from the extraction process to the fermentation process. This raffinate also contains ethanol which would inhibit the performance of microorganisms in producing ethanol during the fermentation process. Therefore, this study aims to find the optimum condition for the amount of solvent to broth ratio (S: B) and recycle to fresh feed ratio (R: F) which enter the fermenter to produce high yield and productivity. This research was carried out by experiment. In the experiment, sugarcane juice was fermented using Zymomonasmobilis mutant. The fermentation broth was extracted using amyl alcohol. The process was integrated with the recycle system by varying the recycle ratio. The highest yield and productivity is 22.3901% and 103.115 g / L.h respectively, obtained in a process that uses recycle to fresh feed ratio (R: F) of 50:50 and solvents to both ratio of 1.

  2. Long-term Memory and Volatility Clustering in Daily and High-frequency Price Changes

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, G J; Um, C J; Kim, Seunghwann; Oh, GabJin; Um, Cheol-Jun

    2006-01-01

    We study the long-term memory in diverse stock market indices and foreign exchange rates using the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis(DFA). For all daily and high-frequency market data studied, no significant long-term memory property is detected in the return series, while a strong long-term memory property is found in the volatility time series. The possible causes of the long-term memory property are investigated using the return data filtered by the AR(1) model, reflecting the short-term memory property, and the GARCH(1,1) model, reflecting the volatility clustering property, respectively. Notably, we found that the memory effect in the AR(1) filtered return and volatility time series remains unchanged, while the long-term memory property either disappeared or diminished significantly in the volatility series of the GARCH(1,1) filtered data. We also found that in the high-frequency data the long-term memory property may be generated by the volatility clustering as well as higher autocorrelation. Our results i...

  3. Scaling Underworld - building up from personal clusters to high performance centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Moresi, L. N.

    2009-12-01

    Though most geodynamic modelers have access to either their own or university wide computer clusters, many mantle dynamics problems, such as 3D continental lithospheric deformation, demand the efficiency and power achieved by high performance computing centers. But how do we scale and optimize computational codes that have been built to run on hundreds of processors rather than petascale machines? In this session, we will present the relative performance trade-offs for specialized high performance machines at dedicated facilities versus the solution of not-especially-sophisticated, but well-integrated CPUs offered by personal computer clusters. We will discuss tuning issues common / different across the different platforms, such as the requirements on some machine for aggressive decomposition to make up for the lack of performance of each computational core which, though not optimal, may be necessary to provide sufficient memory and throughput for the job. We will comment on the cost-effectiveness of the different approaches available to an enthusiastic (perhaps foolhardy) geodynamicist.

  4. HT-Paxos: High Throughput State-Machine Replication Protocol for Large Clustered Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paxos is a prominent theory of state-machine replication. Recent data intensive systems that implement state-machine replication generally require high throughput. Earlier versions of Paxos as few of them are classical Paxos, fast Paxos, and generalized Paxos have a major focus on fault tolerance and latency but lacking in terms of throughput and scalability. A major reason for this is the heavyweight leader. Through offloading the leader, we can further increase throughput of the system. Ring Paxos, Multiring Paxos, and S-Paxos are few prominent attempts in this direction for clustered data centers. In this paper, we are proposing HT-Paxos, a variant of Paxos that is the best suitable for any large clustered data center. HT-Paxos further offloads the leader very significantly and hence increases the throughput and scalability of the system, while at the same time, among high throughput state-machine replication protocols, it provides reasonably low latency and response time.

  5. A Highly Eccentric 3.9-Millisecond Binary Pulsar in the Globular Cluster NGC 6652

    CERN Document Server

    DeCesar, Megan E; Kaplan, David L; Ray, Paul S; Geller, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    We present the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope discovery of the highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1835$-$3259A in the Fermi Large Area Telescope-detected globular cluster NGC 6652. Timing over one orbit yields the pulse period 3.89 ms, orbital period 9.25 d, eccentricity $\\sim 0.95$, and an unusually high companion mass of $0.74\\,M_{\\odot}$ assuming a $1.4\\,M_{\\odot}$ pulsar. We caution that the lack of data near periastron prevents a precise measurement of the eccentricity, and that further timing is necessary to constrain this and the other orbital parameters. From tidal considerations, we find that the companion must be a compact object. This system likely formed through an exchange encounter in the dense cluster environment. Our initial timing results predict the measurements of at least two post-Keplerian parameters with long-term phase-connected timing: the rate of periastron advance $\\dot{\\omega} \\sim 0.1^{\\circ}\\,$yr$^{-1}$, requiring 1 yr of phase connection; and the Einstein delay ...

  6. Association of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements with specific serotypes and virulence potential of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Magaly; Cao, Guojie; Ju, Wenting; Allard, Marc; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2014-02-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains (n = 194) representing 43 serotypes and E. coli K-12 were examined for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays to study genetic relatedness among STEC serotypes. A subset of the strains (n = 81) was further analyzed for subtype I-E cas and virulence genes to determine a possible association of CRISPR elements with potential virulence. Four types of CRISPR arrays were identified. CRISPR1 and CRISPR2 were present in all strains tested; 1 strain also had both CRISPR3 and CRISPR4, whereas 193 strains displayed a short, combined array, CRISPR3-4. A total of 3,353 spacers were identified, representing 528 distinct spacers. The average length of a spacer was 32 bp. Approximately one-half of the spacers (54%) were unique and found mostly in strains of less common serotypes. Overall, CRISPR spacer contents correlated well with STEC serotypes, and identical arrays were shared between strains with the same H type (O26:H11, O103:H11, and O111:H11). There was no association identified between the presence of subtype I-E cas and virulence genes, but the total number of spacers had a negative correlation with potential pathogenicity (P CRISPR-cas system and potential virulence needs to be determined on a broader scale, and the biological link will need to be established.

  7. Method to Produce Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection System Resistant to High Aeroacoustic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor); Calamito, Dominic P. (Inventor); Jong, Anthony (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing a three dimensional angle interlock ceramic fiber which is stable to high aeroacoustic noise of about 170 decibels and to high temperatures of about 2500 F is disclosed. The method uses multiple separate strands of a ceramic fiber or ceramic tow suitable for weaving having multiple warp fibers and multiple fill fibers woven with a modified fly-shuttle loom or rapier shuttleless loom which has nip rolls, a modified fabric advancement mechanism and at least eight harnesses in connection with a Dobby pattern chain utilizing sufficient heddles for each warp fiber and a reed which accommodates at least 168 ends per inch. The method produces a multilayered top fabric, rib fabric and single-layered bottom fabric.

  8. Centrifugal Step Emulsification can Produce Water in Oil Emulsions with Extremely High Internal Volume Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Schuler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The high throughput preparation of emulsions with high internal volume fractions is important for many different applications, e.g., drug delivery. However, most emulsification techniques reach only low internal volume fractions and need stable flow rates that are often difficult to control. Here, we present a centrifugal high throughput step emulsification disk for the fast and easy production of emulsions with high internal volume fractions above 95%. The disk produces droplets at generation rates of up to 3700 droplets/s and, for the first time, enables the generation of emulsions with internal volume fractions of >97%. The coefficient of variation between droplet sizes is very good (4%. We apply our system to show the in situ generation of gel emulsion. In the future, the recently introduced unit operation of centrifugal step emulsification may be used for the high throughput production of droplets as reaction compartments for clinical diagnostics or as starting material for micromaterial synthesis.

  9. XMM-Newton analysis of a newly discovered, extremely X-ray luminous galaxy cluster at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoelken, S.; Schrabback, T.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy clusters, the largest virialized structures in the universe, provide an excellent method to test cosmology on large scales. The galaxy cluster mass function as a function of redshift is a key tool to determine the fundamental cosmological parameters and especially measurements at high redshifts can e.g. provide constraints on dark energy. The fgas test as a direct cosmological probe is of special importance. Therefore, relaxed galaxy clusters at high redshifts are needed but these objects are considered to be extremely rare in current structure formation models. Here we present first results from an XMM-Newton analysis of an extremely X-ray luminous, newly discovered and potentially cool core cluster at a redshift of z=0.9. We carefully account for background emission and PSF effects and model the cluster emission in three radial bins. Our preliminary results suggest that this cluster is indeed a good candidate for a cool core cluster and thus potentially of extreme value for cosmology.

  10. The Aluminum Based Composite Produced by Self Propagating High Temperature Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus PRAMONO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method can be used for producing aluminum and boron carbide based composites. The experimental composites were fabricated using cobalt and carbon as catalysts. The microstructure of the material was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy and the mechanical properties were determined using micro-hardness testing. Al/B4C based composites with improved properties were obtained and the role of Co/C catalysts was studied.

  11. Cluster beam investigation with MCPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Esperanza; Bonaventura, Daniel; Grieser, Silke; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Taeschner, Alexander; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High intensity cluster-jet beams produced in Laval nozzles represent a very attractive and extremely interesting tool for studies at storage ring experiments, such as PANDA, or for laser-induced particle acceleration. Since the cluster properties vary with increasing number of constituents, it is essential to perform systematic measurements on the target thickness and especially on the cluster masses. For this purpose a monitoring system based on Micro Channel Plates (MCPs) combined with a phosphor screen has been developed and installed at the beam dump of the PANDA prototype cluster-jet target in Muenster. It could be shown that this MCP system allows for a direct observation of an ionised cluster beam. In addition, with this setup the possibility to visualise the vertex zone at the ANKE cluster-jet target at COSY was succesfully demonstrated, where a proton beam with a momentum of 2.09 GeV/c interacted with a hydrogen cluster-jet beam. Furthermore, cluster mass investigations can be performed in conjunction with a retardation field. In this presentation an overview of the MCP detection system, images of the cluster-jet beam and the vertex zone as well as the results of the current cluster mass measurements are presented and discussed.

  12. Automated Classification and Cluster Visualization of Genotypes Derived from High Resolution Melt Curves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Kanderian

    Full Text Available High Resolution Melting (HRM following PCR has been used to identify DNA genotypes. Fluorescent dyes bounded to double strand DNA lose their fluorescence with increasing temperature, yielding different signatures for different genotypes. Recent software tools have been made available to aid in the distinction of different genotypes, but they are not fully automated, used only for research purposes, or require some level of interaction or confirmation from an analyst.We describe a fully automated machine learning software algorithm that classifies unknown genotypes. Dynamic melt curves are transformed to multidimensional clusters of points whereby a training set is used to establish the distribution of genotype clusters. Subsequently, probabilistic and statistical methods were used to classify the genotypes of unknown DNA samples on 4 different assays (40 VKORC1, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3 samples in triplicate, and 49 MTHFR c.665C>T samples in triplicate run on the Roche LC480. Melt curves of each of the triplicates were genotyped separately.Automated genotyping called 100% of VKORC1, CYP2C9*3 and MTHFR c.665C>T samples correctly. 97.5% of CYP2C9*2 melt curves were genotyped correctly with the remaining 2.5% given a no call due to the inability to decipher 3 melt curves in close proximity as either homozygous mutant or wild-type with greater than 99.5% posterior probability.We demonstrate the ability to fully automate DNA genotyping from HRM curves systematically and accurately without requiring any user interpretation or interaction with the data. Visualization of genotype clusters and quantification of the expected misclassification rate is also available to provide feedback to assay scientists and engineers as changes are made to the assay or instrument.

  13. Metal chloride-treated graphene oxide to produce high-performance polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Su; Noh, Yong-Jin; Kwon, Sung-Nam; Na, Seok-In, E-mail: nsi12@jbnu.ac.kr [Professional Graduate School of Flexible and Printable Electronics and Polymer Materials Fusion Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 664-14, Deokjin-dong, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ye-Jin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok-Soon, E-mail: sskim@kunsan.ac.kr [Department of Nano and Chemical Engineering, Kunsan National University, Kunsan, Jeollabuk-do 753-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Wook [Soft Innovative Materials Research Center, Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, San 101, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 565-905 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-13

    We introduce a simple but effective graphene oxide (GO) modification with metal chloride treatments to produce high-performance polymer solar cells (PSCs). The role of various metal chlorides on GO and their effects on device performances of PSCs was investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, and current-voltage measurement studies demonstrated that metal chloride can induce a p-doping effect and increase the GO work-function, thus resulting in an improved built-in potential and interfacial resistance in PSCs. The resultant PSCs with metal chloride exhibited improved device efficiency than those with the neat GO. Furthermore, with the metal chloride-doped GO, we finally achieved an excellent PSC-efficiency of 6.58% and a very desirable device stability, which constitute a highly similar efficiency but much better PSC life-time to conventional device with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). This study could be a valuable way to produce various PEDOT:PSS alternatives and beneficial for producing high-performance and cost-efficient polymeric devices.

  14. Polydiacetylene-Based High-Throughput Screen for Surfactin Producing Strains of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyan; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional mutation is still an attractive approach for strain improvement, it is tedious, time-consuming, and inefficient to screen for surfactin producing strains. To overcome this, we developed a high-throughput screening method for surfactin producing mutants by applying polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicles as sensors with visible chromatic change from blue to red, detected as colorimetric response (CR%) signal, which can even semi-quantify the yields of surfactin. Bacillus subtilis 723 was used as parent strain and multiply mutated with atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP). Mutants were cultured in MicroFlask by Duetz (24 square deepwell plates, Applikon Biotechnology) and surfactin titers were tested in 96-well plates with PDA vesicles. Mutants with surfactin titers above150 mg/L (CR% value above 26%) were selected as high-yield strains and further quantified by HPLC. By integrating MicroFlask cultivation and the PDA vesicles detection, we screened 27,000 mutants and found 37 high-yield strains. From these, one mutant produced 473.6 mg/L surfactin (including 353.1 mg/L C15 surfactin), which was 5.4-fold than that of the parent strain. This method is efficient, cost-effective and provides wider application in screening for various surfactants. PMID:24498439

  15. A new catalog of homogenised absorption line indices for Milky Way globular clusters from high-resolution integrated spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hak-Sub; Sharples, Ray M; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Beasley, Michael A; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We perform integrated spectroscopy of 24 Galactic globular clusters. Spectra are observed from one core radius for each cluster with a high wavelength resolution of ~2.0 A FWHM. In combination with two existing data sets from Puzia et al. (2002) and Schiavon et al. (2005), we construct a large database of Lick spectral indices for a total of 53 Galactic globular clusters with a wide range of metallicities, -2.4 < [Fe/H] < 0.1, and various horizontal-branch morphologies. The empirical index-to-metallicity conversion relationships are provided for the 20 Lick indices for the use of deriving metallicities for remote, unresolved stellar systems.

  16. Low cost, highly effective parallel computing achieved through a Beowulf cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner, Marc; Skelton, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A Beowulf cluster is a means of bringing together several computers and using software and network components to make this cluster of computers appear and function as one computer with multiple parallel computing processors. A cluster of computers can provide comparable computing power usually found only in very expensive super computers or servers.

  17. Optimized high energy resolution in γ-ray spectroscopy with AGATA triple cluster detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Andreas

    2011-06-20

    The AGATA demonstrator consists of five AGATA Triple Cluster (ATC) detectors. Each triple cluster detector contains three asymmetric, 36-fold segmented, encapsulated high purity germanium detectors. The purpose of the demonstrator is to show the feasibility of position-dependent γ-ray detection by means of γ-ray tracking, which is based on pulse shape analysis. The thesis describes the first optimization procedure of the first triple cluster detectors. Here, a high signal quality is mandatory for the energy resolution and the pulse shape analysis. The signal quality was optimized and the energy resolution was improved through the modification of the electronic properties, of the grounding scheme of the detector in particular. The first part of the work was the successful installation of the first four triple cluster detectors at INFN (National Institute of Nuclear Physics) in Legnaro, Italy, in the demonstrator frame prior to the AGATA commissioning experiments and the first physics campaign. The four ATC detectors combine 444 high resolution spectroscopy channels. This number combined with a high density were achieved for the first time for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiments. The high quality of the ATC detectors is characterized by the average energy resolutions achieved for the segments of each crystal in the range of 1.943 and 2.131 keV at a γ-ray energy of 1.33 MeV for the first 12 crystals. The crosstalk level between individual detectors in the ATC is negligible. The crosstalk within one crystal is at a level of 10{sup -3}. In the second part of the work new methods for enhanced energy resolution in highly segmented and position sensitive detectors were developed. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved through averaging of the core and the segment signals, which led to an improvement of the energy resolution of 21% for γ-energies of 60 keV to a FWHM of 870 eV. In combination with crosstalk correction, a clearly improved energy resolution was

  18. Selected wild strains of Agaricus bisporus produce high yields of mushrooms at 25°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Pilar; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    To cultivate the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus in warm countries or during summer in temperate countries, while saving energy, is a challenge that could be addressed by using the biological diversity of the species. The objective was to evaluate the yield potential of eight wild strains previously selected in small scale experiments for their ability to produce mature fruiting bodies at 25°C and above. Culture units of 8 kg of compost were used. The yield expressed as weight or number per surface unit and earliness of fruiting were recorded during cultivation in climatic rooms at 17, 25 or 30°C. Only strains of A. bisporus var. burnettii were able to fruit at 30°C. At 25°C they produced the highest yields (27 kg m(-2)) and had best earliness. The yields at 25°C for the strains of A. bisporus var. bisporus ranged from 12 to 16 kg m(-2). The yield ratios 25°C/17°C ranged from 0.8 to 1.2. The variety burnettii originated in the Sonoran Desert in California showed adaptation for quickly producing fruiting bodies at high temperature when humidity conditions were favorable. Strains of the variety bisporus showed interesting potentials for their ability to produce mature fruiting bodies at higher temperature than present cultivars and might be used in breeding programs. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Emerging Diluted Ferromagnetism in High-Tc Superconductors Driven by Point Defect Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazquez, Jaume; Guzman, Roger; Mishra, Rohan; Bartolomé, Elena; Salafranca, Juan; Magén, Cesar; Varela, Maria; Coll, Mariona; Palau, Anna; Valvidares, S Manuel; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Pellegrin, Eric; Herrero-Martin, Javier; Pennycook, Stephen J; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Defects in ceramic materials are generally seen as detrimental to their functionality and applicability. Yet, in some complex oxides, defects present an opportunity to enhance some of their properties or even lead to the discovery of exciting physics, particularly in the presence of strong correlations. A paradigmatic case is the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123), in which nanoscale defects play an important role as they can immobilize quantized magnetic flux vortices. Here previously unforeseen point defects buried in Y123 thin films that lead to the formation of ferromagnetic clusters embedded within the superconductor are unveiled. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission microscopy has been used for exploring, on a single unit-cell level, the structure and chemistry resulting from these complex point defects, along with density functional theory calculations, for providing new insights about their nature including an unexpected defect-driven ferromagnetism, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism for bearing evidence of Cu magnetic moments that align ferromagnetically even below the superconducting critical temperature to form a dilute system of magnetic clusters associated with the point defects.

  20. A Parallel Multigrid Solver for High Frequency Electromagnetic Field Analyses with Small-scale PC Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosui, Kuniaki; Iwashita, Takeshi; Mori, Michiya; Kobayashi, Eiichi

    Finite element analyses of electromagnetic field are commonly used for designing of various electronic devices. The scale of the analyses becomes larger and larger, therefore, a fast linear solver is needed to solve linear equations arising from the finite element method. Since a multigrid solver is the fastest linear solver for these problems, parallelization of a multigrid solver is a quite useful approach. From the viewpoint of industrial applications, an effective usage of a small-scale PC cluster is important due to initial cost for introducing parallel computers. In this paper, a distributed parallel multigrid solver for a small-scale PC cluster is developed. In high frequency electromagnetic field analyses, a special block Gauss-Seidel smoother is used for the multigrid solver instead of general smoothers such as Gauss-Seidel smoother or Jacobi smoother in order to improve a convergence rate. The block multicolor ordering technique is applied to parallelize the smoother. A numerical exsample shows that a 3.7-fold speed-up in computational time and a 3.0-fold increase in the scale of the analysis were attained when the number of CPU was increased from one to five.

  1. Segmentation of high angular resolution diffusion MRI using sparse riemannian manifold clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetingül, H Ertan; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M; Vidal, René

    2014-02-01

    We address the problem of segmenting high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data into multiple regions (or fiber tracts) with distinct diffusion properties. We use the orientation distribution function (ODF) to model diffusion and cast the ODF segmentation problem as a clustering problem in the space of ODFs. Our approach integrates tools from sparse representation theory and Riemannian geometry into a graph theoretic segmentation framework. By exploiting the Riemannian properties of the space of ODFs, we learn a sparse representation for each ODF and infer the segmentation by applying spectral clustering to a similarity matrix built from these representations. In cases where regions with similar (resp. distinct) diffusion properties belong to different (resp. same) fiber tracts, we obtain the segmentation by incorporating spatial and user-specified pairwise relationships into the formulation. Experiments on synthetic data evaluate the sensitivity of our method to image noise and to the concentration parameters, and show its superior performance compared to alternative methods when analyzing complex fiber configurations. Experiments on phantom and real data demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method in segmenting simulated fibers and white matter fiber tracts of clinical importance.

  2. GU Mon, a high-mass eclipsing overcontact binary in the young open cluster Dolidze 25

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo, J; Vilardell, F; Simón-Díaz, S; Pastor, P; Majuelos, M Méndez

    2016-01-01

    Context. The eclipsing binary GU Mon is located in the star-forming cluster Dolidze 25, which has the lowest metallicity measured in a Milky Way young cluster. Aims. GU Mon has been identified as a short-period eclipsing binary with two early B-type components. We set out to derive its orbital and stellar parameters. Methods. We present a comprehensive analysis, including B and V light curves and 11 high-resolution spectra, to verify the orbital period and determine parameters. We use the stellar atmosphere code FASTWIND to obtain stellar parameters and create templates for cross-correlation. We obtain a model to fit the light and radial-velocity curves using the Wilson-Devinney code iteratively and simultaneously. Results. The two components of GU Mon are identical stars of spectral type B1 V, with the same mass and temperature. The lightcurves are typical of an EW-type binary. The spectroscopic and photometric analyses agree on a period of 0.896640 +- 0.000007 d. We determine a mass of 9.0 +- 0.6 Msun for e...

