WorldWideScience

Sample records for clusters iii velocity

  1. Velocity Bias from the Small Scale Clustering of SDSS-III BOSS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Dawson, Kyle; Skibba, Ramin A; Tinker, Jeremy L; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Schneider, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    We present the measurements and modelling of the projected and redshift-space clustering of CMASS galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 11. For a volume-limited luminous red galaxy sample in the redshift range of $0.48velocities must differ from that of the dark matter inside haloes of $\\sim 10^{13}$--$10^{14}h^{-1}{\\rm M_{\\odot}}$, i.e. the data require the existence of galaxy velocity bias. Most notably, central galaxies on average are not at rest with respect to the core of their host haloes (defined by the inner 25% of particles around the halo potential minimum), but rather move around it with a 1D veloci...

  2. Internal kinematics of spiral galaxies in distant clusters III. Velocity fields from FORS2/MXU spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kutdemir, E; Peletier, R F; Da Rocha, C; Kronberger, T; Kapferer, W; Schindler, S; Böhm, A; Jäger, K; Kuntschner, Harald; Verdugo, M

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We study the impact of cluster environment on the evolution of spiral galaxies by examining their structure and kinematics. Rather than two-dimensional rotation curves, we observe complete velocity fields by placing three adjacent and parallel FORS2 MXU slits on each object, yielding several emission and absorption lines. The gas velocity fields are reconstructed and decomposed into circular rotation and irregular motions using kinemetry. To quantify irregularities in the gas kinematics, we define three parameters: sigma_{PA} (standard deviation of the kinematic position angle), Delta phi (the average misalignment between kinematic and photometric position angles) and k_{3,5} (squared sum of the higher order Fourier terms). Using local, undistorted galaxies from SINGS, these can be used to establish the regularity of the gas velocity fields. Here we present the analysis of 22 distant galaxies in the MS0451.6-0305 field with 11 members at z=0.54. In this sample we find both field (4 out of 8) and cl...

  3. Internal kinematics of spiral galaxies in distant clusters - III. Velocity fields from FORS2/MXU spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutdemir, E.; Ziegler, B. L.; Peletier, R. F.; Da Rocha, C.; Kronberger, T.; Kapferer, W.; Schindler, S.; Boehm, A.; Jaeger, K.; Kuntschner, H.; Verdugo, M.

    2008-01-01

    Context. We continue our investigation on how the cluster environment affects the evolution of galaxies. Aims. By examining both galaxy structure and internal kinematics of cluster galaxies at lookback times of similar to 5 Gyr we study the nature and impact of possible interactions at the peak epoc

  4. Internal kinematics of spiral galaxies in distant clusters - III. Velocity fields from FORS2/MXU spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutdemir, E.; Ziegler, B. L.; Peletier, R. F.; Da Rocha, C.; Kronberger, T.; Kapferer, W.; Schindler, S.; Boehm, A.; Jaeger, K.; Kuntschner, H.; Verdugo, M.

    2008-01-01

    Context. We continue our investigation on how the cluster environment affects the evolution of galaxies. Aims. By examining both galaxy structure and internal kinematics of cluster galaxies at lookback times of similar to 5 Gyr we study the nature and impact of possible interactions at the peak epoc

  5. Ca II Triplet Spectroscopy of Small Magellanic Cloud Red Giants. III. Abundances and Velocities for a Sample of 14 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, M C; Clariá, J J; Villanova, S; Marcionni, N; Sarajedini, A; Grocholski, A J

    2015-01-01

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the CaII lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km/s, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at -1.1 and -0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from CaT spectra of a lar...

  6. CA II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. III. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF 14 CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Marcionni, N. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grocholski, A. J., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: nmarcionni@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: svillanova@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s{sup −1}, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at −1.1 and −0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age–metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  7. The Norma cluster (ACO3627) -- III. The Distance and Peculiar Velocity via the Near-Infrared Ks-band Fundamental Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Mutabazi, T; Woudt, P A; Lucey, J R; Jarrett, T H; Bilicki, M; Schroder, A C; Moore, S A W

    2014-01-01

    While Norma (ACO3627) is the richest cluster in the Great Attractor (GA) region, its role in the local dynamics is poorly understood. The Norma cluster has a mean redshift (z_CMB) of 0.0165 and has been proposed as the "core" of the GA. We have used the Ks-band Fundamental Plane (FP) to measure Norma cluster's distance with respect to the Coma cluster. We report FP photometry parameters (effective radii and surface brightnesses), derived from ESO NTT SOFI images, and velocity dispersions, from AAT 2dF spectroscopy, for 31 early-type galaxies in the cluster. For the Coma cluster we use 2MASS images and SDSS velocity dispersion measurements for 121 early-type galaxies to generate the calibrating FP dataset. For the combined Norma-Coma sample we measure FP coefficients of a=1.465+/-0.059 and b=0.326+/-0.020. We find an rms scatter, in log(sigma) of 0.08 dex which corresponds to a distance uncertainty of 28% per galaxy. The zero point offset between Norma's and Coma's FPs is 0.154+\\-0.014 dex. Assuming that the C...

  8. POTENT Reconstruction from Mark III Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, A.; Eldar, A.; Kolatt, T.; Yahil, A.; Willick, J. A.; Faber, S. M.; Courteau, S.; Burstein, D.

    1999-09-01

    We present an improved version of the POTENT method for reconstructing the cosmological velocity and mass density fields from radial peculiar velocities, test it with mock catalogs, and apply it to the Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities. The method is improved in several ways: (1) the inhomogeneous Malmquist bias is reduced by grouping and corrected statistically in either forward or inverse analyses of inferred distances, (2) the smoothing into a radial velocity field is optimized such that window and sampling biases are reduced, (3) the density field is derived from the velocity field using an improved weakly nonlinear approximation in Eulerian space, and (4) the computational errors are made negligible compared to the other errors. The method is carefully tested and optimized using realistic mock catalogs based on an N-body simulation that mimics our cosmological neighborhood, and the remaining systematic and random errors are evaluated quantitatively. The Mark III catalog, with ~3300 grouped galaxies, allows a reliable reconstruction with fixed Gaussian smoothing of 10-12 h-1 Mpc out to ~60 h-1 Mpc and beyond in some directions. We present maps of the three-dimensional velocity and mass-density fields and the corresponding errors. The typical systematic and random errors in the density fluctuations inside 40 h-1 Mpc are +/-0.13 and +/-0.18 (for Ω=1). In its gross features, the recovered mass distribution resembles the galaxy distribution in redshift surveys and the mass distribution in a similar POTENT analysis of a complementary velocity catalog (SFI), including such features as the Great Attractor, Perseus-Pisces, and the large void in between. The reconstruction inside ~40 h-1 Mpc is not affected much by a revised calibration of the distance indicators (VM2, tailored to match the velocities from the IRAS 1.2 Jy redshift survey). The volume-weighted bulk velocity within the sphere of radius 50 h-1 Mpc about the Local Group is V50=370+/-110 km s-1

  9. Calibrating the Planck Cluster Mass Scale with Cluster Velocity Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Stefania; Mei, Simona; Stanford, Spencer A.; Bartlett, James G.; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Lawrence, Charles R.; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Shim, Hyunjin; Marleau, Francine; Stern, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We measure the Planck cluster mass bias using dynamical mass measurements based on velocity dispersions of a subsample of 17 Planck-detected clusters. The velocity dispersions were calculated using redshifts determined from spectra that were obtained at the Gemini observatory with the GMOS multi-object spectrograph. We correct our estimates for effects due to finite aperture, Eddington bias, and correlated scatter between velocity dispersion and the Planck mass proxy. The result for the mass bias parameter, (1-b), depends on the value of the galaxy velocity bias, {b}{{v}}, adopted from simulations: (1-b)=(0.51+/- 0.09){b}{{v}}3. Using a velocity bias of {b}{{v}}=1.08 from Munari et al., we obtain (1-b)=0.64+/- 0.11, i.e., an error of 17% on the mass bias measurement with 17 clusters. This mass bias value is consistent with most previous weak-lensing determinations. It lies within 1σ of the value that is needed to reconcile the Planck cluster counts with the Planck primary cosmic microwave background constraints. We emphasize that uncertainty in the velocity bias severely hampers the precision of the measurements of the mass bias using velocity dispersions. On the other hand, when we fix the Planck mass bias using the constraints from Penna-Lima et al., based on weak-lensing measurements, we obtain a positive velocity bias of {b}{{v}}≳ 0.9 at 3σ .

  10. Velocity Structure Diagnostics of Simulated Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Biffi, Veronica; Boehringer, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Gas motions in the hot intracluster medium of galaxy clusters have an important effect on the mass determination of the clusters through X-ray observations. The corresponding dynamical pressure has to be accounted for in addition to the hydrostatic pressure support to achieve a precise mass measurement. An analysis of the velocity structure of the ICM for simulated cluster-size haloes, especially focusing on rotational patterns, has been performed, demonstrating them to be an intermittent phenomenon, strongly related to the internal dynamics of substructures. We find that the expected build-up of rotation due to mass assembly gets easily destroyed by passages of gas-rich substructures close to the central region. Though, if a typical rotation pattern is established, the corresponding mass contribution is estimated to be up to ~17% of the total mass in the innermost region, and one has to account for it. Extending the analysis to a larger sample of simulated haloes we statistically observe that (i) the distrib...

  11. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  12. Galaxy Cluster Bulk Flows and Collision Velocities in QUMOND

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Harley; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G W

    2013-01-01

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {\\Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain about 1000 km/s by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {\\Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {\\Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for 'pink elephants' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  13. The Luminosity of Population III Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    DeSouza, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e., with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using 2+1D nonaxisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disk (i.e., $M_{\\rm disk} / M_{*} \\gtrsim 0.1$), whose evolution we follow for a further 30--40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disk. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of $10^6\\,\\LSun$. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5--10${\\times}$ greater th...

  14. Velocity dispersions and X-ray temperatures of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M; Biviano, A

    1995-01-01

    Using a large and well-controlled sample of clusters of galaxies, we investigate the relation between cluster velocity dispersions and X-ray temperatures of intra-cluster gas. In order to obtain a reliable estimate of the total velocity dispersion of a cluster, independent of the level of anisotropies in galaxy orbits, we analyze the integrated velocity dispersion profiles over increasing distances from the cluster centers. Distortions in the velocity fields, the effect of close clusters, the presence of substructures, and the presence of a population of (spiral) galaxies not in virial equilibrium with the cluster potential are taken into account. Using our final sample of 37 clusters, for which a reliable estimate of the velocity dispersion could be obtained, we derive a relation between the velocity dispersions and the X-ray temperatures, with a scatter reduced by more than 30 % with respect to previous works. A chi square fit to the temperature-velocity dispersion relation does not exclude the hypothesis t...

  15. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90 - III. Cluster parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    The open cluster Berkeley 90 is the home to one of the most massive binary systems in the Galaxy, LS III +46°11, formed by two identical, very massive stars (O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*), and a second early-O system (LS III +46°12 with an O4.5 IV((f)) component at least). Stars with spectral types earlier than O4 are very scarce in the Milky Way, with no more than 20 examples. The formation of such massive stars is still an open question today, and thus the study of the environments where the most massive stars are found can shed some light on this topic. To this aim, we determine the properties and characterize the population of Berkeley 90 using optical, near-infrared and WISE photometry and optical spectroscopy. This is the first determination of these parameters with accuracy. We find a distance of 3.5^{+0.5}_{-0.5} kpc and a maximum age of 3 Ma. The cluster mass is around 1000 M⊙ (perhaps reaching 1500 M⊙ if the surrounding population is added), and we do not detect candidate runaway stars in the area. There is a second population of young stars to the southeast of the cluster that may have formed at the same time or slightly later, with some evidence for low-activity ongoing star formation.

  16. Synthetic Stellar Clusters for Pop III

    CERN Document Server

    Raimondo, G; Cassisi, S; Castellani, V

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results of an incoming theoretical work concerning the integrated properties of the Population III clusters of stars. On the basis of synthetic Color-Magnitude Diagrams, we provide a grid of optical and near-IR colors of Simple Stellar Populations with very low metallicity (Z=10$^{-10}$ and Z=10$^{-6}$) and age which spans from 10 Myr to 15 Gyr. A comparison with higher metallicities up to 0.006 is also shown, disclosing sizable differences in the CMD morphology, integrated colors and Spectral Energy Distribution (SED).

  17. Using cluster analysis to organize and explore regional GPS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert W.; Thatcher, Wayne; Savage, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers a simple visual exploratory tool for the initial investigation of regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations, which are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, can be subjective and is often guided by the distribution of known faults. To illustrate our method, we apply cluster analysis to GPS velocities from the San Francisco Bay Region, California, to search for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence of block-like behavior. The clustering process identifies four robust groupings of velocities that we identify with four crustal blocks. Although the analysis uses no prior geologic information other than the GPS velocities, the cluster/block boundaries track three major faults, both locked and creeping.

  18. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. III. Cluster parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    The open cluster Berkeley 90 is the home to one of the most massive binary systems in the Galaxy, LS III +46$^{\\circ}$11, formed by two identical, very massive stars (O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*), and a second early-O system (LS III +46$^{\\circ}$12 with an O4.5 IV((f)) component at least). Stars with spectral types earlier than O4 are very scarce in the Milky Way, with no more than 20 examples. The formation of such massive stars is still an open question today, and thus the study of the environments where the most massive stars are found can shed some light on this topic. To this aim, we determine the properties and characterize the population of Berkeley 90 using optical, near-infrared and WISE photometry and optical spectroscopy. This is the first determination of these parameters with accuracy. We find a distance of $3.5^{+0.5}_{-0.5}$ kpc and a maximum age of 3 Ma. The cluster mass is around $1000$ $M_{\\odot}$ (perhaps reaching $1500$ $M_{\\odot}$ if the surrounding population is added), and we do not detect cand...

  19. Characterization of the velocity anisotropy of accreted globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Sills, A.; Miholics, M.

    2017-10-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are believed to have formed in situ in the Galaxy as well as in dwarf galaxies later accreted on to the Milky Way. However, to date, there is no unambiguous signature to distinguish accreted GCs. Using specifically designed N-body simulations of GCs evolving in a variety of time-dependent tidal fields (describing the potential of a dwarf galaxy-Milky Way merger), we analyse the effects imprinted on the internal kinematics of an accreted GC. In particular, we look at the evolution of the velocity anisotropy. Our simulations show that at early phases, the velocity anisotropy is determined by the tidal field of the dwarf galaxy and subsequently the clusters will adapt to the new tidal environment, losing any signature of their original environment in a few relaxation times. At 10 Gyr, GCs exhibit a variety of velocity anisotropy profiles, namely, isotropic velocity distribution in the inner regions and either isotropy or radial/tangential anisotropy in the intermediate and outer regions. Independent of an accreted origin, the velocity anisotropy primarily depends on the strength of the tidal field cumulatively experienced by a cluster. Tangentially anisotropic clusters correspond to systems that have experienced stronger tidal fields and are characterized by higher tidal filling factor, r50/rj ≳ 0.17, higher mass-loss ≳ 60 per cent and relaxation times trel ≲ 109 Gyr. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the presence of tidal tails can significantly contaminate the measurements of velocity anisotropy when a cluster is observed in projection. Our characterization of the velocity anisotropy profiles in different tidal environments provides a theoretical benchmark for the interpretation of the unprecedented amount of three-dimensional kinematic data progressively available for Galactic GCs.

  20. Clustering of GPS velocities in the Mojave Block, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    We find subdivisions within the Mojave Block using cluster analysis to identify groupings in the velocities observed at GPS stations there. The clusters are represented on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. The most significant representation as judged by the gap test involves 4 clusters within the Mojave Block. The fault systems bounding the clusters from east to west are 1) the faults defining the eastern boundary of the Northeast Mojave Domain extended southward to connect to the Hector Mine rupture, 2) the Calico-Paradise fault system, 3) the Landers-Blackwater fault system, and 4) the Helendale-Lockhart fault system. This division of the Mojave Block is very similar to that proposed by Meade and Hager. However, no cluster boundary coincides with the Garlock Fault, the northern boundary of the Mojave Block. Rather, the clusters appear to continue without interruption from the Mojave Block north into the southern Walker Lane Belt, similar to the continuity across the Garlock Fault of the shear zone along the Blackwater-Little Lake fault system observed by Peltzer et al. Mapped traces of individual faults in the Mojave Block terminate within the block and do not continue across the Garlock Fault [Dokka and Travis, ].

  1. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies. III: Beyond Bimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E.; Ciccone, Stephanie M.; Eadie, Gwendolyn M.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Geisler, Douglas; Rothberg, Barry; Bailin, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    We present new deep photometry of the rich globular cluster (GC) systems around the Brightest Cluster Galaxies UGC 9799 (Abell 2052) and UGC 10143 (Abell 2147), obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS and WFC3 cameras. For comparison, we also present new reductions of similar HST/ACS data for the Coma supergiants NGC 4874 and 4889. All four of these galaxies have huge cluster populations (to the radial limits of our data, comprising from 12,000 to 23,000 clusters per galaxy). The metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of the GCs can still be matched by a bimodal-Gaussian form where the metal-rich and metal-poor modes are separated by ≃ 0.8 dex, but the internal dispersions of each mode are so large that the total MDF becomes very broad and nearly continuous from [Fe/H] ≃ ‑2.4 to solar. There are, however, significant differences between galaxies in the relative numbers of metal-rich clusters, suggesting that they underwent significantly different histories of mergers with massive gas-rich halos. Last, the proportion of metal-poor GCs rises especially rapidly outside projected radii R≳ 4 {R}{eff}, suggesting the importance of accreted dwarf satellites in the outer halo. Comprehensive models for the formation of GCs as part of the hierarchical formation of their parent galaxies will be needed to trace the systematic change in structure of the MDF with galaxy mass, from the distinctly bimodal form in smaller galaxies up to the broad continuum that we see in the very largest systems.

  2. Whistler Waves Driven by Anisotropic Strahl Velocity Distributions: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, A.F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Observed properties of the strahl using high resolution 3D electron velocity distribution data obtained from the Cluster/PEACE experiment are used to investigate its linear stability. An automated method to isolate the strahl is used to allow its moments to be computed independent of the solar wind core+halo. Results show that the strahl can have a high temperature anisotropy (T(perpindicular)/T(parallell) approximately > 2). This anisotropy is shown to be an important free energy source for the excitation of high frequency whistler waves. The analysis suggests that the resultant whistler waves are strong enough to regulate the electron velocity distributions in the solar wind through pitch-angle scattering

  3. The globular cluster system of NGC1316. III. Kinematic complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, Tom; Kumar, Brijesh; Bassino, Lilia P; Gomez, Matias; Dirsch, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The merger remnant NGC 1316 (Fornax A) is one of the most important objects regarding the investigation of merger-related processes. We use kinematical data of globular clusters (GCs) and the diffuse stellar light to investigate the global structure of NGC 1316 and to constrain the dark matter content. We perform multi-object-spectroscopy with VLT/FORS2 and MXU. Out of 562 slits, we extract radial velocities for 177 GCs. Moreover, we measure radial velocities of the integrated galaxy light, using slits with a sufficiently bright "sky". To these data, we add 20 cluster velocities from Goudfrooij et al. (2001). In an appendix, we identify new morphological features of NGC 1316 and its companion galaxy NGC 1317. The GC sample based on radial velocities confirms the colour peaks already found in our photometric study. The bright clusters, which probably have their origin in a 2 Gyr-old starburst and younger star formation events, avoid the systemic velocity. A Gaussian velocity distribution is found only for clus...

  4. Fullerene Molecules and Other Clusters of III-V Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Ajit; Auxier, John, II; Lucero, Melinda

    2010-03-01

    The goal of the our work is to derive geometries of fullerene-like cages and other clusters of atoms from groups III and V of the periodic table. Our previous research focused on Carbon Fullerenes and on GanAsn clusters (n = 1 thru 12). Our research group has made an original discovery about GanAsn clusters. In our work on nanotechnology to date, we used the hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry to derive the different geometries for the clusters of interest. We also calculated binding energies, bond-lengths, ionization potentials, electron affinities and HOMO-LUMO gaps, and IR spectra for these geometries. Of particular significance was the magic number for GaAs cluster stability that we found at n = 8. This is important because materials containing controlled III-V nanostructures provide the capability of preparing new classes of materials with enhanced optical, magnetic, chemical sensor and photo-catalytic properties. The second phase of the investigation will examine the effects of confinement on the optical properties the clusters. It will be interesting to observe novel linear as well as nonlinear optical processes in them. The third phase of the investigation will focus on the improved design of solar cells based on the optical properties of the clusters.

  5. Dwarf Galaxies in the Coma Cluster: I. Velocity Dispersion Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kourkchi, E; Carter, D; Karick, A M; Mármol-Queraltó, E; Chiboucas, K; Tully, R B; Mobasher, B; Guzmán, R; Matković, A; Gruel, N

    2011-01-01

    We present the study of a large sample of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster observed with DEIMOS on the Keck II to determine their internal velocity dispersion. We focus on a subsample of 41 member dwarf elliptical galaxies for which the velocity dispersion can be reliably measured, 26 of which were studied for the first time. The magnitude range of our sample is $-21velocity dispersion and their error estimates. The measurements were performed using {\\it pPXF (penalised PiXel Fitting)} and using the Calcium triplet absorption lines. We use Monte Carlo bootstrapping to study various sources of uncertainty in our measurements, namely statistical uncertainty, template mismatch and other systematics. We find that the main source of uncertainty is the template mismatch effect which is reduced by using templates with a range of spectral types. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we study the Faber-Jackson...

  6. Space Velocities of Southern Globular Clusters VI. Nine Clusters in the Inner Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I; Korchagin, Vladimir I; van Altena, William F; Lopez, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    (abridged) We have measured the absolute proper motions of nine low-latitude, inner Galaxy globular clusters, namely NGC 6273 (M 19), NGC 6284, NGC 6287, NGC 6293, NGC 6333 (M 9), NGC 6342, NGC 6356, NGC 6388 and NGC 6441. These are the first determinations ever made for these clusters. The proper motions are on the ICRS via Hipparcos. The proper-motion errors range between 0.4 and 0.9 mas/yr, and are dominated by the number of measurable cluster members in these regions which are very crowded by the bulge/bar and the thick disk. This samle contains five metal poor ([Fe/H < -1.0) and four metal rich clusters; seven clusters are located within 4 kpc from the Galactic center, while the remaining two, namely NGC 6356 and NGC 6284 are in the background of the bulge at 7.5 kpc from the Galactic center. By combining proper motions with radial velocities and distances from the literature we derive 3D velocities. In a number of cases, distance uncertainties make the kinematical classification ambiguous. The two me...

  7. Velocity Dispersions of CNOC Clusters and the Evolution of the Cluster Abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Borgani, S; Carlberg, R G; Yee, H K C; Ellingson, E

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the internal velocity dispersions, interlopers removal algorithm, which is different from that originally applied by Carlberg et al. (1996, C96). We find that the resulting \\sigma_v values are consistent within <10% with the original C96 estimates. This result points in favor of a substantial robustness of currently applied methods for optical studies of the internal cluster dynamics. The resulting distribution of velocity dispersions is used to trace the redshift evolution of the cluster abundance with the aim of constraining the matter density parameter, Ømega_m. We find that constraints on Ømega_m are very sensitive to the adopted value of from 0.5 to 0.6 (for Omega_m=1), the best fitting Omega_m varies in the range 0.3-1.0.

  8. WIYN Open Cluster Study XXXII: Stellar Radial Velocities in the Old Open Cluster NGC 188

    CERN Document Server

    Geller, Aaron M; Harris, Hugh C; McClure, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) We present the results of our ongoing radial-velocity (RV) survey of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188. Our WIYN 3.5m data set spans a time baseline of 11 years, a magnitude range of 12<=V<=16.5 (1.18-0.94 MSun), and a 1 deg. diameter region on the sky. With the addition of a Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) data set we extend our bright limit to V = 10.8 and, for some stars, extend our time baseline to 35 years. Our magnitude limits include solar-mass main-sequence stars, subgiants, giants, and blue stragglers (BSs), and our spatial coverage extends radially to 17 pc (~13 core radii). For the WIYN data we find a measurement precision of 0.4 km/s for narrow-lined stars. We have measured RVs for 1046 stars in the direction of NGC 188, finding 473 to be likely cluster members. We detect 124 velocity-variable cluster members, all of which are likely to be dynamically hard-binary stars. Using our single member stars, we find an average cluster RV of -42.36 +/- 0.04 km/s. We use our pre...

  9. Optical Spectroscopy and Velocity Dispersions of Galaxy Clusters from the SPT-SZ Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, J; Bayliss, M; Brodwin, M; Foley, R J; Stalder, B; Aird, K A; Armstrong, R; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chapman, S C; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Forman, W R; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Nurgaliev, D; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Šuhada, R; Spieler, H G; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2013-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of galaxies in clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We report our own measurements of $61$ spectroscopic cluster redshifts, and $48$ velocity dispersions each calculated with more than $15$ member galaxies. This catalog also includes $19$ dispersions of SPT-observed clusters previously reported in the literature. The majority of the clusters in this paper are SPT-discovered; of these, most have been previously reported in other SPT cluster catalogs, and five are reported here as SPT discoveries for the first time. By performing a resampling analysis of galaxy velocities, we find that unbiased velocity dispersions can be obtained from a relatively small number of member galaxies ($\\lesssim 30$), but with increased systematic scatter. We use this analysis to determine statistical confidence intervals that include the effect of membership selection. We fit scaling relations between the observed cluster velocity dispersio...

  10. Blue stragglers in open clusters. III. NGC 7789

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberner, D.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Drilling, J. S.

    2001-02-01

    We performed for the first time a detailed LTE spectroscopic study of a sample of blue straggler stars in the moderately old open cluster NGC 7789. For eight stars the parameters and abundances of several elements were determined. The cluster members show a remarkable surface magnesium deficiency which is quite unusual for late B - early A stars. Iron and titanium abundances are in agreement with other photometric and spectroscopic estimates of the NGC 7789 metallicity. All the confirmed blue stragglers have rather low projected rotational velocities (with one exception for K88, vsin i = 80 km s-1). Based on the spectra collected at Kitt Peak National Observatory, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation, and at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Plank Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy.}

  11. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. I. Classification and radial velocity for 76 candidate clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2006-09-01

    Aims.We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M 31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M 31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. Methods: .We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy (λ/Δλ ≃ 800-1300) for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-be-confirmed candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M 31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~± 20 km s-1. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. Results: .In our set of 76 candidate clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M 31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foreground Galactic stars, 2 Hii regions belonging to M 31 and 3 unclassified (possibly M 31 clusters or foreground stars) objects. The classification of a few other candidates not included in our survey has been also reassessed on various observational bases. All the sources of radial velocity estimates for M 31 known globular clusters available in the literature have been compared and checked, and a homogeneous general list has been obtained for 349 confirmed clusters with radial velocity. Conclusions: .Our results suggest that a significant number of genuine clusters (≳100) is still hidden among the plethora of known candidates proposed by various authors. Hence our knowledge of the globular cluster system of the M 31 galaxy is still far from complete even in terms of simple membership.

  12. Velocity segregation effects in galaxy clusters at 0.4<~z<~1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Barsanti, S; Biviano, A; Borgani, S; Annunziatella, M; Nonino, M

    2016-01-01

    Our study is meant to extend our knowledge of the galaxy color and luminosity segregation in velocity space (VCS and VLS, resp.), to clusters at intermediate and high redshift. Our sample is a collection of 41 clusters in the 0.4=0.8. For the first time, we detect VLS in non-local clusters and confirm that VLS only affects the very luminous galaxies, with brighter galaxies having lower velocities. The threshold magnitude of VLS is ~m3+0.5, where m3 is the magnitude of the third brightest cluster galaxy, and current data suggest that the threshold value moves to fainter magnitudes at higher redshift. We also detect (marginal) evidence of VLS for blue galaxies. We conclude that the segregation effects, when their study is extended to distant clusters, can be important tracers of the galaxy evolution and cluster assembly and discuss the poor/no evidence of VCS at high redshift.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 76 M31 candidate clusters (Galleti+, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2006-06-01

    We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-be-confirmed candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~+/-20Km/s. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. In our set of 76 candidate clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foreground Galactic stars, 2 HII regions belonging to M31 and 3 unclassified (possibly M31 clusters or foreground stars) objects. The classification of a few other candidates not included in our survey has been also reassessed on various observational bases. All the sources of radial velocity estimates for M31 known globular clusters available in the literature have been compared and checked, and a homogeneous general list has been obtained for 349 confirmed clusters with radial velocity. Our results suggest that a significant number of genuine clusters (~>100) is still hidden among the plethora of known candidates proposed by various authors. Hence our knowledge of the globular cluster system of the M31 galaxy is still far from complete even in terms of simple membership. (1 data file).

  14. Synthesis of supramolecular iron (III) complexes by cluster aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Elisa Joy

    2000-12-01

    Biologically, iron is a ubiquitous and versatile metal, found in the active sites of proteins responsible for both oxygen and electron transport. Multinuclear iron-oxo proteins are either dinuclear, or contain many iron atoms; the [Fe2O] unit occurs in hemerythrin (Hr), ribonucleotide reductase, purple acid phosphatase (POP) and methane monooxygenase (MMO), whereas ferritin (Ft) can store up to 4500 iron atoms. Iron storage and transport are essential for protecting biological organisms from free iron, since free Fe(II) ions, will react with dioxygen to form destructive organic radicals, and free Fe(III) ions form insoluble iron hydroxide aggregates under physiological conditions. The tendency of iron to form molecular aggregates in systems containing water or alcohol, together with the fact that each iron atom possesses a large number of unpaired electrons (5 for high-spin FeIII) often results in products possessing large spin ground states (S). The current record-holder for iron is a Fe19 complex, with at least 33 unpaired electrons in the ground state (S = 33/2). Hence, iron is also important in the rapidly developing field of molecular magnetic materials. For these two reasons, the preparation of iron clusters with new topologies and properties has become a major goal of many synthetic inorganic groups, including our own. In this thesis work, synthetic and spectroscopic methods of inorganic coordination chemistry were used to achieve two different goals: firstly, to synthesize dinuclear iron complexes with the use of tetradentate ligands in order to study the magnetic interactions between the two metal centers; and secondly, to identify reactions and characterize the products whereby pre-formed iron oxide clusters undergo aggregation reactions to produce higher nuclearity products. The tetradentate ligands investigated were a bis-(beta-diketone) ligand L and a bis-bpy ligand L'. The reactions involving L and Fe(III) reagents produced complexes with a triple

  15. Optical spectroscopy and velocity dispersions of galaxy clusters from the SPT-SZ survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruel, J.; Bayliss, M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 München (Germany); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Armstrong, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bautz, M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A., E-mail: mbayliss@cfa.harvard.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of galaxies in clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We report our own measurements of 61 spectroscopic cluster redshifts, and 48 velocity dispersions each calculated with more than 15 member galaxies. This catalog also includes 19 dispersions of SPT-observed clusters previously reported in the literature. The majority of the clusters in this paper are SPT-discovered; of these, most have been previously reported in other SPT cluster catalogs, and five are reported here as SPT discoveries for the first time. By performing a resampling analysis of galaxy velocities, we find that unbiased velocity dispersions can be obtained from a relatively small number of member galaxies (≲ 30), but with increased systematic scatter. We use this analysis to determine statistical confidence intervals that include the effect of membership selection. We fit scaling relations between the observed cluster velocity dispersions and mass estimates from SZ and X-ray observables. In both cases, the results are consistent with the scaling relation between velocity dispersion and mass expected from dark-matter simulations. We measure a ∼30% log-normal scatter in dispersion at fixed mass, and a ∼10% offset in the normalization of the dispersion-mass relation when compared to the expectation from simulations, which is within the expected level of systematic uncertainty.

  16. Calix[4]arene supported clusters: a dimer of [Mn(III)Mn(II)] dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D; Beavers, Christine M;

    2011-01-01

    Phosphinate ligands allow for the transformation of a calix[4]arene supported [Mn(III)(2)Mn(II)(2)] tetramer cluster motif into an unusual [Mn(III)Mn(II)](2) dimer of dimers; the clusters self-assemble in the crystal to form bi-layer arrays reminiscent of the typical packing of calixarene solvates....

  17. Velocity fluctuations and population distribution in clusters of settling particles at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Boschan, A; Annichini, M; Gauthier, G

    2016-01-01

    A study on the spatial organization and velocity fluctuations of non Brownian spherical particles settling at low Reynolds number in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell is reported. The particle volume fraction ranged from 0.005 to 0.05, while the distance between cell plates ranged from 5 to 15 times the particle radius. Particle tracking revealed that particles were not uniformly distributed in space but assembled in transient settling clusters. The population distribution of these clusters followed an exponential law. The measured velocity fluctuations are in agreement with that predicted theoretically for spherical clusters, from the balance between the apparent weight and the drag force. This result suggests that particle clustering, more than a spatial distribution of particles derived from random and independent events, is at the origin of the velocity fluctuations.

  18. Tangential Velocity of the Dark Matter in the Bullet Cluster from Precise Lensed Image Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zitrin, Adi; Rephaeli, Yoel; Shimon, Meir

    2013-09-01

    We show that the fast-moving component of the "Bullet Cluster" (1E0657-56) can induce potentially resolvable redshift differences between multiply lensed images of background galaxies. This moving cluster effect, due to the tangential peculiar velocity of the lens, can be expressed as the scalar product of the lensing deflection angle with the tangential velocity of the mass components; the effect is maximal for clusters colliding in the plane of the sky with velocities boosted by their mutual gravity. The Bullet Cluster is likely to be the best candidate for the first measurement of this effect due to the large collision velocity and because the lensing deflection and the cluster fields can be calculated in advance. We derive the deflection field using multiply lensed background galaxies detected with the Hubble Space Telescope. The velocity field is modeled using self-consistent N-body/hydrodynamical simulations constrained by the observed X-ray and gravitational lensing features of this system. We predict that the triply lensed images of systems "G" and "H" straddling the critical curve of the bullet component will show the largest frequency shifts up to ~0.5 km s-1. These shifts are within the range of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array for molecular emission, and are near the resolution limit of the new generation high-throughput optical-IR spectrographs. The detection of this effect measures the tangential motion of the subclusters directly, thereby clarifying the tension with ΛCDM, which is inferred from the gas motion less directly. This method may be extended to smaller redshift differences using the Lyα forest toward QSOs lensed by more typical clusters of galaxies. More generally, the tangential component of the peculiar velocities of clusters derived by our method complements the radial component determined by the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, providing a full three-dimensional description of velocities.

  19. IN-SYNC. III. THE DYNAMICAL STATE OF IC 348—A SUPER-VIRIAL VELOCITY DISPERSION AND A PUZZLING SIGN OF CONVERGENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Covey, Kevin R. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Foster, Jonathan B. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C.; Rio, Nicola da [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Nidever, David L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steve; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Flaherty, Kevin M. [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Frinchaboy, Peter M., E-mail: MichielCottaar@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Most field stars will have encountered the highest stellar density and hence the largest number of interactions in their birth environment. Yet the stellar dynamics during this crucial phase are poorly understood. Here we analyze the radial velocities measured for 152 out of 380 observed stars in the 2–6 Myr old star cluster IC 348 as part of the SDSS-III APOGEE. The radial velocity distribution of these stars is fitted with one or two Gaussians, convolved with the measurement uncertainties including binary orbital motions. Including a second Gaussian improves the fit; the high-velocity outliers that are best fit by this second component may either (1) be contaminants from the nearby Perseus OB2 association, (2) be a halo of ejected or dispersing stars from IC 348, or (3) reflect that IC 348 has not relaxed to a Gaussian velocity distribution. We measure a velocity dispersion for IC 348 of 0.72 ± 0.07 km s{sup −1} (or 0.64 ± 0.08 km s{sup −1} if two Gaussians are fitted), which implies a supervirial state, unless the gas contributes more to the gravitational potential than expected. No evidence is found for a dependence of this velocity dispersion on distance from the cluster center or stellar mass. We also find that stars with lower extinction (in the front of the cloud) tend to be redshifted compared with stars with somewhat higher extinction (toward the back of the cloud). This data suggest that the stars in IC 348 are converging along the line of sight. We show that this correlation between radial velocity and extinction is unlikely to be spuriously caused by the small cluster rotation of 0.024 ± 0.013 km s{sup −1} arcmin{sup −1} or by correlations between the radial velocities of neighboring stars. This signature, if confirmed, will be the first detection of line of sight convergence in a star cluster. Possible scenarios for reconciling this convergence with IC 348's observed supervirial state include: (a) the cluster is fluctuating around a

  20. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. I. Classification and radial velocity for 76 candidate clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Galleti, S; Bellazzini, M; Buzzoni, A; Pecci, F F

    2006-01-01

    Aims - We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M~31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M~31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. Methods - We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy (lambda/Dlambda~800-1300) for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-confirm candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~+-20km/s. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. Results - In our set of 76 candidates clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M~31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foregrou...

  1. Velocity-Resolved [Ne III] from X-Ray Irradiated Sz 102 Microjets

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Walter, Frederick M; Herczeg, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Neon emission lines are good indicators of high-excitation regions close to a young stellar system because of their high ionization potentials and large critical densities. We have discovered [Ne III]{\\lambda}3869 emission from the microjets of Sz 102, a low-mass young star in Lupus III. Spectroastrometric analyses of two-dimensional [Ne III] spectra obtained from archival high-dispersion ($R\\approx 33,000$) Very Large Telescope/UVES data suggest that the emission consists of two velocity components spatially separated by ~ 0."3, or a projected distance of ~ 60 AU. The stronger redshifted component is centered at ~ +21 km/s with a line width of ~ 140 km/s, and the weaker blueshifted component at ~ -90 km/s with a line width of ~ 190 km/s. The two components trace velocity centroids of the known microjets and show large line widths that extend across the systemic velocity, suggesting their potential origins in wide-angle winds that may eventually collimate into jets. Optical line ratios indicate that the micro...

  2. On the coherence length of large-scale peculiar velocities and gravitational clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (USA); Queen Mary College, London (England))

    1989-08-01

    If the large-scale structure in the universe is formed by gravitational clustering of less than 0 density fluctuations, the correlation function of massive objects/clusters of the clustering hierarchy would be increased over the underlying mass autocorrelation function. This means that if light traces mass, the peculiar gravitational field on the average would be stronger when measured by galaxies associated with such clusters. This in turn would lead to larger rms peculiar velocities deduced from the motions of such samples. Ellipticals are known to populate preferentially dense regions/(rich) clusters, and it is, therefore, suggested that this mechanism is responsible for the large peculiar motions observed recently by the Seven Samurai in a sample of elliptical galaxies. On the assumption that light traces mass, these and the cluster-cluster correlation function results are consistent with gravitational clustering of n of about -1 fluctuations in Omega of about 0.2 universe. It is further shown that according to the gravitational clustering theory, galaxies selected preferentially from poor groups should exhibit small rms peculiar velocities. 21 refs.

  3. Cosmology with velocity dispersion counts: an alternative to measuring cluster halo masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C. E.; McCarthy, I. G.; Baldry, I. K.; Collins, C. A.; Schaye, J.; Bird, S.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of galaxy cluster counts is a powerful probe of several fundamental cosmological parameters. A number of recent studies using this probe have claimed tension with the cosmology preferred by the analysis of the Planck primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, in the sense that there are fewer clusters observed than predicted based on the primary CMB cosmology. One possible resolution to this problem is systematic errors in the absolute halo mass calibration in cluster studies, which is required to convert the standard theoretical prediction (the halo mass function) into counts as a function of the observable (e.g. X-ray luminosity, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, and optical richness). Here we propose an alternative strategy, which is to directly compare predicted and observed cluster counts as a function of the one-dimensional velocity dispersion of the cluster galaxies. We argue that the velocity dispersion of groups/clusters can be theoretically predicted as robustly as mass but, unlike mass, it can also be directly observed, thus circumventing the main systematic bias in traditional cluster counts studies. With the aid of the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the velocity dispersion counts for discriminating even similar Λ cold dark matter models. These predictions can be compared with the results from existing redshift surveys such as the highly complete Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey, and upcoming wide-field spectroscopic surveys such as the Wide Area Vista Extragalactic Survey and the Dark Energy Survey Instrument.

  4. Radial velocities and metallicities of red giant stars in the old open cluster NGC 7762

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Villanova, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    We present and discuss radial velocity and the very first metallicity measurements for nine evolved stars in the poorly known old open cluster NGC 7762. We isolated eight radial velocity cluster members and one interloper. Radial velocities are in good agreement with previous studies. NGC 7762 turns out to be of solar metallicity within the uncertainties ([Fe/H]=0.04$\\pm$0.12). For this metallicity, the cluster age is 2.5$\\pm$0.2 Gyr, and falls in a age range where only a few old open clusters are known. With respect to previous studies, we find a larger distance, implying the cluster to be located at 900$^{+70}_{-50}$ pc from the Sun. For most of the elements we measure solar-scaled abundance ratios. We searched the literature for open clusters of similar age in the solar vicinity and found that NGC 7762 can be considered a twin of Ruprecht 147, a similar age cluster located at only 300 pc from the Sun. In fact, beside age, also metallicity and abundance ratios are very close to Ruprecht 147 values within th...

  5. Advantages and Limitations of Cluster Analysis in Interpreting Regional GPS Velocity Fields in California and Elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    Regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. Cluster analysis, a venerable data analysis method, offers a simple, visual exploratory tool for the initial organization and investigation of GPS velocities (Simpson et al., 2012 GRL). Here we describe the application of cluster analysis to GPS velocities from three regions, the Mojave Desert and the San Francisco Bay regions in California, and the Aegean in the eastern Mediterranean. Our goal is to illustrate the strengths and shortcomings of the method in searching for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence for and against block-like behavior in these 3 regions. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, is subjective and usually guided by the distribution of known faults. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities provides a completely objective method for identifying groups of observations ranging in size from 10s to 100s of km in characteristic dimension based solely on the similarities of their velocity vectors. In the three regions we have studied, statistically significant clusters are almost invariably spatially coherent, fault bounded, and coincide with elastic, geologically identified structural blocks. Often, higher order clusters that are not statistically significant are also spatially coherent, suggesting the existence of additional blocks, or defining regions of other tectonic importance (e.g. zones of localized elastic strain accumulation near locked faults). These results can be used to both formulate tentative tectonic models with testable consequences and to suggest focused new measurements in under-sampled regions. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities has several potential limitations, aside from the

  6. Cluster Analysis of Velocity Field Derived from Dense GNSS Network of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Hashimoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dense GNSS networks have been widely used to observe crustal deformation. Simpson et al. (2012) and Savage and Simpson (2013) have conducted cluster analyses of GNSS velocity field in the San Francisco Bay Area and Mojave Desert, respectively. They have successfully found velocity discontinuities. They also showed an advantage of cluster analysis for classifying GNSS velocity field. Since in western United States, strike-slip events are dominant, geometry is simple. However, the Japanese Islands are tectonically complicated due to subduction of oceanic plates. There are many types of crustal deformation such as slow slip event and large postseismic deformation. We propose a modified clustering method of GNSS velocity field in Japan to separate time variant and static crustal deformation. Our modification is performing cluster analysis every several months or years, then qualifying cluster member similarity. If a GNSS station moved differently from its neighboring GNSS stations, the station will not belong to in the cluster which includes its surrounding stations. With this method, time variant phenomena were distinguished. We applied our method to GNSS data of Japan from 1996 to 2015. According to the analyses, following conclusions were derived. The first is the clusters boundaries are consistent with known active faults. For examples, the Arima-Takatsuki-Hanaore fault system and the Shimane-Tottori segment proposed by Nishimura (2015) are recognized, though without using prior information. The second is improving detectability of time variable phenomena, such as a slow slip event in northern part of Hokkaido region detected by Ohzono et al. (2015). The last one is the classification of postseismic deformation caused by large earthquakes. The result suggested velocity discontinuities in postseismic deformation of the Tohoku-oki earthquake. This result implies that postseismic deformation is not continuously decaying proportional to distance from its epicenter.

  7. Velocity segregation effects in galaxy clusters at 0.4 ≲ z ≲ 1.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, S.; Girardi, M.; Biviano, A.; Borgani, S.; Annunziatella, M.; Nonino, M.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Our study is meant to extend our knowledge of the galaxy color and luminosity segregation in velocity space (VCS and VLS, respectively), to clusters at intermediate and high redshift. Methods: Our sample is a collection of 41 clusters in the 0.4 ≲ z ≲ 1.5 redshift range for a total of 4172 galaxies, 1674 of which are member galaxies of the clusters within 2R200 with photometric or spectroscopic information, as taken from the literature. We perform homogeneous procedures to select cluster members, compute global cluster properties, in particular the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV, and separate blue from red galaxies. Results: We find evidence of VCS in clusters out to z ≃ 0.8 (at the 97-99.99% confidence level, depending on the test), in the sense that the blue galaxy population has a 10-20% larger σV than the red galaxy population. Poor or no VCS is found in the high-z sample at z ≥ 0.8. For the first time, we detect VLS in non-local clusters and confirm that VLS only affects the very luminous galaxies; brighter galaxies have lower velocities. The threshold magnitude of VLS is m3 + 0.5, where m3 is the magnitude of the third brightest cluster galaxy. Current data suggest that the threshold value moves to fainter magnitudes at higher redshift. We also detect (marginal) evidence of VLS for blue galaxies. Conclusions: We conclude that segregation effects can be important tracers of the galaxy evolution and cluster assembly when they are studied up to distant clusters. We also discuss the evidence of VCS at high redshift, which is poor or absent.

  8. Cluster statistics and quasisoliton dynamics in microscopic optimal-velocity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Xu, Xihua; Pang, John Z. F.; Monterola, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Using the non-linear optimal velocity models as an example, we show that there exists an emergent intrinsic scale that characterizes the interaction strength between multiple clusters appearing in the solutions of such models. The interaction characterizes the dynamics of the localized quasisoliton structures given by the time derivative of the headways, and the intrinsic scale is analogous to the "charge" of the quasisolitons, leading to non-trivial cluster statistics from the random perturbations to the initial steady states of uniform headways. The cluster statistics depend both on the quasisoliton charge and the density of the traffic. The intrinsic scale is also related to an emergent quantity that gives the extremum headways in the cluster formation, as well as the coexistence curve separating the absolute stable phase from the metastable phase. The relationship is qualitatively universal for general optimal velocity models.

  9. Tangential Velocity of the Dark Matter in the Bullet Cluster from Precise Lensed Image Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Molnar, Sandor M; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zitrin, Adi; Rephaeli, Yoel; Shimon, Meir

    2013-01-01

    We show that the fast moving component of the "bullet cluster" (1E0657-56) can induce potentially resolvable redshift differences between multiply-lensed images of background galaxies. The moving cluster effect can be expressed as the scalar product of the lensing deflection angle with the tangential velocity of the mass components, and it is maximal for clusters colliding in the plane of the sky with velocities boosted by their mutual gravity. The bullet cluster is likely to be the best candidate for the first measurement of this effect due to the large collision velocity and because the lensing deflection and the cluster fields can be calculated in advance. We derive the deflection field using multiply-lensed background galaxies detected with the Hubble Space Telescope. The velocity field is modeled using self-consistent N-body/hydrodynamical simulations constrained by the observed X-ray and gravitational lensing features of this system. We predict that the triply-lensed images of systems "G" and "H" stradd...

  10. Open Cluster Radial Velocity determination from observations at Observatório Pico Dos Dias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, M. A. F.; Monteiro, H.; Dias, W. S.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2014-10-01

    In studies of the dynamics of the Galactic disk, such as the determination of the speed of the spiral pattern and the permanence of stars in the spiral arms, it is crucial to know orbits obtained from proper motions, radial velocities and the potential of the Galaxy. Aiming to improve the statistics of our catalog of open clusters, maintained by our research group, we determined the radial velocity of stars belonging to a group of open clusters using spectra with a resolution of 4000, obtained at the Pico dos Dias Observatory (LNA) with the 1.60 m telescope and the Coudé spectrograph. We observed the open cluster's member stars and calculated their radial speeds using standard techniques. The stars were selected from our own database based on relevant information concerning the clusters, obtained by statistical analysis of their proper motions and/or their position in the HR's diagram. In this work, we present the detailed analysis of the data reduction and radial velocity determination using synthetic spectra from different libraries. Finally we present the open cluster's radial (and spacial) velocities.

  11. Clustering and velocity distributions in granular gases cooling by solid friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the free evolution of granular gases. Initially, the density of particles is homogeneous and the velocity follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The system cools down due to solid friction between the granular particles. The density remains homogeneous, and the velocity distribution remains MB at early times, while the kinetic energy of the system decays with time. However, fluctuations in the density and velocity fields grow, and the system evolves via formation of clusters in the density field and the local ordering of velocity field, consistent with the onset of plug flow. This is accompanied by a transition of the velocity distribution function from MB to non-MB behavior. We used equal-time correlation functions and structure factors of the density and velocity fields to study the morphology of clustering. From the correlation functions, we obtain the cluster size, L, as a function of time, t. We show that it exhibits power law growth with L(t)∼t^{1/3}.

  12. Clustering and velocity distributions in granular gases cooling by solid friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the free evolution of granular gases. Initially, the density of particles is homogeneous and the velocity follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The system cools down due to solid friction between the granular particles. The density remains homogeneous, and the velocity distribution remains MB at early times, while the kinetic energy of the system decays with time. However, fluctuations in the density and velocity fields grow, and the system evolves via formation of clusters in the density field and the local ordering of velocity field, consistent with the onset of plug flow. This is accompanied by a transition of the velocity distribution function from MB to non-MB behavior. We used equal-time correlation functions and structure factors of the density and velocity fields to study the morphology of clustering. From the correlation functions, we obtain the cluster size, L , as a function of time, t . We show that it exhibits power law growth with L (t ) ˜t1 /3 .

  13. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  14. The Role of Molecule Clustering by Hydrogen Bond in Hydrous Ethanol on Laminar Burning Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Suarta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of hydrogen bond molecule clustering in laminar burning velocities was observed. The water in hydrous ethanol can change the interaction between water-ethanol molecules. A certain amount of water can become oxygenated which increases the burning velocity. The hydrogen bond interaction pattern of ethanol and water molecules was modeled. Based on the molecular model, azeotropic behavior emerges from ethanol-water hydrogen bond, which is at a 95.1%v composition. The interaction with water molecule causes the ethanol molecule to be clustered with centered oxygenated compound. So, it supplies extra oxygen and provides intermolecular empty spaces that are easily infiltrated by the air. In the azeotropic composition, the molecular bond chain is the shortest, so hypothetically the burning velocity is anticipated to increase. The laminar burning velocity of ethanol fuel was tested in a cylindrical explosion bomb in lean, stoichiometric, and rich mixtures. The experimental result showed that the maximum burning velocity occurred at hydrous ethanol of 95.5%v composition. This discrepancy is the result of the addition of energy from 7.7% free ethanol molecules that are not clustered. At the rich mixture, the burning velocity of this composition is higher than that of anhydrous ethanol.

  15. Velocity-resolved [Ne III] from X-ray irradiated Sz 102 microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10641, Taiwan (China); Walter, Frederick M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J. [The Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-10

    Neon emission lines are good indicators of high-excitation regions close to a young stellar system because of their high ionization potentials and large critical densities. We have discovered [Ne III] λ3869 emission from the microjets of Sz 102, a low-mass young star in Lupus III. Spectroastrometric analyses of two-dimensional [Ne III] spectra obtained from archival high-dispersion (R ≈ 33, 000) Very Large Telescope/UVES data suggest that the emission consists of two velocity components spatially separated by ∼0.''3, or a projected distance of ∼60 AU. The stronger redshifted component is centered at ∼ + 21 km s{sup –1} with a line width of ∼140 km s{sup –1}, and the weaker blueshifted component at ∼ – 90 km s{sup –1} with a line width of ∼190 km s{sup –1}. The two components trace velocity centroids of the known microjets and show large line widths that extend across the systemic velocity, suggesting their potential origins in wide-angle winds that may eventually collimate into jets. Optical line ratios indicate that the microjets are hot (T ≲ 1.6 × 10{sup 4} K) and ionized (n{sub e} ≳ 5.7 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}). The blueshifted component has ∼13% higher temperature and ∼46% higher electron density than the redshifted counterpart, forming a system of an asymmetric pair of jets. The detection of the [Ne III] λ3869 line with the distinct velocity profile suggests that the emission originates in flows that may have been strongly ionized by deeply embedded hard X-ray sources, most likely generated by magnetic processes. The discovery of [Ne III] λ3869 emission along with other optical forbidden lines from Sz 102 supports the picture of wide-angle winds surrounding magnetic loops in the close vicinity of the young star. Future high-sensitivity X-ray imaging and high angular-resolution optical spectroscopy may help confirm the picture proposed.

  16. Radial Velocities and Kinematic Membership in the Open Cluster NGC 3114

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jorge Federico; Lapasset, Emilio

    2001-05-01

    Echelle spectroscopic observations for 30 bright stars in the field of the sparse open cluster NGC 3114 are presented. The sample includes main-sequence stars, yellow and red giants, and blue straggler candidates. Radial velocities are derived by cross-correlations using high signal-to-noise ratio standard spectra as templates. The cluster mean velocity is well defined from eight giants and several main-sequence stars whose average is =-3.52+/-0.25 km s-1. The membership probabilities of the observed stars are computed on the basis of the velocity distributions of the cluster and field stars, and the expected percentage of contamination at each position. We classified 19 cluster members and 10 nonmembers; the remaining star is a known spectroscopic binary for which no membership probability was assigned. Among the members, there is a bright yellow giant, seven red giants, and four blue straggler candidates, although they should be considered as turn-off stars. The location of two of them in the color-magnitude diagram (slightly blueward of the turn-off) can be explained by their low rotational velocities. No velocity variations were detected in the 16 stars measured more than once, which indicates that NGC 3114 possess an abnormally low binary frequency. From spectral types of cluster members, a distance modulus (V-Mv)=9.8+/-0.2 mag and a reddening E(B-V)=0.07+/-0.01 mag are derived. The cluster age is estimated to be 1.6×108 yr. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  17. The observational distribution of internal velocity dispersions in nearby galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fadda, D; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M; Fadda, Dario; Girardi, Marisa; Giuricin, Giuliano; Mardirossian, Fabio; Mezzetti, Marino

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the internal velocity dispersions of a sample of 172 nearby galaxy clusters (z 800 km/s). We estimate that our distributions is complete for at least a dispersion greater than 650 km/s. In this completeness range a power law fit is in fair agreement with results coming from the X-ray temperature distributions.

  18. The Velocity Distribution Function of Galaxy Clusters as a Cosmological Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Ntampaka, M; Cisewski, J; Price, L C

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach for quantifying the abundance of galaxy clusters and constraining cosmological parameters using dynamical measurements. In the standard method, galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocities, $v$, or velocity dispersions are used to infer cluster masses, $M$, in order to quantify the halo mass function (HMF), $dn(M)/d\\log(M)$, which is strongly affected by mass measurement errors. In our new method, the probability distribution of velocities for each cluster in the sample are summed to create a new statistic called the velocity distribution function (VDF), $dn(v)/dv$. The VDF can be measured more directly and precisely than the HMF and it can also be robustly predicted with cosmological simulations which capture the dynamics of subhalos or galaxies. We apply these two methods to mock cluster catalogs and forecast the bias and constraints on the matter density parameter $\\Omega_m$ and the amplitude of matter fluctuations $\\sigma_8$ in flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmologies. For an example observation o...

  19. Velocity structure of the dwarf galaxy population in the Centaurus cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, P; Federspiel, M

    1997-01-01

    Based on the photometric survey of the inner region of the Centaurus cluster (Jerjen & Dressler 1997a) we measured redshifts for a deep, surface brightness limited sample of galaxies using the MEFOS multifibre spectrograph at the ESO 3.6m telescope. With the new data set radial velocities for 120 centrally located cluster members become available which is equivalent to 78% of all known cluster galaxies in the region brighter than B_T=18.5. The relevant aspect of this investigation is that new redshifts for 32 dwarf galaxies have been measured, rising the total number to 48. We investigate the prominent bimodal velocity distribution of Centaurus in more detail, discussing the very different characteristics of the velocity distributions for the main Hubble types E&S0, spirals, Im&BCD, and dE&dS0. The nucleated, bright dwarf ellipticals are the only galaxies with a Gaussian-like distribution centred at 3148+/-98 km/s. The remarkable coincidence of this velocity with the mean velocity of Cen30 and...

  20. Incorporation of trinuclear lanthanide(III) hydroxo bridged clusters in macrocyclic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobyłka, Michał J; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Acebrón Rodicio, Maria; Paluch, Marta; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2013-11-18

    A cluster of lanthanide(III) or yttrium(III) ions, Ln3(μ3-OH)2, (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Yb(III), or Y(III)) can be bound in the center of a chiral macrocyclic amines H3L1(R), H3L1(S), and H3L2(S) obtained in a reduction of a 3 + 3 condensation product of (1R,2R)- or (1S,2S)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol or 2,6-diformyl-4-tertbutylphenol. X-ray crystal structures of the Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Dy(III), and Y(III) complexes reveal trinuclear complexes with Ln(III) ions bridged by the phenolate oxygen atoms of the macrocycle as well as by μ3-hydroxo bridges. In the case of the Nd(III) ion, another complex form can be obtained, whose X-ray crystal structure reveals two trinuclear macrocyclic units additionally bridged by hydroxide anions, corresponding to a [Ln3(μ3-OH)]2(μ2-OH)2 cluster encapsulated by two macrocycles. The formation of trinuclear complexes is confirmed additionally by (1)H NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS), and elemental analyses. Titrations of free macrocycles with Sm(III) or Y(III) salts and KOH also indicate that a trinuclear complex is formed in solution. On the other hand, analogous titrations with La(III) salt indicate that this kind of complex is not formed even with the excess of La(III) salt. The magnetic data for the trinuclear Gd(III) indicate weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J = -0.17 cm(-1)) between the Gd(III) ions. For the trinuclear Dy(III) and Tb(III) complexes the χ(M)T vs T plots indicate a more complicated dependence, resulting from the combination of thermal depopulation of mJ sublevels, magnetic anisotropy, and possibly weak antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions.

  1. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Open clusters are known as excellent tools for various topics in Galactic research. For example, they allow accurately tracing the chemical structure of the Galactic disc. However, the metallicity is known only for a rather low percentage of the open cluster population, and these values are based on a variety of methods and data. Therefore, a large and homogeneous sample is highly desirable. Aims: In the third part of our series we compile a large sample of homogenised open cluster metallicities using a wide variety of different sources. These data and a sample of Cepheids are used to investigate the radial metallicity gradient, age effects, and to test current models. Methods: We used photometric and spectroscopic data to derive cluster metallicities. The different sources were checked and tested for possible offsets and correlations. Results: In total, metallicities for 172 open cluster were derived. We used the spectroscopic data of 100 objects for a study of the radial metallicity distribution and the age-metallicity relation. We found a possible increase of metallicity with age, which, if confirmed, would provide observational evidence for radial migration. Although a statistical significance is given, more studies are certainly needed to exclude selection effects, for example. The comparison of open clusters and Cepheids with recent Galactic models agrees well in general. However, the models do not reproduce the flat gradient of the open clusters in the outer disc. Thus, the effect of radial migration is either underestimated in the models, or an additional mechanism is at work. Conclusions: Apart from the Cepheids, open clusters are the best tracers for metallicity over large Galactocentric distances in the Milky Way. For a sound statistical analysis, a sufficiently large and homogeneous sample of cluster metallicities is needed. Our compilation is currently by far the largest and provides the basis for several basic studies such as the statistical

  2. The OCCASO survey: Presentation and radial velocities of twelve Milky Way Open Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Casamiquela, L; Jordi, C; Balaguer-Núñez, L; Pancino, E; Hidalgo, S L; Martínez-Vázquez, C E; Murabito, S; del Pino, A; Aparicio, A; Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Gallart, C

    2016-01-01

    Open clusters (OCs) are crucial for studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, the lack of a large number of OCs analyzed homogeneously hampers the investigations about chemical patterns and the existence of Galactocentric radial and vertical gradients, or an age-metallicity relation. To overcome this, we have designed the Open Cluster Chemical Abundances from Spanish Observatories survey (OCCASO). We aim to provide homogeneous radial velocities, physical parameters and individual chemical abundances of six or more Red Clump stars for a sample of 25 old and intermediate-age OCs visible from the Northern hemisphere. To do so, we use high resolution spectroscopic facilities (R> 62,000) available at Spanish observatories. We present the motivation, design and current status of the survey, together with the first data release of radial velocities for 77 stars in 12 OCs, which represents about 50% of the survey. We include clusters never studied with high-resolution spectroscopy before (NG...

  3. A catalogue of velocities in the direction of the cluster of galaxies Abell 496

    CERN Document Server

    Durret, F; Lobo, C; Slezak, E; Durret, Florence; Felenbok, Paul; Lobo, Catarina; Slezak, Eric

    1999-01-01

    We present a catalogue of velocities for 466 galaxies in the direction of the cluster Abell 496, in a region covering about 160' x 160' (9.2 x 9.2 Mpc for an average redshift for Abell 496 of 0.0331, assuming H$_0$=50 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$). This catalogue includes previously published redshifts by Proust et al. (1987), Quintana and Ramirez (1990) and Malumuth et al. (1992), redshifts from the CfA redshift survey, together with our new measurements. A total of 274 galaxies have velocities in the 7800-11800 km/s interval, and will be considered as members of the cluster. Abell 496 therefore becomes one of the few clusters with a high number of measured redshifts; its physical properties are investigated in a companion paper.

  4. Searching for IMBHs in Galactic globular clusters through radial velocities of individual stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    I present an overview of our ongoing project aimed at building a new generation of velocity dispersion profiles ad rotation curves for a representative sample of Galactic globular clusters, from the the radial velocity of hundreds of individual stars distributed at different distances from the cluster center. The innermost portion of the profiles will be used to constrain the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes. The adopted methodology consists of combining spectroscopic observations acquired with three different instruments at the ESO-VLT: the adaptive-optics assisted, integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph SINFONI for the innermost and highly crowded cluster cores, the multi-IFU spectrograph KMOS for the intermediate regions, and the multi-fiber instrument FLAMES/GIRAFFE-MEDUSA for the outskirts. The case of NGC 6388, representing the pilot project that motivated the entire program, is described in some details.

  5. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Origlia, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani, 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Valenti, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Cirasuolo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh and STFC, UK Astronomy Technology Center Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, EH9 3HJ, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ± 1.5 km s{sup –1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ∼9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  6. The Velocity Distribution Function of Galaxy Clusters as a Cosmological Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Cisewski, J.; Price, L. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach for quantifying the abundance of galaxy clusters and constraining cosmological parameters using dynamical measurements. In the standard method, galaxy line-of-sight velocities, v, or velocity dispersions are used to infer cluster masses, M, to quantify the halo mass function (HMF), {dn}(M)/d{log}(M), which is strongly affected by mass measurement errors. In our new method, the probability distributions of velocities for each cluster in the sample are summed to create a new statistic called the velocity distribution function (VDF), {dn}(v)/{dv}. The VDF can be measured more directly and precisely than the HMF and can be robustly predicted with cosmological simulations that capture the dynamics of subhalos or galaxies. We apply these two methods to realistic (ideal) mock cluster catalogs with (without) interlopers and forecast the bias and constraints on the matter density parameter Ωm and the amplitude of matter fluctuations σ8 in flat ΛCDM cosmologies. For an example observation of 200 massive clusters, the VDF with (without) interloping galaxies constrains the parameter combination {σ }8 {{{Ω }}}m0.29(0.29)=0.589+/- 0.014 (0.584+/- 0.011) and shows only minor bias. However, the HMF with interlopers is biased to low Ωm and high σ8 and the fiducial model lies well outside of the forecast constraints, prior to accounting for Eddington bias. When the VDF is combined with constraints from the cosmic microwave background, the degeneracy between cosmological parameters can be significantly reduced. Upcoming spectroscopic surveys that probe larger volumes and fainter magnitudes will provide clusters for applying the VDF as a cosmological probe.

  7. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    , and nearly a factor of 2 improvement in systematics compared with constraints that can be obtained without clusters. The joint analysis of these four data sets puts a conservative upper limit on the masses of light neutrinos ∑m ν ...Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass...... function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with langzrang = 0.55 derived from 400 deg2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ≈ 0.05 clusters...

  8. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    CERN Document Server

    Netopil, M; Heiter, U; Soubiran, C

    2016-01-01

    Open clusters are known as excellent tools for various topics in Galactic research. For example, they allow accurately tracing the chemical structure of the Galactic disc. However, the metallicity is known only for a rather low percentage of the open cluster population, and these values are based on a variety of methods and data. Therefore, a large and homogeneous sample is highly desirable. In the third part of our series we compile a large sample of homogenised open cluster metallicities using a wide variety of different sources. These data and a sample of Cepheids are used to investigate the radial metallicity gradient, age effects, and to test current models. We used photometric and spectroscopic data to derive cluster metallicities. The different sources were checked and tested for possible offsets and correlations. In total, metallicities for 172 open cluster were derived. We used the spectroscopic data of 100 objects for a study of the radial metallicity distribution and the age-metallicity relation. W...

  9. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO distant cluster survey (EDisCS). II.. Redshifts, velocity dispersions, and substructure for clusters in the last 15 fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milvang-Jensen, B.; Noll, S.; Halliday, C.; Poggianti, B. M.; Jablonka, P.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Nowak, N.; von der Linden, A.; De Lucia, G.; Pelló, R.; Moustakas, J.; Poirier, S.; Bamford, S. P.; Clowe, D. I.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Rudnick, G. H.; Simard, L.; White, S. D. M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2008-05-01

    Aims: We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 15 survey fields as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We determine the redshifts and velocity dispersions of the galaxy clusters located in these fields, and we test for possible substructure in the clusters. Methods: We obtained multi-object mask spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the VLT. We reduced the data with particular attention to the sky subtraction. We implemented the method of Kelson for performing sky subtraction prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data. From the measured galaxy redshifts, we determine cluster velocity dispersions using the biweight estimator and test for possible substructure in the clusters using the Dressler-Shectman test. Results: The method of subtracting the sky prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data delivers photon-noise-limited results, whereas the traditional method of subtracting the sky after the data have been rebinned/interpolated results in substantially larger noise for spectra from tilted slits. Redshifts for individual galaxies are presented and redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for 21 galaxy clusters. For the 9 clusters with at least 20 spectroscopically confirmed members, we present the statistical significance of the presence of substructure obtained from the Dressler-Shectman test, and substructure is detected in two of the clusters. Conclusions: Together with data from our previous paper, spectroscopy and spectroscopic velocity dispersions are now available for 26 EDisCS clusters with redshifts in the range 0.40-0.96 and velocity dispersions in the range 166 km s-1-1080 km s-1. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, as part of large programme 166.A-0162 (the ESO Distant Cluster Survey). Full Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/482/419

  10. Seismotectonic Implications Of Clustered Regional GPS Velocities In The San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, R. W.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    We have used a hierarchical agglomerative clustering algorithm with Euclidean distance and centroid linkage, applied to continuous GPS observations for the Bay region available from the U.S. Geological Survey website. This analysis reveals 4 robust, spatially coherent clusters that coincide with 4 first-order structural blocks separated by 3 major fault systems: San Andreas (SA), Southern/Central Calaveras-Hayward-Rodgers Creek-Maacama (HAY), and Northern Calaveras-Concord-Green Valley-Berryessa-Bartlett Springs (NCAL). Because observations seaward of the San Gregorio (SG) fault are few in number, the cluster to the west of SA may actually contain 2 major structural blocks not adequately resolved: the Pacific plate to the west of the northern SA and a Peninsula block between the Peninsula SA and the SG fault. The average inter-block velocities are 11, 10, and 9 mm/yr across SA, HAY, and NCAL respectively. There appears to be a significant component of fault-normal compression across NCAL, whereas SA and HAY faults appear to be, on regional average, purely strike-slip. The velocities for the Sierra Nevada - Great Valley (SNGV) block to the west of NCAL are impressive in their similarity. The cluster of these velocities in a velocity plot forms a tighter grouping compared with the groupings for the other cluster blocks, suggesting a more rigid behavior for this block than the others. We note that for 4 clusters, none of the 3 cluster boundaries illuminate geologic structures other than north-northwest trending dominantly strike-slip faults, so plate motion is not accommodated by large-scale fault-parallel compression or extension in the region or by significant plastic deformation , at least over the time span of the GPS observations. Complexities of interseismic deformation of the upper crust do not allow simple application of inter-block velocities as long-term slip rates on bounding faults. However, 2D dislocation models using inter-block velocities and typical

  11. Cosmology with velocity dispersion counts: an alternative to measuring cluster halo masses

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, C E; Baldry, I K; Collins, C A; Schaye, J; Bird, S

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of galaxy cluster counts is a powerful probe of several fundamental cosmological parameters. A number of recent studies using this probe have claimed tension with the cosmology preferred by the analysis of the Planck primary CMB data, in the sense that there are fewer clusters observed than predicted based on the primary CMB cosmology. One possible resolution to this problem is systematic errors in the absolute halo mass calibration in cluster studies, which is required to convert the standard theoretical prediction (the halo mass function) into counts as a function of the observable (e.g., X-ray luminosity, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, optical richness). Here we propose an alternative strategy, which is to directly compare predicted and observed cluster counts as a function of the one-dimensional velocity dispersion of the cluster galaxies. We argue that the velocity dispersion of groups/clusters can be theoretically predicted as robustly as mass but, unlike mass, it can also be directly observed, ...

  12. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion -- temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Susan; Rooney, Philip J; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T; Collins, Chris A; McCarthy, Ian G; Romer, A Kathy; Bermeo-Hernandez, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R; Maia, Marcio A G; Mann, Robert G; Mayers, Julian A; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P; Thomas, Peter A; Viana, Pedro T P; Wilcox, Harry

    2015-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\\sigma_{\\rm v}$--$T_{\\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \\textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\\sigma_{\\rm v} \\propto T^{0.86 \\pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \\pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen from the data suggests that the feedback does not significantly heat the gas, a result that...

  13. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Vikhlinin, A; Burenin, R A; Ebeling, H; Forman, W R; Hornstrup, A; Jones, C; Murray, S S; Nagai, D; Quintana, H; Voevodkin, A

    2008-01-01

    Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass function evolution to be used as a useful growth of structure based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 36 clusters with =0.55 derived from 400deg^2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z=~0.05 clusters detected in the All-Sky Survey. Evolution of the mass function between these redshifts requires Omega_Lambda>0 with a ~5sigma significance, and constrains the dark energy equation of state parameter to w0=-1.14+-0.21, assuming constant w and flat universe. Cluster information also significantly improves constraints when combined with other methods. Fitting our cluster data jointly with the latest supernovae, WMAP, and baryonic aco...

  14. Investigating the velocity structure and X-ray observable properties of simulated galaxy clusters with PHOX

    CERN Document Server

    Biffi, Veronica; Boehringer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal motions in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are believed to play a non-negligible role in the pressure support to the total gravitating mass of galaxy clusters. Future X-ray missions, such as ASTRO-H and ATHENA, will eventually allow us to directly detect the signature of these motions from high-resolution spectra of the ICM. In this paper, we present a study on a set of clusters extracted from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, devoted to explore the role of non-thermal velocity amplitude in characterising the cluster state and the relation between observed X-ray properties. In order to reach this goal, we apply the X-ray virtual telescope PHOX to generate synthetic observations of the simulated clusters with both Chandra and ATHENA, the latter used as an example for the performance of very high-resolution X-ray telescopes. From Chandra spectra we extract global properties, e.g. luminosity and temperature, and from ATHENA spectra we estimate the gas velocity dispersion along the line of sigh...

  15. Space Velocities of Southern Globular Clusters. V. A Low Galactic Latitude Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti-Dinescu, D I; Herrera, D; Van Altena, W F; López, C E; Castillo, D J

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motions of globular clusters NGC 2808, 3201, 4372, 4833, 5927 and 5986. The proper motions are on the Hipparcos system and they are the first determinations ever made for these low Galactic latitude clusters. The proper motion uncertainties range from 0.3 to 0.5 mas/yr. The inferred orbits indicate that 1) the single metal rich cluster in our sample, NGC 5927, dynamically belongs to the thick disk, 2) the remaining metal poor clusters have rather low-energy orbits of high eccentricity; among these, there appear to be two "pairs" of dynamically associated clusters, 3) the most energetic cluster in our sample, NGC 3201 is on a highly retrograde orbit -- which had already been surmised from its radial velocity alone -- with an apocentric distance of 22 kpc, and 4) none of the metal poor clusters appear to be associated with the recently detected SDSS streams, or with the Monoceros structure. These are the first results of the Southern Proper-Motion Program (SPM) where the sec...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IN-SYNC. III. Radial velocities of IC348 stars (Cottaar+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottaar, M.; Covey, K. R.; Foster, J. B.; Meyer, M. R.; Tan, J. C.; Nidever, D. L.; Drew Chojnowski, S.; da Rio, N.; Flaherty, K. M.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Wilson, J. C.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-11-01

    Cottaar et al. (Paper I, 2014, J/ApJ/794/125) describes the analysis of the high-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained by the APOGEE multi-object spectrograph from stars in IC 348, NGC 1333, NGC 2264, and Orion A as part of the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) ancillary program. Using radial velocities determined from APOGEE spectra of 380 likely cluster members, we have measured the radial velocity distribution of the young (2-6Myr) cluster IC 348. (2 data files).

  17. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion–temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\\sigma_{\\rm v}$--$T_{\\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \\textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescop...

  18. The XMM cluster survey:evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Susan; Rooney, Philip J; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (sigma(v)-T-X) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high-redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectographs instruments on the Gemini telescopes....

  19. Investigation of the Pleiades cluster. I - Radial velocities of corona stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosvick, J. M.; Mermilliod, J.-C.; Mayor, M.

    1992-02-01

    Coravel radial velocities of 83 stars ranging in spectral types from F5 to K0 selected frozen van Leeuwen's et al. (1986) survey of the corona of the Pleiades show that only 56 are actually members. Six spectroscopic binaries among the members and two among the nonmembers have been found. The large extent of the cluster over the sky also induces a radial-velocity gradient from which a convergent point has been determined. Since the cluster's depth is so large, the width of the main sequence is increased. The present results lead to a star density of 1.1 stars per sq deg for r between 2.5 and 3.5 deg. However, we stress that this is only a preliminary result, since the sample of stars in the corona is incomplete.

  20. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO distant cluster survey (EDisCS).II. Redshifts, velocity dispersions, and substructure for clusters in the last 15 fields

    CERN Document Server

    Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Halliday, Claire; Poggianti, Bianca M; Jablonka, Pascale; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Saglia, Roberto P; Nowak, Nina; von der Linden, Anja; De Lucia, Gabriella; Pello, Roser; Moustakas, John; Poirier, Sebastien; Bamford, Steven P; Clowe, Douglas I; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Rudnick, Gregory H; Simard, Luc; White, Simon D M; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    AIMS. We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 15 survey fields as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We determine the redshifts and velocity dispersions of the galaxy clusters located in these fields, and we test for possible substructure in the clusters. METHODS. We obtained multi-object mask spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the VLT. We reduced the data with particular attention to the sky subtraction. We implemented the method of Kelson for performing sky subtraction prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data. From the measured galaxy redshifts, we determine cluster velocity dispersions using the biweight estimator and test for possible substructure in the clusters using the Dressler-Shectman test. RESULTS. The method of subtracting the sky prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data delivers photon-noise-limited results, whereas the traditional method of subtracting the sky after the data have been rebinned/interpolated results in substantially larger noise f...

  1. Searching for Possible Siblings of the Sun from a Common Cluster based on Stellar Space Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Bobylev, V V; Myllari, A; Valtonen, M; 10.1134/S0320010811070011

    2011-01-01

    We propose a kinematic approach to searching for the stars that could be formed with the Sun in a common "parent" open cluster. The approach consists in preselecting suitable candidates by the closeness of their space velocities to the solar velocity and analyzing the parameters of their encounters with the solar orbit in the past in a time interval comparable to the lifetime of stars. We consider stars from the Hipparcos catalog with available radial velocities. The Galactic orbits of stars have been constructed in the Allen--Santillan potential by taking into account the perturbations from the spiral density wave. We show that two stars, HIP 87382 and HIP 47399, are of considerable interest in our problem. Their orbits oscillate near the solar orbit with an amplitude of about 250 pc; there are short-term close encounters to distances <10 pc. Both stars have an evolutionary status and metallicity similar to the solar ones.

  2. A tetranuclear cobalt(III cluster with 2-(hydroxymethylpyridine ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Ming Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, tetrakis[μ3-(2-pyridylmethanolato]tetrakis[bromido(methanolcobalt(III] tetrabromide 2-(hydroxymethylpyridine tetrasolvate dihydrate, [Co4Br4(C6H6NO4(CH3OH4]Br4·4C6H7NO4·2H2O, the cation comprises a [Co4O4] cubane-type core (overline4 symmetry. The four CoIII ions and bridging O atoms from four (2-pyridylmethanolate anions are located at alternating vertices of the cube, with bromide ions and methanol ligands on the exterior of the core, completing a distorted octahedral geometry. The structure is stablized by intermolecular O—H...Br and O—H...O interactions.

  3. Kinematics of the Orion Nebula Cluster: Velocity Substructure and Spectroscopic Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tobin, J J; Furesz, G; Mateo, M; Megeath, S T

    2009-01-01

    We present a kinematic study of the Orion Nebula Cluster based upon radial velocities measured by multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 meter MMT and Magellan telescopes. Velocities are reported for 1613 stars, with multi-epoch data for 727 objects as part of our continuing effort to detect and analyze spectroscopic binaries. We confirm and extend the results of Furesz et al. showing that the ONC is not relaxed, consistent with its youth, and that the stars generally follow the position-velocity structure of the moderate density gas in the region, traced by $^{13}$CO. The additional radial velocities we have measured enable us to probe some discrepancies between stellar and gaseous structure which can be attributed to binary motion and the inclusion of non-members in our kinematic sample. Our multi-epoch data allow us to identify 89 spectroscopic binaries; more will be found as we continue monitoring. Our results reinforce the idea that the ONC is a cluster in formation, and thus provides a valuable tes...

  4. Gas Density Fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: Clumping Factor and Velocity Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Arevalo, P; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analyzed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 8 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10-30 kpc within radii of 30-160 kpc from the cluster center and from 9 to 7 per cent on scales of ~20-30 kpc in an outer, 60-220 kpc annulus. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km/s on ~20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km/s on smaller scales ~7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the power spectrum of the density fluctuations is low...

  5. A RAVE Investigation on Galactic open Clusters I. Radial velocities and metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, C; Kharchenko, N V; Piskunov, A E; Schilbach, E; Röser, S; Boeche, C; Kordopatis, G; Siebert, A; Williams, M; Munari, U; Matijevič, G; Grebel, E K; Zwitter, T; de Jong, R S; Steinmetz, M; Gilmore, G; Seabroke, G; Freeman, K; Navarro, J F; Parker, Q; Reid, W; Watson, F; Gibson, B K; Bienaymé, O; Wyse, R; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Siviero, A

    2013-01-01

    Context. Galactic open clusters (OCs) mainly belong to the young stellar population in the Milky Way disk, but are there groups and complexes of OCs that possibly define an additional level in hierarchical star formation? Current compilations are too incomplete to address this question, especially regarding radial velocities (RVs) and metallicities ($[M/H]$). Aims. Here we provide and discuss newly obtained RV and $[M/H]$ data, which will enable us to reinvestigate potential groupings of open clusters and associations. Methods.We extracted additional RVs and $[M/H]$ from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) via a cross-match with the Catalogue of Stars in Open Cluster Areas (CSOCA). For the identified OCs in RAVE we derived RV and $[M/H]$ from a cleaned working sample and compared the results with previous findings. Results. Although our RAVE sample does not show the same accuracy as the entire survey, we were able to derive reliable RV for 110 Galactic open clusters. For 37 OCs we publish RV for the first t...

  6. Velocity autocorrelation functions of particles and clusters in liquids. A possible criterion for correlation length of incipient glass formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variyar, Jayasankar E.; Kivelson, Daniel; Lynden-Bell, R. M.

    1992-12-01

    We have carried out molecular-dynamics simulations over a range of densities in two and three dimensions for particles that interact through soft repulsive potentials. We have also carried out calculations of the corresponding systems in which all particles except a tagged particle and its neighbors within a certain distance are frozen. Velocity autocorrelation functions for a single particle, for clusters containing the particle, and for the velocity of the particle relative to an embedding cluster were obtained. The single-particle velocity autocorrelation function can be resolved into correlation functions describing the local rattling in a cage or a cluster, the motion of the cluster itself, and a small cross-correlation term; the function for the single particle is sensitive to the structure of the fluid over a much shorter time scale than are those of clusters, and the shape of the single-particle velocity autocorrelation function comes primarily from rattling motion within a cage. We show that the velocity autocorrelation functions of clusters are probably better probes than that for the single particle for investigating incipient glass formation since they can be used to establish a correlation length which increases when a liquid is cooled. The dynamics of clusters at a given state point depend upon their sizes, and the nature of their motions changes qualitatively from ``rattling'' for small to ``diffusional'' for large clusters, the ``critical'' size at which the change occurs increasing with decreasing temperature. A simple model for this cluster behavior is presented.

  7. Incremental Criterion Validity of the WJ-III COG Clinical Clusters: Marginal Predictive Effects beyond the General Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the clinical clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III ACH). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 4,722) drawn from the nationally representative WJ-III…

  8. A Hectochelle Radial Velocity Survey of Cep OB3b: An ONC like cluster at late gas dispersal phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Nicole; Allen, Thomas; Prchlik, Jakub; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Megeath, Samuel Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Cep OB3b is a young (~3-5 Myr), late gas dispersal cluster of roughly 3000 members broken into two sub-clusters (Eastern and Western) at a distance of 700pc; it is a rare example of nearby cluster in the late stages of gas dispersal and appears to be a more evolved analog to the Orion Nebular Cluster. As part of an ongoing multi wavelength study, we focus on Hectochelle data from the MMT to measure the radial velocities of 499 stars. After removing binaries, outliers, and imposing a minimum R value to the cross correlation, we obtain radial velocities of 57 previously identified members, with an average error of 1.7 km/s. There is no observed variation in radial velocity across the cluster in right ascension or declination. The preferred mechanism for this type of kinematic evolution is that any initial kinematic structure from formation may have been erased and that minimal or no rotation is present in the cluster. However, the Eastern sub-cluster, containing the most massive star in the field, an O7 star, has a higher velocity dispersion than the Western sub-cluster, which contains several B stars. We will compare these results to CO maps of the residual gas in the cluster and discuss possible reasons for this difference. Finally, we will assess whether the cluster is bound or in a state of expansion.

  9. The cosmological analysis of X-ray cluster surveys; III. Bypassing cluster mass measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pierre, M; Faccioli, L; Clerc, N; Gastaud, R; Koulouridis, E; Pacaud, F

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong theoretical arguments, the use of clusters as cosmological probes is, in practice, frequently questioned because of the many uncertainties impinging on cluster mass estimates. Our aim is to develop a fully self-consistent cosmological approach of X-ray cluster surveys, exclusively based on observable quantities, rather than masses. This procedure is justified given the possibility to directly derive the cluster properties via ab initio modelling, either analytically or by using hydrodynamical simulations. In this third paper, we evaluate the method on cluster toy-catalogues. We model the population of detected clusters in the count-rate -- hardness-ratio -- angular size -- redshift space and compare the corresponding 4-dimensional diagram with theoretical predictions. The best cosmology+physics parameter configuration is determined using a simple minimisation procedure; errors on the parameters are derived by scanning the likelihood hyper-surfaces with a wide range of starting values. The metho...

  10. Bayesian Analysis of Two Stellar Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters III: Analysis of 30 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner-Kaiser, R; Sarajedini, A; von Hippel, T; van Dyk, D A; Robinson, E; Stein, N; Jefferys, W H

    2016-01-01

    We use Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and HST archival ACS Treasury observations of 30 Galactic Globular Clusters to characterize two distinct stellar populations. A sophisticated Bayesian technique is employed to simultaneously sample the joint posterior distribution of age, distance, and extinction for each cluster, as well as unique helium values for two populations within each cluster and the relative proportion of those populations. We find the helium differences among the two populations in the clusters fall in the range of ~0.04 to 0.11. Because adequate models varying in CNO are not presently available, we view these spreads as upper limits and present them with statistical rather than observational uncertainties. Evidence supports previous studies suggesting an increase in helium content concurrent with increasing mass of the cluster and also find that the proportion of the first population of stars increases with mass as well. Our results are examined in the context of proposed g...

  11. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, B.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rozo, E.; /Ohio State U.; Evrard, A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Johnston, D.; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, E.; /New York U.; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Lau, E.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Nichol, R.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  12. Spherical Harmonic Analysis of Particle Velocity Distribution Function: Comparison of Moments and Anisotropies using Cluster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgiolo, Chris; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a spherical harmonic analysis of the plasma velocity distribution function using high-angular, energy, and time resolution Cluster data obtained from the PEACE spectrometer instrument to demonstrate how this analysis models the particle distribution function and its moments and anisotropies. The results show that spherical harmonic analysis produced a robust physical representation model of the velocity distribution function, resolving the main features of the measured distributions. From the spherical harmonic analysis, a minimum set of nine spectral coefficients was obtained from which the moment (up to the heat flux), anisotropy, and asymmetry calculations of the velocity distribution function were obtained. The spherical harmonic method provides a potentially effective "compression" technique that can be easily carried out onboard a spacecraft to determine the moments and anisotropies of the particle velocity distribution function for any species. These calculations were implemented using three different approaches, namely, the standard traditional integration, the spherical harmonic (SPH) spectral coefficients integration, and the singular value decomposition (SVD) on the spherical harmonic methods. A comparison among the various methods shows that both SPH and SVD approaches provide remarkable agreement with the standard moment integration method.

  13. A High Stellar Velocity Dispersion and ~100 Globular Clusters for the Ultra Diffuse Galaxy Dragonfly 44

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Danieli, Shany; Merritt, Allison; Mowla, Lamiya; Romanowsky, Aaron; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-01-01

    Recently a population of large, very low surface brightness, spheroidal galaxies was identified in the Coma cluster. The apparent survival of these Ultra Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) in a rich cluster suggests that they have very high masses. Here we present the stellar kinematics of Dragonfly 44, one of the largest Coma UDGs, using a 33.5 hr integration with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope. We find a velocity dispersion of 47 km/s, which implies a dynamical mass of M_dyn=0.7x10^10 M_sun within its deprojected half-light radius of r_1/2=4.6 kpc. The mass-to-light ratio is M/L=48 M_sun/L_sun, and the dark matter fraction is 98 percent within the half-light radius. The high mass of Dragonfly 44 is accompanied by a large globular cluster population. From deep Gemini imaging taken in 0.4" seeing we infer that Dragonfly 44 has 94 globular clusters, similar to the counts for other galaxies in this mass range. Our results add to other recent evidence that many UDGs are "failed" galaxies, with the sizes, dark matter conte...

  14. A heptadecanuclear Mn(III)9Dy(III)8 cluster derived from triethanolamine with two edge sharing supertetrahedra as the core and displaying SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Moubarakia, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2010-06-07

    A heterometallic, heptadecanuclear cluster of formula [Mn(III)9Dy(III)8O8(OH)8(tea)2(teaH)2(teaH2)4(Ac)4(NO3)2(H2O)4](NO3)7·8H2O (1) is reported. The core of 1 displays two edge sharing Mn(III)5Dy(III)5 supertetrahedra and represents one of the largest Mn/4f cluster compound so far reported. Magnetic studies show that 1 displays probable SMM behaviour as observed via non-zero values in the χM''vs T plot.

  15. Deriving physical parameters of unresolved star clusters III. Application to M31 PHAT clusters

    CERN Document Server

    de Meulenaer, Philippe; Mineikis, Tadas; Vansevičius, Vladas

    2015-01-01

    This study is the third of a series that investigates the degeneracy and stochasticity problems present in the determination of physical parameters such as age, mass, extinction, and metallicity of partially resolved or unresolved star cluster populations situated in external galaxies when using broad-band photometry. This work tests the derivation of parameters of artificial star clusters using models with fixed and free metallicity for the WFC3+ACS photometric system. Then the method is applied to derive parameters of a sample of 203 star clusters in the Andromeda galaxy observed with the HST. Following Papers I \\& II, the star cluster parameters are derived using a large grid of stochastic models that are compared to the observed cluster broad-band integrated WFC3+ACS magnitudes. We derive the age, mass, and extinction of the sample of M31 star clusters with one fixed metallicity in agreement with previous studies. Using artificial tests we demonstrate the ability of the WFC3+ACS photometric system to ...

  16. Bayesian analysis of two stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters- III. Analysis of 30 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Stenning, D. C.; Sarajedini, A.; von Hippel, T.; van Dyk, D. A.; Robinson, E.; Stein, N.; Jefferys, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    We use Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and HST archival ACS Treasury observations of 30 Galactic globular clusters to characterize two distinct stellar populations. A sophisticated Bayesian technique is employed to simultaneously sample the joint posterior distribution of age, distance, and extinction for each cluster, as well as unique helium values for two populations within each cluster and the relative proportion of those populations. We find the helium differences among the two populations in the clusters fall in the range of ˜0.04 to 0.11. Because adequate models varying in carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are not presently available, we view these spreads as upper limits and present them with statistical rather than observational uncertainties. Evidence supports previous studies suggesting an increase in helium content concurrent with increasing mass of the cluster and we also find that the proportion of the first population of stars increases with mass as well. Our results are examined in the context of proposed globular cluster formation scenarios. Additionally, we leverage our Bayesian technique to shed light on the inconsistencies between the theoretical models and the observed data.

  17. Astrophysical supplements to the ASCC-2.5. Ia. Radial velocities of about 55000 stars and mean radial velocities of 516 Galactic open clusters and associations

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, N V; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Scholz, R -D

    2007-01-01

    We present the 2nd version of the Catalogue of Radial Velocities with Astrometric Data (CRVAD-2). This is the result of the cross-identification of stars from the All-Sky Compiled Catalogue of 2.5 Million Stars (ASCC-2.5) with the General Catalogue of Radial Velocities and with other recently published radial velocity lists and catalogues. The CRVAD-2 includes accurate J2000 equatorial coordinates, proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes in the Hipparcos system, $B, V$ photometry in the Johnson system, spectral types, radial velocities (RVs), multiplicity and variability flags for 54907 ASCC-2.5 stars. We have used the CRVAD-2 for a new determination of mean RVs of 363 open clusters and stellar associations considering their established members from proper motions and photometry in the ASCC-2.5. For 330 clusters and associations we compiled previously published mean RVs from the literature, critically reviewed and partly revised them. The resulting Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Open Clusters and Assoc...

  18. Streaming motions of galaxy clusters within 12000 km/s - V. The peculiar velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, M J; Lucey, J R; Branchini, E; Hudson, Michael J.; Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Branchini, Enzo

    2004-01-01

    We analyze in detail the peculiar velocity field traced by 56 clusters within 120 h^-1 Mpc in the Streaming Motions of Abell Clusters (SMAC) sample. The bulk flow of the SMAC sample is 687 +- 203 km/s, toward l = 260 +- 13, b = 0 +- 11. We discuss possible systematic errors and show that no systematic effect is larger than half of the random error. The flow does not drop off significantly with depth, which suggests that it is generated by structures on large scales. In particular, a Great Attractor as originally proposed by Lynden-Bell et al. cannot be responsible for the SMAC bulk flow. The SMAC data suggest infall into an attractor at the location of the Shapley Concentration, but the detection is marginal (at the 90% confidence level). We find that distant attractors in addition to the Shapley Concentration are required to explain the SMAC bulk flow. A comparison with peculiar velocities predicted from the IRAS PSCz redshift survey shows good agreement with a best fit value of Beta_I = Omega^0.6/b_I = 0.39...

  19. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Blake, C. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Carlberg, J. K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Crepp, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS UMR 6213, Observatoire des Sciences de l' Univers THETA Franche-Comt é-Bourgogne, Université de Franche Comté, Observatoire de Besançon, BP 1615, F-25010 Besançon Cedex (France); Nidever, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, D. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Ebelke, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Ge, J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ∼2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ∼100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we

  20. The ROCKSTAR Phase-space Temporal Halo Finder and the Velocity Offsets of Cluster Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wu, Hao-Yi

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for identifying dark matter halos, substructure, and tidal features. The approach is based on adaptive hierarchical refinement of friends-of-friends groups in six phase-space dimensions and one time dimension, which allows for robust (grid-independent, shape-independent, and noise-resilient) tracking of substructure; as such, it is named ROCKSTAR (Robust Overdensity Calculation using K-Space Topologically Adaptive Refinement). Our method is massively parallel (up to 105 CPUs) and runs on the largest current simulations (>1010 particles) with high efficiency (10 CPU hours and 60 gigabytes of memory required per billion particles analyzed). A previous paper has shown ROCKSTAR to have excellent recovery of halo properties; we expand on these comparisons with more tests and higher-resolution simulations. We show a significant improvement in substructure recovery compared to several other halo finders and discuss the theoretical and practical limits of simulations in this regard. Finally, we present results that demonstrate conclusively that dark matter halo cores are not at rest relative to the halo bulk or substructure average velocities and have coherent velocity offsets across a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. For massive clusters, these offsets can be up to 350 km s-1 at z = 0 and even higher at high redshifts. Our implementation is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/rockstar.

  1. Tetranuclear {Co(II)2Co(III)2}, Octanuclear {Co(II)4Co(III)4}, and Hexanuclear {Co(III)3Dy(III)3} Pivalate Clusters: Synthesis, Magnetic Characterization, and Theoretical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Ioana; Kravtsov, Victor Ch; Ostrovsky, Serghei M; Reu, Oleg S; Krämer, Karl; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Klokishner, Sophia I; Baca, Svetlana G

    2017-03-06

    New tetranuclear and octanuclear mixed-valent cobalt(II/III) pivalate clusters, namely, [NaCo4(O2CCMe3)6(HO2CCMe3)2(teaH)2(N3)]·2H2O (in two polymorphic modifications, 1 and 1a) and [Co8(O2CCMe3)10(teaH)4(N3)](Me3CCO2)·MeCN·H2O (2) have been synthesized by ultrasonic treatment of a dinuclear cobalt(II) pivalate precursor with sodium azide and triethanolamine (teaH3) ligand in acetonitrile. The use of Dy(NO3)3·6H2O in a similar reaction led to the precipitation of a tetranuclear [NaCo4(O2CCMe3)4(teaH)2(N3)(NO3)2(H2O)2]·H2O (3) cluster and a heterometallic hexanuclear [Co3Dy3(OH)4(O2CCMe3)6(teaH)3(H2O)3](NO3)2·H2O (4) cluster. Single-crystal X-ray analysis showed that 1 (1a) and 3 consist of a tetranuclear pivalate/teaH3 mixed-ligand cluster [Co(II)2Co(III)2(O2CCMe3)4(teaH)2(N3)](+) decorated with sodium pivalates [Na(O2CCMe3)2(HO2CCMe3)2](-) (1 or 1a) or sodium nitrates [Na(NO3)2](-) (3) to form a square-pyramidal assembly. In 2, the cationic [Co8(O2CCMe3)10(teaH)4(N3)](+) cluster comprises a mixed-valent {Co(II)4Co(III)4} core encapsulated by an azide, 4 teaH(2-) alcoholamine ligands, and 10 bridging pivalates. Remarkably, in this core, the μ4-N3(-) ligand joins all four Co(II) atoms. The heterometallic hexanuclear compound 4 consists of a cationic [Co(III)3Dy(III)3(OH)4(O2CCMe3)6(teaH)3(H2O)3](2+) cluster, two NO3(-) anions, and a crystallization water molecule. The arrangement of metal atoms in 4 can be approximated as the assembly of a smaller equilateral triangle defined by three Dy sites with a Dy···Dy distance of 3.9 Å and a larger triangle formed by Co sites [Co···Co, 6.1-6.2 Å]. The interpretation of the magnetic properties of clusters 2-4 was performed in the framework of theoretical models, taking into account the structural peculiarities of clusters and their energy spectra. The behavior of clusters 2 and 3 containing Co(II) ions with orbitally nondegenerate ground states is determined by the zero-field splitting of these states and

  2. CANGAROO-III search for TeV Gamma-rays from two clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kiuchi, R; Bicknell, G V; Clay, R W; Edwards, P G; Enomoto, R; Gunji, S; Hara, S; Hara, T; Hattori, T; Hayashi, S; Higashi, Y; Hirai, Y; Inoue, K; Itoh, C; Kabuki, S; Kajino, F; Katagiri, H; Kawachi, A; Kifune, T; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; Matsubara, Y; Mizukami, T; Mizumoto, Y; Mizuniwa, R; Muraishi, H; Muraki, Y; Naito, T; Nakamori, T; Nakano, S; Nishida, D; Nishijima, K; Ohishi, M; Sakamoto, Y; Seki, A; Stamatescu, V; Suzuki, T; Swaby, D L; Tanimori, T; Thornton, G; Tokanai, F; Tsuchiya, K; Watanabe, S; Yamada, Y; Yamazaki, E; Yanagita, S; Yoshida, T; Yoshikoshi, T; Yukawa, Y

    2009-01-01

    Because accretion and merger shocks in clusters of galaxies may accelerate particles to high energies, clusters are candidate sites for the origin of ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic-rays. A prediction was presented for gamma-ray emission from a cluster of galaxies at a detectable level with the current generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray emission was produced via inverse Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by electron-positron pairs generated by collisions of UHE cosmic rays in the cluster. We observed two clusters of galaxies, Abell 3667 and Abell 4038, searching for very-high-energy gamma-ray emission with the CANGAROO-III atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system in 2006. The analysis showed no significant excess around these clusters, yielding upper limits on the gamma-ray emission. From a comparison of the upper limit for the north-west radio relic region of Abell 3667 with a model prediction, we derive a lower limit for the magnetic field of th...

  3. THE SPATIAL STRUCTURE OF YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS. III. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND EVOLUTIONARY STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sills, Alison [Department of Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Bate, Matthew R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, Devon EX4 4SB (United Kingdom); Borissova, Jordanka [Instituto de Fisica y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-10-20

    We analyze the physical properties of stellar clusters that are detected in massive star-forming regions in the MYStIX project—a comparative, multiwavelength study of young stellar clusters within 3.6 kpc that contain at least one O-type star. Tabulated properties of subclusters in these regions include physical sizes and shapes, intrinsic numbers of stars, absorptions by the molecular clouds, and median subcluster ages. Physical signs of dynamical evolution are present in the relations of these properties, including statistically significant correlations between subcluster size, central density, and age, which are likely the result of cluster expansion after gas removal. We argue that many of the subclusters identified in Paper I are gravitationally bound because their radii are significantly less than what would be expected from freely expanding clumps of stars with a typical initial stellar velocity dispersion of ∼3 km s{sup −1} for star-forming regions. We explore a model for cluster formation in which structurally simpler clusters are built up hierarchically through the mergers of subclusters—subcluster mergers are indicated by an inverse relation between the numbers of stars in a subcluster and their central densities (also seen as a density versus radius relation that is less steep than would be expected from pure expansion). We discuss implications of these effects for the dynamical relaxation of young stellar clusters.

  4. Active galactic nuclei. III - Accretion flow in an externally supplied cluster of black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholczyk, A. G.; Stoeger, W. R.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1989-01-01

    This third paper in the series modeling QSOs and AGNs as clusters of accreting black holes studies the accretion flow within an externally supplied cluster. Significant radiation will be emitted by the cluster core, but the black holes in the outer halo, where the flow is considered spherically symmetric, will not contribute much to the overall luminosity of the source because of their large velocities relative to the infalling gas and therefore their small accretion radii. As a result, the scenario discussed in Paper I will refer to the cluster cores, rather than to entire clusters. This will steepen the high-frequency region of the spectrum unless inverse Compton scattering is effective. In many cases accretion flow in the central part of the cluster will be optically thick to electron scattering, resulting in a spectrum featuring optically thick radiative component in addition to power-law regimes. The fitting of these spectra to QSO and AGN observations is discussed, and application to 3C 273 is worked out as an example.

  5. Active galactic nuclei. III. Accretion flow in an externally supplied cluster of black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacholczyk, A.G.; Stoeger, W.R.; Stepinski, T.F. (Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA); Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1989-08-01

    This third paper in the series modeling QSOs and AGNs as clusters of accreting black holes studies the accretion flow within an externally supplied cluster. Significant radiation will be emitted by the cluster core, but the black holes in the outer halo, where the flow is considered spherically symmetric, will not contribute much to the overall luminosity of the source because of their large velocities relative to the infalling gas and therefore their small accretion radii. As a result, the scenario discussed in Paper I will refer to the cluster cores, rather than to entire clusters. This will steepen the high-frequency region of the spectrum unless inverse Compton scattering is effective. In many cases accretion flow in the central part of the cluster will be optically thick to electron scattering, resulting in a spectrum featuring optically thick radiative component in addition to power-law regimes. The fitting of these spectra to QSO and AGN observations is discussed, and application to 3C 273 is worked out as an example. 14 refs.

  6. The universal distribution of halo interlopers in projected phase space. Bias in galaxy cluster concentration and velocity anisotropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, Gary A; Murante, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    When clusters of galaxies are viewed in projection, one cannot avoid picking up foreground/background interlopers, that lie within the virial cone (VC), but outside the virial sphere. Structural and kinematic deprojection equations are not known for an expanding Universe, where the Hubble flow (HF) stretches the line-of-sight distribution of velocities. We analyze 93 mock relaxed clusters, built from a cosmological simulation. The stacked mock cluster is well fit by an m=5 Einasto DM density profile, with velocity anisotropy (VA) close to the Mamon-Lokas model with anisotropy radius equal to that of density slope -2. The surface density of interlopers is nearly flat out to the virial radius, while their velocity distribution shows a dominant gaussian cluster-outskirts component and a flat field component. This distribution of interlopers in PPS is nearly universal in mass. A local kappa=2.7 sigma velocity cut returns the line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile (LOSVDP) expected from the NFW density and VA p...