  3. Yields of AGB and SAGB models with chemistry of low- and high-metallicity Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, P; Carini, R; D'Antona, F

    2013-01-01

    We present yields from stars of mass in the range Mohigh-Z Globular Clusters. The yields are based on full evolutionary computations, following the evolution of the stars from the pre-Main Sequence through the Asymptotic Giant Branch phase, until the external envelope is lost. Independently of metallicity, stars with M<3Mo are dominated by Third Dredge-Up, thus ejecting into their surroundings gas enriched in carbon and nitrogen. Conversely, Hot Bottom Burning is the main responsible for the modification of the surface chemistry of more massive stars, whose mass exceeds 3Mo: their gas shows traces of proton-capture nucleosynthesis. The extent of Hot Bottom Burning turns out to be strongly dependent on metallicity. In this paper we analyze the consequences of this fact. These results can be used to understand the role played by intermediate mass stars in the self-enrichment scenario of globular clusters: the resu...

  4. Detecting Massive, High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters Using the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Carson; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Loeb, Abraham; Karim, Alexander; Staguhn, Johannes; Erler, Jens; Capak, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    We develop the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect as a direct astrophysical measure of the mass distribution of dark matter halos. The SZ effect increases with cosmological distance, a unique astronomical property, and is highly sensitive to halo mass. We find that this presents a powerful methodology for distinguishing between competing models of the halo mass function distribution, particularly in the high-redshift domain just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Recent surveys designed to probe this epoch of initial galaxy formation such as CANDELS and SPLASH report an over-abundance of highly massive halos as inferred from stellar ultraviolet (UV) luminosities and the stellar mass to halo mass ratio estimated from nearby galaxies. If these UV luminosity to halo mass relations hold to high-redshift, observations estimate several orders of magnitude more highly massive halos than predicted by hierarchical merging and the standard cosmological paradigm. Strong constraints on the masses of these galaxy clusters are essential to resolving the current tension between observation and theory. We conclude that detections of thermal SZ sources are plausible at high-redshift only for the halo masses inferred from observation. Therefore, future SZ surveys will provide a robust determination between theoretical and observational predictions.

  5. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF CLUSTERED RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC CALIBRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemi, S.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Subtraction of compact, bright sources is essential to produce high quality images in radio astronomy. It is recently proposed that 'clustered' calibration can perform better in subtracting fainter background sources. This is due to the fact that the effective power of a source cluster is greater th

  6. Comparative proteomics analysis of high n-butanol producing metabolically engineered Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Kojima, Kyoko; Xu, Ningning; Mobley, James; Zhou, Lufang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Liu, Xiaoguang Margaret

    2015-01-10

    The acidogenic Clostridium tyrobutyricum has recently been metabolically engineered to produce n-butanol. The objective of this study was to obtain a comprehensive understanding as to how butanol production was regulated in C. tyrobutyricum to guide the engineering of next-generation strains. We performed a comparative proteomics analysis, covering 78.1% of open reading frames and 95% of core enzymes, using wild type, ACKKO mutant (Δack) producing 37.30 g/L of butyrate and ACKKO-adhE2 mutant (Δack-adhE2) producing 16.68 g/L of butanol. In ACKKO-adhE2, the expression of most glycolytic enzymes was decreased, the thiolase (thl), acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (ato), 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (hbd) and crotonase (crt) that convert acetyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA were increased, and the heterologous bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2) catalyzing butanol formation was highly expressed. The apparent imbalance of energy and redox was observed due to the downregulation of acids production and the addition of butanol synthesis pathway, which also resulted in increased expression of chaperone proteins and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpA) and the silence of sporulation transcription factor Spo0A (spo0A) as the cellular responses to butanol production. This study revealed the mechanism of carbon redistribution, and limiting factors and rational metabolic cell and process engineering strategies to achieve high butanol production in C. tyrobutyricum.

  7. First Cluster results of the magnetic field structure of the mid- and high-altitude cusps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    Full Text Available Magnetic field measurements from the four Cluster spacecraft from the mid- and high-altitude cusp are presented. Cluster underwent two encounters with the mid-altitude cusp during its commissioning phase (24 August 2000. Evidence for field-aligned currents (FACs was seen in the data from all three operating spacecraft from northern and southern cusps. The extent of the FACs was of the order of 1 RE in the X-direction, and at least 300 km in the Y-direction. However, fine-scale field structures with scales of the order of the spacecraft separation (300 km were observed within the FACs. In the northern crossing, two of the spacecraft appeared to lie along the same magnetic field line, and observed very well matched signals. However, the third spacecraft showed evidence for structuring transverse to the field on scales of a few hundred km. A crossing of the high-altitude cusp from 13 February 2001 is presented. It is revealed to be a highly dynamic structure with the boundaries moving with velocities ranging from a few km/s to tens of km/s, and having structure on timescales ranging from less than one minute up to several minutes. The cusp proper is associated with the presence of a very disordered magnetic field, which is entirely different from the magnetosheath turbulence.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers – Space plasma physics (discontinuities

  8. Submillimeter Imaging of RCS022434-0002.5: Intense Activity in a High-Redshift Cluster?

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, T M A; Ivison, R J; Hoekstra, H; Gladders, M D; Barrientos, L F; Hsieh, B C

    2005-01-01

    We present deep 850micron imaging of the z=0.773 strong lensing galaxy cluster RCSJ022434-0002.5 from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS). These data are part of a larger submillimeter survey of RCS clusters, with SCUBA on the JCMT. We find five objects at 850micron, all of which are also detected at either 1.4-GHz, 450micron or both. The number density of objects in this field is in general agreement with the blank-field source counts; however, when combined with other cluster surveys a general tendency of cluster fields towards higher submm number densities is seen, which may be the result of unrecognized submillimeter luminous cluster galaxies. Primarily employing optical photometric redshifts we show that two of the five submillimeter galaxies in this field are consistent with being cluster members, while two are more likely background systems.

  9. Mutagenesis and selection of high efficiency hydrogen producing mutants by ultraviolet radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is an ideal, clean and sustainable energy source for the future because of its high conversion and nonpolluting nature. Biohydrogen production by dark-fermentation appears to have a great potential to be developed for practical application. However, one limiting factor affecting the development of hydrogen-production industrialization is that the hydrogen-producing capacity of bacteria is lower, so how to increase bacteria's hydrogen-producing ability will be an urgent issue. In this experiment, 2 mutants, namely UV3 and UV7,were obtained by ultra-violet radiation. They grew and produced hydrogen efficiently on iron-containing medium. The hydrogen evolution of UV3 and UV7 were 2 356. 68 ml/L and 2 219. 62 ml/L at a glucose concentration of 10 g/L, respectively. With wild parent strain Ethanoligenens sp. ZGX4, the hydrogen evohution was 1 806. 02 ml/L under the same conditions. Mutants' hydrogen-producing capacities were about 29. 71% and 22.22% higher than that of wild parent strain ZGX4. The maximum H2 production rate by mutants UV3 and UV7 were estimated to be 32. 57 mmol H2/g cell h and 31.19 mmol H2/g cell h, respectively, which were 38. 18% and 34. 78% higher than the control (23.57 mmol H2/g cell h). The abundant products of UV3 and UV7 were ethanol and acetic, which accounted for 95% -98% of total soluble microbial products. In each case, mutant strains UV3 and UV7 evolved hydrogen at a higher rate than the wild type, showing a possible potential for commercial hydrogen production. Another mutant named UV20' was also gained whose main end metabolites were butyric acid and acetic acid. This would provide researched material for a discussion of metabolic pathways of hydrogen-producing bacteria.

  10. High Curie temperature Mn5Ge3 thin films produced by non-diffusive reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, E.; Portavoce, A.; Hoummada, K.; Bertoglio, M.; Bertaina, S.

    2017-02-01

    Polycrystalline Mn5Ge3 thin films were produced on SiO2 using magnetron sputtering and reactive diffusion (RD) or non-diffusive reaction (NDR). In situ X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy were used to determine the layer structures, and magnetic force microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device, and ferromagnetic resonance were used to determine their magnetic properties. RD-mediated layers exhibit similar magnetic properties as molecular beam epitaxy-grown monocrystalline Mn5Ge3 thin films, while NDR-mediated layers show magnetic properties similar to monocrystalline C-doped Mn5Ge3Cx thin films with 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. NDR appears as a complementary metal oxide semi-conductor-compatible efficient method to produce good magnetic quality high-Curie temperature Mn5Ge3 thin films.

  11. Radiation properties and hydrodynamics evolution of highly charged ions in laser-produced silicon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Qi; Su, Maogen; Cao, Shiquan; Sun, Duixiong; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong

    2016-11-15

    We present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation, which can be used to investigate the radiation properties and dynamics evolution of highly charged ions in a laser-produced plasma in vacuum. The outputs of the model consist of the evolution of the electron temperature, atom, and ion density, and the temporal and spatial evolution of various transient particles in plasma, as well as the simulated spectrum related to certain experimental conditions in a specified spectral window. In order to test the model and provide valuable experimental feedback, a series of EUV emission spectra of silicon plasmas have been measured using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma is reliably reconstructed by using this model.

  12. Cluster observations of high-frequency waves in the exterior cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Khotyaintsev

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We study wave emissions, in the frequency range from above the lower hybrid frequency up to the plasma frequency, observed during one of the Cluster crossings of a high-beta exterior cusp region on 4 March 2003. Waves are localized near narrow current sheets with a thickness a few times the ion inertial length; currents are strong, of the order of 0.1-0.5μA/m2 (0.1-0.5mA/m2 when mapped to ionosphere. The high frequency part of the waves, frequencies above the electron-cyclotron frequency, is analyzed in more detail. These high frequency waves can be broad-band, can have spectral peaks at the plasma frequency or spectral peaks at frequencies below the plasma frequency. The strongest wave emissions usually have a spectral peak near the plasma frequency. The wave emission intensity and spectral character change on a very short time scale, of the order of 1s. The wave emissions with strong spectral peaks near the plasma frequency are usually seen on the edges of the narrow current sheets. The most probable generation mechanism of high frequency waves are electron beams via bump-on-tail or electron two-stream instability. Buneman and ion-acoustic instability can be excluded as a possible generation mechanism of waves. We suggest that high frequency waves are generated by electron beams propagating along the separatrices of the reconnection region.

  13. High-Level Culturability of Epiphytic Bacteria and Frequency of Biosurfactant Producers on Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Adrien Y.; Do, Paulina T.; Sbodio, Adrian; Suslow, Trevor V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To better characterize the bacterial community members capable of biosurfactant production on leaves, we distinguished culturable biosurfactant-producing bacteria from nonproducers and used community sequencing to compare the composition of these distinct cultured populations with that from DNA directly recovered from leaves. Communities on spinach, romaine, and head lettuce leaves were compared with communities from adjacent samples of soil and irrigation source water. Soil communities were poorly described by culturing, with recovery of cultured representatives from only 21% of the prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (>0.2% reads) identified. The dominant biosurfactant producers cultured from soil included bacilli and pseudomonads. In contrast, the cultured communities from leaves are highly representative of the culture-independent communities, with over 85% of the prevalent OTUs recovered. The dominant taxa of surfactant producers from leaves were pseudomonads as well as members of the infrequently studied genus Chryseobacterium. The proportions of bacteria cultured from head lettuce and romaine leaves that produce biosurfactants were directly correlated with the culture-independent proportion of pseudomonads in a given sample, whereas spinach harbored a wider diversity of biosurfactant producers. A subset of the culturable bacteria in irrigation water also became enriched on romaine leaves that were irrigated overhead. Although our study was designed to identify surfactant producers on plants, we also provide evidence that most bacteria in some habitats, such as agronomic plant surfaces, are culturable, and these communities can be readily investigated and described by more classical culturing methods. IMPORTANCE The importance of biosurfactant production to the bacteria that live on waxy leaf surfaces as well as their ability to be accurately assessed using culture-based methodologies was determined by interrogating epiphytic populations by

  14. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M., E-mail: maxence.gauthier@stanford.edu; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Propp, A.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Aurand, B.; Willi, O. [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Pak, A.; Ruby, J.; Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kerr, S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1R1 (Canada); Ramakrishna, B. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rödel, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  15. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  16. Properties of Laser-Produced Highly Charged Heavy Ions for Direct Injection Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Sakakibara, Kazuhiko; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ito, Taku; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okamura, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    To accelerate highly charged intense ion beam, we have developed the Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) with laser ion source. In this scheme an ion beam from a laser ion source is injected directly to a RFQ linac without a low energy beam transport (LEBT) and the beam loss in the LEBT can be avoided. We achieved high current acceleration of carbon ions (60mA) by DPIS with the high current optimized RFQ. As the next setp we will use heavier elements like Ag, Pb, Al and Cu as target in LIS (using CO2, Nd-YAG or other laser) for DPIS and will examine properties of laser-produced plasma (the relationship of between charge state and laser power density, the current dependence of the distance from the target, etc).

  17. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  18. Clustered ribbed-nanoneedle structured copper surfaces with high-efficiency dropwise condensation heat transfer performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Luo, Yuting; Tian, Jian; Li, Juan; Gao, Xuefeng

    2015-05-27

    We report that the dropwise condensation heat transfer (DCHT) effectiveness of copper surfaces can be dramatically enhanced by in situ grown clustered ribbed-nanoneedles. Combined experiments and theoretical analyses reveal that, due to the microscopically rugged and low-adhesive nature of building blocks, the nanosamples can not only realize high-density nucleation but constrain growing condensates into suspended microdrops via the self-transport and/or self-expansion mode for subsequently self-propelled jumping, powered by coalescence-released excess surface energy. Consequently, our nanosample exhibits over 125% enhancement in DCHT coefficient. This work helps develop advanced heat-transfer materials and devices for efficient thermal management and energy utilization.

  19. Infrared High-Resolution Integrated Light Spectral Analyses of M31 Globular Clusters from APOGEE

    CERN Document Server

    Sakari, Charli M; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Caldwell, Nelson; Garcia-Hernandez, Domingo Anibal; Lucatello, Sara; Majewski, Steven; O'Connell, Robert W; Pan, Kaike; Strader, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Chemical abundances are presented for 25 M31 globular clusters (GCs), based on moderately high resolution (R = 22, 500) H-band integrated light spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). Infrared spectra offer lines from new elements, of different strengths, and at higher excitation potentials compared to the optical. Integrated abundances of C, N, and O are derived from CO, CN, and OH molecular features, while Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, and Ti abundances are derived from atomic features. These abundances are compared to previous results from the optical, demonstrating the validity and value of infrared integrated light analyses. The CNO abundances are consistent with typical tip of the red giant branch stellar abundances, but are systematically offset from optical, Lick index abundances. With a few exceptions, the other abundances agree between the optical and the infrared within the 1{\\sigma} uncertainties. The first integrated K abundances are also presented, and demo...

  20. Equation-of-motion coupled cluster method for the description of the high spin excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiał, Monika; Lupa, Łukasz; Kucharski, Stanisław A.

    2016-04-01

    The equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled cluster (CC) approach in the version applicable for the excitation energy (EE) calculations has been formulated for high spin components. The EE-EOM-CC scheme based on the restricted Hartree-Fock reference and standard amplitude equations as used in the Davidson diagonalization procedure yields the singlet states. The triplet and higher spin components require separate amplitude equations. In the case of quintets, the relevant equations are much simpler and easier to solve. Out of 26 diagrammatic terms contributing to the R1 and R2 singlet equations in the case of quintets, only R2 operator survives with 5 diagrammatic terms present. In addition all terms engaging three body elements of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian disappear. This indicates a substantial simplification of the theory. The implemented method has been applied to the pilot study of the excited states of the C2 molecule and quintet states of C and Si atoms.

  1. Diversity of capsular polysaccharide gene clusters in Kpc-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates of sequence type 258 involved in the Italian epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Amisano, Francesco; Giani, Tommaso; Conte, Viola; Ciacci, Nagaia; Ambretti, Simone; Santoriello, Luisa; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type beta-lactamases (KPC-Kp) are broadly disseminating worldwide and constitute a major healthcare threat given their extensively drug resistant phenotypes and ability to rapidly disseminate in healthcare settings. In this work we report on the characterization of two different capsular polysaccharide (CPS) gene clusters, named cpsBO-4 and cps207-2, from two KPC-Kp clinical strains from Italy belonging in sequence type (ST) 258, which is one of the most successful ST of KPC-Kp spreading worldwide. While cpsBO-4 was different from known 78 K-types according to the recently proposed typing schemes based on the wzi or wzc gene sequences, cps207-2 was classified as K41 by one of these methods. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that they were represented in the genomic sequences of KPC-Kp from strains of ST258 from different countries, and cpsBO-4 was also detected in a KPC-Kp strain of ST442 from Brazil. Investigation of a collection of 46 ST258 and ST512 (a single locus variant of ST258) clinical strains representative of the recent Italian epidemic of KPC-Kp by means of a multiplex PCR typing approach revealed that cpsBO-4 was the most prevalent type, being detected both in ST258 and ST512 strains with a countrywide distribution, while cps207-2 was only detected in ST258 strains with a more restricted distribution.

  2. Diversity of Capsular Polysaccharide Gene Clusters in Kpc-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates of Sequence Type 258 Involved in the Italian Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Amisano, Francesco; Giani, Tommaso; Conte, Viola; Ciacci, Nagaia; Ambretti, Simone; Santoriello, Luisa; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type beta-lactamases (KPC-Kp) are broadly disseminating worldwide and constitute a major healthcare threat given their extensively drug resistant phenotypes and ability to rapidly disseminate in healthcare settings. In this work we report on the characterization of two different capsular polysaccharide (CPS) gene clusters, named cpsBO-4 and cps207-2, from two KPC-Kp clinical strains from Italy belonging in sequence type (ST) 258, which is one of the most successful ST of KPC-Kp spreading worldwide. While cpsBO-4 was different from known 78 K-types according to the recently proposed typing schemes based on the wzi or wzc gene sequences, cps207-2 was classified as K41 by one of these methods. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that they were represented in the genomic sequences of KPC-Kp from strains of ST258 from different countries, and cpsBO-4 was also detected in a KPC-Kp strain of ST442 from Brazil. Investigation of a collection of 46 ST258 and ST512 (a single locus variant of ST258) clinical strains representative of the recent Italian epidemic of KPC-Kp by means of a multiplex PCR typing approach revealed that cpsBO-4 was the most prevalent type, being detected both in ST258 and ST512 strains with a countrywide distribution, while cps207-2 was only detected in ST258 strains with a more restricted distribution. PMID:24823690

  3. Diversity of capsular polysaccharide gene clusters in Kpc-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates of sequence type 258 involved in the Italian epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Maria D'Andrea

    Full Text Available Strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type beta-lactamases (KPC-Kp are broadly disseminating worldwide and constitute a major healthcare threat given their extensively drug resistant phenotypes and ability to rapidly disseminate in healthcare settings. In this work we report on the characterization of two different capsular polysaccharide (CPS gene clusters, named cpsBO-4 and cps207-2, from two KPC-Kp clinical strains from Italy belonging in sequence type (ST 258, which is one of the most successful ST of KPC-Kp spreading worldwide. While cpsBO-4 was different from known 78 K-types according to the recently proposed typing schemes based on the wzi or wzc gene sequences, cps207-2 was classified as K41 by one of these methods. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that they were represented in the genomic sequences of KPC-Kp from strains of ST258 from different countries, and cpsBO-4 was also detected in a KPC-Kp strain of ST442 from Brazil. Investigation of a collection of 46 ST258 and ST512 (a single locus variant of ST258 clinical strains representative of the recent Italian epidemic of KPC-Kp by means of a multiplex PCR typing approach revealed that cpsBO-4 was the most prevalent type, being detected both in ST258 and ST512 strains with a countrywide distribution, while cps207-2 was only detected in ST258 strains with a more restricted distribution.

  4. The evolutionary divergence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is reflected in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) spacer composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuang; Jensen, Mark A; Bai, Jiawei; Debroy, Chitrita; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G

    2013-09-01

    The Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, including those of O157:H7 and the "big six" serogroups (i.e., serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145), are a group of pathogens designated food adulterants in the United States. The relatively conserved nature of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) in phylogenetically related E. coli strains makes them potential subtyping markers for STEC detection, and a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based assay was previously developed for O26:H11, O45:H2, O103:H2, O111:H8, O121:H19, O145:H28, and O157:H7 isolates. To better evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of this qPCR method, the CRISPR loci of 252 O157 and big-six STEC isolates were sequenced and analyzed along with 563 CRISPR1 and 624 CRISPR2 sequences available in GenBank. General conservation of spacer content and order was observed within each O157 and big-six serogroup, validating the qPCR method. Meanwhile, it was found that spacer deletion, the presence of an insertion sequence, and distinct alleles within a serogroup are sources of false-negative reactions. Conservation of CRISPR arrays among isolates expressing the same flagellar antigen, specifically, H7, H2, and H11, suggested that these isolates share an ancestor and provided an explanation for the false positives previously observed in the qPCR results. An analysis of spacer distribution across E. coli strains provided limited evidence for temporal spacer acquisition. Conversely, comparison of CRISPR sequences between strains along the stepwise evolution of O157:H7 from its O55:H7 ancestor revealed that, over this ∼7,000-year span, spacer deletion was the primary force generating CRISPR diversity.