  7. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE LINE OF SIGHT TO BACKGROUND QUASARS. III. MULTI-OBJECT SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, H.; Barrientos, L. F.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I. [Instituto de Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Avenida Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Lopez, S.; Lira, P.; Maureira, M. J. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Gilbank, D. G. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Ellingson, E. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado at Boulder, Campus Box 389, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Gladders, M. D. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Yee, H. K. C., E-mail: barrientos@astro.puc.cl [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2013-09-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight lines taken from Lopez et al. The targets were selected based on the presence of an intervening Mg II absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance <2 h{sub 71}{sup -1} Mpc from the QSO sight line (a {sup p}hotometric hit{sup )}. The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 A. Our aim was three-fold: (1) to identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, (2) to confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and (3) to determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. In this way, we are able to characterize the absorption systems associated with cluster members. Our main findings are as follows. (1) We identified 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts between 0.2509 {<=} z{sub gal} {<=} 1.0955, up to an impact parameter of 142 h{sub 71}{sup -1} kpc and a maximum velocity difference of 280 km s{sup -1}. (2) We spectroscopically confirmed 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z < 0.7. This relatively low efficiency results from the fact that we centered our observations on the QSO location, and thus occasionally some of the cluster centers were outside the instrument field of view. (3) Following from the results above, we spectroscopically confirmed of 10 out of 14 photometric hits within {approx}650 km s{sup -1} from galaxy clusters/groups, in addition to two new ones related to galaxy group environments. These numbers imply efficiencies of 71% in finding such systems with MOS spectroscopy. This is a remarkable result since we defined a photometric hit as those cluster-absorber pairs having a redshift difference {Delta}z = 0.1. The general population of our confirmed absorbing galaxies have luminosities

  8. The SDSS-III APOGEE Radial Velocity Survey of M dwarfs I: Description of Survey and Science Goals

    CERN Document Server

    Deshpande, R; Bender, C F; Mahadevan, S; Terrien, R C; Carlberg, J; Zasowski, G; Crepp, J; Rajpurohit, A S; Reyle, C; Nidever, D L; Schneider, D P; Prieto, C Allende; Bizyaev, D; Ebelke, G; Fleming, S W; Frinchaboy, P M; Ge, J; Hearty, F; Hernandez, J; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; Majewski, S R; Oravetz, D; Pan, K; Schiavon, R P; Shetrone, M; Simmons, A; Stassun, K G; Wilson, J C; Wisniewski, J

    2013-01-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object NIR APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations are used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey and results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that is publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present RVs and vsini of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsini precision of ~2 km/s and a measurement floor at vsini = 4 km/s. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for vsini and RV variability (at ~100-200 m/s), and will advance the target selection for planned RV and photometric searches for low mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as HPF, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to iden...

  9. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. VII. A low velocity dispersion for the young massive cluster R136

    CERN Document Server

    Hénault-Brunet, V; Sana, H; Gieles, M; Bastian, N; Apellániz, J Maíz; Markova, N; Taylor, W D; Bressert, E; Crowther, P A; van Loon, J Th

    2012-01-01

    Detailed studies of resolved young massive star clusters are necessary to determine their dynamical state and evaluate the importance of gas expulsion and early cluster evolution. In an effort to gain insight into the dynamical state of the young massive cluster R136 and obtain the first measurement of its velocity dispersion, we analyse multi-epoch spectroscopic data of the inner regions of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) obtained as part of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. Following a quantitative assessment of the variability, we use the radial velocities of non-variable sources to place an upper limit of 6 km/s on the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of stars within a projected distance of 5 pc from the centre of the cluster. After accounting for the contributions of undetected binaries and measurement errors through Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that the true velocity dispersion is likely between 4 and 5 km/s given a range of standard assumptions about the binary distribution. This...

  10. Relativistic coupled cluster calculations on hyperfine structures and electromagnetic transition amplitudes of In III

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Sourav; Majumder, Sonjoy

    2014-01-01

    Hyperfine constants and anomalies of ground as well as few low lying excited states of $^{113,115,117}$In III are studied with highly correlated relativistic coupled-cluster theory. The ground state hyperfine splitting of $^{115}$In III is estimated to be 106.8 GHz. A shift of almost 1.9 GHz of the above frequency has been calculated due to modified nuclear dipole moment. This splitting result shows its applicability as communication band and frequency standards at $10^{-11}$ sec. Correlations study of hyperfine constants indicates a few distinct features of many-body effects in the wave-functions in and near the nuclear region of this ion. Astrophysically important forbidden transition amplitudes are estimated for the first time in the literature to our knowledge. The calculated oscillator strengths of few allowed transitions are compared with recent experimental and theoretical results wherever available.

  11. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Susan; Hilton, Matt; Rooney, Philip J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T.; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Mann, Robert G.; Mayers, Julian A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P.; Thomas, Peter A.; Viana, Pedro T. P.; Wilcox, Harry

    2016-11-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (σv-TX) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high-redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectographs instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalization is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero (σv ∝ T0.86±0.14E(z)-0.37±0.33). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.

  12. Turbulence-Induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles III: The Probability Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Scalo, John

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, tau_p1 and tau_p2, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1 tau_eta to 54T_L, with tau_eta and T_L the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of tau_p1, the PDF is the fattest for equal-size particles (tau_p2~tau_p1), and becomes thinner at both tau_p2tau_p1. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in 1/2>T_L). These features are successfully explained by the Pan & Padoan model. Usin...

  13. The M4 Core Project with HST - IV. Internal Kinematics from Accurate Radial Velocities of 2771 Cluster Members

    CERN Document Server

    Malavolta, L; Bedin, L R; Sneden, C; Nascimbeni, V; Sommariva, V

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the internal kinematics of the Galactic Globular Cluster M 4 (NGC 6121), by deriving the radial velocities from 7250 spectra for 2771 stars distributed from the upper part of the Red Giant Branch down to the Main Sequence. We describe new approaches to determine the wavelength solution from day-time calibrations and to determine the radial velocity drifts that can occur between calibration and science observations when observing with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. Two techniques to determine the radial velocity are compared, after a qualitative description of their advantages with respect to other commonly used algorithm, and a new approach to remove the sky contribution from the spectra obtained with fibre-fed spectrograph and further improve the radial velocity precision is presented. The average radial velocity of the cluster is $\\langle v \\rangle = 71.08 \\pm 0.08$ km s$^{-1}$ with an average dispersion of $\\mu_{v_c} = 3.97$ km s$^{-1}$. Using the same dataset and the same ...

  14. Metallicities and radial velocities of two stellar clusters located in the outer regions of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramajo, L. V.; Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Geisler, D.; Vásquez, S.; Da Costa, G.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    We studied near-infrared spectra of red giant stars in two Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters. We used the Caii lines to measure radial velocities as well as the equivalent widths of these lines to determine metallicity. The two studied clusters (L32 and L38) are projected on the outer regions of the SMC so they are particularly interesting to examine the possible existence of a change of sign in the metallicity gradient in the outer regions, as suggested by a recent study.

  15. Structural, energetic, and electronic properties of La(III)-dimethyl sulfoxide clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, Enrico; Chiricotto, Mara; Spezia, Riccardo

    2014-12-11

    By using accurate density functional theory calculations, we have studied the cluster complexes of a La(3+) ion interacting with a small number of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecules of growing size (from 1 to 12). Extended structural, energetic, and electronic structure analyses have been performed to provide a complete picture of the physical properties that are the basis of the interaction of La(III) with DMSO. Recent experimental data in the solid and liquid phase have suggested a coordination number of 8 DMSO molecules with a square antiprism geometry arranged similarly in the liquid and crystalline phases. By using a cluster approach on the La(3+)(DMSO)n gas phase isolated structures, we have found that the 8-fold geometry, albeit less regular than in the crystal, is probably the most stable cluster. Furthermore, we provide new evidence of a 9-fold complexation geometric arrangement that is competitive (at least energetically) with the 8-fold one and that might suggest the existence of transient structures with higher coordination numbers in the liquid phase.

  16. Search for giant planets in M67 III: excess of hot Jupiters in dense open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brucalassi, A; Saglia, R; Ruiz, M T; Bonifacio, P; Leao, I; Martins, B L Canto; de Medeiros, J R; Bedin, L R; Biazzo, K; Melo, C; Lovis, C; Randich, S

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008 we used high-precision radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with different telescopes to detect signatures of massive planets around main-sequence and evolved stars of the open cluster (OC) M67. We aimed to perform a long-term study on giant planet formation in open clusters and determine how this formation depends on stellar mass and chemical composition. A new hot Jupiter (HJ) around the main-sequence star YBP401 is reported in this work. An update of the RV measurements for the two HJ host-stars YBP1194 and YBP1514 is also discussed. Our sample of 66 main-sequence and turnoff stars includes 3 HJs, which indicates a high rate of HJs in this cluster (~5.6% for single stars and ~4.5% for the full sample ). This rate is much higher than what has been discovered in the field, either with RV surveys or by transits. High metallicity is not a cause for the excess of HJs in M67, nor can the excess be attributed to high stellar masses. When combining this rate with the non-zero eccentricity of the o...

  17. A globular cluster toward M87 with a radial velocity < – 1000 km s{sup –1}: the first hypervelocity cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Brodie, Jean P. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Moore, Ben; Diemand, Jurg [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Martizzi, Davide, E-mail: caldwell@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We report the discovery of an object near M87 in the Virgo Cluster with an extraordinary blueshift of –1025 km s{sup –1}, offset from the systemic velocity by >2300 km s{sup –1}. Evaluation of photometric and spectroscopic data provides strong evidence that this object is a distant massive globular cluster, which we call HVGC-1 in analogy to Galactic hypervelocity stars. We consider but disfavor more exotic interpretations, such as a system of stars bound to a recoiling black hole. The odds of observing an outlier as extreme as HVGC-1 in a virialized distribution of intracluster objects are small; it appears more likely that the cluster was (or is being) ejected from Virgo following a three-body interaction. The nature of the interaction is unclear, and could involve either a subhalo or a binary supermassive black hole at the center of M87.

  18. New routes to polymetallic clusters: fluoride-based tri-, deca-, and hexaicosametallic MnIII clusters and their magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leigh F; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Brockman, Jonathon; Murugesu, Muralee; Sanudo, E Carolina; Raftery, Jim; Teat, Simon J; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Christou, George; Brechin, Euan K; Collison, David

    2004-10-11

    The syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of three new MnIII clusters, [Mn26O17(OH)8(OMe)4F10(bta)22(MeOH)14(H2O)2] (1), [Mn(0O6(OH)2(bta)8(py)8F8] (2) and [NHEt3]2[Mn3O(bta)6F3] (3), are reported (bta=anion of benzotriazole), thereby demonstrating the utility of MnF3 as a new synthon in Mn cluster chemistry. The "melt" reaction (100 degrees C) between MnF(3) and benzotriazole (btaH, C6H5N3) under an inert atmosphere, followed by dissolution in MeOH produces the cluster [Mn26O17(OH)8(OMe)4F10(bta)22(MeOH)14(H2O)2] (1) after two weeks. Complex 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1, and consists of a complicated array of metal tetrahedra linked by mu3-O2- ions, mu3- and mu2-OH- ions, mu2-MeO- ions and mu2-bta- ligands. The "simpler" reaction between MnF3 and btaH in boiling MeOH (50 degrees C) also produces complex 1. If this reaction is repeated in the presence of pyridine, the decametallic complex [Mn10O6(OH)2(bta)8(py)8F8] (2) is produced. Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1 and consists of a "supertetrahedral" [Mn(III)10] core bridged by six mu3-O2- ions, two mu3-OH- ions, four mu2-F- ions and eight mu2-bta- ions. The replacement of pyridine by triethylamine in the same reaction scheme produces the trimetallic species [NHEt3]2[Mn3O(bta)6F3] (3). Complex 3 crystallises in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c and has a structure analogous to that of the basic metal carboxylates of general formula [M3O(RCO2)6L3]0/+, which consists of an oxo-centred metal triangle with mu2-bta- ligands bridging each edge of the triangle and the fluoride ions acting as the terminal ligands. DC magnetic susceptibility measurements in the 300-1.8 K and 0.1-7 T ranges were investigated for all three complexes. For each, the value of chi(M)T decreases with decreasing temperatures; this indicates the presence of dominant antiferromagnetic exchange interactions in 1-3. For complex 1, the low-temperature value of chi(M)T is 10 cm(3) K mol(-1) and fitting of

  19. Heterometallic octanuclear RE(III)3Ni(II)5 (RE = Dy(III), Gd(III) and Y(III)) clusters with slow magnetic relaxation for the dysprosium derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiyu; Ke, Hongshan; Lin, Shuang-Yan; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lang; Tang, Jinkui; Li, Yun-Hui

    2013-04-21

    Reactions of rare earth benzoate and nickel perchlorate with a Schiff-base ligand, 2-([(2-hydroxyphenyl)imino]methyl) phenol (H2L), in the presence of triethylamine yielded three heterobimetallic octanuclear clusters of general formula [RE3Ni5L5(PhCOO)3(μ3-OH)5(μ3-OCH3)(CH3OH)4(H2O)]·xCH3OH·yH2O (RE = Dy(III), x = 4, y = 4 (1), RE = Gd(III), x = 5, y = 4 (2), RE = Y(III), x = 5, y = 3 (3)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the metal core of each cluster consists of two distorted [RE2Ni2O4] cubane-like moieties and a heterobimetallic triangular [RE2NiO2] unit, with RE ions arranged in a typical triangular fashion. Variable-temperature solid state magnetic susceptibilities of these complexes were measured in the temperature range 2-300 K and the results indicate that an overall ferromagnetic interaction among the metal ions is operative for compounds 2 and 3. Under zero external field, the Dy3Ni5 compound shows a frequency dependence of the out-of-phase (χ'') signals, which indicates slow relaxation of the magnetization.

  20. Extended Main Sequence Turnoffs in Intermediate-Age Star Clusters: A Correlation Between Turnoff Width and Early Escape Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Kalirai, Jason S; Platais, Imants; Puzia, Thomas H; Correnti, Matteo; Bressan, Alessandro; Chandar, Rupali; Kerber, Leandro; Marigo, Paola; Rubele, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We present color-magnitude diagram analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a mass-limited sample of 18 intermediate-age (1 - 2 Gyr old) star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, including 8 clusters for which new data was obtained. We find that ${\\it all}$ star clusters in our sample feature extended main sequence turnoff (eMSTO) regions that are wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (including unresolved binary stars). FWHM widths of the MSTOs indicate age spreads of 200-550 Myr. We evaluate dynamical evolution of clusters with and without initial mass segregation. Our main results are: (1) the fraction of red clump (RC) stars in secondary RCs in eMSTO clusters scales with the fraction of MSTO stars having pseudo-ages $\\leq 1.35$ Gyr; (2) the width of the pseudo-age distributions of eMSTO clusters is correlated with their central escape velocity $v_{\\rm esc}$, both currently and at an age of 10 Myr. We find that these two results are unlikely to be reproduced by the effects ...

  1. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: qualitative treatment and cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A A; Lau, E T; Nagai, D; Gaspari, M; Allen, S W; Nelson, K; Parrish, I J

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the ICM using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: $(\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho)^2 = \\eta_1^2 (V_{1,k}/c_s)^2$, where $\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho$ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wave number $k$, $V_{1,k}^2=V_k^2/3$ is the mean square component of the velocity field, $c_s$ is the sound speed, and $\\eta_1$ is a dimensionless constant of order unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find $\\eta_1\\approx 1 \\pm 0.3$. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proporti...

  2. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉} red giants in open clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Joleen K., E-mail: jcarlberg@dtm.ciw.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ∼1.6M {sub ☉} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  3. Seeking the Local Convergence Depth; 5, Tully-Fisher Peculiar Velocities for 52 Abell Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Haynes, M P; Campusano, L E; Hardy, E; Dale, Daniel A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Campusano, Luis E.; Hardy, Eduardo

    1999-01-01

    We have obtained I band Tully-Fisher (TF) measurements for 522 late-type galaxies in the fields of 52 rich Abell clusters distributed throughout the sky between 50 and 200\\h Mpc. Here we estimate corrections to the data for various forms of observational bias, most notably Malmquist and cluster population incompleteness bias. The bias-corrected data are applied to the construction of an I band TF template, resulting in a relation with a dispersion of 0.38 magnitudes and a kinematical zero-point accurate to 0.02 magnitudes. This represents the most accurate TF template relation currently available. Individual cluster TF relations are referred to the average template relation to compute cluster peculiar motions. The line-of-sight dispersion in the peculiar motions is 341+/-93 km/s, in general agreement with that found for the cluster sample of Giovanelli and coworkers.

  4. CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50R-5045, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlafly, Eddie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St. MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon (CEFCA), Plaza de San Juan 1, planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Sanchez, Ariel G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Don [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: cwho@lbl.gov [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2012-12-10

    surveys such as the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) and WiggleZ. We also find that systematic-corrected power spectra give consistent constraints on cosmological models when compared with pre-systematic correction power spectra in the angular scales of interest. The SDSS-III Data Release 8 (SDSS-III DR8) Angular Clustering Data allow a wide range of investigations into the cosmological model, cosmic expansion (via BAO), Gaussianity of initial conditions, and neutrino masses. Here, we refer to our companion papers for further investigations using the clustering data. Our calculation of the survey selection function, systematics maps, and likelihood function for the COSMOMC package will be released at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/boss/galaxy/photoz/.

  5. Search for giant planets in M67. III. Excess of hot Jupiters in dense open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucalassi, A.; Pasquini, L.; Saglia, R.; Ruiz, M. T.; Bonifacio, P.; Leão, I.; Canto Martins, B. L.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Bedin, L. R.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C.; Lovis, C.; Randich, S.

    2016-07-01

    Since 2008 we used high-precision radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with different telescopes to detect signatures of massive planets around main-sequence and evolved stars of the open cluster (OC) M67. We aimed to perform a long-term study on giant planet formation in open clusters and determine how this formation depends on stellar mass and chemical composition. A new hot Jupiter (HJ) around the main-sequence star YBP401 is reported in this work. An update of the RV measurements for the two HJ host-stars YBP1194 and YBP1514 is also discussed. Our sample of 66 main-sequence and turnoff stars includes 3 HJs, which indicates a high rate of HJs in this cluster (5.6% for single stars and 4.5%% for the full sample). This rate is much higher than what has been discovered in the field, either with RV surveys or by transits. High metallicity is not a cause for the excess of HJs in M67, nor can the excess be attributed to high stellar masses. When combining this rate with the non-zero eccentricity of the orbits, our results are qualitatively consistent with a HJ formation scenario dominated by strong encounters with other stars or binary companions and subsequent planet-planet scattering, as predicted by N-body simulations. Based on observations collected at the ESO 3.6 m telescope (La Silla), at the 1.93 m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), at the Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET), at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, La Palma) and at the Euler Swiss Telescope.

  6. RpoS and quorum sensing control expression and polar localization of Vibrio cholerae chemotaxis cluster III proteins in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringgaard, Simon; Hubbard, Troy; Mandlik, Anjali; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-08-01

    The diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae contains three gene clusters that encode chemotaxis-related proteins, but only cluster II appears to be required for chemotaxis. Here, we present the first characterization of V. cholerae's 'cluster III' chemotaxis system. We found that cluster III proteins assemble into foci at bacterial poles, like those formed by cluster II proteins, but the two systems assemble independently and do not colocalize. Cluster III proteins are expressed in vitro during stationary phase and in conjunction with growth arrest linked to carbon starvation. This expression, as well as expression in vivo in suckling rabbits, is dependent upon RpoS. V. cholerae's CAI-1 quorum sensing (QS) system is also required for cluster III expression in stationary phase and modulates its expression in vivo, but is not required for cluster III expression in response to carbon starvation. Surprisingly, even though the CAI-1 and AI-2 QS systems are thought to feed into the same signaling pathway, the AI-2 system inhibited cluster III gene expression, revealing that the outputs of the two QS systems are not always the same. The distinctions between genetic determinants of cluster III expression in vitro and in vivo highlight the distinctive nature of the in vivo environment.

  7. The relation between velocity dispersion and mass in simulated clusters of galaxies: dependence on the tracer and the baryonic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Munari, Emiliano; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe; Fabjan, Dunja

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We present an analysis of the relation between the masses of cluster- and group-sized halos, extracted from $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological N-body and hydrodynamic simulations, and their velocity dispersions, at different redshifts from $z=2$ to $z=0$. The main aim of this analysis is to understand how the implementation of baryonic physics in simulations affects such relation, i.e. to what extent the use of the velocity dispersion as a proxy for cluster mass determination is hampered by the imperfect knowledge of the baryonic physics. In our analysis we use several sets of simulations with different physics implemented. Velocity dispersions are determined using three different tracers, DM particles, subhalos, and galaxies. We confirm that DM particles trace a relation that is fully consistent with the theoretical expectations based on the virial theorem and with previous results presented in the literature. On the other hand, subhalos and galaxies trace steeper relations, and with larger values of the n...

  8. Distribution of Peculiar Radial Velocities in Galactic Clusters in a Model with Dissipative Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, V. V.; Raikov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    A cosmological model with dissipative redshift is analyzed. In this model the observed redshifts of galaxies in groups and clusters consist of a Doppler part and an additional (dissipative) term associated with differences in photon path lengths. The contribution to the redshifts from dissipation is estimated for models of galactic clusters with parameters similar to the observed characteristics of the Virgo and Coma clusters. It is shown that for these models the dissipative contribution is several times smaller than the contribution from the Doppler effect. Nevertheless, the effect is detectable when reliable, redshift independent estimates of the distances to probable members of galactic clusters are available and may serve as an independent test of the nature of the redshift of lines in the spectra of extragalactic objects.

  9. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way III. 139 new open clusters at high Galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmeja, S; Piskunov, A E; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Froebrich, D; Scholz, R -D

    2014-01-01

    An earlier analysis of the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalogue revealed an apparent lack of old (> 1 Gyr) open clusters in the solar neighbourhood ( 20{\\deg}. We were looking for stellar density enhancements using a star count algorithm on the 2MASS point source catalogue. To increase the contrast between potential clusters and the field, we applied filters in colour-magnitude space according to typical colour-magnitude diagrams of nearby old open clusters. The subsequent comparison with lists of known objects allowed us to select thus far unknown cluster candidates. For verification they were processed with the standard pipeline used within the MWSC survey for computing cluster membership probabilities and for determining structural, kinematic, and astrophysical parameters. In total we discovered 782 density enhancements, 522 of which were classified as real objects. Among them 139 are new open clusters with ages 8.3 < log (t [yr]) < 9.7, distances d < 3 kpc, and distances from the Galactic plan...

  10. Theoretical fit of Cepheid light an radial velocity curves in the Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1866

    CERN Document Server

    Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Musella, Ilaria; Brocato, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of multifilter (U,B,V, I and K) light and radial velocity curves of five Classical Cepheids in NGC 1866, a young massive cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The best fit models accounting for the luminosity and radial velocity variations of the five selected variables, four pulsating in the fundamental mode and one in the first overtone, provide direct estimates of their intrinsic stellar parameters and individual distances. The resulting stellar properties indicate a slightly brighter Mass Luminosity relation than the canonical one, possibly due to mild overshooting and/or mass loss. As for the inferred distances, the individual values are consistent within the uncertainties. Moreover, their weighted mean value corresponds to a distance modulus of 18.56 + - 0.03 (stat) + - 0.1 (syst) mag, in agreement with several independent results in the literature.

  11. A new method of measuring the cluster peculiar velocity power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Pengjie; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Stebbins, Albert

    2008-01-01

    We propose to use spatial correlations of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (KSZ) flux as an estimator of the peculiar velocity power spectrum. In contrast with conventional techniques, our new method does not require measurements of the thermal SZ signal or the X-ray temperature. Moreover, this method has the special advantage that the expected systematic errors are always sub-dominant to statistical errors on all scales and redshifts of interest. We show that future large sky coverage KSZ surveys may allow a peculiar velocity power spectrum estimates of an accuracy reaching ~10%.

  12. Properties of Star Clusters -- III: Analysis of 13 FSR Clusters using UKIDSS-GPS and VISTA-VVV

    CERN Document Server

    Buckner, A S M

    2016-01-01

    Discerning the nature of open cluster candidates is essential for both individual and statistical analyses of cluster properties. Here we establish the nature of thirteen cluster candidates from the FSR cluster list using photometry from the 2MASS and deeper, higher resolution UKIDSS-GPS and VISTA-VVV surveys. These clusters were selected because they were flagged in our previous studies as expected to contain a large proportion of pre-main sequence members or are at unusually small/large Galactocentric distances. We employ a decontamination procedure of JHK photometry to identify cluster members. Cluster properties are homogeneously determined and we conduct a cross comparative study of our results with the literature (where available). Seven of the here studied clusters were confirmed to contain PMS stars, one of which is a newly confirmed cluster. Our study of FSR1716 is the deepest to date and is in notable disagreement with previous studies, finding that it has a distance of about 7.3kpc and age of 10-12...

  13. Direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - III. Palomar 4 on an eccentric orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonoozi, Akram Hasani; Haghi, Hosein; Kroupa, Pavel; Küpper, Andreas H. W.; Baumgardt, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Palomar 4 is a low-density globular cluster with a current mass ≈30000 M⊙in the outer halo of the Milky Way with a two-body relaxation time of the order of a Hubble time. Yet, it is strongly mass segregated and contains a stellar mass function depleted of low-mass stars. Pal 4 was either born this way or it is a result of extraordinary dynamical evolution. Since two-body relaxation cannot explain these signatures alone, enhanced mass loss through tidal shocking may have had a strong influence on Pal 4. Here, we compute a grid of direct N-body simulations to model Pal 4 on various eccentric orbits within the Milky Way potential to find likely initial conditions that reproduce its observed mass, half-light radius, stellar MF-slope and line-of-sight velocity dispersion. We find that Pal 4 is most likely orbiting on an eccentric orbit with an eccentricity of e ≈ 0.9 and pericentric distance of Rp ≈ 5 kpc. In this scenario, the required 3D half-mass radius at birth is similar to the average sizes of typical GCs (Rh ≈ 4 - 5 pc), while its birth mass is about M0 ≈ 105 M⊙. We also find a high degree of primordial mass segregation among the cluster stars, which seems to be necessary in every scenario we considered. Thus, using the tidal effect to constrain the perigalactic distance of the orbit of Pal 4, we predict that the proper motion of Pal 4 should be in the range -0.52 ≤ μδ ≤ -0.38 mas yr-1 and -0.30 ≤ μαcos δ ≤ -0.15 mas yr-1.

  14. Clustering of velocities in a GPS network spanning the Sierra Nevada Block, the northern Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt, California-Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The deformation across the Sierra Nevada Block, the Walker Lane Belt, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt (CNSB) between 38.5°N and 40.5°N has been analyzed by clustering GPS velocities to identify coherent blocks. Cluster analysis determines the number of clusters required and assigns the GPS stations to the proper clusters. The clusters are shown on a fault map by symbols located at the positions of the GPS stations, each symbol representing the cluster to which the velocity of that GPS station belongs. Fault systems that separate the clusters are readily identified on such a map. Four significant clusters are identified. Those clusters are strips separated by (from west to east) the Mohawk Valley-Genoa fault system, the Pyramid Lake-Wassuk fault system, and the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. The strain rates within the westernmost three clusters approximate simple right-lateral shear (~13 nstrain/a) across vertical planes roughly parallel to the cluster boundaries. Clustering does not recognize the longitudinal segmentation of the Walker Lane Belt into domains dominated by either northwesterly trending, right-lateral faults or northeasterly trending, left-lateral faults.

  15. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given ΛCDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the ARGO code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate N-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual lightcone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10% of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, e.g. BAO reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ), integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) measurements, or environmental studies.

  16. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  17. Heptanuclear Co(II)5Co(III)2 Cluster as Efficient Water Oxidation Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Heng; Guo, Ling-Yu; Su, Hai-Feng; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Wen-Guang; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2017-02-06

    Inspired by the transition-metal-oxo cubical Mn4CaO5 in photosystem II, we herein report a disc-like heptanuclear mixed-valent cobalt cluster, [Co(II)5Co(III)2(mdea)4(N3)2(CH3CN)6(OH)2(H2O)2·4ClO4] (1, H2mdea = N-methyldiethanolamine), for photocatalytic oxygen evolution. The topology of the Co7 core resembles a small piece of cobaltate protected by terminal H2O, N3(-), CH3CN, and multidentate N-methyldiethanolamine at the periphery. Under the optimal photocatalytic conditions, 1 exhibits water oxidation activity with a turnover number (TON) of 210 and a turnover frequency (TOFinitial) of 0.23 s(-1). Importantly, electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to not only identify the possible main active species in the water oxidation reaction but also monitor the evolutions of oxidation states of cobalt during the photocatalytic reactions. These results shed light on the design concept of new water oxidation catalysts and mechanism-related issues such as the key active intermediate and oxidation state evolution in the oxygen evolution process. The magnetic properties of 1 were also discussed in detail.

  18. Mass Calibration and Cosmological Analysis of the SPT-SZ Galaxy Cluster Sample Using Velocity Dispersion $\\sigma_v$ and X-ray $Y_\\textrm{X}$ Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bocquet, S; Mohr, J J; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bayliss, M; Bazin, G; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiu, I; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Desai, S; de Haan, T; Dietrich, J P; Dobbs, M A; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; Gangkofner, D; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Hennig, C; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a velocity dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_v$) and 16 X-ray Yx measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. The calibrations using $\\sigma_v$ and Yx are consistent at the $0.6\\sigma$ level, with the $\\sigma_v$ calibration preferring ~16% higher masses. We use the full cluster dataset to measure $\\sigma_8(\\Omega_ m/0.27)^{0.3}=0.809\\pm0.036$. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming the sum of the neutrino masses is $\\sum m_\

  19. THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE CLUSTER SURVEY. III. CLUSTER CATALOG FROM 2005-2012 ARCHIVAL DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Teng; Wang, Jun-Xian [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Tozzi, Paolo; Tundo, Elena [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Moretti, Alberto [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Brera 28, I-20121 Milano (Italy); Rosati, Piero [Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Via Saragat 1, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Campana, Sergio [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Giavalisco, Mauro, E-mail: liuteng@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present the Swift X-ray Cluster Survey (SWXCS) catalog obtained using archival data from the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite acquired from 2005 February to 2012 November, extending the first release of the SWXCS. The catalog provides positions, soft fluxes, and, when possible, optical counterparts for a flux-limited sample of X-ray group and cluster candidates. We consider the fields with Galactic latitude |b| > 20° to avoid high H I column densities. We discard all of the observations targeted at groups or clusters of galaxies, as well as particular extragalactic fields not suitable to search for faint extended sources. We finally select ∼3000 useful fields covering a total solid angle of ∼400 deg{sup 2}. We identify extended source candidates in the soft-band (0.5-2 keV) images of these fields using the software EXSdetect, which is specifically calibrated for the XRT data. Extensive simulations are used to evaluate contamination and completeness as a function of the source signal, allowing us to minimize the number of spurious detections and to robustly assess the selection function. Our catalog includes 263 candidate galaxy clusters and groups down to a flux limit of 7 × 10{sup –15} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} in the soft band, and the logN-logS is in very good agreement with previous deep X-ray surveys. The final list of sources is cross-correlated with published optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zeldovich catalogs of clusters. We find that 137 sources have been previously identified as clusters in the literature in independent surveys, while 126 are new detections. Currently, we have collected redshift information for 158 sources (60% of the entire sample). Once the optical follow-up and the X-ray spectral analysis of the sources are complete, the SWXCS will provide a large and well-defined catalog of groups and clusters of galaxies to perform statistical studies of cluster properties and tests of cosmological models.

  20. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ata, Metin; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E; Ferraro, Simone; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perciva, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G; Schlege, David; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the \\textsc{argo} code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate $N$-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to $k\\sim0.2\\, h$ Mpc$^{-1}$, and vanishing quadrupoles down to $\\sim20\\,h^{-1}$ Mpc. We also demonstrate tha...

  1. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Galleti, S; Buzzoni, A; Federici, L; Pecci, F Fusi

    2009-01-01

    We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for 245 old globular clusters of the M31 galaxy comprised in the Revised Bologna Catalog. The metallicity distribution of the M31 globular clusters is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistics suggests that the [Fe/H] distribution is likely not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed at the center of the system and share the galactic rotation as traced by the HI disk. Although the velocity dispersion around the curve increases with decreasing metallicity, also clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotational pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts.

  2. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. III. MEASURING AGES AND MASSES OF PARTIALLY RESOLVED STELLAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Lori C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Ben F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larsen, Soren S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Melbourne, Jason L. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: beermalc@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The apparent age and mass of a stellar cluster can be strongly affected by stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), when inferred from the integrated color of low-mass clusters ({approx}<10{sup 4} M {sub Sun }). We use simulated star clusters to show that these effects are minimized when the brightest, rapidly evolving stars in a cluster can be resolved, and the light of the fainter, more numerous unresolved stars can be analyzed separately. When comparing the light from the less luminous cluster members to models of unresolved light, more accurate age estimates can be obtained than when analyzing the integrated light from the entire cluster under the assumption that the IMF is fully populated. We show the success of this technique first using simulated clusters, and then with a stellar cluster in M31. This method represents one way of accounting for the discrete, stochastic sampling of the stellar IMF in less massive clusters and can be leveraged in studies of clusters throughout the Local Group and other nearby galaxies.

  3. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fraia, M., E-mail: michele.di.fraia@desy.de [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 – Km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); O’Keeffe, P. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Lyamayev, V. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Feyer, V.; Moise, A. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 – Km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Devetta, M.; Piseri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, M. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  4. Photodissociation of pyrrole-ammonia clusters by velocity map imaging: mechanism for the H-atom transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Lago, L; Amaral, G A; Oldani, A N; Rodríguez, J D; González, M G; Pino, G A; Bañares, L

    2011-01-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole-ammonia clusters (PyH·(NH(3))(n), n = 2-6) has been studied using a combination of velocity map imaging and non-resonant detection of the NH(4)(NH(3))(n-1) products. The excited state hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism (ESHT) is evidenced through delayed ionization and presents a threshold around 236.6 nm, in agreement with previous reports. A high resolution determination of the kinetic energy distributions (KEDs) of the products reveals slow (∼0.15 eV) and structured distributions for all the ammonia cluster masses studied. The low values of the measured kinetic energy rule out the existence of a long-lived intermediate state, as it has been proposed previously. Instead, a direct N-H bond rupture, in the fashion of the photodissociation of bare pyrrole, is proposed. This assumption is supported by a careful analysis of the structure of the measured KEDs in terms of a discrete vibrational activity of the pyrrolyl co-fragment.

  5. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for the old globular clusters of the M 31 galaxy. The final aim is to add homogeneous spectroscopic metallicities to as many entries as possible of the Revised Bologna Catalog of M 31 clusters, by reporting Lick index measurements from any source (literature, new observations, etc.) on the same scale. Methods: New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2≤ [Fe/H]≤ +0.5. Lick indices for M 31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M 31. Results: Our values are in good agreement with recent estimates based on detailed spectral fitting and with those obtained from color magnitude diagrams of clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. The typical uncertainty on individual estimates is ≃±0.25 dex, as resulted from the comparison with metallicities derived from color magnitude diagrams of individual clusters. Conclusions: The metallicity distribution of M 31 globular cluster is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistical tests suggest that the distribution is probably not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed into the center of the system and to cluster tightly around the galactic rotation curve defined by the HI disk, while the velocity dispersion about the curve increases with decreasing metallicity. However, also the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotation pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts. Based on observations made at La Palma, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque

  6. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury III. Measuring Ages and Masses of Partially Resolved Stellar Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Beerman, Lori C; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Weisz, Daniel R; Seth, Anil C; Williams, Ben F; Bell, Eric F; Bianchi, Luciana C; Caldwell, Nelson; Dolphin, Andrew E; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Kalirai, Jason S; Larsen, Søren S; Melbourne, Jason L; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skillman, Evan D

    2012-01-01

    The apparent age and mass of a stellar cluster can be strongly affected by stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function, when inferred from the integrated color of low mass clusters (less than ~10^4 solar masses). We use simulated star clusters to show that these effects are minimized when the brightest, rapidly evolving stars in a cluster can be resolved, and the light of the fainter, more numerous unresolved stars can be analyzed separately. When comparing the light from the less luminous cluster members to models of unresolved light, more accurate age estimates can be obtained than when analyzing the integrated light from the entire cluster under the assumption that the initial mass function is fully populated. We show the success of this technique first using simulated clusters, and then with a stellar cluster in M31. This method represents one way of accounting for the discrete, stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function in less massive clusters and can be leveraged in studies o...

  7. A compilation of redshifts and velocity dispersions for Abell clusters (Struble and Rood 1987): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The machine readable version of the compilation, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The catalog contains redshifts and velocity dispersions for all Abell clusters for which these data had been published up to 1986 July. Also included are 1950 equatorial coordinates for the centers of the listed clusters, numbers of observations used to determine the redshifts, and bibliographical references citing the data sources.

  8. Measures of Galaxy Environment - III. Difficulties in identifying proto-clusters at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Shattow, Genevieve M; Skibba, Ramin A; Muldrew, Stuart I; Pearce, Frazer R; Abbas, Ummi

    2013-01-01

    Galaxy environment is frequently discussed, but inconsistently defined. It is especially difficult to measure at high redshift where only photometric redshifts are available. With a focus on early forming proto-clusters, we use a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation to show how the environment measurement around high redshift galaxies is sensitive to both scale and metric, as well as to cluster viewing angle, evolutionary state, and the availability of either spectroscopic or photometric data. We use two types of environment metrics (nearest neighbour and fixed aperture) at a range of scales on simulated high-z clusters to see how "observed" overdensities compare to "real" overdensities. We also "observationally" identify z = 2 proto-cluster candidates in our model and track the growth histories of their parent halos through time, considering in particular their final state at z = 0. Although the measured environment of early forming clusters is critically dependent on all of the above effects (and in pa...

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations of Globular Cluster Evolution. III. Primordial Binary Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fregeau, J M; Joshi, K J; Rasio, F A

    2003-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of globular clusters using our 2D Monte Carlo code with the inclusion of primordial binary interactions for equal-mass stars. We use approximate analytical cross sections for energy generation from binary-binary and binary-single interactions. After a brief period of slight contraction or expansion of the core over the first few relaxation times, all clusters enter a much longer phase of stable "binary burning" lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of our models during this phase match well those of most observed globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. Our results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is easily...

  10. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS). III. The Young Open Cluster NGC 1893 in the H II Region W8

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Kim, Jinyoung S; Bessell, Michael S; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    We present a UBV I and H alpha photometric study of the young open cluster NGC 1893 in the H II region W8 (IC 410 or Sh 2-236). A total of 65 early-type members are selected from photometric diagrams. A mean reddening of the stars is = 0.563 +/- 0.083 mag. The published photometric data in the near- and mid-infrared passbands are used to test the reddening law toward the cluster, and we confirm that the reddening law is normal (R_V = 3.1). Zero-age main sequence fitting gives a distance modulus of V_0 - M_V = 12.7 +/- 0.2 mag, equivalent to 3.5 +/- 0.3 kpc. From H alpha photometry 125 H alpha emission stars and candidates are identified as pre-main sequence (PMS). The lists of young stellar objects and X-ray sources published by previous studies allow us to select a large number of PMS members down to 1 M_sun. Isochrone fitting in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram gives a turn-off age of 1.5 Myr and the median age of 1.9 Myr from the PMS members with a spread of 5 Myr. We derive the initial mass function (IMF)...

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: anisotropic galaxy clustering in Fourier space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee-Jong; Saito, Shun; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the anisotropic clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 sample, which consists of 1198 006 galaxies in the redshift range 0.2 measure redshift-space distortions simultaneously with the Alcock-Paczynski effect and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale. We include the power-spectrum monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole in our analysis and compare our measurements with a perturbation-theory-based model, while properly accounting for the survey window function. To evaluate the reliability of our analysis pipeline, we participate in a mock challenge, which results in systematic uncertainties significantly smaller than the statistical uncertainties. While the high-redshift constraint on fσ8 at zeff = 0.61 indicates a small (∼1.4σ) deviation from the prediction of the Planck ΛCDM (Λ cold dark matter) model, the low-redshift constraint is in good agreement with Planck ΛCDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  12. Detecting Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters with PLANCK: III. Properties of the expected SZ-cluster sample

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, B M; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The PLANCK-mission is the most sensitive all-sky submillimetric mission currently being planned and prepared. Special emphasis is given to the observation of clusters of galaxies by their thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. In this work, the results of a simulation are presented that combines all-sky maps of the thermal and kinetic SZ-effect with cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations, Galactic foregrounds (synchrotron emission, thermal emission from dust, free-free emission and rotational transitions of carbon monoxide molecules) and sub-millimetric emission from planets and asteroids of the Solar System. Observational issues, such as PLANCKs beam shapes, frequency response and spatially non-uniform instrumental noise have been incorporated. Matched and scale-adaptive multi-frequency filtering schemes have been extended to spherical coordinates and are now applied to the data sets in order to isolate and amplify the weak thermal SZ-signal. The properties of the resulting SZ-cluster sample are cha...

  13. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ariel G; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. We present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift-space distortions (RSD), based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements a...

  14. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) study of a methoxide-bridged DyIII-CrIII cluster obtained by fluoride abstraction from cis-[CrIIIF2(phen)2]+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreiser, Jan; Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Birk, Torben

    2012-01-01

    An isostructural series of dinuclear chromium(III)-lanthanide(III) clusters is formed by fluoride abstraction of cis-[CrF(2)(phen)(2)](+) by Ln(3+) resulting in LnF(3) and methoxide-bridged Cr-Ln clusters (Ln = Nd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3)) of formula [Cr(III)(phen)(2)(µ-MeO)(2)Ln(NO(3))(4)]·xMeOH (x = 2...

  15. CoMaLit III. Literature Catalogs of weak Lensing Clusters of galaxies (LC^2)

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the mass of clusters of galaxies is crucial for their use in cosmology and astrophysics. Masses can be efficiently determined with weak lensing (WL) analyses. I compiled from Literature a Catalog of weak Lensing Clusters (LC^2). Cluster identifiers, coordinates, and redshifts have been standardised. WL masses were reported to over-densities of 2500, 500, 200, and to the virial one in the reference Lambda-CDM model. Duplicate entries were carefully handled. I produced three catalogs: LC^2-single, with 485 unique groups and clusters analysed with the single-halo model; LC^2-substructure, listing substructures in complex systems; LC^2-all, listing all the 822 WL masses found in literature. The catalogs are publicly available at https://www.dropbox.com/sh/hukhb24c3ahiun2/AADVuW7yUAA2XjyDrFwofejAa?dl=0

  16. Cosmology and Astrophysics from Relaxed Galaxy Clusters III: Thermodynamic Profiles and Scaling Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Mantz, Adam B; Morris, R Glenn; Schmidt, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot (i.e., massive) in Papers I and II of this series. Here we consider the thermodynamics of the intracluster medium, in particular the profiles of density, temperature and related quantities, as well as integrated measurements of gas mass, average temperature, total luminosity and center-excluded luminosity. We fit power-law scaling relations of each of these quantities as a function of redshift and cluster mass, which can be measured precisely and with minimal bias for these relaxed clusters. For the thermodynamic profiles, we jointly model the density and temperature and their intrinsic scatter as a function of radius, thus also capturing the behavior of the gas pressure and entropy. For the integrated quantities, we also jointly fit a multidimensional intrinsic covariance, providing the first observati...

  17. Galaxy Clusters in the Line of Sight to Background Quasars - III Multi-Object Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, H; Lopez, S; Lira, P; Padilla, N; Gilbank, D G; Lacerna, I; Maureira, M J; Ellingson, E; Gladders, M D; Yee, H K C

    2013-01-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight-lines taken from Lopez et al. (2008). The targets were selected based on the presence of a intervening MgII absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance < 2 h^{-1}Mpc from the QSO sight-line (a 'photometric-hit'). The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 angstroms. Our aim was 3-fold: 1) identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, 2) confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and 3) determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. Our main findings are: 1) the identification of 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts up to 1.0955. 2) The spectroscopic confirmation of 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z < 0.7. 3) Following fr...

  18. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca II triplet spectroscopy of open clusters II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603 and NGC 7245

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, R; Ospina, N; Balaguer-Nuñez, L; Jordi, C; Monteagudo, L

    2015-01-01

    Context: Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R~8000) in the infrared region Ca II triplet lines (~8500 AA) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5~m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca II lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain = 48.6+/-3.4, -58.4+/-6.8, 26.0+/-4.3 and -65.3+/-3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603 and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [Fe/H] =-0.25+...

  19. Biases on Initial Mass Function Determinations. III. Cluster Masses Derived from Unresolved Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2009-07-01

    It is currently common to use spatially unresolved multifilter broadband photometry to determine the masses of individual stellar clusters (and hence the cluster mass function, CMF). I analyze the stochastic effects introduced by the sampling of the stellar initial mass function (SIMF) in the derivation of the individual masses and the CMF, and I establish that such effects are the largest contributor to the observational uncertainties. An analytical solution, valid in the limit where uncertainties are small, is provided to establish the range of cluster masses over which the CMF slope can be obtained with a given accuracy. The validity of the analytical solution is extended to higher mass uncertainties using Monte Carlo simulations and the Gamma approximation. The value of the Poisson mass is calculated for a large range of ages and a variety of filters for solar-metallicity clusters measured with single-filter photometry. A method that uses the code CHORIZOS is presented to simultaneously derive masses, ages, and extinctions. The classical method of using unweighted UBV photometry to simultaneously establish ages and extinctions of stellar clusters is found to be unreliable for clusters older than ≈30 Ma, even for relatively large cluster masses. On the other hand, augmenting the filter set to include longer-wavelength filters and using weights for each filter increases the range of masses and ages that can be accurately measured with unresolved photometry. Nevertheless, a relatively large range of masses and ages is found to be dominated by SIMF sampling effects that render the observed masses useless, even when using UBVRIJHK photometry. A revision of some literature results affected by these effects is presented and possible solutions for future observations and analyses are suggested.

  20. The XXL Survey III. Luminosity-temperature relation of the Bright Cluster Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Giles, P A; Pacaud, F; Lieu, M; Clerc, N; Pierre, M; Adami, C; Chiappetti, L; Démoclés, J; Ettori, S; Févre, J P Le; Ponman, T; Sadibekova, T; Smith, G P; Willis, J P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg$^{2}$, the survey contains several hundred galaxy clusters out to a redshift of $\\approx$2 above an X-ray flux limit of $\\sim$5$\\times10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. This paper belongs to the first series of XXL papers focusing on the bright cluster sample. We investigate the luminosity-temperature (LT) relation for the brightest clusters detected in the XXL Survey, taking fully into account the selection biases. We investigate the form of the LT relation, placing constraints on its evolution. We have classified the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey based on their measured X-ray flux. These 100 clusters have been analysed to determine their luminosity and temperature to evaluate the LT relation. We used three methods to fit the LT relation, with two of these methods providing a prescription to fully take into account the selection effects of the survey. We measure the evolution of the LT relation ...

  1. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  2. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters III. Abell 2029, Abell 2052, Abell 2142

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    A sample of five rich galaxy clusters has been mapped by ISO at 60 mum, 100 mum, 135 mum, and 200 mum using the PHT-C camera. In previous papers Abell 2670 and Sersic 159-03 were discussed. Here we present the results for Abell 2029, Abell 2052, and Abell 2142. The conclusion of the survey...

  3. Cross-correlation Weak Lensing of SDSS Galaxy Clusters III: Mass-to-light Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Sheldon, Erin S; Masjedi, Morad; McKay, Timothy A; Blanton, Michael R; Scranton, Ryan; Wechsler, Risa H; Koester, Ben P; Hansen, Sarah M; Frieman, Joshua A; Annis, James

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the excess mass-to-light ratio (M/L) measured around MaxBCG galaxy clusters observed in the SDSS. Using cross-correlation weak lensing, we measure the excess mass density profile above the universal mean \\Delta \\rho(r) = \\rho(r) - \\bar{\\rho} for clusters in bins of richness and optical luminosity. We also measure the excess ^{0.25}i-band luminosity density \\Delta l(r) = l(r) - \\bar{l}. For both mass and light, we de-project the profiles to produce 3D mass and light profiles over scales from 25 kpc/h to 22 Mpc/h. From these profiles we calculate the cumulative excess mass \\Delta M(r) and excess light \\Delta L(r) as a function of separation from the BCG. On small scales, where \\rho(r) >> \\bar{\\rho}, the integrated M/L profile may be interpreted as the cluster M/L. We find the (\\Delta M/\\Delta L)_{200}, the M/L within r_{200}, scales with cluster mass as a power law with index 0.33+/-0.02. On large scales, where \\rho(r) . We find /b^2_{ml} = 362+/-54 h measured in the ^{0.25}i-bandpass...

  4. Cold gas properties of the Herschel Reference Survey. III. Molecular gas stripping in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Boquien, M; Boissier, S; Catinella, B; Gavazzi, G; Lagos, C; Saintonge, A

    2014-01-01

    The HRS is a complete volume-limited sample of nearby objects including Virgo cluster and isolated objects. Using a recent compilation of HI and CO data we study the effects of the cluster on the molecular gas content of spiral galaxies. We first identify M* as the scaling variable that traces the total H2 mass of galaxies better. We show that, on average, HI-deficient galaxies are significantly offset from the M(H2) vs. M* relation for HI-normal galaxies. We use the M(H2) vs. M* scaling relation to define the H2-deficiency parameter. This parameter shows a weak and scattered relation with the HI-def, here taken as a proxy for galaxy interactions with the cluster environment. We also show that, as for the HI, the extent of the H2 disc decreases with increasing HI-deficiency. These results show that cluster galaxies have, on average, a lower H2 content than similar objects in the field. The slope of the H2-def vs. HI-def relation is less than 1, while the D(HI)/D(i) vs. HI-def relation is steeper than the D(CO...

  5. Clustering of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Photometric Luminous Galaxies: The Measurement, Systematics and Cosmological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Shirley; Seo, Hee-Jong; de Putter, Roland; Ross, Ashley J; White, Martin; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Saito, Shun; Schlegel, David J; Schlafly, Eddie; Seljak, Uros; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Sanchez, Ariel G; Percival, Will J; Blanton, Michael; Skibba, Ramin; Schneider, Don; Reid, Beth; Mena, Olga; Viel, Matteo; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Prada, Francisco; Weaver, Benjamin; Bahcall, Neta; Bizyaev, Dimitry; Brewinton, Howard; Brinkman, Jon; da Costa, Luiz Nicolaci; Gott, John R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Nichol, Bob; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Ross, Nicholas P; Simmons, Audrey; de Simoni, Fernando; Snedden, Stephanie; Yeche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between $z=0.45$ and $z=0.65$, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. (2011). This data-set spans 11,000 square degrees and probes a volume of $3h^{-3} \\rm{Gpc}^3$, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at 4 redshift slices with an accuracy of ~15% with bin size of delta_l = 10 on scales of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) (at l~40-400). We derive cosmological constraints using the full-shape of the power-spectra. For a flat Lambda CDM model, when combined with Cosmic Microwave Background Wilkinson Microw...

  6. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters III. Abell 2029, Abell 2052, Abell 2142

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    A sample of five rich galaxy clusters has been mapped by ISO at 60 mum, 100 mum, 135 mum, and 200 mum using the PHT-C camera. In previous papers Abell 2670 and Sersic 159-03 were discussed. Here we present the results for Abell 2029, Abell 2052, and Abell 2142. The conclusion of the survey...

  7. Testing intermediate-age stellar evolution models with VLT photometry of LMC clusters. III. Padova results

    CERN Document Server

    Bertelli, G; Girardi, L; Chiosi, C; Zoccali, M; Gallart, C

    2002-01-01

    The color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of three intermediate-age LMC clusters, NGC 2173, SL556 and NGC2155 are analyzed to determine their age and metallicity basing on Padova stellar models. Synthetic CMDs are compared with cluster data. The best match is obtained using two fitting functions based on star counts in the different bins of the cluster CMD. Two different criteria are used. One of them takes into account the uncertainties in the color of the red clump stars. Given the uncertainties on the experimental values of the clusters metallicity, we provide a set of acceptable solutions. They define the correspondent values of metallicity, age, reddening and distance modulus (for the assumed IMF). The comparison with Padova models suggests for NGC 2173 a prolonged star formation (spanning a period of about 0.3 Gyr), beginning 1.7 Gyr and ending 1.4 Gyr ago. The metallicity Z is in the range 0.0016 $-$ 0.003. Contrary to what suggested for NGC 2173 a period of extended star formation was not required to fit th...

  8. Biases on initial mass function determinations. III. Cluster masses derived from unresolved photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz

    2009-01-01

    It is currently common to use spatially unresolved multi-filter broad-band photometry to determine the masses of individual stellar clusters (and hence the cluster mass function, CMF). I analyze the stochastic effects introduced by the sampling of the stellar initial mass function (SIMF) in the derivation of the individual masses and the CMF and I establish that such effects are the largest contributor to the observational uncertainties. An analytical solution, valid in the limit where uncertainties are small, is provided to establish the range of cluster masses over which the CMF slope can be obtained with a given accuracy. The validity of the analytical solution is extended to higher mass uncertainties using Monte Carlo simulations and the Gamma approximation. The value of the Poisson mass is calculated for a large range of ages and a variety of filters for solar-metallicity clusters measured with single-filter photometry. A method that uses the code CHORIZOS is presented to simultaneously derive masses, ag...

  9. Galactic Dark Matter Halos and Globular Cluster Populations. III. Extension to Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Harris, Gretchen L. H.

    2017-02-01

    The total mass {M}{GCS} in the globular cluster (GC) system of a galaxy is empirically a near-constant fraction of the total mass {M}h\\equiv {M}{bary}+{M}{dark} of the galaxy across a range of 105 in galaxy mass. This trend is radically unlike the strongly nonlinear behavior of total stellar mass M ⋆ versus M h . We discuss extensions of this trend to two more extreme situations: (a) entire clusters of galaxies and (b) the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) recently discovered in Coma and elsewhere. Our calibration of the ratio {η }M={M}{GCS}/{M}h from normal galaxies, accounting for new revisions in the adopted mass-to-light ratio for GCs, now gives {η }M=2.9× {10}-5 as the mean absolute mass fraction. We find that the same ratio appears valid for galaxy clusters and UDGs. Estimates of {η }M in the four clusters we examine tend to be slightly higher than for individual galaxies, but more data and better constraints on the mean GC mass in such systems are needed to determine if this difference is significant. We use the constancy of {η }M to estimate total masses for several individual cases; for example, the total mass of the Milky Way is calculated to be {M}h=1.1× {10}12 {M}ȯ . Physical explanations for the uniformity of {η }M are still descriptive, but point to a picture in which massive dense star clusters in their formation stages were relatively immune to the feedback that more strongly influenced lower-density regions where most stars form.

  10. High Velocity Jet Noise Source Location and Reduction. Task 3 - Experimental Investigation of Suppression Principles Volume III - Suppressor Concepts Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENr AC(CE-ION FOR __-- D DTIf DTIC mic TUB8 UNAflNOUNMI) QT JUSTWICA )ON ELECTE _______JAN 29 19810 A Vl AD WIIXYilf ""W AVAIL...mass average velocity, Vma, and total temperature, Tma , are calculated using vowO + viwi Ti We+ T wi Vma = + w Tma wo + wi 4. A modified density

  11. Oxoselenido clusters of the lanthanides: rational introduction of oxo ligands and near-IR emission from Nd(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Huebner, Louise; Romanelli, Michael D; Kumar, G Ajith; Riman, Richard E; Emge, Thomas J; Brennan, John G

    2005-11-16

    Reactions of Ln(SePh)3 with SeO2 in THF give octanuclear oxoselenido clusters with the general formula (THF)8Ln8O2Se2(SePh)16 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm). In this isomorphous series, the eight Ln(III) ions are connected in the center by a pair of mu3-O2- ligands and mu5-Se2- ligands, with 14 bridging and two terminal selenolate ligands capping the cluster surface. Thermal decomposition at 700 degrees C of the Nd compound in vacuo led to the formation of a phase mixture of NdSe2, Nd2Se3, and Nd2O3. Near-IR emission experiments on the (THF)8Nd8O2Se2(SePh)16 and the fluorinated thiolate compound (DME)2Nd(SC6F5)3 demonstrate that clusters with oxo ligands are not only highly emissive, but also they emit at wavelengths not found in conventional oxides.

  12. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminosity and Color Dependence and Redshift Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Weinberg, David H; Berlind, Andreas A; Blanton, Michael; Chen, Yanmei; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ho, Shirley; Kazin, Eyal; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Nuza, Sebastian E; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Ariel G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin A; Swanson, Molly E C; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A; White, Martin; Bahcall, Neta A; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Bundy, Kevin; da Costa, Luiz N A; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Rossi, Graziano; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Streblyanska, Alina; Thomas, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We measure the luminosity and color dependence and the redshift evolution of galaxy clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Ninth Data Release. We focus on the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of subsets of its CMASS sample, which includes about 260,000 galaxies over ~3,300 sq. deg in the redshift range 0.43clustering, we construct well-defined luminosity and color subsamples by carefully accounting for the CMASS galaxy selection cuts. The 2PCF of the whole CMASS sample, if approximated by a power-law, has a correlation length of r_0=7.93\\pm0.06Mpc/h and an index of \\gamma=1.85\\pm0.01. Clear dependences on galaxy luminosity and color are found for the projected 2PCF in all redshift bins, with more luminous and redder galaxies generally exhibiting stronger clustering and steeper 2PCF. The color dependence is also clearly seen for galaxies within the red sequence, consistent with the behavior o...

  13. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. We present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements are highly correlated. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The methodology presented here is used in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  14. Relative relocation of earthquakes without a predefined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Relative relocation methods are commonly used to precisely relocate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-relocation process. With a synthetic test w...

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ariel G; Crocce, Martin; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; DallaVecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, galaxy bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales $s \\gtrsim 20\\,h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc}$. We combined the galaxy clustering information from BOSS with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter to $w_{\\rm DE}=-0.996\\pm0.042$ when assumed time-independent, the curvature of the Universe to $\\Omega_{k}=-0.0007\\pm 0.0030$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to $\\sum m_{\

  16. Cobalt(III)-oxo cubane clusters as catalysts for oxidation of organic substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Birinchi Kumar Das; Rajesh Chakrabarty

    2011-03-01

    Transition metal coordination complexes play a vital role as catalysts in the oxidation of organic substrates including renewable chemicals in an economically viable and environmentally friendly way. Here we highlight the preparation, characterization and application of oxo-cubane complexes of cobalt(III) as oxidation catalysts using air and water as oxidants. Cobalt(III)-oxo complexes of the type Co4O4(O2CR)4L4 have been prepared by a general method and these have been characterized by analytical, spectroscopic, electrochemical and crystallographic methods. These soluble complexes have shown promising utility as catalysts in the aerobic oxidation of side chains of alkylaromatic hydrocarbon compounds. Oxidation of neat ethylbenzene has shown very high conversion and selectivity for acetophenone formation. On the other hand, oxidation of -xylene has been found to yield both -toluic acid and terephthalic acid. It is also possible to oxidize -xylene in an aqueous medium under moderate applied O2 pressure. Selective epoxidation of -pinene with air as the oxidant also takes place with the cobalt(III)-based homogeneous catalysts.

  17. CLASH-VLT: The mass, velocity-anisotropy, and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of the z=0.44 galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847

    CERN Document Server

    Biviano, A; Balestra, I; Mercurio, A; Girardi, M; Nonino, M; Grillo, C; Scodeggio, M; Lemze, D; Kelson, D; Umetsu, K; Postman, M; Zitrin, A; Czoske, O; Ettori, S; Lombardi, M; Maier, C; Medezinski, E; Mei, S; Presotto, V; Tozzi, P; Ziegler, B; Annunziatella, M; Bartelmann, M; Benitez, N; Bradley, L; Brescia, M; Broadhurst, T; Coe, D; Demarco, R; Donahue, M; Ford, H; Gobat, R; Graves, G; Koekemoer, A; Kuchner, U; Melchior, P; Meneghetti, M; Merten, J; Moustakas, L; Munari, E; Regos, E; Sartoris, B; Seitz, S; Zheng, W

    2013-01-01

    We use an unprecedented data-set of about 600 redshifts for cluster members, obtained as part of a VLT/VIMOS large programme, to constrain the mass profile of the z=0.44 cluster MACS J1206.2-0847 over the radial range 0-5 Mpc (0-2.5 virial radii) using the MAMPOSSt and Caustic methods. We then add external constraints from the gravitational lensing analysis of Umetsu et al. (2012). We invert the Jeans equation to obtain the velocity-anisotropy profiles of cluster members. With the mass-density and velocity-anisotropy profiles we then obtain the first determination of a cluster pseudo-phase-space density profile. The kinematics and lensing determinations of the cluster mass profile are in excellent agreement. This is very well fitted by a NFW model with mass M200=(1.4 +- 0.2) 10^15 Msun and concentration c200=6 +- 1, only slightly higher than theoretical expectations. Other mass profile models also provide acceptable fits to our data, of (slightly) lower (Burkert, Hernquist, and Softened Isothermal Sphere) or ...

  18. The Formation of Supermassive Black Holes from Population III.1 Seeds. I. Cosmic Formation Histories and Clustering Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Monaco, Pierluigi

    2016-08-15

    We calculate the cosmic distributions in space and time of the formation sites of the first, "Pop III.1" stars, exploring a model in which these are the progenitors of all supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Pop III.1 stars are defined to form from primordial composition gas in dark matter minihalos with $\\sim10^6\\:M_\\odot$ that are isolated from neighboring astrophysical sources by a given isolation distance, $d_{\\rm{iso}}$. We assume Pop III.1 sources are seeds of SMBHs, based on protostellar support by dark matter annihilation heating that allows them to accrete a large fraction of their minihalo gas, i.e., $\\sim 10^5\\:M_\\odot$. Exploring $d_{\\rm{iso}}$ from 10--$100\\:\\rm{kpc}$ (proper distances), we predict the redshift evolution of Pop III.1 source and SMBH remnant number densities. The local, $z=0$ density of SMBHs constrains $d_{\\rm{iso}}\\lesssim 100\\:\\rm{kpc}$ (i.e., $3\\:\\rm{Mpc}$ comoving distance at $z\\simeq30$). In our simulated ($\\sim60\\:\\rm{Mpc}$)$^3$ comoving volume, Pop III.1 stars start forming just after $z=40$. Their formation is largely complete by $z\\simeq25$ to 20 for $d_{\\rm{iso}}=100$ to $50\\:\\rm{kpc}$. We follow source evolution to $z=10$, by which point most SMBHs reside in halos with $\\gtrsim10^8\\:M_\\odot$. Over this period, there is relatively limited merging of SMBHs for these values of $d_{\\rm{iso}}$. We also predict SMBH clustering properties at $z=10$: feedback suppression of neighboring sources leads to relatively flat angular correlation functions. Finally, we consider a simple "Str\\"omgren" model for $d_{\\rm iso}$, based on ionizing feedback from zero age main sequence supermassive Pop III.1 stars that may be the direct progenitors of SMBHs in this scenario. Such models naturally produce feedback effects on scales of $\\sim100\\:$kpc and thus self-consistently generate a SMBH number density similar to the observed value.

  19. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. VII. A low velocity dispersion for the young massive cluster R136

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hénault-Brunet, V.; Evans, C.J.; Sana, H.; Gieles, M.; Bastian, N.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Markova, N.; Taylor, W.D.; Bressert, E.; Crowther, P.A.; van Loon, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed studies of resolved young massive star clusters are necessary to determine their dynamical state and evaluate the importance of gas expulsion and early cluster evolution. In an effort to gain insight into the dynamical state of the young massive cluster R136 and obtain the first measurement

  20. The SDSS-III DR12 MARVELS radial velocity data release: the first data release from the multiple object Doppler exoplanet survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Li, Rui; Senan Seieroe Grieves, Nolan; Ma, Bo; de Lee, Nathan M.; Lee, Brian C.; Liu, Jian; Bolton, Adam S.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Weaver, Benjamin; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We present the first data release from the SDSS-III Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) through the SDSS-III DR12. The data include 181,198 radial velocity (RV) measurements for a total of 5520 different FGK stars with V~7.6-12, of which more than 80% are dwarfs and subdwarfs while remainders are GK giants, among a total of 92 fields nearly randomly spread out over the entire northern sky taken with a 60-object MARVELS dispersed fixed-delay interferometer instrument over four years (2008-2012). There were 55 fields with a total of 3300 FGK stars which had 14 or more observations over about 2-year survey window. The median number of observations for these plates is 27 RV measurements. This represents the largest homogeneous sample of precision RV measurements of relatively bright stars. In this first released data, a total of 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries with additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are reported. The released data were produced by the MARVELS finalized 1D pipeline. We will also report preliminary statistical results from the MARVELS 2D data pipeline which has produced a median RV precision of ~30 m/s for stable stars.

  1. Population Parameters of Intermediate-Age Star Clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. III. Dynamical Evidence for a Range of Ages Being Responsible for Extended Main Sequence Turnoffs

    CERN Document Server

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Chandar, Rupali; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera

    2011-01-01

    We present new analysis of 11 intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr) star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. Seven of the clusters feature main sequence turnoff (MSTO) regions that are wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population, whereas their red giant branches indicate a single value of [Fe/H]. The star clusters cover a range in present-day mass from about 1E4 to 2E5 solar masses. We compare radial distributions of stars in the upper and lower parts of the MSTO region, and calculate cluster masses and escape velocities from the present time back to a cluster age of 10 Myr. Our main result is that for all clusters in our sample with estimated escape velocities > 15 km/s at an age of 10 Myr, the stars in the brightest half of the MSTO region are significantly more centrally concentrated than the stars in the faintest half AND more massive red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch stars. This is not the case for clusters with escape velocities < 10...

  2. AGN Jet Power, Formation of X-ray Cavities, and FR I/II Dichotomy in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the ability of jets in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to break out of the ambient gas with sufficiently large advance velocities. Using observationally estimated jet power, we analyze 28 bright elliptical galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters. Because the gas density profiles in the innermost regions of galaxies have not been resolved so far, we consider two extreme cases for temperature and density profiles. We also follow two types of evolution for the jet cocoons: being driven by the pressure inside the cocoon (Fanaroff-Riley [FR] I type), and being driven by the jet momentum (FR II type). Our main result is that regardless of the assumed form of density profiles, jets with observed powers of ~ 10^{44} erg s^{-1} are less affected by the ambient medium, and some of them, but not all, could serve as precursors of the FR II sources.

  3. Multisite campaign on the open cluster M67. III. Delta Scuti pulsations in the blue stragglers

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Suárez, J C; Arentoft, T; Bedding, T R; Bouzid, M Y; Csubry, Z; Dall, T H; Dind, Z E; Frandsen, S; Gilliland, R L; Jacob, A P; Jensen, H R; Kang, Y B; Kim, S -L; Kiss, L L; Kjeldsen, H; Koo, J -R; Lee, J -A; Lee, C -U; Nuspl, J; Sterken, C; Szabó, R

    2007-01-01

    We have made an asteroseismic analysis of the variable blue stragglers in the open cluster M67. The data set consists of photometric time series from eight sites using nine 0.6-2.1 meter telescopes with a time baseline of 43 days. In two stars, EW Cnc and EX Cnc, we detect the highest number of frequencies (41 and 26) detected in delta Scuti stars belonging to a stellar cluster, and EW Cnc has the second highest number of frequencies detected in any delta Scuti star. We have computed a grid of pulsation models that take the effects of rotation into account. The distribution of observed and theoretical frequencies show that in a wide frequency range a significant fraction of the radial and non-radial low-degree modes are excited to detectable amplitudes. Despite the large number of observed frequencies we cannot constrain the fundamental parameters of the stars. To make progress we need to identify the degrees of some of the modes either from multi-colour photometry or spectroscopy.

  4. The Swift X-ray Telescope Cluster Survey III: X-ray spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, P; Tundo, E; Liu, T; Rosati, P; Borgani, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Fugazza, D; D'Avanzo, P

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a spectral analysis of a new, flux-limited sample of 72 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies identified with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite down to a flux limit of ~10-14 erg/s/cm2 (SWXCS, Tundo et al. 2012). We carry out a detailed X-ray spectral analysis with the twofold aim of measuring redshifts and characterizing the properties of the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM). Optical counterparts and spectroscopic or photometric redshifts are obtained with a cross-correlation with NED. Additional photometric redshifts are computed with a dedicated follow-up program with the TNG and a cross-correlation with the SDSS. We also detect the iron emission lines in 35% of the sample, and hence obtain a robust measure of the X-ray redshift zX. We use zX whenever the optical redshift is not available. Finally, for all the sources with measured redshift, background-subtracted spectra are fitted with a mekal model. We perform extensive spectral simulations to derive an empirical formul...

  5. Relativistic distortions in the large-scale clustering of SDSS-III BOSS CMASS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Zhu, Hongyu; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Ho, Shirley; Giusarma, Elena; Schneider, Donald P.

    2017-09-01

    General relativistic effects have long been predicted to subtly influence the observed large-scale structure of the universe. The current generation of galaxy redshift surveys has reached a size where detection of such effects is becoming feasible. In this paper, we report the first detection of the redshift asymmetry from the cross-correlation function of two galaxy populations that is consistent with relativistic effects. The data set is taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy sample, and we detect the asymmetry at the 2.7σ level by applying a shell-averaged estimator to the cross-correlation function. Our measurement dominates at scales around 10 h-1 Mpc, larger than those over which the gravitational redshift profile has been recently measured in galaxy clusters, but smaller than scales for which linear perturbation theory is likely to be accurate. The detection significance varies by 0.5σ with the details of our measurement and tests for systematic effects. We have also devised two null tests to check for various survey systematics and show that both results are consistent with the null hypothesis. We measure the dipole moment of the cross-correlation function, and from this the asymmetry is also detected, at the 2.8σ level. The amplitude and scale dependence of the clustering asymmetries are approximately consistent with the expectations of general relativity and a biased galaxy population, within large uncertainties. We explore theoretical predictions using numerical simulations in a companion paper.

  6. Pre-main-sequence isochrones -- III. The Cluster Collaboration isochrone server

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Cameron P M; Naylor, Tim; Mayne, N J; Jeffries, R D; Mamajek, Eric E; Rowe, John

    2014-01-01

    We present an isochrone server for semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones in the following systems: Johnson-Cousins, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two-Micron All-Sky Survey, Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) Wide-Field Camera, and INT Photometric H$\\alpha$ Survey (IPHAS)/UV-Excess Survey (UVEX). The server can be accessed via the Cluster Collaboration webpage {http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/isochrones/}. To achieve this we have used the observed colours of member stars in young clusters with well-established age, distance and reddening to create fiducial loci in the colour-magnitude diagram. These empirical sequences have been used to quantify the discrepancy between the models and data arising from uncertainties in both the interior and atmospheric models, resulting in tables of semi-empirical bolometric corrections (BCs) in the various photometric systems. The model isochrones made available through the server are based on existing stellar interior models coupled with our newly derived semi-empiric...

  7. Deep MMT Transit Survey of the Open Cluster M37 III: Stellar Rotation at 550 Myr

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, J D; Pinsonneault, M H; Stanek, K Z; Holman, M J; McLeod, B A; Meibom, S; Barranco, J A; Singh-Kalirai, J

    2008-01-01

    In the course of conducting a deep (14.5 ~~ 0.8 Msun show a tight correlation between period and mass with heavier stars rotating more rapidly. There is a group of 4 stars with P > 15 days that fall well above this relation, which, if real, would present a significant challenge to theories of stellar angular momentum evolution. Below 0.8 Msun the stars continue to follow the period-mass correlation but with a broad tail of rapid rotators that expands to shorter periods with decreasing mass. We combine these results with observations of other open clusters to test the standard theory of lower-main sequence stellar angular momentum evolution. Notably we find that the rotation period of the Sun and the periods of solar mass stars in M37, and the Hyades do not follow the ``Skumanich law'', i.e. they cannot be related by a simple model invoking solid-body rotation with a standard wind angular momentum-loss law. We also find that for late-K through early-M dwarf stars in this cluster r apid rotators tend to be blue...

  8. Variable Stars in the Fornax dSph Galaxy. III. The Globular Cluster Fornax 5

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Claudia; Catelan, Marcio; Held, Enrico V; Poretti, Ennio; Gullieuszik, Marco; Maio, Marcella; Rest, Armin; De Lee, Nathan; Smith, Horace A; Pritzl, Barton J

    2009-01-01

    We present a new study of the variable star population in globular cluster 5 of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on B and V time series photometry obtained with the MagIC camera of the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope and complementary HST archive data. Light curves and accurate periodicities were obtained for 30 RR Lyrae stars and 1 SX Phoenicis variable. The RR Lyrae sample includes 15 fundamental-mode pulsators, 13 first-overtone pulsators, 1 candidate double-mode pulsator and one RR Lyrae star with uncertain type classification. The average and minimum periods of the ab-type RR Lyrae stars, =0.590 days, P(ab,min)=0.53297 days, and the position in the horizontal branch type--metallicity plane, indicate that the cluster has Oosterhoff-intermediate properties, basically confirming previous indications by Mackey & Gilmore (2003b), although with some differences both in the period and type classification of individual variables. The average apparent magnitude of the Fornax 5 RR Lyrae stars is =21.35 ...

  9. THE HIGH-VELOCITY SYSTEM: INFALL OF A GIANT LOW-SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS GALAXY TOWARD THE CENTER OF THE PERSEUS CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Alice P.-Y.; Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Jeffrey C.-C. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Ohyama, Youichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    The high-velocity system (HVS) lies just north-west of the center and is moving at a speed of 3000 km s{sup −1} toward NGC 1275, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Perseus cluster. We report imaging spectroscopy of the HVS in Hα and [N ii] that resolves both the nature of this galaxy and its physical relationship with NGC 1275. The HVS exhibits a distorted disk having a projected rotational velocity that rises steadily to ∼200 km s{sup −1} at a radius of ∼12 kpc, the same maximal extent detectable in neutral gas and dust. We discover highly blueshifted emission at relative velocities of up to ∼800 km s{sup −1} distributed throughout and confined almost entirely within the projected area of the disk, tracing gas stripped by ram pressure. The distribution of the stripped gas implies that the HVS is moving essentially along our sightline closely toward the center of NGC 1275. We show that the speed of the HVS is consistent with it having fallen from rest at the virial radius of the Perseus cluster and reached ∼100 kpc from the cluster center. Despite having an overall metallicity (inferred from [N ii]/Hα) significantly lower than that of star-forming disk galaxies, the HVS exhibits a current star formation rate of ∼3.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} and numerous young star clusters projected against giant H ii regions. The evidence assembled implicates a progenitor giant low-surface-brightness galaxy that, because of galaxy harassment and/or the cluster tidal field, has developed two prominent spiral arms along which star formation is strongly elevated.

  10. Co(II)4, Co(II)7, and a Series of Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) Coordination Clusters: Search for Single Molecule Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Christou, George; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-10-03

    We report herein the syntheses and investigation of the magnetic properties of a Co(II)4 compound, a series of trinuclear Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) complexes, and a Co(II)7 complex. The homometallic Co(II)4 core was obtained from the reaction of Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(NO3)2·6H2O/H2vab/Et3N in a 0.5:0.5:1:2 ratio in methanol. Variation in synthetic conditions was necessary to get the desired Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes. The Co(II)-Ln(III) assembly was synthesized from Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(OAc)2·4H2O/H2vab/NaOMe in a 0.4:0.5:1:1 ratio in methanol. The isostructural Co(II)2Ln(III) complexes have a core structure with the general formula [Co2Ln(Hvab)4(NO3)](NO3)2·MeOH·H2O, (where H2vab = 2-[(2-hydroxymethyl-phenylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol) with simultaneous crystallization of Co(II)7 complex in each reaction. The magnetic investigation of these complexes reveals that both homometallic complexes and four Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes (except Co(II)-Nd(III)) display behavior characteristic of single molecule magnets.

  11. Numerical modelling of the lobes of radio galaxies in cluster environments - III. Powerful relativistic and non-relativistic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, W.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Krause, M. G. H.

    2016-09-01

    We present results from two suites of simulations of powerful radio galaxies in poor cluster environments, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the radio lobes. One suite of models uses relativistic hydrodynamics and the other relativistic magnetohydrodynamics; both are set up to cover a range of jet powers and velocities. The dynamics of the lobes are shown to be in good agreement with analytical models and with previous numerical models, confirming in the relativistic regime that the observed widths of radio lobes may be explained if they are driven by very light jets. The ratio of energy stored in the radio lobes to that put into the intracluster gas is seen to be the same regardless of jet power, jet velocity or simulation type, suggesting that we have a robust understanding of the work done on the ambient gas by this type of radio source. For the most powerful jets, we at times find magnetic field amplification by up to a factor of 2 in energy, but mostly the magnetic energy in the lobes is consistent with the magnetic energy injected. We confirm our earlier result that for jets with a toroidally injected magnetic field, the field in the lobes is predominantly aligned with the jet axis once the lobes are well developed, and that this leads to radio flux anisotropies of up to a factor of about two for mature sources. We reproduce the relationship between 151 MHz luminosity and jet power determined analytically in the literature.

  12. Numerical modelling of the lobes of radio galaxies in cluster environments - III. Powerful relativistic and nonrelativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    English, William; Krause, Martin G H

    2016-01-01

    We present results from two suites of simulations of powerful radio galaxies in poor cluster environments, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the radio lobes. One suite of models uses relativistic hydrodynamics and the other relativistic magnetohydrodynamics; both are set up to cover a range of jet powers and velocities. The dynamics of the lobes are shown to be in good agreement with analytical models and with previous numerical models, confirming in the relativistic regime that the observed widths of radio lobes may be explained if they are driven by very light jets. The ratio of energy stored in the radio lobes to that put into the intracluster gas is seen to be the same regardless of jet power, jet velocity or simulation type, suggesting that we have a robust understanding of the work done on the ambient gas by this type of radio source. For the most powerful jets we at times find magnetic field amplification by up to a factor of two in energy, but mostly the magnetic energy in the lobes is co...

  13. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm-1 (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ˜0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  14. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng, E-mail: Lai-Sheng-Wang@brown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm{sup −1} (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ∼0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Berkeley 90. III. Cluster parameters (Marco+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present tables with coordinates in J2000, Johnson photometry and near-IR photometry for stars in the open cluster Berkeley 90 and a field to the southeast of this region. We used the imager and spectrograph Andalucia Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (ALFOSC) on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) at the La Palma observatory to obtain UBVR photometry on the night of 2007 July 9, and spectroscopy of 20 selected stars on the nights of 2004 October 4, 2005 October 2-4 and 2007 July 10. We also downloaded UKIDSS (https://www.ukidss.org/archive/archive.html) images in the JHKS filters to perform deep near-IR photometry. (2 data files).

  16. Clustering of Local Group distances: publication bias or correlated measurements? III. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at providing a firm mean distance estimate to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and thus to place it within the internally consistent Local Group distance framework we recently established, we compiled the current-largest database of published distance estimates to the galaxy. Based on careful statistical analysis, we derive mean distance estimates to the SMC using eclipsing binary systems, variable stars, stellar population tracers, and star cluster properties. Their weighted mean leads to a final recommendation for the mean SMC distance of $(m-M)_0^{\\rm SMC} = 18.96 \\pm 0.02$ mag, where the uncertainty represents the formal error. Systematic effects related to lingering uncertainties in extinction corrections, our physical understanding of the stellar tracers used, and the SMC's complex geometry---including its significant line-of-sight depth, its irregular appearance which renders definition of the galaxy's center uncertain, as well as its high inclination and possibly warped disk---may contribute a...

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from CMASS anisotropic galaxy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Beutler, Florian; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Manera, Marc; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongbo; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Maraston, Claudia; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 h-1 Mpc). We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z = 0.59, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular- diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z), and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We obtain robust measurements by including a polynomial as the model for the systematic errors, and find it works very well against the systematic effects, e.g. ones induced by stars and seeing. We provide accurate measurements {DA(0.59)rs,fid/rs, H(0.59)rs/rs,fid, f(0.59)σ8(0.59), Ωm h2} = {1427 ± 26 Mpc, 97.3 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1, 0.488 ± 0.060, 0.135 ± 0.016}, where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. The parameters which are not well constrained by our galaxy clustering analysis are marginalized over with wide flat priors. Since no priors from other data sets, e.g. cosmic microwave background (CMB), are adopted and no dark energy models are assumed, our results from BOSS CMASS galaxy clustering alone may be combined with other data sets, i.e. CMB, SNe, lensing or other galaxy clustering data to constrain the parameters of a given cosmological model. The uncertainty on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, from CMB+CMASS is about 8 per cent. The uncertainty on the curvature fraction, Ωk, is 0.3 per cent. We do not find deviation from flat ΛCDM.

  18. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales s ≳ 20 h-1 Mpc. We combined the information from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter to wDE = -0.996 ± 0.042 when to be assumed time independent, the curvature of the Universe to Ωk = -0.0007 ± 0.0030 and the sum of the neutrino masses to ∑mν < 0.25 eV at 95 per cent confidence levels. We explore the constraints on the growth rate of cosmic structures assuming f(z) = Ωm(z)γ and obtain γ = 0.609 ± 0.079, in good agreement with the predictions of general relativity of γ = 0.55. We compress the information of our clustering measurements into constraints on the parameter combinations DV(z)/rd, FAP(z) and fσ8(z) at zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61 with their respective covariance matrices and find good agreement with the predictions for these parameters obtained from the best-fitting ΛCDM model to the CMB data from the Planck satellite. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others by Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  19. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters III: Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, J E; Bonnell, I A

    2012-01-01

    We extend our previous SPH parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range $10^{4}-10^{6}$M$_{\\odot}$ with initial virial ratios $E_{\\rm kin}/E_{\\rm pot}$=2.3, allow them to form stars, and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3Myr timescale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fractions of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while lower-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this timescale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing t...

  20. nIFTY galaxy cluster simulations III: The Similarity & Diversity of Galaxies & Subhaloes

    CERN Document Server

    Elahi, Pascal J; Pearce, Frazer R; Power, Chris; Yepes, Gustavo; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; Kay, Scott T; Sembolini, Federico; Beck, Alexander M; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G; Murante, Giuseppe; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01

    We examine subhaloes and galaxies residing in a simulated LCDM galaxy cluster ($M^{\\rm crit}_{200}=1.1\\times10^{15}M_\\odot/h$) produced by hydrodynamical codes ranging from classic Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), newer SPH codes, an adaptive mesh code and a moving mesh scheme. These codes use subgrid models to capture galaxy formation physics. We compare how well these codes reproduce the same subhaloes/galaxies in gravity only, non-radiative hydrodynamics and full radiative physics runs by looking at the overall subhalo/galaxy distribution and on an individual objects basis. We find the subhalo population is reproduced to within $\\lesssim10\\%$ for both dark matter only and non-radiative runs, with individual objects showing code-to-code scatter of $\\lesssim0.1$ dex, although the gas in non-radiative simulations shows significant scatter. Including radiative physics significantly increases the diversity seen. The subhalo mass and $V_{max}$ distributions vary by $\\approx20\\%$, a result of feedback moving ...

  1. Synthesis and magnetothermal properties of a ferromagnetically coupled Ni(II)-Gd(III)-Ni(II) cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Apoorva; Komatireddy, Navatha; Ghirri, Alberto; Tuna, Floriana; Langley, Stuart K; Srivastava, Anant K; Sañudo, E Carolina; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; McInnes, Eric J L; Affronte, Marco; Shanmugam, Maheswaran

    2014-01-07

    A linear trimeric cluster of molecular formula [Ni2Gd(L(-))6](NO3) (1) (L(-) = (C14H12NO2) has been isolated with its structure determined via single crystal X-ray diffraction. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of 1 show that the nickel and gadolinium ions are coupled ferromagnetically, with a ground total spin state (S) of 11/2. Best fit spin Hamiltonian parameters obtained for 1 are J(1(Ni-Gd)) = +0.54 cm(-1), g = 2.01. EPR measurements confirm a low magnetic anisotropy (D = -0.135 cm(-1)) for 1. Heat capacity determination of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) parameters for 1 shows that the change in magnetic entropy (-ΔS(m)) achieves a maximum of 13.74 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 4.0 K, with the ferromagnetic coupling giving a rapid change in low applied fields, confirming the potential of Gd molecular derivatives as coolants at liquid helium temperature.

  2. Chandra X-Ray Observations of Young Clusters. III. NGC 2264 and the Orion Flanking Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Rebull, L M; Micela, G; Ramírez, S V; Sciortino, S; Stauffer, J R; Strom, S E; Wolff, S C

    2006-01-01

    Chandra observations of solar-like pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the Orion Flanking Fields (age ~1 Myr) and NGC 2264 (~3 Myr) are compared with the results of the COUP survey of similar objects in the ONC (~0.5 Myr). The correlations between log Lx and mass found for PMS stars on convective tracks in these clusters are consistent with the relationships found for the ONC, indicating little change in the median values of either log Lx or log Lx/Lbol during the first ~3-5 Myr of evolution down convective tracks. The fraction of stars with extreme values of Lx, more than 10 times higher than the average for a given Lbol or with log Lx/Lbol greater than the canonical saturation value of -2.9, is however larger by a factor of two in the younger ONC when compared with the Orion FF and NGC 2264. PMS stars in NGC 2264 on radiative tracks have Lx/Lbol values that are systematically lower by a factor of ~10 times than those found for stars of similar mass on convective tracks. The dramatic decrease in flux from conve...

  3. Planck intermediate results. III. The relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borgani, S; Borrill, J; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jagemann, T; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Khamitov, I; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Savini, G; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Weller, J; White, S D M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal D_A^2 Y for a sample of nineteen objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses (HE) are derived from XMM-Newton archive data and the SZ effect signal is measured from Planck all-sky survey data. We find an M_WL-D_A^2 Y relation that is consistent in slope and normalisation with previous determinations using weak lensing masses; however, there is a normalisation offset with respect to previous measures based on hydrostatic X-ray mass-proxy relations. We verify that our SZ effect measurements are in excellent agreement with previous determinations from Planck data. At odds with expectations, for the present sample, the hydrostatic X-ray masses at R_500 are on average 22 +/- 8 per cent larger than the corresponding weak lensing masses. We show that the mass discrepancy is driven by a difference in mass concentratio...

  4. Galaxy populations in the Antlia cluster - III. Properties of faint early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, Analia V Smith; Faifer, Favio R; Bassino, Lilia P; Richtler, Tom; Romero, Gisela A; Calderon, Juan Pablo; Caso, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    (Abridge) We present a new analysis of the early-type galaxy population in the central region of the Antlia cluster, focusing on the faint systems like dwarf ellipticals (dE) and dwarf spheroidals (dSph). We confirm 22 early-type galaxies as Antlia members, using GEMINI-GMOS and MAGELLAN-MIKE spectra. Among them, 2 belong to the rare type of compact ellipticals (cE), and 5 are new faint dwarfs that had never been catalogued before. In addition, we present 16 newly identified low surface brightness galaxy candidates, almost half of them displaying morphologies consistent with being Antlia's counterparts of Local Group dSphs, that extend the faint luminosity limit of our study down to MB = -10.1 (BT = 22.6) mag. We built an improved CMR in the Washington photometric system, i.e. integrated T1 magnitudes versus (C - T1) colours, which extends \\sim 4 mag faintwards the limit of spectroscopically confirmed Antlia members. When only confirmed early-type members are considered, this relation extends over 10 mag in l...

  5. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first stellar cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low metallicity (0.01 Zsun) stellar cluster in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z~14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks with the MESA code. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 Msun. Their masses range from ~0.1 Msun to 14.4 Msun with a median mass ~0.5-1 Msun. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while...

  6. Large Magnetic Moments of Arsenic-Doped Mn Clusters and their Relevance to Mn-Doped III-V Semiconductor Ferromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Kabir, M; Mookerjee, A; Kabir, Mukul; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2005-01-01

    We report electronic and magnetic structure of arsenic-doped manganese clusters from density-functional theory using generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. We find that arsenic stabilizes manganese clusters, though the ferromagnetic coupling between Mn atoms are found only in Mn$_2$As and Mn$_4$As clusters with magnetic moments 9 $\\mu_B$ and 17 $\\mu_B$, respectively. For all other sizes, $x=$ 3, 5-10, Mn$_x$As clusters show ferrimagnetic coupling. It is suggested that, if grown during the low temperature MBE, the giant magnetic moments due to ferromagnetic coupling in Mn$_2$As and Mn$_4$As clusters could play a role on the ferromagnetism and on the variation observed in the Curie temperature of Mn-doped III-V semiconductors.

  7. Space Velocities of Southern Globular Clusters VII. NGC 6397, NGC 6626 (M 28) and NGC 6656 (M 22)

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I; Jilkova, Lucie; van Altena, William F; Podesta, Federico; Lopez, Carlos E

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motions of globular clusters NGC 6397, NGC 6626 (M 22) and NGC 6656 (M 28) as part of our ongoing Southern Proper-Motion Program. The reference system is the ICRS via Hipparcos stars for these three low galactic latitude clusters. Formal errors range between ~0.3 and 0.7 mas/yr. Notable is the result for NGC 6397 which differs by 2.5 mas/yr from two HST determinations, while agreeing with previous ground-based ones. We determine orbits for all three clusters in an axisymmetric and barred model of the Galaxy and discuss these in the context of globular-cluster formation. M 22 is a well-known cluster with an iron abundance spread; such clusters are now believed to have formed in massive parent systems that can retain ejecta of core-collapsed SNe. We find that the five currently-accepted globular clusters with iron/calcium abundance spread show orbits unrelated to each other, thus suggesting at least five independent, massive progenitors that have contributed to the build-up ...

  8. SPACE VELOCITIES OF SOUTHERN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. VII. NGC 6397, NGC 6626 (M28), AND NGC 6656 (M22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.; Van Altena, William F. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Jilkova, Lucie [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, CZ-61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Podesta, Federico; Lopez, Carlos E., E-mail: dana.casetti@yale.edu, E-mail: terry.girard@yale.edu, E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu, E-mail: jilkoval@physics.muni.cz [Universidad National de San Juan, Observatorio Astronomico ' ' Felix Aguilar' ' and Yale Southern Observatory, Chimbas, 5413 San Juan (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motions of globular clusters NGC 6397, NGC 6626 (M22), and NGC 6656 (M28) as part of our ongoing Southern Proper-Motion Program. The reference system is the ICRS via Hipparcos stars for these three low-Galactic-latitude clusters. Formal errors range between {approx}0.3 and 0.7 mas yr{sup -1}. Notable is the result for NGC 6397, which differs by 2.5 mas yr{sup -1} from two Hubble Space Telescope determinations while agreeing with previous ground-based ones. We determine orbits for all three clusters in an axisymmetric and barred model of the Galaxy and discuss these in the context of globular-cluster formation. M22 is a well-known cluster with an iron abundance spread; such clusters are now believed to have formed in massive parent systems that can retain ejecta of core-collapsed supernovae. We find that the five currently accepted globular clusters with iron/calcium abundance spread show orbits unrelated to each other, thus suggesting at least five independent, massive progenitors that have contributed to the build-up of the Milky-Way halo.

  9. Is the Escape Velocity in Star Clusters Linked to Extended Star Formation Histories? Using NGC 7252: W3 as a Test Case

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera-Ziri, I; Hilker, M; Davies, B; Schweizer, F; Kruijssen, J M D; Mejía-Narváez, A; Niederhofer, F; Brandt, T D; Rejkuba, M; Bruzual, G; Magris, G

    2016-01-01

    The colour-magnitude diagrams of some intermediate-age clusters (1-2 Gyr) star clusters show unexpectedly broad main-sequence turnoffs, raising the possibility that these clusters have experienced more than one episode of star formation. Such a scenario predicts the existence of an extended main sequence turn off (eMSTO) only in clusters with escape velocities above a certain threshold ($>15$ km s$^{-1}$), which would allow them to retain or accrete gas that eventually would fuel a secondary extended star-formation episode. This paper presents a test of this scenario based on the study of the young and massive cluster NGC 7252: W3. We use the HST photometry from WFPC2 and WFC3 images obtained with UV and optical filters, as well as MagE echellette spectrograph data from the Las Campanas Clay 6.5m telescope, in order to construct the observed UV/optical SED of NGC 7252: W3. The observations are then compared with synthetic spectra based on different star formation histories consistent with those of the eMSTO c...

  10. Constraining galaxy cluster velocity field with the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cross-bispectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurier, G.

    2017-08-01

    The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects are produced by the interaction of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons with the ionized and diffuse gas of electrons inside galaxy clusters integrated along the line of sight. The two main effects are the thermal SZ (tSZ) produced by thermal pressure inside galaxy clusters and the kinematic SZ (kSZ) produced by peculiar motion of galaxy clusters compared to CMB rest-frame. The kSZ effect is particularly challenging to measure as it follows the same spectral behavior as the CMB, and consequently cannot be separated from the CMB using spectral considerations. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of detecting the kSZ through the computation of the tSZ-CMB-CMB cross-correlation bispectrum for current and future CMB experiments. We conclude that the next generation of CMB experiments will offer the possibility to detect the tSZ-kSZ-kSZ bispectrum at high signal-to-noise ration (S/N). This measurement will constraints the intra-cluster dynamics and the velocity field of galaxy cluster that is extremely sensitive to the growth rate of structures and thus to dark energy properties. Additionally, we also demonstrate that the tSZ-kSZ-kSZ bispectrum can be used to break the degeneracies between the mass-observable relation and the cosmological parameters to set tight constraints, up to 4%, on the Y - M relation calibration.

  11. nIFTY galaxy cluster simulations - III. The similarity and diversity of galaxies and subhaloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Knebe, Alexander; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Yepes, Gustavo; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; Kay, Scott T.; Sembolini, Federico; Beck, Alexander M.; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-05-01

    We examine subhaloes and galaxies residing in a simulated Λ cold dark matter galaxy cluster (M^crit_{200}=1.1× 10^{15} h^{-1} M_{⊙}) produced by hydrodynamical codes ranging from classic smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), newer SPH codes, adaptive and moving mesh codes. These codes use subgrid models to capture galaxy formation physics. We compare how well these codes reproduce the same subhaloes/galaxies in gravity-only, non-radiative hydrodynamics and full feedback physics runs by looking at the overall subhalo/galaxy distribution and on an individual object basis. We find that the subhalo population is reproduced to within ≲10 per cent for both dark matter only and non-radiative runs, with individual objects showing code-to-code scatter of ≲0.1 dex, although the gas in non-radiative simulations shows significant scatter. Including feedback physics significantly increases the diversity. Subhalo mass and Vmax distributions vary by ≈20 per cent. The galaxy populations also show striking code-to-code variations. Although the Tully-Fisher relation is similar in almost all codes, the number of galaxies with 109 h- 1 M⊙ ≲ M* ≲ 1012 h- 1 M⊙ can differ by a factor of 4. Individual galaxies show code-to-code scatter of ˜0.5 dex in stellar mass. Moreover, systematic differences exist, with some codes producing galaxies 70 per cent smaller than others. The diversity partially arises from the inclusion/absence of active galactic nucleus feedback. Our results combined with our companion papers demonstrate that subgrid physics is not just subject to fine-tuning, but the complexity of building galaxies in all environments remains a challenge. We argue that even basic galaxy properties, such as stellar mass to halo mass, should be treated with errors bars of ˜0.2-0.4 dex.

  12. A Direct Measurement of the High-Mass End of the Velocity Dispersion Function at z~0.55 from SDSS-III/BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Shu, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    We report the first direct spectroscopic measurement of the velocity dispersion function (VDF) for the high-mass red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift $z \\sim 0.55$. We achieve high precision by using a sample of 600,000 massive galaxies with spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III), covering stellar masses $M_* \\gtrsim 10^{11} M_{\\odot}$. We determine the VDF by projecting the joint probability-density function (PDF) of luminosity $L$ and velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, i.e. $p(L, \\sigma)$, defined by our previous measurements of the RS luminosity function (LF) and $L-\\sigma$ relation for this sample. These measurements were corrected from red--blue galaxy population confusion, photometric blurring, incompleteness and selection effects within a forward-modeling framework that furthermore correctly accommodates the low spectroscopic signal-to-noise ratio of the individual BOSS spectra. The $z\\sim0.55$ RS VDF is in agreement with t...

  13. Joint relative location of earthquakes without a predefined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, G.; Gudmundsson, Ó.; Einarsson, P.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-09-01

    Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a predefined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of meters wide in horizontal directions and around 100 meters in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of meters in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the

  14. Joint relative location of earthquakes without a pre-defined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, G.; Gudmundsson, Ó.; Einarsson, P.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1-D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a pre-defined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1-D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of metres wide in horizontal directions and around 100 metres in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of metres in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Analysis of potential systematics

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ashley J; Sanchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Ho, Shirley; Kazin, Eyal; Manera, Marc; Reid, Beth; White, Martin; Tojeiro, Rita; McBride, Cameron K; Xu, Xiaoying; Wake, David A; Strauss, Michael A; Montesano, Francesco; Swanson, Molly E C; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S; Dorta, Antonio Montero; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Guo, Hong; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Nichol, Robert C; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Prada, Francisco; Schlegel, David J; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Zehavi, Idit; Blanton, Michael; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Cuesta, Antonio J; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Parejko, John; Pan, Kaike; Shelden, Donald P Schneider Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the density field of galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) included in the SDSS Data Release Nine (DR9). DR9 includes spectroscopic redshifts for over 400,000 galaxies spread over a footprint of 3,275 deg^2. We identify, characterize, and mitigate the impact of sources of systematic uncertainty on large-scale clustering measurements, both for angular moments of the redshift-space correlation function and the spherically averaged power spectrum, P(k), in order to ensure that robust cosmological constraints will be obtained from these data. A correlation between the projected density of stars and the higher redshift (0.43 120h^-1Mpc or k < 0.01hMpc^-1. We find that these errors can be ameliorated by weighting galaxies based on their surface brightness and the local stellar density. We use mock galaxy catalogs that simulate the CMASS selection function to determine that randomly selecting galaxy redshifts in order to simulate th...

  16. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and the role of conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; Nagai, D; Lau, E T; Zhuravleva, I

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the ICM power spectrum can help us to probe the physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its relation with the thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (density, entropy, or pressure) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For low 3D Mach number M~0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M>0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute, passing the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, associated with isotropic turbulence (or a slight radial bias). Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting towards isotropic vel...

  17. THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. III. IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS AND THE FORMATION OF DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfrommer, Christoph [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang, Philip; Broderick, Avery E., E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org, E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: pchang@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-06-10

    A subset of blazars are powerful TeV emitters, dominating the extragalactic component of the very high energy gamma-ray universe (E {approx}> 100 GeV). These TeV gamma rays generate ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs via pair production with the extragalactic background light. While it has generally been assumed that the kinetic energy of these pairs cascades to GeV gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering, we have argued in Broderick et al. (Paper I in this series) that plasma beam instabilities are capable of dissipating the pairs' energy locally on timescales short in comparison to the inverse Compton cooling time, heating the intergalactic medium (IGM) with a rate that is independent of density. This dramatically increases the entropy of the IGM after redshift z {approx} 2, with a number of important implications for structure formation: (1) this suggests a scenario for the origin of the cool core (CC)/non-cool core (NCC) bimodality in galaxy clusters and groups. Early-forming galaxy groups are unaffected because they can efficiently radiate the additional entropy, developing a CC. However, late-forming groups do not have sufficient time to cool before the entropy is gravitationally reprocessed through successive mergers-counteracting cooling and potentially raising the core entropy further. This may result in a population of X-ray dim groups/clusters, consistent with X-ray stacking analyses of optically selected samples. Hence, blazar heating works differently than feedback by active galactic nuclei, which we show can balance radiative cooling but is unable to transform CC into NCC clusters on the buoyancy timescale due to the weak coupling between the mechanical energy to the cluster gas. (2) We predict a suppression of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) power spectrum template on angular scales smaller than 5' due to the globally reduced central pressure of groups and clusters forming after z {approx} 1. This allows for a larger rms amplitude

  18. The overlooked potential of generalized linear models in astronomy - III. Bayesian negative binomial regression and globular cluster populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, R. S.; Hilbe, J. M.; Buelens, B.; Riggs, J. D.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Chies-Santos, A. L.; Killedar, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the third in a series illustrating the power of generalized linear models (GLMs) for the astronomical community, we elucidate the potential of the class of GLMs which handles count data. The size of a galaxy's globular cluster (GC) population (NGC) is a prolonged puzzle in the astronomical literature. It falls in the category of count data analysis, yet it is usually modelled as if it were a continuous response variable. We have developed a Bayesian negative binomial regression model to study the connection between NGC and the following galaxy properties: central black hole mass, dynamical bulge mass, bulge velocity dispersion and absolute visual magnitude. The methodology introduced herein naturally accounts for heteroscedasticity, intrinsic scatter, errors in measurements in both axes (either discrete or continuous) and allows modelling the population of GCs on their natural scale as a non-negative integer variable. Prediction intervals of 99 per cent around the trend for expected NGC comfortably envelope the data, notably including the Milky Way, which has hitherto been considered a problematic outlier. Finally, we demonstrate how random intercept models can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type. Bayesian variable selection methodology allows for automatically identifying galaxy types with different productions of GCs, suggesting that on average S0 galaxies have a GC population 35 per cent smaller than other types with similar brightness.

  19. LOW-VELOCITY SHOCKS TRACED BY EXTENDED SiO EMISSION ALONG THE W43 RIDGES: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Martin, P. G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Motte, F.; Louvet, F.; Hill, T.; Hennemann, M.; Didelon, P. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU - CNRS/INSU - Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, Bât. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Carlhoff, P.; Schilke, P. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Lesaffre, P.; Gusdorf, A. [ENS, LERMA, UMR 8112, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond 75005 Paris, France LRA/ENS (France); Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Duarte-Cabral, A. [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, CNRS, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bendo, G. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Roussel, H. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014, Paris (France); Bernard, J.-P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, CESR, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bronfman, L., E-mail: qnguyen@cita.utoronto.ca [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2013-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is tightly linked to that of their parental clouds. Here, we focus on the high-density parts of W43, a molecular cloud undergoing an efficient event of star formation. Using a column density image derived from Herschel continuum maps, we identify two high-density filamentary clouds, called the W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges. Both have gas masses of 2.1 × 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} and 3.5 × 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} above >10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} and within areas of ∼6 and ∼14 pc{sup 2}, respectively. The W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges are structures that are coherent in velocity and gravitationally bound, despite their large velocity dispersion measured by the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) lines of the W43-HERO IRAM large program. Another intriguing result is that these ridges harbor widespread (∼10 pc{sup 2}) bright SiO (2-1) emission, which we interpret to be the result of low-velocity shocks (≤10 km s{sup –1}). We measure a significant relationship between the SiO (2-1) luminosity and velocity extent and show that it distinguishes our observations from the high-velocity shocks associated with outflows. We use state-of-the-art shock models to demonstrate that a small percentage (10%) of Si atoms in low-velocity shocks, observed initially in gas phase or in grain mantles, can explain the observed SiO column density in the W43 ridges. The spatial and velocity overlaps between the ridges of high-density gas and the shocked SiO gas suggest that ridges could be forming via colliding flows driven by gravity and accompanied by low-velocity shocks. This mechanism may be the initial conditions for the formation of young massive clusters.