  5. Highly charged ions from laser-cluster interactions: local-field-enhanced impact ionization and frustrated electron-ion recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennel, Thomas; Ramunno, Lora; Brabec, Thomas

    2007-12-07

    Our molecular dynamics analysis of Xe_{147-5083} clusters identifies two mechanisms that contribute to the yet unexplained observation of extremely highly charged ions in intense laser cluster experiments. First, electron impact ionization is enhanced by the local cluster electric field, increasing the highest charge states by up to 40%; a corresponding theoretical method is developed. Second, electron-ion recombination after the laser pulse is frustrated by acceleration electric fields typically used in ion detectors. This increases the highest charge states by up to 90%, as compared to the usual assumption of total recombination of all cluster-bound electrons. Both effects together augment the highest charge states by up to 120%, in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  6. The performance of a new Geant4 Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model in high throughput computing (HTC) cluster architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aatos, Heikkinen; Andi, Hektor; Veikko, Karimaki; Tomas, Linden [Helsinki Univ., Institute of Physics (Finland)

    2003-07-01

    We study the performance of a new Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model implemented in the general detector simulation tool-kit Geant4 with a High Throughput Computing (HTC) cluster architecture. A 60 node Pentium III open-Mosix cluster is used with the Mosix kernel performing automatic process load-balancing across several CPUs. The Mosix cluster consists of several computer classes equipped with Windows NT workstations that automatically boot, daily and become nodes of the Mosix cluster. The models included in our study are a Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with excitons, consisting of a pre-equilibrium model, a nucleus explosion model, a fission model and an evaporation model. The speed and accuracy obtained for these models is presented. (authors)

  7. The performance of a new Geant4 Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model in high throughput computing (HTC) cluster architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aatos, Heikkinen; Andi, Hektor; Veikko, Karimaki; Tomas, Linden [Helsinki Univ., Institute of Physics (Finland)

    2003-07-01

    We study the performance of a new Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model implemented in the general detector simulation tool-kit Geant4 with a High Throughput Computing (HTC) cluster architecture. A 60 node Pentium III open-Mosix cluster is used with the Mosix kernel performing automatic process load-balancing across several CPUs. The Mosix cluster consists of several computer classes equipped with Windows NT workstations that automatically boot, daily and become nodes of the Mosix cluster. The models included in our study are a Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with excitons, consisting of a pre-equilibrium model, a nucleus explosion model, a fission model and an evaporation model. The speed and accuracy obtained for these models is presented. (authors)

  8. High resolution X-ray spherically bent crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali Xiao; Hongjian Wang; Jun Shi; Changhuan Tang; Shenye Liu

    2009-01-01

    A new high spectral resolution crystal spectrometer is designed to measure very low emissive X-ray spectra of laser-produced plasma in 0.5 - 0.9 nm range. A large open aperture (30 x 20 (mm)) mica (002) spherically bent crystal with curvature radius R = 380 mm is used as dispersive and focusing element. The imaging plate is employed to obtain high spectral resolution with effective area of 30 x 80 (mm). The long designed path of the X-ray spectrometer beam is 980 mm from the source to the detector via the crystal. Experiment is carried out at a 20-J laser facility. X-ray spectra in an absolute intensity scale is obtained from Al laser produced plasmas created by laser energy of 6.78 J. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to E/鈻矱 ~ 1500 are presented. The results clearly show that the device is good to diagnose laser high-density plasmas.

  9. High shape recovery Ni–Ti SMA wire produced from electron beam melted ingot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, A.S. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica – ITA, 12.228-900, S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul – IFMS, 79.331-040, Corumba, MS (Brazil); Tosetti, J.P.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica – ITA, 12.228-900, S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Otubo, J., E-mail: jotubo@ita.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica – ITA, 12.228-900, S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► It was obtained a remarkable complete shape recovery up to 9% pre-strain. ► Shape recovery higher than 9% was obtained for a pre-strain up to 15%. ► These good results are attributed to a high purity NiTi SMA wire produced from EBM ingot. -- Abstract: Shape recovery of a 2 mm in diameter shape memory alloy (SMA) wire produced from EB melted NiTi ingot is presented. The results indicate complete shape recovery as high as 9% and a shape recovery higher than 9% for a pre-strain between 10 and 15%. These excellent results are attributed to the high purity of starting ingot with carbon content of 0.016 wt%. It was observed no change in reverse martensitic transformation temperature for pre-strain up to 9% and for higher pre-strain there was a 50 °C increase in reverse martensitic transformation peak temperatures indicating some work hardening of the material.

  10. High-resolution tSZ cartography of clusters of galaxies with NIKA at the IRAM 30-m telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Adane, A; Ade, P; André, P; Arnaud, M; Bartalucci, I; Beelen, A; Benoît, A; Bideaud, A; Billot, N; Blanquer, G; Boudou, N; Bourrion, O; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Coiffard, G; Comis, B; Cruciani, A; Désert, F -X; Doyle, S; Goupy, J; Hasnoun, B; Hermelo, I; Kramer, C; Lagache, G; Leclercq, S; Macías-Pérez, J F; Mauskopf, P; Monfardini, A; Pajot, F; Perotto, L; Pointecouteau, E; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Revéret, V; Ritacco, A; Rodriguez, L; Ruppin, F; Schuster, K; Sievers, A; Triqueneaux, S; Tucker, C; Zylka, R

    2016-01-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) is a powerful probe to study clusters of galaxies and is complementary with respect to X-ray, lensing or optical observations. Previous arcmin resolution tSZ observations ({\\it e.g.} SPT, ACT and Planck) only enabled detailed studies of the intra-cluster medium morphology for low redshift clusters ($z < 0.2$). Thus, the development of precision cosmology with clusters requires high angular resolution observations to extend the understanding of galaxy cluster towards high redshift. NIKA2 is a wide-field (6.5 arcmin field of view) dual-band camera, operated at $100 \\ {\\rm mK}$ and containing $\\sim 3300$ KID (Kinetic Inductance Detectors), designed to observe the millimeter sky at 150 and 260 GHz, with an angular resolution of 18 and 12 arcsec respectively. The NIKA2 camera has been installed on the IRAM 30-m telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain) in September 2015. The NIKA2 tSZ observation program will allow us to observe a large sample of clusters (50) at redshift ranging...

  11. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimbal, Daniel; Fournier, Lionel; Barbu, Alain

    2016-01-01

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium.

  12. A high fat diet containing saturated but not unsaturated fatty acids enhances T cell receptor clustering on the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Boyle, Sarah; Edidin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Cell culture studies show that the nanoscale lateral organization of surface receptors, their clustering or dispersion, can be altered by changing the lipid composition of the membrane bilayer. However, little is known about similar changes in vivo, which can be effected by changing dietary lipids. We describe the use of a newly developed method, k-space image correlation spectroscopy, kICS, for analysis of quantum dot fluorescence to show that a high fat diet can alter the nanometer-scale clustering of the murine T cell receptor, TCR, on the surface of naive CD4(+) T cells. We found that diets enriched primarily in saturated fatty acids increased TCR nanoscale clustering to a level usually seen only on activated cells. Diets enriched in monounsaturated or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids had no effect on TCR clustering. Also none of the high fat diets affected TCR clustering on the micrometer scale. Furthermore, the effect of the diets was similar in young and middle aged mice. Our data establish proof-of-principle that TCR nanoscale clustering is sensitive to the composition of dietary fat.

  13. High value added lipids produced by microorganisms: a potential use of sugarcane vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bruna Soares; Vieira, João Paulo Fernandes; Contesini, Fabiano Jares; Mantelatto, Paulo Eduardo; Zaiat, Marcelo; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz

    2017-12-01

    This review aims to present an innovative concept of high value added lipids produced by heterotrophic microorganisms, bacteria and fungi, using carbon sources, such as sugars, acids and alcohols that could come from sugarcane vinasse, which is the main byproduct from ethanol production that is released in the distillation step. Vinasse is a rich carbon source and low-cost feedstock produced in large amounts from ethanol production. In 2019, the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply estimates that growth of ethanol domestic consumption will be 58.8 billion liters, more than double the amount in 2008. This represents the annual production of more than 588 billion liters of vinasse, which is currently used as a fertilizer in the sugarcane crop, due to its high concentration of minerals, mainly potassium. However, studies indicate some disadvantages such as the generation of Greenhouse Gas emission during vinasse distribution in the crop, as well as the possibility of contaminating the groundwater and soil. Therefore, the development of programs for sustainable use of vinasse is a priority. One profitable alternative is the fermentation of vinasse, followed by an anaerobic digester, in order to obtain biomaterials such as lipids, other byproducts, and methane. Promising high value added lipids, for instance carotenoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAS), with a predicted market of millions of US$, could be produced using vinasse as carbon source, to guide an innovative concept for sustainable production. Example of lipids obtained from the fermentation of compounds present in vinasse are vitamin D, which comes from yeast sucrose fermentation and Omega 3, which can be obtained by bacteria and fungi fermentation. Additionally, several other compounds present in vinasse can be used for this purpose, including sucrose, ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, acetate and other carbon sources. Finally, this paper illustrates the potential market and

  14. Rapid Induction of High-Level Carbapenem Resistance in Heteroresistant KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams-Sapper, Sheila; Nolen, Shantell; Donzelli, Grace Fox; Lal, Mallika; Chen, Kunihiko; Justo da Silva, Livia Helena; Moreira, Beatriz M.

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae strains producing the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) have disseminated worldwide, causing an urgent threat to public health. KPC-producing strains often exhibit low-level carbapenem resistance, which may be missed by automated clinical detection systems. In this study, eight Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with heterogeneous resistance to imipenem were used to elucidate the factors leading from imipenem susceptibility to high-level resistance as defined by clinical laboratory testing standards. Time-kill analysis with an inoculum as low as 3 × 106 CFU/ml and concentrations of imipenem 8- and 16-fold higher than the MIC resulted in the initial killing of 99.9% of the population. However, full recovery of the population occurred by 20 h of incubation in the same drug concentrations. Population profiles showed that recovery was mediated by a heteroresistant subpopulation at a frequency of 2 × 10−7 to 3 × 10−6. Samples selected 2 h after exposure to imipenem were as susceptible as the unexposed parental strain and produced the major outer membrane porin OmpK36. However, between 4 to 8 h after exposure, OmpK36 became absent, and the imipenem MIC increased at least 32-fold. Individual colonies isolated from cultures after 20 h of exposure revealed both susceptible and resistant subpopulations. Once induced, however, the high-level imipenem resistance was maintained, and OmpK36 remained unexpressed even without continued carbapenem exposure. This study demonstrates the essential coordination between blaKPC and ompK36 expression mediating high-level imipenem resistance from a population of bacteria that initially exhibits a carbapenem-susceptibility phenotype. PMID:25801565

  15. Automation of labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced 188Re.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepareur, Nicolas; Ardisson, Valérie; Noiret, Nicolas; Boucher, Eveline; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Clément, Bruno; Garin, Etienne

    2011-02-01

    This work describes optimisation of the kit formulation for labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced rhenium-188. Radiochemical purity (RCP) was 92.52±2.3% and extraction yield was 98.56±1.2%. The synthesis has been automated with a TADDEO module (Comecer) giving a mean final yield of 52.68±9.6%, and reducing radiation burden to the radiochemist by 80%. Radiolabelled Lipiodol ((188)Re-SSS/Lipiodol) is stable for at least 7 days (RCP=91.07±0.9%).

  16. A facile method to produce highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongliang; Wang, Chungang; Ma, Zhanfang; Su, Zhongmin

    2006-10-01

    Multiple shapes of nano- and micro-structured cystine aggregates, including spheres, rods, spindles, dendrites, and multipods, were easily synthesized just by adjusting the concentrations and pH values of L-Cysteine solutions under ultrasonic irritation. Importantly, highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates 225 nm in diameter without any other shapes were easily obtained for the system of 0.1 M L-Cysteine with pH 8. This will provide a very simple and effective approach to produce monodispersed cystine microspheres, which could promote new possibilities for future applications in biosensor, drug delivery, medicine, and the production of nanomaterials.

  17. A facile method to produce highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Hongliang; Wang Chungang; Ma Zhanfang; Su Zhongmin [Chemistry Department, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2006-10-28

    Multiple shapes of nano- and micro-structured cystine aggregates, including spheres, rods, spindles, dendrites, and multipods, were easily synthesized just by adjusting the concentrations and pH values of L-Cysteine solutions under ultrasonic irritation. Importantly, highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates 225 nm in diameter without any other shapes were easily obtained for the system of 0.1 M L-Cysteine with pH 8. This will provide a very simple and effective approach to produce monodispersed cystine microspheres, which could promote new possibilities for future applications in biosensor, drug delivery, medicine, and the production of nanomaterials.

  18. Automation of labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced {sup 188}Re

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepareur, Nicolas, E-mail: n.lepareur@rennes.fnclcc.f [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Ardisson, Valerie [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Noiret, Nicolas [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6226, Chimie Organique et Supramoleculaire, Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Boucher, Eveline; Raoul, Jean-Luc [INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); Service d' Oncologie Digestive, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); Clement, Bruno [INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Garin, Etienne [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Eugene Marquis, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U-991, Foie, Metabolismes et Cancer, 35033 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France)

    2011-02-15

    This work describes optimisation of the kit formulation for labelling of Lipiodol with high-activity generator-produced rhenium-188. Radiochemical purity (RCP) was 92.52{+-}2.3% and extraction yield was 98.56{+-}1.2%. The synthesis has been automated with a TADDEO module (Comecer) giving a mean final yield of 52.68{+-}9.6%, and reducing radiation burden to the radiochemist by 80%. Radiolabelled Lipiodol ({sup 188}Re-SSS/Lipiodol) is stable for at least 7 days (RCP=91.07{+-}0.9%).

  19. High temperature corrosion by combustion gases produced by burning liquid fuels containing sulphur, sodium and vanadium.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Fazlur Rahman

    1980-01-01

    High temperature corrosion, at 730° C, by combustion gases produced by burning liquid fuels in a laboratory combustor has been investigated. A selected range of steels and alloys (mild steel, stainless steel type 347, Nimonic N90, N105, and IN657) have been tested in the combustion gases using fuels containing varying amounts of impurities in the range of 0 - 6% sulphur, 0 - 60 ppm sodium, and 0 - 300 ppm vanadium. On the basis of the comprehensive results a computer programme was written t...

  20. Induction heating of rotating nonmagnetic billet in magnetic field produced by high-parameter permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Doležel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An advanced way of induction heating of nonmagnetic billets is discussed and modeled. The billet rotates in a stationary magnetic field produced by unmoving high-parameter permanent magnets fixed on magnetic circuit of an appropriate shape. The mathematical model of the problem consisting of two coupled partial differential equations is solved numerically, in the monolithic formulation. Computations are carried out using our own code Agros2D based on a fully adaptive higher-order finite element method. The most important results are verified experimentally on our own laboratory device.

  1. Plasmidome-analysis of ESBL-producing escherichia coli using conventional typing and high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Brolund

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing E. coli are an emerging global problem, threatening the effectiveness of the extensively used β-lactam antibiotics. ESBL dissemination is facilitated by plasmids, transposons, and other mobile elements. We have characterized the plasmid content of ESBL-producing E. coli from human urinary tract infections. Ten diverse isolates were selected; they had unrelated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE types (<90% similarity, were from geographically dispersed locations and had diverging antibiotic resistance profiles. Three isolates belonged to the globally disseminated sequence type ST131. ESBL-genes of the CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-9 phylogroups were identified in all ten isolates. The plasmid content (plasmidome of each strain was analyzed using a combination of molecular methods and high-throughput sequencing. Hidden Markov Model-based analysis of unassembled sequencing reads was used to analyze the genetic diversity of the plasmid samples and to detect resistance genes. Each isolate contained between two and eight distinct plasmids, and at least 22 large plasmids were identified overall. The plasmids were variants of pUTI89, pKF3-70, pEK499, pKF3-140, pKF3-70, p1ESCUM, pEK204, pHK17a, p083CORR, R64, pLF82, pSFO157, and R721. In addition, small cryptic high copy-number plasmids were frequent, containing one to seven open reading frames per plasmid. Three clustered groups of such small cryptic plasmids could be distinguished based on sequence similarity. Extrachromosomal prophages were found in three isolates. Two of them resembled the E. coli P1 phage and one was previously unknown. The present study confirms plasmid multiplicity in multi-resistant E. coli. We conclude that high-throughput sequencing successfully provides information on the extrachromosomal gene content and can be used to generate a genetic fingerprint of possible use in epidemiology. This could be a valuable tool for

  2. Research on the Fe-silicon nitride material self-producing N2 at high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Fe-silicon nitride synthesized by flashing combustion process was studied to determine the reaction temperature between Fe and silicon nitride, the account of N2 given out in the course of the reaction, and the change of the microstructure during calcination. The results showed that at 1127.2℃ the Fe-silicon nitride self-reacts and releases N2 and under 101.3 kPa the volume of N2 given out in the course of the reaction is 20 times more than that of the starting material. N2 is produced quickly, and completes in several decade seconds. With the producing of N2, the structure of Silicon Nitride around Fe becomes loose and porous, or cracks are formed by the reaction between Fe and silicon nitride. So if it is made use of that Fe-silicon nitride self-producing N2 at the high temperature, the performance of the material on a base of Fe-silicon nitride could be greatly improved.

  3. Cloning and characterization of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase from the highly branched isoprenoid producing diatom Rhizosolenia setigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriols, Victor Marco Emmanuel N; Yaginuma, Ryoko; Adachi, Masao; Takada, Kentaro; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Okada, Shigeru

    2015-05-21

    The diatom Rhizosolenia setigera Brightwell produces highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) hydrocarbons that are ubiquitously present in marine environments. The hydrocarbon composition of R. setigera varies between C25 and C30 HBIs depending on the life cycle stage with regard to auxosporulation. To better understand how these hydrocarbons are biosynthesized, we characterized the farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase (FPPS) enzyme of R. setigera. An isolated 1465-bp cDNA clone contained an open reading frame spanning 1299-bp encoding a protein with 432 amino acid residues. Expression of the RsFPPS cDNA coding region in Escherichia coli produced a protein that exhibited FPPS activity in vitro. A reduction in HBI content from diatoms treated with an FPPS inhibitor, risedronate, suggested that RsFPPS supplies precursors for HBI biosynthesis. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry also revealed that RsFPPS produced small amounts of the cis-isomers of geranyl pyrophosphate and FPP, candidate precursors for the cis-isomers of HBIs previously characterized. Furthermore, RsFPPS gene expression at various life stages of R. setigera in relation to auxosporulation were also analyzed. Herein, we present data on the possible role of RsFPPS in HBI biosynthesis, and it is to our knowledge the first instance that an FPPS was cloned and characterized from a diatom.

  4. Dense and Cellular Zirconia Produced by Gel Casting with Agar: Preparation and High Temperature Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Tulliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified gel-casting process was developed to produce both dense and highly porous (40% volume yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP using agar, a natural polysaccharide, as gelling agent. A fugitive phase, made of commercial polyethylene spheres, was added to the ceramic suspension before gelling to produce cellular ceramic structures. The characterization of the microstructural features of both dense and cellular ceramics was carried out by FEG SEM analysis of cross-sections produced by focused ion beam. The mechanical properties of the components were characterized at room temperature by nanoindentation tests in continuous stiffness measurement mode, by investigating the direct effect of the presence of residual microporosity. The presence of a diffuse residual microporosity from incomplete gel deaeration resulted in a decay of the bending strength and of the elastic modulus. The mechanical behavior of both dense and cellular zirconia (in terms of elastic modulus, flexural strength, and deformation at rupture was investigated by performing four-point bending tests at the temperature of 1500°C.

  5. The Cluster Gas Mass - Temperature Relation Evidence for a High Level of Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Balogh, M L; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; Babul, Arif; Balogh, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations have been used to demonstrate that the cluster gas mass - temperature relation is steeper than theoretical self-similar predictions drawn from numerical simulations that consider the evolution of the cluster gas through the effects of gravity and shock heating alone. One possible explanation for this is that the gas mass fraction is not constant across clusters of different temperature, as usually assumed. Observationally, however, there is no compelling evidence for gas mass fraction variation, especially in the case of hot clusters. Seeking an alternative physical explanation for the observed trends, we investigate the role of preheating the intracluster medium by some arbitrary source on the cluster gas mass - temperature relation for clusters with emission-weighted mean temperatures of greater than about 3 keV. Making use of the physically-motivated, analytic model developed by Babul et al. (2002), we find that preheating does, indeed, lead to a steeper relation. This is in agree...

  6. A rapamycin-releasing perivascular polymeric sheath produces highly effective inhibition of intimal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohua; Takayama, Toshio; Goel, Shakti A; Shi, Xudong; Zhou, Yifan; Kent, K Craig; Murphy, William L; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2014-10-10

    Intimal hyperplasia produces restenosis (re-narrowing) of the vessel lumen following vascular intervention. Drugs that inhibit intimal hyperplasia have been developed, however there is currently no clinical method of perivascular drug-delivery to prevent restenosis following open surgical procedures. Here we report a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) sheath that is highly effective in preventing intimal hyperplasia through perivascular delivery of rapamycin. We first screened a series of bioresorbable polymers, i.e., poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), PCL, and their blends, to identify desired release kinetics and sheath physical properties. Both PLGA and PLLA sheaths produced minimal (PBS buffer. In contrast, PCL sheaths exhibited more rapid and near-linear release kinetics, as well as durable integrity (>90days) as evidenced in both scanning electron microscopy and subcutaneous embedding experiments. Moreover, a PCL sheath deployed around balloon-injured rat carotid arteries was associated with a minimum rate of thrombosis compared to PLGA and PLLA. Morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed that rapamycin-loaded perivascular PCL sheaths produced pronounced (85%) inhibition of intimal hyperplasia (0.15±0.05 vs 1.01±0.16), without impairment of the luminal endothelium, the vessel's anti-thrombotic layer. Our data collectively show that a rapamycin-loaded PCL delivery system produces substantial mitigation of neointima, likely due to its favorable physical properties leading to a stable yet flexible perivascular sheath and steady and prolonged release kinetics. Thus, a PCL sheath may provide useful scaffolding for devising effective perivascular drug delivery particularly suited for preventing restenosis following open vascular surgery.

  7. Size Determination of Argon Clusters from a Rayleigh Scattering Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI An-Le; ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; LI Zhong; NI Guo-Yuan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Argon clusters are produced in the process of adiabatic expansion of a high backing pressure gas into vacuum through a nozzle. The cluster size is determined by a Rayleigh scattering measurement. The scattered signal measured is proportional to the 2.78th power of gas stagnation pressure. The average cluster sizes vary from 100 to more than 12000 atoms/cluster with the argon gas backing pressures ranging between 3 to 45 atm.

  8. Highly localized clustering states in a granular gas driven by a vibrating wall

    OpenAIRE

    Livne, Eli; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V.

    2000-01-01

    An ensemble of inelastically colliding grains driven by a vibrating wall in 2D exhibits density clustering. Working in the limit of nearly elastic collisions and employing granular hydrodynamics, we predict, by a marginal stability analysis, a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the extended clustering state (ECS). 2D steady-state solutions found numerically describe localized clustering state (LCSs). Time-dependent granular hydrodynamic simulations show that LCSs can develop from natural initia...

  9. Cluster-state quantum computing enhanced by high-fidelity generalized measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, D N; Kaltenbaek, R; Hamel, D R; Weihs, G; Rudolph, T; Resch, K J

    2009-12-11

    We introduce and implement a technique to extend the quantum computational power of cluster states by replacing some projective measurements with generalized quantum measurements (POVMs). As an experimental demonstration we fully realize an arbitrary three-qubit cluster computation by implementing a tunable linear-optical POVM, as well as fast active feedforward, on a two-qubit photonic cluster state. Over 206 different computations, the average output fidelity is 0.9832+/-0.0002; furthermore the error contribution from our POVM device and feedforward is only of O(10(-3)), less than some recent thresholds for fault-tolerant cluster computing.

  10. Using young massive star clusters to understand star formation and feedback in high-redshift-like environments

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven; Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Dale, James; Henshaw, Jonathan; Walker, Daniel; Rathborne, Jill; Testi, Leonardo; Ott, Juergen; Ginsburg, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The formation environment of stars in massive stellar clusters is similar to the environment of stars forming in galaxies at a redshift of 1 - 3, at the peak star formation rate density of the Universe. As massive clusters are still forming at the present day at a fraction of the distance to high-redshift galaxies they offer an opportunity to understand the processes controlling star formation and feedback in conditions similar to those in which most stars in the Universe formed. Here we describe a system of massive clusters and their progenitor gas clouds in the centre of the Milky Way, and outline how detailed observations of this system may be able to: (i) help answer some of the fundamental open questions in star formation and (ii) quantify how stellar feedback couples to the surrounding interstellar medium in this high-pressure, high-redshift analogue environment.

  11. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-10-06

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  12. High doses of dextromethorphan, an NMDA antagonist, produce effects similar to classic hallucinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although reports of dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have increased recently, few studies have examined the effects of high doses of DXM. Objective This study in humans evaluated the effects of supratherapeutic doses of DXM and triazolam. Methods Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg/70kg), and placebo were administered to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Subjective, behavioral, and physiological effects were assessed repeatedly after drug administration for 6 hours. Results Triazolam produced dose-related increases in subject-rated sedation, observer-rated sedation, and behavioral impairment. DXM produced a profile of dose-related physiological and subjective effects differing from triazolam. DXM effects included increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and emesis, increases in observer-rated effects typical of classic hallucinogens (e.g. distance from reality, visual effects with eyes open and closed, joy, anxiety), and participant ratings of stimulation (e.g. jittery, nervous), somatic effects (e.g. tingling, headache), perceptual changes, end-of-session drug liking, and mystical-type experience. After 400 mg/70kg DXM, 11 of 12 participants indicated on a pharmacological class questionnaire that they thought they had received a classic hallucinogen (e.g. psilocybin). Drug effects resolved without significant adverse effects by the end of the session. In a 1-month follow up volunteers attributed increased spirituality and positive changes in attitudes, moods, and behavior to the session experiences. Conclusions High doses of DXM produced effects distinct from triazolam and had characteristics that were similar to the classic hallucinogen psilocybin. PMID:22526529

  13. State Support for Promotion of Electrical Energy Produced in High Efficiency Cogeneration in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushatescu V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Romania accumulated a useful experience in supporting high efficient cogeneration through a bonus type scheme. Spreading this experience to other countries that can choose a similar support scheme could lead to important savings and better results in developing this efficient tool. This state aid is operational, targeted to new investments stimulation for cogeneration technologies and replacement or existing plants rehabilitation. Present paper focuses on the results of support scheme after five years of its application: increase of number of producers who benefit of this aid, raising of general efficiency of high efficient cogeneration, important savings of primary energy and CO2 emissions avoided. On the other hand, use of this scheme showed a number of problems (to which this paper proposes adequate solutions on institutional/administrative, investition, technical, economical-financial and social frameworks that influences beneficiaries and/or financiers of state aid.

  14. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota.

  15. Prevalence and Characterization of High Histamine-Producing Bacteria in Gulf of Mexico Fish Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Bowers, John C; Benner, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Recent developments in detection and enumeration of histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) have created powerful molecular-based tools to better understand the presence of spoilage bacteria and conditions, resulting in increased risk of scombrotoxin fish poisoning. We examined 235 scombrotoxin-forming fish from the Gulf of Mexico for the presence of high HPB. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae was the most prevalent HPB (49%), followed by Morganella morganii (14%), Enterobacter aerogenes (4%), and Raoultella planticola (3%). The growth characteristics and histamine production capabilities of the two most prevalent HPB were further examined. M. morganii and P. damselae had optimum growth at 35°C and 30 to 35°C and 0 to 2% and 1 to 3% NaCl, respectively. P. damselae produced significantly (P production was not significantly different between the two HPB in inoculated tuna, possibly due to differences in muscle composition and salt content. Results in this study showed that P. damselae was the most prevalent high HPB in Gulf of Mexico fish. In addition, previously reported results using the traditional Niven's method may underreport the prevalence of P. damselae. Molecular-based methods should be used in addition to culture-based methods to enhance detection and enumeration of HPB.

  16. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  17. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Janek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84% was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota.

  18. Utilization of potato starch processing wastes to produce animal feed with high lysine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Jiang, Cheng; Yang, Qian

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to utilize wastes from the potato starch industry to produce single-cell protein (SCP) with high lysine content as animal feed. In this work, S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine hydrochloride-resistant Bacillus pumilus E1 was used to produce SCP with high lysine content, whereas Aspergillus niger was used to degrade cellulose biomass and Candida utilis was used to improve the smell and palatability of the feed. An orthogonal design was used to optimize the process of fermentation for maximal lysine content. The optimum fermentation conditions were as follows: temperature of 40°C, substrate concentration of 3%, and natural pH of about 7.0. For unsterilized potato starch wastes, the microbial communities in the fermentation process were determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Results showed that the dominant population was Bacillus sp. The protein quality as well as the amino acid profile of the final product was found to be significantly higher compared with the untreated waste product at day 0. Additionally, acute toxicity test showed that the SCP product was non-toxic, indicating that it can be used for commercial processing.

  19. A Highly Parallel FPGA Implementation of a 2D-Clustering Algorithm for the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, N; The ATLAS collaboration; Beretta, M; Gatta, M; Gkaitatzis, S; Iizawa, T; Kordas, K; Korikawa, T; Nikolaidis, N; Petridou, P; Sotiropoulou, C-L; Yorita, K; Volpi, G

    2014-01-01

    The highly parallel 2D-clustering FPGA implementation used for the input system of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) processor is presented. The input system for the FTK processor will receive data from the Pixel and micro-strip detectors read out drivers (RODs) at 760Gbps, the full rate of level 1 triggers. Clustering serves two purposes. The first is to reduce the high rate of the received data before further processing. The second is to determine the cluster centroid to obtain the best spatial measurement. For the pixel detectors the clustering is implemented by using a 2D-clustering algorithm that takes advantage of a moving window technique to minimize the logic required for cluster identification. The implementation is fully generic, therefore the detection window size can be optimized for the cluster identification process. Additionally, the implementation can be parallelized by instantiating multiple cores to identify different clusters independently thus exploiting more FPGA resources. This flexibility ma...

  20. Spontaneous high piezoelectricity in poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanoribbons produced by iterative thermal size reduction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, Mehmet; Aktas, Ozan; Sen, Huseyin Sener; Durgun, Engin; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-09-23

    We produced kilometer-long, endlessly parallel, spontaneously piezoelectric and thermally stable poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) micro- and nanoribbons using iterative size reduction technique based on thermal fiber drawing. Because of high stress and temperature used in thermal drawing process, we obtained spontaneously polar γ phase PVDF micro- and nanoribbons without electrical poling process. On the basis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, we observed that PVDF micro- and nanoribbons are thermally stable and conserve the polar γ phase even after being exposed to heat treatment above the melting point of PVDF. Phase transition mechanism is investigated and explained using ab initio calculations. We measured an average effective piezoelectric constant as -58.5 pm/V from a single PVDF nanoribbon using a piezo evaluation system along with an atomic force microscope. PVDF nanoribbons are promising structures for constructing devices such as highly efficient energy generators, large area pressure sensors, artificial muscle and skin, due to the unique geometry and extended lengths, high polar phase content, high thermal stability and high piezoelectric coefficient. We demonstrated two proof of principle devices for energy harvesting and sensing applications with a 60 V open circuit peak voltage and 10 μA peak short-circuit current output.

  1. High indium non-polar InGaN clusters with infrared sensitivity grown by PAMBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Mukundan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the optical properties of InGaN alloy of relatively higher indium content are of potential interest to understand the effect of indium content on the optical band gap of epitaxial InGaN. We report the growth of self assembled non-polar high indium clusters of In0.55Ga0.45N over non-polar (11-20 a-plane In0.17Ga0.83N epilayer grown on a-plane (11-20GaN/(1-102 r-plane sapphire substrate using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE. Such structures are potential candidates for high brightness LEDs emitting in longer wavelengths. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of two distinct compositions of InxGa1−xN alloys, which were further confirmed by photoluminescence studies. A possible mechanism for the formation of such structure was postulated which was supported with the results obtained by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The structure hence grown when investigated for photo-detecting properties, showed sensitivity to both infrared and ultraviolet radiations due to the different composition of InGaN region.

  2. High indium non-polar InGaN clusters with infrared sensitivity grown by PAMBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Shruti; Mohan, Lokesh; Chandan, Greeshma; Krupanidhi, S. B., E-mail: sbk@mrc.iisc.ernet.in; Shinde, Satish; Nanda, K. K. [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Roul, Basanta [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Central Research Laboratory, Bharat Electronics, Bangalore 560013 (India); Maiti, R.; Ray, S. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the optical properties of InGaN alloy of relatively higher indium content are of potential interest to understand the effect of indium content on the optical band gap of epitaxial InGaN. We report the growth of self assembled non-polar high indium clusters of In{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N over non-polar (11-20) a-plane In{sub 0.17}Ga{sub 0.83}N epilayer grown on a-plane (11-20)GaN/(1-102) r-plane sapphire substrate using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Such structures are potential candidates for high brightness LEDs emitting in longer wavelengths. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of two distinct compositions of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N alloys, which were further confirmed by photoluminescence studies. A possible mechanism for the formation of such structure was postulated which was supported with the results obtained by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The structure hence grown when investigated for photo-detecting properties, showed sensitivity to both infrared and ultraviolet radiations due to the different composition of InGaN region.

  3. High-intensity exercise training produces morphological and biochemical changes in adrenal gland of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalucci, A; Ferrucci, M; Fulceri, F; Lazzeri, G; Lenzi, P; Toti, L; Serpiello, F R; La Torre, A; Gesi, M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of training are dependent on complex, adaptive changes which are induced by acute physical exercise at different levels. In particular, evidence shows that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, as well as the sympatho-adrenomedullary system, is mainly involved in mediating the physiological effects of physical exercise. The aim of the present study was to investigate, through a morphological and biochemical approach, the effects of training on the adrenal gland of mice, following two different protocols consisting of either low- or high-intensity training. Mice were run daily on a motorised treadmill for 8 weeks, at a velocity corresponding to 60% (low-intensity exercise) or 90% (high-intensity exercise) of the maximal running velocity previously determined by an incremental exercise test. We found that physical exercise produced an increase in the adrenal gland size compared with the control (sedentary) mice. The increase was 31.04% for mice that underwent high-intensity exercise and 10.08% for mice that underwent low intensity exercise, and this appeared to be the result of an increase in the area of both the adrenal cortex and adrenal medulla. Morphological analysis of the adrenal cortex showed that both types of exercise produced an increase in cytoplasmic vacuoles in steroidogenic cells, appearing more abundant after high-intensity exercise. No change was found in the reticulate zone. In the adrenal medulla, despite the absence of morphological changes, immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine β-hydroxylase and phenyl-ethanolamine-N-methyltransferase demonstrated an increased immunopositivity for these cathecolamine-synthesizing enzymes after intense exercise. These results were confirmed by immunoblot accompanied by densitometric analysis.

  4. Commensal E. coli Stx2 lysogens produce high levels of phages after spontaneous prophage induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Hildegunn; L' Abée-Lund, Trine M; Aspholm, Marina; Arnesen, Lotte P S; Lindbäck, Toril

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is a food-borne pathogen that causes disease ranging from uncomplicated diarrhea to life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and nervous system complications. Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) is the major virulence factor of EHEC and is critical for development of HUS. The genes encoding Stx2 are carried by lambdoid bacteriophages and the toxin production is tightly linked to the production of phages during lytic cycle. It has previously been suggested that commensal E. coli could amplify the production of Stx2-phages and contribute to the severity of disease. In this study we examined the susceptibility of commensal E. coli strains to the Stx2-converting phage ϕ734, isolated from a highly virulent EHEC O103:H25 (NIPH-11060424). Among 38 commensal E. coli strains from healthy children below 5 years, 15 were lysogenized by the ϕ734 phage, whereas lytic infection was not observed. Three of the commensal E. coli ϕ734 lysogens were tested for stability, and appeared stable and retained the phage for at least 10 cultural passages. When induced to enter lytic cycle by H2O2 treatment, 8 out of 13 commensal lysogens produced more ϕ734 phages than NIPH-11060424. Strikingly, five of them even spontaneously (non-induced) produced higher levels of phage than the H2O2 induced NIPH-11060424. An especially high frequency of HUS (60%) was seen among children infected by NIPH-11060424 during the outbreak in 2006. Based on our findings, a high Stx2 production by commensal E. coli lysogens cannot be ruled out as a contributor to the high frequency of HUS during this outbreak.

  5. Cluster analysis of bone microarchitecture from high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography demonstrates two separate phenotypes associated with high fracture risk in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M H; Robinson, D E; Ward, K A; Javaid, M K; Walker-Bone, K; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare problem which is conventionally assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). New technologies such as high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) also predict fracture risk. HRpQCT measures a number of bone characteristics that may inform specific patterns of bone deficits. We used cluster analysis to define different bone phenotypes and their relationships to fracture prevalence and areal bone mineral density (BMD). 177 men and 159 women, in whom fracture history was determined by self-report and vertebral fracture assessment, underwent HRpQCT of the distal radius and femoral neck DXA. Five clusters were derived with two clusters associated with elevated fracture risk. "Cluster 1" contained 26 women (50.0% fractured) and 30 men (50.0% fractured) with a lower mean cortical thickness and cortical volumetric BMD, and in men only, a mean total and trabecular area more than the sex-specific cohort mean. "Cluster 2" contained 20 women (50.0% fractured) and 14 men (35.7% fractured) with a lower mean trabecular density and trabecular number than the sex-specific cohort mean. Logistic regression showed fracture rates in these clusters to be significantly higher than the lowest fracture risk cluster [5] (pcluster 5 in women in cluster 1 and 2 (pcluster 2 (pclusters in both men and women which may differ in etiology and response to treatment. As cluster 1 in men does not have low areal BMD, these men may not be identified as high risk by conventional DXA alone. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The major resistance gene cluster in lettuce is highly duplicated and spans several megabases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, B C; Chin, D B; Shen, K A; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Lavelle, D O; Zhang, Z; Michelmore, R W

    1998-11-01

    At least 10 Dm genes conferring resistance to the oomycete downy mildew fungus Bremia lactucae map to the major resistance cluster in lettuce. We investigated the structure of this cluster in the lettuce cultivar Diana, which contains Dm3. A deletion breakpoint map of the chromosomal region flanking Dm3 was saturated with a variety of molecular markers. Several of these markers are components of a family of resistance gene candidates (RGC2) that encode a nucleotide binding site and a leucine-rich repeat region. These motifs are characteristic of plant disease resistance genes. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified by using duplicated restriction fragment length polymorphism markers from the region, including the nucleotide binding site-encoding region of RGC2. Twenty-two distinct members of the RGC2 family were characterized from the bacterial artificial chromosomes; at least two additional family members exist. The RGC2 family is highly divergent; the nucleotide identity was as low as 53% between the most distantly related copies. These RGC2 genes span at least 3.5 Mb. Eighteen members were mapped on the deletion breakpoint map. A comparison between the phylogenetic and physical relationships of these sequences demonstrated that closely related copies are physically separated from one another and indicated that complex rearrangements have shaped this region. Analysis of low-copy genomic sequences detected no genes, including RGC2, in the Dm3 region, other than sequences related to retrotransposons and transposable elements. The related but divergent family of RGC2 genes may act as a resource for the generation of new resistance phenotypes through infrequent recombination or unequal crossing over.

  7. High-Performance, Multi-Node File Copies and Checksums for Clustered File Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, Paul Z.; Ciotti, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Modern parallel file systems achieve high performance using a variety of techniques, such as striping files across multiple disks to increase aggregate I/O bandwidth and spreading disks across multiple servers to increase aggregate interconnect bandwidth. To achieve peak performance from such systems, it is typically necessary to utilize multiple concurrent readers/writers from multiple systems to overcome various singlesystem limitations, such as number of processors and network bandwidth. The standard cp and md5sum tools of GNU coreutils found on every modern Unix/Linux system, however, utilize a single execution thread on a single CPU core of a single system, and hence cannot take full advantage of the increased performance of clustered file systems. Mcp and msum are drop-in replacements for the standard cp and md5sum programs that utilize multiple types of parallelism and other optimizations to achieve maximum copy and checksum performance on clustered file systems. Multi-threading is used to ensure that nodes are kept as busy as possible. Read/write parallelism allows individual operations of a single copy to be overlapped using asynchronous I/O. Multinode cooperation allows different nodes to take part in the same copy/checksum. Split-file processing allows multiple threads to operate concurrently on the same file. Finally, hash trees allow inherently serial checksums to be performed in parallel. Mcp and msum provide significant performance improvements over standard cp and md5sum using multiple types of parallelism and other optimizations. The total speed-ups from all improvements are significant. Mcp improves cp performance over 27x, msum improves md5sum performance almost 19x, and the combination of mcp and msum improves verified copies via cp and md5sum by almost 22x. These improvements come in the form of drop-in replacements for cp and md5sum, so are easily used and are available for download as open source software at http://mutil.sourceforge.net.

  8. Final Report of the Evaluation of the 1969-1970 Benjamin Franklin Cluster Program: Programs and Patterns for Disadvantaged High School Students. ESEA Title I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Louis J.

    The Cluster Program at Benjamin Franklin High School, funded under Title I of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, is designed to be a school within a school in which 249 ninth grade students attend classes in two separate clusters. Each cluster is formulated such that all students receive instruction from five teachers in classes whose…

  9. Gluconacetobacter hansenii subsp. nov., a high-yield bacterial cellulose producing strain induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Han-Jing; Du, Shuang-Kui; Lin, De-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Na; Xiang, Jin-Le; Li, Zhi-Xi

    2011-12-01

    Strain M(438), deposited as CGMCC3917 and isolated from inoculums of bacterial cellulose (BC) producing strain screened in homemade vinegar and then induced by high hydrostatic pressure treatment (HHP), has strong ability to produce BC more than three times as that of its initial strain. It is the highest yield BC-producing strain ever reported. In this paper, M(438) was identidied as Gluconacetobacter hansenii subsp. nov. on the basis of the results obtained by examining it phylogenetically, phenotypically, and physiologically-biochemically. Furthermore, the genetic diversity of strain M(438) and its initial strain was examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism. The results indicated that strain M(438) was a deletion mutant induced by HHP, and the only deleted sequence showed 99% identity with 24,917-24,723 bp in the genome sequence of Ga. hansenii ATCC23769, and the complement gene sequence was at 24,699-25,019 bp with local tag GXY_15142, which codes small multidrug resistance (SMR) protein. It can be inferred that SMR might be related to inhibiting BC production to a certain extent.