  20. Bias Properties of Extragalactic Distance Indicators. VII. Correlation of Absolute Luminosity and Rotational Velocity for SC Galaxies over the Range of Luminosity Class from I to III-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Allan

    1999-01-01

    A distance-limited subset of the complete flux-limited sample of Sc galaxies in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies is isolated by means of separate Spaenhauer diagrams for six individual van den Bergh luminosity class intervals from Sc I+I.2,.3 to Sc III-IV. The distribution functions of kinematic absolute B^0,i_T(220,50) magnitudes and 21 cm line widths, W_20, corrected to edge-on orientation, have been determined for the same six bins of luminosity class. The individual luminosity functions for each luminosity class are bounded on both the bright and faint ends, showing that the present sample includes no dwarf Sc spirals fainter than M(B_T)(220,50)=-18 belonging to luminosity classes I to III-IV, as defined by the regularity of the spiral pattern. Star-forming galaxies with spiral structures as regular as the ones found in these luminosity classes have absolute magnitudes brighter than M_B(H=50)=-18 and 21 cm line widths larger than W_20/sini=2v_rot(max)=165 km s^-1. Furthermore, the 21 cm line-width distributions move toward smaller rotational velocities as the luminosity classes change from I to III, showing that rotation is a principal parameter determining the regularity of the spiral pattern. Whether it is the only parameter awaits a similar investigation for spirals of all luminosity classes along the complete Hubble sequence. In particular, it has not yet been proved that all Im and Sm galaxies, where, by definition, the spiral arms are either lacking or are semichaotic, have absolute magnitudes that are fainter than M_B=-18 and whose 21 cm LWs are smaller than ~165 km s^-1, presumably because of smaller mass than the high-luminosity, regular spirals. The Teerikorpi ``cluster population incompleteness bias'' is demonstrated again. Here, however, as in Papers II-IV of this series, we use field galaxies to show that the slope and zero point of the Tully-Fisher (T-F) relation are systematically incorrect for flux-limited samples, the error

  1. X-ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters III: New insights into the triggering mechanisms of cluster AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Ehlert, S; Brandt, W N; Canning, R E A; Luo, B; Mantz, A; Morris, R G; von der Linden, A; Xue, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a new analysis of the X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population in the vicinity of 135 of the most massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.9 observed with Chandra. With a sample of more than 11,000 X-ray point sources, we are able to measure, for the first time, evidence for evolution in the cluster AGN population beyond the expected evolution of field AGN. Our analysis shows that overall number density of cluster AGN scales with the cluster mass as $\\sim M_{500}^{-1.2}$. There is no evidence for the overall number density of cluster member X-ray AGN depending on the cluster redshift in a manner different than field AGN, nor there is any evidence that the spatial distribution of cluster AGN (given in units of the cluster overdensity radius r_500) strongly depends on the cluster mass or redshift. The $M^{-1.2 \\pm 0.7}$ scaling relation we measure is consistent with theoretical predictions of the galaxy merger rate in clusters, which is expected ...

  2. Mass segregation in rich clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud - III. Implications for the initial mass function

    CERN Document Server

    De Grijs, R; MacKey, A D; Wilkinson, M I; Beaulieu, S F; Johnson, R A; Santiago, B X

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of core radii of rich clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) systematically increases in both upper limit and spread with increasing cluster age. Cluster-to-cluster variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF) have been suggested as an explanation. We discuss the implications of the observed degree of mass segregation in our sample clusters for the shape of the initial mass function. Our results are based on Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 observations of six rich star clusters in the LMC, selected to include three pairs of clusters of similar age, metallicity, and distance from the LMC centre, and exhibiting a large spread in core radii between the clusters in each pair. All clusters show clear evidence of mass segregation: (i) their luminosity function slopes steepen with increasing cluster radius, and (ii) the brighter stars are characterized by smaller core radii. For all sample clusters, both the slope of the luminosity function in the cluster centres and the degree of mass s...

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: measurements of the growth of structure and expansion rate at z=0.57 from anisotropic clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Beth A; White, Martin; Percival, Will J; Manera, Marc; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Bailey, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gunn, James E; Honscheid, Klaus; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Muna, Demitri; Nichol, Robert C; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; de Putter, Roland; Roe, N A; Ross, Nicholas P; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin S; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A; Snedden, Stephanie; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the anisotropic clustering of massive galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) sample, which consists of 264,283 galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 0.57, and when combined imply \\Omega_{\\Lambda} = 0.74 +/- 0.016, independent of the Universe's evolution at z<0.57. In our companion paper (Samushia et al. prep), we explore further cosmological implications of these observations.

  4. MASS CALIBRATION AND COSMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SPT-SZ GALAXY CLUSTER SAMPLE USING VELOCITY DISPERSION σ {sub v} AND X-RAY Y {sub X} MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Bazin, G.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bautz, M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Benson, B. A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States); Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrosifica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); De Haan, T., E-mail: bocquet@usm.lmu.de [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); and others

    2015-02-01

    We present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg{sup 2} of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σ {sub v}) and 16 X-ray Y {sub X} measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σ {sub v} and Y {sub X} are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ {sub v} calibration preferring ∼16% higher masses. We use the full SPT{sub CL} data set (SZ clusters+σ {sub v}+Y {sub X}) to measure σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.27){sup 0.3} = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is ∑m {sub ν} = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger ∑m {sub ν} further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPT{sub CL} and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the Y {sub X} calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ {sub v} calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (∼44% and ∼23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ω{sub m} = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ{sub 8} = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find ∑m {sub ν} = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the dark energy equation

  5. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of iron(II/III), cobalt(II) and copper(II) cluster complexes of the polytopic ligand: N-(2-pyridyl)-3-carboxypropanamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark E; Hawes, Chris S; Ferguson, Alan; Polson, Matthew I J; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Kruger, Paul E

    2013-10-07

    Herein we describe the synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of three transition metal cluster complexes that feature the polytopic ligand N-(2-pyridyl)-3-carboxypropanamide (H2L): [Fe3(III)Fe2(II)(HL)6(O)(H2O)3][ClO4]5·3MeCN·4H2O, 1, [Co8(HL)8(O)(OH)4(MeOH)3(H2O)]-[ClO4]3·5MeOH·2H2O, 2, and [Cu6(L(ox))4(MeOH)(H2O)3]·MeOH, 3. Complex 1 is a mixed valence penta-nuclear iron cluster containing the archetypal {Fe3(III)O} triangular basic carboxylate cluster at its core, with two Fe(II) ions above and below the core coordinated to three bidentate pyridyl-amide groups. The structure of the octanuclear Co(II) complex, 2, is based upon a central Co4 square with the remaining four Co(II) centres at the 'wing-tips' of the complex. The cluster core is replete with bridging oxide, hydroxide and carboxylate groups. Cluster 3 contains an oxidised derivative of the ligand, L(ox), generated in situ through hydroxylation of an α-carbon atom. This hexanuclear cluster has a 'barrel-like' core and contains Cu(II) ions in both square planar and square-based pyramidal geometries. Bridging between Cu(II) centres is furnished by alkoxide and carboxylate groups. Magnetic studies on 1-3 reveals dominant antiferro-magnetic interactions for 1 and 2, leading to small non-zero spin ground states, while 3 shows ferro-magnetic exchange between the Cu(II) centres to give an S = 3 spin ground state.

  6. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey III: A young massive cluster at the far edge of the Galactic bar

    CERN Document Server

    Alegría, S Ramírez; Chené, A N; O'Leary, E; Amigo, P; Minniti, D; Saito, R K; Geisler, D; Kurtev, R; Hempel, M; Gromadzki, M; Clarke, J R A; Negueruela, I; Marco, A; Fierro, C; Bonatto, C; Catelan, M

    2014-01-01

    Context: Young massive clusters are key to map the Milky Way's structure, and near-IR large area sky surveys have contributed strongly to the discovery of new obscured massive stellar clusters. Aims: We present the third article in a series of papers focused on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the physical characterization of VVV CL086, using part of its OB-stellar population. Methods: We physically characterized the cluster using $JHK_S$ near-infrared photometry from ESO public survey VVV images, using the VVV-SkZ pipeline, and near-infrared $K$-band spectroscopy, following the methodology presented in the first article of the series. Results: Individual distances for two observed stars indicate that the cluster is located at the far edge of the Galactic bar. These stars, which are probable cluster members from the statistically field-star decontaminated CMD, have spectral types between O9 and B0V. According to our analysis, this young cluster ($1.0$ Myr $...

  7. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. I. LS III +46 11: a very massive O3.5 If* + O3.5 If* binary

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Barbá, R H; Walborn, N R; Pellerin, A; Simón-Díaz, S; Sota, A; Marco, A; Alonso-Santiago, J; Bermudez, J Sanchez; Gamen, R C; Lorenzo, J

    2015-01-01

    Context: It appears that most (if not all) massive stars are born in multiple systems. At the same time, the most massive binaries are hard to find due to their low numbers throughout the Galaxy and the implied large distances and extinctions. AIMS: We want to study: [a] LS III +46 11, identified in this paper as a very massive binary; [b] another nearby massive system, LS III +46 12; and [c] the surrounding stellar cluster, Berkeley 90. Methods: Most of the data used in this paper are multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra though we also use Lucky Imaging and archival photometry. The spectra are reduced with devoted pipelines and processed with our own software, such as a spectroscopic-orbit code, CHORIZOS, and MGB. Results: LS III +46 11 is identified as a new very-early-O-type spectroscopic binary [O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*] and LS III +46 12 as another early O-type system [O4.5 V((f))]. We measure a 97.2-day period for LS III +46 12 and derive minimum masses of 38.80$\\pm$0.83 M_Sol and 35.60$\\pm$0.77 M_Sol for it...

  8. A Chandra Study of the Rosette Star-Forming Complex. III. The NGC 2237 Cluster and the Region's Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Townsley, Leisa K; Broos, Patrick S; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G; Lada, Elizabeth; Garmire, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray images of the NGC 2237 young star cluster on the periphery of the Rosette Nebula. We detect 168 X-ray sources, 80% of which have counterparts in USNO, 2MASS, and deep FLAMINGOS images. These constitute the first census of the cluster members with 0.2<~M<~2 Msun. Star locations in near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams indicate a cluster age around 2 Myr with a visual extinction of 1cluster NGC 2244. We derive the K-band luminosity function and the X-ray luminosity function of the cluster, which indicate a population ~400-600 stars. The X-ray-selected sample shows a K-excess disk frequency of 13%. The young Class II counterparts are aligned in an arc ~3 pc long suggestive of a triggered formation process induced by the O stars in NGC 2244. The diskless Class III sources are more dispersed. Several X-ray emitting stars are located inside the molecular cloud and around gaseous pillars projecting from the cloud. These...

  9. Catalogues of radial and rotational velocities of 1253 F-K dwarfs in 13 nearby open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermilliod, J.-C.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2009-05-01

    Context: We conducted a long-term monitoring of solar-type dwarfs in 13 nearby open clusters, d electronic form. Based on observations collected at the Haute-Provence Observatory (France) and with the Danish 1.54-m at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. This reaserch has made use of the WEBDA database, operated at the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Vienna, and of the SIMBAD database, operated at CDS, Strasbourg, France This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. Full Tables 8, 10, and 11 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/498/949

  10. Ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on functionalized gold clusters/graphene nanohybrids coupling with exonuclease III-aided cascade target recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bao, Ting; Zeng, Xi; Xiong, Huayu; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a novel and ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor was constructed for DNA detection based on functionalized gold clusters/graphene nanohybrids (AuNCs/GR nanobybrids) and exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided cascade target recycling. By utilizing the capacity of GR as universal template, different metal nanoclusters including AuNCs/GR nanobybrids and PtNCs/GR nanohybrids were synthesized through convenient ultrasonic method. Exo III-aided cascade recycling was initiated by target DNA, generating the final cleavage product (S2), which acted as a linkage between capture probe and the functionalized metal nanoclusters/GR conjugates in the construction of the biosensor. The AuNCs/GR-DNA-enzyme conjugates acted as interfaces of enzyme-catalyzed silver deposition reaction, achieving DNA detection ranging from 0.02 fM to 20 pM with a detection limit of 0.057 fM. In addition, PtNCs/GR-DNA conjugates presented peroxidase-like activity and the functionalized PtNCs/GR nanohybrids-based electrochemical biosensor also realized DNA detection by catalyzing the 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine-hydrogen peroxide (TMB-H2O2) system to produce electrochemical signal. This metal clusters/GR-based multiple-amplified electrochemical biosensor provided an universal method for DNA detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The search for multiple populations in Magellanic Cloud Clusters - III. No evidence for multiple populations in the SMC cluster NGC 419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martocchia, S.; Bastian, N.; Usher, C.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Niederhofer, F.; Cabrera-Ziri, I.; Dalessandro, E.; Hollyhead, K.; Kacharov, N.; Lardo, C.; Larsen, S.; Mucciarelli, A.; Platais, I.; Salaris, M.; Cordero, M.; Geisler, D.; Hilker, M.; Li, C.; Mackey, D.

    2017-07-01

    We present the third paper about our ongoing Hubble Space Telescope survey for the search for multiple stellar populations (MPs) within Magellanic Cloud clusters. We report here the analysis of NGC 419, an ˜1.5 Gyr old, massive (≳2 × 105 M⊙) star cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). By comparing our photometric data with stellar isochrones, we set a limit on [N/Fe] enhancement of ≲+0.5 dex and hence we find that no MPs are detected in this cluster. This is surprising because in the first two papers of this series, we found evidence for MPs in four other SMC clusters (NGC 121; Lindsay 1, NGC 339, NGC 416), aged from 6 Gyr up to ˜10-11 Gyr. This finding raises the question whether age could play a major role in the MPs phenomenon. Additionally, our results appear to exclude mass or environment as the only key factors regulating the existence of a chemical enrichment, since all clusters studied so far in this survey are equally massive (˜1-2 × 105 M⊙) and no particular patterns are found when looking at their spatial distribution in the SMC.

  12. M/L, Hα Rotation Curves, and H I Gas Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals. III. Evolution in Fundamental Galaxy Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry

    2004-06-01

    We have conducted a study of optical and H I properties of spiral galaxies (size, luminosity, Hα flux distribution, circular velocity, H I gas mass) to investigate causes (e.g., nature vs. nurture) for variation within the cluster environment. We find H I-deficient cluster galaxies to be offset in fundamental plane space, with disk scale lengths decreased by a factor of 25%. This may be a relic of early galaxy formation, caused by the disk coalescing out of a smaller, denser halo (e.g., higher concentration index) or by truncation of the hot gas envelope due to the enhanced local density of neighbors, although we cannot completely rule out the effect of the gas stripping process. The spatial extent of Hα flux and the B-band radius also decreases, but only in early-type spirals, suggesting that gas removal is less efficient within steeper potential wells (or that stripped late-type spirals are quickly rendered unrecognizable). We find no significant trend in stellar mass-to-light ratios or circular velocities with H I gas content, morphological type, or clustercentric radius, for star-forming spiral galaxies throughout the clusters. These data support the findings of a companion paper that gas stripping promotes a rapid truncation of star formation across the disk and could be interpreted as weak support for dark matter domination over baryons in the inner regions of spiral galaxies.

  13. Two lanthanide(III)-copper(II) organic frameworks based on {OLn6 } clusters that exhibited a large magnetocaloric effect and slow relaxation of the magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Yanmin; Xu, Na; Shi, Wei; Liu, Ke; Cheng, Peng

    2013-07-01

    Two new 3D lanthanide(III)-copper(II) organic frameworks based on unusual {OLn6} clusters have been successfully synthesized and fully characterized. Crystallographic studies showed that the {OLn6} clusters acted as 12-connected nodes that were linked together by [CuL2] (H2L = 3-hydroxypyrazine-2-carboxylic acid) moieties to construct an interesting 4,12-c net with the point symbol {4(36).6(30)}{4(4).6(2)}3. Magnetic studies revealed that these two isostructural heterometallic frameworks exhibited different magnetic properties, depending on the different anisotropies of the lanthanide spin carriers: Gd-Cu showed a large magnetocaloric effect, with an entropy change (-ΔS(m)) of 35.76 J  kg(-1)  K(-1), which is one of the largest values in high-dimensional complexes, whilst Dy-Cu exhibited slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperatures.

  14. Chemical tagging in the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey: new identifications of halo stars with globular cluster origins

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah; Lucatello, Sara; Schiavon, Ricardo; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Hernandez, Anibal Garcia; Beers, Tim; Nidever, David

    2016-01-01

    We present new identifications of five red giant stars in the Galactic halo with chemical abundance patterns that indicate they originally formed in globular clusters. Using data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Survey available through Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (DR12), we first identify likely halo giants, and then search those for the well-known chemical tags associated with globular clusters, specifically enrichment in nitrogen and aluminum. We find that 2% of the halo giants in our sample have this chemical signature, in agreement with previous results. Following the interpretation in our previous work on this topic, this would imply that at least 13% of halo stars originally formed in globular clusters. Recent developments in the theoretical understanding of globular cluster formation raise questions about that interpretation, and we concede the possibility that these migrants represent a small fraction of the halo field. There are roughly as many st...

  15. Two New Octadecanuclear Copper(II)-Lanthanide(III) Clusters Encapsulating μ9-NO -3 Anions. Synthesis, Structures, and Magnetic Properties of [Cu 12Ln6( μ3-OH) 24(C 5H 5NCH 2CO 2) 12(H 2O) 18( μ9-NO 3)](PF 6) 10(NO 3) 7·12H 2O ( LnIII=Sm III or Gd III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang-Yi; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ng, Seik Weng

    2001-11-01

    Two new octadecanuclear clusters [Cu12Ln6(μ3-OH)24(C5H5NCH2CO2)12(H2O)18(μ9-NO3)](PF6)10(NO3)7·12H2O [LnIII=SmIII (1) or GdIII (2)] have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction. They are isomorphous and crystallize in the triclinic space group Poverline1 with Z=1. The cell dimensions of 1 are a=17.366(1), b=17.790(1), and c=19.002(1) Å, α=117.279(1), β=91.763(1), and γ=111.585(1)°. In the cluster, 6 SmIII atoms are positioned at the vertices of an octahedron, while 12 CuII atoms are at the midpoints of the edges of the octahedron. The CuII-SmIII metal framework is interconnected by the 24 similar μ3-OH- groups, each bridging one SmIII and two CuII atoms. The octahedral cage encapsulates an unusual μ9-NO-3 anion with each oxygen atom coordinated to three CuII atoms. The 12 carboxylate ligands act as μ2-carboxylate-O,O‧ bridges, each linking a SmIII and a CuII atom. The PF-6 counteranion plays an important role in crystallization of the two complexes.

  16. Virgo cluster early-type dwarf galaxies with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. III. Subpopulations: distributions, shapes, origins

    CERN Document Server

    Lisker, T; Binggeli, B; Glatt, K; Lisker, Thorsten; Grebel, Eva K.; Binggeli, Bruno; Glatt, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    From a quantitative analysis of 413 Virgo cluster early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we find that the dE class can be divided into multiple subpopulations that differ significantly in their morphology and clustering properties. Three dE subclasses are shaped like thick disks and show no central clustering: (1) dEs with disk features like spiral arms or bars, (2) dEs with central star formation, and (3) ordinary, bright dEs that have no or only a weak nucleus. These populations probably formed from infalling progenitor galaxies. In contrast, ordinary nucleated dEs follow the picture of classical dwarf elliptical galaxies in that they are spheroidal objects and are centrally clustered like E and S0 galaxies, indicating that they have resided in the cluster since a long time, or were formed along with it. These results define a morphology-density relation within the dE class. We find that the difference in the clustering properties of nucleated dEs and dEs with no or only...

  17. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of three 1D chain complexes based on high-spin metal-cyanide clusters: [Mn(III)6M(III)] (M = Cr, Fe, Co).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Xu, Yong-Lu; Song, Xiao-Jiao; Song, You; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2011-08-01

    On the basis of high-spin metal-cyanide clusters of Mn(III)(6)M(III) (M = Cr, Fe, Co), three one-dimensional (1D) chain complexes, [Mn(salen)](6)[Cr(CN)(6)](2)·6CH(3)OH·H(2)O (1), [Mn(5-CH(3))salen)](6)[Fe(CN)(6)](2)·2CH(3)CN·10H(2)O (2), and [Mn(5-CH(3))salen)](6)[Co(CN)(6)](2)·2CH(3)CN·10H(2)O (3) [salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato) dianion], have been synthesized and characterized structurally as well as magnetically. Complexes 2 and 3 are isomorphic but slightly different from complex 1. All three complexes contain a 1D chain structure which is comprised of alternating high-spin metal-cyanide clusters of [Mn(6)M](3+) and a bridging group [M(CN)(6)](3-) in the trans mode. Furthermore, the three complexes all exhibit extended 3D supramolecular networks originating from short intermolecular contacts. Magnetic investigation indicates that the coupling mechanisms are intrachain antiferromagnetic interactions for 1 and ferromagnetic interactions for 2, respectively. Complex 3 is a magnetic dilute system due to the diamagnetic nature of Co(III). Further magnetic investigations show that complexes 1 and 2 are dominated by the 3D antiferromagnetic ordering with T(N) = 7.2 K for 1 and 9.5 K for 2. It is worth noting that the weak frequency-dependent phenomenon of AC susceptibilities was observed in the low-temperature region in both 1 and 2, suggesting the presence of slow magnetic relaxations.

  18. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final BOSS DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, $\\omega(\\theta)$, in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from $w_\\rm{DE} = -1$, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity u...

  19. The Color and Stellar Mass Dependence of Small-scale Galaxy Clustering in SDSS-III BOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law-Smith, Jamie; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    We measure the color and stellar mass dependence of clustering in spectroscopic galaxies at 0.6 noise ratio. We find the ratio of the clustering amplitudes of red and blue massive galaxies to be {w}{red}/{w}{blue}=1.92+/- 0.11 in our smallest annulus of 75–125 kpc. At our largest radii (2–4 Mpc), we find {w}{red}/{w}{blue}=1.24+/- 0.05. Red galaxies therefore have denser environments than their blue counterparts at z ∼ 0.625, and this effect increases with decreasing radius. Irrespective of color, we find that w(R) does not obey a simple power-law relation with radius, showing a dip around 1 Mpc. Holding stellar mass fixed, we find a clear differentiation between clustering in red and blue galaxies, showing that clustering is not solely determined by stellar mass. Holding color fixed, we find that clustering increases with stellar mass, especially for red galaxies at small scales (more than a factor of 2 effect over 0.75 dex in stellar mass).

  20. Polyaspartic acid facilitates oxolation within iron(iii) oxide pre-nucleation clusters and drives the formation of organic-inorganic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, J.; Drechsler, M.; Ma, X.; Stöckl, M. T.; Konsek, J.; Schwaderer, J. B.; Stadler, S. M.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Gebauer, D.

    2016-12-01

    The interplay between polymers and inorganic minerals during the formation of solids is crucial for biomineralization and bio-inspired materials, and advanced material properties can be achieved with organic-inorganic composites. By studying the reaction mechanisms, basic questions on organic-inorganic interactions and their role during material formation can be answered, enabling more target-oriented strategies in future synthetic approaches. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the hydrolysis of iron(iii) in the presence of polyaspartic acid. For the basic investigation of the formation mechanism, a titration assay was used, complemented by microscopic techniques. The polymer is shown to promote precipitation in partly hydrolyzed reaction solutions at the very early stages of the reaction by facilitating iron(iii) hydrolysis. In unhydrolyzed solutions, no significant interactions between the polymer and the inorganic solutes can be observed. We demonstrate that the hydrolysis promotion by the polymer can be understood by facilitating oxolation in olation iron(iii) pre-nucleation clusters. We propose that the adsorption of olation pre-nucleation clusters on the polymer chains and the resulting loss in dynamics and increased proximity of the reactants is the key to this effect. The resulting composite material obtained from the hydrolysis in the presence of the polymer was investigated with additional analytical techniques, namely, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, light microscopy, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential measurements, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analyses. It consists of elastic, polydisperse nanospheres, ca. 50-200 nm in diameter, and aggregates thereof, exhibiting a high polymer and water content.

  1. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, ω(θ), in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard Λ cold dark matter model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from wDE = -1, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity (GR) using the growth-index γ parametrization. These results are, in general, comparable to the most precise present-day constraints on cosmological parameters, and show very good agreement with the standard model. In particular, combining CMB, ω(θ) and SNIa, we find a value of wDE consistent with -1 to a precision better than 5 per cent when it is assumed to be constant in time, and better than 6 per cent when we also allow for a spatially curved Universe.

  2. Isolated ellipticals and their globular cluster systems III. NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240 and IC 4889

    CERN Document Server

    Salinas, R; Richtler, T; Lane, R R

    2015-01-01

    As tracers of star formation, galaxy assembly and mass distribution, globular clusters have provided important clues to our understanding of early-type galaxies. But their study has been mostly constrained to galaxy groups and clusters where early-type galaxies dominate, leaving the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of isolated ellipticals as a mostly uncharted territory. We present Gemini-South/GMOS $g'i'$ observations of five isolated elliptical galaxies: NGC 3962, NGC 2865, IC 4889, NGC 2271 and NGC 4240. Photometry of their GCSs reveals clear color bimodality in three of them, remaining inconclusive for the other two. All the studied GCSs are rather poor with a mean specific frequency $S_N\\sim 1.5$, independently of the parent galaxy luminosity. Considering also previous work, it is clear that bimodality and especially the presence of a significant, even dominant, population of blue clusters occurs at even the most isolated systems, casting doubts on a possible accreted origin of metal-poo...

  3. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. III. A very massive star in apparent isolation from the massive cluster R136

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bestenlehner, J.M.; Vink, J.S.; Gräfener, G.; Najarro, F.; Evans, C.J.; Bastian, N.; Bonanos, A.Z.; Bressert, E.; Crowther, P.A.; Doran, E.; Friedrich, K.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; de Koter, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sana, H.; Soszynski, I.; Taylor, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    VFTS 682 is located in an active star-forming region, at a projected distance of 29 pc from the young massive cluster R136 in the Tarantula Nebula of the Large Magellanic Cloud. It was previously reported as a candidate young stellar object, and more recently spectroscopically revealed as a

  4. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters III: Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MUSIC set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a mass-limited sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to high redshift, and we trace the cluster formation back to $z$ = 1.5, 2.3 and 4. We study the features and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the cluster progenitors and for the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at $z$ = 0. A natural extension to redshifts larger than 1 is applied to the estimate of the baryon content also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we focus on the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton $y$-parameter, and we check for the possibility to extend the mass-observable paradigm to the proto...

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: modeling of the luminosity and colour dependence in the Data Release 10

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Xu, Haojie; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Weinberg, David H; Bahcall, Neta A; Berlind, Andreas A; Comparat, Johan; McBride, Cameron K; Ross, Ashley J; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin A; Swanson, Molly E C; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and colour dependence of clustering of CMASS galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Tenth Data Release. The halo occupation distribution framework is adopted to model the projected two-point correlation function measurements on small and intermediate scales (from $0.02$ to $60\\,h^{-1}{\\rm {Mpc}}$) and to interpret the observed trends and infer the connection of galaxies to dark matter halos. We find that luminous red galaxies reside in massive halos of mass $M{\\sim}10^{13}$--$10^{14}\\,h^{-1}{\\rm M_\\odot}$ and more luminous galaxies are more clustered and hosted by more massive halos. The strong small-scale clustering requires a fraction of these galaxies to be satellites in massive halos, with the fraction at the level of 5--8 per cent and decreasing with luminosity. The characteristic mass of a halo hosting on average one satellite galaxy above a luminosity threshold is about a factor $8.7$ larger than that of a halo hosting a centra...

  6. A missing high-spin molecule in the family of cyano-bridged heptanuclear heterometal complexes, [(LCuII)6FeIII(CN)6]3+, and its CoIII and CrIII analogues, accompanied in the crystal by a novel octameric water cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Maxim, Catalin; Khuntia, Panchanana; Madalan, Augustin M; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Caneschi, Andrea; Journauxe, Yves; Andruh, Marius; 10.1039/b924505g

    2010-01-01

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged heptanuclear complexes, [{CuII(saldmen)(H2O)}6{MIII(CN)6}](ClO4)3$\\cdotp$8H2O (M = FeIII 2; CoIII, 3; CrIII 4), have been obtained by reacting the binuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu2(saldmen)2(mu-H2O)(H2O)2](ClO4)2$\\cdotp$2H2O 1, with K3[Co(CN)6], K4[Fe(CN)6], and, respectively, K3[Cr(CN)6] (Hsaldmen is the Schiff base resulted from the condensation of salicylaldehyde with N,N-dimethylethylenediamine). A unique octameric water cluster, with bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-like structure, is sandwiched between the heptanuclear cations in 2, 3 and 4. The cryomagnetic investigations of compounds 2 and 4 reveal ferromagnetic couplings of the central FeIII or CrIII ions with the CuII ions (JCuFe = +0.87 cm-1, JCuCr = +30.4 cm-1). The intramolecular Cu-Cu exchange interaction in 3, across the diamagnetic cobalt(III) ion, is -0.3 cm-1. The solid-state1H-NMR spectra of compounds 2 and 3 have been investigated.

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Effect of smoothing of density field on reconstruction and anisotropic BAO analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Ho, Shirley; Fromenteau, Sebastien.; Cuesta, Antonio. J.

    2017-01-01

    The reconstruction algorithm introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007), which is widely used in clustering analysis, is based on the inference of the first order Lagrangian displacement field from the Gaussian smoothed galaxy density field in redshift space. The 2smoothing scale applied to the density field affects the inferred displacement field that is used to move the galaxies, and partially 2erases the nonlinear evolution of the density field. In this article, we explore this crucial step 2in the reconstruction algorithm. We study the performance of the reconstruction technique using two metrics: first, we study the performance using the anisotropic clustering, extending previous studies focused on isotropic clustering; second, we study its effect on the displacement field. We find that smoothing has a strong effect in the quadrupole of the correlation function and affects the accuracy and precision 2with which we can measure DA(z) and H(z). We find that the optimal smoothing scale to use in the reconstruction algorithm applied to BOSS-CMASS is between 5-10 h-1Mpc. Varying from the "usual" 15h-1Mpc to 5h-1Mpc 2shows ˜ 0.3% variations in DA(z) and ˜ 0.4% H(z) and uncertainties are also reduced by 40% and 30% respectively. We also find that the accuracy of velocity field reconstruction depends strongly on the smoothing scale used for the density field. We measure the bias and uncertainties associated with different choices of smoothing length.

  8. Nonlinear Color-Metallicity Relations of Globular Clusters. III. On the Discrepancy in Metallicity between Globular Cluster Systems and their Parent Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Blakeslee, John P; Peng, Eric W; Sohn, Sangmo T; Cho, Jaeil; Kim, Hak-Sub; Chung, Chul; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Young-Wook

    2011-01-01

    One of the conundrums in extragalactic astronomy is the discrepancy in observed metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) between the two prime stellar components of early-type galaxies-globular clusters (GCs) and halo field stars. This is generally taken as evidence of highly decoupled evolutionary histories between GC systems and their parent galaxies. Here we show, however, that new developments in linking the observed GC colors to their intrinsic metallicities suggest nonlinear color-to-metallicity conversions, which translate observed color distributions into strongly-peaked, unimodal MDFs with broad metal-poor tails. Remarkably, the inferred GC MDFs are similar to the MDFs of resolved field stars in nearby elliptical galaxies and those produced by chemical evolution models of galaxies. The GC MDF shape, characterized by a sharp peak with a metal-poor tail, indicates a virtually continuous chemical enrichment with a relatively short timescale. The characteristic shape emerges across three orders of magni...

  9. Isolated ellipticals and their globular cluster systems. III. NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240, and IC 4889

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Alabi, A.; Richtler, T.; Lane, R. R.

    2015-05-01

    As tracers of star formation, galaxy assembly, and mass distribution, globular clusters have provided important clues to our understanding of early-type galaxies. But their study has been mostly constrained to galaxy groups and clusters where early-type galaxies dominate, leaving the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of isolated ellipticals as a mostly uncharted territory. We present Gemini-South/GMOS g'i' observations of five isolated elliptical galaxies: NGC 3962, NGC 2865, IC 4889, NGC 2271, and NGC 4240. Photometry of their GCSs reveals clear color bimodality in three of them, but remains inconclusive for the other two. All the studied GCSs are rather poor with a mean specific frequency SN ~ 1.5, independently of the parent galaxy luminosity. Considering information from previous work as well, it is clear that bimodality and especially the presence of a significant, even dominant, population of blue clusters occurs at even the most isolated systems, which casts doubts on a possible accreted origin of metal-poor clusters, as suggested by some models. Additionally, we discuss the possible existence of ultra-compact dwarfs around the isolated elliptical NGC 3962. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).Globular cluster photometry is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A59Appendices are available in

  10. The Cosmological Impact of Luminous TeV Blazars III: Implications for Galaxy Clusters and the Formation of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    A subset of blazars emit TeV gamma rays which annihilate and pair produce on the extragalactic background light. We have argued in Broderick et al. (2011, Paper I) that plasma beam instabilities can dissipate the pairs' energy locally. This heats the intergalactic medium and dramatically increases its entropy after redshift z~2, with important implications for structure formation: (1) This suggests a scenario for the origin of the cool core (CC)/non-cool core (NCC) bimodality in galaxy clusters and groups. Early forming galaxy groups are unaffected because they can efficiently radiate the additional entropy, developing a CC. However, late forming groups do not have sufficient time to cool before the entropy is gravitationally reprocessed through successive mergers - counteracting cooling and raising the core entropy further. Hence blazar heating works different than feedback by active galactic nuclei, which balances radiative cooling but is unable to transform CC into NCC clusters due to the weak coupling to ...

  11. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters - III. Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; De Petris, Marco; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MultiDark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to z = 4. We study the characteristics and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at z = 0. We extend the study of the baryon content to redshifts larger than 1 also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we compute the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton y-parameter. We find that the slope of this scaling law is steeper than what expected for a self-similarity assumption among these objects, and it increases with redshift mainly when radiative processes are included. We use three different criteria to account for the dynamical state of the protoclusters, and find no significant dependence of the scaling parameters on the level of relaxation. We exclude the dynamical state as the cause of the observed deviations from self-similarity in protoclusters.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of a gene cluster encoding an additional, rhizobial-like type III secretion system that is narrowly distributed among Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, Anastasia D; Sarris, Panagiotis F; Fadouloglou, Vasiliki E; Charova, Spyridoula N; Mathioudakis, Nikolaos; Panopoulos, Nicholas J; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2012-09-02

    The central role of Type III secretion systems (T3SS) in bacteria-plant interactions is well established, yet unexpected findings are being uncovered through bacterial genome sequencing. Some Pseudomonas syringae strains possess an uncharacterized cluster of genes encoding putative components of a second T3SS (T3SS-2) in addition to the well characterized Hrc1 T3SS which is associated with disease lesions in host plants and with the triggering of hypersensitive response in non-host plants. The aim of this study is to perform an in silico analysis of T3SS-2, and to compare it with other known T3SSs. Based on phylogenetic analysis and gene organization comparisons, the T3SS-2 cluster of the P. syringae pv. phaseolicola strain is grouped with a second T3SS found in the pNGR234b plasmid of Rhizobium sp. These additional T3SS gene clusters define a subgroup within the Rhizobium T3SS family. Although, T3SS-2 is not distributed as widely as the Hrc1 T3SS in P. syringae strains, it was found to be constitutively expressed in P. syringae pv phaseolicola through RT-PCR experiments. The relatedness of the P. syringae T3SS-2 to a second T3SS from the pNGR234b plasmid of Rhizobium sp., member of subgroup II of the rhizobial T3SS family, indicates common ancestry and/or possible horizontal transfer events between these species. Functional analysis and genome sequencing of more rhizobia and P. syringae pathovars may shed light into why these bacteria maintain a second T3SS gene cluster in their genome.

  13. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from CMASS and LOWZ anisotropic galaxy clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Ho, Shirley; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Manera, Marc; Nuza, Sebastian E; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Weaver, Benjamin A; Brownstein, Joel R; Dawson, Kyle S; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 Mpc/h), which can be modeled by perturbation theory. We analyze the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 11 (DR11) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z=0.57, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance D_A(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)\\sigma_8(z), and the physical matter density \\Omega_mh^2. We provide accurate measurements on {H^{-1}R_{fid}^{-1.0}, D_A R_{fid}^{-0.96}, f\\sigma_8(\\Omega_m h^2)^{0.45}}, where R_{fid}\\equiv r_s/r_{s,fid}, r_s is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch, and r_{s,fid} is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. We also extract cosmological constraints from BOSS DR11 LOWZ sample, ...

  14. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: galaxy clustering measurements in the low redshift sample of Data Release 11

    CERN Document Server

    Tojeiro, Rita; Burden, Angela; Samushia, Lado; Manera, Marc; Percival, Will J; Beutler, Florian; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ho, Shirley; Howett, Cullan; McBride, Cameron K; Montesano, Francisco; Parejko, John K; Reid, Beth; Sánchez, Ariel G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Tinker, Jeremy L; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; White, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We present the distance measurement to z = 0.32 using the 11th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Survey (BOSS). We use 313,780 galaxies of the low-redshift (LOWZ) sample over 7,341 square-degrees to compute $D_V = (1264 \\pm 25)(r_d/r_{d,fid})$ - a sub 2% measurement - using the baryon acoustic feature measured in the galaxy two-point correlation function and power-spectrum. We compare our results to those obtained in DR10. We study observational systematics in the LOWZ sample and quantify potential effects due to photometric offsets between the northern and southern Galactic caps. We find the sample to be robust to all systematic effects found to impact on the targeting of higher-redshift BOSS galaxies, and that the observed north-south tensions can be explained by either limitations in photometric calibration or by sample variance, and have no impact on our final result. Our measurement, combined with the baryonic acoustic scale at z = 0.57, is used in Anderson et a...

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Anisotropic galaxy clustering in Fourier-space

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Florian; Saito, Shun; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Sánchez, Ariel G; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropic clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 (DR12) sample, which consists of $1\\,198\\,006$ galaxies in the redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.75$ and a sky coverage of $10\\,252\\,$deg$^2$. We analyse this dataset in Fourier space, using the power spectrum multipoles to measure Redshift-Space Distortions (RSD) simultaneously with the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale. We include the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole in our analysis and compare our measurements with a perturbation theory based model, while properly accounting for the survey window function. To evaluate the reliability of our analysis pipeline we participate in a mock challenge, which resulted in systematic uncertainties significantly smaller than the statistical uncertainties. While the high-redshift constraint on $f\\sigma_8$ at $z_{\\rm eff}=0.61$ indicates a small ($\\sim 1.4\\sigma$) deviation from the prediction of th...

  16. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering -- towards an accurate model

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Zhao, Gong-bo; Wang, Yuting; Cuesta, Antonio J; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Satpathy, Siddharth; Slosar, Anže; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A; Brownstein, Joel R; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate $H(z)$, the angular-diameter distance $D_A(z)$, the normalised growth rate $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)$, and the physical matter density $\\Omega_mh^2$. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a `single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalise over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models, thus we develop a new methodology to speed up our analysis. We obtain $\\{D_A(z)r_{s,fid}/r_s$Mpc, $H(z)r_s/r_{s,fid}$kms$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$, $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)$, $\\Omega_m h^2\\}$ = $\\{956\\pm28$ , $75.0\\pm4.0$ , $0.397 \\pm 0.073$, $0.143\\pm0.017\\}$ at $z=0.32$ and $\\{1421\\pm23$, $96.7\\pm2.7$ , $0.497 ...

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Observational systematics and baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ashley J; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Seo, Hee-Jong; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J; Percival, Will J; Burden, Angela; Sanchez, Ariel G; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Reid, Beth; Brownstein, Joel R; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio A; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Schneider, Donald P; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; White, Martin; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We present baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements determined from the clustering of 1.2 million massive galaxies with redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.75 distributed over 9300 square degrees, as quantified by their redshift-space correlation function. In order to facilitate these measurements, we define, describe, and motivate the selection function for galaxies in the final data release (DR12) of the SDSS III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This includes the observational footprint, masks for image quality and Galactic extinction, and weights to account for density relationships intrinsic to the imaging and spectroscopic portions of the survey. We simulate the observed systematic trends in mock galaxy samples and demonstrate that they impart no bias on baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements and have a minor impact on the recovered statistical uncertainty. We measure transverse and radial BAO distance measurements in 0.2 < z < 0.5, 0.5 < z < 0.75, and (overla...

  18. Introduction of a prognostic biomarker to strengthen risk stratification of acutely admitted patients: rationale and design of the TRIAGE III cluster randomized interventional trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandø, Andreas; Schultz, Martin; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    patients at the ED. The main hypothesis is that the availability of suPAR can reduce all-cause mortality, assessed at least 10 months after admission, by drawing attention towards patients with an unrecognized high risk, leading to improved diagnostics and treatment. METHODS: The study is designed...... as a cross-over cluster randomized interventional trial. SuPAR is measured within 2 h after admission and immediately reported to the treating physicians in the ED. All ED physicians are educated in the prognostic capabilities of suPAR prior to the inclusion period. The inclusion period began January 11(th......) 2016 and ends June 6(th) 2016. The study aims to include 10.000 patients in both the interventional and control arm. The results will be presented in 2017. DISCUSSION: The present article aims to describe the design and rationale of the TRIAGE III study that will investigate whether the availability...

  19. An XMM-Newton view of the young open cluster NGC 6231 - III. Optically faint X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, H.; Rauw, G.; Sung, H.; Gosset, E.; Vreux, J.-M.

    2007-05-01

    We discuss the properties of the X-ray sources with faint optical counterparts in the very young open cluster NGC 6231. From their positions in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we find that the bulk of these objects probably consists of low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars with masses in the range 0.3-3.0 Msolar. The age distribution of these objects indicates that low-mass star formation in NGC 6231 started more than 10Myr ago and culminated in a starburst-like event about 1-4Myr ago when the bulk of the low-mass PMS stars as well as the massive cluster members formed. We find no evidence for a spatial age gradient that could point towards a sequential star formation process. Only a few X-ray sources have counterparts with a reddening exceeding the average value of the cluster or with infrared colours indicating the presence of a moderate near-IR excess. The X-ray spectra of the brightest PMS sources are best fitted by rather hard thermal plasma models and a significant fraction of these sources display flares in their light curve. The X-ray brightest flaring sources have decay times between 2 and 16ks. The X-ray selected PMS stars in NGC 6231 have logLX/Lbol values that increase strongly with decreasing bolometric luminosity and can reach a saturation level (logLX/Lbol ~ -2.4) for non-flaring sources and even more extreme values during flares. Based on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the USA (NASA). E-mail: hsana@eso.org ‡ FNRS Research Associate (Belgium).

  20. High-resolution CCD spectra of stars in globular clusters. III - M4, M13, and M22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George; Leep, E. Myckky; Oke, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Spectra of 0.3 and 0.6 A resolution of stars in M4, M13 and M22 to derive abundances of various atomic species and the CN molecule. For M13, the usual Fe/H ratio and a surprisingly high aluminum abundance is found. The CN lines indicate a larger column density in the oxygen-rich star III-63 than in the oxygen-poor star II-67 by a factor of 10. It appears that II-67 is deficient in C, N, and O by about a factor 3 relative to iron for all three elements. For M4, Fe/H = -1.2 using solar f values derived via the Bell et al. (1976) model. This Fe abundance lies between earlier echelle values and photometric values. For two stars, CN data are obtained that can be understood if there was a slight excess of C/Fe and N/Fe prior to CN cycling and mixing. For M22, a large difference in CN is found between stars III-3 and IV-102. The origin of the CNO elements is discussed in terms of mass loss from an early generation of red giants and possibly Wolf-Rayet stars.

  1. The VLT LBG Redshift Survey - III. The clustering and dynamics of Lyman-break galaxies at z ~ 3

    CERN Document Server

    Bielby, R; Shanks, T; Crighton, N H M; Infante, L; Bornancini, C G; Francke, H; Heraudeau, P; Lambas, D G; Metcalfe, N; Minniti, D; Padilla, N; Theuns, T; Tummuangpak, P; Weilbacher, P

    2012-01-01

    We present a survey of 2,148 galaxy redshifts from the VLT LBG Redshift Survey (VLRS), a spectroscopic survey of z ~ 3 galaxies in wide fields centred on background QSOs made using the VLT VIMOS instrument. To make a definitive LBG clustering analysis, we have combined the VLRS redshifts with the 813 Keck LBG redshifts of Steidel et al, with the statistical power of VLRS at large scales complementing the accuracy of the Keck sample at small scales. From the semi-projected correlation function for the VLRS and combined surveys, we find that the results are well fit with a single power law model for the real space correlation function with clustering scale lengths of respectively r0 = 3.32 \\pm 0.41 and 3.75 \\pm 0.24 Mpc/h. We note that the corresponding combined slope is flatter than for local galaxies at {\\gamma} = 1.55 \\pm 0.09. This flat slope is confirmed by the z-space correlation function and in the range 10 < s < 100 Mpc/h the VLRS shows a 2.5{\\sigma} excess over the {\\Lambda}CDM linear prediction....

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Data Release 9 Spectroscopic Galaxy Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Lauren; Bailey, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Cuesta, Antonio J; da Costa, Luiz N A; Dawson, Kyle S; de Putter, Roland; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harding, Paul; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Kazin, Eyal; Kirkby, D; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Labatie, Antione; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Mehta, Kushal T; Mena, Olga; Montesano, Francesco; Muna, Demetri; Nichol, Robert C; Nuza, Sebastian E; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Paris, Isabelle; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Ariel G; Schneider, David J Schlegel Donald P; Scoccola, Claudia G; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A; Strauss, Michael A; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Verde, Licia; Wagner, Christian; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Xu, Xiaoying; Yeche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We present measurements of galaxy clustering from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). These use the Data Release 9 (DR9) CMASS sample, which contains 264,283 massive galaxies covering 3275 square degrees with an effective redshift z=0.57 and redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7. Assuming a concordance Lambda-CDM cosmological model, this sample covers an effective volume of 2.2 Gpc^3, and represents the largest sample of the Universe ever surveyed at this density, n = 3 x 10^-4 h^-3 Mpc^3. We measure the angle-averaged galaxy correlation function and power spectrum, including density-field reconstruction of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature. The acoustic features are detected at a significance of 5\\sigma in both the correlation function and power spectrum. Combining with the SDSS-II Luminous Red Galaxy Sample, the detection significance increases to 6.7\\sigma. Fitting for the position of the acoustic features measures the ...

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Data Release 10 and 11 galaxy samples

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Lauren; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Blanton, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Lupton, Robert H; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Mena, Olga; Montesano, Francesco; Nichol, Robert C; Nuza, Sebastian E; Olmstead, Matthew D; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Parejko, John; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Reid, Beth; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Sabiu, Cristiano G; Saito, Shun; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Ariel G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Scoccola, Claudia G; Seo, Hee-Jong; Skibba, Ramin A; Strauss, Michael A; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Xu, Xiaoying; Yeche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2013-01-01

    We present a one per cent measurement of the cosmic distance scale from the detections of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the clustering of galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). Our results come from the Data Release 11 (DR11) sample, containing nearly one million galaxies and covering approximately 8500 square degrees and the redshift range $0.2

  4. Electronic structure description of a [Co(III)3Co(IV)O4] cluster: a model for the paramagnetic intermediate in cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpin, J Gregory; Stich, Troy A; Ohlin, C André; Surendranath, Yogesh; Nocera, Daniel G; Casey, William H; Britt, R David

    2011-10-01

    Multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonace (EPR) spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations were performed on [Co(4)O(4)(C(5)H(5)N)(4)(CH(3)CO(2))(4)](+) (1(+)), a cobalt tetramer with total electron spin S = 1/2 and formal cobalt oxidation states III, III, III, and IV. The cuboidal arrangement of its cobalt and oxygen atoms is similar to that of proposed structures for the molecular cobaltate clusters of the cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) water-oxidizing catalyst. The Davies electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectrum is well-modeled using a single class of hyperfine-coupled (59)Co nuclei with a modestly strong interaction (principal elements of the hyperfine tensor are equal to [-20(±2), 77(±1), -5(±15)] MHz). Mims (1)H ENDOR spectra of 1(+) with selectively deuterated pyridine ligands confirm that the amount of unpaired spin on the cobalt-bonding partner is significantly reduced from unity. Multifrequency (14)N ESEEM spectra (acquired at 9.5 and 34.0 GHz) indicate that four nearly equivalent nitrogen nuclei are coupled to the electron spin. Cumulatively, our EPR spectroscopic findings indicate that the unpaired spin is delocalized almost equally across the eight core atoms, a finding corroborated by results from DFT calculations. Each octahedrally coordinated cobalt ion is forced into a low-spin electron configuration by the anionic oxo and carboxylato ligands, and a fractional electron hole is localized on each metal center in a Co 3d(xz,yz)-based molecular orbital for this essentially [Co(+3.125)(4)O(4)] system. Comparing the EPR spectrum of 1(+) with that of the catalyst film allows us to draw conclusions about the electronic structure of this water-oxidation catalyst.

  5. The Clustering of Galaxies in the SDSS-III DR10 Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: No Detectable Colour Dependence of Distance Scale or Growth Rate Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ashley J; Burden, Angela; Percival, Will J; Tojeiro, Rita; Manera, Marc; Beutler, Florian; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Carnero, Aurelio; da Costa, Luiz A N; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; Maia, Marcio A G; Montesano, Francesco; Muna, Demitri; Nichol, Robert C; Nuza, Sebastian E; Sanchez, Ariel G; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin A; Sobreira, Flavia; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Wake, David A; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2013-01-01

    We study the clustering of galaxies, as a function of their colour, from Data Release Ten (DR10) of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We select 122,967 galaxies with 0.43 < z < 0.7 into a "Blue" sample and 131,969 into a "Red" sample based on k+e corrected (to z=0.55) r-i colours and i band magnitudes. The samples are chosen to each contain more than 100,000 galaxies, have similar redshift distributions, and maximize the difference in clustering amplitude. The Red sample has a 40% larger bias than the Blue (b_Red/b_Blue = 1.39+-0.04), implying the Red galaxies occupy dark matter halos with an average mass that is 0.5 log Mo greater. Spherically averaged measurements of the correlation function, \\xi 0, and the power spectrum are used to locate the position of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of both samples. Using \\xi 0, we obtain distance scales, relative to our reference LCDM cosmology, of 1.010+-0.027 for the Red sample and 1.005+-0.031 for the Blue. After apply...