  10. High prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli producing cyclomodulin and genotoxin in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Buc

    Full Text Available Some Escherichia coli strains produce toxins designated cyclomodulins (CMs which interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle of host cells, suggesting a possible link between these bacteria and cancers. There are relatively few data available concerning the colonization of colon tumors by cyclomodulin- and genotoxic-producing E. coli. We did a qualitative and phylogenetic analysis of mucosa-associated E. coli harboring cyclomodulin-encoding genes from 38 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and 31 with diverticulosis. The functionality of these genes was investigated on cell cultures and the genotoxic activity of strains devoid of known CM-encoding gene was investigated. Results showed a higher prevalence of B2 phylogroup E. coli harboring the colibatin-producing genes in biopsies of patients with CRC (55.3% than in those of patients with diverticulosis (19.3%, (p<0.01. Likewise, a higher prevalence of B2 E. coli harboring the CNF1-encoding genes in biopsies of patients with CRC (39.5% than in those of patients with diverticulosis (12.9%, (p = 0.01. Functional analysis revealed that the majority of these genes were functional. Analysis of the ability of E. coli to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells Int-407 indicated that highly adherent E. coli strains mostly belonged to A and D phylogroups, whatever the origin of the strains (CRC or diverticulosis, and that most E. coli strains belonging to B2 phylogroup displayed very low levels of adhesion. In addition, 27.6% (n = 21/76 E. coli strains devoid of known cyclomodulin-encoding genes induced DNA damage in vitro, as assessed by the comet assay. In contrast to cyclomodulin-producing E. coli, these strains mainly belonged to A or D E. coli phylogroups, and exhibited a non significant difference in the distribution of CRC and diverticulosis specimens (22% versus 32.5%, p = 0.91. In conclusion, cyclomodulin-producing E. coli belonging mostly to B2 phylogroup colonize the colonic mucosa of

  11. Pressure distribution of the high-redshift cluster of galaxies CL J1226.9+3332 with NIKA

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Macías-Pérez, J -F; Adane, A; Ade, P; André, P; Beelen, A; Belier, B; Benoît, A; Bideaud, A; Billot, N; Blanquer, G; Bourrion, O; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Coiffard, G; D'Addabbo, A; Désert, F -X; Doyle, S; Goupy, J; Kramer, C; Leclercq, S; Martino, J; Mauskopf, P; Mayet, F; Monfardini, A; Pajot, F; Pascale, E; Perotto, L; Pointecouteau, E; Ponthieu, N; Revéret, V; Ritacco, A; Rodriguez, L; Savini, G; Schuster, K; Sievers, A; Tucker, C; Zylka, R

    2014-01-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich (tSZ) effect is expected to provide a low scatter mass proxy for galaxy clusters since it is directly proportional to the cluster thermal energy. tSZ observations have proven to be a powerful tool to detect and study them but high angular resolution observations are now necessary to push their investigation at higher redshift. In this paper, we report high angular (< 20 arcsec) resolution tSZ observations of the high-redshift cluster CLJ1226.9+3332 (z=0.89). It was imaged at 150 and 260 GHz using the NIKA camera at the IRAM 30-meter telescope. The 150 GHz map shows that CLJ1226.9+3332 is morphologically relaxed on large scales with evidence of a disturbed core, while the 260 GHz channel is used mostly to identify point source contamination. NIKA data are combined with those of Planck and X-ray from Chandra to infer the cluster radial pressure, density, temperature and entropy distributions. The total mass profile of the cluster is derived, and we find $M_{500} = 5.96^{+1.02}_...

  12. Ionization of Sodium Cluster by Heavy Ion Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Energetic ions have recently been used as an efficient means to produce highly charged cold clusters~[1]. There are two ways to obtain highly-charged clusters: low-fluence nano-second lasers irradiation and energetic highly charged ions impact. Compared to the low-density laser, heavy ions, e.g. delivered by ECR sources, have the

  13. High Metallicity of the X-Ray Gas up to the Virial Radius of a Binary Cluster of Galaxies: Evidence of Galactic Superwinds at High-Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Reiprich, Thomas H

    2007-01-01

    We present the analysis of a Suzaku observation of the link region between the galaxy clusters A399 and A401. We obtain the metallicity of the intracluster medium (ICM) up to the cluster virial radii for the first time. We determine the metallicity where the viral radii of the two clusters cross each other (~2 Mpc away from their centers) and find that it is comparable to that in their inner regions (~0.2 Z_sun). It is unlikely that the uniformity of metallicity up to the virial radii is due to mixing caused by a cluster collision. Since ram-pressure is too small to strip interstellar medium of galaxies around the virial radius of a cluster, the fairly high metallicity we found there indicates that the metals in the ICM are not transported from member galaxies by ram-pressure stripping. Instead, the uniformity suggests that the proto-cluster region was extensively polluted with metals by extremely powerful outflows (superwinds) from galaxies before the clusters formed. We also search for the oxygen emission f...

  14. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  15. Measurement of photoneutron dose produced by wedge filters of a high energy linac using polycarbonate films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Torkzadeh, Falamarz

    2008-05-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most widely spread technique to control and treat cancer. To increase the treatment efficiency, high energy linacs are used. However, applying high energy photon beams leads to a non-negligible dose of neutrons contaminating therapeutic beams. In addition, using conventional linacs necessitates applying wedge filters in some clinical conditions. However, there is not enough information on the effect of these filters on the photoneutrons produced. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of photoneutron dose equivalent due to the use of linac wedge filters. A high energy (18 MV) linear accelerator (Elekta SL 75/25) was studied. Polycarbonate films were used to measure the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. After electrochemical etching of the films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated using Hp(10) factor, and its variation on the patient plane at 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 cm from the center of the X-ray beam was determined. By increasing the distance from the center of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreased rapidly for the open and wedged fields. Increasing of the field size increased the photoneutron dose equivalent. The use of wedge filter increased the proportion of the neutron dose equivalent. The increase can be accounted for by the selective absorption of the high energy photons by the wedge filter.

  16. Electro-spray of high viscous liquids for producing mono-sized spherical alginate beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Moghadam; Mohsen Samimi; Abdolreza Samimi; Mohamad Khorram

    2008-01-01

    Alginate beads, often used for controlled release of enzymes and drugs, are usually produced by spraying sodium alginate liquid into a gelling agent using mechanical vibration nozzle or air jet. In this work an alternative method of electro-spray was employed to form droplets with desired size from a highly viscous sodium alginate solution using constant DC voltage. The droplets were then cured in a calcium chloride solution. The main objective was to produce mono-sized beads from such a highly viscous and non-Newtonian liquid (1000-5000 mPa s). The effects of nozzle diameter, flow rate and concentration of liquid on the size of the beads were investigated. Among the parameters studied, voltage had a pronounced effect on the size of beads as compared to flow rate zzle diameter and concentration of alginate liquid. The size of beads was reduced to a minimum value with increasing the voltage in the range of 0-10 kV. At the early stages of voltage increase (I.e. Up to about 4 kV), the rate of size reduction was relatively low, while the dripping mode dominated. However, in the middle part of the range of applied voltage, where the rate of size reduction was high (I.e. About 4-7 kV), an unstable transition occurred between dripping and jetting. At the end part of the range (I.e. 7-10 kV) jet mode of spray was observed. Increasing the height of fall of the droplets was found to improve the sphericity of the beads, because of the increased time of flight for the droplets. This was especially identifiable at higher concentrations of the alginate liquid (I.e. 3 w/v%)

  17. New supercharging reagents produce highly charged protein ions in native mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Going, Catherine C; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R

    2015-11-07

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which these proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods.

  18. Semi-Supervised Clustering for High-Dimensional and Sparse Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Su

    2010-01-01

    Clustering is one of the most common data mining tasks, used frequently for data organization and analysis in various application domains. Traditional machine learning approaches to clustering are fully automated and unsupervised where class labels are unknown a priori. In real application domains, however, some "weak" form of side…

  19. A Massive, Cooling-Flow-Induced Starburst in the Core of a Highly Luminous Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lieu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-01-01

    In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L_2-10 keV = 8.2 x 10^45 erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (dM/dt = 3820 +/- 530 Msun/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Msun/yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully establishe...

  20. miRNA profiling of high, low and non-producing CHO cells during biphasic fed-batch cultivation reveals process relevant targets for host cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Fabian; Fischer, Simon; Sczyrba, Alexander; Otte, Kerstin; Hesse, Friedemann

    2016-05-10

    Fed-batch cultivation of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines is one of the most widely used production modes for commercial manufacturing of recombinant protein therapeutics. Furthermore, fed-batch cultivations are often conducted as biphasic processes where the culture temperature is decreased to maximize volumetric product yields. However, it remains to be elucidated which intracellular regulatory elements actually control the observed pro-productive phenotypes. Recently, several studies have revealed microRNAs (miRNAs) to be important molecular switches of cell phenotypes. In this study, we analyzed miRNA profiles of two different recombinant CHO cell lines (high and low producer), and compared them to a non-producing CHO DG44 host cell line during fed-batch cultivation at 37°C versus a temperature shift to 30°C. Taking advantage of next-generation sequencing combined with cluster, correlation and differential expression analyses, we could identify 89 different miRNAs, which were differentially expressed in the different cell lines and cultivation phases. Functional validation experiments using 19 validated target miRNAs confirmed that these miRNAs indeed induced changes in process relevant phenotypes. Furthermore, computational miRNA target prediction combined with functional clustering identified putative target genes and cellular pathways, which might be regulated by these miRNAs. This study systematically identified novel target miRNAs during different phases and conditions of a biphasic fed-batch production process and functionally evaluated their potential for host cell engineering.

  1. The Accelerated Build-up of the Red Sequence in High Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cerulo, P; Lidman, C; Demarco, R; Huertas-Company, M; Mei, S; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Barrientos, L F; Muñoz, R P

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of the red sequence in a sample of galaxy clusters at redshifts $0.8 11.5$) red sequence galaxies in the WINGS clusters, which do not include only the brightest cluster galaxies and which are not present in the HCS clusters, suggesting that they formed at epochs later than $z=0.8$. The comparison with the luminosity distribution of a sample of passive red sequence galaxies drawn from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field in the photometric redshift range $0.8clusters is more developed at the faint end, suggesting that halo mass plays an important role in setting the time-scales for the build-up of the red sequence.

  2. Properties of the Open Cluster Tombaugh 1 from High-resolution Spectroscopy and uvbyCaHβ Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales Silva, João V.; Carraro, Giovanni; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Moni Bidin, Christian; Costa, Edgardo; Twarog, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Open clusters can be the key to deepening our knowledge on various issues involving the structure and evolution of the Galactic disk and details of stellar evolution because a cluster’s properties are applicable to all its members. However, the number of open clusters with detailed analysis from high-resolution spectroscopy or precision photometry imposes severe limitations on studies of these objects. To expand the number of open clusters with well-defined chemical abundances and fundamental parameters, we investigate the poorly studied, anticenter open cluster Tombaugh 1. Using precision uvbyCaHβ photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy, we derive the cluster’s reddening, obtain photometric metallicity estimates, and, for the first time, present a detailed abundance analysis of 10 potential cluster stars (nine clump stars and one Cepheid). Using the radial position from the cluster center and multiple color indices, we have isolated a sample of unevolved, probable single-star members of Tombaugh 1. From 51 stars, the cluster reddening is found to be E(b-y) = 0.221 ± 0.006 or E(B-V) = 0.303 ± 0.008, where the errors refer to the internal standard errors of the mean. The weighted photometric metallicity from m1 and hk is [Fe/H] = -0.10 ± 0.02, while a match to the Victoria-Regina Strömgren isochrones leads to an age of 0.95 ± 0.10 Gyr and an apparent modulus of (m-M) = 13.10 ± 0.10. Radial velocities identify six giants as probable cluster members, and the elemental abundances of Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Y, Ba, Ce, and Nd have been derived for both the cluster and the field stars. Tombaugh 1 appears to be a typical inner thin disk, intermediate-age open cluster of slightly subsolar metallicity, located just beyond the solar circle, with solar elemental abundance ratios except for the heavy s-process elements, which are a factor of two above solar. Its metallicity is consistent with a steep metallicity gradient in the galactocentric region

  3. Metabolic engineering of a thermophilic bacterium to produce ethanol at high yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A Joe; Podkaminer, Kara K; Desai, Sunil G; Bardsley, John S; Rogers, Stephen R; Thorne, Philip G; Hogsett, David A; Lynd, Lee R

    2008-09-16

    We report engineering Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium that ferments xylan and biomass-derived sugars, to produce ethanol at high yield. Knockout of genes involved in organic acid formation (acetate kinase, phosphate acetyltransferase, and L-lactate dehydrogenase) resulted in a strain able to produce ethanol as the only detectable organic product and substantial changes in electron flow relative to the wild type. Ethanol formation in the engineered strain (ALK2) utilizes pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase with electrons transferred from ferredoxin to NAD(P), a pathway different from that in previously described microbes with a homoethanol fermentation. The homoethanologenic phenotype was stable for >150 generations in continuous culture. The growth rate of strain ALK2 was similar to the wild-type strain, with a reduction in cell yield proportional to the decreased ATP availability resulting from acetate kinase inactivation. Glucose and xylose are co-utilized and utilization of mannose and arabinose commences before glucose and xylose are exhausted. Using strain ALK2 in simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation experiments at 50 degrees C allows a 2.5-fold reduction in cellulase loading compared with using Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 37 degrees C. The maximum ethanol titer produced by strain ALK2, 37 g/liter, is the highest reported thus far for a thermophilic anaerobe, although further improvements are desired and likely possible. Our results extend the frontier of metabolic engineering in thermophilic hosts, have the potential to significantly lower the cost of cellulosic ethanol production, and support the feasibility of further cost reductions through engineering a diversity of host organisms.

  4. Origin of the turbulent spectra in the high-altitude cusp: Cluster spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nykyri

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution magnetic field data from Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM and the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF instruments are used to study turbulent magnetic field fluctuations during the high-altitude cusp crossing on 17 March 2001. Despite the quiet solar wind conditions, the cusp was filled with magnetic field turbulence whose power correlates with the field-aligned ion plasma flux. The magnetic field wave spectra shows power law behavior with both double and single slopes with break in the spectra usually occurring in the vicinity of the local ion cyclotron frequency. Strong peaks in the wave power close to local ion cyclotron frequency were sometimes observed, with secondary peaks at higher harmonics indicative of resonant processes between protons and the waves. We show that the observed spectral break point may be caused partly by damping of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén (KAW waves and partly by cyclotron damping of ion cyclotron waves.

  5. Cluster observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the high-altitude cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nykyri

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution (22 vector/s magnetic field data from Cluster FGM instrument are presented for the high-altitude cusp crossing on 17 March 2001. Despite the quiet solar wind conditions, the cusp was filled with magnetic field turbulence for much of the crossing. Large-scale fluctuations show some correlation between spacecraft but the higher frequency fluctuations show no correlation, indicating that the length scales of these waves are smaller than the spacecraft separation (500km. In many intervals, there are clear peaks in the wave power around the ion cyclotron frequency (~1Hz, and there is some evidence for waves at the first harmonic of this frequency. Both left- and right-hand polarised waves are found, with angles of propagation with respect to the ambient magnetic field that range from parallel to perpendicular. The regions of enhanced magnetic field fluctuations appear to be associated with plasma flows possibly originating from a lobe reconnection site. The most coherent, long lasting wave trains with frequencies close to local ion cyclotron frequency occur at a boundary between a sheared flow and a stagnant plasma.

  6. Image Segmentation By Cluster Analysis Of High Resolution Textured SPOT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, M.; Roux, C.; Hillion, A.

    1986-04-01

    Textural analysis is now a commonly used technique in digital image processing. In this paper, we present an application of textural analysis to high resolution SPOT satellite images. The purpose of the methodology is to improve classification results, i.e. image segmentation in remote sensing. Remote sensing techniques, based on high resolution satellite data offer good perspectives for the cartography of littoral environment. Textural information contained in the pan-chromatic channel of ten meters resolution is introduced in order to separate different types of structures. The technique we used is based on statistical pattern recognition models and operates in two steps. A first step, features extraction, is derived by using a stepwise algorithm. Segmentation is then performed by cluster analysis using these extracted. features. The texture features are computed over the immediate neighborhood of the pixel using two methods : the cooccurence matrices method and the grey level difference statistics method. Image segmentation based only on texture features is then performed by pixel classification and finally discussed. In a future paper, we intend to compare the results with aerial data in view of the management of the littoral resources.

  7. Head-Tail Galaxies: Beacons of High-Density Regions in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie Y; Stevens, Jamie B; Wotherspoon, Simon J

    2008-01-01

    Using radio data at 1.4 GHz from the ATCA we identify five head-tail (HT) galaxies in the central region of the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Physical parameters of the HT galaxies were determined along with substructure in the HRS to probe the relationship between environment and radio properties. Using a density enhancement technique applied to 582 spectroscopic measurements in the 2 degree x 2 degree region about A3125/A3128, we find all five HT galaxies reside in regions of extremely high density (>100 galaxies/Mpc^3). In fact, the environments surrounding HT galaxies are statistically denser than those environments surrounding non-HT galaxies and among the densest environments in a cluster. Additionally, the HT galaxies are found in regions of enhanced X-ray emission and we show that the enhanced density continues out to substructure groups of 10 members. We propose that it is the high densities that allow ram pressure to bend the HT galaxies as opposed to previously proposed mechanisms relyin...

  8. Investigation of air-assisted sprays submitted to high frequency transverse acoustic fields: Droplet clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficuciello, A.; Blaisot, J. B.; Richard, C.; Baillot, F.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of a high amplitude transverse acoustic field on coaxial jets is presented in this paper. Water and air are used as working fluids at ambient pressure. The coaxial injectors are placed on the top of a semi-open resonant cavity where the acoustic pressure fluctuations of the standing wave can reach a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 12 kPa at the forcing frequency of 1 kHz. Several test conditions are considered in order to quantify the influence of injection conditions, acoustic field amplitude, and injector position with respect to the standing wave acoustic field. A high speed back-light visualization technique is used to characterize the jet response. Image processing is used to obtain valuable information about the jet behavior. It is shown that the acoustic field drastically affects the atomization process for all atomization regimes. The position of the injector in the acoustic field determines the jet response, and a droplet-clustering phenomenon is highlighted in multi-point injection conditions and quantified by determining discrete droplet location distributions. A theoretical model based on nonlinear acoustics related to the spatial distribution of the radiation pressure exerted on an object explains the behavior observed.

  9. Implications for Primordial Non-Gaussianity ($f_{NL}$) from weak lensing masses of high-z galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Raul

    2009-01-01

    The recent weak lensing measurement of the dark matter mass of the high-redshift galaxy cluster XMMUJ2235.3-2557 of (8.5 +- 1.7) x 10^{14} Msun at z=1.4, indicates that, if the cluster is assumed to be the result of the collapse of dark matter in a primordial gaussian field in the standard LCDM model, then its abundance should be 3-10 if the non-Gaussianity parameter f^local_NL is in the range 150-200. This value is comparable to the limit for f_NL obtained by current constraints from the CMB. We conclude that mass determination of high-redshift, massive clusters can offer a complementary probe of primordial non-gaussianity.

  10. Formation of Cosmic Crystals in Highly-Supersaturated Silicate Vapor Produced by Planetesimal Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, H; Yamamoto, T; Nakamoto, T; Yamada, J; Tsukamoto, K; Nozawa, J

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that fine silicate crystals observed in primitive meteorite and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) nucleated in a supersaturated silicate vapor followed by crystalline growth. We investigated evaporation of $\\mu$m-sized silicate particles heated by a bow shock produced by a planetesimal orbiting in the gas in the early solar nebula and condensation of crystalline silicate from the vapor thus produced. Our numerical simulation of shock-wave heating showed that these {\\mu}m-sized particles evaporated almost completely when the bow shock is strong enough to cause melting of chondrule precursor dust particles. We found that the silicate vapor cools very rapidly with expansion into the ambient unshocked nebular region; the cooling rate is estimated, for instance, to be as high as 2000 K s$^{-1}$ for a vapor heated by a bow shock associated with a planetesimal of radius 1 km. The rapid cooling of the vapor leads to nonequilibrium gas-phase condensation of dust at temperatures muc...

  11. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  12. Application of reverse genetics for producing attenuated vaccine strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    In this study, reverse genetics was applied to produce vaccine candidate strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of the H5N1 subtype. The H5 subtype vaccine strains were generated by a reverse genetics method in a biosafety level 2 facility. The strain contained the HA gene from the H5N1 subtype HPAIV attenuated by genetic modification at the cleavage site, the NA gene derived from the H5N1 subtype HPAI or the H5N3 subtype of avian influenza virus and internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34. Vaccination with an inactivated recombinant virus with oil-emulsion completely protected chickens from a homologous viral challenge with a 640 HAU or 3,200 HAU/vaccination dose. Vaccination with a higher dose of antigen, 3,200 HAU, was effective at increasing survival and efficiently reduced viral shedding even when challenged by a virus of a different HA clade. The feasibility of differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) was demonstrated against a challenge with H5N1 HPAIVs when the recombinant H5N3 subtype viruses were used as the antigens of the vaccine. Our study demonstrated that the use of reverse genetics would be an option to promptly produce an inactivated vaccine with better matching of antigenicity to a circulating strain.

  13. High level compressive residual stresses produced in aluminum alloys by laser shock processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Rosas, G. [Centro de Ingenieria y Desarrollo Industrial, CIDESI, Av. Playa Pie de la Cuesta, 702 Desarrollo San Pablo, c.p. 76130 Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: ggomez@cidesi.mx; Rubio-Gonzalez, C. [Centro de Ingenieria y Desarrollo Industrial, CIDESI, Av. Playa Pie de la Cuesta, 702 Desarrollo San Pablo, c.p. 76130 Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico); Ocana, J.L [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Porro, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Chi-Moreno, W. [Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia (Mexico); Morales, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2005-11-15

    Laser shock processing (LSP) has been proposed as a competitive alternative technology to classical treatments for improving fatigue and wear resistance of metals. We present a configuration and results for metal surface treatments in underwater laser irradiation at 1064 nm. A convergent lens is used to deliver 1.2 J/cm{sup 2} in a 8 ns laser FWHM pulse produced by 10 Hz Q-switched Nd:YAG, two laser spot diameters were used: 0.8 and 1.5 mm. Results using pulse densities of 2500 pulses/cm{sup 2} in 6061-T6 aluminum samples and 5000 pulses/cm{sup 2} in 2024 aluminum samples are presented. High level of compressive residual stresses are produced -1600 MPa for 6061-T6 Al alloy, and -1400 MPa for 2024 Al alloy. It has been shown that surface residual stress level is higher than that achieved by conventional shot peening and with greater depths. This method can be applied to surface treatment of final metal products.

  14. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  15. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangul, F. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ramli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  16. Bacteriocin-Producing Enterococcus faecium LCW 44: A High Potential Probiotic Candidate from Raw Camel Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Vimont

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial isolates from raw camel milk were screened for antibacterial activity using the agar diffusion assay. Ten isolates selected for their inhibition of Gram-positive bacteria were identified by 16S sequencing as Enterococcus faecium or durans. An isolate named E. faecium LCW 44 exhibited the broadest antibacterial spectrum with an inhibitory activity against several Gram-positive strains belonging to the genera Clostridium, Listeria, Staphylococcus, and Lactobacillus. E. faecium LCW 44 was shown to produce N-formylated enterocins L50A and L50B, as revealed by mass spectrometry and PCR analyses. This isolate did not harbor any of the virulence factors tested and was shown to be sensitive to all tested antibiotics. It showed high resistance to gastric and intestinal conditions (78 ± 4% survival. Its adhesion index was evaluated at 176 ± 86 and 24 ± 86 on Caco-2 cells and HT-29 cells, respectively, and it significantly reduced adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes by 65 and 49%, respectively. In Macfarlane broth (simulating the nutrient content of the colon, counts of L. monocytogenes were reduced by 2 log10 cycles after 24 h in co-culture with E. faecium LCW 44, compared to the increase of 4 log10 cycles when cultured alone. Comparison with a bacteriocin-non-producing mutant of E. faecium LCW 44 strongly suggests that inhibition of L. monocytogenes was due to bacteriocin production. Altogether, E. faecium LCW 44 thus has potential for use as a probiotic for humans and veterinary medicine.