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Shadab; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A; Bolton, Adam S; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Reid, Beth A; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Satpathy, Siddharth; Scóccola, Claudia G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg^2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc^3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51, and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DM*H from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by f{\\sigma}8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one m...

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Mock galaxy catalogues for the final BOSS Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Gil-Marin, Hector; Guo, Hong; Yepes, Gustavo; Klypin, Anatoly; Scoccola, Claudia G; Tinker, Jeremy; McBride, Cameron; Reid, Beth; Sanchez, Ariel G; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J; Neyrinck, Mark; Beutler, Florian; Comparat, Johan; Percival, Will; Ross, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    We reproduce the galaxy clustering catalogue from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) with high fidelity on all relevant scales in order to allow a robust analysis of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions. We have generated 12,288 MultiDark patchy light-cones corresponding to an effective volume of ~192,000 [Gpc/h]^3 (the largest ever simulated volume), including cosmic evolution in the range from 0.15 to 0.75. The mocks have been calibrated using a reference galaxy catalogue based on the Halo Abundance Matching modelling of the BOSS DR12 galaxy clustering data and on the data themselves. The production of the MultiDark PATCHY BOSS DR12 mocks follows three steps. First, we apply the PATCHY-code to generate a dark matter field and an object distribution including nonlinear stochastic galaxy bias. Second, we run the halo/stellar distribution reconstruction HADRON-code to assign masses to the various objects. This step uses the mass distribution...

  8. M/L, H-alpha Rotation Curves, and HI Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals: III. Evolutionin Fundamental Galaxy Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, N P; Giovanelli, R; Herter, T; Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry

    2004-01-01

    We have conducted a study of optical and HI properties of spiral galaxies (size, luminosity, H-alpha flux distribution, circular velocity, HI gas mass) to investigate causes (e.g., nature versus nurture) for variation within the cluster environment. We find HI deficient cluster galaxies to be offset in Fundamental Plane space, with disk scale lengths decreased by a factor of 25%. This may be a relic of early galaxy formation, caused by the disk coalescing out of a smaller, denser halo (e.g., higher concentration index) or by truncation of the hot gas envelope due to the enhanced local density of neighbors, though we cannot completely rule out the effect of the gas stripping process. The spatial extent of H-alpha flux and the B-band radius also decreases, but only in early type spirals, suggesting that gas removal is less efficient within steeper potential wells (or that stripped late type spirals are quickly rendered unrecognizable). We find no significant trend in stellar mass-to-light ratios or circular vel...

  9. New Maser Emission from Nonmetastable Ammonia in NGC 7538. III. Detection of the (10,6) Transition and a Velocity Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Ian M

    2012-01-01

    We present the first astronomical detection of the 14NH3 (J,K) = (10,6) line: nonthermal emission at several velocities in the Galactic star-forming region NGC 7538. Using the VLA we have imaged the (10,6) and (9,6) ammonia masers at several positions within NGC 7538 IRS 1. The individual sources have angular sizes 1E6 K. We apply the pumping model of Brown & Cragg, confirming the conjecture that multiple ortho-ammonia masers can occur with the same value of K. The positions and velocities of the (10,6) and (9,6) masers are modeled as motion in a possible disk or torus and are discussed in the context of recent models of the region.

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Modeling the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS-CMASS galaxies in the Final Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Guo, Hong; Klypin, Anatoly; Behroozi, Peter; Hahn, Chang Hoon; Comparat, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Brownstein, Joel R; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Tinker, Jeremy; Gottlöber, Stefan; Favole, Ginevra; Shu, Yiping; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Bolton, Adam; Scoccimarro, Román; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P; Thomas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7 drawn from the Final SDSS-III Data Release. We compare the BOSS results with the predictions of a halo abundance matching (HAM) clustering model that assigns galaxies to dark matter halos selected from the large BigMultiDark N-body simulation of a flat $\\Lambda$CDM Planck cosmology. We compare the observational data with the simulated ones on a light-cone constructed from 20 subsequent outputs of the simulation. Observational effects such as incompleteness, geometry, veto masks and fiber collisions are included in the model, which reproduces within 1-$\\sigma$ errors the observed monopole of the 2-point correlation function at all relevant scales{: --} from the smallest scales, 0.5 $h^{-1}$Mpc , up to scales beyond the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation feature. This model also agrees remarkably well with the BOSS galaxy power spectrum (up to $k\\sim1$ $h$ Mpc$^{-1}$), and the three...

  11. Globular clusters with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Giuffrida, G.; Marinoni, S.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of crowded fields in Gaia data will only be a reality in a few years from now. In particular, for globular clusters, only the end-of-mission data (public in 2022-2023) will have the necessary full crowding treatment and will reach sufficient quality for the faintest stars. As a consequence, the work on the deblending and decontamination pipelines is still ongoing. We describe the present status of the pipelines for different Gaia instruments, and we model the end-of-mission crowding errors on the basis of available information. We then apply the nominal post-launch Gaia performances, appropriately worsened by the estimated crowding errors, to a set of 18 simulated globular clusters with different concentration, distance, and field contamination. We conclude that there will be 103-104 stars with astrometric performances virtually untouched by crowding (contaminated by <1 mmag) in the majoritiy of clusters. The most limiting factor will be field crowding, not cluster crowding: the most contaminated clusters will only contain 10-100 clean stars. We also conclude that: (i) the systemic proper motions and parallaxes will be determined to 1% or better up to ≃15 kpc, and the nearby clusters will have radial velocities to a few km s-1 ; (ii) internal kinematics will be of unprecendented quality, cluster masses will be determined to ≃10% up to 15 kpc and beyond, and it will be possible to identify differences of a few km s-1 or less in the kinematics (if any) of cluster sub-populations up to 10 kpc and beyond; (iii) the brightest stars (V≃17 mag) will have space-quality, wide-field photometry (mmag errors), and all Gaia photometry will have 1-3% errors on the absolute photometric calibration.

  12. Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies III: Detection of the Baryon Acoustic Peak in the 3-point Correlation Function

    CERN Document Server

    Gaztañaga, E; Castander, F; Crocce, M; Fosalba, P

    2008-01-01

    We present the 3-point function $\\xi_3$ and $Q_3=\\xi_3/\\xi_2^2$ for a spectroscopic volume limited sample of 40,000 luminous red galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6. We find a strong (S/N>6) detection of Q_3 on scales of 55-125 Mpc/h, with a well defined peak around 105 Mpc/h in all $\\xi_2$, $\\xi_3$ and Q_3, in excellent agreement with the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We use very large simulations (from a cubic box of L=7680 Mpc/h) to asses and test the significance of our measurement. This detection demonstrates the non-linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z=1000 and the present. Our measurements show the expected shape for Q_3 as a function of the triangular configuration. This provides a first direct measurement of the non-linear mode coupling coefficients of density and velocity fluctuations which, on these large scales, are independent of cosmic time, the amplitude of fluctuations or cosmological paramet...

  13. The Initial Conditions of Clustered Star Formation III. The Deuterium Fractionation of the Ophiuchus B2 Core

    CERN Document Server

    Friesen, R K; Myers, P C; Belloche, A; Shirley, Y L; Bourke, T L; André, P

    2010-01-01

    We present N2D+ 3-2 (IRAM) and H2D+ 1_11 - 1_10 and N2H+ 4-3 (JCMT) maps of the small cluster-forming Ophiuchus B2 core in the nearby Ophiuchus molecular cloud. In conjunction with previously published N2H+ 1-0 observations, the N2D+ data reveal the deuterium fractionation in the high density gas across Oph B2. The average deuterium fractionation R_D = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+) ~ 0.03 over Oph B2, with several small scale R_D peaks and a maximum R_D = 0.1. The mean R_D is consistent with previous results in isolated starless and protostellar cores. The column density distributions of both H2D+ and N2D+ show no correlation with total H2 column density. We find, however, an anticorrelation in deuterium fractionation with proximity to the embedded protostars in Oph B2 to distances >= 0.04 pc. Destruction mechanisms for deuterated molecules require gas temperatures greater than those previously determined through NH3 observations of Oph B2 to proceed. We present temperatures calculated for the dense core gas through the eq...

  14. Healthcare worker-related MRSA cluster in a German neonatology level III ICU: a true European story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, S; Trepels-Kottek, S; Häfner, H; Keller, D; Ittel, T; Wagner, N; Heimann, K; Schoberer, M; Schwarz, R; Haase, G; Waitschies, B; Orlikowsky, T; Lemmen, S

    2014-03-01

    Here we investigated a cluster of eight newly Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-colonized neonates at an ICU, and present data on molecular strain characterization as well as the source identification process in which we analyze the impact of MRSA-colonized HCWs. Molecular strain characterization revealed a unique pattern which was identified as spa-type t 127--an extremely rare strain type in Germany. Environmental sampling and screening of parents of colonized neonates proved negative. However, staff screening identified one healthcare worker (HCW; 1/134) belonging to a group of recently employed Romanian HCWs who was colonized with the spa 127 strain. Subsequent screening also detected MRSA in 9/51 Romanian HCWs (18%) and 7/9 (14% of all) isolates showed the same molecular pattern as the index case (spa/PFGE type). All carriers were successfully decolonized, after which no new patient cases occurred. As a result, we have now implemented a universal screening programme of all new employees as part of our infection control management strategy. MRSA-colonized HCWs can act as a source for in hospital transmission. Since HCWs from high endemic countries are particular prone to being colonized, they may pose a risk to patients.

  15. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey III: A very massive star in apparent isolation from the massive cluster R136

    CERN Document Server

    Bestenlehner, Joachim M; Gräfener, G; Najarro, F; Evans, C J; Bastian, N; Bonanos, A Z; Bressert, E; Crowther, P A; Doran, E; Friedrich, K; Hénault-Brunet, V; Herrero, A; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Lennon, D J; Apellániz, J Maíz; Sana, H; Soszynski, I; Taylor, W D

    2011-01-01

    VFTS 682 is located in an active star-forming region, at a projected distance of 29 pc from the young massive cluster R136 in the Tarantula Nebula of the Large Magellanic Cloud. It was previously reported as a candidate young stellar object, and more recently spectroscopically revealed as a hydrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet (WN5h) star. Our aim is to obtain the stellar properties, such as its intrinsic luminosity, and to investigate the origin of VFTS 682. To this purpose, we model optical spectra from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey with the non-LTE stellar atmosphere code CMFGEN, as well as the spectral energy distribution from complementary optical and infrared photometry. We find the extinction properties to be highly peculiar (RV ~4.7), and obtain a surprisingly high luminosity log(L/Lsun) = 6.5 \\pm 0.2, corresponding to a present-day mass of ~150Msun. The high effective temperature of 52.2 \\pm 2.5kK might be explained by chemically homogeneous evolution - suggested to be the key process in the path towards long ...

  16. A Flow Model for the Settling Velocities of Non Spherical Particles in Creeping Motion. Part III. Slender Bodies, the Stream Functions, the Flow and the Momentum Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Mendez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper follows previous work regarding the settling velocity of non spherical particles in creeping motion. In this paper, we summarize the flow model, present solutions for the slender plate and the cylinder (Stoke’s paradox, demonstrate the application for euhedral pseudo hexagonal plates (KGa-1 and show the match to the experimental data. In addition, we derive the stream function for the sphere, the slender cylinder and the plate, develop the relationships to compute the flow about a settling particle, back calculate the momentum equation and examine the result

  17. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  18. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE UV LEGACY SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. III. A QUINTUPLE STELLAR POPULATION IN NGC 2808

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Jerjen, H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Piotto, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica—Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, Padova, IT-35122 (Italy); Renzini, A.; Bedin, L. R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei,” Univ. di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, Padova, IT-35122 (Italy); Anderson, J.; Bellini, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3800 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica—Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Via Mentore Maggini s.n.c., I-64100 Teramo (Italy); D’Antona, F.; Ventura, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy)

    2015-07-20

    In this study we present the first results from multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 as an extension of the Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic GCs (GO-13297 and previous proprietary and HST archive data). Our analysis allowed us to disclose a multiple-stellar-population phenomenon in NGC 2808 even more complex than previously thought. We have separated at least five different populations along the main sequence and the red giant branch (RGB), which we name A, B, C, D, and E (though an even finer subdivision may be suggested by the data). We identified the RGB bump in four out of the five RGBs. To explore the origin of this complex color–magnitude diagram, we have combined our multi-wavelength HST photometry with synthetic spectra, generated by assuming different chemical compositions. The comparison of observed colors with synthetic spectra suggests that the five stellar populations have different contents of light elements and helium. Specifically, if we assume that NGC 2808 is homogeneous in [Fe/H] (as suggested by spectroscopy for Populations B, C, D, E, but lacking for Population A) and that population A has a primordial helium abundance, we find that populations B, C, D, E are enhanced in helium by ΔY ∼ 0.03, 0.03, 0.08, 0.13, respectively. We obtain similar results by comparing the magnitude of the RGB bumps with models. Planned spectroscopic observations will test whether Population A also has the same metallicity, or whether its photometric differences with Population B can be ascribed to small [Fe/H] and [O/H] differences rather than to helium.

  19. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, Rotation and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at CFHT, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in \\citet{2013malo}, taking into account only the position, proper motion and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in $\\beta$ Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at three or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 2...

  20. Finite-size effects in molecular dynamics simulations: Intermediate scattering function and velocity of sound. III. Theory and application to a model krypton fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salacuse, J. J.; Egelstaff, P. A.

    2001-11-01

    We describe a method for obtaining the intermediate scattering function I(Q,t) from a computer simulation: it is an extension of our earlier calculation [Salacuse, Denton, and Egelstaff, Phys. Rev. E 53, 2382 (1996)] for the t-->0 limit. We use this approach to obtain I(Q,t) for low Q and t from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a model krypton fluid whose atoms interact via a truncated Aziz pair potential, and the results are compared over their range of validity to I(Q,t) determined by the standard MD method and also by a time expansion approach. In its range of validity our approach is much more efficient than the standard MD method; however, it covers a restricted range of t due to the movement of density fluctuations (sound waves) through the simulated fluid which produces an anomaly in the time behavior of I(Q,t). By analyzing I(Q=0,t) the velocity of sound in the simulation is determined, and the results compare favorably with published experimental results for the sound velocity of liquid krypton.

  1. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales.

  2. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.

    1985-08-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references.

  3. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  4. Theoretical studies on polynuclear {Cu(II)5Gd(III)n} clusters (n = 4, 2): towards understanding their large magnetocaloric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeshkumar, Thayalan; Annadata, Harshini V; Evangelisti, Marco; Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-02-16

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies on two polynuclear clusters, [Cu(II)5Gd(III)4O2(OMe)4(teaH)4(O2CC(CH3)3)2(NO3)4] (1) and [Cu5Gd2(OH)4(Br)2-(H2L)2(H3L)2(NO3)2(OH2)4] (2), have been carried out to probe the origin of the large magnetocaloric effect (MCE). The magnetic exchange interactions for 1 and 2 via multiple pathways are estimated using DFT calculations. While the calculated exchange parameters deviate from previous experimental estimates obtained by fitting the magnetic data, the DFT parameter set is found to offer a striking match to the magnetic data for both complexes, highlighting the problem of overparameterization. Magnetostructural correlations for {Cu-Gd} pairs have been developed where both the Cu-O-Gd angles and Cu-O-Gd-O dihedral angles are found to significantly influence the magnitude and sign of the exchange constants. The magnitude of the MCE has been examined as a function of the exchange interactions, and clues on how the effect can be enhanced are discussed.

  5. Interstellar neutral helium in the heliosphere from IBEX observations. III. Mach number of the flow, velocity vector, and temperature from the first six years of measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bzowski, M; Kubiak, M A; Sokol, J M; Fuselier, S A; Galli, A; Heirtzler, D; Kucharek, H; Leonard, T W; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Schwadron, N A; Wurz, P

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed observations of interstellar neutral helium (ISN~He) obtained from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) satellite during its first six years of operation. We used a refined version of the ISN~He simulation model, presented in the companion paper by Sokol_et al. 2015, and a sophisticated data correlation and uncertainty system and parameter fitting method, described in the companion paper by Swaczyna et al 2015. We analyzed the entire data set together and the yearly subsets, and found the temperature and velocity vector of ISN~He in front of the heliosphere. As seen in the previous studies, the allowable parameters are highly correlated and form a four-dimensional tube in the parameter space. The inflow longitudes obtained from the yearly data subsets show a spread of ~6 degree, with the other parameters varying accordingly along the parameter tube, and the minimum chi-square value is larger than expected. We found, however, that the Mach number of the ISN~He flow shows very little scatter an...

  6. The Clustering of Galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Measuring H(z) and D_A(z) at z = 0.57 with Clustering Wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Kazin, Eyal A; Cuesta, Antonio J; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Manera, Marc; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Ashley J; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Xu, Xiaoying; Brinkmann, J; Joel, Brownstein; Nichol, Robert C; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Thomas, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the 2D correlation function of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS sample of massive galaxies of the ninth data release to measure cosmic expansion H and the angular diameter distance D_A at a mean redshift of = 0.57. We apply, for the first time, a new correlation function technique called clustering wedges. Using a physically motivated model, the anisotropic baryonic acoustic feature in the galaxy sample is detected at a significance level of 4.7 sigma compared to a featureless model. The baryonic acoustic feature is used to obtain model independent constraints cz/H/r_s = 12.28 +- 0.82 (6.7 per-cent accuracy) and D_A/r_s = 9.05 +- 0.27 (3.0 per-cent) with a correlation coefficient of -0.5, where r_s is the sound horizon scale at the end of the baryonic drag era. We conduct thorough tests on the data and 600 simulated realizations, finding robustness of the results regardless of the details of the analysis method. Combining with r_s constraints from the Cosmic Microw...

  7. Recognition of self-assembled water-nitrate cluster in a Co(III)-2,2'-bipyridine host: Synthesis, X-ray structure, DNA cleavage, molecular docking and anticancer activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUBRATA DAS; ANANDAN RANJANI; LOGANATHAN GAYATHRI; SUBHASISH SAHA; JORGE PASAN; DHARUMADURAI DHANASEKARAN; MOHAMMAD ABDULKADER AKBARSHA; MILAN MAJI; BHASKAR BISWAS

    2016-11-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(III) complex [Co(bpy)₂Cl₂]NO₃·2H₂O (1) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) has been synthesized and crystallographically characterized. Self-assembly of the lattice water molecules from rectangular tetrameric water cluster interacts with nitrate anion along the c-axis forming a six membered hexagonal water-nitrate cluster. It presents a new mode of association of water molecules with nitrate molecules which is not predicted theoretically or found experimentally. The molecule effectively cleaves bacterial genomic DNA and shows important cytotoxicity against human hepatocarcinoma cell (HepG2).

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  9. A mixed methods protocol for developing and testing implementation strategies for evidence-based obesity prevention in childcare: a cluster randomized hybrid type III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Taren; Johnson, Susan L; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Curran, Geoffrey M

    2017-07-18

    Despite the potential to reach at-risk children in childcare, there is a significant gap between current practices and evidence-based obesity prevention in this setting. There are few investigations of the impact of implementation strategies on the uptake of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for obesity prevention and nutrition promotion. This study protocol describes a three-phase approach to developing and testing implementation strategies to support uptake of EBPs for obesity prevention practices in childcare (i.e., key components of the WISE intervention). Informed by the i-PARIHS framework, we will use a stakeholder-driven evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) process to apply information gathered in qualitative interviews on barriers and facilitators to practice to inform the design of implementation strategies. Then, a Hybrid Type III cluster randomized trial will compare a basic implementation strategy (i.e., intervention as usual) with an enhanced implementation strategy informed by stakeholders. All Head Start centers (N = 12) within one agency in an urban area in a southern state in the USA will be randomized to receive the basic or enhanced implementation with approximately 20 classrooms per group (40 educators, 400 children per group). The educators involved in the study, the data collectors, and the biostastician will be blinded to the study condition. The basic and enhanced implementation strategies will be compared on outcomes specified by the RE-AIM model (e.g., Reach to families, Effectiveness of impact on child diet and health indicators, Adoption commitment of agency, Implementation fidelity and acceptability, and Maintenance after 6 months). Principles of formative evaluation will be used throughout the hybrid trial. This study will test a stakeholder-driven approach to improve implementation, fidelity, and maintenance of EBPs for obesity prevention in childcare. Further, this study provides an example of a systematic process to develop

  10. Nearest Neighbor: The Low-Mass Milky Way Satellite Tucana III

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, J D; Drlica-Wagner, A; Bechtol, K; Marshall, J L; James, D J; Wang, M Y; Strigari, L; Balbinot, E; Kuehn, K; Walker, A R; Abbott, T M C; Allam, S; Annis, J; Benoit-Levy, A; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Doel, P; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Garcia-Bellido, J; Gaztanaga, E; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gutierrez, G; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; Martini, P; Menanteau, F; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Whiteway, L; Yanny, B

    2016-01-01

    We present Magellan/IMACS spectroscopy of the recently discovered Milky Way satellite Tucana III (Tuc III). We identify 26 member stars in Tuc III, from which we measure a mean radial velocity of v_hel = -102.3 +/- 0.4 (stat.) +/- 2.0 (sys.) km/s, a velocity dispersion of 0.1^+0.7_-0.1 km/s, and a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.42^+0.07_-0.08. The upper limit on the velocity dispersion is sigma < 1.5 km/s at 95.5% confidence, and the corresponding upper limit on the mass within the half-light radius of Tuc III is 9.0 x 10^4 Msun. We cannot rule out mass-to-light ratios as large as 240 Msun/Lsun for Tuc III, but much lower mass-to-light ratios that would leave the system baryon-dominated are also allowed. We measure an upper limit on the metallicity spread of the stars in Tuc III of 0.19 dex at 95.5% confidence. Tuc III has a smaller metallicity dispersion and likely a smaller velocity dispersion than any known dwarf galaxy, but a larger size and lower surface brightness than any known globular cluster. It...

  11. A matched-pair cluster design study protocol to evaluate implementation of the Canadian C-spine rule in hospital emergency departments: Phase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Brian H

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians in Canadian emergency departments (EDs annually treat 185,000 alert and stable trauma victims who are at risk for cervical spine (C-spine injury. However, only 0.9% of these patients have suffered a cervical spine fracture. Current use of radiography is not efficient. The Canadian C-Spine Rule is designed to allow physicians to be more selective and accurate in ordering C-spine radiography, and to rapidly clear the C-spine without the need for radiography in many patients. The goal of this phase III study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an active strategy to implement the Canadian C-Spine Rule into physician practice. Specific objectives are to: 1 determine clinical impact, 2 determine sustainability, 3 evaluate performance, and 4 conduct an economic evaluation. Methods We propose a matched-pair cluster design study that compares outcomes during three consecutive 12-months "before," "after," and "decay" periods at six pairs of "intervention" and "control" sites. These 12 hospital ED sites will be stratified as "teaching" or "community" hospitals, matched according to baseline C-spine radiography ordering rates, and then allocated within each pair to either intervention or control groups. During the "after" period at the intervention sites, simple and inexpensive strategies will be employed to actively implement the Canadian C-Spine Rule. The following outcomes will be assessed: 1 measures of clinical impact, 2 performance of the Canadian C-Spine Rule, and 3 economic measures. During the 12-month "decay" period, implementation strategies will continue, allowing us to evaluate the sustainability of the effect. We estimate a sample size of 4,800 patients in each period in order to have adequate power to evaluate the main outcomes. Discussion Phase I successfully derived the Canadian C-Spine Rule and phase II confirmed the accuracy and safety of the rule, hence, the potential for physicians to improve care. What

  12. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  13. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. III. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND CONSTRAINTS ON FORMATION SCENARIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Boselli, A.; Boissier, S. [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Peletier, R. F. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Emsellem, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lisker, T. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Van de Ven, G. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Simon, J. D.; Adams, J. J.; Benson, A. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Den Brok, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Gorgas, J. [Departamento de Astrofísica y Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Hensler, G. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Janz, J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H. [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Paudel, S., E-mail: toloba@ucolick.org [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λ{sub Re} and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3° (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disk-like structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo Cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between λ{sub Re} and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram-pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.

  14. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) III. Construction of the first flux-limited supercluster sample

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung; Nowak, Nina

    2012-01-01

    We present the first supercluster catalogue constructed with the extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster survey (REFLEX II) data, which comprises 919 X-ray selected galaxy clusters. Based on this cluster catalogue we construct a supercluster catalogue using a friends-of-friends algorithm with a linking length depending on the local cluster density. The resulting catalogue comprises 164 superclusters at redshift z<=0.4. We study the properties of different catalogues such as the distributions of the redshift, extent and multiplicity by varying the choice of parameters. In addition to the main catalogue we compile a large volume-limited cluster sample to investigate the statistics of the superclusters. We also compare the X-ray luminosity function for the clusters in superclusters with that for the field clusters with the flux- and volume-limited catalogues. The results mildly support the theoretical suggestion of a top-heavy X-ray luminosity function of galaxy clusters in regions of high cluste...

  15. Detection of Intracluster Planetary Nebulae in the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhard, O; Freeman, K C; Kashikawa, N; Okamura, S; Yasuda, N; Gerhard, Ortwin; Arnaboldi, Magda; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Okamura, Sadanori; Yasuda, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    [OIII] lambda 5007AA emission lines of 16 intracluster planetary nebulae candidates in the Coma cluster were detected with a Multi-Slit Imaging Spectroscopy (MSIS) technique using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope. The identification of these faint emission sources as PNe is supported by (i) their point-like flux distribution in both space and wavelength, with tight limits on the continuum flux; (ii) the identification of the second [OIII] lambda 4959 line in the only object at high enough velocity that this line too falls into the filter bandpass; (iii) emission line fluxes consistent with PNe at 100 Mpc distance, in the range 2.8 x 10^{-19} - 1.7 x 10^{-18} erg/s/cm^2; and (iv) a narrow velocity distribution approximately centered on the systemic velocity of the Coma cluster. Comparing with the velocities of galaxies in our field, we conclude that the great majority of these candidates would be intracluster PNe, free floating in the Coma cluster core. Their velocity dispersion is ~760 km/s, and their mean veloc...

  16. The as-prepared gold cluster-based fluorescent sensor for the selective detection of AsIII ions in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhasish; Palui, Goutam; Banerjee, Arindam

    2012-03-01

    Water-soluble fluorescent gold clusters (AuCs) have been successfully synthesized by a wet-chemical approach at room temperature using a dipeptide l-cysteinyl-l-cysteine. We have followed the core-etching mechanism for the synthesis of the gold clusters. Clusters show the excitation maximum at 300 nm and the emission maximum at 410 nm. These gold clusters show interesting fluorescent properties including large Stoke's shift (110 nm), with a quantum yield of 41.3%, and photochemical stability. Transmission electron microscopic analysis shows that most of these particles are HR-MS, 1H NMR, FT-IR, XRPD, I-V, TEM, etc. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11786j

  17. Chemistry at the protein-mineral interface in L-ferritin assists the assembly of a functional (μ(3)-oxo)Tris[(μ(2)-peroxo)] triiron(III) cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Cecilia; Ciambellotti, Silvia; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Di Pisa, Flavio; Mangani, Stefano; Turano, Paola

    2017-03-07

    X-ray structures of homopolymeric L-ferritin obtained by freezing protein crystals at increasing exposure times to a ferrous solution showed the progressive formation of a triiron cluster on the inner cage surface of each subunit. After 60 min exposure, a fully assembled (μ(3)-oxo)Tris[(μ(2)-peroxo)(μ(2)-glutamato-κO:κO')](glutamato-κO)(diaquo)triiron(III) anionic cluster appears in human L-ferritin. Glu60, Glu61, and Glu64 provide the anchoring of the cluster to the protein cage. Glu57 shuttles incoming iron ions toward the cluster. We observed a similar metallocluster in horse spleen L-ferritin, indicating that it represents a common feature of mammalian L-ferritins. The structures suggest a mechanism for iron mineral formation at the protein interface. The functional significance of the observed patch of carboxylate side chains and resulting metallocluster for biomineralization emerges from the lower iron oxidation rate measured in the E60AE61AE64A variant of human L-ferritin, leading to the proposal that the observed metallocluster corresponds to the suggested, but yet unobserved, nucleation site of L-ferritin.

  18. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Chantereau, William; Charbonnel, Corinne; Meynet, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims. We pre...

  19. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2009-04-15

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNa(v) sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNa(v) channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the alpha-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the alpha-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4-IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4-IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix.

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Percival, Will J; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles l > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we constra...

  1. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russel diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Chantereau, William; Meynet, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims. We present the distribution of helium-rich stars in present-day globular clusters as it is expected in the original framework of the fast-rotating massive stars scenario (FRMS) as first-population polluters. We focus on NGC 6752. (to be continued)

  2. Photometric and spectroscopic study of the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Pegasus III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Geha, Marla C.; Chiti, Anirudh; Milone, Antonino; Da Costa, Gary S.; Mackey, Dougal; Frebel, Anna; Conn, Blair

    2017-01-01

    Pegasus III (Peg III) is one of the few known ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) satellite galaxies in the outer halo (R >150 kpc) of the Milky Way (MW). We present results from a recent study of Peg III using Magellan/IMACS and Keck/DEIMOS. Our newly-measured structural parameters confirm that Peg III is large (rh = 53±14pc), elongated (∈ = 0.38+0.22-0.38 ), and faint (MV=-3.4±0.4 mag) — indicative of its nature as a dwarf rather than a globular cluster. In the color-magnitude diagram, Peg III is well described by an old (>12Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]measurements of individual stars, we identify seven kinematic members of Peg III. The Ca II triplet lines of the brightest members verify that Peg III indeed contains stars with metallicity as low as [Fe/H]=-2.55±0.15 dex. The systemic velocity and velocity dispersion of Peg III are -222.9±2.6 km/s and 5.4+3.0-2.5 km/s, respectively. The inferred dynamical mass within the half-light radius of 1.4+3.0-1.1×106M⊙, and the mass-to-light ratio of M/LV = 1470+5660-1240M⊙/L⊙ provide further evidence that Peg III is a bona fide UFD. Peg III and another distant UFD Pisces II lie relatively close to each other (△dspatial=43±19 kpc) and share similar systemic radial velocities (△vGSR=12.3±3.7 km/s), which suggests that they may share a common origin.

  3. Structural Diversities in Heterometallic Mn-Ca Cluster Chemistry from the Use of Salicylhydroxamic Acid: {Mn(III)4Ca2}, {Mn(II/III)6Ca2}, {Mn(III/IV)8Ca}, and {Mn(III)8Ca2} Complexes with Relevance to Both High- and Low-Valent States of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Alysha A; Koumousi, Evangelia S; Cunha-Silva, Luís; McCormick, Laura J; Teat, Simon J; Psycharis, Vassilis; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Mukherjee, Shreya; Li, Chaoran; Gupta, Sayak Das; Escuer, Albert; Christou, George; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2017-09-05

    One-pot reactions between the [Mn3O(O2CPh)6(py)x](+/0) triangular precursors and either CaBr2·xH2O or CaCl2·6H2O, in the presence of salicylhydroxamic acid (shaH2), have afforded the heterometallic complexes [Mn(III)4Ca2(O2CPh)4(shi)4(H2O)3(Me2CO)] (1) and (pyH)[Mn(II)2Mn(III)4Ca2Cl2(O2CPh)7(shi)4(py)4] (2), respectively, in good yields. Further reactions but using a more flexible synthetic scheme comprising the Mn(NO3)2·4H2O/Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and Mn(O2CPh)2·2H2O/Ca(ClO4)2·4H2O "metal blends" and shaH2, in the presence of external base NEt3, led to the new complexes (NHEt3)2[Mn(III)4Mn(IV)4Ca(OEt)2(shi)10(EtOH)2] (3) and (NHEt3)4[Mn(III)8Ca2(CO3)4(shi)8] (4), respectively. In all reported compounds, the anion of the tetradentate (N,O,O,O)-chelating/bridging ligand salicylhydroxime (shi(3-)), resulting from the in situ metal-ion-assisted amide-iminol tautomerism of shaH2, was found to bridge both Mn and Ca atoms. Complexes 1-4 exhibit a variety of different structures, metal stoichiometries, and Mn oxidation-state descriptions; 1 possesses an overall octahedral metal arrangement, 2 can be described as a Mn4Ca2 octahedron bound to an additional Mn2 unit, 3 consists of a Mn8 "ring" surrounding a Ca(II) atom, and 4 adopts a rectangular cuboidal motif of eight Mn atoms accommodating two Ca(II) atoms. Solid-state direct-current magnetic susceptibility studies revealed the presence of predominant antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the Mn centers, leading to S = 0 spin ground-state values for all complexes. From a bioinorganic chemistry perspective, the reported compounds may demonstrate some relevance to both high-valent scheme (3) and lower-oxidation-level species (1, 2, and 4) of the catalytic cycle of the oxygen-evolving complex.

  4. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: III. Correlated Properties of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Hosts at 0.9 < z < 1.46

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, J; Barbary, K; Barrientos, L F; Brodwin, M; Dawson, K S; Deustua, S; Doi, M; Eisenhardt, P; Faccioli, L; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Gonzalez, A H; Hattori, T; Hsiao, E; Ihara, Y; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Lidman, C; Lubin, L; Morokuma, T; Oda, T; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Rykoff, E; Spadafora, A; Stanford, S A; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Yasuda, N

    2012-01-01

    Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the GOODS fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify six SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and eleven SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z>0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions (SEDs) expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of ea...

  5. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CLUSTER SUPERNOVA SURVEY. III. CORRELATED PROPERTIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR HOSTS AT 0.9 < z < 1.46

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, J.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Goldhaber, G. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aldering, G.; Faccioli, L.; Hsiao, E. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Barrientos, L. F. [Departmento de Astronomia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Brodwin, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dawson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Doi, M.; Ihara, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gilbank, D. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University Of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Gladders, M. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hattori, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North Aohaku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kashikawa, N., E-mail: jmeyers314@berkeley.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2012-05-01

    Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify 6 SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and 11 SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z > 0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson and Chary, we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z > 0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B - V) {approx}< 0.06. The similarity of the field and cluster early-type host samples suggests that field early-type galaxies that lie on the red sequence may also be minimally affected by dust. Hence, the early-type-hosted SNe Ia studied here occupy a more favorable environment to use as well-characterized high-redshift standard candles than other SNe Ia.

  6. Global Properties of the Rich Cluster ABCG 209 at z~0.2. Spectroscopic and Photometric Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Mercurio, A; Haines, C P; Merluzzi, P; Busarello, G; Capaccioli, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aimed at giving an overview of the global properties of the rich cluster of galaxies ABCG 209. This is achieved by complementing the already available data with new medium resolution spectroscopy and NIR photometry which allow us to i) analyse in detail the cluster dynamics, distinguishing among galaxies belonging to different substructures and deriving their individual velocity distributions, using a total sample of 148 galaxies in the cluster region, of which 134 belonging to the cluster; ii) derive the cluster NIR luminosity function; iii) study the Kormendy relation and the photometric plane of cluster early-type galaxies (ETGs). Finally we provide an extensive photometric (optical and NIR) and spectroscopic dataset for such a complex system to be used in further analyses investigating the nature, formation and evolution of rich clusters of galaxies. The observational scenario confirms that ABCG 209 is presently undergoing strong dynamical evolution with the merging of two or more subclumps....

  7. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-07

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4

  8. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. III. Correlated Properties of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Hosts at 0.9 < Z < 1.46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, J.; Aldering, G.; Barbary, K.; Barrientos, L. F.; Brodwin, M.; Dawson, K. S.; Deustua, S.; Doi, M.; Eisenhardt, P.; Faccioli, L.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Goldhaber, G.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hattori, T.; Hsiao, E.; Ihara, Y.; Kashikawa, N.; Koester, B.; Konishi, K.; Lidman, C.; Lubin, L.; Morokuma, T.; Oda, T.; Perlmutter, S.; Postman, M.; Ripoche, P.; Rosati, P.; Rubin, D.; Rykoff, E.; Spadafora, A.; Stanford, S. A.; Suzuki, N.; Takanashi, N.; Tokita, K.; Yasuda, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project, The

    2012-05-01

    Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify 6 SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and 11 SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z > 0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson & Chary, we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z > 0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B - V) candles than other SNe Ia. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555. The observations are associated with program 10496.

  9. A stochastic Monte Carlo approach to model real star cluster evolution, III. Direct integrations of three- and four-body interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Giersz, M

    2003-01-01

    Spherically symmetric equal mass star clusters containing a large amount of primordial binaries are studied using a hybrid method, consisting of a gas dynamical model for single stars and a Monte Carlo treatment for relaxation of binaries and the setup of close resonant and fly-by encounters of single stars with binaries and binaries with each other (three- and four-body encounters). What differs from our previous work is that each encounter is being integrated using a highly accurate direct few-body integrator which uses regularized variables. Hence we can study the systematic evolution of individual binary orbital parameters (eccentricity, semi-major axis) and differential and total cross sections for hardening, dissolution or merging of binaries (minimum distance) from a sampling of several ten thousands of scattering events as they occur in real cluster evolution including mass segregation of binaries, gravothermal collapse and reexpansion, binary burning phase and ultimately gravothermal oscillations. Fo...

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-05-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power-spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new fast-Fourier-transform-based estimators, we measure the power-spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular-diameter distance, the Hubble parameter and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full-shape clustering measurements in combination with cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova data. Assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1 Mpc^{-1}}, at a confidence level of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy-clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a ΛCDM cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}, at a confidence level (CL) of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  12. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantereau, W.; Charbonnel, C.; Meynet, G.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims: We present the distribution of helium-rich stars in present-day globular clusters as it is expected in the original framework of the fast-rotating massive stars scenario (FRMS) as first-population polluters. We focus on NGC 6752. Methods: We completed a grid of 330 stellar evolution models for globular cluster low-mass stars computed with different initial chemical compositions corresponding to the predictions of the original FRMS scenario for [Fe/H] = -1.75. Starting from the initial helium-sodium relation that allows reproducing the currently observed distribution of sodium in NGC 6752, we deduce the helium distribution expected in that cluster at ages equal to 9 and 13 Gyr. We distinguish the stars that are moderately enriched in helium from those that are very helium-rich (initial helium mass fraction below and above 0.4, respectively), and compare the predictions of the FRMS framework with other scenarios for globular cluster enrichment. Results: The effect of helium enrichment on the stellar lifetime and evolution reduces the total number of very helium-rich stars that remain in the cluster at 9 and 13 Gyr to only 12% and 10%, respectively, from an initial fraction of 21%. Within this age range, most of the stars still burn their hydrogen in their core, which widens the MS band significantly in effective temperature. The fraction of very helium-rich stars drops in the more advanced evolution phases, where the associated spread in effective temperature strongly decreases. These

  13. 1,2,3-triazolate-bridged tetradecametallic transition metal clusters [M14(L)6O6(OMe)18X6] (M=FeIII, CrIII and VIII/IV) and related compounds: ground-state spins ranging from S=0 to S=25 and spin-enhanced magnetocaloric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rachel; Laye, Rebecca H; Jones, Leigh F; Low, David M; Talbot-Eeckelaers, Caytie; Wei, Qiang; Milios, Constantinos J; Teat, Simon; Helliwell, Madeleine; Raftery, James; Evangelisti, Marco; Affronte, Marco; Collison, David; Brechin, Euan K; McInnes, Eric J L

    2007-06-11

    We report the synthesis, by solvothermal methods, of the tetradecametallic cluster complexes [M14(L)6O6(OMe)18Cl6] (M=FeIII, CrIII) and [V14(L)6O6(OMe)18Cl6-xOx] (L=anion of 1,2,3-triazole or derivative). Crystal structure data are reported for the {M14} complexes [Fe14(C2H2N3)6O6(OMe)18Cl6], [Cr14(bta)6O6(OMe)18Cl6] (btaH=benzotriazole), [V14O6(Me2bta)6(OMe)18Cl6-xOx] [Me2btaH=5,6-Me2-benzotriazole; eight metal sites are VIII, the remainder are disordered between {VIII-Cl}2+ and {VIV=O}2+] and for the distorted [FeIII14O9(OH)(OMe)8(bta)7(MeOH)5(H2O)Cl8] structure that results from non-solvothermal synthetic methods, highlighting the importance of temperature regime in cluster synthesis. Magnetic studies reveal the {Fe14} complexes to have ground state electronic spins of Sbta- and H2C2N3-, respectively). The huge spins of the {Fe14} complexes lead to very large magnetocaloric effects (MCE)-the largest known for any material below 10 K-which is further enhanced by spin frustration within the molecules due to the competing antiferromagnetic interactions. The largest MCE is found for [Fe14(C2H2N3)6O6(OMe)18Cl6] with an isothermal magnetic entropy change -DeltaSm of 20.3 J kg-1 K-1 at 6 K for an applied magnetic field change of 0-7 T.

  14. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: modelling the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the Final Data Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Guo, Hong; Klypin, Anatoly; Behroozi, Peter; Hahn, Chang Hoon; Comparat, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Tinker, Jeremy; Gottlöber, Stefan; Favole, Ginevra; Shu, Yiping; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Bolton, Adam; Scoccimarro, Román; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the clustering and halo occupation distribution of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 veto masks and fibre collisions are included in the model, which reproduces within 1σ errors the observed monopole of the two-point correlation function at all relevant scales: from the smallest scales, 0.5 h-1 Mpc, up to scales beyond the baryon acoustic oscillation feature. This model also agrees remarkably well with the BOSS galaxy power spectrum (up to k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1), and the three-point correlation function. The quadrupole of the correlation function presents some tensions with observations. We discuss possible causes that can explain this disagreement, including target selection effects. Overall, the standard HAM model describes remarkably well the clustering statistics of the CMASS sample. We compare the stellar-to-halo mass relation for the CMASS sample measured using weak lensing in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey with the prediction of our clustering model, and find a good agreement within 1σ. The BigMD-BOSS light cone including properties of BOSS galaxies and halo properties is made publicly available.

  15. A new method of measuring the peculiar velocity power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Juszkiewicz, R; Feldman, H A; Zhang, Pengjie; Stebbins, Albert; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Feldman, Hume

    2004-01-01

    We show that by directly correlating the cluster kinetic Sunyaev Zeldovich (KSZ) flux, the cluster peculiar velocity power spectrum can be measured to $\\sim 10%$ accuracy by future large sky coverage KSZ surveys. This method is almost free of systemics entangled in the usual velocity inversion method. The direct correlation brings extra information of density and velocity clustering. We utilize these information to construct two indicators of the Hubble constant and comoving angular distance and propose a novel method to constrain cosmology.

  16. Structures in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Escalera, E; Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mazure, A; Mezzetti, M

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the presence of substructures in 16 well-sampled clusters of galaxies suggests a stimulating hypothesis: Clusters could be classified as unimodal or bimodal, on the basis of to the sub-clump distribution in the {\\em 3-D} space of positions and velocities. The dynamic study of these clusters shows that their fundamental characteristics, in particular the virial masses, are not severely biased by the presence of subclustering if the system considered is bound.

  17. DFT-D investigation of the interaction between Ir (III) based photosensitizers and small silver clusters Ag{sub n} (n = 2–20, 92)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokareva, Olga S., E-mail: obokareva@gmail.com; Kühn, Oliver

    2014-05-19

    Highlights: • Dispersion effects in weakly bonded systems containing silver clusters are investigated. • Different dispersion models and their parametrizations are discussed. • Reparametrization of C{sub 6} coefficients for Ag and Ir is performed using MP2 and RPA as a reference. - Abstract: A dispersion-corrected density functional theory study of the photosensitizer [Ir(ppy){sub 2}(bpy)]{sup +} and its derivatives bound to silver clusters Ag{sub n} (n = 2–20, 92) is performed. The goal is to provide a new system-specific set of C{sub 6} interaction parameters for Ag and Ir atoms. To this end a QM:QM scheme is employed using the PBE functional and RPA as well as MP2 calculations as reference. The obtained C{sub 6} coefficients were applied to determine dissociation curves of selected IrPS–Ag{sub n} complexes and binding energies of derivatives containing oxygen and sulphur as heteroatoms in the ligands. Comparing different C{sub 6} parameters it is concluded that RPA-based dispersion correction produces binding energies close to standard D2 and D3 models, whereas MP2-derived parameters overestimate these energies.

  18. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: theoretical systematics and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the galaxy correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J; O'Connell, Ross; Ross, Ashley J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Percival, Will J; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Brownstein, Joel R; Olmstead, Matthew; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential sources of theoretical systematics in the anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements from the clustering of galaxies in configuration space using the final Data Release (DR12) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We perform a detailed study of the impact on BAO measurements from choices in the methodology such as fiducial cosmology, clustering estimators, random catalogues, fitting templates, and covariance matrices. The theoretical systematic uncertainties in BAO parameters are found to be 0.002 in in the isotropic dilation $\\alpha$ and 0.003 in in the quadrupolar dilation $\\epsilon$. We also present BAO-only distance scale constraints from the anisotropic analysis of the correlation function. Our constraints on the angular diameter distance $D_A(z)$ and the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ including both statistical and theoretical systematic uncertainties are 1.5% and 2.8% at $z_{\\rm eff}=0.38$, 1.4% and 2.4% at $z_{\\rm eff}=0.51$, and 1....

  19. On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and X-ray Surveys III: Measurement Biases and Cosmological Evolution of Gas and Stellar Mass Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Pfrommer, C; Sievers, J L

    2012-01-01

    Gas masses tightly correlate with the virial masses of galaxy clusters, allowing for a precise determination of cosmological parameters by means of large-scale X-ray surveys. However, according to recent Suzaku X-ray measurements, gas mass fractions, f_gas, appear to be considerably larger than the cosmic mean at the virial radius, R_200, questioning the accuracy of the cosmological parameter estimations. Here, we use a large suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study measurement biases of f_gas. We employ different variants of simulated physics, including radiative gas physics, star formation, and thermal feedback by active galactic nuclei. Computing the mass profiles in 48 angular cones, whose footprints partition the sphere, we find anisotropic gas and total mass distributions that imply an angular variance of f_gas at the level of 30%. This anisotropic distribution originates from the recent formation epoch of clusters and from the strong internal baryon-to-dark-matter density bias. In the ...

  20. Statistical analysis of galaxy surveys - III: The non-linear clustering of red and blue galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    CERN Document Server

    Croton, D J; Gaztañaga, E; Baugh, C M; Croton, Darren J.; Norberg, Peder; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the higher-order clustering of red and blue galaxies as a function of scale and luminosity made from the two-degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). We use a counts-in-cells analysis to estimate the volume averaged correlation functions, xi_p, as a function of scale up to order p=5, and also the reduced void probability function. Hierarchical amplitudes are constructed using the estimates of the correlation functions: S_p=(xi_p/xi_2)^(p-1). We find that: 1) Red galaxies display stronger clustering than blue galaxies at all orders measured. 2) Red galaxies show values of S_p that are strongly dependent on luminosity, whereas blue galaxies show no segregation in S_p within the errors; this is remarkable given the segregation in the variance. 3) The linear relative bias shows the opposite trend to the hierarchical amplitudes, with little segregation for the red sequence and some segregation for the blue. 4) Faint red galaxies deviate significantly from the "universal" negative bi...

  1. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: observational systematics and baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Seo, Hee-Jong; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Percival, Will J.; Burden, Angela; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Reid, Beth; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; White, Martin; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We present baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements determined from the clustering of 1.2 million massive galaxies with redshifts 0.2 image quality and Galactic extinction, and weights to account for density relationships intrinsic to the imaging and spectroscopic portions of the survey. We simulate the observed systematic trends in mock galaxy samples and demonstrate that they impart no bias on BAO scale measurements and have a minor impact on the recovered statistical uncertainty. We measure transverse and radial BAO distance measurements in 0.2 < z < 0.5, 0.5 < z < 0.75, and (overlapping) 0.4 < z < 0.6 redshift bins. In each redshift bin, we obtain a precision that is 2.7 per cent or better on the radial distance and 1.6 per cent or better on the transverse distance. The combination of the redshift bins represents 1.8 per cent precision on the radial distance and 1.1 per cent precision on the transverse distance. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  2. The chloridomolybdenum(III) cluster in [BMIm]4[AgMo10Cl35] with infinite chains of Ag(+)-linked [Mo10Cl35](5-) wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenmann, Dominic; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-10-07

    [BMIm]4[AgMo10Cl35] is prepared by reaction of MoCl5 and elemental silver in the ionic liquid [BMIm][AlCl4] ([BMIm(+)]: 1-butyl-4-methylimidazolium). Surprisingly, elemental silver is oxidized under these conditions. The title compound contains a new wheel-shaped [Mo10Cl35](5-) chlorido molybdenum(iii) species with five pairs of Mo-Mo bonds. The Mo-Mo distances are found to be 263 pm on average. The [Mo10Cl35](5-) wheels exhibit a maximum opening of 558 pm in diameter. They are interlinked via Ag(+) to form infinite [AgMo10Cl35](4-) chains. The title compound is characterized by single crystal structure analysis, EDX, FT-IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The wheel-type structure and Ag(+) linkage to infinite chains are a new aspect of halogenido metalates and low-valence molybdenum compounds.

  3. β,β-Isomer of Open-Wells–Dawson Polyoxometalate Containing a Tetra-Iron(III Hydroxide Cluster: [{Fe4(H2O(OH5}(β,β-Si2W18O66]9−

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Matsunaga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The β,β-isomer of open-Wells–Dawson polyoxometalate (POM containing a tetra-iron(III cluster, K9[{Fe4(H2O(OH5}(β,β-Si2W18O66]·17H2O (potassium salt of β,β-Fe4-open, was synthesized by reacting Na9H[A-β-SiW9O34]·23H2O with FeCl3·6H2O at pH 3, and characterized by X-ray crystallography, FTIR, elemental analysis, TG/DTA, UV–Vis, and cyclic voltammetry. X-ray crystallography revealed that the {Fe3+4(H2O(OH5}7+ cluster was included in the open pocket of the β,β-type open-Wells–Dawson polyanion [β,β-Si2W18O66]16− formed by the fusion of two trilacunary β-Keggin POMs, [A-β-SiW9O34]10−, via two W–O–W bonds. The β,β-open-Wells–Dawson polyanion corresponds to an open structure of the standard γ-Wells–Dawson POM. β,β-Fe4-open is the first example of the compound containing a geometrical isomer of α,α-open-Wells–Dawson structural POM.

  4. A PSF-based approach to Kepler/K2 data - III. Search for exoplanets and variable stars within the open cluster M 67 (NGC 2682)

    CERN Document Server

    Nardiello, D; Bedin, L R; Piotto, G; Borsato, L; Granata, V; Malavolta, L; Nascimbeni, V

    2016-01-01

    In the third paper of this series we continue the exploitation of Kepler/K2 data in dense stellar fields using our PSF-based method. This work is focused on a ~720-arcmin^2 region centred on the Solar-metallicity and Solar-age open cluster M 67. We extracted light curves for all detectable sources in the Kepler channels 13 and 14, adopting our technique based on the usage of a high-angular-resolution input catalogue and target-neighbour subtraction. We detrended light curves for systematic errors, and searched for variables and exoplanets using several tools. We found 451 variables, of which 299 are new detection. Three planetary candidates were detected by our pipeline in this field. Raw and detrended light curves, catalogues, and K2 stacked images used in this work will be released to the community.