  17. Controlled chemical stabilization of polyvinyl precursor fiber, and high strength carbon fiber produced therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-12-27

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber, which comprises: (i) immersing functionalized polyvinyl precursor fiber into a liquid solution having a boiling point of at least 60.degree. C.; (ii) heating the liquid solution to a first temperature of at least 25.degree. C. at which the functionalized precursor fiber engages in an elimination-addition equilibrium while a tension of at least 0.1 MPa is applied to the fiber; (iii) gradually raising the first temperature to a final temperature that is at least 20.degree. C. above the first temperature and up to the boiling point of the liquid solution for sufficient time to convert the functionalized precursor fiber to a pre-carbonized fiber; and (iv) subjecting the pre-carbonized fiber produced according to step (iii) to high temperature carbonization conditions to produce the final carbon fiber. Articles and devices containing the fibers, including woven and non-woven mats or paper forms of the fibers, are also described.

  18. Final Technical Report: Magnetic Reconnection in High-Energy Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germaschewski, Kai [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Fox, William [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-04-06

    This report describes the final results from the DOE Grant DE-SC0007168, “Fast Magnetic Reconnection in HED Laser-Produced Plasmas.” The recent generation of laboratory high-energy-density physics facilities has opened significant physics opportunities for experimentally modeling astrophysical plasmas. The goal of this proposal is to use these new tools to study fundamental problems in plasma physics and plasma astrophysics. Fundamental topics in this area involve study of the generation, amplification, and fate of magnetic fields, which are observed to pervade the plasma universe and govern its evolution. This project combined experiments at DOE laser facilities with kinetic plasma simulation to study these processes. The primary original goal of the project was to study magnetic reconnection using a new experimental platform, colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas. However through a series of fortuitous discoveries, the work broadened out to allow significant advancement on multiple topics in laboratory astrophysics, including magnetic reconnection, Weibel instability, and collisionless shocks.

  19. Application of the MST clustering to the high energy gamma-ray sky. IV - Blazar candidates found as possible counterparts of photon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Bernieri, E

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a cluster search in the Fermi-LAT Pass 8 gamma-ray sky by means of the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm, at energies higher than 10 GeV and at Galactic latitudes higher than 25 degrees. The selected clusters have a minimum number of photons higher than or equal to 5, a high degree of concentration, and are without a clear corresponding counterpart in blazar catalogues. A sample of 30 possible gamma-ray sources was obtained. These objects were verified by applying the standard Maximum Likelihood analysis on the Fermi-LAT data. A search for possible radio counterparts in a circle having a radius of 6 arcmin was performed, finding several interesting objects, the majority of them without optical spectroscopical data. These can be considered as new blazar candidates. Some of them were already noticed as possible blazars or Active Galactic Nuclei in previous surveys, but never associated with high energy emission. These possible counterparts are reported and their properties are discussed.

  20. High resolution clustering of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo strains using a next-generation sequencing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allard Marc W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS is increasingly being used as a molecular epidemiologic tool for discerning ancestry and traceback of the most complicated, difficult to resolve bacterial pathogens. Making a linkage between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires distinguishing the suspected pathogen from an environmental background and placing the variation observed into the wider context of variation occurring within a serovar and among other closely related foodborne pathogens. Equally important is the need to validate these high resolution molecular tools for use in molecular epidemiologic traceback. Such efforts include the examination of strain cluster stability as well as the cumulative genetic effects of sub-culturing on these clusters. Numerous isolates of S. Montevideo were shot-gun sequenced including diverse lineage representatives as well as numerous replicate clones to determine how much variability is due to bias, sequencing error, and or the culturing of isolates. All new draft genomes were compared to 34 S. Montevideo isolates previously published during an NGS-based molecular epidemiological case study. Results Intraserovar lineages of S. Montevideo differ by thousands of SNPs, that are only slightly less than the number of SNPs observed between S. Montevideo and other distinct serovars. Much less variability was discovered within an individual S. Montevideo clade implicated in a recent foodborne outbreak as well as among individual NGS replicates. These findings were similar to previous reports documenting homopolymeric and deletion error rates with the Roche 454 GS Titanium technology. In no case, however, did variability associated with sequencing methods or sample preparations create inconsistencies with our current phylogenetic results or the subsequent molecular epidemiological evidence gleaned from these data. Conclusions Implementation of a validated pipeline for NGS data acquisition and

  1. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  2. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  3. Micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Galloudec, Nathalie

    2013-09-10

    The present invention relates to micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams. In one embodiment, the micro-cone target includes a substantially cone-shaped body including an outer surface, an inner surface, a generally flat and round, open-ended base, and a tip defining an apex. The cone-shaped body tapers along its length from the generally flat and round, open-ended base to the tip defining the apex. In addition, the outer surface and the inner surface connect the base to the tip, and the tip curves inwardly to define an outer surface that is concave, which is bounded by a rim formed at a juncture where the outer surface meets the tip.

  4. Volume Diffuse Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Produced by Nanosecond High Voltage Pulse in Airflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Haicheng; GAO Wei; FAN Zhihui; LIU Yidi; REN Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced in subsonic airflow by nanosecond high-voltage pulse power supply with a plate-to-plate discharge cell at 6 mm air gap length.The discharge images,optical emission spectra (OES),the applied voltage and current waveforms of the discharge at the changed airflow rates are obtained.When airflow rate is increased,the transition of the discharge mode and the variations of discharge intensity,breakdown characteristics and the temperature of the discharge plasma are investigated.The results show that the discharge becomes more diffuse,discharge intensity is decreased accompanied by the increased breakdown voltage and time lag,and the temperature of the discharge plasma reduces when airflow of small vclocity is introduced into the discharge gap.These phenomena are because that the airflow changes the spatial distribution of the heat and the space charge in the discharge gap.

  5. Volume Diffuse Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Produced by Nanosecond High Voltage Pulse in Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haicheng; Gao, Wei; Fan, Zhihui; Liu, Yidi; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced in subsonic airflow by nanosecond high-voltage pulse power supply with a plate-to-plate discharge cell at 6 mm air gap length. The discharge images, optical emission spectra (OES), the applied voltage and current waveforms of the discharge at the changed airflow rates are obtained. When airflow rate is increased, the transition of the discharge mode and the variations of discharge intensity, breakdown characteristics and the temperature of the discharge plasma are investigated. The results show that the discharge becomes more diffuse, discharge intensity is decreased accompanied by the increased breakdown voltage and time lag, and the temperature of the discharge plasma reduces when airflow of small velocity is introduced into the discharge gap. These phenomena are because that the airflow changes the spatial distribution of the heat and the space charge in the discharge gap. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51437002)

  6. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  7. High-throughput detection of ethanol-producing cyanobacteria in a microdroplet platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalde-Cela, Sara; Gould, Anna; Liu, Xin; Kazamia, Elena; Smith, Alison G; Abell, Chris

    2015-05-06

    Ethanol production by microorganisms is an important renewable energy source. Most processes involve fermentation of sugars from plant feedstock, but there is increasing interest in direct ethanol production by photosynthetic organisms. To facilitate this, a high-throughput screening technique for the detection of ethanol is required. Here, a method for the quantitative detection of ethanol in a microdroplet-based platform is described that can be used for screening cyanobacterial strains to identify those with the highest ethanol productivity levels. The detection of ethanol by enzymatic assay was optimized both in bulk and in microdroplets. In parallel, the encapsulation of engineered ethanol-producing cyanobacteria in microdroplets and their growth dynamics in microdroplet reservoirs were demonstrated. The combination of modular microdroplet operations including droplet generation for cyanobacteria encapsulation, droplet re-injection and pico-injection, and laser-induced fluorescence, were used to create this new platform to screen genetically engineered strains of cyanobacteria with different levels of ethanol production.

  8. Seeing like a research project: producing "high-quality data" in AIDS research in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biruk, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Numbers are the primary way that we know about AIDS in Africa, yet their power and utility often obscure the conditions of their production. I show that quantification is very much a sociocultural process by focusing on everyday realities of making AIDS-related numbers in Malawi. "Seeing like a research project" implies systematically transforming social reality into data points and managing uncertainties inherent in numbers. Drawing on 20 months of participant observation with survey research projects (2005, 2007-2008), I demonstrate how standards govern data collection to protect and reproduce demographers' shared expectations of "high-quality data." Data are expected to be "clean," accurate and precise, data collection efficient and timely, and data collected from sufficiently large, pure, and representative samples. I employ ethnographic analysis to show that each of these expectations not only guides survey research fieldwork but also produces categories, identities, and practices that reinforce and challenge these standardizing values.

  9. Development of Hydrocracking Catalyst to Produce High Quality Clean Middle Distillates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xuejun; Zhang Zhihua

    2004-01-01

    A novel hydrocracking Ni-W binary catalyst was tentatively designed and prepared by means of impregnation on mixed supports of modified Y zeolite and amorphous aluminosilicate. The structure and properties of catalyst were extensively characterized by XRD, NH3-TPD, IR and XRF techniques. The performance of catalyst was evaluated by a 100-ml hydrogenation laboratory test unit with two single-stage fixed-bed reactors connected in series. The characterization results showed that the catalyst has a developed and concentrated mesopores distribution, suitable acid sites and acid strength distribution, and uniform and high dispersion of metal sites. Under a high conversion rate of 73.8% with the >350℃ feedstock, a 98. 1m% of C5+yield and 83.5% of middle distillates selectivity were obtained. The yield of middle distillates boiling between 140℃and 370℃ was 68.70m% and its quality could meet the WWFC category Ⅲ specification. It means that this catalyst could be used to produce more high quality clean middle distillates derived from heavy oil hydrocracking. The potential aromatic content of heavy naphtha from 65℃ to 140℃ was 37.5m%. The BMCI value of >370℃ tail oil was 6.6. The heavy naphtha and tail oil are premium feedstocks for catalytic reforming and steam cracker units.

  10. Mastitis Pathogens with High Virulence in a Mouse Model Produce a Distinct Cytokine Profile In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Artursson, Karin; Söderlund, Robert; Guss, Bengt; Rönnberg, Elin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a serious medical condition of dairy cattle. Here, we evaluated whether the degree of virulence of mastitis pathogens in a mouse model can be linked to the inflammatory response that they provoke. Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (strain 556 and 392) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) (676 and 127), and laboratory control strains [8325-4 (S. aureus) and MG1655 (E. coli)], were injected i.p. into mice, followed by the assessment of clinical scores and inflammatory parameters. As judged by clinical scoring, E. coli 127 exhibited the largest degree of virulence among the strains. All bacterial strains induced neutrophil recruitment. However, whereas E. coli 127 induced high peritoneal levels of CXCL1, G-CSF, and CCL2, strikingly lower levels of these were induced by the less virulent bacterial strains. High concentrations of these compounds were also seen in blood samples taken from animals infected with E. coli 127, suggesting systemic inflammation. Moreover, the levels of CXCL1 and G-CSF, both in the peritoneal fluid and in plasma, correlated with clinical score. Together, these findings suggest that highly virulent clinical mastitis isolates produce a distinct cytokine profile that shows a close correlation with the severity of the bacterial infection. PMID:27713743

  11. Physiological characterization of the high malic acid-producing Aspergillus oryzae strain 2103a-68.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Christoph; Nookaew, Intawat; Remmers, Ilse; Khoomrung, Sakda; Brown, Stephen; Berry, Alan; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-04-01

    Malic acid is a C₄ dicarboxylic acid that is currently mainly used in the food and beverages industry as an acidulant. Because of the versatility of the group of C₄ dicarboxylic acids, the chemical industry has a growing interest in this chemical compound. As malic acid will be considered as a bulk chemical, microbial production requires organisms that sustain high rates, yields, and titers. Aspergillus oryzae is mainly known as an industrial enzyme producer, but it was also shown that it has a very competitive natural production capacity for malic acid. Recently, an engineered A. oryzae strain, 2103a-68, was presented which overexpressed pyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, and a malic acid transporter. In this work, we report a detailed characterization of this strain including detailed rates and yields under malic acid production conditions. Furthermore, transcript levels of the genes of interest and corresponding enzyme activities were measured. On glucose as carbon source, 2103a-68 was able to secrete malic acid at a maximum specific production rate during stationary phase of 1.87 mmol (g dry weight (DW))⁻¹ h⁻¹ and with a yield of 1.49 mol mol⁻¹. Intracellular fluxes were obtained using ¹³C flux analysis during exponential growth, supporting the success of the metabolic engineering strategy of increasing flux through the reductive cytosolic tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) branch. Additional cultivations using xylose and a glucose/xylose mixture demonstrated that A. oryzae is able to efficiently metabolize pentoses and hexoses to produce malic acid at high titers, rates, and yields.

  12. Methods for Producing High-Performance Silicon Carbide Fibers, Architectural Preforms, and High-Temperature Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties tier each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  13. [Construction of high sulphite-producing industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Na; He, Xiu-ping; Guo, Xue-na; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Bo-run

    2006-02-01

    In the process of beer storage and transportation, off-flavor can be produced for oxidation of beer. Sulphite is important for stabilizing the beer flavor because of its antioxidant activity. However, the low level of sulphite synthesized by the brewing yeast is not enough to stabilize beer flavor. Three enzymes involve sulphite biosynthesis in yeast. One of them, APS kinase (encoded by MET14) plays important role in the process of sulphite formation. In order to construct high sulphite-producing brewing yeast strain for beer production, MET14 gene was cloned and overexpressed in industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Primer 1 (5'-TGTGAATTCCTGTACACCAATGGCTACT-3', EcoR I) and primer 2 (5'-TATAAGCTTGATGA GGTGGATGAAGACG-3', HindIII) were designed according to the MET14 sequence in GenBank. A 1.1kb DNA fragment containing the open reading frame and terminator of MET14 gene was amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae YSF-5 by PCR, and inserted into YEp352 to generate recombinant plasmid pMET14. To express MET14 gene properly in S. cerevisiae, the recombinant expression plasmids pPM with URA3 gene as the selection marker and pCPM with URA3 gene and copper resistance gene as the selection marker for yeast transformation were constructed. In plasmid pPM, the PGK1 promoter from plasmid pVC727 was fused with the MET14 gene from pMET14, and the expression cassette was inserted into the plasmid YEp352. The dominant selection marker, copper-resistance gene expression cassette CUP1-MTI was inserted in plasmid pPM to result in pCPM. Restriction enzyme analysis showed that plasmids pPM and pCPM were constructed correctly. The laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae YS58 with ura3, trp1, leu2, his4 auxotroph was transformed with plasmid pPM. Yeast transformants were screened on synthetic minimal medium (SD) containing leucine, histidine and tryptophan. The sulphite production of the transformants carrying pPM was 2 fold of that in the control strain YS58, which showed that the

  14. Tailoring of Pd-Pt bimetallic clusters with high stability for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Daojian; Wang, Wenchuan

    2012-03-01

    The composition-dependent equilibrium structure and thermal stability of Pd-Pt clusters with the size of 55 atoms, and CO, O, OH, and O2 adsorption on these clusters have been studied using molecular simulation based on the Gupta empirical potential and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is found that Pd43Pt12 with a three-shell onionlike structure (TS-cluster) exhibits the highest relative stability in both DFT and Gupta levels and also the highest melting point at the Gupta level among these Pd-Pt clusters. In addition, the Pd43Pt12 TS-cluster possesses the weakest CO, O, OH, and O2 adsorption strength, compared to the Pt55, Pd55, and Pd13Pt42 clusters, indicating good catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) among these Pd-Pt clusters considered. We expect that this kind of DFT-guided strategy by controlling the composition could provide a simple way for possibly searching new electrocatalysts.

  15. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  16. Hierarchical rutile TiO2 flower cluster-based high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells via direct hydrothermal growth on conducting substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meidan; Liu, Hsiang-Yu; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2013-01-28

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on hierarchical rutile TiO(2) flower clusters prepared by a facile, one-pot hydrothermal process exhibit a high efficiency. Complex yet appealing rutile TiO(2) flower films are, for the first time, directly hydrothermally grown on a transparent conducting fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate. The thickness and density of as-grown flower clusters can be readily tuned by tailoring growth parameters, such as growth time, the addition of cations of different valence and size, initial concentrations of precursor and cation, growth temperature, and acidity. Notably, the small lattice mismatch between the FTO substrate and rutile TiO(2) renders the epitaxial growth of a compact rutile TiO(2) layer on the FTO glass. Intriguingly, these TiO(2) flower clusters can then be exploited as photoanodes to produce DSSCs, yielding a power conversion efficiency of 2.94% despite their rutile nature, which is further increased to 4.07% upon the TiCl(4) treatment.

  17. Low-field-enhanced unusual hysteresis produced by metamagnetism of the MnP clusters in the insulating CdGe P2 matrix under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanov, T. R.; Arslanov, R. K.; Kilanski, L.; Chatterji, T.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Emirov, R. M.; Ril, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    Hydrostatic pressure studies of the isothermal magnetization and volume changes up to 7 GPa of magnetic composite containing MnP clusters in an insulating CdGe P2 matrix are presented. Instead of alleged superparamagnetic behavior, a pressure-induced magnetization process was found at zero magnetic field, showing gradual enhancement in a low-field regime up to H ⩾5 kOe. The simultaneous application of pressure and magnetic field reconfigures the MnP clusters with antiferromagnetic alignment, followed by onset of a field-induced metamagnetic transition. An unusual hysteresis in magnetization after pressure cycling is observed, which is also enhanced by application of the magnetic field, and indicates reversible metamagnetism of MnP clusters. We relate these effects to the major contribution of structural changes in the composite, where limited volume reduction by 1.8% is observed at P ˜5.2 GPa.

  18. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Methods The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. Results The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. Trial registration ACTRN12608000561381

  19. In-clustering effects in InAlN and InGaN revealed by high pressure studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Kaminska, A.;

    2010-01-01

    results are compared with the results of photoluminescence measurements performed at high hydrostatic pressures on InAlN and InGaN quasi-bulk epilayers. We discuss the modification of the uppermost valence band due to formation of In clusters which, together with the related lattice relaxations, may...

  20. Selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium peas and oats in selenium-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Johnson, LuAnn K

    2011-06-08

    This study determined the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from yellow peas and oats harvested from the high-Se soil of South Dakota, United States. The Se concentrations were 13.5 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg (dry weight) for peas and oats, respectively. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were depleted of Se by feeding them a 30% Torula yeast-based diet (4.1 μg Se/kg) for 56 days, and then they were replenished with Se for an additional 50 days by feeding them the same diet supplemented with 20, 30, or 40 μg Se/kg from peas or oats, respectively. Selenium bioavailability was determined on the basis of the restoration of Se-dependent enzyme activities and tissue Se concentrations in Se-depleted rats, comparing those responses for yellow peas and oats to those for l-selenomethionine (SeMet; used as a reference) by using a slope-ratio method. Dietary supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in glutathione peroxidase activities in blood and liver and in thioredoxin reductase activity in liver. Supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in Se concentrations of plasma, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and kidneys. The overall bioavailability was approximately 88% for Se from yellow peas and 92% from oats, compared to SeMet. It was concluded that Se from naturally produced high-Se yellow peas or oats is highly bioavailable in this model and that these high-Se foods may be a good dietary source of Se.

  1. Infrared High-resolution Integrated Light Spectral Analyses of M31 Globular Clusters from APOGEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakari, Charli M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; Caldwell, Nelson; Aníbal García-Hernández, Domingo; Lucatello, Sara; Majewski, Steven; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pan, Kaike; Strader, Jay

    2016-10-01

    Chemical abundances are presented for 25 M31 globular clusters (GCs), based on moderately high resolution (R = 22,500) H-band integrated light (IL) spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). Infrared (IR) spectra offer lines from new elements, lines of different strengths, and lines at higher excitation potentials compared to the optical. Integrated abundances of C, N, and O are derived from CO, CN, and OH molecular features, while Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, and Ti abundances are derived from atomic features. These abundances are compared to previous results from the optical, demonstrating the validity and value of IR IL analyses. The CNO abundances are consistent with typical tip of the red giant branch stellar abundances but are systematically offset from optical Lick index abundances. With a few exceptions, the other abundances agree between the optical and the IR within the 1σ uncertainties. The first integrated K abundances are also presented and demonstrate that K tracks the α elements. The combination of IR and optical abundances allows better determinations of GC properties and enables probes of the multiple populations in extragalactic GCs. In particular, the integrated effects of the Na/O anticorrelation can be directly examined for the first time.

  2. Cardiac motion estimation by using high-dimensional features and K-means clustering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubel, Estanislao; Hero, Alfred O.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2006-03-01

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently the reference modality for myocardial motion and strain analysis. Mutual Information (MI) based non rigid registration has proven to be an accurate method to retrieve cardiac motion and overcome many drawbacks present on previous approaches. In a previous work1, we used Wavelet-based Attribute Vectors (WAVs) instead of pixel intensity to measure similarity between frames. Since the curse of dimensionality forbids the use of histograms to estimate MI of high dimensional features, k-Nearest Neighbors Graphs (kNNG) were applied to calculate α-MI. Results showed that cardiac motion estimation was feasible with that approach. In this paper, K-Means clustering method is applied to compute MI from the same set of WAVs. The proposed method was applied to four tagging MRI sequences, and the resulting displacements were compared with respect to manual measurements made by two observers. Results show that more accurate motion estimation is obtained with respect to the use of pixel intensity.

  3. Wave particle interactions in the high-altitude polar cusp: a Cluster case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grison

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available On 23 March 2002, the four Cluster spacecraft crossed in close configuration (~100 km separation the high-altitude (10 RE cusp region. During a large part of the crossing, the STAFF and EFW instruments have detected strong electromagnetic wave activity at low frequencies, especially when intense field-aligned proton fluxes were detected by the CIS/HIA instrument. In all likelihood, such fluxes correspond to newly-reconnected field lines. A focus on one of these ion injection periods highlights the interaction between waves and protons. The wave activity has been investigated using the k-filtering technique. Experimental dispersion relations have been built in the plasma frame for the two most energetic wave modes. Results show that kinetic Alfvén waves dominate the electromagnetic wave spectrum up to 1 Hz (in the spacecraft frame. Above 0.8 Hz, intense Bernstein waves are also observed. The close simultaneity observed between the wave and particle events is discussed as an evidence for local wave generation. A mechanism based on current instabilities is consistent with the observations of the kinetic Alfvén waves. A weak ion heating along the recently-opened field lines is also suggested from the examination of the ion distribution functions. During an injection event, a large plasma convection motion, indicative of a reconnection site location, is shown to be consistent with the velocity perturbation induced by the large-scale Alfvén wave simultaneously detected.

  4. Simulating Retrieval from a Highly Clustered Network: Implications for Spoken Word Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitevitch, Michael S.; Ercal, Gunes; Adagarla, Bhargav

    2011-01-01

    Network science describes how entities in complex systems interact, and argues that the structure of the network influences processing. Clustering coefficient, C – one measure of network structure – refers to the extent to which neighbors of a node are also neighbors of each other. Previous simulations suggest that networks with low C dissipate information (or disease) to a large portion of the network, whereas in networks with high C information (or disease) tends to be constrained to a smaller portion of the network (Newman, 2003). In the present simulation we examined how C influenced the spread of activation to a specific node, simulating retrieval of a specific lexical item in a phonological network. The results of the network simulation showed that words with lower C had higher activation values (indicating faster or more accurate retrieval from the lexicon) than words with higher C. These results suggest that a simple mechanism for lexical retrieval can account for the observations made in Chan and Vitevitch (2009), and have implications for diffusion dynamics in other fields. PMID:22174705

  5. Some aspects of modelling the high-latitude ionospheric convection from Cluster/Edi data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, M.; Feldstein, Y. I.; Gromova, L. I.; Dremukhina, L. A.; Levitin, A. E.; Haaland, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements onboard Cluster satellites are briefly described, which form the base for determining the intensity and direction of the electric field in the magnetosphere. The aim of this paper is to describe (1) the methodology of calculating the potential distribution at the ionospheric level and the results of constructing spatiotemporal convection patterns for different orientations of the IMF vector in the GSM YZ plane; (2) derivation of basic convection patterns (BCPs), which allow to deduce the statistical ionospheric convection pattern at high latitudes for any IMF Bz and By values (statistical convection model) using different sets of independent data; (3) the consequences of enlarging the amount of data used for analysis; (4) the results of potential calculations with various orders of the spherical harmonics describing them; (5) determination of the cross-polar cap potential with different IMF sector widths (α from 45° down to 10°); (6) the results of our trials to determine the contribution of the IMF Bx component to the convection pattern.

  6. Differences of hormones involved in adipose metabolism and lactation between high and low producing Holstein cows during heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzi Qu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate hormonal involvement in the adipose metabolism and lactation between high and low producing dairy cows in a hot environment. Forty Holstein healthy cows with a similar parity were used and assigned into high producing group (average production 41.44 ± 2.25 kg/d and low producing group (average production 29.92 ± 1.02 kg/d with 20 cows in each group. Blood samples were collected from caudal vein to determine the difference of hormones related to adipose metabolism and lactation. The highest, lowest, and average temperature humidity index (THI, recorded as 84.02, 79.35 and 81.89, respectively, indicated that cows were at the state of high heat stress. No significant differences between high and low producing groups were observed in the levels of nonestesterified fatty acid (NEFA, β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB, total cholesterol (TCHO, and insulin (INS (P > 0.05. However, the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, apolipoprotein B100 (apoB-100, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and estrogen (E2 concentrations in high producing group were significantly higher than those of low producing group (P  0.05, whereas high producing group had a rise in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 level compared with low producing group (P < 0.05. These results indicated that, during summer, high and low producing dairy cows have similar levels of lipid catabolism, but high producing dairy cows have advantages in outputting hepatic triglyceride (TG.

  7. A cell sorting protocol for selecting high-producing sub-populations of Sf9 and High Five™ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidigal, João; Dias, Mafalda M; Fernandes, Fabiana; Patrone, Marco; Bispo, Cláudia; Andrade, Cláudia; Gardner, Rui; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2013-12-01

    Insect cell lines such as Sf9 and High Five™ have been widely used to produce recombinant proteins mostly by the lytic baculovirus vector system. We have recently established an expression platform in Sf9 cells using a fluorescence-based recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) strategy which has similar development timelines but avoids baculovirus infection. To expedite cell engineering efforts, a robust fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) protocol optimized for insect cells was developed here. The standard sorting conditions used for mammalian cells proved to be unsuitable, resulting in post-sorting viabilities below 10% for both cell lines. We found that the extreme sensitivity to the shear stress displayed by Sf9 and High Five™ cells was the limiting factor, and using Pluronic F-68 in the cell suspension could increase post-sorting viabilities in a dose dependent manner. The newly developed protocol was then used to sort stable populations of both cell lines tagged with a DsRed-expressing cassette. Before sorting, the average fluorescence intensity of the Sf9 cell population was 3-fold higher than that of the High Five™ cell population. By enriching with the 10% strongest DsRed-fluorescent cells, the productivity of both cell populations could be successfully improved. The established sorting protocol potentiates the use of RMCE technology for recombinant protein production in insect cells.

  8. Investing in Cognac Producing Vineyards to Hedge Wealth While Receiving High Returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakob Hakobyan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The general trend over the last decade for investments has been moving towards emerging markets, where investors are promised high returns for risky investments. These kind of investments favor the brave and bold, but are frightening for the risk averse. In this paper I will be presenting the opportunities that an investment into cognac producing vineyards can offer. High return and relatively low risk investment opportunities that exists in France. Included in the paper will be examples of large investments made recently into the industry. I will analyze the trends in the market over the past 8 years for the prices of land, cognac itself and the ease of sales of such products. There will also be an in-depth explanation of why cognac is today’s least risky product to invest into, comparing it to the Champagne regions’ similar historic trends. The findings show that land prices have increased at an average of 10% while simultaneously the price of cognac, has grow at an average of 14%. This product also has a unique hedging opportunity for investors. In short, excluding the growth of cognac prices in general the product itself gains value the longer it is stored, by an average of 12%. In this industry there are 5 big players that compete with each other on quality and also access to future stocks. This reality gives an investor the unique ability to sign futures contracts for 100% of their production over a 5 year period (standard market contract. Similar contracts can be signed with cooperatives who manage the lands for the investor, making the investment hassle free. This allows for an assured projection of both costs and returns for an unprecedented length of time compared to any other industry today. In conclusion, cognac producing vineyards are an investment that can potentially bring high returns, while being able to hedge the investment and see capital gains over the course of time. There will be a final simulation of a 5 year

  9. Statistical analysis of solid lipid nanoparticles produced by high-pressure homogenization: a practical prediction approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran-Lobato, Matilde, E-mail: mduran@us.es [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. Farmacia y Tecnologia Farmaceutica, Facultad de Farmacia (Espana) (Spain); Enguix-Gonzalez, Alicia [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Facultad de Matematicas (Espana) (Spain); Fernandez-Arevalo, Mercedes; Martin-Banderas, Lucia [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. Farmacia y Tecnologia Farmaceutica, Facultad de Farmacia (Espana) (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are a promising carrier for all administration routes due to their safety, small size, and high loading of lipophilic compounds. Among the LNP production techniques, the easy scale-up, lack of organic solvents, and short production times of the high-pressure homogenization technique (HPH) make this method stand out. In this study, a statistical analysis was applied to the production of LNP by HPH. Spherical LNPs with mean size ranging from 65 nm to 11.623 {mu}m, negative zeta potential under -30 mV, and smooth surface were produced. Manageable equations based on commonly used parameters in the pharmaceutical field were obtained. The lipid to emulsifier ratio (R{sub L/S}) was proved to statistically explain the influence of oil phase and surfactant concentration on final nanoparticles size. Besides, the homogenization pressure was found to ultimately determine LNP size for a given R{sub L/S}, while the number of passes applied mainly determined polydispersion. {alpha}-Tocopherol was used as a model drug to illustrate release properties of LNP as a function of particle size, which was optimized by the regression models. This study is intended as a first step to optimize production conditions prior to LNP production at both laboratory and industrial scale from an eminently practical approach, based on parameters extensively used in formulation.

  10. Coupled-Multiplier Accelerator Produces High-Power Electron Beams for Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatridge, M.; McIntyre, P.; Roberson, S.; Sattarov, A.; Thomas, E.; Meitzler, Charles

    2003-08-01

    The coupled multiplier is a new approach to efficient generation of MeV d.c. power for accelerator applications. High voltage is produced by a series of modules, each of which consists of a high-power alternator, step-up transformer, and 3-phase multiplier circuit. The alternators are connected mechanically along a rotating shaft, and connected by insulating flexible couplers. This approach differs from all previous d.c. technologies in that power is delivered to the various stages of the system mechanically, rather than through capacitive or inductive electrical coupling. For this reason the capital cost depends linearly on required voltage and power, rather than quadratically as with conventional technologies. The CM technology enables multiple electron beams to be driven within a common supply and insulating housing. MeV electron beam is extremely effective in decomposing organic contaminants in water. A 1 MeV, 100 kW industrial accelerator using the CM technology has been built and is being installed for treatment of wastewater at a petrochemical plant.

  11. High Performance Data Clustering: A Comparative Analysis of Performance for GPU, RASC, MPI, and OpenMP Implementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luobin; Chiu, Steve C; Liao, Wei-Keng; Thomas, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Compared to Beowulf clusters and shared-memory machines, GPU and FPGA are emerging alternative architectures that provide massive parallelism and great computational capabilities. These architectures can be utilized to run compute-intensive algorithms to analyze ever-enlarging datasets and provide scalability. In this paper, we present four implementations of K-means data clustering algorithm for different high performance computing platforms. These four implementations include a CUDA implementation for GPUs, a Mitrion C implementation for FPGAs, an MPI implementation for Beowulf compute clusters, and an OpenMP implementation for shared-memory machines. The comparative analyses of the cost of each platform, difficulty level of programming for each platform, and the performance of each implementation are presented.

  12. High Performance Data Clustering: A Comparative Analysis of Performance for GPU, RASC, MPI, and OpenMP Implementations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luobin; Chiu, Steve C.; Liao, Wei-Keng; Thomas, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to Beowulf clusters and shared-memory machines, GPU and FPGA are emerging alternative architectures that provide massive parallelism and great computational capabilities. These architectures can be utilized to run compute-intensive algorithms to analyze ever-enlarging datasets and provide scalability. In this paper, we present four implementations of K-means data clustering algorithm for different high performance computing platforms. These four implementations include a CUDA implementation for GPUs, a Mitrion C implementation for FPGAs, an MPI implementation for Beowulf compute clusters, and an OpenMP implementation for shared-memory machines. The comparative analyses of the cost of each platform, difficulty level of programming for each platform, and the performance of each implementation are presented. PMID:25309040

  13. Efficient computation of k-Nearest Neighbour Graphs for large high-dimensional data sets on GPU clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dashti

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of the brute-force exact k-Nearest Neighbor Graph (k-NNG construction for ultra-large high-dimensional data cloud. The proposed method uses Graphics Processing Units (GPUs and is scalable with multi-levels of parallelism (between nodes of a cluster, between different GPUs on a single node, and within a GPU. The method is applicable to homogeneous computing clusters with a varying number of nodes and GPUs per node. We achieve a 6-fold speedup in data processing as compared with an optimized method running on a cluster of CPUs and bring a hitherto impossible [Formula: see text]-NNG generation for a dataset of twenty million images with 15 k dimensionality into the realm of practical possibility.

  14. Enhancement of electric and magnetic properties by tuning Co cluster in ZnO films via high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Li, Guojian; Wang, Zhao; Liu, Shan; Wang, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    To reveal the origin of magnetic coupling in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), this article utilized high magnetic field (HMF) in the process of oxidizing Co/Zn bilayers to study the influence of Co clusters and oxygen vacancy (Vo) content control on magnetic and electrical properties of Co doped ZnO (Co-ZnO) films. Results indicated that HMF can suppress the diffusion of Co and remain the content of Co clusters compared with oxidation growth in the absence of HMF. Moreover, HMF promoted the oxidation of Zn, improved the crystallinity in the films, and lowered the content of Vo. Consequently, the resistivity of the films oxidized in HMF was decreased by 50%, while both the saturation magnetization and coercivity were increased by 100%. This indicates that contribution of more Co clusters to the magnetic properties of the films is greater than that of Vo.

  15. High-power EUV lithography sources based on gas discharges and laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Uwe; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Balogh, Istvan; Birner, H.; Bolshukhin, D.; Brudermann, J.; Enke, S.; Flohrer, Frank; G„bel, Kai; G÷tze, S.; Hergenhan, G.; Kleinschmidt, J.'rgen; Kl÷pfel, Diethard; Korobotchko, Vladimir; Ringling, Jens; Schriever, Guido; Tran, C. D.; Ziener, C.

    2003-06-01

    Semiconductor chip manufacturers are expecting to use extreme UV lithography for production in 2009. EUV tools require high power, brilliant light sources at 13.5 nm with collector optics producing 120 W average power at entrance of the illuminator system. Today the power and lifetime of the EUV light source are considered as the most critical issue for EUV lithography. The present paper gives an update of the development status of EUV light sources at XTREME technologies, a joint venture of Lambda Physik AG, Goettingen, and Jenoptik LOS GmbH, Jena, Germany. Results on both laser produced plasma (LPP) and gas discharge produced plasma (GDPP), the two major technologies in EUV sources, are given. The LPP EUV sources use xenon-jet target systems and pulsed lasers with 400 W average power at 10 kHz developed at XTREME technologies. The maximum conversion efficiency form laser power into EUV in-band power is 0.75% into 2π solid angle. With 300 W laser average power at 3300 Hz repetition rate up to 1.5 W EUV radiation is generated at 13.5 nm. After a collector of 5 sr this corresponds to 0.6 W in intermediate focus without spectral purity filter and 0.5 W in intermediate focus with spectral purity filter. The direct generation of the EUV emitting plasma from electrical discharges is much simpler than LPP because the electrical energy has not to be converted into laser radiation before plasma excitation. XTREME technologies' Xenon GDPP EUV sources use the Z-pinch principle with efficient sliding discharge pre-ionization. The plasma pinch size and the available emission angle have been matched to the etendue of the optical system of 2-3 mm2 sr, i.e. no additional etendue related loss reduces the usable EUV power from the source. In continuous operation at 1000 Hz the GDPP sources emit 50W into 2π solid angle are obtained from the Z-pinch sources. Spatial and temporal emission stability of the EUV sources is in the range of a few percent. Debris shields for EUV sources

  16. The Red Sequence of High-Redshift Clusters: A Comparison with Cosmological Galaxy Formation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menci, N.

    2008-10-01

    We compare the results from a state-of-the-art semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with spectroscopic observations of the distant galaxy clusters observed in the range 1≲ z≲ 1.5. In our model we find that i) a well-defined, narrow red sequence (RS) is obtained already by z≈ 1.2; this is more populated than the field RS analogously to what observed and predicted at z=0; ii) the predicted RS colors and width have average values of 1 and 0.15, respectively, with a cluster-to-cluster variance. The width of the RS of cluster galaxy is 5-10 times lower than the corresponding field value; iii) The predicted distribution of stellar ages of RS galaxies at z=1.2 are peaked at the value τ=3.7 Gyr for both cluster and field; however, for the latter the distribution is significantly skewed toward lower ages. When compared with observations, the above findings show an overall consistency, although the average value ≈ 0.07 of the observed cluster RS width at z≈1.2 is smaller than the corresponding model central value. We discuss the physical origin and the significance of the above results in the framework of cosmological galaxy formation.

  17. The Red Sequence of High-Redshift Clusters: a Comparison with Cosmological Galaxy Formation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N; Gobat, R; Strazzullo, V; Rettura, A; Mei, S; Demarco, R

    2008-01-01

    We compare the results from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with spectro-photometric observations of distant galaxy clusters observed in the range 0.8< z< 1.3. We investigate the properties of their red sequence (RS) galaxies and compare them with those of the field at the same redshift. In our model we find that i) a well-defined, narrow RS is obtained already by z= 1.2; this is found to be more populated than the field RS, analogously to what observed and predicted at z=0; ii) the predicted U-V rest-frame colors and scatter of the cluster RS at z=1.2 have average values of 1 and 0.15 respectively, with a cluster-to-cluster variance of 0.2 and 0.06, respectively. The scatter of the RS of cluster galaxies is around 5 times smaller than the corresponding field value; iii) when the RS galaxies are considered, the mass growth histories of field and cluster galaxies at z=1.2 are similar, with 90 % of the stellar mass of RS galaxies at z=1.2 already formed at cosmic times t=2.5 Gyr, and 50 % at t=1...

  18. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of transition properties in highly charged inert-gas ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out an extensive investigation of various spectroscopic properties of highly charged inert-gas ions using a relativistic coupled-cluster method through a one-electron detachment procedure. In particular, we have calculated the atomic states 2 s22 p53/2 2P, 2 s22 p51/2 2P, and 2 s 2 p61/2 2S in F-like inert-gas ions; 3 s23 p53/2 2P, 3 s23 p51/2 2P, and 3 s 3 p61/2 2S states in Cl-like Kr, Xe, and Rn; and 4 s24 p53/2 2P, 4 s24 p51/2 2P, and 4 s 4 p61/2 2S states in Br-like Xe and Rn. Starting from a single-reference Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function, we construct our exact atomic states by including the dynamic correlation effects in an all-order perturbative fashion. Employing this method, we estimate the ionization potential energies of three low-lying orbitals present in their respective closed-shell configurations. Since the considered highly charged inert-gas ions exhibit huge relativistic effects, we have taken into account the corrections due to Breit interaction as well as from the dominant quantum electrodynamic correction such as vacuum polarization and self-energy effects in these systems. Using our calculated relativistic atomic wave functions and energies, we accurately determine various transition properties such as wavelengths, line strengths, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and lifetimes of the excited states.

  19. High-throughput Analysis of Large Microscopy Image Datasets on CPU-GPU Cluster Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, George; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin M; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee A D; Podhorszki, Norbert; Klasky, Scott; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-05-01

    Analysis of large pathology image datasets offers significant opportunities for the investigation of disease morphology, but the resource requirements of analysis pipelines limit the scale of such studies. Motivated by a brain cancer study, we propose and evaluate a parallel image analysis application pipeline for high throughput computation of large datasets of high resolution pathology tissue images on distributed CPU-GPU platforms. To achieve efficient execution on these hybrid systems, we have built runtime support that allows us to express the cancer image analysis application as a hierarchical data processing pipeline. The application is implemented as a coarse-grain pipeline of stages, where each stage may be further partitioned into another pipeline of fine-grain operations. The fine-grain operations are efficiently managed and scheduled for computation on CPUs and GPUs using performance aware scheduling techniques along with several optimizations, including architecture aware process placement, data locality conscious task assignment, data prefetching, and asynchronous data copy. These optimizations are employed to maximize the utilization of the aggregate computing power of CPUs and GPUs and minimize data copy overheads. Our experimental evaluation shows that the cooperative use of CPUs and GPUs achieves significant improvements on top of GPU-only versions (up to 1.6×) and that the execution of the application as a set of fine-grain operations provides more opportunities for runtime optimizations and attains better performance than coarser-grain, monolithic implementations used in other works. An implementation of the cancer image analysis pipeline using the runtime support was able to process an image dataset consisting of 36,848 4Kx4K-pixel image tiles (about 1.8TB uncompressed) in less than 4 minutes (150 tiles/second) on 100 nodes of a state-of-the-art hybrid cluster system.

  20. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-02-01

    Context: Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. Aims: We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects that are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. Methods: We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. Results: We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution of such star-forming haloes will be one of the most significant foregrounds in the high frequency channels of future CMB experiments, such as PLANCK, ACT and SPT. The correlation term, due to the clustering of multiple haloes at redshift z ~ 2-6, is dominant in the broad range of angular scales 200 ⪉ l ⪉ 3000. Poisson fluctuations due to bright sub-millimeter sources are more important at higher l, but since they are generated from the bright sources, such contribution could be strongly reduced if bright sources are excised from the sky maps. The contribution of the correlation term to the angular power spectrum depends strongly on the redshift evolution of the escape fraction of UV photons and the resulting temperature of the dust. The measurement of this signal will therefore give important information about the sub-millimeter emission and the escape fraction of UV photons from galaxies, in the early stage of their evolution.