  5. Candidates for Intracluster Planetary Nebulae in the Virgo Cluster based on the Suprime-Cam Narrow-Band Imaging in O[III] and Halpha

    CERN Document Server

    Okamura, S; Arnaboldi, M; Freeman, K C; Ando, H; Doi, M; Furusawa, H; Gerhard, O E; Hamabe, M; Kimura, M; Kajino, T; Komiyama, Yu; Miyazaki, S; Nakata, F; Napolitano, N R; Ouchi, M; Pannella, M; Sekiguchi, M; Shimasaku, K; Yagi, M

    2002-01-01

    We have identified 38 candidates of intracluster planetary nebulae (ICPNe) in a $34'\\times27'$ field in the core of the Virgo cluster based on the Suprime-Cam imaging through two narrow-band filters centered at the redshifted wavelengths of the [OIII]$\\lambda=5007\\AA$ and the Halpha \\lambda=6563\\AA lines. Broad-band images in V and R bands are used to check for any emissions in the adjacent continuum. We describe the method briefly and present the list of intracluster planetary nebulae candidates, together with their finding charts. The ICPN candidates show a highly inhomogeneous distribution, which may suggest an association with the M86-M84 subcluster. Fraction of diffuse intracluster light with respect to total light in galaxies is estimated to be about 10%, leading to an estimate of about 20% for the baryon fraction. Spectroscopic follow up and a wider survey are critical to reveal the nature of intracluster stellar population.

  6. DFT-D Investigation of the Interaction Between Ir(III) Based Photosensitizers and Small Silver Clusters Ag$_n$ ($n$=2-20, 92)

    CERN Document Server

    Bokareva, Olga S

    2013-01-01

    A dispersion-corrected density functional theory study of the photosensitizer [Ir(ppy)$_2$(bpy)]$^+$ and its derivatives bound to silver clusters Ag$_n$ ($n$=2-20, 92) is performed. The goal is to provide a new system-specific set of $C_{\\rm 6}^{}$ interaction parameters for Ag and Ir atoms. To this end a QM:QM scheme is employed using the PBE functional and RPA as well as MP2 calculation as a reference. The obtained $C_{\\rm 6}^{}$ coefficients were applied to calculate dissociation curves of selected IrPS-Ag$_n$ complexes and binding energies of derivatives containing oxygen and sulphur as heteroatoms in the ligands. Comparing different $C_{\\rm 6}^{}$ parameters it is concluded that RPA-based dispersion correction produces binding energies close to standard D2 and D3 models, whereas MP2-derived parameters overestimate these energies.

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in Fourier space

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Saito, Shun; Wang, Dandan; Ross, Ashley J; Beutler, Florian; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Percival, Will J; Brownstein, Joel R; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Weinberg, David H; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2016-01-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) analysis using the monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum measured from the pre-reconstructed combined galaxy sample of the completed Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release (DR)12 covering the redshift range of $0.20

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in configuration space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Brownstein, Joel R.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2017-08-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) analysis using the two-point galaxy correlation function measured from the combined sample of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12), which covers the redshift range of 0.2 clustering, we obtain a measurement of DA(z)/rd and H(z)rd at nine effective redshifts with the full covariance matrix calibrated using MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues. Using the reconstructed galaxy catalogues, we obtain the precision of 1.3-2.2 per cent for DA(z)/rd and 2.1-6.0 per cent for H(z)rd. To quantify the gain from the tomographic information, we compare the constraints on the cosmological parameters using our nine-bin BAO measurements, the consensus three-bin BAO and redshift space distortion measurements at three effective redshifts in Alam et al., and the non-tomographic (one-bin) BAO measurement at a single effective redshift. Comparing the nine-bin with one-bin constraint result, it can improve the dark energy Figure of Merit by a factor of 1.24 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization for equation-of-state parameter wDE. The errors of w0 and wa from nine-bin constraints are slightly improved when compared to the three-bin constraint result.

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in configuration space

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuting; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ross, Ashley J; Percival, Will J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Cuesta, Antonio J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Brownstein, Joel R; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ho, Shirley; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Olmstead, Matt; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2016-01-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations analysis using the two-point galaxy correlation function measured from the combined sample of BOSS DR12, which covers the redshift range of $0.2clustering, we obtain a measurement of $D_A(z)/r_d$ and $H(z)r_d$ at nine effective redshifts with the full covariance matrix calibrated using MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues. Using the reconstructed galaxy catalogues, we obtain the precision of $1.3\\%-2.3\\%$ for $D_A(z)/r_d$ and $2.5\\%-5.7\\%$ for $H(z)r_d$. To quantify the gain from the tomographic information, we compare the constraints on the cosmological parameters using our 9-bin BAO measurements, the consensus 3-bin BAO and RSD measurements at three effective redshifts in \\citet{Alam2016}, and the non-tomographic (1-bin) BAO measurement at a single effective redshift. Comparing the 9-bin with 1-bin constraint result, it can improve the...

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: higher-order correlations revealed by germ-grain Minkowski Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegand, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We probe the higher-order clustering of the galaxies in the final data release (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) using the method of germ-grain Minkowski Functionals (MFs). Our sample consists of 410,615 BOSS galaxies from the northern Galactic cap in the redshift range 0.450--0.595. We show the MFs to be sensitive to contributions up to the six-point correlation function for this data set. We ensure with a custom angular mask that the results are more independent of boundary effects than in previous analyses of this type. We extract the higher-order part of the MFs and quantify the difference to the case without higher-order correlations. The resulting $\\chi^{2}$ value of over 10,000 for a modest number of degrees of freedom, O(200), indicates a 100-sigma deviation and demonstrates that we have a highly significant signal of the non-Gaussian contributions to the galaxy distribution. This statistical power can be useful in testing models with differing highe...

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We measure and analyse the clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) relative to the line-of-sight (LOS), for LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples drawn from the final Data Release 12 (DR12). The LOWZ sample contains 361\\,762 galaxies with an effective redshift of $z_{\\rm lowz}=0.32$, and the CMASS sample 777\\,202 galaxies with an effective redshift of $z_{\\rm cmass}=0.57$. From the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole moments around the LOS, we measure the growth of structure parameter $f$ times the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations $\\sigma_8$ by modeling the Redshift-Space Distortion signal. When the geometrical Alcock-Paczynski effect is also constrained from the same data, we find joint constraints on $f\\sigma_8$, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch $H(z)r_s(z_d)$, and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon $D_A(z)/r_s(z_d)$. We find $f(z_{\\rm lowz})\\sigma_8(z_{\\rm lowz})=0.394\\pm0.062$, $D_A(z_{\\rm l...

  12. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in Fourier space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Saito, Shun; Wang, Dandan; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Percival, Will J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Weinberg, David H.; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2017-04-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) analysis using the monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum measured from the pre-reconstructed combined galaxy sample of the completed Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release12 covering the redshift range of 0.20 < z < 0.75. By allowing for overlap between neighbouring redshift slices, we successfully obtained the isotropic and anisotropic BAO distance measurements within nine redshift slices to a precision of 1.5-3.4 per cent for DV/rd, 1.8-4.2 per cent for DA/rd and 3.7-7.5 per cent for H rd, depending on effective redshifts. We provide our BAO measurement of DA/rd and H rd with the full covariance matrix, which can be used for cosmological implications. Our measurements are consistent with those presented in Alam et al., in which the BAO distances are measured at three effective redshifts. We constrain dark energy parameters using our measurements and find an improvement of the Figure-of-Merit of dark energy in general due to the temporal BAO information resolved. This paper is a part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS.

  13. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates With the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, Matthew.B. [MIT, MKI; Zengo, Kyle [Colby Coll.; Ruel, Jonathan [Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Benson, Bradford A. [Fermilab; Bleem, Lindsey E. [Argonne; Bocquet, Sebastian [Argonne; Bulbul, Esra [MIT, MKI; Brodwin, Mark [Missouri U., Kansas City; Capasso, Raffaella [Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Chiu, I-non [Taiwan, Natl. Tsing Hua U.; McDonald, Michael [MIT, MKI; Rapetti, David [NASA, Ames; Saro, Alex [Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Stalder, Brian [Inst. Astron., Honolulu; Stark, Antony A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Strazzullo, Veronica [Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Stubbs, Christopher W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Zenteno, Alfredo [Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

    2016-12-08

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning $ 0.28 < z < 1.08$. Our sample is primarily draw from the SPT-GMOS spectroscopic survey, supplemented by additional published spectroscopy, resulting in a final spectroscopic sample of 4148 galaxy spectra---2868 cluster members. The velocity dispersion of star-forming cluster galaxies is $17\\pm4$% greater than that of passive cluster galaxies, and the velocity dispersion of bright ($m < m^{*}-0.5$) cluster galaxies is $11\\pm4$% lower than the velocity dispersion of our total member population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive vs. star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations in which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3\\% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  14. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: double-probe measurements from BOSS galaxy clustering \\& Planck data -- towards an analysis without informative priors

    CERN Document Server

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Cuesta, Antonio J; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo; Ross, Ashley J; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors in the estimation of cosmological parameters. We extract the dark-energy-model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of $\\{R$, $l_a$, $\\Omega_b h^2$, $n_s$, $log(A_s)$, $\\Omega_k$, $H(z)$, $D_A(z)$, $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)\\}$, which give an efficient summary of Planck data and 2-point statistics from BOSS galaxy sample, where $R=\\sqrt{\\Omega_m H_0^2}\\,r(z_*)$, and $l_a=\\pi r(z_*)/r_s(z_*)$, $z_*$ is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and $r(z_*)$ and $r_s(z_*)$ denote our comoving distance to $z_*$ and sound horizon at $z_*$ respectively. The advantage of this method is that we do not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is not able to constrain well, i.e. $\\Omega_b...

  15. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  16. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: baryon acoustic oscillations in the Fourier space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; McDonald, Patrick; Saito, Shun; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Slosar, Anže; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in the Fourier space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The data set includes 1198 006 galaxies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.75. We divide this data set into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as ˜1000 MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues that mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density field reconstruction to enhance the BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can separate the line of sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H(z) separately. We obtain two independent 1.6 and 1.5 per cent constraints on DA(z) and 2.9 and 2.3 per cent constraints on H(z) for the low (zeff = 0.38) and high (zeff = 0.61) redshift bin, respectively. We obtain two independent 1 and 0.9 per cent constraints on the angular averaged distance DV(z), when ignoring the Alcock-Paczynski effect. The detection significance of the BAO signal is of the order of 8σ (post-reconstruction) for each of the three redshift bins. Our results are in good agreement with the Planck prediction within Λ cold dark matter. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: towards a computationally efficient analysis without informative priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gongbo; Ross, Ashley J.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A.; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-07-01

    We develop a new computationally efficient methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors (those coming from extra probes) in the estimation of cosmological parameters. Using our new methodology, we extract the dark energy model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of {R, la, Ωbh2, ns, log(As), Ωk, H(z), DA(z), f(z)σ8(z)}, which give an efficient summary of the Planck data and two-point statistics from the BOSS galaxy sample. The CMB shift parameters are R=√{Ω _m H_0^2} r(z_*) and la = πr(z*)/rs(z*), where z* is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and r(z*) and rs(z*) denote our comoving distance to the z* and sound horizon at z*, respectively; Ωb is the baryon fraction at z = 0. This approximate methodology guarantees that we will not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is unable to constrain, i.e. Ωbh2 and ns. The main advantage is that the computational time required for extracting these parameters is decreased by a factor of 60 with respect to exact full-likelihood analyses. The results obtained show no tension with the flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood exact analysis with fixed dark energy models, on one hand we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints that can be conveniently used to study dark energy models, and on the other hand we provide a reliable set of measurements assuming dark energy models to be used, for example, in distance estimations. We extend our study to measure the sum of the neutrino mass using different methodologies, including double-probe analysis (introduced in this study), full-likelihood analysis and single-probe analysis

  18. Study of Effect of Variation of Ionic Strength of the Medium on Velocity Constant of Ru(Iii Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydroxy Benzoic Acids by Chloramine-T in Acidic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Parmod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the effect of variation of ionic strength of the medium on rate of oxidation of hydroxy benzoic acids as its effect provides some clues regarding the nature of reactive species involved in the rate determining step. In order to realize the above aim the experiments has been carried out which ultimately concluded that ionic strength variation does not change the reaction velocity constant significantly.

  19. Anchors for the Cosmic Distance Scale: the Cepheid QZ Normae in the Open Cluster NGC 6067

    CERN Document Server

    Majaess, D; Bidin, C Moni; Soto, M; Gieren, W; Cohen, R; Mauro, F; Geisler, D; Bonatto, C; Borissova, J; Minniti, D; Turner, D; Lane, D; Madore, B; Carraro, G; Berdnikov, L

    2013-01-01

    Cepheids are key to establishing the cosmic distance scale. Therefore it's important to assess the viability of QZ Nor, V340 Nor, and GU Nor as calibrators for Leavitt's law via their purported membership in the open cluster NGC 6067. The following suite of evidence confirms that QZ Nor and V340 Nor are members of NGC 6067, whereas GU Nor likely lies in the foreground: (i) existing radial velocities for QZ Nor and V340 Nor agree with that established for the cluster (-39.4+-1.2 km/s) to within 1 km/s, whereas GU Nor exhibits a markedly smaller value; (ii) a steep velocity-distance gradient characterizes the sight-line toward NGC 6067, thus implying that objects sharing common velocities are nearly equidistant; (iii) a radial profile constructed for NGC 6067 indicates that QZ Nor is within the cluster bounds, despite being 20' from the cluster center; (iv) new BVJH photometry for NGC 6067 confirms the cluster lies d=1.75+-0.10 kpc distant, a result that matches Wesenheit distances computed for QZ Nor/V340 Nor ...

  20. The rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, Hrant M

    2015-01-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher of the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with $a/b>1.8$ and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy in which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60\\%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ~ 35%. The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not have merging with other clusters and groups of galaxies, in the result of which the rotation has been prevented.

  1. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  2. A Commodity Computing Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuben, P. J.; Wolfire, M. G.; Pound, M. W.; Mundy, L. G.

    We have assembled a cluster of Intel-Pentium based PCs running Linux to compute a large set of Photodissociation Region (PDR) and Dust Continuum models. For various reasons the cluster is heterogeneous, currently ranging from a single Pentium-II 333 MHz to dual Pentium-III 450 MHz CPU machines. Although this will be sufficient for our ``embarrassingly parallelizable problem'' it may present some challenges for as yet unplanned future use. In addition the cluster was used to construct a MIRIAD benchmark, and compared to equivalent Ultra-Sparc based workstations. Currently the cluster consists of 8 machines, 14 CPUs, 50GB of disk-space, and a total peak speed of 5.83 GHz, or about 1.5 Gflops. The total cost of this cluster has been about $12,000, including all cabling, networking equipment, rack, and a CD-R backup system. The URL for this project is http://dustem.astro.umd.edu.

  3. Range/velocity limitations for time-domain blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The traditional range/velocity limitation for blood velocity estimation systems using ultrasound is elucidated. It is stated that the equation is a property of the estimator used, not the actual physical measurement situation, as higher velocities can be estimated by the time domain cross......-correlation approach. It is demonstrated that the time domain technique under certain measurement conditions will yield unsatisfactory results, when trying to estimate high velocities. Various methods to avoid these artifacts using temporal and spatial clustering techniques are suggested. The improvement...

  4. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, Hiroaki; Allende Prieto, Carlos; An, Deokkeun; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Éric; Balbinot, Eduardo; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W.N.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in 2008 August, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Lyα forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around ~8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes five-band imaging of roughly 5...

  5. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  6. Analysis of plasmaspheric plumes: CLUSTER and IMAGE observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouzet, Fabien; DeKeyser, Johan; Decreau, Pierrette; Gallagher, Dennis; Pierrard, Viviane; Lemaire, Joseph; Dandouras, Iannis; Matsui, Hiroshi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Andre, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Plasmaspheric plumes have been routinely observed by CLUSTER and IMAGE. The CLUSTER mission provides high time resolution four-point measurements of the plasmasphere near perigee. Total electron density profiles can be derived from the plasma frequency and/or from the spacecraft potential (note that the electron spectrometer is usually not operating inside the plasmasphere); ion velocity is also measured onboard these satellites (but ion density is not reliable because of instrumental limitations). The EUV imager onboard the IMAGE spacecraft provides global images of the plasmasphere with a spatial resolution of 0.1 RE every 10 minutes; such images acquired near apogee from high above the pole show the geometry of plasmaspheric plumes, their evolution and motion. We present coordinated observations for 3 plume events and compare CLUSTER in-situ data (panel A) with global images of the plasmasphere obtained from IMAGE (panel B), and with numerical simulations for the formation of plumes based on a model that includes the interchange instability mechanism (panel C). In particular, we study the geometry and the orientation of plasmaspheric plumes by using a four-point analysis method, the spatial gradient. We also compare several aspects of their motion as determined by different methods: (i) inner and outer plume boundary velocity calculated from time delays of this boundary observed by the wave experiment WHISPER on the four spacecraft, (ii) ion velocity derived from the ion spectrometer CIS onboard CLUSTER, (iii) drift velocity measured by the electron drift instrument ED1 onboard CLUSTER and (iv) global velocity determined from successive EUV images. These different techniques consistently indicate that plasmaspheric plumes rotate around the Earth, with their foot fully co-rotating, but with their tip rotating slower and moving farther out.

  7. Analysis of plasmaspheric plumes: CLUSTER and IMAGE observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouzet, Fabien; DeKeyser, Johan; Decreau, Pierrette; Gallagher, Dennis; Pierrard, Viviane; Lemaire, Joseph; Dandouras, Iannis; Matsui, Hiroshi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Andre, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Plasmaspheric plumes have been routinely observed by CLUSTER and IMAGE. The CLUSTER mission provides high time resolution four-point measurements of the plasmasphere near perigee. Total electron density profiles can be derived from the plasma frequency and/or from the spacecraft potential (note that the electron spectrometer is usually not operating inside the plasmasphere); ion velocity is also measured onboard these satellites (but ion density is not reliable because of instrumental limitations). The EUV imager onboard the IMAGE spacecraft provides global images of the plasmasphere with a spatial resolution of 0.1 RE every 10 minutes; such images acquired near apogee from high above the pole show the geometry of plasmaspheric plumes, their evolution and motion. We present coordinated observations for 3 plume events and compare CLUSTER in-situ data (panel A) with global images of the plasmasphere obtained from IMAGE (panel B), and with numerical simulations for the formation of plumes based on a model that includes the interchange instability mechanism (panel C). In particular, we study the geometry and the orientation of plasmaspheric plumes by using a four-point analysis method, the spatial gradient. We also compare several aspects of their motion as determined by different methods: (i) inner and outer plume boundary velocity calculated from time delays of this boundary observed by the wave experiment WHISPER on the four spacecraft, (ii) ion velocity derived from the ion spectrometer CIS onboard CLUSTER, (iii) drift velocity measured by the electron drift instrument ED1 onboard CLUSTER and (iv) global velocity determined from successive EUV images. These different techniques consistently indicate that plasmaspheric plumes rotate around the Earth, with their foot fully co-rotating, but with their tip rotating slower and moving farther out.

  8. Probing the dynamical and X-ray mass proxies of the cluster of galaxies Abell S1101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Andreas; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Schwope, Axel; Verdugo, Miguel; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Klein, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Context. The galaxy cluster Abell S1101 (S1101 hereafter) deviates significantly from the X-ray luminosity versus velocity dispersion relation (L-σ) of galaxy clusters in our previous study. Given reliable X-ray luminosity measurement combining XMM-Newton and ROSAT, this could most likely be caused by the bias in the velocity dispersion due to interlopers and low member statistic in the previous sample of member galaxies, which was solely based on 20 galaxy redshifts drawn from the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the galaxy member statistics to perform precision measurements of the velocity dispersion and dynamical mass of S1101. We aim for a detailed substructure and dynamical state characterization of this cluster, and a comparison of mass estimates derived from (i) the velocity dispersion (Mvir), (ii) the caustic mass computation (Mcaustic), and (iii) mass proxies from X-ray observations and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Methods: We carried out new optical spectroscopic observations of the galaxies in this cluster field with VIMOS, obtaining a sample of 60 member galaxies for S1101. We revised the cluster redshift and velocity dispersion measurements based on this sample and also applied the Dressler-Shectman substructure test. Results: The completeness of cluster members within r200 was significantly improved for this cluster. Tests for dynamical substructure do not show evidence of major disturbances or merging activities in S1101. We find good agreement between the dynamical cluster mass measurements and X-ray mass estimates, which confirms the relaxed state of the cluster displayed in the 2D substructure test. The SZ mass proxy is slightly higher than the other estimates. The updated measurement of σ erased the deviation of S1101 in the L-σ relation. We also noticed a background structure in the cluster field of S1101. This structure is a galaxy group that is very close to the cluster S1101 in projection but at almost twice its redshift

  9. On the coherent rotation of diffuse matter in numerical simulations of clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Anna Silvia; De Petris, Marco; Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; Lamagna, Luca; Rasia, Elena

    2017-03-01

    We present a study on the coherent rotation of the intracluster medium and dark matter components of simulated galaxy clusters extracted from a volume-limited sample of the MUSIC project. The set is re-simulated with three different recipes for the gas physics: (i) non-radiative, (ii) radiative without active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback and (iii) radiative with AGN feedback. Our analysis is based on the 146 most massive clusters identified as relaxed, 57 per cent of the total sample. We classify these objects as rotating and non-rotating according to the gas spin parameter, a quantity that can be related to cluster observations. We find that 4 per cent of the relaxed sample is rotating according to our criterion. By looking at the radial profiles of their specific angular momentum vector, we find that the solid body model is not a suitable description of rotational motions. The radial profiles of the velocity of the dark matter show a prevalence of the random velocity dispersion. Instead, the intracluster medium profiles are characterized by a comparable contribution from the tangential velocity and the dispersion. In general, the dark matter component dominates the dynamics of the clusters, as suggested by the correlation between its angular momentum and the gas one, and by the lack of relevant differences among the three sets of simulations.

  10. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... A cluster headache begins as a severe, sudden headache. The headache commonly strikes 2 to 3 hours after you fall ...

  11. Cluster Forests

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Donghui; Jordan, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by Random Forests (RF) in the context of classification, we propose a new clustering ensemble method---Cluster Forests (CF). Geometrically, CF randomly probes a high-dimensional data cloud to obtain "good local clusterings" and then aggregates via spectral clustering to obtain cluster assignments for the whole dataset. The search for good local clusterings is guided by a cluster quality measure $\\kappa$. CF progressively improves each local clustering in a fashion that resembles the tree growth in RF. Empirical studies on several real-world datasets under two different performance metrics show that CF compares favorably to its competitors. Theoretical analysis shows that the $\\kappa$ criterion is shown to grow each local clustering in a desirable way---it is "noise-resistant." A closed-form expression is obtained for the mis-clustering rate of spectral clustering under a perturbation model, which yields new insights into some aspects of spectral clustering.

  12. Optical Substructures in 48 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Fadda, D; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the presence of substructures in a set of 48 galaxy clusters, by using galaxy positions and redshifts. We use a multi-scale analysis which couples kinematical estimators with the wavelet transform. 14% of our clusters are strongly substructured (i.e. they are bimodal or complex) and 24% of the remaining unimodal clusters contain substructures at small scales. Thus, in substantial agreement with previous studies, about one third of clusters show substructures. In unimodal clusters the presence of substructures does not affect the estimates of both virial masses and velocity dispersions, which are generally in good agreement with the X-ray temperatures. Thus, unimodal clusters are not too far from a status of dynamical equilibrium. On the contrary, velocity dispersions and masses for some bimodal or complex clusters strongly depend on whether they are treated as single systems or as sums of different clumps and X-ray temperatures and velocity dispersions may be very different.

  13. Star Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gieles, M.

    1993-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of stars and star clusters. These complexes share similar properties with giant molecular clouds, from which they are formed. Many (70%) of the young clusters will not survive the fist 10 Myr, due to t...

  14. Cosmology and cluster halo scaling relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Melo, Pablo A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of dark matter and dark energy on the dynamical scaling properties of galaxy clusters. We investigate the cluster Faber-Jackson (FJ), Kormendy and Fundamental Plane (FP) relations between the mass, radius and velocity dispersion of cluster-sized haloes in cosmological N-body s

  15. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  16. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...

  17. Investigation of Galactic open cluster remnants: the case of NGC 7193

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Mateus de Souza; Barbosa, Wagner José Corradi; Maia, Francisco Ferreira de Souza; Piatti, Andrés Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Galactic open clusters (OCs) that survive the early gas-expulsion phase are gradually destroyed over time by the action of disruptive dynamical processes. Their final evolutionary stages are characterized by a poorly populated concentration of stars called open cluster remnant (OCR). This study is devoted to assess the real physical nature of the OCR candidate NGC 7193. GMOS/Gemini spectroscopy of 53 stars in the inner target region were obtained to derive radial velocities and atmospheric parameters. We also employed photometric and proper motion data. The analysis method consists of the following steps: (i) analysis of the statistical resemblance between the cluster and a set of field samples with respect to the sequences defined in colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs); (ii) a 5-dimensional iteractive exclusion routine was employed to identify outliers from kinematical and positional data; (iii) isochrone fitting to the $K_{s}\\times(J-K_{s})$ CMD of the remaining stars and the dispersion of spectral types along...

  18. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates with the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Matthew. B.; Zengo, Kyle; Ruel, Jonathan; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Bulbul, Esra; Brodwin, Mark; Capasso, Raffaella; Chiu, I.-non; McDonald, Michael; Rapetti, David; Saro, Alex; Stalder, Brian; Stark, Antony A.; Strazzullo, Veronica; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning 0.28population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive versus star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations, which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  19. Mass spectra and time-of-flight distributions of helium cluster beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenau, H.; Knuth, E.L.; Northby, J.; Toennies, J.P.; Winkler, C. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Stroemungsforschung, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-3400 Goettingen, Federal Republic of Germany (DE))

    1990-06-01

    Liquid helium clusters are produced by expanding gaseous {sup 4} He into a vacuum from a cold source with temperatures between 5 and 20 K at stagnation pressures from {ital P}{sub 0} =8 to 20 bar and are studied by time-of-flight (TOF) and mass spectrometry. At low temperatures, {ital T}{sub 0} {lt}12 K, the mass spectra show several anomalies which can be attributed to pick-up of residual gases. At {ital T}{sub 0} {lt}10K, there is evidence for a very intense peak at {ital m}=16 amu which is attributed to He{sup +}{sub 4} . Depending on the temperatures, the TOF spectra reveal ions with three different velocities. These TOF observations are analyzed using isentropic lines in the known phase diagram of {sup 4} He, which take into account deviations from ideal gas behavior. Three qualitatively different expansion regimes are identified: (I) the expansion proceeds through a region on the high temperature side of the critical point, (II) the expansion passes through or near the critical point, and (III) the expansion passes through a region on the low temperature side of the critical point. The mass spectra, peak velocities and speed ratios, when analyzed with the aid of the phase diagram, indicate that (a) two of the TOF peaks are due to clusters, (b) the fastest cluster peak is due to clusters formed by condensation of gas phase atoms, and (c) the slowest cluster peak is due to either separation into two phases (regime II) or disintegration of a liquid phase (regime III). Measured conversions of initial enthalpy into free jet kinetic energy suggest that the cluster temperature undergoes a sharp drop to a very low temperature approaching 0 K at {ital T}{sub 0} {lt}6.5 K where the expansion isentrope intersects the liquid--vapor line upstream from the source orifice.

  20. Optical properties of cluster plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Downer, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    It is shown that unlike a gas plasma or an electron plasma in a metal, an ionized clustered material (`cluster plasma`) permits propagation below the plasma cut-off of electromagnetic (EM) waves whose phase velocity is close to but below the speed of light. This results from the excitation of a plasma oscillation mode (and/or polarization mode) through the cluster surface which does not exist in usual gaseous plasma. The existence of this new optical mode, cluster mode, is confirmed via numerical simulation. (author)

  1. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. II. The foreground ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Sota, A; Simón-Díaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nearly one century after their discovery, the carrier(s) of Diffuse Interstellar Bands is/are still unknown and there are few sightlines studied in detail for a large number of DIBs. Aims: We want to study the ISM sightlines towards LS III +46 11 and LS III +46 12, two early-O-type stellar systems, and LS III +46 11 B, a mid-B-type star. The three targets are located in the stellar cluster Berkeley 90 and have a high extinction. Methods: We use the multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra presented in paper I (Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. 2015), the extinction results derived there, and additional spectra. Results: We have measured equivalent widths, velocities, and FWHMs for a large number of absorption lines in the rich ISM spectrum in front of Berkeley 90. The absorbing ISM has at least two clouds at different velocities, one with a lower column density (thinner) in the K I lines located away from Berkeley 90 and another one with a higher column density (thicker) associated with the cluster. The first cl...

  2. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  3. INTERACTION OF FAST HYDROGEN IONIC CLUSTERS WITH MATTER

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Fast ionic clusters Hn+ interact with matter in a specific way which is observed to deviate strongly from the interaction of atomic ions at the same velocity. We present some results obtained at Lyon about foil and gas interactions of hydrogen clusters (5 ≤ n ≤ 23) at projectile velocities close to the Bohr velocity, i.e. dynamics of the cluster fragmentation, charge state of atomic fragments and absolute dissociation cross sections in gas. We also discuss future experiments specially at high...

  4. Velocity selective optical pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Aminoff, C. G.; Pinard, M.

    1982-01-01

    We consider optical pumping with a quasi monochromatic tunable light beam, in the low intensity limit where a rate equation regime is obtained The velocity selective optical pumping (V.S.O.P.) introduces a correlation between atomic velocity and internal variables in the ground (or metastable) state. The aim of this article is to evaluate these atomic observables (orientation, alignment, population) as a function of velocity, using a phenomenological description of the relaxation effect of co...

  5. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. EG is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and σ8. While traditionally, the lensing field for EG has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for EG at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of EG ever, up to 150 Mpc h-1, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter β. We report EG(z = 0.57) = 0.243 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity (GR) prediction at a level of 2.6σ. Note that our EG measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc h-1, scales which have not been probed by previous EG tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  6. Constraining Gravity at the Largest Scales through CMB Lensing and Galaxy Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, Anthony R; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. $E_G$ is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and $\\sigma_8$. While traditionally, the lensing field for $E_G$ has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for $E_G$ at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of $E_G$ ever, up to 150 Mpc/$h$, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter $\\beta$. We report $E_G(z=0.57)=0.243\\pm0.060$ (stat) $\\pm0.013$ (sys), a me...

  7. Velocity bias in a LCDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Pierre; Kravtsov, A V; Colin, Pedro; Klypin, Anatoly; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2000-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the velocity bias of dark matter halos, the difference in the velocity fields of dark matter and halos, in a flat low- density LCDM model. The high force, 2kpc/h, and mass, 10^9Msun/h, resolution allows dark matter halos to survive in very dense environments of groups and clusters making it possible to use halos as galaxy tracers. We find that the velocity bias pvb measured as a ratio of pairwise velocities of the halos to that of the dark matter evolves with time and depends on scale. At high redshifts (z ~5) halos move generally faster than the dark matter almost on all scales: pvb(r)~1.2, r>0.5Mpc/h. At later moments the bias decreases and gets below unity on scales less than r=5Mpc/h: pvb(r)~(0.6-0.8) at z=0. We find that the evolution of the pairwise velocity bias follows and probably is defined by the spatial antibias of the dark matter halos at small scales. One-point velocity bias b_v, defined as the ratio of the rms velocities of halos and dark matter, provides a mo...

  8. Intra Cluster Globular Clusters around NGC 1399 in Fornax?

    CERN Document Server

    Schuberth, Y; Bassino, L; Hilker, M

    2007-01-01

    We investigate whether the globular clusters (GCs) in the recently published sample of GCs in the Fornax cluster by Bergond and coworkers are indeed intra-cluster objects. We combine the catalogue of radial velocity measurements by Bergond et al. with our CTIO MOSAIC photometry in the Washington system and analyse the relation of metal-poor and metal-rich GCs with their host galaxies. The metal-rich GCs appear to be kinematically associated with their respective host galaxies. The vast majority of the metal-poor GCs found in between the galaxies of the Fornax cluster have velocities which are consistent with them being members of the very extended NGC 1399 GC system. We find that when the sample is restricted to the most accurate velocity measurements, the GC velocity dispersion profile can be described with a mass model derived for the NGC 1399 GC system within 80 kpc. We identify one ``vagrant'' GC whose radial velocity suggests that it is not bound to any galaxy unless its orbit has a very large apogalacti...

  9. Tomo III

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Memorias, histórico, físicas, crítico, apologéticas de la América Meridional con unas breves advertencias y noticias útiles, a los que de orden de Su Majestad, hubiesen de viajar y describir aquellas vastas regiones. Reino Animal. Tomo III. Por un anónimo americano en Cádiz por los años de 1757. Primera Parte Prólogo Artículo 1°De los cuadrúpedos útiles al hombre a varios usos y a su sustento. Vaca Caballos Carneros de la tierra, especie de camellos Vicuña Guanacos Puercos monteses Artículo 2...

  10. Rotation and flattening of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, S. M.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for measuring globular cluster ellipticities and the results of such measurements are reviewed, and the processes that determine the shapes of globular clusters and the ways in which they change with time are discussed. The use of the virial tensor theorem to study the connection between the global rotation, velocity anisotropy, and the shape of a self-gravitating system is addressed, and the employment of N-body models to simulate the evolution of globular clusters with initially anisotropic velocity distributions is examined. The application of a simple evaporation model and Fokker-Planck integrations to study the two-body diffusion in globular clusters is reviewed.

  11. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exits, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte-Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z<~0.1 with member galaxies selected from the SDSS DR10 spectroscopic database. We find that ~35% of our clusters are rotating when using a set of strict criteria, while loosening the criteria we find this fraction increasing to ~48%. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation that the significance and strength of their...

  12. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  13. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  14. Probing the dynamical and X-ray mass proxies of the cluster of galaxies Abell S1101

    CERN Document Server

    Rabitz, Andreas; Schwope, Axel; Verdugo, Miguel; Reiprich, Thomas H; Klein, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Context: The galaxy cluster Abell S1101 (S1101 hereafter) deviates significantly from the X-ray luminosity versus velocity dispersion relation (L-sigma) of galaxy clusters in our previous study. Given reliable X-ray luminosity measurement combining XMM-Newton and ROSAT, this could most likely be caused by the bias in the velocity dispersion due to interlopers and low member statistic in the previous sample of member galaxies, which was solely based on 20 galaxy redshifts drawn from the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the galaxy member statistic to perform a precision measurement of the velocity dispersion and dynamical mass of S1101. We aim for a detailed substructure and dynamical state characterization of this cluster, and a comparison of mass estimates derived from (i) the velocity dispersion (M_vir), (ii) the caustic mass computation (M_caustic), and (iii) mass proxies from X-ray observations and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. Methods: We carried out new optical spectroscopic observations of t...

  15. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  16. The electrophysiologic profile of Dejerine-Sottas disease (HMSN III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstead, T J; Kuntz, N L; Miller, R G; Daube, J R

    1990-07-01

    Electrophysiologic studies in 11 patients with Dejerine-Sottas disease (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III, HMSN III) showed median and ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities less than 6 m/sec in all but 1 patient. Marked temporal dispersion without conduction block was present in all patients. Uniform slowing in adjacent motor nerves was consistent with other studies of inherited neuropathies, although marked temporal dispersion may make HMSN III more difficult to distinguish from acquired neuropathies than other hereditary conditions. The electrophysiologic features of HMSN III patients were significantly different from a series of patients with other hereditary neuropathies chosen because of very slow nerve conduction velocity.

  17. Highly Ionized Envelopes of High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Zekis, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results on highly ionized gas in Galactic High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs), originally surveyed in OVI (Sembach et al. 2003). In a new FUSE/HST survey of SiII/III/IV (Shull et al. 2009) toward 37 AGN, we detected SiIII (lambda 1206.500 A) absorption with a sky coverage fraction 81 +/- 5% (61 HVCs along 30 of 37 high-latitude sight lines). The SiIII (lambda 1206.500 A) line is typically 4-5 times stronger than OVI (lambda 1031.926 A). The mean HVC column density of perhaps 10^19 cm^-2 of low-metallicity (0.1 - 0.2 Z_sun) ionized gas in the low halo. Recent determinations of HVC distances allow us to estimate a total reservoir of ~10^8 M_sun. Estimates of infall velocities indicate an infall rate of around 1 M_sun yr^-1, comparable to the replenishment rate for star formation in the disk. HVCs appear to be sheathed by intermediate-temperature gas (10^4.0 - 10^4.5 K) detectable in SiIII and SiIV, as well as hotter gas seen in OVI and other high ions. To prepare for HST observations of 10 HVC-selecte...

  18. Cluster Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Kneib, Jean-Paul; 10.1007/s00159-011-0047-3

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most recently assembled, massive, bound structures in the Universe. As predicted by General Relativity, given their masses, clusters strongly deform space-time in their vicinity. Clusters act as some of the most powerful gravitational lenses in the Universe. Light rays traversing through clusters from distant sources are hence deflected, and the resulting images of these distant objects therefore appear distorted and magnified. Lensing by clusters occurs in two regimes, each with unique observational signatures. The strong lensing regime is characterized by effects readily seen by eye, namely, the production of giant arcs, multiple-images, and arclets. The weak lensing regime is characterized by small deformations in the shapes of background galaxies only detectable statistically. Cluster lenses have been exploited successfully to address several important current questions in cosmology: (i) the study of the lens(es) - understanding cluster mass distributions and issues pertaining...

  19. Scale-Invariant Correlations in Dynamic Bacterial Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Dong, Xu; Be'er, Avraham; Swinney, Harry L.; Zhang, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    In Bacillus subtilis colonies, motile bacteria move collectively, spontaneously forming dynamic clusters. These bacterial clusters share similarities with other systems exhibiting polarized collective motion, such as bird flocks or fish schools. Here we study experimentally how velocity and orientation fluctuations within clusters are spatially correlated. For a range of cell density and cluster size, the correlation length is shown to be 30% of the spatial size of clusters, and the correlation functions collapse onto a master curve after rescaling the separation with correlation length. Our results demonstrate that correlations of velocity and orientation fluctuations are scale invariant in dynamic bacterial clusters.

  20. Superluminal Recession Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, T M; Davis, Tamara M.; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2000-01-01

    Hubble's Law, v=HD (recession velocity is proportional to distance), is a theoretical result derived from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. v=HD applies at least as far as the particle horizon and in principle for all distances. Thus, galaxies with distances greater than D=c/H are receding from us with velocities greater than the speed of light and superluminal recession is a fundamental part of the general relativistic description of the expanding universe. This apparent contradiction of special relativity (SR) is often mistakenly remedied by converting redshift to velocity using SR. Here we show that galaxies with recession velocities faster than the speed of light are observable and that in all viable cosmological models, galaxies above a redshift of three are receding superluminally.

  1. Deconstructing the Antlia cluster core

    CERN Document Server

    Caso, J P

    2015-01-01

    The present literature does not give a satisfactory answer to the question about the nature of the "Antlia galaxy cluster". The radial velocities of galaxies found in the region around the giant ellipticals NGC 3258/3268 range from about 1000 km/s to 4000 km/s. We characterise this region and its possible kinematical and population substructure. We have obtained VLT--VIMOS multi-object spectra of the galaxy population in the inner part of the Antlia cluster and measure radial velocities for 45 potential members. We supplement our galaxy sample with literature data, ending up with 105 galaxy velocities. We find a large radial velocity dispersion for the entire sample as reported in previous papers. However, we find three groups at about 1900 km/s, 2800 km/s, and 3700 km/s, which we interpret as differences in the recession velocities rather than peculiar velocities. The high radial velocity dispersion of galaxies in the Antlia region reflects a considerable extension along the line of sight.

  2. Mean-cluster approach indicates cell sorting time scales are determined by collective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrici, Carine P.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-03-01

    Cell migration is essential to cell segregation, playing a central role in tissue formation, wound healing, and tumor evolution. Considering random mixtures of two cell types, it is still not clear which cell characteristics define clustering time scales. The mass of diffusing clusters merging with one another is expected to grow as td /d +2 when the diffusion constant scales with the inverse of the cluster mass. Cell segregation experiments deviate from that behavior. Explanations for that could arise from specific microscopic mechanisms or from collective effects, typical of active matter. Here we consider a power law connecting diffusion constant and cluster mass to propose an analytic approach to model cell segregation where we explicitly take into account finite-size corrections. The results are compared with active matter model simulations and experiments available in the literature. To investigate the role played by different mechanisms we considered different hypotheses describing cell-cell interaction: differential adhesion hypothesis and different velocities hypothesis. We find that the simulations yield normal diffusion for long time intervals. Analytic and simulation results show that (i) cluster evolution clearly tends to a scaling regime, disrupted only at finite-size limits; (ii) cluster diffusion is greatly enhanced by cell collective behavior, such that for high enough tendency to follow the neighbors, cluster diffusion may become independent of cluster size; (iii) the scaling exponent for cluster growth depends only on the mass-diffusion relation, not on the detailed local segregation mechanism. These results apply for active matter systems in general and, in particular, the mechanisms found underlying the increase in cell sorting speed certainly have deep implications in biological evolution as a selection mechanism.

  3. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  4. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  5. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities for 1309 stars and 166 OCl (Mermilliod+, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermilliod, J.-C.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2008-02-01

    We present the final catalogues of a long term observing program performed with the two Coravel spectrovelocimeters for red giants in open clusters. The main aims were to detect spectroscopic binaries and determine their orbital parameters, determine the membership, and compute mean velocities for the stars and open clusters. We computed weighted mean radial velocities for 1309 stars from 10517 individual observations, including the systemic radial velocities from spectroscopic orbits and for Cepheids. The final results are contained in three catalogues collecting 10517 individual radial velocities, mean radial velocities for 1309 red giants, and mean radial velocities for 166 open clusters, among which 57 are new determinations. We identify 891 members and 418 non-members. We discovered a total of 288 spectroscopic binaries, among which 57 were classified as non-members. In addition 27 stars were judged to be variable in radial velocities, all of them being red supergiants. (5 data files).

  7. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eCopenhagen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped, where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  8. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  9. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  10. Clustered regression with unknown clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barman, Kishor

    2011-01-01

    We consider a collection of prediction experiments, which are clustered in the sense that groups of experiments ex- hibit similar relationship between the predictor and response variables. The experiment clusters as well as the regres- sion relationships are unknown. The regression relation- ships define the experiment clusters, and in general, the predictor and response variables may not exhibit any clus- tering. We call this prediction problem clustered regres- sion with unknown clusters (CRUC) and in this paper we focus on linear regression. We study and compare several methods for CRUC, demonstrate their applicability to the Yahoo Learning-to-rank Challenge (YLRC) dataset, and in- vestigate an associated mathematical model. CRUC is at the crossroads of many prior works and we study several prediction algorithms with diverse origins: an adaptation of the expectation-maximization algorithm, an approach in- spired by K-means clustering, the singular value threshold- ing approach to matrix rank minimization u...

  11. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  12. Boosting Moving Object Indexing through Velocity Partitioning

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Thi; Zhang, Rui; Ward, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    There have been intense research interests in moving object indexing in the past decade. However, existing work did not exploit the important property of skewed velocity distributions. In many real world scenarios, objects travel predominantly along only a few directions. Examples include vehicles on road networks, flights, people walking on the streets, etc. The search space for a query is heavily dependent on the velocity distribution of the objects grouped in the nodes of an index tree. Motivated by this observation, we propose the velocity partitioning (VP) technique, which exploits the skew in velocity distribution to speed up query processing using moving object indexes. The VP technique first identifies the "dominant velocity axes (DVAs)" using a combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and k-means clustering. Then, a moving object index (e.g., a TPR-tree) is created based on each DVA, using the DVA as an axis of the underlying coordinate system. An object is maintained in the index whose DVA...

  13. Subspace clustering through attribute clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun NIU; Shubo ZHANG; Junliang CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Many recently proposed subspace clustering methods suffer from two severe problems. First, the algorithms typically scale exponentially with the data dimensionality or the subspace dimensionality of clusters. Second, the clustering results are often sensitive to input parameters. In this paper, a fast algorithm of subspace clustering using attribute clustering is proposed to over-come these limitations. This algorithm first filters out redundant attributes by computing the Gini coefficient. To evaluate the correlation of every two non-redundant attributes, the relation matrix of non-redundant attributes is constructed based on the relation function of two dimensional united Gini coefficients. After applying an overlapping clustering algorithm on the relation matrix, the candidate of all interesting subspaces is achieved. Finally, all subspace clusters can be derived by clustering on interesting subspaces. Experiments on both synthesis and real datasets show that the new algorithm not only achieves a significant gain of runtime and quality to find subspace clusters, but also is insensitive to input parameters.

  14. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  15. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  16. Refractory chronic cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Edvinsson, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cluster headache (CCH) often resists to prophylactic pharmaceutical treatments resulting in patients' life damage. In this rare but pragmatic situation escalation to invasive management is needed but framing criteria are lacking. We aimed to reach a consensus for refractory CCH definition...... for clinical and research use. The preparation of the final consensus followed three stages. Internal between authors, a larger between all European Headache Federation members and finally an international one among all investigators that have published clinical studies on cluster headache the last five years....... Eighty-five investigators reached by email. Proposed criteria were in the format of the International Classification of Headache Disorders III-beta (description, criteria, notes, comments and references). Following this evaluation eight drafts were prepared before the final. Twenty-four (28...

  17. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  18. Dynamical Evolution of Young Embedded Clusters: A Parameter Space Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Proszkow, Eva-Marie

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamical evolution of embedded stellar clusters from the protocluster stage, through the embedded star-forming phase, and out to ages of 10 Myr -- after the gas has been removed from the cluster. The relevant dynamical properties of young stellar clusters are explored over a wide range of possible star formation environments using N-body simulations. Many realizations of equivalent initial conditions are used to produce robust statistical descriptions of cluster evolution including the cluster bound fraction, radial probability distributions, as well as the distributions of close encounter distances and velocities. These cluster properties are presented as a function of parameters describing the initial configuration of the cluster, including the initial cluster membership N, initial stellar velocities, cluster radii, star formation efficiency, embedding gas dispersal time, and the degree of primordial mass segregation. The results of this parameter space survey, which includes ab...

  19. BOSS DR12 combined galaxy sample: The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: On the measurement of growth rate using galaxy correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Satpathy, Siddharth; Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Bahcall, Neta A; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Kitaura, Francisco; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G; Seo, Hee-Jong; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the linear growth rate of structure, \\textit{f} from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 (DR12) using Convolution Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (CLPT) with Gaussian Streaming Redshift-Space Distortions (GSRSD) to model the two point statistics of BOSS galaxies in DR12. The BOSS-DR12 dataset includes 1,198,006 massive galaxies spread over the redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.75$. These galaxy samples are categorized in three redshift bins. Using CLPT-GSRSD in our analysis of the combined sample of the three redshift bins, we report measurements of $f \\sigma_8$ for the three redshift bins. We find $f \\sigma_8 = 0.430 \\pm 0.054$ at $z_{\\rm eff} = 0.38$, $f \\sigma_8 = 0.452 \\pm 0.057$ at $z_{\\rm eff} = 0.51$ and $f \\sigma_8 = 0.457 \\pm 0.052$ at $z_{\\rm eff} = 0.61$. Our results are consistent with the predictions of Planck $\\Lambda$CDM-GR. Our constraints on the growth rates of structure in the Universe at differ...

  20. Planck intermediate results. XIII. Constraints on peculiar velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Democles, J; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Doerl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Ensslin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Genova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jasche, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lahteenmaki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vornle, M; Lopez-Caniego, M; Macias-Perez, J F; Maino, D; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Puisieux, S; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Roman, M; Rubino-Martin, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zibin, J P; Zonca, A

    2013-01-01

    Using \\Planck\\ data combined with the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we address the study of peculiar motions by searching for evidence of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ). By implementing various filters designed to extract the kSZ generated at the positions of the clusters, we obtain consistent constraints on the radial peculiar velocity average, root mean square (rms), and local bulk flow amplitude at different depths. For the whole cluster sample of average redshift 0.18, the measured average radial peculiar velocity with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at that redshift, i.e., the kSZ monopole, amounts to $72 \\pm 60$\\,km\\,s$^{-1}$. This constitutes less than 1\\,% of the relative Hubble velocity of the cluster sample with respect to our local CMB frame. From a subset of this cluster sample \\Planck\\ finds the radial peculiar velocity rms to be below 800\\,km\\,s$^{-1}$ at the 95\\,% confidence level, which is around three times the $\\Lambda$CD...

  1. The Circular Velocity Function of Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Louis E; Benson, Andrew J; Kollmeier, Juna A; Mulchaey, John S

    2013-01-01

    A robust prediction of LCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. However, the correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened relative to LCDM expectations at circular velocities v_c < 200 km/s. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role of environment in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v_c estimators, we find no transition from field- to LCDM-shaped CVF above v_c = 50 km/s as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 < log(M_halo/M_sun) < 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs that are marginally suppressed at low-v_c compared to tha...

  2. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side...

  3. Weighted Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Margareta; Branzei, Simina; Loker, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate clustering in the weighted setting, in which every data point is assigned a real valued weight. We conduct a theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in each of the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterising the precise conditions under which such algorithms react to weights, and classifying clustering methods into three broad categories: weight-responsive, weight-considering, and weight-robust. Our analysis raises several interesting questions and can be directly mapped to the classical unweighted setting.

  4. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  5. Velocity dispersion of M87 using a population model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, R. J.; Junkkarinen, V.; Talbert, F. D.; Brandt, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity dispersion of M 87 (NGC 4486) is determined using (1) a single star of class K0 III and (2) two different population models to represent the spectral region of the G-band. Although the models fit the overall spectrum better than the single-star, there is only a small difference in the derived velocity dispersion. This work revises the earlier velocity dispersion result of Brandt and Roosen (1969) down to 350 km/sec, in agreement with Faber and Jackson (1976) and Sargent et al. (1978).

  6. 1,1,1-Tris(hydroxymethyl)propane in manganese carboxylate chemistry: synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a mixed-valence [MnIII4MnII4] cluster featuring the novel [MnIII4MnII4(mu3-OR)6(mu2-OR)8]6+ core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milios, Constantinos J; Fabbiani, Francesca P A; Parsons, Simon; Murugesu, Muralee; Christou, George; Brechin, Euan K

    2006-01-14

    The reaction between MnBr(2).4H(2)O with H(3)tmp (1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)propane) in MeCN in the presence of Na(O(2)CCMe(3)) and NBu(4)Br produces the complex [Mn(8)(O(2)CCMe(3))(2)(tmp)(2)(Htmp)(4)Br(4)(H(2)O)(2)].2MeCN (1.2MeCN) in good yield. The centrosymmetric octanuclear molecule consists of four Mn(III) and four Mn(II) ions assembled together by fourteen alkoxo bridges to give a [Mn(III)(4)Mn(II)(4)(mu(3)-OR)(6)(mu(2)-OR)(8)](6+) rod-like core in which the metal centres are arranged in a planar zigzag fashion. Peripheral ligation is provided by a combination of bridging pivalate ions, terminal bromides and water molecules. Dc magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the presence of dominant antiferromagnetic interactions leading to a spin ground state of S = 0. A rationalization of this result is attempted by structural comparison with previously reported tetranuclear manganese complexes containing the [Mn(III)(2)Mn(II)(2)(mu(3)-OR)(2)(mu(2)-OR)(4)] core in which the magnetic interactions are ferromagnetic.