  1. Multiple Species of Trichosporon Produce Biofilms Highly Resistant to Triazoles and Amphotericin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrieta-González, Isabel Antonieta; Padovan, Ana Carolina Barbosa; Bizerra, Fernando César; Hahn, Rosane Christine; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Invasive infections caused by Trichosporon spp. have increased considerably in recent years, especially in neutropenic and critically ill patients using catheters and antibiotics. The genus presents limited sensitivity to different antifungal agents, but triazoles are the first choice for treatment. Here, we investigated the biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility to triazoles and amphotericin B of 54 Trichosporon spp. isolates obtained from blood samples (19), urine (20) and superficial mycosis (15). All isolates and 7 reference strains were identified by sequence analysis and phylogenetic inferences of the IGS1 region of the rDNA. Biofilms were grown on 96-well plates and quantitation was performed using crystal violet staining, complemented with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Susceptibility tests for fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and amphotericin B were processed using the microdilution broth method (CLSI) for planktonic cells and XTT reduction assay for biofilm-forming cells. Our results showed that T. asahii was the most frequent species identified (66.7%), followed by T. faecale (11.1%), T. asteroides (9.3%), T. inkin (7.4%), T. dermatis (3.7%) and one T. coremiiforme (1.8%). We identified 4 genotypes within T. asahii isolates (G1, G3, G4 and G5) and 2 genotypes within T. faecale (G1 and G3). All species exhibited high adhesion and biofilm formation capabilities, mainly T. inkin, T. asteroides and T. faecale. Microscopy images of high biofilm-producing isolates showed that T. asahii presented mainly hyphae and arthroconidia, whereas T. asteroides exhibited mainly short arthroconidia and few filaments. Voriconazole exhibited the best in vitro activity against all species tested. Biofilm-forming cells of isolates and reference strains were highly resistant to all antifungals tested. We concluded that levels of biofilm formation by Trichosporon spp. were similar or even greater than those described for the Candida genus. Biofilm

  2. Malfunctioning of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces Oxidative Stress via an Iron-Dependent Mechanism, Causing Dysfunction in Respiratory Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Mauricio; Pérez-Gallardo, Rocío V.; Sánchez, Luis A.; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Meza Carmen, Victor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Lara-Romero, Javier; Jiménez-Sandoval, Sergio; Rodríguez, Francisco; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S.; Campos-García, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis and recycling of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters play important roles in the iron homeostasis mechanisms involved in mitochondrial function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Fe–S clusters are assembled into apoproteins by the iron–sulfur cluster machinery (ISC). The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ISC gene deletion and consequent iron release under oxidative stress conditions on mitochondrial functionality in S. cerevisiae. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused by H2O2, menadione, or ethanol, was associated with a loss of iron homeostasis and exacerbated by ISC system dysfunction. ISC mutants showed increased free Fe2+ content, exacerbated by ROS-inducers, causing an increase in ROS, which was decreased by the addition of an iron chelator. Our study suggests that the increment in free Fe2+ associated with ROS generation may have originated from mitochondria, probably Fe–S cluster proteins, under both normal and oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that Fe–S cluster anabolism is affected. Raman spectroscopy analysis and immunoblotting indicated that in mitochondria from SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants, the content of [Fe–S] centers was decreased, as was formation of Rieske protein-dependent supercomplex III2IV2, but this was not observed in the iron-deficient ATX1 and MRS4 mutants. In addition, the activity of complexes II and IV from the electron transport chain (ETC) was impaired or totally abolished in SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants. These results confirm that the ISC system plays important roles in iron homeostasis, ROS stress, and in assembly of supercomplexes III2IV2 and III2IV1, thus affecting the functionality of the respiratory chain. PMID:25356756

  3. The effect of Glycoline® on reproductive efficiency in high-producing dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Del Campo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Determine the effect of Glycoline® on reproductive efficiency in high producing dairy cows. Materials and methods. 100 Holstein cows one month before delivery were selected. About 21 days before parturition they were put in a barn and were randomized in two groups: Glycoline® Group (GG, n=50, 300 g/day of Glycoline® for 21 days antepartum and 250 g/day of GlycoLine® over the following 21 days postpartum, and the Control Group (CG, n=50 with the same feed and silage ration as GG during the same period, but without the addition of Glycoline®. Events and reproductive variables of the cows were recorded for 202 days. The data were systematized, analyzed and statistically compared. Results. Comparisons were made between GG and CG respectively: Retained placenta (0.0 vs. 12.0%; p=0.027, downer cow syndrome (14.3 vs. 44.0%; p=0.002, uterine involution (64.6 vs. 36.4%; p=0.019 , uterine infection (10.4% vs. 35.5%; p=0.006, no ovarian activity (6.3 vs. 25.6%; p=0.018, follicular cysts (0.0 vs. 18.2%, p = 0.002, luteal structures (25.0 vs. 9.3% ; p=0.058, mean estrus presentation (40.1% vs. 63.5%; p=0.033 inseminated females (79.6 vs. 68.0%; p=0.017, pregnancy rate at day 150 (57.1 vs. 46.0%; p≥0.317 and intervals (days: calving to 1st estrus (39.8 vs. 63.2; p≤0.006, calving to IA (62.4 vs. 87.5; p≤0.006 calving to conception (81.7 vs. 93.6; p≤0.006; p=0.103. Conclusions. Results suggest that dietary Glycoline® added in the transition period improves reproductive efficiency of high-producing dairy cows.

  4. Colistin resistance in KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains from a high specialization rehabilitation facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Migliavacca

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide rapid spread of KPC carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp represents an increasing problem in clinical settings. Reports on KPC-Kp epidemic spread in Italian hospitals began to appear since 2010; colistin (COL represents one of the few remaining therapeutic options available for the treatment of such multi drug-resistant (MDR pathogens. Here we report the presence and diffusion of COL resistant KPC-Kp isolates from a High Specialization Rehabilitation Facility located in Northern Italy. Species identification and antimicrobial susceptibilities were obtained by NBC46/NM40 Microscan panels (Siemens; imipenem, meropenem and ertapenem MICs were also evaluated by Etest and broth microdilution method; blaKPC-like genes PCR were performed. PFGE (XbaI was used to investigate clonal relatedness; epidemiological data were collected from the hospital database. Seventy-five carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were collected from the Fondazione S. Maugeri hospital during the period January-June 2011. Seven out of 75 MDR KPC-Kp isolates by Microscan System showed COL resistance (MIC >2 mg/L. Among them, 5/7 were collected from coma and 2/7 from cardiology and rehabilitation cardiology wards. Most of these strains were from urine (5/7; the remaining 2/7 were from blood and bronco-alveolar lavage. The 85.7% of the strains showed susceptibility to tigecycline and fosfomycin; 71.4% only to gentamicina, 28.5% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and 14.2% to amikacin. The PFGE profiles obtained analyzing 5/7 isolates from patients hospitalized from almost 10 days, showed clonal relatedness between 4/5 isolates, thus confirming the high epidemic potential of almost one KPC-Kp clinical strain collected from 4 different wards.The emergence of COL resistance in KPC-Kp, dramatically reduces the available therapeutic options. These results underline the ability of a COL resistant KPC-producing clone to rapidly spread within this

  5. On the spatial correlation between areas of high coseismic slip and aftershock clusters of the Maule earthquake Mw=8.8

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras-Reyes, Javier E

    2012-01-01

    We study the spatial distribution of clusters associated to the aftershocks of the megathrust Maule earthquake MW 8.8 of 27 February 2010. We used a recent clustering method which hinges on a nonparametric estimation of the underlying probability density function to detect subsets of points forming clusters associated to high density areas. In addition, we estimate the probability density function using a nonparametric kernel method for each of these clusters. This allow us to identify a set of regions where there is an association between frequency of events and pre-seismic locking. Specifically, our results suggest that high coseismic slip spatially correlates with high aftershock frequency.

  6. Energy deposition at the bone-tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of nuclear fragmentation recoils produced by high-energy nucleons in the region of the bone-tissue interface is considered. Results for the different flux and absorbed dose for recoils produced by 1 GeV protons are presented in a bidirectional transport model. The energy deposition in marrow cavities is seen to be enhanced by recoils produced in bone. Approximate analytic formulae for absorbed dose near the interface region are also presented for a simplified range-energy model.

  7. Cu, Pu and Fe high T{sub c} superconductors: Spin holes in anti-ferromagnetic clusters form nonmagnetic bipolarons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, Peter, E-mail: wachter@solid.phys.ethz.c [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    The new iron based high T{sub c} superconductors with T{sub c} up to 55 K have stirred new interest in this field. It is consensus that the BCS mechanism is not able to explain the high T{sub c}'s. In the following we propose that spin holes in anti-ferromagnetic clusters combine to make nonmagnetic bipolarons, which can condense and lead to superconductivity.

  8. CLUSTER encounters with the high altitude cusp: boundary structure and magnetic field depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from the four spacecraft Cluster mission during a high altitude cusp crossing on 13 February 2001 are presented. The spacecraft configuration has one leading spacecraft, with the three trailing spacecraft lying in a plane that corresponds roughly to the nominal magnetopause surface. The typical spacecraft separation is approximately 600km. The encounter occurs under conditions of strong and steady southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF. The cusp is identified as a seven-minute long depression in the magnetic field, associated with ion heating and a high abundance of He+. Cusp entry involves passage through a magnetopause boundary that has undergone very significant distortion from its nominal shape, is moving rapidly, and exhibits structure on scales of the order of the spacecraft separation or less. This boundary is associated with a rotation of the magnetic field, a normal field component, and a plasma flow into the cusp of approximately 35 km/s. However, it cannot be identified positively as a rotational discontinuity. Exit from the cusp into the lobe is through a boundary that is initially sharp, but then retreats tailward at a few km/s. As the leading spacecraft passes through this boundary, there is a plasma flow out of the cusp of approximately 30km/s, suggesting that this is not a tangential discontinuity. A few minutes after exit from the cusp, the three trailing the spacecraft see a single cusp-like signature in the magnetic field. There is an associated temperature increase at two of the three trailing spacecraft. Timing measurements indicate that this is due to cusp-like regions detaching from the rear of the cusp boundary, and moving tailward. The magnetic field in the cusp is highly disordered, with no obvious relation between the four spacecraft, indicative of structure on scales <<600km. However, the plasma moments show only a gradual change over many minutes. A similar cusp crossing on 20 February 2001 also

  9. High-latitude plasma convection from Cluster EDI: variances and solar wind correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Förster

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on drift velocity measurements of the EDI instruments on Cluster during the years 2001–2006, we have constructed a database of high-latitude ionospheric convection velocities and associated solar wind and magnetospheric activity parameters. In an earlier paper (Haaland et al., 2007, we have described the method, consisting of an improved technique for calculating the propagation delay between the chosen solar wind monitor (ACE and Earth's magnetosphere, filtering the data for periods of sufficiently stable IMF orientations, and mapping the EDI measurements from their high-altitude positions to ionospheric altitudes. The present paper extends this study, by looking at the spatial pattern of the variances of the convection velocities as a function of IMF orientation, and by performing sortings of the data according to the IMF magnitude in the GSM y-z plane, |ByzIMF|, the estimated reconnection electric field, Er,sw, the solar wind dynamic pressure, Pdyn, the season, and indices characterizing the ring current (Dst and tail activity (ASYM-H. The variability of the high-latitude convection shows characteristic spatial patterns, which are mirror symmetric between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres with respect to the IMF By component. The latitude range of the highest variability zone varies with IMF Bz similar to the auroral oval extent. The magnitude of convection standard deviations is of the same order as, or even larger than, the convection magnitude itself. Positive correlations of polar cap activity are found with |ByzIMF| and with Er,sw, in particular. The strict linear increase for small magnitudes of Er,sw starts to deviate toward a flattened increase above about 2 mV/m. There is also a weak positive correlation with Pdyn. At

  10. Multiple populations in globular clusters. Lessons learned from the Milky Way globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gratton, Raffaele; Bragaglia, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in studies of globular clusters has shown that they are not simple stellar populations, being rather made of multiple generations. Evidence stems both from photometry and spectroscopy. A new paradigm is then arising for the formation of massive star clusters, which includes several episodes of star formation. While this provides an explanation for several features of globular clusters, including the second parameter problem, it also opens new perspectives about the relation between globular clusters and the halo of our Galaxy, and by extension of all populations with a high specific frequency of globular clusters, such as, e.g., giant elliptical galaxies. We review progress in this area, focusing on the most recent studies. Several points remain to be properly understood, in particular those concerning the nature of the polluters producing the abundance pattern in the clusters and the typical timescale, the range of cluster masses where this phenomenon is active, and the relation between globu...

  11. Measurement of cluster-cluster interaction in liquids by deposition and AFM of silicon clusters onto HOPG surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galinis, Gediminas; Torricelli, Gauthier; Akraiam, Atea; Haeften, Klaus von, E-mail: kvh6@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    We have investigated the interaction and aggregation of novel fluorescent silicon nanoclusters in liquids by measuring the size distribution of dried clusters on graphite. The clusters were produced by gas aggregation and co-deposition with a beam of water vapour. Drops of the solutions were placed on freshly cleaved highly oriented pyrolitic graphite, subsequently vacuum dried and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ultra high vacuum. The AFM images show single clusters and agglomerates. The height distributions are Gaussian-shaped with average heights of 1 nm and widths of 1 nm. The heights never exceed 3 nm. In some regions a second cluster layer is observed. In all samples the separation between first and second layers is larger than the separation between the first layer and the graphite substrate, which we attribute to a stronger interaction between clusters and surface than the cluster self-interaction. We conclude that the separation between first and second layer represents a much better fingerprint of the original size distribution of the clusters in solution than the height of the first layer. The observation of a second cluster layer is important for using silicon clusters as building blocks for cluster-assembled materials.

  12. Application of dielectric spectroscopy for monitoring high cell density in monoclonal antibody producing CHO cell cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párta, László; Zalai, Dénes; Borbély, Sándor; Putics, Akos

    2014-02-01

    The application of dielectric spectroscopy was frequently investigated as an on-line cell culture monitoring tool; however, it still requires supportive data and experience in order to become a robust technique. In this study, dielectric spectroscopy was used to predict viable cell density (VCD) at industrially relevant high levels in concentrated fed-batch culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells producing a monoclonal antibody for pharmaceutical purposes. For on-line dielectric spectroscopy measurements, capacitance was scanned within a wide range of frequency values (100-19,490 kHz) in six parallel cell cultivation batches. Prior to detailed mathematical analysis of the collected data, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to compare dielectric behavior of the cultivations. PCA analysis resulted in detecting measurement disturbances. By using the measured spectroscopic data, partial least squares regression (PLS), Cole-Cole, and linear modeling were applied and compared in order to predict VCD. The Cole-Cole and the PLS model provided reliable prediction over the entire cultivation including both the early and decline phases of cell growth, while the linear model failed to estimate VCD in the later, declining cultivation phase. In regards to the measurement error sensitivity, remarkable differences were shown among PLS, Cole-Cole, and linear modeling. VCD prediction accuracy could be improved in the runs with measurement disturbances by first derivative pre-treatment in PLS and by parameter optimization of the Cole-Cole modeling.

  13. Spectroscopy of high lying resonances in {sup 9}Be produced with radioactive {sup 8}Li beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepini-Szily, A.; Leistenschneider, E.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Condori, R. Pampa; Scarduelli, V.; Rossi, E.; Zagatto, V.A.; Aguiar, V.A.P.; Duarte, J., E-mail: alinka@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Faria, P.N. de; Santos, H. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Descouvemont, P. [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels (Belgium); Barioni, A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pires, K.C.C. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Cornelio Procopio, PR (Brazil); Morcelle, V. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itabira, MG (Brazil); Moraes, M.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Britos, T.; Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil); Zamora, J.C. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, (Germany); Shorto, J.M.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of the {sup 8}Li(p,α){sup 5}He and {sup 8}Li(p,p){sup 8}Li reactions measured at the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) system. The experiment was realized in inverse kinematics using a thick [CH{sub 2}]{sub n} polyethylene target and an incident {sup 8}Li beam, produced by RIBRAS. Using the thick target method, the complete excitation function could be measured between E{sub cm} = 0.2 - 2.1 MeV, which includes the Gamow peak energy region. The excitation function of the {sup 8}Li(p,α){sup 5}He reaction, populating resonances between 16.888 and 19.0 MeV in {sup 9}Be, was obtained[1] and the resonances were fitted using R-matrix calculations. This study shed light on spins, parities, partial widths and isospin values of high lying resonances in {sup 9}Be. The measurement of the resonant elastic scattering {sup 8}Li(p,p){sup 8}Li populating resonances in the same energy region can constrain the resonance parameters. Preliminary results of the elastic scattering are also presented. (author)

  14. Stable droplet generator for a high brightness laser produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodov, A.; Krivokorytov, M.; Sidelnikov, Yu.; Krivtsun, V.; Medvedev, V.; Bushuev, V.; Koshelev, K.; Glushkov, D.; Ellwi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the low-melting liquid metal droplets generation based on excited Rayleigh jet breakup. We discuss on the operation of the industrial and in-house designed and manufactured dispensing devices for the droplets generation. Droplet diameter can be varied in the range of 30-90 μm. The working frequency of the droplets, velocity, and the operating temperature were in the ranges of 20-150 kHz, 4-15 m/s, and up to 250 °C, respectively. The standard deviations for the droplet center of mass position both their diameter σ < 1 μm at the distance of 45 mm from the nozzle. Stable operation in the long-term (over 1.5 h) was demonstrated for a wide range of the droplet parameters: diameters, frequencies, and velocities. Physical factors affecting the stability of the generator operation have been identified. The technique for droplet synchronization, allowing using the droplet as a target for laser produced plasma, has been created; in particular, the generator has been successfully used in a high brightness extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source. The operation with frequency up to 8 kHz was demonstrated as a result of the experimental simulation, which can provide an average brightness of the EUV source up to ˜1.2 kW/mm2 sr.

  15. Cellulose/inorganic-composite fibers for producing textile fabrics of high X-ray absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, Karoline; Giebing, Christina; Askani, Antonia [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Leisegang, Tilmann [Saxray GmbH, Maria-Reiche-Str. 1, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Krieg, Marcus [TITK, Thüringisches Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung e.V., Breitscheidstraße 97, 07407 Rudolstadt (Germany); Kyosev, Yordan; Weide, Thomas [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Mahltig, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Mahltig@hs-niederrhein.de [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    Common textile materials as cotton or polyester do not possess reliable X-ray absorption properties. This is due to their morphology and chemical composition in particular. Common fibers are built up from organic polymers containing mainly the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. These “light” elements only have low X-ray absorption coefficients. In contrast, inorganic materials composed of “heavy” elements with high atomic numbers, e.g. barium or bismuth, exhibit X-ray absorption coefficients higher by up to two orders of magnitude. To obtain a flexible yarn with high X-ray absorption properties both these materials, the organic polymer and the inorganic X-ray absorber, are combined to an inorganic/organic composite fiber material. Hence, as the organic component cellulose from modified Lyocell-process is used as carrier fiber and blended with inorganic absorber particles of low toxicity and high absorption coefficients, as bariumsulphate, bariumtitanate or bismuthoxide. A content of inorganic absorber particles equally distributed in the whole fiber of up to 20% is achieved. The composite fibers are produced as staple or filament fibers and processed to multifilament or staple fiber yarns. The staple fiber yarns are rotor-spinned to increase the comfort of the subsequent textile material. Several woven fabrics, considering multilayer structure and different warp/weft density, are developed. The energy dependent X-ray shielding properties are determined in dependence on the different yarn compositions, yarn types and structural parameters of the woven fabrics. As a result, a production process of textile materials with comfortable and dedicated X-ray absorption properties is established. It offers a promising opportunity for manufacturing of specialized textiles, working clothes or uniforms applicable for medicine, air craft and security personal, mining as well as for innovative composite materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of cellulosic

  16. Real-time measurement of materials properties at high temperatures by laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong W.

    1990-01-01

    Determination of elemental composition and thermophysical properties of materials at high temperatures, as visualized in the context of containerless materials processing in a microgravity environment, presents a variety of unusual requirements owing to the thermal hazards and interferences from electromagnetic control fields. In addition, such information is intended for process control applications and thus the measurements must be real time in nature. A new technique is described which was developed for real time, in-situ determination of the elemental composition of molten metallic alloys such as specialty steel. The technique is based on time-resolved spectroscopy of a laser produced plasma (LPP) plume resulting from the interaction of a giant laser pulse with a material target. The sensitivity and precision were demonstrated to be comparable to, or better than, the conventional methods of analysis which are applicable only to post-mortem specimens sampled from a molten metal pool. The LPP technique can be applied widely to other materials composition analysis applications. The LPP technique is extremely information rich and therefore provides opportunities for extracting other physical properties in addition to the materials composition. The case in point is that it is possible to determine thermophysical properties of the target materials at high temperatures by monitoring generation and transport of acoustic pulses as well as a number of other fluid-dynamic processes triggered by the LPP event. By manipulation of the scaling properties of the laser-matter interaction, many different kinds of flow events, ranging from shock waves to surface waves to flow induced instabilities, can be generated in a controllable manner. Time-resolved detection of these events can lead to such thermophysical quantities as volume and shear viscosities, thermal conductivity, specific heat, mass density, and others.

  17. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David K.; Penkler, David L.; Musyoka, Thommas M.; Bishop, Özlem Tastan

    2015-01-01

    Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC) clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS), a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC). JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS. PMID:26280450

  18. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David K; Penkler, David L; Musyoka, Thommas M; Bishop, Özlem Tastan

    2015-01-01

    Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC) clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS), a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC). JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS.

  19. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Brown

    Full Text Available Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS, a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC. JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS.

  20. An interactive visual testbed system for dimension reduction and clustering of large-scale high-dimensional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Hanseung; Liu, Zhicheng; Stasko, John; Park, Haesun

    2013-01-01

    Many of the modern data sets such as text and image data can be represented in high-dimensional vector spaces and have benefited from computational methods that utilize advanced computational methods. Visual analytics approaches have contributed greatly to data understanding and analysis due to their capability of leveraging humans' ability for quick visual perception. However, visual analytics targeting large-scale data such as text and image data has been challenging due to the limited screen space in terms of both the numbers of data points and features to represent. Among various computational methods supporting visual analytics, dimension reduction and clustering have played essential roles by reducing these numbers in an intelligent way to visually manageable sizes. Given numerous dimension reduction and clustering methods available, however, the decision on the choice of algorithms and their parameters becomes difficult. In this paper, we present an interactive visual testbed system for dimension reduction and clustering in a large-scale high-dimensional data analysis. The testbed system enables users to apply various dimension reduction and clustering methods with different settings, visually compare the results from different algorithmic methods to obtain rich knowledge for the data and tasks at hand, and eventually choose the most appropriate path for a collection of algorithms and parameters. Using various data sets such as documents, images, and others that are already encoded in vectors, we demonstrate how the testbed system can support these tasks.