  7. A New Nanometer-Sized Ga(III-Oxyhydroxide Cation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. Casey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new 30-center Ga(III-oxy-hydroxide cation cluster was synthesized by hydrolysis of an aqueous GaCl3 solution near pH = 2.5 and crystallized using 2,6-napthalene disulfonate (NDS. The cluster has 30 metal centers and a nominal stoichiometry: [Ga30(μ4-O12(μ3-O4(μ3-OH4(μ2-OH42(H2O16](2,6-NDS6, where 2,6-NDS = 2,6-napthalene disulfonate This cluster augments the very small library of Group 13 clusters that have been isolated from aqueous solution and closely resembles one other Ga(III cluster with 32 metal centers that had been isolated using curcurbit ligands. These clusters have uncommon linked Ga(O4 centers and sets of both protonated and unprotonated μ3-oxo.

  8. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  9. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A symptom is a condition indicating the presence of a disease, especially, when regarded as an aid in diagnosis.Symptoms are the smallest units indicating the existence of a disease. A syndrome on the other hand is an aggregate, set or cluster of concurrent symptoms which together indicate...... and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c......-mean clustering is an easy and well improved tool, which has been applied in many medical fields. We used c-mean fuzzy clustering after feature extraction from an aphasia database. Factor analysis was applied on a correlation matrix of 26 symptoms of language disorders and led to five factors. The factors...

  10. Kinematics of Star Clusters in M101

    CERN Document Server

    Simanton, Lesley; Miller, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    We have identified a few thousand star clusters in the nearby, late-type spiral galaxy M101, including approximately 90 candidate ancient globular clusters (GCs), from multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. We obtained follow-up low-resolution (R approximately 2000) optical spectroscopy from Gemini-GMOS for 43 total clusters, of which 18 are old GCs and 25 are young massive clusters (YMCs). We measure radial velocities for these clusters and find that, as expected, the YMCs rotate with the HI disk. The old GCs do not show any obvious evidence for rotation and have a much higher velocity dispersion than the YMCs, suggesting that the GCs in M101 are likely part of a stellar halo or thick disk.

  11. A revised moving cluster distance to the Pleiades open cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Galli, P A B; Bouy, H; Bouvier, J; Olivares, J; Teixeira, R

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We provide a new distance estimate for the Pleiades based on the moving cluster method, which will be useful to further discuss the so-called Pleiades distance controversy and compare it with the very precise parallaxes from the Gaia space mission. Methods: We apply a refurbished implementation of the convergent point search method to an updated census of Pleiades stars to calculate the convergent point position of the cluster from stellar proper motions. Then, we derive individual parallaxes for 64 cluster members using radial velocities compiled from the literature, and approximate parallaxes for another 1146 stars based on the spatial velocity of the cluster. This represents the largest sample of Pleiades stars with individual distances to date. Results: The parallaxes derived in this work are in good agreement with previous results obtained in different studies (excluding Hipparcos) for individual stars in the cluster. We report a mean parallax of $7.44\\pm 0.08$~mas and distance of $134.4^{+2.9}_{-2...

  12. 3D cluster members and near-infrared distance of open cluster NGC 6819

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Hua; Xu, Shou-Kun; Chen, Li

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain clean members of the open cluster NGC 6819, the proper motions and radial velocities of 1691 stars are used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) velocity space. Based on the DBSCAN clustering algorithm, 537 3D cluster members are obtained. From the 537 3D cluster members, the average radial velocity and absolute proper motion of the cluster are Vr = +2.30 ± 0.04 km s-1 and (PMRA, PMDec) = (-2.5 ± 0.5, -4.3 ± 0.5) mas yr-1, respectively. The proper motions, radial velocities, spatial positions and color-magnitude diagram of the 537 3D members indicate that our membership determination is effective. Among the 537 3D cluster members, 15 red clump giants can be easily identified by eye and are used as reliable standard candles for the distance estimate of the cluster. The distance modulus of the cluster is determined to be (m - M)0 = 11.86 ± 0.05 mag (2355 ± 54 pc), which is quite consistent with published values. The uncertainty of our distance modulus is dominated by the intrinsic dispersion in the luminosities of red clump giants (˜ 0.04 mag).

  13. Properties of hydrogen cluster-jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Esperanza; Bonaventura, Daniel; Grieser, Silke; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Hetz, Benjamin; Hordt, Fabian; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Taeschner, Alexander; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    A highly intense cluster-jet beam represents a very attractive and extremely interesting target for studies at storage ring experiments (e.g. anti PANDA/FAIR) as well as for laser-induced particle acceleration. Since the target beam or rather the cluster properties vary with increasing number of constituents, the theoretical description of these many-body systems holds a lot of challenges. Therefore, it is essential to perform systematic measurements on cluster beam characteristics, in particular: the velocity, beam density, and cluster mass. The study of these correlated parameters enables the optimisation of the target design for highest performance and allows for insights into the cluster production process. This presentation gives an overview of the hydrogen cluster-jet target prototype for the anti PANDA experiment. Furthermore, the systematic investigation of these mentioned cluster properties and their recent results are presented and discussed.

  14. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  15. The circular velocity function of group galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramson, Louis E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Williams, Rik J.; Benson, Andrew J.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Mulchaey, John S., E-mail: labramson@uchicago.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    A robust prediction of ΛCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. The correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain, however: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened compared to ΛCDM expectations at circular velocities v {sub c} ≲ 200 km s{sup –1}. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role environment plays in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v {sub c} estimators, we find no transition from field to ΛCDM-shaped CVF above v {sub c} = 50 km s{sup –1} as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 ≲ log M {sub halo}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs marginally suppressed at low v {sub c} compared to that of the field. Conversely, some agreement with N-body results emerges for samples saturated with late-type galaxies, with isolated late-types displaying a CVF similar in shape to ΛCDM predictions. We conclude that the flattening of the low-v {sub c} slope in groups is due to their depressed late-type fractions—environment affecting the CVF only to the extent that it correlates with this quantity—and that previous cluster analyses may suffer from interloper contamination. These results serve as useful benchmarks for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  16. A Survey of Grid Based Clustering Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR ILANGO

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cluster Analysis, an automatic process to find similar objects from a database, is a fundamental operation in data mining. A cluster is a collection of data objects that are similar to one another within the same cluster and are dissimilar to the objects in other clusters. Clustering techniques have been discussed extensively in SimilaritySearch, Segmentation, Statistics, Machine Learning, Trend Analysis, Pattern Recognition and Classification [1]. Clustering methods can be classified into i Partitioning methods ii Hierarchical methods iii Density-based methods iv Grid-based methods v Model-based methods. Grid based methods quantize the object space into a finite number of cells (hyper-rectangles and then perform the required operations on the quantized space. The main advantage of Grid based method is its fast processing time which depends on number of cells in each dimension in quantized space. In this research paper, we present some of the grid based methods such as CLIQUE (CLustering In QUEst [2], STING (STatistical INformation Grid [3], MAFIA (Merging of Adaptive Intervals Approach to Spatial Data Mining [4], Wave Cluster [5]and O-CLUSTER (Orthogonal partitioning CLUSTERing [6], as a survey andalso compare their effectiveness in clustering data objects. We also present some of the latest developments in Grid Based methods such as Axis Shifted Grid Clustering Algorithm [7] and Adaptive Mesh Refinement [Wei-Keng Liao etc] [8] to improve the processing time of objects.

  17. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds-1: Parameterisation and Classification of 1072 Clusters in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, P. K.; Subramaniam, A.; Choudhury, S.; Indu, G.; Sagar, Ram

    2016-08-01

    We have introduced a semi-automated quantitative method to estimate the age and reddening of 1072 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) III survey data. This study brings out 308 newly parameterised clusters. In a first of its kind, the LMC clusters are classified into groups based on richness/mass as very poor, poor, moderate and rich clusters, similar to the classification scheme of open clusters in the Galaxy. A major cluster formation episode is found to happen at 125±25 Myr in the inner LMC. The bar region of the LMC appears prominently in the age range 60 - 250 Myr and is found to have a relatively higher concentration of poor and moderate clusters. The eastern and the western ends of the bar are found to form clusters initially, which later propagates to the central part. We demonstrate that there is a significant difference in the distribution of clusters as a function of mass, using a movie based on the propagation (in space and time) of cluster formation in various groups. The importance of including the low mass clusters in the cluster formation history is demonstrated. The catalog with parameters, classification, and cleaned and isochrone fitted CMDs of 1072 clusters, which are available as online material, can be further used to understand the hierarchical formation of clusters in selected regions of the LMC.

  18. Transverse velocity shifts in protostellar jets: rotation or velocity asymmetries?

    CERN Document Server

    De Colle, Fabio; Riera, Angels

    2016-01-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction, which have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could be originated by rotation in the flow, or by side to side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (~ 100-200 km/s), an asymmetry >~ 10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts. Our analysis indicate that side to side velocities asymmetries could ...

  19. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  20. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  1. Minimum Length - Maximum Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Panes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA about superluminal neutrinos.

  2. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  3. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    .g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco......, Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e...... to the automotive sector in Wales. Specifically, the paper evaluates the "Accelerates" programme initiated by the Welsh Development Agency and elaborates on how and to what extent the Accelerate programme supports the development of a sustainable automotive industry cluster. The Accelerate programme was set up...

  4. CyberStorm III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; et al

    2010-01-01

    Projectteam Cyber Storm III - De Verenigde Staten organiseerden de afgelopen jaren een reeks grootschalige ICT-crisisoefeningen met de naam Cyber Storm. Cyber Storm III is de derde oefening in de reeks. Het scenario van Cyber Storm III staat in het teken van grootschalige ICT-verstoringen, waarbij n

  5. Dynamics of the Globular Cluster NGC 665 with WFPC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ding; CHEN Li; WANG Jia-Ji

    2004-01-01

    @@ We have used the Hubble Space Telescope observations to measure proper motion of the globular cluster NGC6656 (M22) with respect to the background bulge stars and its internal velocity dispersion profile. Based on the proper motion of the cluster, its space velocity (II, (-) , W) = (184 ± 3, 209 ±14, 132 ± 15) km s- 1 and galactic orbit are also obtained. The central velocity dispersion in radial and tangential components of the internal motion of cluster stars is 16.99 km s-1. We derive the mass-to-light ratio M/ LV ~ 3.3 ± 0.2, which is relatively higher than the previous results.

  6. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...program provides Precise Positioning Service (PPS) to military operations and force enhancement. It also provides increased anti-jam power to the earth ...to be modified . On January 31, 2016, USD(AT&L) signed the GPS III revised APB. This Change 1 to the APB was due to both cost and schedule breaches

  7. Investigating potential planetary nebula/cluster pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Bidin, Christian Moni; Bonatto, Charles; Mauro, Francesco; Turner, David; Geisler, Doug; Chene, Andres-Nicolas; Gormaz-Matamala, Alex C; Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostin G; Minniti, Dante; Carraro, Giovanni; Gieren, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental parameters characterizing the end-state of intermediate-mass stars may be constrained by discovering planetary nebulae (PNe) in open clusters (OCs). Cluster membership may be exploited to establish the distance, luminosity, age, and physical size for PNe, and the intrinsic luminosity and mass of its central star. Four potential PN-OC associations were investigated, to assess the cluster membership for the PNe. Radial velocities were measured from intermediate-resolution optical spectra, complemented with previous estimates in the literature. When the radial velocity study supported the PN/OC association, we analyzed if other parameters (e.g., age, distance, reddening, central star brightness) were consistent with this conclusion. Our measurements imply that the PNe VBe3 and HeFa1 are not members of the OCs NGC5999 and NGC6067, respectively, and likely belong to the background bulge population. Conversely, consistent radial velocities indicate that NGC2452/NGC2453 could be associated, but our resul...

  8. Clues on the Evolution of Cluster Galaxies From The Analysis of Their Orbital Anisotropies

    OpenAIRE

    Biviano, A.; Katgert, P.; Thomas, T; Mazure, A.

    2003-01-01

    We study the evolution of galaxies in clusters by the analysis of a sample of about 3000 galaxies, members of 59 clusters from the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS). We distinguish four cluster galaxy populations, based on their radial and velocity distributions within the clusters. Using the class of ellipticals and S0's (excluding the very bright ellipticals), we determine the average cluster mass profile, that we compare with mass models available from numerical simulations. We then ...

  9. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands...

  10. Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A E A

    2004-01-01

    We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations, and produce maps of variations of velocity centroids to study their scaling properties. We compare them with those of the underlying velocity field, and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested, with success, a criteria for recovering velocity statistics from velocity centroids derived in our previous work. That is, if >> (where S is a 2D map of ``unnormalized'', v velocity, and I integrated intensity map -column density-), then the structure function of the centroids is dominated by the structure function of velocity. We show that it is possible to extract the velocity statistics using centroids for subsonic and mildly supersonic turbulence (e.g. Mach numbers ~2.5). While, towards higher Mach numbers other effects could affect significantly the statistics of centroids.

  11. Statistics of Velocity from Spectral Data Modified Velocity Centroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    We address the problem of studying interstellar (ISM) turbulence using spectral line data. We construct a measure that we term modified velocity centroids (MVCs) and derive an analytical solution that relates the 2D spectra of the modified centroids with the underlying 3D velocity spectrum. We test our results using synthetic maps constructed with data obtained through simulations of compressible MHD turbulence. We prove that the MVCs are able to restore the underlying spectrum of turbulent velocity. We show that the modified velocity centroids (MVCs) are complementary to the the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) technique that we introduced earlier. Employed together they make determining of the velocity spectral index more reliable. At the same time we show that MVCs allow to determine velocity spectra when the underlying statistics is not a power law and/or the turbulence is subsonic.

  12. Relativistic Particles in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ensslin, T A

    2002-01-01

    A brief overview on the theory and observations of relativistic particle populations in clusters of galaxies is given. The following topics are addressed: (i) the diffuse relativistic electron population within the intra-cluster medium (ICM) as seen in the cluster wide radio halos and possibly also seen in the high energy X-ray and extreme ultraviolet excess emissions of some clusters, (ii) the observed confined relativistic electrons within fresh and old radio plasma and their connection to cluster radio relics at cluster merger shock waves, (iii) the relativistic proton population within the ICM, and its observable consequences (if it exists), and (iv) the confined relativistic proton population (if it exists) within radio plasma. The importance of upcoming, sensitive gamma-ray telescopes for this research area is highlighted.

  13. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jerjen, Helmut [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Lisker, Thorsten [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg (ZAH), Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sung, Eon-Chang [Korea Astronomy and Space Science institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  14. Appraisal and standardization of curvilinear velocity (VCL) cut-off values for CASA analysis of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, U; Malecki, I A; Mahmood, M; Martin, G B

    2017-06-01

    One of the basic steps in objective analysis of sperm motility is the subdivision of a motile sperm population into slow, medium and rapid categories based on their velocity. However, for CASA analysis of quail sperm, the velocity values for categorization of slow, medium and rapid sperm have not yet been standardized. To identify the cut-off values of "velocity curvilinear" (VCL) for quail sperm categorization, we captured and analysed 22,300 tracks of quail sperm using SCA(®) -CASA. The median and mean VCL values were 85 and 97 μm/s. To define the VCL cut-off values, we used two methods. In the first, we identified the upper (rapid sperm) and lower (slow sperm) cut-off values using: (i) median VCL ± 25% or ± 50% or ± 75% of median VCL value; (ii) first and third quartile values of VCL data (i.e. 25% cut-off setting); and (iii) 33% and 66% of VCL data. Among these settings, sperm categories and their corresponding motility characteristics recorded using the "25%" setting (i.e. slow ≤36 ≤ medium ≤154 ≤ rapid) were found the most realistic and coherent with male ranking by fertility. In the second method, we calculated heteroscedasticity in the total VCL data using PCA and the two-step clustering method. With this approach, the mean of the high and low clusters was 165 and 51 μm/s, respectively. Together, the mean from two methods suggested that, for SCA(®) -CASA categorization of quail sperm, sperm should be classed as "rapid" at VCL ≥160 μm/s and "slow" at VCL ≤45 μm/s. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Minimal information in velocity space

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, Guillaume

    1995-01-01

    Jaynes' transformation group principle is used to derive the objective prior for the velocity of a non-zero rest-mass particle. In the case of classical mechanics, invariance under the classical law of addition of velocities, leads to an improper constant prior over the unbounded velocity space of classical mechanics. The application of the relativistic law of addition of velocities leads to a less simple prior. It can however be rewritten as a uniform volumetric distribution if the relativistic velocity space is given a non-trivial metric.

  16. Quotients of cluster categories

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Higher cluster categories were recently introduced as a generalization of cluster categories. This paper shows that in Dynkin types A and D, half of all higher cluster categories are actually just quotients of cluster categories. The other half can be obtained as quotients of 2-cluster categories, the "lowest" type of higher cluster categories. Hence, in Dynkin types A and D, all higher cluster phenomena are implicit in cluster categories and 2-cluster categories. In contrast, the same is not...

  17. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  18. VELOCITY AND SUSPENSION CONCENTRATION IN SEDIMENT-MIXED FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.S.MAZUMDER; K.GHOSHAL

    2002-01-01

    The present paper is focussed on the effects of viscous and turbulent shear stresses on both vertical velocity and concentration distributions in large suspension of sands. When the flow carries large amount of sediments in suspension,the properties of fluid mixture are changed in terms of modified viscosity,density and fall velocity,and hence the flow characteristics. Theoretical models have been developed for both velocity and concentration profiles,taking into account the viscous and turbulent shear stresses,which are the function of volumetric concentration. Comparison of theoretical models with experimental data reveals that (i) the modified velocity and concentration profiles agree well with the observed data for high suspension,(ii) the higher the sediment suspension,the smaller the vonKarman constant,and (iii) sediment diffusion coefficient is less than momentum diffusion coefficient for fine sands in suspension.

  19. Clustered impacts - Experiments and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1985-04-01

    The characteristics of impact by clusters of projectiles are experimentally studied by launching grouped projectiles of aluminum shot, steel shot, iron filings, and sand. Cratering efficiency is considered as a function of a dimensionless parameter related to projectile size and impact velocity. The effects of different target and projectile densities on cratering efficiency are examined. Crater morphology is addressed by considering a typical example, reviewing the systematics between cluster dispersion and crater morphology for vertical impacts, and examining oblique angle impacts which have relevance for planetary secondary cratering processes. These results are compared with impacts by single bodies with different strengths. The evolution of the ejecta plume for clustered impacts is compared to that for single-body impacts for vertical and oblique impacts from 1.3 to 1.8 km/s. The experimental results are discussed in the context of planetary surface processes, emphasizing processes in an atmosphere-free environment and secondary impact cratering.

  20. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  1. Pairwise Velocity Statistics of Dark Halos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yan Zhang; Yi-Peng Jing

    2004-01-01

    We have accurately evaluated the halo pairwise velocity dispersion and the halo mean streaming velocity in the LCDM model (the flat ω0 = 0.3 model)using a set of high-resolution N-body simulations. Based on the simulation results,we have developed a model for the pairwise velocity dispersion of halos. Our model agrees with the simulation results over all scales we studied. We have also tested the model of Sheth et al. for the mean streaming motion of halos derived from the pair-conservation equation. We found that their model reproduces the simulation data very well on large scale, but under-predicts the streaming motion on scales r < 10 h-1 Mpc. We have introduced an empirical relation to improve their model.These improved models are useful for predicting the redshift correlation functions and the redshift power spectrum of galaxies if the halo occupation number model,e.g. the cluster weighted model, is given for the galaxies.

  2. High Velocity Features in the Orion Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    O'Dell, C R

    2008-01-01

    We have used widely spaced in time Hubble Space Telescope images to determine tangential velocities of features associated with outflows from young stars. These observations were supplemented by groundbased telescope spectroscopy and from the resultant radial velocities, space velocities were determined for many outflows. Numerous new moving features were found and grouped into known and newly assigned Herbig Haro objects. It was found that stellar outflow is highly discontinuous, as frequently is the case, with long-term gaps of a few hundred years and that these outflow periods are marked by staccato bursts over periods of about ten years. Although this has been observed in other regions, the Orion Nebula Cluster presents the richest display of this property. Most of the large scale Herbig Haro objects in the brightest part of the Orion Nebula appear to originate from a small region northeast of the strong Orion-S radio and infrared sources. With the possible exception of HH 203, we are not able to identify...

  3. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  4. Tangling clustering instability for small particles in temperature stratified turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, Tov; Liberman, Michael; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2013-01-01

    We study particle clustering in a temperature stratified turbulence with small finite correlation time. It is shown that the temperature stratified turbulence strongly increases the degree of compressibility of particle velocity field. This results in the strong decrease of the threshold for the excitation of the tangling clustering instability even for small particles. The tangling clustering instability in the temperature stratified turbulence is essentially different from the inertial clustering instability that occurs in non-stratified isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. While the inertial clustering instability is caused by the centrifugal effect of the turbulent eddies, the mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is related to the temperature fluctuations generated by the tangling of the mean temperature gradient by the velocity fluctuations. Temperature fluctuations produce pressure fluctuations and cause particle clustering in regions with increased pressure fluctuations. It is shown that t...

  5. A spatio-velocity model based semantic event detection algorithm for traffic surveillance video

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Detection of vehicle events is a research hotspot in digital traffic.In this paper,an approach is proposed to detect vehicle events with semantic analysis of traffic surveillance video using spatio-velocity statistic models.The approach includes two successive phases:trajectory clustering and semantic events detection.For trajectory clustering,a statistic model of vehicle trajectories are presented,for which a spatio-velocity model is trained by analyzing the trajectories of moving vehicles in the scene.Based on the trajectory,which represents both the position of the vehicle and its instantaneous velocity,a trajectory similarity measure is proposed.Then,an improved hierarchical clustering algorithm is adopted to cluster the trajectories according to different spatial and velocity distributions.In each cluster,trajectories that are spatially close have similar velocities of motion and represent one type of activity pattern.For the semantic events detection phase,statistic models of semantic regions in the scene are generated by estimating the probability density and velocity distributions of each type of activity pattern.Finally,semantic events are detected by the proposed spatio-velocity statistic models.The paper also presents experiments using real video sequence to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Dumb-bell galaxies in southern clusters: Catalog and preliminary statistical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettolani, G.; Gregorini, L.; Parma, P.; Deruiter, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant galaxy of a rich cluster is often an object whose formation and evolution is closely connected to the dynamics of the cluster itself. Hoessel (1980) and Schneider et al. (1983) estimate that 50 percent of the dominant galaxies are either of the dumb-bell type or have companions at projected distances less than 20 kpc, which is far in excess of the number expected from chance projection (see also Rood and Leir 1979). Presently there is no complete sample of these objects, with the exception of the listing of dumb-bell galaxies in BM type I and I-II clusters in the Abell statistical sample of Rood and Leir (1979). Recent dynamical studies of dumb-bell galaxies in clusters (Valentijn and Casertano, 1988) still suffer from inhomogeneity of the sample. The fact that it is a mixture of optically and radio selected objects may have introduced an unknown biases, for instance if the probability of radio emission is enhanced by the presence of close companions (Stocke, 1978, Heckman et al. 1985, Vettolani and Gregorini 1988) a bias could be present in their velocity distribution. However, this situation is bound to improve: a new sample of Abell clusters in the Southern Hemisphere has been constructed (Abell et al., 1988 hereafter ACO), which has several advantages over the original northern catalog. The plate material (IIIaJ plates) is of better quality and reaches fainter magnitudes. This makes it possible to classify the cluster types with a higher degree of accuracy, as well as to fainter magnitudes. The authors therefore decided to reconsider the whole problem constructing a new sample of dumb-bell galaxies homogeneously selected from the ACO survey. Details of the classification criteria are given.

  7. Cluster Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Greiner, Walter

    One of the rare examples of phenomena predicted before experimental discovery, offers the opportunity to introduce fission theory based on the asymmetric two center shell model. The valleys within the potential energy surfaces are due to the shell effects and are clearly showing why cluster radioactivity was mostly detected in parent nuclei leading to a doubly magic lead daughter. Saddle point shapes can be determined by solving an integro-differential equation. Nuclear dynamics allows us to calculate the half-lives. The following cluster decay modes (or heavy particle radioactivities) have been experimentally confirmed: 14C, 20O, 23F, 22,24-26Ne, 28,30Mg, 32,34Si with half-lives in good agreement with predicted values within our analytical superasymmetric fission model. The preformation probability is calculated as the internal barrier penetrability. An universal curve is described and used as an alternative for the estimation of the half-lives. The macroscopic-microscopic method was extended to investigate two-alpha accompanied fission and true ternary fission. The methods developed in nuclear physics are also adapted to study the stability of deposited atomic clusters on the planar surfaces.

  8. A revised moving cluster distance to the Pleiades open cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Moraux, E.; Bouy, H.; Bouvier, J.; Olivares, J.; Teixeira, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The distance to the Pleiades open cluster has been extensively debated in the literature over several decades. Although different methods point to a discrepancy in the trigonometric parallaxes produced by the Hipparcos mission, the number of individual stars with known distances is still small compared to the number of cluster members to help solve this problem. Aims: We provide a new distance estimate for the Pleiades based on the moving cluster method, which will be useful to further discuss the so-called Pleiades distance controversy and compare it with the very precise parallaxes from the Gaia space mission. Methods: We apply a refurbished implementation of the convergent point search method to an updated census of Pleiades stars to calculate the convergent point position of the cluster from stellar proper motions. Then, we derive individual parallaxes for 64 cluster members using radial velocities compiled from the literature, and approximate parallaxes for another 1146 stars based on the spatial velocity of the cluster. This represents the largest sample of Pleiades stars with individual distances to date. Results: The parallaxes derived in this work are in good agreement with previous results obtained in different studies (excluding Hipparcos) for individual stars in the cluster. We report a mean parallax of 7.44 ± 0.08 mas and distance of pc that is consistent with the weighted mean of 135.0 ± 0.6 pc obtained from the non-Hipparcos results in the literature. Conclusions: Our result for the distance to the Pleiades open cluster is not consistent with the Hipparcos catalog, but favors the recent and more precise distance determination of 136.2 ± 1.2 pc obtained from Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations. It is also in good agreement with the mean distance of 133 ± 5 pc obtained from the first trigonometric parallaxes delivered by the Gaia satellite for the brightest cluster members in common with our sample. Full Table B.2 is only

  9. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... and renamed as MT-III. In this study we have raised polyclonal antibodies in rabbits against recombinant rat MT-III (rMT-III). The sera obtained reacted specifically against recombinant zinc-and cadmium-saturated rMT-III, and did not cross-react with native rat MT-I and MT-II purified from the liver of zinc...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...

  10. A method to deconvolve stellar rotational velocities II

    CERN Document Server

    Christen, A; Cure, M; Rial, D F; Cassetti, J

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the distribution of stellar rotational velocities is essential for the understanding stellar evolution. Because we measure the projected rotational speed vsini, we need to solve an ill-posed problem given by a Fredholm integral of the first kind to recover the true rotational velocity distribution. After discretization of the Fredholm integral, we apply the Tikhonov regularization method to obtain directly the probability distribution function for stellar rotational velocities. We propose a simple and straightforward procedure to determine the Tikhonov parameter. We applied Monte Carlo simulations to prove that Tikhonov method is a consistent estimator and asymptotically unbiased. This method is applied to a sample of cluster stars. We obtain confidences intervals using bootstrap method. Our results are in good agreement with the one obtained using the Lucy method, in recovering the probability density distribution of rotational velocities. Furthermore, Lucy estimation lies inside our confidence inter...

  11. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer,; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster

  12. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  13. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  14. Cluster Galaxy Dynamics and the Effects of Large Scale Environment

    CERN Document Server

    White, Martin; Smit, Renske

    2010-01-01

    We use a high-resolution N-body simulation to study how the influence of large-scale structure in and around clusters causes correlated signals in different physical probes and discuss some implications this has for multi-physics probes of clusters. We pay particular attention to velocity dispersions, matching galaxies to subhalos which are explicitly tracked in the simulation. We find that not only do halos persist as subhalos when they fall into a larger host, groups of subhalos retain their identity for long periods within larger host halos. The highly anisotropic nature of infall into massive clusters, and their triaxiality, translates into an anisotropic velocity ellipsoid: line-of-sight galaxy velocity dispersions for any individual halo show large variance depending on viewing angle. The orientation of the velocity ellipsoid is correlated with the large-scale structure, and thus velocity outliers correlate with outliers caused by projection in other probes. We quantify this orientation uncertainty and ...

  15. The Gaia-ESO Survey: the inner disk, intermediate-age open cluster Trumpler 23

    CERN Document Server

    Overbeek, J C; Donati, P; Smiljanic, R; Jacobson, H R; Hatzidimitriou, D; Held, E V; Magrini, L; Bragaglia, A; Randich, S; Vallenari, A; Cantat-Gaudin, T; Tautvaisiene, G; Jimenez-Esteban, F; Frasca, A; Geisler, D; Villanova, S; Tang, B; Munoz, C; Marconi, G; Carraro, G; Roman, I San; Drazdauskas, A; Zenoviene, R; Gilmore, G; Jeffries, R D; Flaccomio, E; Pancino, E; Bayo, A; Costado, M T; Damiani, F; Jofre, P; Monaco, L; Prisinzano, L; Sousa, S G; Zaggia, S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Trumpler 23 is a moderately populated, intermediate-age open cluster within the solar circle at a Rgc ~6 kpc. It is in a crowded field very close to the Galactic plane and the color-magnitude diagram shows significant field contamination and possible differential reddening; it is a relatively understudied cluster for these reasons, but its location makes it a key object for determining Galactic abundance distributions. Aims: New data from the Gaia-ESO Survey enable the first ever radial velocity and spectroscopic metallicity measurements for this cluster. We aim to use velocities to isolate cluster members, providing more leverage for determining cluster parameters. Methods: Gaia-ESO Survey data for 167 potential members have yielded radial velocity measurements, which were used to determine the systemic velocity of the cluster and membership of individual stars. Atmospheric parameters were also used as a check on membership when available. Literature photometry was used to re-determine cluster param...

  16. Astrometric radial velocities; 1, Non-spectroscopic methods for measuring stellar radial velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, D; Madsen, S; Dravins, Dainis; Lindegren, Lennart; Madsen, Soren

    1999-01-01

    High-accuracy astrometry permits the determination of not only stellar tangential motion, but also the component along the line-of-sight. Such non-spectroscopic (i.e. astrometric) radial velocities are independent of stellar atmospheric dynamics, spectral complexity and variability, as well as of gravitational redshift. Three methods are analysed: (1) changing annual parallax, (2) changing proper motion and (3) changing angular extent of a moving group of stars. All three have significant potential in planned astrometric projects. Current accuracies are still inadequate for the first method, while the second is marginally feasible and is here applied to 16 stars. The third method reaches high accuracy (<1 km/s) already with present data, although for some clusters an accuracy limit is set by uncertainties in the cluster expansion rate.

  17. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...... with a 90° angle on the vessel. Moreover secondary flow in the abdominal aorta is illustrated by scanning on the transversal axis....

  18. Velocity Variations in the Phoenix-Hermus Star Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Grillmair, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of velocity and density perturbations along stellar streams in the Milky Way provide a time-integrated measure of dark matter substructure at larger galactic radius than the complementary instantaneous inner-halo strong lensing detection of dark matter sub-halos in distant galaxies. An interesting case to consider is the proposed Phoenix-Hermus star stream, which is long, thin, and on a nearly circular orbit, making it a particular good target to study for velocity variations along its length. In the presence of dark matter sub-halos, the stream velocities are significantly perturbed in a manner that is readily understood with the impulse approximation. A set of simulations shows that only sub-halos above a few 107 M ⊙ lead to reasonably long-lived observationally detectable velocity variations of amplitude of order 1 km s-1, with an average of about one visible hit per (two-armed) stream over a 3 Gyr interval. An implication is that globular clusters themselves will not have a visible impact on the stream. Radial velocities have the benefit of being completely insensitive to distance errors. Distance errors scatter individual star velocities perpendicular and tangential to the mean orbit, but their mean values remain unbiased. Calculations like these help build the quantitative case to acquire large, fairly deep, precision velocity samples of stream stars.

  19. On the theory of the type III burst exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1976-01-01

    In situ satellite observations of type III burst exciters at 1 AU show that the beam does not evolve into a plateau in velocity space, contrary to the prediction of quasilinear theory. The observations can be explained by a theory that includes mode coupling effects due to excitation of the parametric oscillating two-stream instability and its saturation by anomalous resistivity. The time evolution of the beam velocity distribution is included in the analysis.

  20. Distant star clusters of the Milky Way in MOND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, H.; Baumgardt, H.; Kroupa, P.

    2011-03-01

    We determine the mean velocity dispersion of six Galactic outer halo globular clusters, AM 1, Eridanus, Pal 3, Pal 4, Pal 15, and Arp 2 in the weak acceleration regime to test classical vs. modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). Owing to the nonlinearity of MOND's Poisson equation, beyond tidal effects, the internal dynamics of clusters is affected by the external field in which they are immersed. For the studied clusters, particle accelerations are much lower than the critical acceleration a0 of MOND, but the motion of stars is neither dominated by internal accelerations (ai ≫ ae) nor external accelerations (ae ≫ ai). We use the N-body code N-MODY in our analysis, which is a particle-mesh-based code with a numerical MOND potential solver developed by Ciotti et al. (2006, ApJ, 640, 741) to derive the line-of-sight velocity dispersion by adding the external field effect. We show that Newtonian dynamics predicts a low-velocity dispersion for each cluster, while in modified Newtonian dynamics the velocity dispersion is much higher. We calculate the minimum number of measured stars necessary to distinguish between Newtonian gravity and MOND with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We also show that for most clusters it is necessary to measure the velocities of between 30 to 80 stars to distinguish between both cases. Therefore the observational measurement of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of these clusters will provide a test for MOND.

  1. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  2. Attempt to Resolute Chiral Clusters by Optically Active Hydrazide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new kind of hydrazone (I) diastereoisomers was prepared with enantiomeric hydazide (II) and chiral cluster (III), which was characterized by HMBC. Unfortunately, the mixture could not be separated into pure diastereoisomer. This could be a direction to separate the racemic chiral clusters.

  3. An Automatic Clustering Technique for Optimal Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, K Karteeka; Rao, A V Dattatreya; 10.5121/ijcsea.2011.1412

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple, automatic and efficient clustering algorithm, namely, Automatic Merging for Optimal Clusters (AMOC) which aims to generate nearly optimal clusters for the given datasets automatically. The AMOC is an extension to standard k-means with a two phase iterative procedure combining certain validation techniques in order to find optimal clusters with automation of merging of clusters. Experiments on both synthetic and real data have proved that the proposed algorithm finds nearly optimal clustering structures in terms of number of clusters, compactness and separation.

  4. Angular momentum in cluster Spherical Collapse Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cupani, Guido; Mardirossian, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Our new formulation of the Spherical Collapse Model (SCM-L) takes into account the presence of angular momentum associated with the motion of galaxy groups infalling towards the centre of galaxy clusters. The angular momentum is responsible for an additional term in the dynamical equation which is useful to describe the evolution of the clusters in the non-equilibrium region which is investigated in the present paper. Our SCM-L can be used to predict the profiles of several strategic dynamical quantities as the radial and tangential velocities of member galaxies, and the total cluster mass. A good understanding of the non-equilibrium region is important since it is the natural scenario where to study the infall in galaxy clusters and the accretion phenomena present in these objects. Our results corroborate previous estimates and are in very good agreement with the analysis of recent observations and of simulated clusters.

  5. Clustering of Aerosols in Atmospheric Turbulent Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; L'vov, V; Liberman, M A; Rogachevskii, I

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism of formation of small-scale inhomogeneities in spatial distributions of aerosols and droplets associated with clustering instability in the atmospheric turbulent flow is discussed. The particle clustering is a consequence of a spontaneous breakdown of their homogeneous space distribution due to the clustering instability, and is caused by a combined effect of the particle inertia and a finite correlation time of the turbulent velocity field. In this paper a theoretical approach proposed in Phys. Rev. E 66, 036302 (2002) is further developed and applied to investigate the mechanisms of formation of small-scale aerosol inhomogeneities in the atmospheric turbulent flow. The theory of the particle clustering instability is extended to the case when the particle Stokes time is larger than the Kolmogorov time scale, but is much smaller than the correlation time at the integral scale of turbulence. We determined the criterion of the clustering instability for the Stokes number larger than 1. We discussed...

  6. On the Formation of cD Galaxies and their Parent Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, H M; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.22044.x

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of formation of cD galaxies we search for possible dependencies between the K-band luminosity of cDs and the parameters of their host clusters which we select to have a dominant cD galaxy, corresponding to a cluster morphology of Bautz-Morgan (BM) type I. As a comparison sample we use cD galaxies in clusters where they are not dominant, which we define here as non-BMI (NBMI) type clusters. We find that for 71 BMI clusters the absolute K-band luminosity of cDs depends on the cluster richness, but less strongly on the cluster velocity dispersion. Meanwhile, for 35 NBMI clusters the correlation between cD luminosity and cluster richness is weaker, and is absent between cD luminosity and velocity dispersion. In addition, we find that the luminosity of the cD galaxy hosted in BMI clusters tends to increase with the cD's peculiar velocity with respect to the cluster mean velocity. In contrast, for NBMI clusters the cD luminosity decreases with increasing peculiar velocity. Also, the ...

  7. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov;

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making...

  8. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  9. Kriging Interpolating Cosmic Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yu; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01

    [abridge] Volume-weighted statistics of large scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in mass-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number $n_k$ of the nearby particles to interpolate and the density $n_P$ of the observed sample are investigated. (1) We find that Kriging induces $1\\%$ and $3\\%$ systematics at $k\\sim 0.1h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ when $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-2} ({\\rm Mpc}/h)^{-3}$ and $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-3} ({\\rm Mpc...

  10. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS)

    CERN Document Server

    Halliday, C; Poirier, S; Poggianti, B M; Jablonka, P; Aragón-Salamanca, A; Saglia, R P; De Lucia, G; Pellò, R; Simard, L; Clowe, D I; Rudnick, G; Dalcanton, J J; White, S D M; Zaritsky, D

    2004-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 4 clusters at z = 0.7-0.8 and in one cluster at z~0.5 obtained with the FORS2 spectrograph on the VLT as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), a photometric and spectroscopic survey of 20 intermediate to high redshift clusters. We describe our target selection, mask design, observation and data reduction procedures, using these first 5 clusters to demonstrate how our strategies maximise the number of cluster members for which we obtain spectroscopy. We present catalogues containing positions, I-band magnitudes and spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the fields of our 5 clusters. These contain 236 cluster members, with the number of members per cluster ranging from 30 to 67. Our spectroscopic success rate, i.e. the fraction of spectroscopic targets which are cluster members, averages 50% and ranges from 30% to 75%. We use a robust biweight estimator to measure cluster velocity dispersions from our spectroscopic redshift samples. We also make a...

  11. Gravity-driven clustering of inertial particles in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongnam; Lee, Changhoon

    2014-06-01

    We report a different kind of particle clustering caused purely by gravity, discovered in our simulation of particle-laden turbulence. Clustering in a vertical strip pattern forms when strong gravity acts on heavy particles. This phenomenon is explained by the skewness of the flow velocity gradient in the gravitational direction experienced by particles, which causes horizontal convergence of particles.

  12. GEMINI-GMOS spectroscopy in the Antlia cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Faifer, F; Bassino, L P; Richtler, T; Cellone, S A

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a spectroscopic study performed in the Antlia cluster through GEMINI-GMOS data. We derived new radial velocities that allow us to confirm the cluster membership of several new faint galaxies, as well as to identify very interesting background objects.

  13. The dependence of sheet erosion velocity on slope angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method for estimating the erosion velocity on forested natural area. As a research object for testing the methodology the authors selected Neskuchny Garden - a city Park on the Moskva river embankment, named after the cognominal Palace of Catherine's age. Here, an almost horizontal surface III of the Moskva river terrace above the flood-plain is especially remarkable, accentuated by the steep sides of the ravine parallel to St. Andrew's, but short and nameless. The crests of the ravine sides are sharp, which is the evidence of its recent formation, but the old trees on the slopes indicate that it has not been growing for at least 100 years. Earlier Russian researchers defined vertical velocity of sheet erosion for different regions and slopes with different parent (in relation to the soil rocks. The comparison of the velocities shows that climatic conditions, in the first approximation, do not have a decisive influence on the erosion velocity of silt loam soils. The velocities on the shores of Issyk-Kul lake and in Moscow proved to be the same. But the composition of the parent rocks strongly affects the sheet erosion velocity. Even low-strength rock material reduces the velocity by times. Phytoindication method gives a real, physically explainable sheet erosion velocities. The speed is rather small but it should be considered when designing long-term structures on the slopes composed of dispersive soils. On the slopes composed of rocky soils sheet erosion velocity is so insignificant that it shouldn't be taken into account when designing. However, there may be other geological processes, significantly disturbing the stability of slopes connected with cracks.

  14. Peculiarities of {\\alpha}-element abundances in Galactic open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Marsakov, V A; Koval', V V; Shpigel', L V

    2016-01-01

    A catalog compiling the parameters of 346 open clusters, including their metallicities, positions, ages, and velocities has been composed. The elements of the Galactic orbits for 272 of the clusters have been calculated. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances, [el/Fe], for 14 elements synthesized in various nuclear processes averaged over data from 109 publications are presented for 90 clusters. Since no systematic effects distorting the relative abundances of the studied elements in these clusters have been found, these difference suggest real differences between clusters with high, elongated orbits and field stars. In particular, this supports the earlier conclusion, based on an analysis of the elements of the Galactic orbits, that some clusters formed as a result of interactions between high-velocity, metal-poor clouds and the interstellar medium of the Galactic thin disk. On average, clusterswith high, elongated orbits and metallicities ${\\rm [Fe/H]} - 0.1$ formed as a result of interact...

  15. Multiple Stellar Populations of Globular Clusters from Homogenous Ca by Photometry I. M22 (NGC 6656)

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the multiple stellar populations in one of peculiar globular clusters (GCs) M22 using new ground-based wide-field Ca by and HST/WFC3 photometry with equivalent passbands, confirming our previous result that M22 has a distinctive red-giant branch (RGB) split mainly due to difference in metal abundances. We also make use of radial velocity measurements of the large number of cluster membership stars by other. Our main results are followings. (i) The RGB and the subgiant branch (SGB) number ratios show that the calcium-weak (Ca-w) group is the dominant population of the cluster. However, an irreconcilable difference can be seen in the rather simple two horizontal branch (HB) classification by other. (ii) Each group has its own CN-CH anti-correlation. However, the alleged CN-CH positive correlation is likely illusive. (iii) The location of the RGB bump of the calcium-strong (Ca-s) group is significantly fainter, which may pose a challenge to the helium enhancement scenario in the Ca-s group. (iv) T...

  16. Stripping of a planetary nebula from the globular cluster M22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimier J.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Harrington, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    High-spatial resolution imaging in the O III lambda 5007 line of a planetary nebula (PN) in the globular cluster M22 reveals a strongly asymmetric (half-moon shaped) nebular morphology. We confirm that this peculiar morphology is caused by the distortion of stellar ejecta by the ram pressure of the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) through which the cluster is moving with a high velocity of 200 km/s. Emission knots visible in the leading (upstream) nebular section confirm theoretical expectations that the shell should have been fragmented by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Stripping of the PN from M22 by the ambient ISM is the first direct evidence for removal of gas from globular clusters. M22 is at a favorable location for the ram-pressure stripping to be effective, only 400 pc below the Galactic plane, well within a 2 kpc thick layer of ionized gas enveloping the plane. Ionized (or possibly neutral) gas in this layer, with a hydrogen density of about 0.1 cu/cm, is responsible for the observed interaction.

  17. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ˜3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics.

  18. Abundances, Stellar Parameters, and Spectra From the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Holtzman, Jon A; Johnson, Jennifer A; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Andrews, Brett; Beers, Timothy C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Bovy, Jo; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, Jessica; Perez, Ana E Garcia; Hernandez, D Anibal Garcia; Hasselquist, Sten; Hayden, Michael R; Hearty, Fred R; Ivans, Inese; Majewski, Steven R; Martell, Sarah; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nidever, David L; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; O'Connell, Robert W; Pan, Kaike; Pinsonneault, Marc; Robin, Annie C; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shane, Neville; Sobeck, Jennifer; Smith, Verne V; Troup, Nicholas; Weinberg, David H; Wilson, John C; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The SDSS-III/APOGEE survey operated from 2011-2014 using the APOGEE spectrograph, which collects high-resolution (R~22,500), near-IR (1.51-1.70 microns) spectra with a multiplexing (300 fiber-fed objects) capability. We describe the survey data products that are publicly available, which include catalogs with radial velocity, stellar parameters, and 15 elemental abundances for over 150,000 stars, as well as the more than 500,000 spectra from which these quantities are derived. Calibration relations for the stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [M/H], [alpha/M]) and abundances (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni) are presented and discussed. The internal scatter of the abundances within clusters indicates that abundance precision is generally between 0.05 and 0.09 dex across a broad temperature range; within more limited ranges and at high S/N, it is smaller for some elemental abundances. We assess the accuracy of the abundances using comparison of mean cluster metallicities with literature values...

  19. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  20. Hot and Turbulent Gas in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Wolfram; Niemeyer, Jens C; Almgren, Ann S

    2016-01-01

    The gas in galaxy clusters is heated by shock compression through accretion (outer shocks) and mergers (inner shocks). These processes additionally produce turbulence. To analyse the relation between the thermal and turbulent energies of the gas under the influence of non-adiabatic processes, we performed numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation in a box of 152 Mpc comoving size with radiative cooling, UV background, and a subgrid scale model for numerically unresolved turbulence. By smoothing the gas velocities with an adaptive Kalman filter, we are able to estimate bulk flows toward cluster cores. This enables us to infer the velocity dispersion associated with the turbulent fluctuation relative to the bulk flow. For halos with masses above $10^{13}\\,M_\\odot$, we find that the turbulent velocity dispersions averaged over the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and the intracluster medium (ICM) are approximately given by powers of the mean gas temperatures with exponents around 0.5, corresponding...

  1. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  2. Supersonic Motions of Galaxies in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Faltenbacher, A; Nagai, D; Gottlöber, S; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We study motions of galaxies in galaxy clusters formed in the concordance LCDM cosmology. We use high-resolution cosmological simulations that follow dynamics of dark matter and gas and include various physical processes critical for galaxy formation: gas cooling, heating and star formation. Analysing motions of galaxies and the properties of intracluster gas in the sample of eight simulated clusters at z=0, we study velocity dispersion profiles of the dark matter, gas, and galaxies. We measure the mean velocity of galaxy motions and gas sound speed as a function of radius and calculate the average Mach number of galaxy motions. The simulations show that galaxies, on average, move supersonically with the average Mach number of ~1.4, approximately independent of the cluster-centric radius. The supersonic motions of galaxies may potentially provide an important source of heating for the intracluster gas by driving weak shocks and via dynamical friction, although these heating processes appear to be inefficient ...

  3. Heavy hitters via cluster-preserving clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nelson, Jelani; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2016-01-01

    , providing correctness whp. In fact, a simpler version of our algorithm for p = 1 in the strict turnstile model answers queries even faster than the "dyadic trick" by roughly a log n factor, dominating it in all regards. Our main innovation is an efficient reduction from the heavy hitters to a clustering...... problem in which each heavy hitter is encoded as some form of noisy spectral cluster in a much bigger graph, and the goal is to identify every cluster. Since every heavy hitter must be found, correctness requires that every cluster be found. We thus need a "cluster-preserving clustering" algorithm......, that partitions the graph into clusters with the promise of not destroying any original cluster. To do this we first apply standard spectral graph partitioning, and then we use some novel combinatorial techniques to modify the cuts obtained so as to make sure that the original clusters are sufficiently preserved...

  4. The type III manufactory

    CERN Document Server

    Palcoux, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Using unusual objects in the theory of von Neumann algebra, as the chinese game Go or the Conway game of life (generalized on finitely presented groups), we are able to build, by hands, many type III factors.

  5. Crust and upper mantle velocity structure of the northwestern Indian Peninsular Shield from inter-station phase velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddale Suresh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We measure the inter-station Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocities across the northwestern Indian Peninsular shield (NW-IP through cross-correlation and invert these velocities to evaluate the underneath crust and upper mantle velocity structure down to 400 km. We consider a cluster of three stations in the northern tip of the Peninsula and another cluster of eight stations in the south. We measure phase velocities along 28 paths for Rayleigh waves and 17 paths for Love waves joining two stations with one from each cluster and using broadband records of earthquakes which lie nearly on the great circle joining the pair of stations. The phase velocities are in the period range of 10 to 275 s for Rayleigh waves and of 10 to 120 s for Love waves. The isotropic model obtained through inversion of the phase velocities indicates 199.1 km thick lithosphere with 3-layered crust of thickness 36.3 km; the top two layers have nearly same velocities and both constitute the upper crust with thickness of 12.6 km. The upper crust is mafic, whereas the lower crust is felsic. In the mantle lid, velocities increase with depth. The velocities of mantle lid beneath NW-IP is lower than those beneath south Indian Peninsula showing the former is hotter than the later perhaps due to large Phanerozoic impact on NW-IP. The significant upper mantle low velocity zone beneath NW-IP indicates high temperature which could be attributed to the past existence of a broad plume head at the west-central part of the Peninsula.

  6. New cluster members and halo stars of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851

    CERN Document Server

    Navin, Colin A; Zucker, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1851 is an intriguing Galactic globular cluster, with multiple stellar evolutionary sequences, light and heavy element abundance variations and indications of a surrounding stellar halo. We present the first results of a spectroscopic study of red giant stars within and outside of the tidal radius of this cluster. Our results identify nine probable new cluster members (inside the tidal radius) with heliocentric radial velocities consistent with that of NGC 1851. We also identify, based on their radial velocities, four probable extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ~3.1 times the tidal radius, which are supportive of previous findings that NGC 1851 is surrounded by an extended stellar halo. Proper motions were available for 12 of these 13 stars and all are consistent with that of NGC 1851. Apart from the cluster members and cluster halo stars, our observed radial velocity distribution agrees with the expected distribution from a Besancon disk/N-body stellar halo Milky Way model generated by the ...

  7. Radial velocity curve of the spectroscopic binary HD 25639 (ADS 2984A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the reduction of our observations for the spectroscopic binary ADS 2984A (B0 II-B0 III), which along with its visual component ADS 2984B (SZ Cam) are the brightest members of the open star cluster NGC 1502. The spectroscopic data were obtained with a fiber-fed echelle spectrograph ( R = 15 000) at the 1.2-m telescope of the Astronomical Observatory of the Ural Federal University. The period of ADS 2984A ( P orb = 57.24 ± 0.05 days) has been found for the first time. This spectroscopic binary is shown to belong to the SB1 type. We have determined the parameters of the radial velocity curve for the visible spectroscopic component, V 0 = -5.5 ± 1.2 km s-1 and K = 41.5 ± 1.7 km s-1. The lower mass limit for the invisible spectroscopic component has been estimated to be 5M_ ⊙ . Evidence for the presence of a stellar wind outflowing from the surface of this blue giant is presented.

  8. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain un