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Sample records for clusters iii testing

  1. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  2. A mixed methods protocol for developing and testing implementation strategies for evidence-based obesity prevention in childcare: a cluster randomized hybrid type III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Taren; Johnson, Susan L; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Curran, Geoffrey M

    2017-07-18

    Despite the potential to reach at-risk children in childcare, there is a significant gap between current practices and evidence-based obesity prevention in this setting. There are few investigations of the impact of implementation strategies on the uptake of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for obesity prevention and nutrition promotion. This study protocol describes a three-phase approach to developing and testing implementation strategies to support uptake of EBPs for obesity prevention practices in childcare (i.e., key components of the WISE intervention). Informed by the i-PARIHS framework, we will use a stakeholder-driven evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) process to apply information gathered in qualitative interviews on barriers and facilitators to practice to inform the design of implementation strategies. Then, a Hybrid Type III cluster randomized trial will compare a basic implementation strategy (i.e., intervention as usual) with an enhanced implementation strategy informed by stakeholders. All Head Start centers (N = 12) within one agency in an urban area in a southern state in the USA will be randomized to receive the basic or enhanced implementation with approximately 20 classrooms per group (40 educators, 400 children per group). The educators involved in the study, the data collectors, and the biostastician will be blinded to the study condition. The basic and enhanced implementation strategies will be compared on outcomes specified by the RE-AIM model (e.g., Reach to families, Effectiveness of impact on child diet and health indicators, Adoption commitment of agency, Implementation fidelity and acceptability, and Maintenance after 6 months). Principles of formative evaluation will be used throughout the hybrid trial. This study will test a stakeholder-driven approach to improve implementation, fidelity, and maintenance of EBPs for obesity prevention in childcare. Further, this study provides an example of a systematic process to develop

  3. Incremental Criterion Validity of the WJ-III COG Clinical Clusters: Marginal Predictive Effects beyond the General Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the clinical clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III ACH). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 4,722) drawn from the nationally representative WJ-III…

  4. A cluster randomized Hybrid Type III trial testing an implementation support strategy to facilitate the use of an evidence-based practice in VA homeless programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelson, David A; Chinman, Matthew; McCarthy, Sharon; Hannah, Gordon; Sawh, Leon; Glickman, Mark

    2015-05-28

    The Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program is one of the largest initiatives to end Veteran homelessness. However, mental health and substance use disorders continue to reduce client stability and impede program success. HUD-VASH programs do not consistently employ evidence-based practices that address co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. This paper presents a study protocol to evaluate the implementation of an evidence-based, co-occurring disorder treatment called Maintaining Independence and Sobriety Through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking-Veterans Edition (MISSION-Vet) in HUD-VASH using an implementation strategy called Getting To Outcomes (GTO). In three large VA Medical Centers, this Hybrid Type III trial will randomize case managers and their clients by HUD-VASH sub-teams to receive either MISSION-Vet Implementation as Usual (IU-standard training and access to the MISSION-Vet treatment manuals) or MISSION-Vet implementation augmented by GTO. In addition to testing GTO, effectiveness of the treatment (MISSION-Vet) will be assessed using existing Veteran-level data from the HUD-VASH data monitoring system. This project will compare GTO and IU case managers and their clients on the following variables: (1) fidelity to the MISSION-Vet intervention; (2) proportion of time the Veteran is housed; (3) mental health, substance use, and functional outcomes among Veterans; and (4) factors key to the successful deployment of a new treatment as specified by the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) model. This project is an important step for developing an implementation strategy to increase adoption of evidence-based practice use in VA homeless programs, and to further examine efficacy of MISSION-Vet in HUD-VASH. This project has important implications for program managers, policy makers, and researchers within the homelessness field. VA Central IRB approval

  5. Integration of Openstack cloud resources in BES III computing cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Cheng, Yaodong; Huang, Qiulan; Cheng, Zhenjing; Shi, Jingyan

    2017-10-01

    Cloud computing provides a new technical means for data processing of high energy physics experiment. However, the resource of each queue is fixed and the usage of the resource is static in traditional job management system. In order to make it simple and transparent for physicist to use, we developed a virtual cluster system (vpmanager) to integrate IHEPCloud and different batch systems such as Torque and HTCondor. Vpmanager provides dynamic virtual machines scheduling according to the job queue. The BES III use case results show that resource efficiency is greatly improved.

  6. Doublet III construction and engineering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Progress during FY-78 on the construction and operation of the Doublet III is reported. Detailed discussions about the installation and testing of various components and subsystems, including the B-coil, E-coil, F-coils and support structure, vacuum vessel, vacuum pumping system, limiter, thermal insulation blanket, control system, B-coil power system, E-coil power system, F-coil power system, and motor-generator, are presented. A brief review of the engineering test operation is given

  7. Calix[4]arene supported clusters: a dimer of [Mn(III)Mn(II)] dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D; Beavers, Christine M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphinate ligands allow for the transformation of a calix[4]arene supported [Mn(III)(2)Mn(II)(2)] tetramer cluster motif into an unusual [Mn(III)Mn(II)](2) dimer of dimers; the clusters self-assemble in the crystal to form bi-layer arrays reminiscent of the typical packing of calixarene solvates....

  8. A Hybrid III stepped wedge cluster randomized trial testing an implementation strategy to facilitate the use of an evidence-based practice in VA Homeless Primary Care Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Molly M; Gabrielian, Sonya; Byrne, Thomas; McCullough, Megan B; Smith, Jeffery L; Taylor, Thom J; O'Toole, Tom P; Kane, Vincent; Yakovchenko, Vera; McInnes, D Keith; Smelson, David A

    2017-04-04

    Homeless veterans often have multiple health care and psychosocial needs, including assistance with access to housing and health care, as well as support for ongoing treatment engagement. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) developed specialized Homeless Patient Alignment Care Teams (HPACT) with the goal of offering an integrated, "one-stop program" to address housing and health care needs of homeless veterans. However, while 70% of HPACT's veteran enrollees have co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, HPACT does not have a uniform, embedded treatment protocol for this subpopulation. One wraparound intervention designed to address the needs of homeless veterans with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders which is suitable to be integrated into HPACT clinic sites is the evidence-based practice called Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking-Veterans Edition, or MISSION-Vet. Despite the promise of MISSION-Vet within HPACT clinics, implementation of an evidence-based intervention within a busy program like HPACT can be difficult. The current study is being undertaken to identify an appropriate implementation strategy for MISSION-Vet within HPACT. The study will test the implementation platform called Facilitation and compared to implementation as usual (IU). The aims of this study are as follows: (1) Compare the extent to which IU or Facilitation strategies achieve fidelity to the MISSION-Vet intervention as delivered by HPACT homeless provider staff. (2) Compare the effects of Facilitation and IU strategies on the National HPACT Performance Measures. (3) Compare the effects of IU and Facilitation on the permanent housing status. (4) Identify and describe key stakeholders' (patients, providers, staff) experiences with, and perspectives on, the barriers to, and facilitators of implementing MISSION. Type III Hybrid modified stepped wedge implementation comparing IU to Facilitation

  9. Testing cosmology with galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapetti Serra, David Angelo

    2011-01-01

    PASCOS 2011 will be held in Cambridge UK. The conference will be hosted by the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology (DAMTP) at the Mathematical Sciences site in the University of Cambridge. The aim of the conference is to explore and develop synergies between particle physics, string theory and cosmo......PASCOS 2011 will be held in Cambridge UK. The conference will be hosted by the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology (DAMTP) at the Mathematical Sciences site in the University of Cambridge. The aim of the conference is to explore and develop synergies between particle physics, string theory...... and cosmology. There will be an emphasis on timely interdisciplinary topics: • critical tests of inflationary cosmology • advances in fundamental cosmology • applications of string theory (AdS/CMT) • particle and string phenomenology • new experimental particle physics results • and cosmological probes...

  10. Cobalt(III)-oxo cubane clusters as catalysts for oxidation of organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    been prepared by a general method and these have been characterized by analytical, spectroscopic, electro- chemical and ... alkylaromatics, alkenes and alcohols.1 Several indus- .... us to obtain the cobalt(III)-oxo clusters in good to very.

  11. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with langzrang = 0.55 derived from 400 deg2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ≈ 0.05 clusters...

  12. Rapid identification of Enterobacter hormaechei and Enterobacter cloacae genetic cluster III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohad, S; Block, C; Kravitz, V; Farber, A; Pilo, S; Breuer, R; Rorman, E

    2014-05-01

    Enterobacter cloacae complex bacteria are of both clinical and environmental importance. Phenotypic methods are unable to distinguish between some of the species in this complex, which often renders their identification incomplete. The goal of this study was to develop molecular assays to identify Enterobacter hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III which are relatively frequently encountered in clinical material. The molecular assays developed in this study are qPCR technology based and served to identify both Ent. hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III. qPCR results were compared to hsp60 sequence analysis. Most clinical isolates were assigned to Ent. hormaechei subsp. steigerwaltii and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III. The latter was proportionately more frequently isolated from bloodstream infections than from other material (P < 0·05). The qPCR assays detecting Ent. hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. The presented qPCR assays allow accurate and rapid identification of clinical isolates of the Ent. cloacae complex. The improved identifications obtained can specifically assist analysis of Ent. hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III in nosocomial outbreaks and can promote rapid environmental monitoring. An association was observed between Ent. cloacae cluster III and systemic infection that deserves further attention. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. CHANDRA CLUSTER COSMOLOGY PROJECT III: COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER CONSTRAINTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.; Voevodkin, A.; Ebeling, H.; Hornstrup, A.; Nagai, D.; Quintana, H.

    2009-01-01

    Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with (z) = 0.55 derived from 400 deg 2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ∼ 0.05 clusters detected in the All-Sky Survey. Evolution of the mass function between these redshifts requires Ω Λ > 0 with a ∼5σ significance, and constrains the dark energy equation-of-state parameter to w 0 = -1.14 ± 0.21, assuming a constant w and a flat universe. Cluster information also significantly improves constraints when combined with other methods. Fitting our cluster data jointly with the latest supernovae, Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements, we obtain w 0 = -0.991 ± 0.045 (stat) ±0.039 (sys), a factor of 1.5 reduction in statistical uncertainties, and nearly a factor of 2 improvement in systematics compared with constraints that can be obtained without clusters. The joint analysis of these four data sets puts a conservative upper limit on the masses of light neutrinos Σm ν M h and σ 8 from the low-redshift cluster mass function.

  14. Deep CCD photometry in globular clusters III. M15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlman, G.G.; Richer, H.B.; Vandenberg, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    CCD photometry in U, B, and V is presented for a 5' x 3' field in the globular cluster M15. The location of the main sequence in the color-magnitude diagram is found here to be significantly bluer than previous studies have indicated. The luminosity function of the cluster is studied down to V = 22.8 (Mroughly-equal7.5) and shown to be consistent with a power-law mass function, n(M) = QM/sup -alpha/ with α = 2.5 +- 1.0, to the limit of our data. The field star population brighter than V = 21.5, is examined in some detail. There appears to be about 50% more stars belonging to the disk in the field as compared with the Bahcall-Soneira standard galaxy model. The reddening to the cluster is found to be E(B-V) = 0.11 +- 0.04 from nine bright field stars. A new value for the ultraviolet excess of the cluster main-sequence stars is obtained, delta(0.6) = 0.25 +- 0.02, and confirms the well-known fact that M15 is among the metal poorest of the globular clusters

  15. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f R0 | < 6 × 10 −5 , which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales

  16. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, 739-8526 (Japan); Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C., E-mail: telkina@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk, E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup −5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  17. Hydrogen-Mediated Nitrogen Clustering in Dilute III-V Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Limpijumnong, Sukit; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-08-01

    First-principles calculation reveals multi-N clusters to be the ground states for hydrogenated N in dilute III-V nitrides. While hydrogenation of a single N, forming H2*(N), can relax the large strain induced by the size-mismatched N, formation of the clusters will relax the strain even more effectively. This suppresses the formation of H2*(N), the existence of which has recently been debated. More importantly, postgrowth dehydrogenation of the N-H clusters provides an explanation to the observed metastable bare N clusters in GaAsN grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy or metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  18. Variable Stars in Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Clusters. III. Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Dame, Kyra; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Márcio; Jeon, Young-Beom; Nemec, James M.; Walker, Alistair R.; Kunder, Andrea; Pritzl, Barton J.; De Lee, Nathan; Borissova, Jura

    2013-06-01

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the variable stars in old globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The primary goal of this series is to look at how the characteristics and behavior of RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to those of their counterparts in Oosterhoff-I/II systems. In this paper we present the results of our new time-series BVI photometric study of the globular cluster Reticulum. We found a total of 32 variables stars (22 RRab, 4 RRc, and 6 RRd stars) in our field of view. We present photometric parameters and light curves for these stars. We also present physical properties, derived from Fourier analysis of light curves, for some of the RR Lyrae stars. We discuss the Oosterhoff classification of Reticulum and use our results to re-derive the distance modulus and age of the cluster. Based on observations taken with the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium and observations taken at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  19. Testing the Large-scale Environments of Cool-core and Non-cool-core Clusters with Clustering Bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medezinski, Elinor; Battaglia, Nicholas; Cen, Renyue; Gaspari, Massimo; Strauss, Michael A.; Spergel, David N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Coupon, Jean, E-mail: elinorm@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva, ch. dEcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland)

    2017-02-10

    There are well-observed differences between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters, but the origin of this distinction is still largely unknown. Competing theories can be divided into internal (inside-out), in which internal physical processes transform or maintain the NCC phase, and external (outside-in), in which the cluster type is determined by its initial conditions, which in turn leads to different formation histories (i.e., assembly bias). We propose a new method that uses the relative assembly bias of CC to NCC clusters, as determined via the two-point cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function (CCF), to test whether formation history plays a role in determining their nature. We apply our method to 48 ACCEPT clusters, which have well resolved central entropies, and cross-correlate with the SDSS-III/BOSS LOWZ galaxy catalog. We find that the relative bias of NCC over CC clusters is b = 1.42 ± 0.35 (1.6 σ different from unity). Our measurement is limited by the small number of clusters with core entropy information within the BOSS footprint, 14 CC and 34 NCC clusters. Future compilations of X-ray cluster samples, combined with deep all-sky redshift surveys, will be able to better constrain the relative assembly bias of CC and NCC clusters and determine the origin of the bimodality.

  20. Testing the Large-scale Environments of Cool-core and Non-cool-core Clusters with Clustering Bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medezinski, Elinor; Battaglia, Nicholas; Cen, Renyue; Gaspari, Massimo; Strauss, Michael A.; Spergel, David N.; Coupon, Jean

    2017-01-01

    There are well-observed differences between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters, but the origin of this distinction is still largely unknown. Competing theories can be divided into internal (inside-out), in which internal physical processes transform or maintain the NCC phase, and external (outside-in), in which the cluster type is determined by its initial conditions, which in turn leads to different formation histories (i.e., assembly bias). We propose a new method that uses the relative assembly bias of CC to NCC clusters, as determined via the two-point cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function (CCF), to test whether formation history plays a role in determining their nature. We apply our method to 48 ACCEPT clusters, which have well resolved central entropies, and cross-correlate with the SDSS-III/BOSS LOWZ galaxy catalog. We find that the relative bias of NCC over CC clusters is b = 1.42 ± 0.35 (1.6 σ different from unity). Our measurement is limited by the small number of clusters with core entropy information within the BOSS footprint, 14 CC and 34 NCC clusters. Future compilations of X-ray cluster samples, combined with deep all-sky redshift surveys, will be able to better constrain the relative assembly bias of CC and NCC clusters and determine the origin of the bimodality.

  1. A Test for Cluster Bias: Detecting Violations of Measurement Invariance across Clusters in Multilevel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a test for cluster bias, which can be used to detect violations of measurement invariance across clusters in 2-level data. We show how measurement invariance assumptions across clusters imply measurement invariance across levels in a 2-level factor model. Cluster bias is investigated by testing whether the within-level factor loadings…

  2. Trinuclear rhenium(III) halide clusters with carboxylate ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Jeffrey Steven

    Four mono(carboxylato)trirhenium complexes and three bis(carboxylato)trirhenium complexes have been synthesized and characterized, principally by mass spectrometry, with supporting evidence from X-ray diffraction. These compounds represent the first trinuclear rhenium carboxylate complexes. The reactions generally proceed readily under comparatively mild conditions. Mass spectrometry has again proved its usefulness as a technique in the field of metal cluster chemistry, having provided the initial identification of the products of the reactions studied. These compounds provide a further base to which future mass spectra of metal cluster compounds can be compared. Re-examination of a reaction reported by Taha and Wilkinson has also cast considerable doubt onto the validity of a conversion widely reported in the literature that transforms (Re3Cl9) x into [Re2(O2CCH3)4Cl 2]. We believe that the literature result is a consequence of the purity of the metal precursor, and suggest that the starting material in the earlier work may have contained ReCl4 or ReCl5. The importance of mass spectrometry in the characterization of the new compounds synthesized in this project has led to a thorough study of calculated isotopic distributions. The information gathered suggests that for isotopically simple molecules, the choice of algorithm for computing an isotopic distribution is unimportant. However, it is important to compute the mass spectrum of an isotopically complex molecule using an algorithm that can, if desired, show the underlying isotopic fine structure of a peak of interest. In the last chapter of this thesis, the results of a project in chemistry education research are presented. Predicting the success of students in general chemistry has long been of interest to the chemistry education community, and several factors have been identified as contributing factors. An off-hand comment by a student inspired an examination of whether continuity with the same instructor for

  3. Irradiation test of FPGA for BES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yixin; Liang Hao; Xue Jundong; Liu Baoying; Liu Qiang; Yu Xiaoqi; Zhou Yongzhao; Hou Long

    2005-01-01

    The irradiation effect of FPGA, applied in Front-end Electronics for experiments of High-Energy Physics, is a serious problem. The performance of FPGA, used in the front-end card of Muon Counters of BES III project, needs to be evaluated under irradiation. SEUs on Altera ACEX 1K FPGA, observed in the experiment under the irradiation of γ ray, 14 and 2.5 MeV neutrons, was investigated. The authors calculated involved cross-section and provided reasonable analysis and evaluation for the result of the experiment. The conclusion about feasibility of applying ACEX 1K FPGA in the front-end card of the readout system of Muon Counters for BES III was given. (authors)

  4. A heptadecanuclear Mn(III)9Dy(III)8 cluster derived from triethanolamine with two edge sharing supertetrahedra as the core and displaying SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Moubarakia, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2010-06-07

    A heterometallic, heptadecanuclear cluster of formula [Mn(III)9Dy(III)8O8(OH)8(tea)2(teaH)2(teaH2)4(Ac)4(NO3)2(H2O)4](NO3)7·8H2O (1) is reported. The core of 1 displays two edge sharing Mn(III)5Dy(III)5 supertetrahedra and represents one of the largest Mn/4f cluster compound so far reported. Magnetic studies show that 1 displays probable SMM behaviour as observed via non-zero values in the χM''vs T plot.

  5. Experimental Tests of the Algebraic Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Moshe

    2018-02-01

    The Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) of Bijker and Iachello that was proposed already in 2000 has been recently applied to 12C and 16O with much success. We review the current status in 12C with the outstanding observation of the ground state rotational band composed of the spin-parity states of: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4± and 5-. The observation of the 4± parity doublet is a characteristic of (tri-atomic) molecular configuration where the three alpha- particles are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration of a symmetric spinning top. We discuss future measurement with electron scattering, 12C(e,e’) to test the predicted B(Eλ) of the ACM.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Clusters of galaxies in SDSS-III (Wen+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.; Liu, F. S.

    2012-06-01

    Wen et al. (2009, Cat. J/ApJS/183/197) identified 39668 galaxy clusters from the SDSS DR6 by the discrimination of member galaxies of clusters using photometric redshifts of galaxies. Wen & Han (2011ApJ...734...68W) improved the method and successfully identified the high-redshift clusters from the deep fields of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Wide survey, the CHFT Deep survey, the Cosmic Evolution Survey, and the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey. Here, we follow and improve the algorithm to identify clusters from SDSS-III (SDSS Data Release 8; Aihara et al. 2011ApJS..193...29A, see Cat. II/306). (1 data file).

  7. Hydrogen-mediated Nitrogen Clustering in Dilute III-V Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, M.-H.; Limpijumnong, S.; Zhang, S. B

    2006-01-01

    First-principles calculation reveals multi-N clusters to be the ground states for hydrogenated N in dilute III-V nitrides. While hydrogenation of a single N, forming H*{sub 2}(N), can relax the large strain induced by the size-mismatched N, formation of the clusters will relax the strain even more effectively. This suppresses the formation of H*{sub 2}(N), the existence of which has recently been debated. More importantly, postgrowth dehydrogenation of the N-H clusters provides an explanation to the observed metastable bare N clusters in GaAsN grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy or metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  8. Structure and Magnetic Properties of a Dodecanuclear Twisted-Ring Iron(III) Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneschi, Andrea; Cornia, Andrea; Fabretti, Antonio C; Gatteschi, Dante

    1999-05-03

    An unprecedented nonplanar structure characterizes the complex [Fe(OCH 3 ) 2 (dbm)] 12 (on the left in the picture), which contains the largest cyclic ferric cluster yet reported with chemically equivalent bridging units. It is made up of twelve high-spin, antiferromagnetically coupled iron(III) centers and neatly reacts with Na I or Li I templates in organic solution to give hexairon(III) coronates (right). Fe=•, O=○, NaI or LiI=• Hdbm=dibenzoylmethane. © 1999 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  9. SMORN-III benchmark test on reactor noise analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Hirota, Jitsuya

    1984-02-01

    A computational benchmark test was performed in conjunction with the Third Specialists Meeting on Reactor Noise (SMORN-III) which was held in Tokyo, Japan in October 1981. This report summarizes the results of the test as well as the works made for preparation of the test. (author)

  10. Portrait Of Portugal’s Nut Iii Regions In Productive Location Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Lopes de souse Diniz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to piece together a picture of Portuguese regions at the end of the first decade of the twenty-first century. In particular, the authors tried to group NUT III regions according to the location of productive activities bearing in mind employment and other economic and social indicators, namely productivity and purchasing power, as well as competitiveness and environmental quality indicators. Using clusters, it was possible to obtain a map of Portugal containing 6 cluster typologies. Clearly, at one end of these typologies are the regions where tertiary activities are predominant and where there is more purchasing power, productivity and competitiveness, causing, however, more damages to the environment, whereas at the other end are the rural less competitive regions with a lower purchasing power but environmentally more attractive. In between, there are other situations which are also looked into.

  11. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype

  12. Testing the accuracy of clustering redshifts with simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottez, V.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Mellier, Y.

    2018-03-01

    We explore the accuracy of clustering-based redshift inference within the MICE2 simulation. This method uses the spatial clustering of galaxies between a spectroscopic reference sample and an unknown sample. This study give an estimate of the reachable accuracy of this method. First, we discuss the requirements for the number objects in the two samples, confirming that this method does not require a representative spectroscopic sample for calibration. In the context of next generation of cosmological surveys, we estimated that the density of the Quasi Stellar Objects in BOSS allows us to reach 0.2 per cent accuracy in the mean redshift. Secondly, we estimate individual redshifts for galaxies in the densest regions of colour space ( ˜ 30 per cent of the galaxies) without using the photometric redshifts procedure. The advantage of this procedure is threefold. It allows: (i) the use of cluster-zs for any field in astronomy, (ii) the possibility to combine photo-zs and cluster-zs to get an improved redshift estimation, (iii) the use of cluster-z to define tomographic bins for weak lensing. Finally, we explore this last option and build five cluster-z selected tomographic bins from redshift 0.2 to 1. We found a bias on the mean redshift estimate of 0.002 per bin. We conclude that cluster-z could be used as a primary redshift estimator by next generation of cosmological surveys.

  13. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  14. THE CHEMISTRY OF POPULATION III SUPERNOVA EJECTA. II. THE NUCLEATION OF MOLECULAR CLUSTERS AS A DIAGNOSTIC FOR DUST IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherchneff, Isabelle; Dwek, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We study the formation of molecular precursors to dust in the ejecta of Population III supernovae (Pop. III SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach to follow the evolution of small dust cluster abundances from day 100 to day 1000 after explosion. Our work focuses on zero-metallicity 20 M sun and 170 M sun progenitors, and we consider fully macroscopically mixed and unmixed ejecta. The dust precursors comprise molecular chains, rings, and small clusters of chemical composition relevant to the initial elemental composition of the ejecta under study. The nucleation stage for small silica, metal oxides and sulfides, pure metal, and carbon clusters is described with a new chemical reaction network highly relevant to the kinetic description of dust formation in hot circumstellar environments. We consider the effect of the pressure dependence of critical nucleation rates and test the impact of microscopically mixed He + on carbon dust formation. Two cases of metal depletion on silica clusters (full and no depletion) are considered to derive upper limits to the amounts of dust produced in SN ejecta at 1000 days, while the chemical composition of clusters gives a prescription for the type of dust formed in Pop. III SNe. We show that the cluster mass produced in the fully mixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor is ∼ 25 M sun whereas its 20 M sun counterpart forms ∼ 0.16 M sun of clusters. The unmixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor SN synthesize ∼5.6 M sun of small clusters, while its 20 M sun counterpart produces ∼0.103 M sun . Our results point to smaller amounts of dust formed in the ejecta of Pop. III SNe by a factor of ∼ 5 compared to values derived by previous studies, and to different dust chemical compositions. Such deviations result from some erroneous assumptions made, the inappropriate use of classical nucleation theory to model dust formation, and the omission of the synthesis of molecules in SN ejecta. We also find that the unmixed ejecta of massive Pop

  15. The Chemistry of Population III Supernova Ejecta. II. The Nucleation of Molecular Clusters as a Diagnostic for Dust in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherchneff, Isabelle; Dwek, Eli

    2010-04-01

    We study the formation of molecular precursors to dust in the ejecta of Population III supernovae (Pop. III SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach to follow the evolution of small dust cluster abundances from day 100 to day 1000 after explosion. Our work focuses on zero-metallicity 20 M sun and 170 M sun progenitors, and we consider fully macroscopically mixed and unmixed ejecta. The dust precursors comprise molecular chains, rings, and small clusters of chemical composition relevant to the initial elemental composition of the ejecta under study. The nucleation stage for small silica, metal oxides and sulfides, pure metal, and carbon clusters is described with a new chemical reaction network highly relevant to the kinetic description of dust formation in hot circumstellar environments. We consider the effect of the pressure dependence of critical nucleation rates and test the impact of microscopically mixed He+ on carbon dust formation. Two cases of metal depletion on silica clusters (full and no depletion) are considered to derive upper limits to the amounts of dust produced in SN ejecta at 1000 days, while the chemical composition of clusters gives a prescription for the type of dust formed in Pop. III SNe. We show that the cluster mass produced in the fully mixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor is ~ 25 M sun whereas its 20 M sun counterpart forms ~ 0.16 M sun of clusters. The unmixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor SN synthesize ~5.6 M sun of small clusters, while its 20 M sun counterpart produces ~0.103 M sun. Our results point to smaller amounts of dust formed in the ejecta of Pop. III SNe by a factor of ~ 5 compared to values derived by previous studies, and to different dust chemical compositions. Such deviations result from some erroneous assumptions made, the inappropriate use of classical nucleation theory to model dust formation, and the omission of the synthesis of molecules in SN ejecta. We also find that the unmixed ejecta of massive Pop. III SNe

  16. Experimental results of some cluster tests in NSRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shinsho; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Yoshimura, Tomio; Lussie, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    The NSRR programme is in progress in JAERI using a pulsed reactor to evaluate the behavior of reactor fuels under reactivity accident conditions. This report describes briefly the experimental results and preliminary analysis of two cluster tests. In the cluster configuration of five fuel rods, the power distribution in outer fuel rods are not symmetric due to neutron absorption in central fuel rod. The cladding temperature on the exterior boundaries of the cluster is higher than that in interior. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and measured cladding temperature histories. In the 3.8$ excess reactivity test, cluster averaged energy deposition of 237 cal/g.UO 2 , cladding melting and deformation were limited to the portions of the fuel rods that were on the exterior boundaries of the cluster. (auth.)

  17. Experiment data of ROSA-III integral test Run 7341

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Soda, Kunihisa; Tasaka, Kanji

    1983-02-01

    This report presents the test data of Run 7341 in the single failure test series of the ROSA-III program to conduct the system effect test concerning the response of a BWR during a LOCA with the ECC injection. The ROSA-III test facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) system of the BWR/6 with an electrically heated core and the scaled ECCS. Run 7341 is a double-ended break test at the recirculation pump inlet with the assumption that all ECCS function as designed. The test is initiated with the steam dome pressure of 7.28 MPa, the lower plenum subcooling of 11.0 K, the core inlet flow rate of 15.3 kg/s, and the core heat generation rate of 3.55 MW and proceeded as planned. The whole core is quenched after the ECCS actuation and the maximum fuel cladding temperature is 810 K. The effectiveness of ECC injection has been clarified from the comparison of the test results with those of the other test in the series without ECCS. (author)

  18. Old star clusters: Bench tests of low mass stellar models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaris M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Old star clusters in the Milky Way and external galaxies have been (and still are traditionally used to constrain the age of the universe and the timescales of galaxy formation. A parallel avenue of old star cluster research considers these objects as bench tests of low-mass stellar models. This short review will highlight some recent tests of stellar evolution models that make use of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved old star clusters. In some cases these tests have pointed to additional physical processes efficient in low-mass stars, that are not routinely included in model computations. Moreover, recent results from the Kepler mission about the old open cluster NGC6791 are adding new tight constraints to the models.

  19. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III Testing. This procedure will test the sealing integrity of the Flexible Receiver System to ensure that release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from tank SY-101

  20. CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth; Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Seo, Hee-Jong; De Putter, Roland; Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Saito, Shun; Schlafly, Eddie; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Blanton, Michael; Skibba, Ramin; Schneider, Don; Mena, Olga; Viel, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    spectra give consistent constraints on cosmological models when compared with pre-systematic correction power spectra in the angular scales of interest. The SDSS-III Data Release 8 (SDSS-III DR8) Angular Clustering Data allow a wide range of investigations into the cosmological model, cosmic expansion (via BAO), Gaussianity of initial conditions, and neutrino masses. Here, we refer to our companion papers for further investigations using the clustering data. Our calculation of the survey selection function, systematics maps, and likelihood function for the COSMOMC package will be released at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/boss/galaxy/photoz/.

  1. CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50R-5045, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlafly, Eddie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St. MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon (CEFCA), Plaza de San Juan 1, planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Sanchez, Ariel G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Don [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: cwho@lbl.gov [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2012-12-10

    surveys such as the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) and WiggleZ. We also find that systematic-corrected power spectra give consistent constraints on cosmological models when compared with pre-systematic correction power spectra in the angular scales of interest. The SDSS-III Data Release 8 (SDSS-III DR8) Angular Clustering Data allow a wide range of investigations into the cosmological model, cosmic expansion (via BAO), Gaussianity of initial conditions, and neutrino masses. Here, we refer to our companion papers for further investigations using the clustering data. Our calculation of the survey selection function, systematics maps, and likelihood function for the COSMOMC package will be released at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/boss/galaxy/photoz/.

  2. Doublet III neutral beam injector test tank cryopanel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Arend, P.V.

    1980-03-01

    A simple condensing cryopanel has been designed for the Doublet III neutral beam test tank with a 320,000 liters per second pumping capacity for hydrogen. This maintains a vacuum in the test tank which simulates the Doublet III vessel, 1.3 x 10 -3 Pa (approx.10 -5 torr). The hydrogen gas load comes from the beam striking the test tank calorimeter and amounts to about 7.2 torr liters per second. The cryopanel is cylindrical shaped with a liquid helium (LHe) surface that pumps through liquid nitrogen (LN) cooled aluminum chevrons located in squirrel-cage fashion around the inside surface of the cylinder. The LHe cooled surface is a smooth cylinder 2.09m in diameter by .69m long with LHe flowing in a approx. 1mm annular space between concentric cylinders. The chevrons which are not blackened are cooled from each end with LN flowing in ring manifolds that serve as the primary cryopanel structure. The LHe is force fed at 55.2 kPa remaining in the liquid phase through the panel. External heat exchanger capability permits use of helium at 3.8 to 4.2 0 K. Normal operating flow rate is 1.4 g/sec for a heat load expected to be 12.2 W total

  3. Test computations on the dynamical evolution of star clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeletti, L.; Giannone, P.

    1977-01-01

    Test calculations have been carried out on the evolution of star clusters using the fluid-dynamical method devised by Larson (1970). Large systems of stars have been considered with specific concern with globular clusters. With reference to the analogous 'standard' model by Larson, the influence of varying in turn the various free parameters (cluster mass, star mass, tidal radius, mass concentration of the initial model) has been studied for the results. Furthermore, the partial release of some simplifying assumptions with regard to the relaxation time and distribution of the 'target' stars has been considered. The change of the structural properties is discussed, and the variation of the evolutionary time scale is outlined. An indicative agreement of the results obtained here with structural properties of globular clusters as deduced from previous theoretical models is pointed out. (Auth.)

  4. Experimental studies and tests on An(III)/Ln(III) separation using the TODGA extractant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, Xavier; Sorel, Christian; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Cames, Beatrice; Hill, Clement; Bisel, Isabelle; Espinoux, Denis; Viallesoubranne, Carole; Baron, Pascal; Lorrain, Brigitte [CEA/DEN/MAR/DRCP, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2009-06-15

    Minor actinide recycling by separation and transmutation is worldwide considered as one of the most promising strategies to reduce the inventory of radioactive waste, thus contributing to make nuclear energy more sustainable. One of the different options investigated at the CEA Marcoule and within the ACSEPT project (a European collaborative project partly funded by the 7. EURATOM Framework Program) to separate trivalent minor actinide (Am(III)-Cf(III)) from the fission and activation products contained in PUREX raffinates is the TODGA process, which consists in: 1. Co-extracting trivalent 4f and 5f elements from highly acidic PUREX raffinates by a mixture of TODGA (tetraoctyl-diglycolamide) and TBP (tributyl-phosphate), dissolved in HTP (hydrogenated tetra-propene). 2. Selectively stripping the trivalent minor actinides by a hydrophilic poly-aminocarboxylic acid used as a complexing agent in a buffered aqueous solution, while the trivalent lanthanides are kept in the organic solvent thanks to a sodium nitrate salting-out effect. 3. Stripping the lanthanides in a diluted nitric acid solution. The major difficulty of this TODGA separation process is to tune the pH in a very narrow range of operating conditions in the second step, because of the high sensitivity of the performances of the flow-sheet vs pH. This difficulty was however overcome. This paper describes the development of the TODGA process from experimental studies to hot test implementation in shielded cells of the ATALANTE facility, including (i) the optimization of the extraction system (both the formulation of the organic solvent and those of the aqueous scrubbing and stripping solutions), (ii) the implementation of a cold test in small scale mixer-settlers in the G1 facility (MARCEL loop), using a surrogate feed composed of major fission products, (iii) the validation of some steps of the process, using a surrogate feed, spiked with Am-241 and Eu-152, and similar laboratory contactors (medium activity

  5. Experimental fast reactor JOYO MK-III functional test. Primary auxiliary cooling system test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karube, Koji; Akagi, Shinji; Terano, Toshihiro; Onuki, Osamu; Ito, Hideaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Odo, Toshihiro

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the results of primary auxiliary cooling system, which were done as a part of JOYO MK-III function test. The aim of the tests was to confirm the operational performance of primary auxiliary EMP and the protection system including siphon breaker of primary auxiliary cooling system. The items of the tests were: (Test No.): (Test item). 1) SKS-117: EMP start up test. 2) SKS-118-1: EMP start up test when pony motor running. 3) SKS-121: Function test of siphon breaker. The results of the tests satisfied the required performance, and demonstrated successful operation of primary auxiliary cooling system. (author)

  6. 75 FR 76636 - Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Child Test Dummy, Hybrid III 6-Year-Old...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... provision: ``When a motor vehicle safety standard is in effect under this chapter, a State or a political... [Docket No. NHTSA-2010-0147] RIN 2127-AK34 Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Child Test Dummy, Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety...

  7. ROSA-III 50 % break integral test RUN 916

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, Taisuke; Tasaka, Kanji; Koizumi, Yasuo; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Hideo

    1985-08-01

    This report presents the experimental data of RUN 916 conducted at the ROSA-III test facility. The facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) simulator for a BWR/6 with the electrically heated core, the break simulator and the scaled ECCS(emergency core cooling system). RUN 916 was a 50 % split break test at the recirculation pump suction line with an assumption of HPCS diegel generator failure and conducted as one of the break area parameter tests. A peak cladding temperature (PCT) of 917 K was reached at 190 s after the break during the reflooding phase. Whole core was completely quenched by ECCS, and the effectiveness of ECCS was confermed. The primary test results of RUN 916 are compared in this report with those of RUN 926, which was a 200 % double-ended break test. The initiation of core dryout in RUN 916 was later than that in RUN 926 because of the smaller discharge flow rate. Duration of core dryourt was, however, longer in RUN 916 because of later actuation of ECCSs. PCT in RUN 916 was 133 K higher than that in RUN 926. (author)

  8. ROSA-III 100 % break integral test Run 914

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, Taisuke; Tasaka, Kanji; Koizumi, Yasuo; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Hideo

    1987-05-01

    This report presents the experimental data of RUN 914 conducted at the ROSA-III test facility. The facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) simulator for a BWR/6 with the electrically heated core, the break simulator and the scaled ECCS (emergency core cooling system). RUN 914 was a 100% split break test at the recirculation pump suction line with an assumption of HPCS diesel generator failure and conducted as one of the break area parameter tests. A peak cladding temperature (PCT) of 851 K was reached at 130 s after the break during the reflooding phase. Whole core was completely quenched by ECCS, and the effectiveness of ECCS was confirmed. The primary test results of RUN 914 are compared in this report with those of RUN 926, which was a 200 % double-ended break test. The initiation of core dryout in RUN 914 was almost the same as that in RUN 926. Duration of core dryourt was, however, longer in RUN 914 because of later actuation of ECCSs. PCT in RUN 914 was 67 K higher than that in RUN 926. (author)

  9. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I II & III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016 were done in three phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. The goal of the third phase was to see if surrogate aerosol gets released from the PC when the drum lid is off. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I, II, and III, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  10. Experiment data of ROSA-III integral test RUN 710

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji; Adachi, Hiromichi; Anoda, Yoshinari; Soda, Kunihisa

    1981-01-01

    The report presents data of RUN 710 at ROSA-III test facility. RUN 710 simulates a 200% double-ended break at the inlest side of a recirculation pump of a BWR. All ECCS are activated and electric power to simulated fuel rods in one core channel among four is not supplied in RUN 710. The primary initial conditions are steam dome pressure 7.35 MPa, lower plenum subcooling 10.8 K, core inlet flow rate 31.3 kg/s and core heat generation 2.42 MW. Peak cladding temperature is 609 K at Position 3, 352.5 mm above the mid plane of the core. All heater rods are quenched after ECCS actuation and the effectiveness of ECCS is confirmed. (author)

  11. Testing of full size high current superconductors in SULTAN III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, B.; Rohleder, I.; Vecsey, G.; Pasotti, G.; Ricci, M. V.; Sacchetti, N.; Bruzzone, P.; Katheder, H.; Mitchell, N.; Bessette, D.

    1994-07-01

    The high field test facility SULTAN III in operation at PSI/Switzerland tests full size industrial prototype superconductors for fusion applications such as ITER. The facility provides a background field of up to 11 T over a length of 58 cm. A 50 kA superconducting transformer works as a very low noise current source which allows a criterion of 0.1 mu V/cm to determine the superconducting to normal transition. Three 3.6 m long cable-in-conduit conductors based on both NbTi and Nb3Sn, developed by different manufacturers, suitable for the central solenoid and toroidal field coils of ITER, have been tested so far. This paper presents the results of extensive measurements of critical current and current sharing temperature of the Nb3Sn conductors in the 8 - 11 T range for temperatures between 4.5 K and 11 K. Voltage versus current curves have been analyzed with respect to the n value. The manufacturing of a high quality joint between two Nb3Sn conductors after heat treatment is reported, together with some measurements of the joint resistance.

  12. Testing of full size high current superconductors in SULTAN III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, B.; Rohleder, I.; Vecsey, G.

    1994-01-01

    The high field test facility SULTAN III in operation at PSI/Switzerland tests full size industrial prototype superconductors for fusion applications such as ITER. The facility provides a background field of up to 11 T over a length of 58 cm. A 50 kA superconducting transformer works as a very low noise current source which allows a criterion of 0.1 μV/cm to determine the superconducting to normal transition. Three 3.6 m long cable-in-conduit conductors based on both NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, developed by different manufacturers, suitable for the central solenoid and toroidal field coils of ITER, have been tested so far. This paper presents the results of extensive measurements of critical current and current sharing temperature of the Nb 3 Sn conductors in the 8--11 T range for temperatures between 4.5 K and 11 K Voltage versus current curves have been analyzed with respect to the n value. The manufacturing of a high quality joint between two Nb 3 Sn conductors after heat treatment is reported, together with some measurements of the joint resistance

  13. The KMOS Cluster Survey (KCS). III. Fundamental Plane of Cluster Galaxies at z ≃ 1.80 in JKCS 041

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Laura J.; Davies, Roger L.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Cappellari, Michele; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Bender, Ralf; Galametz, Audrey; Saglia, Roberto P.; Stott, John P.; Wilman, David J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Wegner, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We present data for 16 galaxies in the overdensity JKCS 041 at z≃ 1.80 as part of the K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) Cluster Survey (KCS). With 20 hr integrations, we have obtained deep absorption-line spectra from which we derived velocity dispersions for seven quiescent galaxies. We combined photometric parameters derived from Hubble Space Telescope images with the dispersions to construct a fundamental plane (FP) for quiescent galaxies in JKCS 041. From the zero-point evolution of the FP, we derived a formation redshift for the galaxies of {z}{form}=3.0+/- 0.3, corresponding to a mean age of 1.4 ± 0.2 Gyr. We tested the effect of structural and velocity dispersion evolution on our FP zero-point and found a negligible contribution when using dynamical mass-normalized parameters (˜ 3 % ) but a significant contribution from stellar-mass-normalized parameters (˜ 42 % ). From the relative velocities of the galaxies, we probed the 3D structure of these 16 confirmed members of JKCS 041 and found that a group of galaxies in the southwest of the overdensity had systematically higher velocities. We derived ages for the galaxies in the different groups from the FP. We found that the east-extending group had typically older galaxies ({2.1}-0.2+0.3 Gyr) than those in the southwest group (0.3 ± 0.2 Gyr). Although based on small numbers, the overdensity dynamics, morphology, and age results could indicate that JKCS 041 is in formation and may comprise two merging groups of galaxies. This result could link large-scale structure to ages of galaxies for the first time at this redshift. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs: 095.A-0137(A) and 096.A-0189(A)).

  14. Very Broad [O III] λλ4959, 5007 Emission from the NGC 4472 Globular Cluster RZ 2109 and Implications for the Mass of Its Black Hole X-Ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Stern, Daniel; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Kundu, Arunav; Kamionkowski, Marc; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl

    2008-08-01

    We present Keck LRIS spectroscopy of the black hole-hosting globular cluster RZ 2109 in the Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4472. We find that this object has extraordinarily broad [O III] λ5007 and [O III] λ4959 emission lines, with velocity widths of approximately 2000 km s-1. This result has significant implications for the nature of this accreting black hole system and the mass of the globular cluster black hole. We show that the broad [O III] λ5007 emission must arise from material driven at high velocity from the black hole system. This is because the volume available near the black hole is too small by many orders of magnitude to have enough [O III]-emitting atoms to account for the observed L([O III] λ5007) at high velocities, even if this volume is filled with oxygen at the critical density for [O III] λ5007. The Balmer emission is also weak, indicating the observed [O III] is not due to shocks. We therefore conclude that the [O III] λλ4959, 5007 is produced by photoionization of material driven across the cluster. The only known way to drive significant material at high velocity is for a system accreting mass near or above its Eddington limit, which indicates a stellar-mass black hole. Since it is dynamically implausible to form an accreting stellar-mass black hole system in a globular cluster with an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH), it appears this massive globular cluster does not have an IMBH. We discuss further tests of this conclusion, and its implications for the MBH - Mstellar and MBH - σ relations. Based on observations made at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  15. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. III. MEASURING AGES AND MASSES OF PARTIALLY RESOLVED STELLAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Lori C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Ben F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larsen, Soren S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Melbourne, Jason L. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: beermalc@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The apparent age and mass of a stellar cluster can be strongly affected by stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), when inferred from the integrated color of low-mass clusters ({approx}<10{sup 4} M {sub Sun }). We use simulated star clusters to show that these effects are minimized when the brightest, rapidly evolving stars in a cluster can be resolved, and the light of the fainter, more numerous unresolved stars can be analyzed separately. When comparing the light from the less luminous cluster members to models of unresolved light, more accurate age estimates can be obtained than when analyzing the integrated light from the entire cluster under the assumption that the IMF is fully populated. We show the success of this technique first using simulated clusters, and then with a stellar cluster in M31. This method represents one way of accounting for the discrete, stochastic sampling of the stellar IMF in less massive clusters and can be leveraged in studies of clusters throughout the Local Group and other nearby galaxies.

  16. Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Barnes, S.M.; Bindi, B.G.; Palmer, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed

  17. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented.

  18. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented

  19. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE LINE OF SIGHT TO BACKGROUND QUASARS. III. MULTI-OBJECT SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, H.; Barrientos, L. F.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I.; López, S.; Lira, P.; Maureira, M. J.; Gilbank, D. G.; Ellingson, E.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight lines taken from López et al. The targets were selected based on the presence of an intervening Mg II absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance 71 -1 Mpc from the QSO sight line (a p hotometric hit ) . The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 Å. Our aim was three-fold: (1) to identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, (2) to confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and (3) to determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. In this way, we are able to characterize the absorption systems associated with cluster members. Our main findings are as follows. (1) We identified 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts between 0.2509 ≤ z gal ≤ 1.0955, up to an impact parameter of 142 h 71 -1 kpc and a maximum velocity difference of 280 km s –1 . (2) We spectroscopically confirmed 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z –1 from galaxy clusters/groups, in addition to two new ones related to galaxy group environments. These numbers imply efficiencies of 71% in finding such systems with MOS spectroscopy. This is a remarkable result since we defined a photometric hit as those cluster-absorber pairs having a redshift difference Δz = 0.1. The general population of our confirmed absorbing galaxies have luminosities L B ∼L B * and mean rest-frame colors (R c – z') typical of S cd galaxies. From this sample, absorbing cluster galaxies hosting weak absorbers are consistent with lower star formation activity than the rest, which produce strong absorption and agree with typical Mg II absorbing galaxies found in the literature. Our spectroscopic confirmations lend support to the selection of

  20. Sled Tests Using the Hybrid III Rail Safety ATD and Workstation Tables for Passenger Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Hybrid III Rail Safety (H3-RS) anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is a crash test dummy developed in the United Kingdom to evaluate abdomen and lower thorax injuries that occur when passengers impact workstation tables during train accidents. The ...

  1. Oak Ridge Institutional Cluster Autotune Test Drive Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jibonananda, Sanyal [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-02-01

    The Oak Ridge Institutional Cluster (OIC) provides general purpose computational resources for the ORNL staff to run computation heavy jobs that are larger than desktop applications but do not quite require the scale and power of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). This report details the efforts made and conclusions derived in performing a short test drive of the cluster resources on Phase 5 of the OIC. EnergyPlus was used in the analysis as a candidate user program and the overall software environment was evaluated against anticipated challenges experienced with resources such as the shared memory-Nautilus (JICS) and Titan (OLCF). The OIC performed within reason and was found to be acceptable in the context of running EnergyPlus simulations. The number of cores per node and the availability of scratch space per node allow non-traditional desktop focused applications to leverage parallel ensemble execution. Although only individual runs of EnergyPlus were executed, the software environment on the OIC appeared suitable to run ensemble simulations with some modifications to the Autotune workflow. From a standpoint of general usability, the system supports common Linux libraries, compilers, standard job scheduling software (Torque/Moab), and the OpenMPI library (the only MPI library) for MPI communications. The file system is a Panasas file system which literature indicates to be an efficient file system.

  2. Fingerprinting dark energy. II. Weak lensing and galaxy clustering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin; Amendola, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of dark energy is a central task of cosmology. To go beyond a cosmological constant, we need to introduce at least an equation of state and a sound speed and consider observational tests that involve perturbations. If dark energy is not completely homogeneous on observable scales, then the Poisson equation is modified and dark matter clustering is directly affected. One can then search for observational effects of dark energy clustering using dark matter as a probe. In this paper we exploit an analytical approximate solution of the perturbation equations in a general dark energy cosmology to analyze the performance of next-decade large-scale surveys in constraining equation of state and sound speed. We find that tomographic weak lensing and galaxy redshift surveys can constrain the sound speed of the dark energy only if the latter is small, of the order of c s < or approx. 0.01 (in units of c). For larger sound speeds the error grows to 100% and more. We conclude that large-scale structure observations contain very little information about the perturbations in canonical scalar field models with a sound speed of unity. Nevertheless, they are able to detect the presence of cold dark energy, i.e. a dark energy with nonrelativistic speed of sound.

  3. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for the old globular clusters of the M 31 galaxy. The final aim is to add homogeneous spectroscopic metallicities to as many entries as possible of the Revised Bologna Catalog of M 31 clusters, by reporting Lick index measurements from any source (literature, new observations, etc.) on the same scale. Methods: New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2≤ [Fe/H]≤ +0.5. Lick indices for M 31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M 31. Results: Our values are in good agreement with recent estimates based on detailed spectral fitting and with those obtained from color magnitude diagrams of clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. The typical uncertainty on individual estimates is ≃±0.25 dex, as resulted from the comparison with metallicities derived from color magnitude diagrams of individual clusters. Conclusions: The metallicity distribution of M 31 globular cluster is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistical tests suggest that the distribution is probably not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed into the center of the system and to cluster tightly around the galactic rotation curve defined by the HI disk, while the velocity dispersion about the curve increases with decreasing metallicity. However, also the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotation pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts. Based on observations made at La Palma, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque

  4. CROSS-CORRELATION WEAK LENSING OF SDSS GALAXY CLUSTERS. III. MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, Erin S.; Johnston, David E.; Masjedi, Morad; Blanton, Michael R.; McKay, Timothy A.; Scranton, Ryan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Annis, James

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the excess mass-to-light ratio (M/L) measured around MaxBCG galaxy clusters observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This red-sequence cluster sample includes objects from small groups with M 200 ∼ 5 x 10 12 h -1 M sun to clusters with M 200 ∼ 10 15 h -1 M sun . Using cross-correlation weak lensing, we measure the excess mass density profile above the universal mean Δρ(r)=ρ(r)-ρ-bar for clusters in bins of richness and optical luminosity. We also measure the excess luminosity density Δl(r)=l(r)-l-bar measured in the z = 0.25 i band. For both mass and light, we de-project the profiles to produce three-dimensional mass and light profiles over scales from 25 h -1 kpc to 22 h -1 Mpc. From these profiles we calculate the cumulative excess mass ΔM(r) and excess light ΔL(r) as a function of separation from the BCG. On small scales, where ρ(r)>>ρ-bar, the integrated mass-to-light profile (ΔM/ΔL)(r) may be interpreted as the cluster M/L. We find the (ΔM/ΔL) 200 , the M/L within r 200 , scales with cluster mass as a power law with index 0.33 ± 0.02. On large scales, where ρ(r)∼ρ-bar, the ΔM/ΔL approaches an asymptotic value independent of cluster richness. For small groups, the mean (ΔM/ΔL) 200 is much smaller than the asymptotic value, while for large clusters (ΔM/ΔL) 200 is consistent with the asymptotic value. This asymptotic value should be proportional to the mean M/L of the universe (M/L). We find (M/L)b -2 M/L = 362 ± 54h (statistical). There is additional uncertainty in the overall calibration at the ∼10% level. The parameter b 2 M/L is primarily a function of the bias of the L ∼ * galaxies used as light tracers, and should be of order unity. Multiplying by the luminosity density in the same bandpass we find Ω m b -2 M/L = 0.20 ± 0.03, independent of the Hubble parameter.

  5. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES IN THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITY AND COLOR DEPENDENCE AND REDSHIFT EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Hong; Zehavi, Idit [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, OH 44106 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT 84112 (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy and CCAPP, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Chen Yanmei [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Eisenstein, Daniel J.; McBride, Cameron K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ho, Shirley; Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kazin, Eyal [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Nuza, Sebastian E. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K. [Department of Physics, Yale University, 260 Whitney Ave, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); and others

    2013-04-20

    We measure the luminosity and color dependence and the redshift evolution of galaxy clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Ninth Data Release. We focus on the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of subsets of its CMASS sample, which includes about 260,000 galaxies over {approx}3300 deg{sup 2} in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7. To minimize the selection effect on galaxy clustering, we construct well-defined luminosity and color subsamples by carefully accounting for the CMASS galaxy selection cuts. The 2PCF of the whole CMASS sample, if approximated by a power-law, has a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 7.93 {+-} 0.06 h {sup -1} Mpc and an index of {gamma} = 1.85 {+-} 0.01. Clear dependences on galaxy luminosity and color are found for the projected 2PCF in all redshift bins, with more luminous and redder galaxies generally exhibiting stronger clustering and steeper 2PCF. The color dependence is also clearly seen for galaxies within the red sequence, consistent with the behavior of SDSS-II main sample galaxies at lower redshifts. At a given luminosity (k + e corrected), no significant evolution of the projected 2PCFs with redshift is detected for red sequence galaxies. We also construct galaxy samples of fixed number density at different redshifts, using redshift-dependent magnitude thresholds. The clustering of these galaxies in the CMASS redshift range is found to be consistent with that predicted by passive evolution. Our measurements of the luminosity and color dependence and redshift evolution of galaxy clustering will allow for detailed modeling of the relation between galaxies and dark matter halos and new constraints on galaxy formation and evolution.

  6. Round robin tests of the PISC III programme on defective steam generators tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.; Herkenrath, H.; Crutzen, S.; Miyake, Y.; Maciga, G.

    1991-11-01

    The PISC III actions are intended to extend the results and methodologies of the previous PISC exercises, i.e. the assessment of the capabilities of the various examination techniques when used on real or realistic flaws in real components under real conditions of inspection. Being aware of the industrial problems that the degradation of steam generator tubes can create, the PISC III management board decided to include in the PISC III programme a special action on steam generator tubes testing (SGT). (author)

  7. Planck intermediate results: III. the relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Bucher, M.; Cardoso, J.-F.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal DA2 Y500 for a sample of 19 objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses are derived from XMM-N...

  8. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters III. Abell 2029, Abell 2052, Abell 2142

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    A sample of five rich galaxy clusters has been mapped by ISO at 60 mum, 100 mum, 135 mum, and 200 mum using the PHT-C camera. In previous papers Abell 2670 and Sersic 159-03 were discussed. Here we present the results for Abell 2029, Abell 2052, and Abell 2142. The conclusion of the survey...

  9. Low-mass stars in globular clusters. III. The mass function of 47 Tucanae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marchi, G.; Paresce, F.

    1995-12-01

    We have used the WFPC2 on board HST to investigate the stellar population in a field located 4'6 E of the center of the globular cluster 47 Tuc (NGC 104), close to the half-mass radius, through wide band imaging at 606 and 812nm. A total of ~3000 stars are accurately classified by two-color photometry to form a color-magnitude diagram extending down to a limiting magnitude m_814_=~m_I_=~24. A rich cluster main sequence is detected spanning the range from m_814_=~18 through m_814_=~23, where it spreads considerably due to the increasing photometric uncertainty and galaxy contamination. A secondary sequence of objects is also detected, parallel to the main sequence, as expected for a population of binary stars. The measured binary fraction in the range 195%. The main sequence luminosity function obtained from the observed CMD increases with decreasing luminosity following a power-law trend with index α=~0.15 in the range 5crowding. On the basis of the available mass-luminosity relation for this metallicity, the resultant mass function shows a power-law increase in numbers for decreasing masses in the range 0.8-0.3Msun_ with a slope α=~1.5, but then flattens out in the 0.3-0.15Msun_ range. The comparison of the mass function of 47 Tuc with that of NGC 6397 (Paper I) and of M 15 (Paper II), previously investigated with the same instrumentation, suggests that the stellar population near the half-mass radius of these clusters should not be very sensitive to either internal or externally-driven dynamical processes. The difference between their mass functions could then be attributed to metallicity, reflecting an intrinsic difference in their initial mass functions, unless mass-segregation is stronger in 47 Tuc than in the other two clusters. This latter circumstance could be due, for instance, to the large number of binaries discovered in 47 Tuc. In all cases, however, the mass function is found to flatten below 0.3Msun_ and the flattening is most likely an intrinsic

  10. The Formation of Supermassive Black Holes from Population III.1 Seeds. I. Cosmic Formation Histories and Clustering Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Monaco, Pierluigi

    2016-08-15

    We calculate the cosmic distributions in space and time of the formation sites of the first, "Pop III.1" stars, exploring a model in which these are the progenitors of all supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Pop III.1 stars are defined to form from primordial composition gas in dark matter minihalos with $\\sim10^6\\:M_\\odot$ that are isolated from neighboring astrophysical sources by a given isolation distance, $d_{\\rm{iso}}$. We assume Pop III.1 sources are seeds of SMBHs, based on protostellar support by dark matter annihilation heating that allows them to accrete a large fraction of their minihalo gas, i.e., $\\sim 10^5\\:M_\\odot$. Exploring $d_{\\rm{iso}}$ from 10--$100\\:\\rm{kpc}$ (proper distances), we predict the redshift evolution of Pop III.1 source and SMBH remnant number densities. The local, $z=0$ density of SMBHs constrains $d_{\\rm{iso}}\\lesssim 100\\:\\rm{kpc}$ (i.e., $3\\:\\rm{Mpc}$ comoving distance at $z\\simeq30$). In our simulated ($\\sim60\\:\\rm{Mpc}$)$^3$ comoving volume, Pop III.1 stars start forming just after $z=40$. Their formation is largely complete by $z\\simeq25$ to 20 for $d_{\\rm{iso}}=100$ to $50\\:\\rm{kpc}$. We follow source evolution to $z=10$, by which point most SMBHs reside in halos with $\\gtrsim10^8\\:M_\\odot$. Over this period, there is relatively limited merging of SMBHs for these values of $d_{\\rm{iso}}$. We also predict SMBH clustering properties at $z=10$: feedback suppression of neighboring sources leads to relatively flat angular correlation functions. Finally, we consider a simple "Str\\"omgren" model for $d_{\\rm iso}$, based on ionizing feedback from zero age main sequence supermassive Pop III.1 stars that may be the direct progenitors of SMBHs in this scenario. Such models naturally produce feedback effects on scales of $\\sim100\\:$kpc and thus self-consistently generate a SMBH number density similar to the observed value.

  11. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III: Psychometric properties and significance for application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bucik

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the content, conceptual structure and methodological steps of the latest revision of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III, which is a highly functional and valuable vocabulary test that has been in use since 1959 in different language and cultural surroundings. On the case of the PPVT-III we are presenting the procedure of development and standardization of such vocabulary tests as well as its translation and adaptation from one language and cultural milieu to another. We also note the practical use of the PPVT-III for research purposes. In Slovenian language no vocabulary tests were developed or adapted so far; PPVT-III is presented in this context, too.

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; O' Connell, Ross [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong; Schlegel, David; Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94702 (United States); Ross, Ashley [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Hirata, Christopher; Huff, Eric; Weinberg, David [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Strauss, Michael; Bahcall, Neta [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brinkmann, J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie, E-mail: shirleyh@andrew.cmu.edu [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2015-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z=0.5 and z=2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans 0∼ 11,00 square degrees and probes a volume of 80 h{sup −3} Gpc{sup 3}. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ∼ 25% over a bin width of δ{sub l} ∼ 10−15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (0ℓ ∼ 2−3). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of f{sub NL} = −113{sup +154}{sub −154} (1σ error). We next assume that the bias of quasar and galaxy distributions can be obtained independently from quasar/galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements (such as those in Sherwin et al. (2013)). This can be facilitated by spectroscopic observations of the sources, enabling the redshift distribution to be

  13. LITERATURE CURRICULUM III--TEST FOR "THE MERCHANT OF VENICE."

    Science.gov (United States)

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    THIS TEST--"THE MERCHANT OF VENICE"--WAS DESIGNED BY THE OREGON CURRICULUM STUDY CENTER FOR A NINTH-GRADE LITERATURE CURRICULUM. IT IS INTENDED TO ACCOMPANY CURRICULUM UNITS AVAILABLE AS ED 010 815 AND ED 010 816. (MM)

  14. The bone diagnostic instrument III: Testing mouse femora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Connor; Mathews, Phillip; Yurtsev, Eugene; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David; Hansma, Paul

    2009-06-01

    Here we describe modifications that allow the bone diagnostic instrument (BDI) [P. Hansma et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 064303 (2008); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 075105 (2006)], developed to test human bone, to test the femora of mice. These modifications include reducing the effective weight of the instrument on the bone, designing and fabricating new probe assemblies to minimize damage to the small bone, developing new testing protocols that involve smaller testing forces, and fabricating a jig for securing the smaller bones for testing. With these modifications, the BDI was used to test the hypothesis that short-term running has greater benefit on the mechanical properties of the femur for young growing mice compared to older, skeletally mature mice. We measured elastic modulus, hardness, and indentation distance increase (IDI), which had previously been shown to be the best discriminators in model systems known to exhibit differences in mechanical properties at the whole bone level. In the young exercised murine femora, the IDI was significantly lower than in young control femora. Since IDI has a relation to postyield properties, these results suggest that exercise during bone development increases post yield mechanical competence. We were also able to measure effects of aging on bone properties with the BDI. There was a significant increase in the IDI, and a significant decrease in the elastic modulus and hardness between the young and old groups. Thus, with the modifications described here, the BDI can take measurements on mouse bones and obtain statistically significant results.

  15. Validation of the Serpent 2-DYNSUB code sequence using the Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, Miriam; Mercatali, Luigi; Sanchez, Victor; Stieglitz, Robert; Macian-Juan, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Full few-group cross section tables created by Monte Carlo lattice code Serpent 2. • Serpent 2 group constant methodology verified for HFP static and transient cases. • Serpent 2-DYNSUB tool chainvalidated using SPERT III REA experiments. • Serpent 2-DYNSUB tool chain suitable to model RIAs in PWRs. - Abstract: The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) is studied using the Serpent 2-DYNSUB code sequence in order to validate it for modeling reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) in PWRs. The SPERT III E-core was a thermal research reactor constructed to analyze reactor dynamics. Its configuration resembles a commercial PWR on terms of fuel type, choice of moderator, coolant flow and system pressure. The initial conditions of the rod ejection accident experiments (REA) performed cover cold startup, hot startup, hot standby and operating power scenarios. Eight of these experiments were analyzed in detail. Firstly, multi-dimensional nodal diffusion cross section tables were created for the three-dimensional reactor simulator DYNSUB employing the Monte Carlo neutron transport code Serpent 2. In a second step, DYNSUB stationary simulations were compared to Monte Carlo reference three-dimensional full scale solutions obtained with Serpent 2 (cold startup conditions) and Serpent 2/SUBCHANFLOW (operating power conditions) with a good agreement being observed. The latter tool is an internal coupling of Serpent 2 and the sub-channel thermal-hydraulics code SUBCHANFLOW. Finally, DYNSUB was utilized to study the eight selected transient experiments. Results were found to match measurements well. As the selected experiments cover much of the possible transient (delayed super-critical, prompt super-critical and super-prompt critical excursion) and initial conditions (cold and hot as well as zero, little and full power reactor states) one expects in commercial PWRs, the obtained results give confidence that the Serpent 2-DYNSUB tool chain is

  16. Results of the initial test program for the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III (SPR III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Reuscher, J.A.

    1976-08-01

    This document presents a detailed discussion of the reactor including the mechanical and nuclear design characteristics. Also presented are the complete results of the Initial Approach to Critical and the Zero-and-Low Power testing programs. Reactivity worth measurements are given for such parameters as control element integral worth, Safety Block integral worth, and various materials (polyethylene, copper, lead, etc) as a function of position relative to the core. Subcritical reactivity measurements made during the approach to critical generally proved to be in reasonably good agreement with design values due to the good source-fuel-detector geometry possible with a reactor of this type. Subsequent dynamic measurements for reactivity worths are shown to be in good agreement with calculated results

  17. The Double Galaxy Cluster A2465. III. X-Ray and Weak-lensing Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, Gary A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03745 (United States); Umetsu, Keiichi; Molnar, Sandor M. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Nonino, Mario [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, 34143 Trieste (Italy); Medezinski, Elinor [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Bogdan, Akos; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine, E-mail: gary.wegner@dartmouth.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    We report Chandra X-ray observations and optical weak-lensing measurements from Subaru/Suprime-Cam images of the double galaxy cluster A2465 ( z = 0.245). The X-ray brightness data are fit to a β model to obtain the radial gas density profiles of the northeast (NE) and southwest (SW) subcomponents, which are seen to differ in structure. We determine core radii, central temperatures, the gas masses within r {sub 500c}, and the total masses for the broader NE and sharper SW components assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. There is no large X-ray excess between the two components. The central entropy of the NE subcluster is about two times higher than the SW. Along with its structural properties and an apparent radio halo that is a sign of a merger, this suggests that the NE component has undergone merging on its own. The weak-lensing analysis gives virial masses for each substructure, which compare well with earlier dynamical results. The derived outer mass contours of the SW sub-component from weak lensing are more irregular and extended than those of the NE. Although there is a weak enhancement and small offsets between X-ray gas and mass centers from weak lensing, the lack of large amounts of gas between the two subclusters indicates that A2465 is in a pre-merger state. We discuss star formation enhancement in this system resulting from its dynamics and shock-induced star formation scenarios. A dynamical model that is consistent with the observed cluster data, based on the FLASH program and the radial infall model, is constructed, where the subclusters currently separated by ∼1.2 Mpc are approaching each other at ∼2000 km s{sup −1} and will meet in ∼0.4 Gyr.

  18. The Double Galaxy Cluster A2465. III. X-Ray and Weak-lensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Gary A.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Molnar, Sandor M.; Nonino, Mario; Medezinski, Elinor; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Bogdan, Akos; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine

    2017-07-01

    We report Chandra X-ray observations and optical weak-lensing measurements from Subaru/Suprime-Cam images of the double galaxy cluster A2465 (z = 0.245). The X-ray brightness data are fit to a β model to obtain the radial gas density profiles of the northeast (NE) and southwest (SW) subcomponents, which are seen to differ in structure. We determine core radii, central temperatures, the gas masses within r 500c, and the total masses for the broader NE and sharper SW components assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. There is no large X-ray excess between the two components. The central entropy of the NE subcluster is about two times higher than the SW. Along with its structural properties and an apparent radio halo that is a sign of a merger, this suggests that the NE component has undergone merging on its own. The weak-lensing analysis gives virial masses for each substructure, which compare well with earlier dynamical results. The derived outer mass contours of the SW sub-component from weak lensing are more irregular and extended than those of the NE. Although there is a weak enhancement and small offsets between X-ray gas and mass centers from weak lensing, the lack of large amounts of gas between the two subclusters indicates that A2465 is in a pre-merger state. We discuss star formation enhancement in this system resulting from its dynamics and shock-induced star formation scenarios. A dynamical model that is consistent with the observed cluster data, based on the FLASH program and the radial infall model, is constructed, where the subclusters currently separated by ˜1.2 Mpc are approaching each other at ˜2000 km s-1 and will meet in ˜0.4 Gyr. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Society of Japan.

  19. Making System Dynamics Cool III : New Hot Teaching & Testing Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruyt, E.

    2011-01-01

    This follow-up paper presents seven actual cases for testing and teaching System Dynamics developed and used between January 2010 and January 2011 for one of the largest System Dynamics courses (250+ students per year) at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. The cases presented in this

  20. Phase III (full scale) agitated mixing test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A (WRAP 2A) is the proposed second module of the WRAP facility. This facility will provide the required treatment for contact Handled (CH) Low Level (LL) Mixed Waste (MW) to allow its permanent disposal. Solidification of a portion of this waste using a cement based grout has been selected in order to reduce the toxicity and mobility of the waste in the disposal site. Mixing of the waste with the cement paste and material handling constraints/requirements associated with the mixed material is, therefore, a key process in the overall treatment strategy. This test plan addresses Phase 3, Full Scale Testing. The objectives of these tests are to determine if there are scale-up issues associated with the mixing results obtained in Phase 1 and 2 mixing tests, verify the workability of mixtures resulting from previous formulation development efforts (Waste Immobilization Development [WID]), and provide a baseline for WRAP 2A mixing equipment design. To this end, the following objectives are of particular interest: determine geometric influence of mixing blade at full scale (i.e., size, type, and location: height/offset); determine if similar results in terms of mixing effectiveness and product quality are achievable at this scale; determine if vibration is as effective at this larger scale in fluidizing the mixture and aiding in cleaning the vessel; determine if baffles or sweeping blades are needed to aid in mixing at the larger size and for cleaning the vessel; and determine quality of the poured monolithic product and investigate exotherm and filling influences at this larger size

  1. Testing dark energy and dark matter cosmological models with clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Hans [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are, as the largest building blocks of our Universe, ideal probes to study the large-scale structure and to test cosmological models. The principle approach und the status of this research is reviewed. Clusters lend themselves for tests in serveral ways: the cluster mass function, the spatial clustering, the evolution of both functions with reshift, and the internal composition can be used to constrain cosmological parameters. X-ray observations are currently the best means of obtaining the relevant data on the galaxy cluster population. We illustrate in particular all the above mentioned methods with our ROSAT based cluster surveys. The mass calibration of clusters is an important issue, that is currently solved with XMM-Newton and Chandra studies. Based on the current experience we provide an outlook for future research, especially with eROSITA.

  2. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. III. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF FIELD GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Dressler, Alan [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States); Gladders, Michael G.; Abramson, Louis [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fritz, Jacopo [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2013-06-10

    Using data from the IMACS Cluster Building Survey and from nearby galaxy surveys, we examine the evolution of the rate of star formation in field galaxies from z = 0.60 to the present. Fitting the luminosity function to a standard Schechter form, we find a rapid evolution of M{sub B}{sup *} consistent with that found in other deep surveys; at the present epoch M{sub B}{sup *} is evolving at the rate of 0.38 Gyr{sup -1}, several times faster than the predictions of simple models for the evolution of old, coeval galaxies. The evolution of the distribution of specific star formation rates (SSFRs) is also too rapid to explain by such models. We demonstrate that starbursts cannot, even in principle, explain the evolution of the SSFR distribution. However, the rapid evolution of both M{sub B}{sup *} and the SSFR distribution can be explained if some fraction of galaxies have star formation rates characterized by both short rise and fall times and by an epoch of peak star formation more recent than the majority of galaxies. Although galaxies of every stellar mass up to 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} show a range of epochs of peak star formation, the fraction of ''younger'' galaxies falls from about 40% at a mass of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} to zero at a mass of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. The incidence of younger galaxies appears to be insensitive to the density of the local environment; but does depend on group membership: relatively isolated galaxies are much more likely to be young than are group members.

  3. Modified Gravity and its test on galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus M.; Morandi, Andrea; Limousin, Marceau

    2018-05-01

    The MOdified Gravity (MOG) theory of J. Moffat assumes a massive vector particle which causes a repulsive contribution to the tensor gravitation. For the galaxy cluster A1689 new data for the X-ray gas and the strong lensing properties are presented. Fits to MOG are possible by adjusting the galaxy density profile. However, this appears to work as an effective dark matter component, posing a serious problem for MOG. New gas and strong lensing data for the cluster A1835 support these conclusions and point at a tendency of the gas alone to overestimate the lensing effects in MOG theory.

  4. Specialist committee's review reports for experimental fast reactor JOYO' MK-III performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2004-02-01

    Performance tests (startup-physics tests and power elevation tests) were planed for experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' MK-III where irradiation performances were upgraded by power increase from 100 to 140 MW. The reactor safety committee of O-arai Engineering Center has established a specialist committee for 'JOYO' MK-III Performance Tests at the first meeting of 2003 on 23th. April 2003, to accomplish the tests successfully. Subjects of the specialist committee were reviews of following items covering a wide range. 1) Contents of modification works. 2) Reflections of functional test results to the plant and facilities. 3) Reflections of safety rule modification to instruction and manual for operation. 4) Quality assurances and pre-calculation for performance test. 5) Inspection plan and its results. 6) Adequacy of performance test plan. 7) Confirmation of performance test results. Before test-starts, the specialist committee has confirmed by reviewing the items from 1) to 6) based on explanations and documents of the Division of Experimental Reactor, that the test plan and pre-inspections are adequate. After the tests, the specialist committee had confirmed by reviewing the item 7) in the same way, that the each test result satisfies the corresponding criterion. The specialist committee has concluded from these review's results before and after the tests that the 'JOYO' MK-III Performance Tests were carried out appropriately. Besides, the first criticality of the JOYO MK-III was achieved on 2nd. July 2003, and the continuous full power operation was carried on 20th. Nov. 2003. Finally, all performance tests were completed by the pass of the last governmental pre-serviced inspection (dose rate measurement during the shut down condition). (author)

  5. Family-based clusters of cognitive test performance in familial schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partonen Timo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive traits derived from neuropsychological test data are considered to be potential endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Previously, these traits have been found to form a valid basis for clustering samples of schizophrenia patients into homogeneous subgroups. We set out to identify such clusters, but apart from previous studies, we included both schizophrenia patients and family members into the cluster analysis. The aim of the study was to detect family clusters with similar cognitive test performance. Methods Test scores from 54 randomly selected families comprising at least two siblings with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and at least two unaffected family members were included in a complete-linkage cluster analysis with interactive data visualization. Results A well-performing, an impaired, and an intermediate family cluster emerged from the analysis. While the neuropsychological test scores differed significantly between the clusters, only minor differences were observed in the clinical variables. Conclusions The visually aided clustering algorithm was successful in identifying family clusters comprising both schizophrenia patients and their relatives. The present classification method may serve as a basis for selecting phenotypically more homogeneous groups of families in subsequent genetic analyses.

  6. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  7. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  8. Comparisons of ROSA-III and FIST BWR loss of coolant accident simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Koizumi, Yasuo

    1985-10-01

    A common understanding and interpretation of BWR system response and the controlling phenomena in LOCA transients has been achieved through the evaluation and comparison of counterpart tests performed in the ROSA-III and FIST test facilities. These facilities, which are designed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic response of BWR systems, are operated respectively by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the General Electric Company. Comparison is made between three types of counterpart tests, each performed under similar tests conditions in the two facilities. They are large break, small break, and steamline break LOCA's. The system responses to these tests in each facility are quite similar. The sequence of events are similar, and the timing of these events are similar. Differences that do occur are due to minor differences in modeling objectives, facility scaling, and test conditions. Parallel channel flow interactions effects in the ROSA-III four channel (half length) core, although noticeable in the large break test, do not result in major differences with the single channel response in FIST. In the small break tests the timing of events is offset by the earlier ADS actuation in FIST. The steamline test responses are similar except there is no heatup in FIST, resulting from a different ECCS trip modeling. Overall comparisons between ROSA-III and FIST system responses in LOCA tests is very good. (author)

  9. Assessment of Random Assignment in Training and Test Sets using Generalized Cluster Analysis Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACĂ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The properness of random assignment of compounds in training and validation sets was assessed using the generalized cluster technique. Material and Method: A quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship model using Molecular Descriptors Family on Vertices was evaluated in terms of assignment of carboquinone derivatives in training and test sets during the leave-many-out analysis. Assignment of compounds was investigated using five variables: observed anticancer activity and four structure descriptors. Generalized cluster analysis with K-means algorithm was applied in order to investigate if the assignment of compounds was or not proper. The Euclidian distance and maximization of the initial distance using a cross-validation with a v-fold of 10 was applied. Results: All five variables included in analysis proved to have statistically significant contribution in identification of clusters. Three clusters were identified, each of them containing both carboquinone derivatives belonging to training as well as to test sets. The observed activity of carboquinone derivatives proved to be normal distributed on every. The presence of training and test sets in all clusters identified using generalized cluster analysis with K-means algorithm and the distribution of observed activity within clusters sustain a proper assignment of compounds in training and test set. Conclusion: Generalized cluster analysis using the K-means algorithm proved to be a valid method in assessment of random assignment of carboquinone derivatives in training and test sets.

  10. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  11. Heat loss and fluid leakage tests of the ROSA-III facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1981-12-01

    The report presents characteristic test results about the steady state heat loss, one of the inherent characteristics of the ROSA-III test facility. The steady state heat loss tests were conducted at five different temperature conditions between 111 0 C and 290 0 C . Net heat loss rates were obtained by estimating the electric power supplied to the core, heat input from the recirculation pumps and steam leakage rate. The heat loss characteristics have important contribution to analyses of the ROSA-III small break tests. A following simple relation was obtained between the net heat loss rate Q*sub(HL) (kJ/s) (*: radical) of the ROSA-III facility and the temperature difference ΔT ( 0 C) between the fluid temperature of the system and the room temperature, Q*sub(HL) = 0.56 x ΔT. (*: radical) And the steam leak flow at normal operating condition of the ROSA-III test, (P = 7.2 MPa) was obtained as 8.9 x 10 -3 kg/s and corresponding steam leakage energy as 10.5 kJ/s. The heat input from the recirculation pumps was indirectly estimated under a constant speed by assuming the heat input was equal to the brake horce power of the pumps. (author)

  12. The New Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III: An Illusion of Unbiased Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Ida J

    2000-10-01

    This article examines whether changes in the ethnic minority composition of the standardization sample for the latest edition of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III, Dunn & Dunn, 1997) can be used as the sole explanation for children's better test scores when compared to an earlier edition, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R, Dunn & Dunn, 1981). Results from a comparative analysis of these two test editions suggest that other factors may explain improved performances. Among these factors are the number of words and age levels sampled, the types of words and pictures used, and characteristics of the standardization sample other than its ethnic minority composition. This analysis also raises questions regarding the usefulness of converting scores from one edition to the other and the type of criteria that could be used to evaluate whether the PPVT-III is an unbiased test of vocabulary for children from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

  13. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Holland, Stephen T. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Breeveld, Alice A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Brown, Peter J., E-mail: siegel@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: blp14@psu.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: sholland@stsci.edu, E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: grbpeter@yahoo.com [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  14. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  15. Incremental Validity of the WJ III COG: Limited Predictive Effects beyond the GIA-E

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.; Busse, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    This study is an examination of the incremental validity of Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) broad clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ III ACH). The participants were children and adolescents, ages 6-18 (n = 4,722), drawn from the WJ…

  16. Visual test and colorimetric determination of gold(III with the use of indicator paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana N. Khudyakova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A visual test method has been proposed for the evaluation of the gold content. It is based on the linear dependence between the length of the colored zone on an indicator paper and gold(III concentration. Indicator paper was covered by a polymer film and was in contact with the solution tested along one edge during analysis. It was impregnated by 3-phenyl-2,6-dimercapto-1,4-thiopyrone or by precipitate of its complex with copper(II. Besides Cu(II can be replaced by the Au(III ion tested in the composition of this complex. The concentration ranges for Au(III determination were equal to 0.02−2 mg·L−1 or 4−590 mg·L−1, respectively, in the presence of excess of the transition and noble metals. It was demonstrated the effectiveness of the dynamic preconcentration of Au(III for the subsequent colorimetric determination on paper filter for the concentration range 0.005–0.3 mg·L−1 (DL 0.02 mg·L−1 by using a sample volume of 10 mL. The developed procedures were successfully utilized for the determination of gold in synthetic mixtures, in auriferous quartz (RSD < 5%, and in ore from Zyryanovsk’s mine (Kazakhstan with RSD < 8%.

  17. Analysis of excess reactivity of JOYO MK-III performance test core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Yokoyama, Kenji

    2003-10-01

    JOYO is currently being upgraded to the high performance irradiation bed JOYO MK-III core'. The MK-III core is divided into two fuel regions with different plutonium contents. To obtain a higher neutron flux, the active core height was reduced from 55 cm to 50 cm. The reflector subassemblies were replaced by shielding subassemblies in the outer two rows. Twenty of the MK-III outer core fuel subassemblies in the performance test core were partially burned in the transition core. Four irradiation test rigs, which do not contain any fuel material, were loaded in the center of the performance test core. In order to evaluate the excess reactivity of MK-III performance test core accurately, we evaluated it by applying not only the JOYO MK-II core management code system MAGI, but also the MK-III core management code system HESTIA, the JUPITER standard analysis method and the Monte Carlo method with JFS-3-J3.2R content set. The excess reactivity evaluations obtained by the JUPITER standard analysis method were corrected to results based on transport theory with zero mesh-size in space and angle. A bias factor based on the MK-II 35th core, which sensitivity was similar to MK-III performance test core's, was also applied, except in the case where an adjusted nuclear cross-section library was used. Exact three-dimensional, pin-by-pin geometry and continuous-energy cross sections were used in the Monte Carlo calculation. The estimated error components associated with cross-sections, methods correction factors and the bias factor were combined based on Takeda's theory. Those independently calculated values agree well and range from 2.8 to 3.4%Δk/kk'. The calculation result of the MK-III core management code system HESTLA was 3.13% Δk/kk'. The estimated errors for bias method range from 0.1 to 0.2%Δk/kk'. The error in the case using adjusted cross-section was 0.3%Δk/kk'. (author)

  18. On the Observability of Individual Population III Stars and Their Stellar-mass Black Hole Accretion Disks through Cluster Caustic Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Timmes, F. X.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K.; Coe, Daniel; Diego, Jose M.; Dijkstra, Mark; Driver, Simon P.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Kim, Duho

    2018-02-01

    We summarize panchromatic Extragalactic Background Light data to place upper limits on the integrated near-infrared surface brightness (SB) that may come from Population III stars and possible accretion disks around their stellar-mass black holes (BHs) in the epoch of First Light, broadly taken from z ≃ 7–17. Theoretical predictions and recent near-infrared power spectra provide tighter constraints on their sky signal. We outline the physical properties of zero-metallicity Population III stars from MESA stellar evolution models through helium depletion and of BH accretion disks at z≳ 7. We assume that second-generation non-zero-metallicity stars can form at higher multiplicity, so that BH accretion disks may be fed by Roche-lobe overflow from lower-mass companions. We use these near-infrared SB constraints to calculate the number of caustic transits behind lensing clusters that the James Webb Space Telescope and the next-generation ground-based telescopes may observe for both Population III stars and their BH accretion disks. Typical caustic magnifications can be μ ≃ {10}4{--}{10}5, with rise times of hours and decline times of ≲ 1 year for cluster transverse velocities of {v}T≲ 1000 km s‑1. Microlensing by intracluster-medium objects can modify transit magnifications but lengthen visibility times. Depending on BH masses, accretion-disk radii, and feeding efficiencies, stellar-mass BH accretion-disk caustic transits could outnumber those from Population III stars. To observe Population III caustic transits directly may require monitoring 3–30 lensing clusters to {AB}≲ 29 mag over a decade.

  19. ROSA-III 200% double-ended break integral test RUN 901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Tasaka, Kanji; Koizumi, Yasuo; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Murata, Hideo; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the experimental data of RUN 901, a 200% double-ended break test at the recirculation pump suction line with the ROSA-III test facility. The ROSA-III test facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) system of the BWR/6. The facility has the electrically heated core, the break simulator and the scaled ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). The MSIV closure and the ECCS actuation were tripped by the liquid level in the upper downcomer. The channel inlet flows were measured by differential pressure transducers installed at the channel inlet orifices of the fuel assembly No.4. The PCT (Peak Cladding Temperature) was 780 K occured during the blowdown phase in RUN 901. The whole core was quenched after the ECCS actuation and the effectiveness of ECCS has been confirmed. (author)

  20. Evaluation of candidate magnetohydrodynamic materials for the U-02 Phase III test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1978-06-01

    As part of a cooperative U.S.--U.S.S.R. program, electrode and insulator materials tested at the Westinghouse Electrode Systems Test Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were evaluated. From this evaluation materials will be selected for use in the third phase of tests being conducted in the U-02 magnetohydrodynamics test facility in the Soviet Union. Electrode and insulator materials were examined with both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The cathodes were found to behave differently from the anodes; most notably, the cathodes showed greater potassium interaction. The lanthanum chromite-based electrodes (excluding those fabricated by plasma-spraying) are recommended for testing in the U-02 Phase III test. Hotpressed, fused-grained MgO and sintered MgAl 2 O 4 are recommended as insulator materials. The electrode attachment techniques used in the Westinghouse Tests were inadequate and need to be modified for the U-02 test

  1. Robust electrochemical analysis of As(III) integrating with interference tests: A case study in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhong-Gang [Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chen, Xing; Liu, Jin-Huai [Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Huang, Xing-Jiu, E-mail: xingjiuhuang@iim.ac.cn [Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Robust determination of As(III) in Togtoh water samples has been demonstrated. • The results were comparable to that obtained by ICP–AES. • No obvious interference was observed after a series of interference tests. • Robust stability was obtained in long-term measurements. - Abstract: In Togtoh region of Inner Mongolia, northern China, groundwater encountered high concentrations As contamination (greater than 50 μg L{sup −1}) causes an increasing concern. This work demonstrates an electrochemical protocol for robust (efficient and accurate) determination of As(III) in Togtoh water samples using Au microwire electrode without the need of pretreatment or clean-up steps. Considering the complicated conditions of Togtoh water, the efficiency of Au microwire electrode was systematically evaluated by a series of interference tests, stability and reproducibility measurements. No obvious interference on the determination of As(III) was observed. Especially, the influence of humic acid (HA) was intensively investigated. Electrode stability was also observed with long-term measurements (70 days) in Togtoh water solution and under different temperatures (0–35 °C). Excellent reproducibility (RSD:1.28%) was observed from different batches of Au microwire electrodes. The results obtained at Au microwire electrode were comparable to that obtained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP–AES), indicating a good accuracy. These evaluations (efficiency, robustness, and accuracy) demonstrated that the Au microwire electrode was able to determine As(III) in application to real environmental samples.

  2. CLUMP-3D: Testing ΛCDM with Galaxy Cluster Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, Mauro; Umetsu, Keiichi; Ettori, Stefano; Sayers, Jack; Chiu, I.-Non; Meneghetti, Massimo; Vega-Ferrero, Jesús; Zitrin, Adi

    2018-06-01

    The ΛCDM model of structure formation makes strong predictions on the concentration and shape of dark matter (DM) halos, which are determined by mass accretion processes. Comparison between predicted shapes and observations provides a geometric test of the ΛCDM model. Accurate and precise measurements needs a full three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the cluster mass distribution. We accomplish this with a multi-probe 3D analysis of the X-ray regular Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) clusters combining strong and weak lensing, X-ray photometry and spectroscopy, and the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect (SZe). The cluster shapes and concentrations are consistent with ΛCDM predictions. The CLASH clusters are randomly oriented, as expected given the sample selection criteria. Shapes agree with numerical results for DM-only halos, which hints at baryonic physics being less effective in making halos rounder.

  3. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. I. LS III +46 11: a very massive O3.5 If* + O3.5 If* binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Negueruela, I.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Pellerin, A.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Sota, A.; Marco, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; Sanchez Bermudez, J.; Gamen, R. C.; Lorenzo, J.

    2015-07-01

    Context. It appears that most (if not all) massive stars are born in multiple systems. At the same time, the most massive binaries are hard to find owing to their low numbers throughout the Galaxy and the implied large distances and extinctions. Aims: We want to study LS III +46 11, identified in this paper as a very massive binary; another nearby massive system, LS III +46 12; and the surrounding stellar cluster, Berkeley 90. Methods: Most of the data used in this paper are multi-epoch high S/N optical spectra, although we also use Lucky Imaging and archival photometry. The spectra are reduced with dedicated pipelines and processed with our own software, such as a spectroscopic-orbit code, CHORIZOS, and MGB. Results: LS III +46 11 is identified as a new very early O-type spectroscopic binary [O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*] and LS III +46 12 as another early O-type system [O4.5 V((f))]. We measure a 97.2-day period for LS III +46 11 and derive minimum masses of 38.80 ± 0.83 M⊙ and 35.60 ± 0.77 M⊙ for its two stars. We measure the extinction to both stars, estimate the distance, search for optical companions, and study the surrounding cluster. In doing so, a variable extinction is found as well as discrepant results for the distance. We discuss possible explanations and suggest that LS III +46 12 may be a hidden binary system where the companion is currently undetected.

  4. Data report on spray cooling test by ROSA-III, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Murata, Hideo; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1980-03-01

    A separate effect test on spray cooling was carried out using one core channel of ROSA-III BWR LOCA test facility. This report describes a heating experiment in the series of runs. (1) The cooling from top of the core by spray easily causes countercurrent flow limit due to the vaparization of falling water itself, so it becomes in effective. (2) The cooling by falling water is irregular and unstable. Therefore, the cooling by the falling water is not to be relied on. (3) CCFL at porous plate is hard to occur, compared with single pipe. A quantitative study of this is desired to evaluate reflooding rate. Some suggestions for ROSA-III design are also made. (author)

  5. A NEW TEST OF THE STATISTICAL NATURE OF THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel statistic is proposed to examine the hypothesis that all cluster galaxies are drawn from the same luminosity distribution (LD). In such a 'statistical model' of galaxy LD, the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are simply the statistical extreme of the galaxy population. Using a large sample of nearby clusters, we show that BCGs in high luminosity clusters (e.g., L tot ∼> 4 x 10 11 h -2 70 L sun ) are unlikely (probability ≤3 x 10 -4 ) to be drawn from the LD defined by all red cluster galaxies more luminous than M r = -20. On the other hand, BCGs in less luminous clusters are consistent with being the statistical extreme. Applying our method to the second brightest galaxies, we show that they are consistent with being the statistical extreme, which implies that the BCGs are also distinct from non-BCG luminous, red, cluster galaxies. We point out some issues with the interpretation of the classical tests proposed by Tremaine and Richstone (TR) that are designed to examine the statistical nature of BCGs, investigate the robustness of both our statistical test and those of TR against difficulties in photometry of galaxies of large angular size, and discuss the implication of our findings on surveys that use the luminous red galaxies to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation features in the galaxy power spectrum.

  6. CA II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. III. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF 14 CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Marcionni, N. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grocholski, A. J., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: nmarcionni@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: svillanova@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s{sup −1}, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at −1.1 and −0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age–metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  7. Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) response to head impacts and potential implications for athletic headgear testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Morr, Douglas; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-09-01

    The Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is the most widely used human impact testing surrogate and has historically been used in automotive or military testing. More recently, this ATD is finding use in applications evaluating athletic helmet protectivity, quantifying head impact dosage and estimating injury risk. But ATD head-neck response has not been quantified in omnidirectional athletic-type head impacts absent axial preload. It is probable that headgear injury reduction that can be quantified in a laboratory, including in American football, boxing, hockey, lacrosse and soccer, is related to a number of interrelated kinetic and kinematic factors, such as head center of gravity linear acceleration, head angular acceleration, head angular velocity, occipito-cervical mechanics and neck stiffness. Therefore, we characterized ATD head-neck dynamic response to direct head impacts in a series of front, oblique front and lateral head impacts. Key findings were: (1) impacts producing highest ATD resultant center of gravity linear acceleration resulted in the lowest resultant occipito-cervical spine bending moment/force. (2) Resultant ATD head angular velocity and angular acceleration did not appear coupled to impact direction at lower impact energy levels; these parameters were coupled at higher energy levels. (3) The ATD had progressively increasing occipito-cervical stiffness in extension, torsion and lateral bending, respectively. Because the ATD neck influenced head and neck impact dosage parameters, testing agencies, manufacturers and researchers should consider using the Hybrid III head form attached to a neck as a means to quantify head and neck injury risks as opposed to systems that do not utilize a neck. This heightened understanding of Hybrid III ATD head-neck response, and consideration of order of stiffest axes in the lateral, oblique and extension directions, respectively, should aid in the development of head and neck injury

  8. TESTING STRICT HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM IN SIMULATED CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR A1689

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Umetsu, K.; Chiu, I.-N.; Chen, P.; Hearn, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Bryan, G.; Shang, C.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate mass determination of clusters of galaxies is crucial if they are to be used as cosmological probes. However, there are some discrepancies between cluster masses determined based on gravitational lensing and X-ray observations assuming strict hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e., the equilibrium gas pressure is provided entirely by thermal pressure). Cosmological simulations suggest that turbulent gas motions remaining from hierarchical structure formation may provide a significant contribution to the equilibrium pressure in clusters. We analyze a sample of massive clusters of galaxies drawn from high-resolution cosmological simulations and find a significant contribution (20%-45%) from non-thermal pressure near the center of relaxed clusters, and, in accord with previous studies, a minimum contribution at about 0.1 R vir , growing to about 30%-45% at the virial radius, R vir . Our results strongly suggest that relaxed clusters should have significant non-thermal support in their core region. As an example, we test the validity of strict hydrostatic equilibrium in the well-studied massive galaxy cluster A1689 using the latest high-resolution gravitational lensing and X-ray observations. We find a contribution of about 40% from non-thermal pressure within the core region of A1689, suggesting an alternate explanation for the mass discrepancy: the strict hydrostatic equilibrium is not valid in this region.

  9. Evaluating Tests of Virialization and Substructure Using Galaxy Clusters in the ORELSE Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, N.; Lemaux, B. C.; Tomczak, A. R.; Shen, L.; Pelliccia, D.; Lubin, L. M.; Kocevski, D. D.; Wu, P.-F.; Gal, R. R.; Mei, S.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Squires, G. K.

    2018-05-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of different indicators of cluster virialization using 12 large-scale structures in the ORELSE survey spanning from 0.7 distributions of galaxy populations, and centroiding differences. For comparison to a wide range of studies, we used two sets of tests: ones that did and did not use spectral energy distribution fitting to obtain rest-frame colours, stellar masses, and photometric redshifts of galaxies. Our results indicated that the difference between the stellar mass or light mean-weighted center and the X-ray center, as well as the projected offset of the most-massive/brightest cluster galaxy from other cluster centroids had the strongest correlations with scaling relation offsets, implying they are the most robust indicators of cluster virialization and can be used for this purpose when X-ray data is insufficiently deep for reliable LX and TX measurements.

  10. Test computations on the dynamical evolution of star clusters. [Fluid dynamic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeletti, L; Giannone, P. (Rome Univ. (Italy))

    1977-01-01

    Test calculations have been carried out on the evolution of star clusters using the fluid-dynamical method devised by Larson (1970). Large systems of stars have been considered with specific concern with globular clusters. With reference to the analogous 'standard' model by Larson, the influence of varying in turn the various free parameters (cluster mass, star mass, tidal radius, mass concentration of the initial model) has been studied for the results. Furthermore, the partial release of some simplifying assumptions with regard to the relaxation time and distribution of the 'target' stars has been considered. The change of the structural properties is discussed, and the variation of the evolutionary time scale is outlined. An indicative agreement of the results obtained here with structural properties of globular clusters as deduced from previous theoretical models is pointed out.

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  12. A test of the adhesion approximation for gravitational clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei; Weinberg, David H.

    1993-01-01

    We quantitatively compare a particle implementation of the adhesion approximation to fully non-linear, numerical 'N-body' simulations. Our primary tool, cross-correlation of N-body simulations with the adhesion approximation, indicates good agreement, better than that found by the same test performed with the Zel-dovich approximation (hereafter ZA). However, the cross-correlation is not as good as that of the truncated Zel-dovich approximation (TZA), obtained by applying the Zel'dovich approximation after smoothing the initial density field with a Gaussian filter. We confirm that the adhesion approximation produces an excessively filamentary distribution. Relative to the N-body results, we also find that: (a) the power spectrum obtained from the adhesion approximation is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA, (b) the error in the phase angle of Fourier components is worse than that from TZA, and (c) the mass distribution function is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA. It appears that adhesion performs well statistically, but that TZA is more accurate dynamically, in the sense of moving mass to the right place.

  13. Football helmet drop tests on different fields using an instrumented Hybrid III head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Withnall, Chris; Wonnacott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    An instrumented Hybrid III head was placed in a Schutt ION 4D football helmet and dropped on different turfs to study field types and temperature on head responses. The head was dropped 0.91 and 1.83 m giving impacts of 4.2 and 6.0 m/s on nine different football fields (natural, Astroplay, Fieldturf, or Gameday turfs) at turf temperatures of -2.7 to 23.9 °C. Six repeat tests were conducted for each surface at 0.3 m (1') intervals. The Hybrid III was instrumented with triaxial accelerometers to determine head responses for the different playing surfaces. For the 0.91-m drops, peak head acceleration varied from 63.3 to 117.1 g and HIC(15) from 195 to 478 with the different playing surfaces. The lowest response was with Astroplay, followed by the engineered natural turf. Gameday and Fieldturf involved higher responses. The differences between surfaces decreased in the 1.83 m tests. The cold weather testing involved higher accelerations, HIC(15) and delta V for each surface. The helmet drop test used in this study provides a simple and convenient means of evaluating the compliance and energy absorption of football playing surfaces. The type and temperature of the playing surface influence head responses.

  14. Post-test analysis of ROSA-III experiment Run 702

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Osamu; Soda, Kunihisa

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the ROSA-III experiment with a scaled BWR test facility is to examine primary coolant thermal-hydraulic behavior and performance of ECCS during a posturated loss-of-coolant accident of BWR. The results provide information for verification and improvement of reactor safety analysis codes. Run 702 assumed a 200% split break at the recirculation pump suction line under an average core power without ECCS activation. Post - test analysis of the Run 702 experiment was made with computer code RELAP4J. Agreement of the calculated system pressure and the experiment one was good. However, the calculated heater surface temperatures were higher than the measured ones. Also, the axial temperature distribution was different in tendency from the experimental one. From these results, the necessity was indicated of improving the analytical model of void distribution in the core and the nodalization in the pressure vassel, in order to make the analysis more realistic. And also, the need of characteristic test was indicated for ROSA-III test facility components, such as jet pump and piping form loss coefficient; likewise, flow rate measurements must be increased and refined. (author)

  15. Lower extremity functional tests and risk of injury in division iii collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumitt, Jason; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Manske, Robert C; Niemuth, Paul E; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2013-06-01

    Functional tests have been used primarily to assess an athlete's fitness or readiness to return to sport. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single-leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time-loss sports-related low back or lower extremity injury. A total of 193 Division III athletes from 15 university teams (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to their sports seasons. Athletes performed the functional tests in the following sequence: SLJ, SLH, LEFT. The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury. Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury. Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time-loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more. Female athletes with a greater than 10% side-to-side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4-fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4). Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3-fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury. The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury. Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population. The single-leg hop for distance and the lower extremity functional test, when administered to Division III

  16. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. III. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: Fe AND AGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a ∼5 Gyr range, the ages of ∼2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a ∼200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex); the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of ∼20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope.

  17. Tests of a homogeneous Poisson process against clustering and other alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-05-01

    This report presents three closely related tests of the hypothesis that data points come from a homogeneous Poisson process. If there is too much observed variation among the log-transformed between-point distances, the hypothesis is rejected. The tests are more powerful than the standard chi-squared test against the alternative hypothesis of event clustering, but not against the alternative hypothesis of a Poisson process with smoothly varying intensity

  18. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE UV LEGACY SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. III. A QUINTUPLE STELLAR POPULATION IN NGC 2808

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Jerjen, H.; Piotto, G.; Renzini, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Anderson, J.; Bellini, A.; Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; D’Antona, F.; Ventura, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present the first results from multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 2808 as an extension of the Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic GCs (GO-13297 and previous proprietary and HST archive data). Our analysis allowed us to disclose a multiple-stellar-population phenomenon in NGC 2808 even more complex than previously thought. We have separated at least five different populations along the main sequence and the red giant branch (RGB), which we name A, B, C, D, and E (though an even finer subdivision may be suggested by the data). We identified the RGB bump in four out of the five RGBs. To explore the origin of this complex color–magnitude diagram, we have combined our multi-wavelength HST photometry with synthetic spectra, generated by assuming different chemical compositions. The comparison of observed colors with synthetic spectra suggests that the five stellar populations have different contents of light elements and helium. Specifically, if we assume that NGC 2808 is homogeneous in [Fe/H] (as suggested by spectroscopy for Populations B, C, D, E, but lacking for Population A) and that population A has a primordial helium abundance, we find that populations B, C, D, E are enhanced in helium by ΔY ∼ 0.03, 0.03, 0.08, 0.13, respectively. We obtain similar results by comparing the magnitude of the RGB bumps with models. Planned spectroscopic observations will test whether Population A also has the same metallicity, or whether its photometric differences with Population B can be ascribed to small [Fe/H] and [O/H] differences rather than to helium

  19. Recirculation pump suction line 2.8% break integral test at ROSA-III with HPCS failure, RUN 984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Anoda, Yoshinari; Tasaka, Kanji; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Murata, Hideo; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1984-06-01

    This report presents the experimental data of 2.8% suction line break test RUN 984 at ROSA-III, which was conducted as one of counterpart tests to FIST program sponsored by GE, EPRI and USNRC. The similarity study between the ROSA-III and FIST tests is on the way. The report also presents the information on the ROSA-III test facility, experiment results and the effects of the ADS flow rate and the MSIV trip level comparing with the previously conducted ROSA-III small break tests, RUNs 920 and 922. Major conclusions obtained are as follows. (1) Change of the MSIV trip level from L2 to L1 gives delay of MSIV closure and longer actuation of pressure control system in a small break LOCA. (2) Larger ADS flow gives faster depressurization rate and earlier ECCS actuation, which results in shorter fuel rod dryout period and lower PCT. (author)

  20. An Application of Graphical Approach to Construct Multiple Testing Procedure in a Hypothetical Phase III Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitee eTing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many multiple testing procedures (MTP have been developed in recent years. Among these new procedures, the graphical approach is flexible and easy to communicate with non-statisticians. A hypothetical Phase III clinical trial design is introduced in this manuscript to demonstrate how graphical approach can be applied in clinical product development. In this design, an active comparator is used. It is thought that this test drug under development could potentially be superior to this comparator. For comparison of efficacy, the primary endpoint is well established and widely accepted by regulatory agencies. However, an important secondary endpoint based on Phase II findings looks very promising. The target dose may have a good opportunity to deliver superiority to the comparator. Furthermore, a lower dose is included in case the target dose may demonstrate potential safety concerns. This Phase III study is designed as a non-inferiority trial with two doses, and two endpoints. This manuscript will illustrate how graphical approach is applied to this design in handling multiple testing issues.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy, and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject, and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit, and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the CO2 production measured by an additional gas analyzer at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were used to adjust the treadmill workload to meet

  2. MK-III function tests in JOYO. Primary main cooling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, Kazunori; Saito, Takakazu; Sumino, Kouzo; Karube, Kouji; Terano, Toshihiro; Sakaba, Hideo; Nakai, Satoru

    2004-06-01

    MK-III function test (SKS-1) that was carried out from October 17, 2001 through October 23, 2001 using MK-III transition core configuration and MK-III function tests (SKS-2) was carried out from January 27, 2003 through February 13, 2003 using MK-III core configuration. The major function tests results of primary cooling system were shown as follows; (1) The stability of the primary main pump flow control system was confirmed on both CAS (cascade) mode and Man (manual) mode. Also no divergence of flow and revolution of the pump were observed at step flow change disturbance. (2) The main motor was shifted to run-back flow control operation in about 54 seconds after scram. The flow rate and pump revolution at run-back operation of A and B cooling system were 167 m 3 /h and 117 rpm, 185m 3 /h and 118 rpm respectively. The pump revolution was within the design target revolution 122 rpm ± 8 rpm and the flow was over the 10% of the rated flow. (3) The pony motor was engaged in operation in about 39 seconds after the primary main pump trip. The flow rate and pump revolution at the pony motor operation of A and B cooling system were 180 m 3 /h and 124 rpm, 190 m 3 /h and 123 rpm respectively. These values were satisfied the design low limit of 93 rpm and 10% of the rated flow. (4) Free flow coast down time constant was longer than 10 seconds that was design shortest time at both the primary pump trip and run-back operation. (5) Pump over flow column sodium levels of both A and B cooling system at rated operating condition were NL-1550 mm and, NL-1468 mm respectively and were lower than NL-1581 mm of the design value. This result shows the new IHX pressure loss estimation was conservative. (6) It was confirmed that the primary main pump could operate with out scram for up to 0.6 seconds of external power supply loss. (author)

  3. Cluster Detection Tests in Spatial Epidemiology: A Global Indicator for Performance Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Guttmann

    Full Text Available In cluster detection of disease, the use of local cluster detection tests (CDTs is current. These methods aim both at locating likely clusters and testing for their statistical significance. New or improved CDTs are regularly proposed to epidemiologists and must be subjected to performance assessment. Because location accuracy has to be considered, performance assessment goes beyond the raw estimation of type I or II errors. As no consensus exists for performance evaluations, heterogeneous methods are used, and therefore studies are rarely comparable. A global indicator of performance, which assesses both spatial accuracy and usual power, would facilitate the exploration of CDTs behaviour and help between-studies comparisons. The Tanimoto coefficient (TC is a well-known measure of similarity that can assess location accuracy but only for one detected cluster. In a simulation study, performance is measured for many tests. From the TC, we here propose two statistics, the averaged TC and the cumulated TC, as indicators able to provide a global overview of CDTs performance for both usual power and location accuracy. We evidence the properties of these two indicators and the superiority of the cumulated TC to assess performance. We tested these indicators to conduct a systematic spatial assessment displayed through performance maps.

  4. Cluster Detection Tests in Spatial Epidemiology: A Global Indicator for Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, Aline; Li, Xinran; Feschet, Fabien; Gaudart, Jean; Demongeot, Jacques; Boire, Jean-Yves; Ouchchane, Lemlih

    2015-01-01

    In cluster detection of disease, the use of local cluster detection tests (CDTs) is current. These methods aim both at locating likely clusters and testing for their statistical significance. New or improved CDTs are regularly proposed to epidemiologists and must be subjected to performance assessment. Because location accuracy has to be considered, performance assessment goes beyond the raw estimation of type I or II errors. As no consensus exists for performance evaluations, heterogeneous methods are used, and therefore studies are rarely comparable. A global indicator of performance, which assesses both spatial accuracy and usual power, would facilitate the exploration of CDTs behaviour and help between-studies comparisons. The Tanimoto coefficient (TC) is a well-known measure of similarity that can assess location accuracy but only for one detected cluster. In a simulation study, performance is measured for many tests. From the TC, we here propose two statistics, the averaged TC and the cumulated TC, as indicators able to provide a global overview of CDTs performance for both usual power and location accuracy. We evidence the properties of these two indicators and the superiority of the cumulated TC to assess performance. We tested these indicators to conduct a systematic spatial assessment displayed through performance maps. PMID:26086911

  5. Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

    1977-03-01

    A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components

  6. Effects of 3d-4f magnetic exchange interactions on the dynamics of the magnetization of Dy(III)-M(II)-Dy(III) trinuclear clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointillart, Fabrice; Bernot, Kevin; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2007-01-01

    [{Dy(hfac)(3)}(2){Fe(bpca)(2)}] x CHCl(3) ([Dy(2)Fe]) and [{Dy(hfac)(3)}(2){Ni(bpca)(2)}]CHCl(3) ([Dy(2)Ni]) (in which hfac(-)=1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate and bpca(-)=bis(2-pyridylcarbonyl)amine anion) were synthesized and characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction shows that [Dy(2)Fe] and [Dy(2)Ni] are linear trinuclear complexes. Static magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a weak ferromagnetic exchange interaction between Ni(II) and Dy(III) ions in [Dy(2)Ni], whereas the use of the diamagnetic Fe(II) ion leads to the absence of magnetic exchange interaction in [Dy(2)Fe]. Dynamic susceptibility measurements show a thermally activated behavior with the energy barrier of 9.7 and 4.9 K for the [Dy(2)Fe] and [Dy(2)Ni] complexes, respectively. A surprising negative effect of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction has been found and has been attributed to the structural conformation of these trinuclear complexes.

  7. Experimental analysis of the power curve sensitivity test series at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Iriko, M.; Yonomoto, T.; Tasaka, K.

    1985-01-01

    The rig of safety assessment (ROSA)-III facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) boiling water reactor (BWR/6) system with an electrically heated core designed for integral LOCA and ECCS tests. Seven recirculation pump suction line break LOCA experiments were conducted at the ROSA-III facility in order to examine the effect of the initial stored heat of a fuel rod on the peak cladding temperature (PCT). The break size was changed from 200% to 5% in the test series and a failure of a high pressure core spray (HPCS) diesel generator was assumed. Three power curves which represented conservative, realistic and zero initial stored heat, respectively, were used. In a large break LOCA such as 200% or 50% breaks, the initial stored heat in a fuel rod has a large effect on the cladding surface temperature because core uncovery occurs before all the initial stored heat is released, whereas in a small break LOCA such as a 5% break little effect is observed because core uncovery occurs after the initial stored heat is released. The maximum PCTs for the conservative initial stored heat case was 925 K, obtained in the 50% break experiment, and that for the realistic initial stored heat case was 835 K, obtained in the 5% break experiment. (orig./HP)

  8. Effect of using heat-inactivated serum with the Abbott human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III antibody test.

    OpenAIRE

    Jungkind, D L; DiRenzo, S A; Young, S J

    1986-01-01

    The Abbott enzyme immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) antibody was evaluated to determine the effect of using heat-inactivated (56 degrees C for 30 min) serum as the sample. Each of 58 nonreactive serum samples gave a higher A492 value when tested after heat inactivation. Ten of the samples became reactive after heating. Heat-inactivated serum should not be used in the current Abbott HTLV-III antibody test, because thi...

  9. Region III involvement in quality control and quality assurance of radon testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, F.T.

    1990-01-01

    Region III has set a goal of increasing the testing for radon by our residents. One approach to this goal, is to bolster the public's confidence in the testing laboratories. We believe that this can be done most effectively by assuring the quality of the measurements available to the public. All Proficient Laboratories and Pennsylvania Certified Laboratories have submitted a quality assurance (QA) program. A QA audit checklist has been developed which will be finalized and made available to the states in our Region. This paper deals with inspection, verification, and documentation of the various laboratories and their compliance with prudent measuring protocols and addresses the following items: Organization and responsibilities; Sampling procedures; Detector chain of custody; Measurement procedures, quality control checks; State certification and RMP; Data resection, validation, and reporting; Quality assurance reports to management; Interview and discussion of QA audit with responsible officer

  10. Addenbrooke's cognitive examination III: diagnostic utility for mild cognitive impairment and dementia and correlation with standardized neuropsychological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A; Cortés-Martínez, Ana; Valles-Salgado, Maria; Rognoni, Teresa; Fernández-Matarrubia, Marta; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination III (ACE-III) is a screening test that was recently validated for diagnosing dementia. Since it assesses attention, language, memory, fluency, and visuospatial function separately, it may also be useful for general neuropsychological assessments. The aim of this study was to analyze the tool's ability to detect early stages of Alzheimer's disease and to examine the correlation between ACE-III scores and scores on standardized neuropsychological tests. Our study included 200 participants categorized as follows: 25 healthy controls, 48 individuals with subjective memory complaints, 47 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and 47 mild Alzheimer's disease, and 33 patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. The ACE-III memory and language domains were highly correlated with the neuropsychological tests specific to those domains (Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.806 for total delayed recall on the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test vs. 0.744 on the Boston Naming Test). ACE-III scores discriminated between controls and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (AUC: 0.906), and between controls and patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AUC: 0.978). Our results suggest that ACE-III is a useful neuropsychological test for assessing the cognitive domains of attention, language, memory, and visuospatial function. It also enables detection of Alzheimer's disease in early stages.

  11. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. III. A very massive star in apparent isolation from the massive cluster R136

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bestenlehner, J.M.; Vink, J.S.; Gräfener, G.; Najarro, F.; Evans, C.J.; Bastian, N.; Bonanos, A.Z.; Bressert, E.; Crowther, P.A.; Doran, E.; Friedrich, K.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; de Koter, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sana, H.; Soszynski, I.; Taylor, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    VFTS 682 is located in an active star-forming region, at a projected distance of 29 pc from the young massive cluster R136 in the Tarantula Nebula of the Large Magellanic Cloud. It was previously reported as a candidate young stellar object, and more recently spectroscopically revealed as a

  12. Pearson's chi-square test and rank correlation inferences for clustered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Joanna H; Fay, Michael P

    2017-09-01

    Pearson's chi-square test has been widely used in testing for association between two categorical responses. Spearman rank correlation and Kendall's tau are often used for measuring and testing association between two continuous or ordered categorical responses. However, the established statistical properties of these tests are only valid when each pair of responses are independent, where each sampling unit has only one pair of responses. When each sampling unit consists of a cluster of paired responses, the assumption of independent pairs is violated. In this article, we apply the within-cluster resampling technique to U-statistics to form new tests and rank-based correlation estimators for possibly tied clustered data. We develop large sample properties of the new proposed tests and estimators and evaluate their performance by simulations. The proposed methods are applied to a data set collected from a PET/CT imaging study for illustration. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. CONSTRAINTS ON HELIUM ENHANCEMENT IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M3 (NGC 5272): THE HORIZONTAL BRANCH TEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catelan, M.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; Cortes, C.; Grundahl, F.; Sweigart, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the presence of multiple populations showing various amounts of helium enhancement is the rule, rather than the exception, among globular star clusters. An important prediction of this helium enhancement scenario is that the helium-enhanced blue horizontal branch (HB) stars should be brighter than the red HB stars which are not helium enhanced. In this Letter, we test this prediction in the case of the Galactic globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272), for which the helium-enhancement scenario predicts helium enhancements of ∼>0.02 in virtually all blue HB stars. Using high-precision Stroemgren photometry and spectroscopic gravities for blue HB stars, we find that any helium enhancement among most of the cluster's blue HB stars is very likely less than 0.01, thus ruling out the much higher helium enhancements that have been proposed in the literature.

  14. The Successful Test Taker: Exploring Test-Taking Behavior Profiles through Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Lyrén, Per-Erik; Eklöf, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    To be successful in a high-stakes testing situation is desirable for any test taker. It has been found that, beside content knowledge, test-taking behavior, such as risk-taking strategies, motivation, and test anxiety, is important for test performance. The purposes of the present study were to identify and group test takers with similar patterns…

  15. Testing modified gravity with globular clusters: the case of NGC 2419

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinares, Claudio

    2018-05-01

    The dynamics of globular clusters has been studied in great detail in the context of general relativity as well as with modifications of gravity that strongly depart from the standard paradigm such as Modified Newtonian Dynamics. However, at present there are no studies that aim to test the impact that less extreme modifications of gravity (e.g. models constructed as alternatives to dark energy) have on the behaviour of globular clusters. This Letter presents fits to the velocity dispersion profile of the cluster NGC 2419 under the symmetron-modified gravity model. The data show an increase in the velocity dispersion towards the centre of the cluster which could be difficult to explain within general relativity. By finding the best-fitting solution associated with the symmetron model, we show that this tension does not exist in modified gravity. However, the best-fitting parameters give a model that is inconsistent with the dynamics of the Solar system. Exploration of different screening mechanisms should give us the chance to understand if it is possible to maintain the appealing properties of the symmetron model when it comes to globular clusters and at the same time recover the Solar system dynamics properly.

  16. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-III Test S3-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Iguchi, Tadashi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Akimoto, Hajime; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1991-07-01

    Two tests (Tests S3-20 and S3-22) were conducted with JAERI's Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-III in order to investigate water break-through and core cooling behaviors under the intermittent ECC water delivery from the hot legs to one location in the upper plenum and the alternate ECC water delivery to two locations in the upper plenum during reflooding, respectively. This report presents an analysis on Test S3-22 (the alternate case). Subcooled ECC water was injected alternately just above the upper core support plate above Bundles 7 and 8 and Bundles 3 and 4. The total injection rate from both injection ports was the same as that in SCTF Test S3-20 and Test S3-13. Analyzing the test data together with those of Tests S3-13 and S3-20 the following has been found: (1) Alternate break-through occurred immediately corresponding to the alternate ECC water injection except for one period, during which no break-through was observed. However, there observed a difference in break-through behavior that break-through was strong above the low power region, whereas weak above the high power region. (2) Although its break-through behavior was different, nearly the same core cooling as in the continuous or intermittent ECC water delivery case was observed except for the period around quench. (3) Around quench time, degraded core cooling comparing to the continuous or intermittent ECC water delivery case was observed. That is, quench time at the midplane level of the present test was 35 s later than in the continuous case. This is considered to result from decrease in core water inventory caused by water sealing at the cross-over leg. (J.P.N.)

  17. On the Observability of Individual Population III Stars and Their Stellar-mass Black Hole Accretion Disks through Cluster Caustic Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Wyithe, Stuart; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Timmes, F. X.; Andrews, Stephen K.; Kim, Duho; Kelly, Patrick; Coe, Dan A.; Diego, Jose M.; Driver, Simon P.; Dijkstra, Mark

    2018-06-01

    We summarize panchromatic Extragalactic Background Light data to place upper limits on the integrated near-IR surface brightness (SB) that may come from Population III stars and possible accretion disks around their stellar-mass black holes (BHs) in the epoch of First Light, broadly taken from z=7-17.We outline the physical properties of zero-metallicity Population III stars from MESA stellar evolution models through helium depletion and of BH accretion disks at z>7. We assume that second-generation non-zero-metallicity stars can form at higher multiplicity, so that BH accretion disks may be fed by Roche-lobe overflow from lower-mass companions.We use these near-infrared SB constraints to calculate the number of caustic transits behind lensing clusters that the James Webb Space Telescope and the next-generation ground-based telescopes may observe for both Population III stars and their BH accretion disks. Typical caustic magnifications can be 10^4-10^5x, with rise times of hours and decline times of z~Economia y Competitividad of Spain Consolider Project CSD2010-00064.

  18. Standard test method for plutonium assay by plutonium (III) diode array spectrophotometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the determination of total plutonium as plutonium(III) in nitrate and chloride solutions. The technique is applicable to solutions of plutonium dioxide powders and pellets (Test Methods C 697), nuclear grade mixed oxides (Test Methods C 698), plutonium metal (Test Methods C 758), and plutonium nitrate solutions (Test Methods C 759). Solid samples are dissolved using the appropriate dissolution techniques described in Practice C 1168. The use of this technique for other plutonium-bearing materials has been reported (1-5), but final determination of applicability must be made by the user. The applicable concentration range for plutonium sample solutions is 10–200 g Pu/L. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropria...

  19. Test-particle motion in Einstein's unified field theory. III. Magnetic monopoles and charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper (paper I), we developed a method for finding the exact equations of structure and motion of multipole test particles in Einstein's unified field theory: the theory of the nonsymmetric field. In that paper we also applied the method and found in Einstein's unified field theory the equations of structure and motion of neutral pole-dipole test particles possessing no electromagnetic multipole moments. In a second paper (paper II), we applied the method and found in Einstein's unified field theory the exact equations of structure and motion of charged test particles possessing no magnetic monopole moments. In the present paper (paper III), we apply the method and find in Einstein's unified field theory the exact equations of structure and motion of charged test particles possessing magnetic monopole moments. It follows from the form of these equations of structure and motion that in general in Einstein's unified field theory a test particle possessing a magnetic monopole moment in a background electromagnetic field must also possess spin

  20. Gold chloride clusters with Au(III) and Au(I) probed by FT-ICR mass spectrometry and MP2 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Kono H

    2014-05-07

    Microsolvated clusters of gold chloride are probed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and scalar relativistic electronic structure calculations. Electrospray ionization of aqueous AuCl3 leads to mononuclear clusters of types [AuCl2](+)(H2O)n (n = 0-4), [AuOHCl](+)(H2O)n (n = 0-1) and [AuCl2](+)(HCl)2(H2O)n (n = 0-4). In addition, strong ion signals due to dinuclear [Au2Cl5-xOHx](+)(H2O)n (x = 0-1) are present in ESI mass spectra of aqueous AuCl3, with the abundance of individual dinuclear species controlled by the concentration-dependent variation of the precursor complexes [AuCl2-xOHx](+)(H2O)n and AuCl3. Equilibrium structures, energies and thermodynamic properties of mono- and dinuclear gold clusters have been predicted using MP2 and CCSD(T) theory, and these data have been applied to examine the influence of microsolvation on cluster stability. Specifically, results from CCSD(T) calculations indicate that non-covalently bound ion-neutral complexes Au(+)(Cl2)(H2O)n, with formal Au(I), are the dominant forms of mononuclear gold with n = 0-2, while higher hydrates (n > 2) are covalently bound [AuCl2](+)(H2O)n complexes in which gold exists as Au(III). MP2 calculations show that the lowest energy structure of dinuclear gold is an ion-molecule cluster [Au2Cl(Cl2)2](+) consisting of a single-bridged digold-chloronium ion bound end-on to two dichlorine ligands, with two higher energy isomers, single-bridged [Au2Cl3(Cl2)](+) and double-bridged [Au2Cl5](+) clusters. Finally, AuAu interactions in the singly-bridged clusters [Au2Cl(Cl2)2](+)(H2O)n and [Au2Cl3(Cl2)](+)(H2O)n are examined employing a wide range of computational tools, including natural bond order (NBO) analysis and localized orbital locator (LOL) profiles.

  1. Chromium(III) release from chromium‐tanned leather elicits allergic contact dermatitis: a use test study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Behnaz; Matura, Mihály; Lidén, Carola

    2018-01-01

    Summary Background Chromium (Cr) is a common skin sensitizer. The use of Cr(VI) in leather is restricted in the EU, but that of Cr(III) is not. Objectives To assess whether prolonged exposure to Cr‐tanned leather with mainly Cr(III) release may elicit allergic contact dermatitis in Cr‐allergic individuals. Method Ten Cr‐allergic subjects and 22 controls were patch tested with serial dilutions of Cr(III) and Cr(VI), and with leather samples. They then conducted a use test with a Cr‐tanned and a Cr‐free leather bracelet over a period of 3 weeks, for 12 h per day. Cr deposited on the skin from the bracelets was measured in the controls, and the diphenylcarbazide test for Cr(VI) and extraction tests for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were conducted for the different leathers. Results Four of 10 Cr‐allergic subjects developed positive reactions to the Cr‐tanned bracelet within 7–21 days, whereas only 1 of 10 had a positive patch test reaction to this leather. Cr released from the Cr‐tanned leather was most probably entirely Cr(III), with a quantifiable amount being deposited on the skin. Conclusions This study strongly suggests that prolonged and repeated exposure to Cr‐tanned leather with mainly Cr(III) release is capable of eliciting allergic contact dermatitis in Cr‐allergic individuals. PMID:29322530

  2. Evidence for vacancy migration in stage III for copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antesberger, G.; Sonnenberg, K.; Wienhold, P.; Coltman, R.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Specimens doped with interstitial clusters and single vacancies have been annealed isochronally through the temperature range of stage III. Combining this annealing with a test irradiation after each annealing step reactions of mobile single test interstitials with the doping defects were studied. These reactions provide information about the variation of the doping defect structure during annealing. The experimental results suggest that vacancy clusters are formed in stage III

  3. Isolated ellipticals and their globular cluster systems. III. NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240, and IC 4889

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Alabi, A.; Richtler, T.; Lane, R. R.

    2015-05-01

    As tracers of star formation, galaxy assembly, and mass distribution, globular clusters have provided important clues to our understanding of early-type galaxies. But their study has been mostly constrained to galaxy groups and clusters where early-type galaxies dominate, leaving the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of isolated ellipticals as a mostly uncharted territory. We present Gemini-South/GMOS g'i' observations of five isolated elliptical galaxies: NGC 3962, NGC 2865, IC 4889, NGC 2271, and NGC 4240. Photometry of their GCSs reveals clear color bimodality in three of them, but remains inconclusive for the other two. All the studied GCSs are rather poor with a mean specific frequency SN ~ 1.5, independently of the parent galaxy luminosity. Considering information from previous work as well, it is clear that bimodality and especially the presence of a significant, even dominant, population of blue clusters occurs at even the most isolated systems, which casts doubts on a possible accreted origin of metal-poor clusters, as suggested by some models. Additionally, we discuss the possible existence of ultra-compact dwarfs around the isolated elliptical NGC 3962. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).Globular cluster photometry is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A59Appendices are available in

  4. MK-III function tests in JOYO. Dump heat exchanger (DHX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Hirotaka; Isozaki, Kazunori; Ishii, Takayuki; Ichige, Satoshi; Sakaba, Hideo; Nakai, Satoru; Nose, Shouiti

    2004-06-01

    A key part of the upgrade of the experimental fast reactor JOYO to the MK-III design was the replacement of the dump heat exchangers. MK-III function tests (SKS-1) of the new dump heat exchangers were carried out from August 27, 2001 through September 13, 2001. The major results of the function tests of the dump heat exchangers were as follows: (1) Air flow of the main blower with an inlet vane opening of 50% was confirmed to exceed the design rated flow of 7,700 m 3 /min. It was also demonstrated that an inlet vane opening of 100% provides about 130% of the design rated flow. This is because the new DHX flow route has more low pressure loss than the design value. (2) Tests of the air flow of the main blower demonstrated that with a fully opened inlet damper, a full opened outlet damper and an inlet vane opening of 0% provides about 5% of the design rated flow. (3) Free flow coast down characteristics of the main blower achieved an inlet vane 0% opening in an average of 7.9 seconds. Revolutions per minute of the main blower reached zero in an average of 8.7 seconds. The delay time from the opening of the vacuum contact breaker to the air flow decrease was approximately 1 second. This was a more conservative value than the 5 seconds assumed in design thermal transient analyses. (4) The loudest noise occurred with the main blower operating with a 25% inlet vane opening. At that time, the noise around the main blower was approximately 100 dB, and in the surrounding monitoring area boundary, the noise was 50 dB. This was confirmed to be within the standard of the Ibaraki prefectural ordinance. (5) Although the MK-III inlet vane and inlet damper drive unit was bigger than the MK-II unit, the accumulator tank was confirmed to provide sufficient volume during a compression air loss event. (author)

  5. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters - III. Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; De Petris, Marco; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MultiDark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to z = 4. We study the characteristics and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at z = 0. We extend the study of the baryon content to redshifts larger than 1 also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we compute the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton y-parameter. We find that the slope of this scaling law is steeper than what expected for a self-similarity assumption among these objects, and it increases with redshift mainly when radiative processes are included. We use three different criteria to account for the dynamical state of the protoclusters, and find no significant dependence of the scaling parameters on the level of relaxation. We exclude the dynamical state as the cause of the observed deviations from self-similarity in protoclusters.

  6. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. III. ON THE DISCREPANCY IN METALLICITY BETWEEN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AND THEIR PARENT ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Cho, Jaeil; Kim, Hak-Sub; Chung, Chul; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Blakeslee, John P.; Peng, Eric W.; Sohn, Sangmo T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the conundrums in extragalactic astronomy is the discrepancy in observed metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) between the two prime stellar components of early-type galaxies—globular clusters (GCs) and halo field stars. This is generally taken as evidence of highly decoupled evolutionary histories between GC systems and their parent galaxies. Here we show, however, that new developments in linking the observed GC colors to their intrinsic metallicities suggest nonlinear color-to-metallicity conversions, which translate observed color distributions into strongly peaked, unimodal MDFs with broad metal-poor tails. Remarkably, the inferred GC MDFs are similar to the MDFs of resolved field stars in nearby elliptical galaxies and those produced by chemical evolution models of galaxies. The GC MDF shape, characterized by a sharp peak with a metal-poor tail, indicates a virtually continuous chemical enrichment with a relatively short timescale. The characteristic shape emerges across three orders of magnitude in the host galaxy mass, suggesting a universal process of chemical enrichment among various GC systems. Given that GCs are bluer than field stars within the same galaxy, it is plausible that the chemical enrichment processes of GCs ceased somewhat earlier than that of the field stellar population, and if so, GCs preferentially trace the major, vigorous mode of star formation events in galactic formation. We further suggest a possible systematic age difference among GC systems, in that the GC systems in more luminous galaxies are older. This is consistent with the downsizing paradigm whereby stars of brighter galaxies, on average, formed earlier than those of dimmer galaxies; this additionally supports the similar nature shared by GCs and field stars. Although the sample used in this study (the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel, WFPC2, and WFC3 photometry for the GC systems in the Virgo galaxy cluster) confines our

  7. Post-test analysis of ROSA-III experiment RUNs 705 and 706

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Soda, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Osamu; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of ROSA-III experiment with a scaled BWR Test facility is to examine primary coolant thermal-hydraulic behavior and performance of ECCS during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident of BWR. The results provide the information for verification and improvement of reactor safety analysis codes. RUNs 705 and 706 assumed a 200% double-ended break at the recirculation pump suction. RUN 705 was an isothermal blowdown test without initial power and initial core flow. In RUN 706 for an average core power and no ECCS, the main steam line and feed water line were isolated immediately on the break. Post-test analysis of RUNs 705 and 706 was made with computer code RELAP4J. The agreement in system pressure between calculation and experiment was satisfactory. However, the calculated heater rod surface temperature were significantly higher than the experimental ones. The calculated axial temperature profile was different in tendency from the experimental one. The calculated mixture level behavior in the core was different from the liquid void distribution observed in experiment. The rapid rise of fuel rod surface temperature was caused by the reduction of heat transfer coefficient attributed to the increase of quality. The need was indicated for improvement of analytical model of void distribution in the core, and also to performe a characteristic test of recirculation line under reverse flow and to examine the core inlet flow rate experimentally and analytically. (author)

  8. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-III test S3-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ohnuki, Akira; Adachi, Hiromichi; Murao, Yoshio; Minato, Akihiko; Sakaki, Isao.

    1988-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of radial power distribution on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA with a combined injection type ECCS, a core cooling separate effect test S3-06 and a combined injection test S3-16-Phase 2 were performed using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-III. The radial power distributions in these two tests simulated a reference distribution for a PWR with a combined injection type ECCS and a steep distribution for a PWR with a cold leg injection type ECCS, respectively. Under the radial power distribution of a PWR with a combined injection type ECCS, the radial power distribution had little effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior in the two-phase up-flow region due to the approximately flat power distribution in this region (power ratio = 1.04 ∼ 1.08). The overall fluid behavior in the pressure vessel was also little affected by the radial power distribution. On the other hand, under the steep radial power distribution (peak power ratio = 1.36), the degree of heat transfer enhancement in high power bundles in the two-phase up-flow region was dominated by the bundlewise radial power ratio as in the case of a PWR with a cold leg injection type ECCS. (author)

  9. JOYO MK-III performance test. Criticality test, excess reactivity measurement and burn-up coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi; Kitano, Akihiro; Nagasaki, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    The MK-III performance test began in June 2003 to fully characterize the upgraded core and heat transfer system of the experimental fast reactor JOYO. This paper describes the results of the approach to criticality, the excess reactivity evaluation and the burn-up coefficient measurement. In the approach to criticality test, the MK-III core achieved initial criticality at the control rod bank position of 412.8 mm on 14:03 July 2nd, 2003. Because the replacement of the outer two rows of reflector subassemblies with shielding subassemblies reduced the source range monitor signals by a factor of 3 at the same reactor power compared with those in the MK-II core, we measured the change of the monitor's response and determined the count rate 2x10 4 cps.' as an appropriate value judging the zero power criticality. In the excess reactivity evaluation, the zero power excess reactivity at 250degC was 2.99±0.10%Δk/kk' based on the measured critical rod bank position and the measured control rod worths. The predicted value by the JOYO core management code system HESTIA was 3.13±0.16%Δk/kk', showing good agreement with the measured value. The measured excess reactivity was within the safety requirement limit. In the burn-up coefficient measurement, the excess reactivity change versus the reactor burn-up was evaluated. The measurement method adopted was to measure the control rod positions during the rated power operation. A value of -2.12x10 -4 Δk/kk'/MWd was obtained as a measured burn-up coefficient. The value calculated by HESTIA was -2.12x10 -4 Δk/kk'/MWd, and it agreed well with the measured value. All technical safety requirements for MK-III core were satisfied and the calculation accuracy of the core management code system HESTIA was confirmed. (author)

  10. Development of Ozone Detector for Ksr-Iii and Preliminary Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hyun Hwang

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available KARI (Korea Aerospace Research Institute has measured the ozone density profiles over the Korean Peninsular since the launch of the Korean Sounding Rocket-I (KSR-I in 1993. The purpose of ozone measurements is to obtain the stratospheric and mesospheric vertical ozone density profiles over the Korean Peninsular with solar UV radiometers. With the visible channel of the radiometer, the attitude variation of the rocket was corrected and compensated. Developed system is based on ozone detector designs onboard the KSR-I and KSR-II. We discuss the development of ozone detector which will be onboard the KSR-III and its circuit and vibration test results for EM Model.

  11. Test-retest reliability and practice effects of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ada H Y; Humphreys, Michael; Byrne, Gerard J; Pachana, Nancy A

    2012-09-01

    Although serial administration of cognitive tests is increasingly common, there is a paucity of research on test-retest reliabilities and practice effects, both of which are important for evaluating changes in functioning. Reliability is generally conceptualized as involving short-lasting changes in performance. However, when repeated testing occurs over a period of years, there will be some longer lasting effects. The implications of these longer lasting effects and practice effects on reliability were examined in the context of repeated administrations of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III in 339 community-dwelling women aged 40-79 years over 2 to 7 years. The results showed that Logical Memory and Verbal Paired Associates subtests were consistently the most reliable subtests across the age cohorts. The magnitude of practice effects varied as a function of subtests and age. The largest practice effects were found in the youngest age cohort, especially on the Faces, Logical Memory, and Verbal Paired Associates subtests. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Física, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Centro de Astroingeniería, Av. Vicuña Mackena 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Alonso-García, J. [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Av. Vicuña Mackena 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Cortés, C. [Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Facultad de Ciencias Básicas, Departamento de Física, Av. José Pedro Alessandri 774, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-02-20

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ΔY ≲ 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)—a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  13. Permutation Tests of Hierarchical Cluster Analyses of Carrion Communities and Their Potential Use in Forensic Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Joris L

    2016-05-19

    Forensic entomologists can use carrion communities' ecological succession data to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI). Permutation tests of hierarchical cluster analyses of these data provide a conceptual method to estimate part of the PMI, the post-colonization interval (post-CI). This multivariate approach produces a baseline of statistically distinct clusters that reflect changes in the carrion community composition during the decomposition process. Carrion community samples of unknown post-CIs are compared with these baseline clusters to estimate the post-CI. In this short communication, I use data from previously published studies to demonstrate the conceptual feasibility of this multivariate approach. Analyses of these data produce series of significantly distinct clusters, which represent carrion communities during 1- to 20-day periods of the decomposition process. For 33 carrion community samples, collected over an 11-day period, this approach correctly estimated the post-CI within an average range of 3.1 days. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Catelan, M.; Alonso-García, J.; Cortés, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ΔY ≲ 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)—a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  15. THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. III. IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS AND THE FORMATION OF DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfrommer, Christoph; Chang, Philip; Broderick, Avery E.

    2012-01-01

    A subset of blazars are powerful TeV emitters, dominating the extragalactic component of the very high energy gamma-ray universe (E ∼> 100 GeV). These TeV gamma rays generate ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs via pair production with the extragalactic background light. While it has generally been assumed that the kinetic energy of these pairs cascades to GeV gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering, we have argued in Broderick et al. (Paper I in this series) that plasma beam instabilities are capable of dissipating the pairs' energy locally on timescales short in comparison to the inverse Compton cooling time, heating the intergalactic medium (IGM) with a rate that is independent of density. This dramatically increases the entropy of the IGM after redshift z ∼ 2, with a number of important implications for structure formation: (1) this suggests a scenario for the origin of the cool core (CC)/non-cool core (NCC) bimodality in galaxy clusters and groups. Early-forming galaxy groups are unaffected because they can efficiently radiate the additional entropy, developing a CC. However, late-forming groups do not have sufficient time to cool before the entropy is gravitationally reprocessed through successive mergers—counteracting cooling and potentially raising the core entropy further. This may result in a population of X-ray dim groups/clusters, consistent with X-ray stacking analyses of optically selected samples. Hence, blazar heating works differently than feedback by active galactic nuclei, which we show can balance radiative cooling but is unable to transform CC into NCC clusters on the buoyancy timescale due to the weak coupling between the mechanical energy to the cluster gas. (2) We predict a suppression of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) power spectrum template on angular scales smaller than 5' due to the globally reduced central pressure of groups and clusters forming after z ∼ 1. This allows for a larger rms amplitude of the density power

  16. Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Two new tests to the distance duality relation with galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-da-Costa, Simony [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatório Nacional, Street General José Cristino, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Busti, Vinicius C. [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Holanda, Rodrigo F.L., E-mail: simonycosta.nic@gmail.com, E-mail: vcbusti@astro.iag.usp.br, E-mail: holanda@uepb.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, Street Baraúnas, Campina Grande (Brazil)

    2015-10-01

    The cosmic distance duality relation is a milestone of cosmology involving the luminosity and angular diameter distances. Any departure of the relation points to new physics or systematic errors in the observations, therefore tests of the relation are extremely important to build a consistent cosmological framework. Here, two new tests are proposed based on galaxy clusters observations (angular diameter distance and gas mass fraction) and H(z) measurements. By applying Gaussian Processes, a non-parametric method, we are able to derive constraints on departures of the relation where no evidence of deviation is found in both methods, reinforcing the cosmological and astrophysical hypotheses adopted so far.

  18. Summary report of the experimental fast reactor JOYO MK-III performance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yukimoto; Aoyama, Takafumi; Yoshida, Akihiro

    2004-03-01

    An upgrading project (MK-III project) was started to improve the irradiation capability of the experimental fast reactor JOYO. In this project, core replacement and increase of the reactor thermal power by the factor 1.4 were necessary for increasing the maximum fast neutron flux by the factor 1.3 and doubling the capacity for irradiation rigs. The modification of the cooling system that included the replacement of the main intermediate heat exchangers and the dump heat exchangers was completed in September 2000. After a series of system function tests, the performance test, of which objective is to fully characterize the upgraded core and heat transfer system, was started in June 2003. Twenty eight tests were selected and carried out as performance test, in order to confirm that the whole plant satisfy the design criteria and have sufficient characteristics (data necessary for safe and steady operation, core management, reactor control and monitoring) as an irradiation bed. After attaining the initial criticality of the core on 2nd July 2003, core characteristics (the excess reactivity, the isotherm temperature reactivity coefficient, the power reactivity coefficient and so on), plant characteristics (the plant heat balance, the adjustment of the temperature control system, the plant behavior at transient), shielding characteristics (dose rate distribution). As the result, it was confirmed that all the criteria regulated was satisfied and the core and plant have sufficient margins for full power operation, which was increased by the factor 1.4. Especially, nuclear analysis accuracy was verified by comparing the calculation with measured core characteristics of the initial core which consists of fifty five fresh fuel subassemblies. The operational data which is supposed to be useful for developing in-core anomaly detection system were also obtained. The operation manual and training simulator and design of next reactor development were revised based on the results

  19. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  20. Dynamical mass of a star cluster in M 83: a test of fibre-fed multi-object spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, S.L.; Grijs, R.; Anders, P.; Crowther, P.A.; Larsen, S.S.; Smith, L.J.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We obtained VLT/FLAMES+UVES high-resolution, fibre-fed spectroscopy of five young massive clusters (YMCs) in M 83 (NGC 5236). This forms the basis of a pilot study testing the feasibility of using fibre-fed spectroscopy to measure the velocity dispersions of several clusters simultaneously, in

  1. Dynamical mass of a star cluster in M 83: A test of fibre-fed multi-object spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, S.L.; de Grijs, R.; Anders, P.; Crowther, P.A.; Larsen, S.S.; Smith, L.J.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We obtained VLT/FLAMES+UVES high-resolution, fibre-fed spectroscopy of five young massive clusters (YMCs) in M 83 (NGC 5236). This forms the basis of a pilot study testing the feasibility of using fibre-fed spectroscopy to measure the velocity dispersions of several clusters simultaneously, in

  2. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  3. Propriedades psicométricas dos itens do teste WISC-III Propiedades psicométricas de los ítenes del subtest WISC-III Psychometric properties of WISC-III items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Marques de Figueiredo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O aperfeiçoamento de um teste se dá através da seleção, substituição ou revisão de itens, e quando um item é analisado, aumenta a validade e precisão do teste. Este artigo trata da apresentação dos resultados relativos às propriedades psicométricas dos itens dos subtestes do WISC-III, referentes a dificuldade, discriminação e validade. O WISC-III é um instrumento amplamente utilizado no contexto da avaliação da inteligência, e conhecer a qualidade dos itens é essencial ao profissional que administra o teste. As análises foram efetuadas com base nas pontuações de 801 protocolos do teste, aplicados por ocasião da pesquisa de adaptação a um contexto brasileiro. As análises mostraram que os itens adaptados apresentaram características psicométricas adequadas, possibilitando a utilização do instrumento como meio confiável de diagnóstico.El perfeccionamiento de un teste ocurre por la selección, sustitución o revisión de ítenes y, cuando un item es analisado, aumenta la validez y fiabilidad del teste. Ese artículo trata de la presentación de los resultados relativos a las propiedades psicométricas de los ítenes del subtest WISC-III, referentes a la dificultad, a la discriminación y a la validez. El WISC-III es un instrumento muy utilizado en el contexto de la evaluación de la inteligencia, y conocer a la calidad de los ítenes es esencial al profesional que administra el teste. Los análisis fueron efectuados con base el los puntajes de 801 protocolos de registro del teste, aplicados por ocasión de encuesta de estandarización a un contexto brasileño. Los análisis enseñaron que los ítenes adaptados apuntaron características psicométricas adecuadas, permitiendo la utilización del instrumento como medio confiable de diagnóstico.The improvement of the quality of items by selection, substitution and review will increase a test's validity and reliability. Current essay will present results referring to

  4. Testing Numerical Models of Cool Core Galaxy Cluster Formation with X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jason W.; Gantner, Brennan; Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, Eric J.

    2009-12-01

    Using archival Chandra and ROSAT data along with numerical simulations, we compare the properties of cool core and non-cool core galaxy clusters, paying particular attention to the region beyond the cluster cores. With the use of single and double β-models, we demonstrate a statistically significant difference in the slopes of observed cluster surface brightness profiles while the cluster cores remain indistinguishable between the two cluster types. Additionally, through the use of hardness ratio profiles, we find evidence suggesting cool core clusters are cooler beyond their cores than non-cool core clusters of comparable mass and temperature, both in observed and simulated clusters. The similarities between real and simulated clusters supports a model presented in earlier work by the authors describing differing merger histories between cool core and non-cool core clusters. Discrepancies between real and simulated clusters will inform upcoming numerical models and simulations as to new ways to incorporate feedback in these systems.

  5. Bank liquidity-stress testing and Basel III implementation in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Adam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the possibility of the implementation of the Basel III, namely the rules of banking sector. The population analyzed in this study comprises the 120 banks in Indonesia. The result shows that Indonesian banking sector has tremendous value if the Basel III standards is applied in Indonesia. Bank BCA has the lowest values with a score of 8.89 while Bank BRI has the highest value with a score of 9.68. This study concludes that the standard rules of Basel III would be able to be implemented in Indonesia.

  6. Bank Liquidity-stress Testing and Basel III Implementation in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Mohamad; Taufik, Taufik; Prathama, Muhammad Aditya Erfiyan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the possibility of the implementation of the Basel III, namely the rules of banking sector. The population analyzed in this study comprises the 120 banks in Indonesia. The result shows that Indonesian banking sector has tremendous value if the Basel III standards is applied in Indonesia. Bank BCA has the lowest values with a score of 8.89 while Bank BRI has the highest value with a score of 9.68. This study concludes that the standard rules of Basel III would be able to be...

  7. Occupant kinematics in low-speed frontal sled tests: Human volunteers, Hybrid III ATD, and PMHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Franck, Christopher T; Loftus, Stephen C

    2012-07-01

    A total of 34 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed, 17 low (2.5g, Δv=4.8kph) and 17 medium (5.0g, Δv=9.7kph), with five male human volunteers of approximately 50th percentile height and weight, a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD, and three male PMHS. Each volunteer was exposed to two impulses at each severity, one relaxed and one braced prior to the impulse. A total of four tests were performed at each severity with the ATD and one trial was performed at each severity with each PMHS. A Vicon motion analysis system, 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D kinematics (±1mm) (1kHz). Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. The forward excursions of the select anatomical regions generally increased with increasing severity. The forward excursions of relaxed human volunteers were significantly larger than those of the ATD for nearly every region at both severities. The forward excursions of the upper body regions of the braced volunteers were generally significantly smaller than those of the ATD at both severities. Forward excursions of the relaxed human volunteers and PMHSs were fairly similar except the head CG response at both severities and the right knee and C7 at the medium severity. The forward excursions of the upper body of the PMHS were generally significantly larger than those of the braced volunteers at both severities. Forward excursions of the PMHSs exceeded those of the ATD for all regions at both severities with significant differences within the upper body regions. Overall human volunteers, ATD, and PMHSs do not have identical biomechanical responses in low-speed frontal sled tests but all contribute valuable data that can be used to refine and validate computational models and ATDs used to assess injury risk in automotive collisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interpreting results of cluster surveys in emergency settings: is the LQAS test the best option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilukha, Oleg O; Blanton, Curtis

    2008-12-09

    Cluster surveys are commonly used in humanitarian emergencies to measure health and nutrition indicators. Deitchler et al. have proposed to use Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) hypothesis testing in cluster surveys to classify the prevalence of global acute malnutrition as exceeding or not exceeding the pre-established thresholds. Field practitioners and decision-makers must clearly understand the meaning and implications of using this test in interpreting survey results to make programmatic decisions. We demonstrate that the LQAS test--as proposed by Deitchler et al.--is prone to producing false-positive results and thus is likely to suggest interventions in situations where interventions may not be needed. As an alternative, to provide more useful information for decision-making, we suggest reporting the probability of an indicator's exceeding the threshold as a direct measure of "risk". Such probability can be easily determined in field settings by using a simple spreadsheet calculator. The "risk" of exceeding the threshold can then be considered in the context of other aggravating and protective factors to make informed programmatic decisions.

  9. Myth of the Master Detective: Reliability of Interpretations for Kaufman's "Intelligent Testing" Approach to the WISC-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmann, Gregg M.; Barnett, David W.

    1997-01-01

    Used computer simulation to examine the reliability of interpretations for Kaufman's "intelligent testing" approach to the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (3rd ed.) (WISC-III). Findings indicate that factor index-score differences and other measures could not be interpreted with confidence. Argues that limitations of IQ testing…

  10. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  11. A Review and Comparison of the Reliabilities of the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, and PAI Presented in Their Respective Test Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Edward A.; Streiner, David L.; Walfish, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a review of the literature to determine the most frequently used personality tests. Based on this review, internal consistency and test-retest reliability coefficients from the test manuals for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and Personality…

  12. Interpreting results of cluster surveys in emergency settings: is the LQAS test the best option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanton Curtis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster surveys are commonly used in humanitarian emergencies to measure health and nutrition indicators. Deitchler et al. have proposed to use Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS hypothesis testing in cluster surveys to classify the prevalence of global acute malnutrition as exceeding or not exceeding the pre-established thresholds. Field practitioners and decision-makers must clearly understand the meaning and implications of using this test in interpreting survey results to make programmatic decisions. We demonstrate that the LQAS test–as proposed by Deitchler et al. – is prone to producing false-positive results and thus is likely to suggest interventions in situations where interventions may not be needed. As an alternative, to provide more useful information for decision-making, we suggest reporting the probability of an indicator's exceeding the threshold as a direct measure of "risk". Such probability can be easily determined in field settings by using a simple spreadsheet calculator. The "risk" of exceeding the threshold can then be considered in the context of other aggravating and protective factors to make informed programmatic decisions.

  13. ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Subsystem Tests of a Prototype Cluster Processor Module

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Apostologlou, P; Ay, C; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Brawn, I P; Bohm, C; Dahlhoff, A; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Eisenhandler, E F; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Hanke, P; Hellman, S; Hidévgi, A; Hillier, S J; Jakobs, K; Kluge, E E; Landon, M; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Moye, T H; Mills, D; Moyse, E; Nix, O; Penno, K; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Schmitt, K; Schäfer, U; Silverstein, S; Staley, R J; Thomas, J; Trefzger, T M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; 9th Workshop On Electronics For LHC Experiments - LECC 2003

    2003-01-01

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger consists of a Preprocessor (PP), a Cluster Processor (CP), and a Jet/Energy-sum Processor (JEP). The CP and JEP receive digitised trigger-tower data from the Preprocessor and produce trigger multiplicity and Region-of-Interest (RoI) information. The trigger will also provide intermediate results to the data acquisition (DAQ) system for monitoring and diagnostic purposes by using Readout Driver (ROD) Modules. The CP Modules (CPM) are designed to find isolated electron/photon and hadron/tau clusters in overlapping windows of trigger towers. Each pipelined CPM processes 8-bit data from a total of 128 trigger towers at each LHC crossing. Four full-specification prototypes of CPMs have been built and results of complete tests on individual boards will be presented. These modules were then integrated with other modules to build an ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger subsystem test bench. Realtime data were exchanged between modules, and time-slice readout data were tagged and transferr...

  14. Image processing of globular clusters - Simulation for deconvolution tests (GlencoeSim)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Martin; Pata, Petr

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an algorithmic approach for efficiency tests of deconvolution algorithms in astronomic image processing. Due to the existence of noise in astronomical data there is no certainty that a mathematically exact result of stellar deconvolution exists and iterative or other methods such as aperture or PSF fitting photometry are commonly used. Iterative methods are important namely in the case of crowded fields (e.g., globular clusters). For tests of the efficiency of these iterative methods on various stellar fields, information about the real fluxes of the sources is essential. For this purpose a simulator of artificial images with crowded stellar fields provides initial information on source fluxes for a robust statistical comparison of various deconvolution methods. The "GlencoeSim" simulator and the algorithms presented in this paper consider various settings of Point-Spread Functions, noise types and spatial distributions, with the aim of producing as realistic an astronomical optical stellar image as possible.

  15. Development of III-nitride semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy and cluster beam epitaxy and fabrication of LEDs based on indium gallium nitride MQWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Chou Papo

    The family of III-Nitrides (the binaries InN, GaN, AIN, and their alloys) is one of the most important classes of semiconductor materials. Of the three, Indium Nitride (InN) and Aluminum Nitride (AIN) have been investigated much less than Gallium Nitride (GaN). However, both of these materials are important for optoelectronic infrared and ultraviolet devices. In particular, since InN was found recently to be a narrow gap semiconductor (Eg=0.7eV), its development should extend the applications of nitride semiconductors to the spectral region appropriate to fiber optics communication and photovoltaic applications. Similarly, the development of AIN should lead to deep UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). The first part of this work addresses the evaluation of structural, optical and transport properties of InN films grown by two different deposition methods. In one method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of nitrogen radicals by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted source. In an alternative method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of clusters containing approximately 2000 nitrogen molecules. These clusters were produced by adiabatic expansion from high stagnation pressure through a narrow nozzle into vacuum. The clusters were singly or doubly ionized with positive charge by electron impact and accelerated up to approximately 20 to 25 KV prior to their disintegration on the substrate. Due to the high local temperature produced during the impact of clusters with the substrate, this method is suitable for the deposition of InN at very low temperatures. The films are auto-doped n-type with carrier concentrations varying from 3 x 1018 to 1020 cm-3 and the electron effective mass of these films was determined to be 0.09m0. The majority of the AIN films was grown by the cluster beam epitaxy method and was doped n- and p- type by incorporating silicon (Si) and magnesium (Mg) during the film deposition. All films were grown under Al-rich conditions at relatively

  16. English Language Proficiency and Test Performance: An Evaluation of Bilingual Students with the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Ortiz, Samuel O.; Flanagan, Dawn P.; Chaplin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the findings of an exploratory empirical study that investigated the relationship between English Language Proficiency (ELP) on performance on the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities-Third Edition (WJ III) when administered in English to bilingual students of varying levels of ELP. Sixty-one second-grade…

  17. BWR 2 % main recirculation line break LOCA tests RUNs 915 and 920 without HPCS in ROSA-III program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the experimental results of BWR LOCA integral tests, RUNs 915 and 920, which are performed in the ROSA-III program simulating 2 % main recirculation line break LOCA tests with and without pressure control system operation. The ROSA-III test facility simulates a BWR system with volume scale of 1/424 and has four half-length electrically heated fuel bundles, two active recirculation loops, four types of ECCS's, and steam and feedwater systems. The report presents (1) the experimental results of 2 % small break LOCA phanomena in the ROSA-III system and (2) the effects of the pressure control system on the LOCA phenomena. The pressure control system contributed to (A) prevent bulk flashing in the early blowdown phase, (B) early closure of MSIV by L2 level trip, (C) early actuation of ADS by L1 level trip. However, the core thermal responses of the two tests were similar because of the similar mass inventory in PV after the ADS actuation in both tests. (author)

  18. Fabrication and testing of the sintered ceramic UO2 fuel - I - III, Part III - testing of sintered uranium dioxide properties dependent on the fabrication procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.; Ristic, M.M.

    1961-12-01

    The objective of this task was testing the influence of some parameters on the properties of sintered UO 2 . The influence of parameters tested were as follows: adhesives; pressure in the pressing procedure; temperature of sintering of the UO 2 powder. Other parameters were chosen according to the theoretical study. Sintering was done in argon atmosphere. Characterization of the UO 2 powder was performed meaning determining the needed chemical, physical and physico-chemical properties. Some new methods were developed within this task: SET method for measuring the specific surfaces, DTA, TGA, high-temperature torsion

  19. Current and Future Tests of the Algebraic Cluster Model of12C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Moshe

    2017-07-01

    A new theoretical approach to clustering in the frame of the Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) has been developed. It predicts, in12C, rotation-vibration structure with rotational bands of an oblate equilateral triangular symmetric spinning top with a D 3h symmetry characterized by the sequence of states: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4±, 5- with a degenerate 4+ and 4- (parity doublet) states. Our newly measured {2}2+ state in12C allows the first study of rotation-vibration structure in12C. The newly measured 5- state and 4- states fit very well the predicted ground state rotational band structure with the predicted sequence of states: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4±, 5- with almost degenerate 4+ and 4- (parity doublet) states. Such a D 3h symmetry is characteristic of triatomic molecules, but it is observed in the ground state rotational band of12C for the first time in a nucleus. We discuss predictions of the ACM of other rotation-vibration bands in12C such as the (0+) Hoyle band and the (1-) bending mode with prediction of (“missing 3- and 4-”) states that may shed new light on clustering in12C and light nuclei. In particular, the observation (or non observation) of the predicted (“missing”) states in the Hoyle band will allow us to conclude the geometrical arrangement of the three alpha particles composing the Hoyle state at 7.6542 MeV in12C. We discuss proposed research programs at the Darmstadt S- DALINAC and at the newly constructed ELI-NP facility near Bucharest to test the predictions of the ACM in isotopes of carbon.

  20. Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-01

    The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results

  1. Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-01

    The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: constraining modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eva-Maria; Percival, Will; Linder, Eric; Alam, Shadab; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Beutler, Florian; Brinkmann, Jon

    2018-04-01

    We use baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion from the completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, corresponding to Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, combined sample analysis in combination with cosmic microwave background, supernova, and redshift space distortion measurements from additional spectroscopic surveys to test deviations from general relativity. We present constraints on several phenomenological models of modified gravity: First, we parametrize the growth of structure using the growth index γ, finding γ = 0.566 ± 0.058 (68 per cent C.L.). Secondly, we modify the relation of the two Newtonian potentials by introducing two additional parameters, GM and GL. In this approach, GM refers to modifications of the growth of structure whereas GL to modification of the lensing potential. We consider a power law to model the redshift dependence of GM and GL as well as binning in redshift space, introducing four additional degrees of freedom, GM(z 0.5), GL(z 0.5). At 68 per cent C.L., we measure GM = 0.980 ± 0.096 and GL = 1.082 ± 0.060 for a linear model, GM = 1.01 ± 0.36 and GL = 1.31 ± 0.19 for a cubic model as well as GM(z 0.5) = 0.986 ± 0.022, GL(z 0.5) = 1.037 ± 0.029. Thirdly, we investigate general scalar tensor theories of gravity, finding the model to be mostly unconstrained by current data. Assuming a one-parameter f(R) model, we can constrain B0 < 7.7 × 10-5 (95 per cent C.L). For all models we considered, we find good agreement with general relativity.

  3. Aero thermal test results obtained on the n. C 5 EL 4 Cluster in the atmospheric pressure cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasc, B.

    1964-01-01

    In the framework of thermal studies on the EL-4 cluster, the full-scale tests at atmospheric pressure are designed to permit measurement of local values of the wall temperature, of the velocity and of the temperature in the fluid. The experimental results, obtained with the help of an original measuring apparatus, make it possible to follow the changes in these values along the cluster and to predict in much detail the in-pile thermal behaviour. In particular it is shown that changes in the wall temperature along the cluster are greatly influenced by disruption of the flow caused by grids and supports. (author) [fr

  4. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  5. Use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests by community health workers in Afghanistan: cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Toby; Rowland, Mark; Mikhail, Amy; Cundill, Bonnie; Willey, Barbara; Alokozai, Asif; Mayan, Ismail; Hasanzai, Anwar; Baktash, Sayed Habibullah; Mohammed, Nader; Wood, Molly; Rahimi, Habib-U-Rahman; Laurent, Baptiste; Buhler, Cyril; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2017-07-07

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends parasitological diagnosis of malaria before treatment, but use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) by community health workers (CHWs) has not been fully tested within health services in south and central Asia. mRDTs could allow CHWs to diagnose malaria accurately, improving treatment of febrile illness. A cluster randomised trial in community health services was undertaken in Afghanistan. The primary outcome was the proportion of suspected malaria cases correctly treated for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed malaria and PCR negative cases receiving no antimalarial drugs measured at the level of the patient. CHWs from 22 clusters (clinics) received standard training on clinical diagnosis and treatment of malaria; 11 clusters randomised to the intervention arm received additional training and were provided with mRDTs. CHWs enrolled cases of suspected malaria, and the mRDT results and treatments were compared to blind-read PCR diagnosis. In total, 256 CHWs enrolled 2400 patients with 2154 (89.8%) evaluated. In the intervention arm, 75.3% (828/1099) were treated appropriately vs. 17.5% (185/1055) in the control arm (cluster adjusted risk ratio: 3.72, 95% confidence interval 2.40-5.77; p < 0.001). In the control arm, 85.9% (164/191) with confirmed Plasmodium vivax received chloroquine compared to 45.1% (70/155) in the intervention arm (p < 0.001). Overuse of chloroquine in the control arm resulted in 87.6% (813/928) of those with no malaria (PCR negative) being treated vs. 10.0% (95/947) in the intervention arm, p < 0.001. In the intervention arm, 71.4% (30/42) of patients with P. falciparum did not receive artemisinin-based combination therapy, partly because operational sensitivity of the RDTs was low (53.2%, 38.1-67.9). There was high concordance between recorded RDT result and CHW prescription decisions: 826/950 (87.0%) with a negative test were not prescribed an antimalarial. Co

  6. TESTING THE DISTANCE-DUALITY RELATION WITH GALAXY CLUSTERS AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Lima, J. A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, we propose a new and model-independent cosmological test for the distance-duality (DD) relation, η = D L (z)(1 + z) -2 /D A (z) = 1, where D L and D A are, respectively, the luminosity and angular diameter distances. For D L we consider two sub-samples of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) taken from Constitution data whereas D A distances are provided by two samples of galaxy clusters compiled by De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al. by combining Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray surface brightness. The SNe Ia redshifts of each sub-sample were carefully chosen to coincide with the ones of the associated galaxy cluster sample (Δz A (z) ape D L (z), we have tested the DD relation by assuming that η is a function of the redshift parameterized by two different expressions: η(z) = 1 + η 0 z and η(z) = 1 + η 0 z/(1 + z), where η 0 is a constant parameter quantifying a possible departure from the strict validity of the reciprocity relation (η 0 = 0). In the best scenario (linear parameterization), we obtain η 0 = -0.28 +0.44 -0.44 (2σ, statistical + systematic errors) for the De Filippis et al. sample (elliptical geometry), a result only marginally compatible with the DD relation. However, for the Bonamente et al. sample (spherical geometry) the constraint is η 0 = -0.42 +0.34 -0.34 (3σ, statistical + systematic errors), which is clearly incompatible with the duality-distance relation.

  7. Waste retrieval sluicing system vapor sampling and analysis plan for evaluation of organic emissions, process test phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained to address vapor issues related to the sluicing of tank 241-C-106. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection Phase III (Jones 1999) and Process Test Plan Phase III, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection (Powers 1999). Analytical requirements include those specified in Request for Ecology Concurrence on Draft Strategy/Path Forward to Address Concerns Regarding Organic Emissions from C-106 Sluicing Activities (Peterson 1998). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System was installed to retrieve and transfer high-heat sludge from tank 241-C-106 to tank 241-AY-102, which is designed for high-heat waste storage. During initial sluicing of tank 241-C-106 in November 1998, operations were halted due to detection of unexpected high volatile organic compounds in emissions that exceeded regulatory permit limits. Several workers also reported smelling sharp odors and throat irritation. Vapor grab samples from the 296-C-006 ventilation system were taken as soon as possible after detection; the analyses indicated that volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds were present. In December 1998, a process test (phase I) was conducted in which the pumps in tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 were operated and vapor samples obtained to determine constituents that may be present during active sluicing of tank 241-C-106. The process test was suspended when a jumper leak was detected. On March 7, 1999, phase I1 of the process test was performed; the sluicing system was operated for approximately 7 hours and was ended using the controlled shutdown method when the allowable amount of solids were transferred to 241-AY-102. The phase II test was successful, however, further testing is required to obtain vapor samples at higher emission levels

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  9. Resemblance profiles as clustering decision criteria: Estimating statistical power, error, and correspondence for a hypothesis test for multivariate structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilborn, Joshua P; Jones, David L; Peebles, Ernst B; Naar, David F

    2017-04-01

    Clustering data continues to be a highly active area of data analysis, and resemblance profiles are being incorporated into ecological methodologies as a hypothesis testing-based approach to clustering multivariate data. However, these new clustering techniques have not been rigorously tested to determine the performance variability based on the algorithm's assumptions or any underlying data structures. Here, we use simulation studies to estimate the statistical error rates for the hypothesis test for multivariate structure based on dissimilarity profiles (DISPROF). We concurrently tested a widely used algorithm that employs the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) to estimate the proficiency of clustering with DISPROF as a decision criterion. We simulated unstructured multivariate data from different probability distributions with increasing numbers of objects and descriptors, and grouped data with increasing overlap, overdispersion for ecological data, and correlation among descriptors within groups. Using simulated data, we measured the resolution and correspondence of clustering solutions achieved by DISPROF with UPGMA against the reference grouping partitions used to simulate the structured test datasets. Our results highlight the dynamic interactions between dataset dimensionality, group overlap, and the properties of the descriptors within a group (i.e., overdispersion or correlation structure) that are relevant to resemblance profiles as a clustering criterion for multivariate data. These methods are particularly useful for multivariate ecological datasets that benefit from distance-based statistical analyses. We propose guidelines for using DISPROF as a clustering decision tool that will help future users avoid potential pitfalls during the application of methods and the interpretation of results.

  10. A cluster analytic study of the Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children-IV in children referred for psychoeducational assessment due to persistent academic difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Corinne R; Casey, Joseph E; Ricciardi, Philip W R

    2014-02-01

    Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children-IV core subtest scores of 472 children were cluster analyzed to determine if reliable and valid subgroups would emerge. Three subgroups were identified. Clusters were reliable across different stages of the analysis as well as across algorithms and samples. With respect to external validity, the Globally Low cluster differed from the other two clusters on Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II Word Reading, Numerical Operations, and Spelling subtests, whereas the latter two clusters did not differ from one another. The clusters derived have been identified in studies using previous WISC editions. Clusters characterized by poor performance on subtests historically associated with the VIQ (i.e., VCI + WMI) and PIQ (i.e., POI + PSI) did not emerge, nor did a cluster characterized by low scores on PRI subtests. Picture Concepts represented the highest subtest score in every cluster, failing to vary in a predictable manner with the other PRI subtests.

  11. The potential of clustering methods to define intersection test scenarios: Assessing real-life performance of AEB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ulrich; Lubbe, Nils

    2018-04-01

    Intersection accidents are frequent and harmful. The accident types 'straight crossing path' (SCP), 'left turn across path - oncoming direction' (LTAP/OD), and 'left-turn across path - lateral direction' (LTAP/LD) represent around 95% of all intersection accidents and one-third of all police-reported car-to-car accidents in Germany. The European New Car Assessment Program (Euro NCAP) have announced that intersection scenarios will be included in their rating from 2020; however, how these scenarios are to be tested has not been defined. This study investigates whether clustering methods can be used to identify a small number of test scenarios sufficiently representative of the accident dataset to evaluate Intersection Automated Emergency Braking (AEB). Data from the German In-Depth Accident Study (GIDAS) and the GIDAS-based Pre-Crash Matrix (PCM) from 1999 to 2016, containing 784 SCP and 453 LTAP/OD accidents, were analyzed with principal component methods to identify variables that account for the relevant total variances of the sample. Three different methods for data clustering were applied to each of the accident types, two similarity-based approaches, namely Hierarchical Clustering (HC) and Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM), and the probability-based Latent Class Clustering (LCC). The optimum number of clusters was derived for HC and PAM with the silhouette method. The PAM algorithm was both initiated with random start medoid selection and medoids from HC. For LCC, the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) was used to determine the optimal number of clusters. Test scenarios were defined from optimal cluster medoids weighted by their real-life representation in GIDAS. The set of variables for clustering was further varied to investigate the influence of variable type and character. We quantified how accurately each cluster variation represents real-life AEB performance using pre-crash simulations with PCM data and a generic algorithm for AEB intervention. The

  12. DENBRAN: A basic program for a significance test for multivariate normality of clusters from branching patterns in dendrograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneath, P. H. A.

    A BASIC program is presented for significance tests to determine whether a dendrogram is derived from clustering of points that belong to a single multivariate normal distribution. The significance tests are based on statistics of the Kolmogorov—Smirnov type, obtained by comparing the observed cumulative graph of branch levels with a graph for the hypothesis of multivariate normality. The program also permits testing whether the dendrogram could be from a cluster of lower dimensionality due to character correlations. The program makes provision for three similarity coefficients, (1) Euclidean distances, (2) squared Euclidean distances, and (3) Simple Matching Coefficients, and for five cluster methods (1) WPGMA, (2) UPGMA, (3) Single Linkage (or Minimum Spanning Trees), (4) Complete Linkage, and (5) Ward's Increase in Sums of Squares. The program is entitled DENBRAN.

  13. BWR 200 % recirculation pump suction line break LOCA tests, RUNs 942 and 943 at ROSA-III without HPCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Murata, Hideo; Koizumi, Yasuo

    1986-03-01

    This report presents the experimental results of RUNs 942 and 943 in ROSA-III program, which are 200 % recirculation pump suction line break LOCA tests with assumption of HPCS failure. The ROSA-III test facility simulates a BWR system with volume scale of 1/424 and has four half-length electrically heated fuel bundles, two active recirculation loops, ECCS's, and steam and feedwater systems. Effects of initial core void distribution and other fluid conditions on overall LOCA phenomena with special interest on transient core cooling phenomena were investigated by comparing the present test results with those of RUN 926, a 200 % suction line break test with standard initial fluid conditions. The initial core outlet quality was changed between 5 % and 43 %. As conclusions, (1) the initial lower core flow and higher void fraction affected significantly the core cooling conditions and resulted in earlier and higher PCT. (2) The lower plenum flashing temporarily contributed to cool down the core. (3) Flashing of remained hot water in the feedwater line affected slightly the pressure response and delayed the actuation of LPCI by 11 seconds. (4) The whole core was completely cooled down within 104 seconds after the LPCI actuation in these large break tests. (author)

  14. Shock Isolation Elements Testing for High Input Loadings. Volume III. Mechanical Shock Isolation Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*GUIDED MISSILE SILOS, SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*SPRINGS, (*SHOCK(MECHANICS), REDUCTION), TORSION BARS, ELASTOMERS, DAMPING, EQUATIONS OF MOTION, MODEL TESTS, TEST METHODS, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, HARDENING.

  15. BWR recirculation loop discharge line break LOCA tests with break areas of 50 and 100% assuming HPCS failure at ROSA-III test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Murata, Hideo; Shiba, Masayoshi; Iriko, Masanori.

    1985-03-01

    This report presents the experimental results of RUN 962 and RUN 963 in ROSA-III program, which are 50 and 100 % break LOCA tests at the BWR recirculation pump discharge line, respectively. The ROSA-III test facility simulates a volumetrically scaled (1/424) BWR system and has four half-length electrically heated fuel bundles, two active recirculation loops, three types of ECCSs and steam and feedwater systems. The experimental data of RUN 962 and RUN 963 were compared with those of RUN 961, a 200 % discharge line break test to study the break area effects on the transient thermal hydraulic phenomena. The least flow areas at the jet pump drive nozzles and recirculation pump discharge nozzle in the broken recirculation loop limitted the discharge flows from the pressure vessel and the depressurization rate in the 100 and 200 % break tests, whereas the least flow area at break nozzle limitted the depressurization rate in the 50 % break test. The highest PCT was observed in the 50 % break test among the three tests. (author)

  16. HIV self-testing among female sex workers in Zambia: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M Chanda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV self-testing (HIVST may play a role in addressing gaps in HIV testing coverage and as an entry point for HIV prevention services. We conducted a cluster randomized trial of 2 HIVST distribution mechanisms compared to the standard of care among female sex workers (FSWs in Zambia.Trained peer educators in Kapiri Mposhi, Chirundu, and Livingstone, Zambia, each recruited 6 FSW participants. Peer educator-FSW groups were randomized to 1 of 3 arms: (1 delivery (direct distribution of an oral HIVST from the peer educator, (2 coupon (a coupon for collection of an oral HIVST from a health clinic/pharmacy, or (3 standard-of-care HIV testing. Participants in the 2 HIVST arms received 2 kits: 1 at baseline and 1 at 10 weeks. The primary outcome was any self-reported HIV testing in the past month at the 1- and 4-month visits, as HIVST can replace other types of HIV testing. Secondary outcomes included linkage to care, HIVST use in the HIVST arms, and adverse events. Participants completed questionnaires at 1 and 4 months following peer educator interventions. In all, 965 participants were enrolled between September 16 and October 12, 2016 (delivery, N = 316; coupon, N = 329; standard of care, N = 320; 20% had never tested for HIV. Overall HIV testing at 1 month was 94.9% in the delivery arm, 84.4% in the coupon arm, and 88.5% in the standard-of-care arm (delivery versus standard of care risk ratio [RR] = 1.07, 95% CI 0.99-1.15, P = 0.10; coupon versus standard of care RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.86-1.05, P = 0.29; delivery versus coupon RR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.22, P = 0.005. Four-month rates were 84.1% for the delivery arm, 79.8% for the coupon arm, and 75.1% for the standard-of-care arm (delivery versus standard of care RR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.98-1.27, P = 0.11; coupon versus standard of care RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.92-1.22, P = 0.42; delivery versus coupon RR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.18, P = 0.40. At 1 month, the majority of HIV tests were self-tests (88.4%. HIV self-test

  17. HIV self-testing among female sex workers in Zambia: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Michael M; Ortblad, Katrina F; Mwale, Magdalene; Chongo, Steven; Kanchele, Catherine; Kamungoma, Nyambe; Fullem, Andrew; Dunn, Caitlin; Barresi, Leah G; Harling, Guy; Bärnighausen, Till; Oldenburg, Catherine E

    2017-11-01

    HIV self-testing (HIVST) may play a role in addressing gaps in HIV testing coverage and as an entry point for HIV prevention services. We conducted a cluster randomized trial of 2 HIVST distribution mechanisms compared to the standard of care among female sex workers (FSWs) in Zambia. Trained peer educators in Kapiri Mposhi, Chirundu, and Livingstone, Zambia, each recruited 6 FSW participants. Peer educator-FSW groups were randomized to 1 of 3 arms: (1) delivery (direct distribution of an oral HIVST from the peer educator), (2) coupon (a coupon for collection of an oral HIVST from a health clinic/pharmacy), or (3) standard-of-care HIV testing. Participants in the 2 HIVST arms received 2 kits: 1 at baseline and 1 at 10 weeks. The primary outcome was any self-reported HIV testing in the past month at the 1- and 4-month visits, as HIVST can replace other types of HIV testing. Secondary outcomes included linkage to care, HIVST use in the HIVST arms, and adverse events. Participants completed questionnaires at 1 and 4 months following peer educator interventions. In all, 965 participants were enrolled between September 16 and October 12, 2016 (delivery, N = 316; coupon, N = 329; standard of care, N = 320); 20% had never tested for HIV. Overall HIV testing at 1 month was 94.9% in the delivery arm, 84.4% in the coupon arm, and 88.5% in the standard-of-care arm (delivery versus standard of care risk ratio [RR] = 1.07, 95% CI 0.99-1.15, P = 0.10; coupon versus standard of care RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.86-1.05, P = 0.29; delivery versus coupon RR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.22, P = 0.005). Four-month rates were 84.1% for the delivery arm, 79.8% for the coupon arm, and 75.1% for the standard-of-care arm (delivery versus standard of care RR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.98-1.27, P = 0.11; coupon versus standard of care RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.92-1.22, P = 0.42; delivery versus coupon RR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.18, P = 0.40). At 1 month, the majority of HIV tests were self-tests (88.4%). HIV self-test use

  18. TESTING STELLAR POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELS WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY COLORS OF M31's GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Kundu, Arunav

    2011-01-01

    Accurate stellar population synthesis models are vital in understanding the properties and formation histories of galaxies. In order to calibrate and test the reliability of these models, they are often compared with observations of star clusters. However, relatively little work has compared these models in the ugriz filters, despite the recent widespread use of this filter set. In this paper, we compare the integrated colors of globular clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with those predicted from commonly used simple stellar population (SSP) models. The colors are based on SDSS observations of M31's clusters and provide the largest population of star clusters with accurate photometry available from the survey. As such, it is a unique sample with which to compare SSP models with SDSS observations. From this work, we identify a significant offset between the SSP models and the clusters' g - r colors, with the models predicting colors which are too red by g - r ∼ 0.1. This finding is consistent with previous observations of luminous red galaxies in the SDSS, which show a similar discrepancy. The identification of this offset in globular clusters suggests that it is very unlikely to be due to a minority population of young stars. The recently updated SSP model of Maraston and Stroembaeck better represents the observed g - r colors. This model is based on the empirical MILES stellar library, rather than theoretical libraries, suggesting an explanation for the g - r discrepancy.

  19. The young star cluster population of M51 with LEGUS - II. Testing environmental dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Matteo; Adamo, A.; Calzetti, D.; Reina-Campos, M.; Colombo, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Chandar, R.; Dale, D. A.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Fumagalli, M.; Johnson, K. E.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Östlin, G.; Shabani, F.; Smith, L. J.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2018-06-01

    It has recently been established that the properties of young star clusters (YSCs) can vary as a function of the galactic environment in which they are found. We use the cluster catalogue produced by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) collaboration to investigate cluster properties in the spiral galaxy M51. We analyse the cluster population as a function of galactocentric distance and in arm and inter-arm regions. The cluster mass function exhibits a similar shape at all radial bins, described by a power law with a slope close to -2 and an exponential truncation around 105 M⊙. While the mass functions of the YSCs in the spiral arm and inter-arm regions have similar truncation masses, the inter-arm region mass function has a significantly steeper slope than the one in the arm region, a trend that is also observed in the giant molecular cloud mass function and predicted by simulations. The age distribution of clusters is dependent on the region considered, and is consistent with rapid disruption only in dense regions, while little disruption is observed at large galactocentric distances and in the inter-arm region. The fraction of stars forming in clusters does not show radial variations, despite the drop in the H2 surface density measured as a function of galactocentric distance. We suggest that the higher disruption rate observed in the inner part of the galaxy is likely at the origin of the observed flat cluster formation efficiency radial profile.

  20. Validity of FAA-approved color vision tests for class II and class III aeromedical screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    All clinical color vision tests currently used in the medical examination of pilots were studied regarding validity for prediction of performance on practical tests of ability to discriminate the aviation signal colors, red, green, and white given un...

  1. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Strader, Jay, E-mail: brodie@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  2. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Strader, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  3. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Testing the Effectiveness of Houvast: A Strengths-Based Intervention for Homeless Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenborg, Manon A. M.; Boersma, Sandra N.; van der Veld, William M.; van Hulst, Bente; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Wolf, Judith R. L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the effectiveness of Houvast: a strengths-based intervention for homeless young adults. Method: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 10 Dutch shelter facilities randomly allocated to an intervention and a control group. Homeless young adults were interviewed when entering the facility and when care ended.…

  4. A cluster randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of Houvast: A strengths-based intervention for homeless young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, M.A.M.; Boersma, S.N.; Veld, W.M. van der; Hulst, B. van; Vollebergh, W.A.M.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the effectiveness of Houvast: a strengths-based intervention for homeless young adults. Method: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 10 Dutch shelter facilities randomly allocated to an intervention and a control group. Homeless young adults were interviewed

  5. An Extension and Test of Sutherland's Concept of Differential Social Organization: The Geographic Clustering of Japanese Suicide and Homicide Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baller, Robert D.; Shin, Dong-Joon; Richardson, Kelly K.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to explain the spatial patterning of violence, we expanded Sutherland's (1947) concept of differential social organization to include the level of deviance exhibited by neighboring areas. To test the value of this extension, the geographic clustering of Japanese suicide and homicide rates is assessed using 1985 and 1995 data for…

  6. Comparison of tests for spatial heterogeneity on data with global clustering patterns and outliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hachey Mark

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to evaluate geographic heterogeneity of cancer incidence and mortality is important in cancer surveillance. Many statistical methods for evaluating global clustering and local cluster patterns are developed and have been examined by many simulation studies. However, the performance of these methods on two extreme cases (global clustering evaluation and local anomaly (outlier detection has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We compare methods for global clustering evaluation including Tango's Index, Moran's I, and Oden's I*pop; and cluster detection methods such as local Moran's I and SaTScan elliptic version on simulated count data that mimic global clustering patterns and outliers for cancer cases in the continental United States. We examine the power and precision of the selected methods in the purely spatial analysis. We illustrate Tango's MEET and SaTScan elliptic version on a 1987-2004 HIV and a 1950-1969 lung cancer mortality data in the United States. Results For simulated data with outlier patterns, Tango's MEET, Moran's I and I*pop had powers less than 0.2, and SaTScan had powers around 0.97. For simulated data with global clustering patterns, Tango's MEET and I*pop (with 50% of total population as the maximum search window had powers close to 1. SaTScan had powers around 0.7-0.8 and Moran's I has powers around 0.2-0.3. In the real data example, Tango's MEET indicated the existence of global clustering patterns in both the HIV and lung cancer mortality data. SaTScan found a large cluster for HIV mortality rates, which is consistent with the finding from Tango's MEET. SaTScan also found clusters and outliers in the lung cancer mortality data. Conclusion SaTScan elliptic version is more efficient for outlier detection compared with the other methods evaluated in this article. Tango's MEET and Oden's I*pop perform best in global clustering scenarios among the selected methods. The use of SaTScan for

  7. Cluster cosmological analysis with X ray instrumental observables: introduction and testing of AsPIX method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valotti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cosmology is one of the fundamental pillars of astrophysics, as such it contains many unsolved puzzles. To investigate some of those puzzles, we analyze X-ray surveys of galaxy clusters. These surveys are possible thanks to the bremsstrahlung emission of the intra-cluster medium. The simultaneous fit of cluster counts as a function of mass and distance provides an independent measure of cosmological parameters such as Ω m , σ s , and the dark energy equation of state w0. A novel approach to cosmological analysis using galaxy cluster data, called top-down, was developed in N. Clerc et al. (2012). This top-down approach is based purely on instrumental observables that are considered in a two-dimensional X-ray color-magnitude diagram. The method self-consistently includes selection effects and scaling relationships. It also provides a means of bypassing the computation of individual cluster masses. My work presents an extension of the top-down method by introducing the apparent size of the cluster, creating a three-dimensional X-ray cluster diagram. The size of a cluster is sensitive to both the cluster mass and its angular diameter, so it must also be included in the assessment of selection effects. The performance of this new method is investigated using a Fisher analysis. In parallel, I have studied the effects of the intrinsic scatter in the cluster size scaling relation on the sample selection as well as on the obtained cosmological parameters. To validate the method, I estimate uncertainties of cosmological parameters with MCMC method Amoeba minimization routine and using two simulated XMM surveys that have an increasing level of complexity. The first simulated survey is a set of toy catalogues of 100 and 10000 deg 2 , whereas the second is a 1000 deg 2 catalogue that was generated using an Aardvark semi-analytical N-body simulation. This comparison corroborates the conclusions of the Fisher analysis. In conclusion, I find that a cluster diagram that accounts

  8. Reactor building pressure proof test (PPT) and leak rate test (LRT) of Qinshan phase III (CANDU) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jun; Shi Jinqi; Fan Fuping

    2004-12-01

    As the first reactor building (R/B) without stainless steel liner in china, TQNPC studied the containment characteristics, such as strong concrete absorb/release air effect, poor containment penetration. etc. And carefully prepared test scheme and emergency response, creatively introduced the instrument air self-supply system in reactor building, developed the special measurement and analysis system for PPT and LRT, organized work under high-pressure on large-scale in the test. Finally got the containment leak rate result and the test-cost-time value is the best in all same type tests. (authors)

  9. SHAM beyond clustering: new tests of galaxy–halo abundance matching with galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-27

    We construct mock catalogs of galaxy groups using subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) and undertake several new tests of the SHAM prescription for the galaxy-dark matter connection. All SHAM models we studied exhibit significant tension with galaxy groups observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The SHAM prediction for the field galaxy luminosity function (LF) is systematically too dim, and the group galaxy LF systematically too bright, regardless of the details of the SHAM prescription. SHAM models connecting r-band luminosity, Mr, to Vacc, the maximum circular velocity of a subhalo at the time of accretion onto the host, faithfully reproduce galaxy group abundance as a function of richness, g(N). However, SHAM models connecting Mr with Vpeak, the peak value of Vmax over the entire merger history of the halo, over-predict galaxy group abundance. Our results suggest that no SHAM model can simultaneously reproduce the observed g(N) and two-point projected galaxy clustering. Nevertheless, we also report a new success of SHAM: an accurate prediction for Phi(m12), the abundance of galaxy groups as a function of magnitude gap m12, defined as the difference between the r-band absolute magnitude of the two brightest group members. We show that it may be possible to use joint measurements of g(N) and Phi(m12) to tightly constrain the details of the SHAM implementation. Additionally, we show that the hypothesis that the luminosity gap is constructed via random draws from a universal LF provides a poor description of the data, contradicting recent claims in the literature. Finally, we test a common assumption of the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) formalism, that the satellite LF need only be conditioned by the brightness of the central galaxy. We find this assumption to be well-supported by the observed Phi(m12).

  10. Towards Accurate Modelling of Galaxy Clustering on Small Scales: Testing the Standard ΛCDM + Halo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Manodeep; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Piscionere, Jennifer A.; Wibking, Benjamin D.

    2018-04-01

    Interpreting the small-scale clustering of galaxies with halo models can elucidate the connection between galaxies and dark matter halos. Unfortunately, the modelling is typically not sufficiently accurate for ruling out models statistically. It is thus difficult to use the information encoded in small scales to test cosmological models or probe subtle features of the galaxy-halo connection. In this paper, we attempt to push halo modelling into the "accurate" regime with a fully numerical mock-based methodology and careful treatment of statistical and systematic errors. With our forward-modelling approach, we can incorporate clustering statistics beyond the traditional two-point statistics. We use this modelling methodology to test the standard ΛCDM + halo model against the clustering of SDSS DR7 galaxies. Specifically, we use the projected correlation function, group multiplicity function and galaxy number density as constraints. We find that while the model fits each statistic separately, it struggles to fit them simultaneously. Adding group statistics leads to a more stringent test of the model and significantly tighter constraints on model parameters. We explore the impact of varying the adopted halo definition and cosmological model and find that changing the cosmology makes a significant difference. The most successful model we tried (Planck cosmology with Mvir halos) matches the clustering of low luminosity galaxies, but exhibits a 2.3σ tension with the clustering of luminous galaxies, thus providing evidence that the "standard" halo model needs to be extended. This work opens the door to adding interesting freedom to the halo model and including additional clustering statistics as constraints.

  11. Assessing contaminant sensitivity of endangered and threatened aquatic species: Part III. Effluent toxicity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Whites, D.W.; Augspurger, T.; Canfield, T.J.; Mount, D.R.; Mayer, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were conducted with Ceriodaphnia dubia, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and seven threatened and endangered (listed) fish species from four families: (1) Acipenseridae: shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum); (2) Catostomidae; razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus); (3) Cyprinidae: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), and spotfin chub (Cyprinella monacha); and (4) Poecillidae: Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis). We conducted 7-day survival and growth studies with embryo-larval fathead minnows and analogous exposures using the listed species. Survival and reproduction were also determined with C. dubia. Tests were conducted with carbaryl, ammonia-or a simulated effluent complex mixture of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol and permethrin at equitoxic proportions. In addition, Cape Fear shiners and spotfin chub were tested using diazinon, copper, and chlorine. Toxicity tests were also conducted with field-collected effluents from domestic or industrial facilities. Bonytail chub and razorback suckers were tested with effluents collected in Arizona whereas effluent samples collected from North Carolina were tested with Cape Fear shiner, spotfin chub, and shortnose sturgeon. The fathead minnow 7-day effluent test was often a reliable estimator of toxic effects to the listed fishes. However, in 21 % of the tests, a listed species was more sensitive than fathead minnows. More sensitive species results varied by test so that usually no species was always more or less sensitive than fathead minnows. Only the Gila topminnow was consistently less sensitive than the fathead minnow. Listed fish species were protected 96% of the time when results for both fathead minnows and C. dubia were considered, thus reinforcing the value of standard whole

  12. GALEN skin test study III: Minimum battery of test inhalent allergens needed in epidemiological studies in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, P.-J.; Burbach, G.; Heinzerling, L. M.; Edenharter, G.; Bachert, C.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bonini, S.; Bousquet-Rouanet, L.; Demoly, P.; Bresciani, M.; Bruno, A.; Gjomarkaj, M.; Canonica, G. W.; Darsow, U.; Durham, S.; Fokkens, W. J.; Giavi, S.; Gramiccioni, C.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Haahtela, T.; Kowalski, M. L.; Magyar, P.; Muraközi, G.; Orosz, M.; Röhnelt, C.; Stingl, G.; Todo-Bom, A.; von Mutius, E.; Wiesner, A.; Wöhrl, S.; Bousquet, J.; Zuberbier, T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The number of allergens to be tested in order to identify sensitized patients is important in order to have the most cost-effective approach in epidemiological studies. Objective: To define the minimal number and the type of skin prick test (SPT) allergens required to identify a patient

  13. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-III tests S3-7 and S3-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Iguchi, Tadashi; Iwamura, Takamichi

    1990-03-01

    It has been said that the Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) water injected into the hot legs flows into the upper plenum and then falls back to the core (i.e. break-through) during reflood phase in a German type Pressurized Water Reactor (GPWR) with the combined-injection-type ECCS, and that the break-through occurs where the water temperature at the tie plate area is lower and subcooled. Based on this information two tests were conducted with the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-III in order to investigate the effects of the water temperature distribution at the tie plate area on the break-through and the core cooling. In these tests, the subcooled ECC water was injected just above the Upper Core Support Plate (UCSP) in order to establish the desired water temperature distribution at the tie plate area. In one test (Test S3-7) the ECC water injection above the UCSP was performed above Bundles 3 and 4, and in the other test (Test S3-8) above Bundles 7 and 8 during initial 60 s a and then was changed to above Bundles 3 and 4. The test data were compared with those of Test S3-SH1, in which the injection was performed above Bundles 7 and 8 and the other test conditions were the same as in Tests S3-7 and S3-8. Analyzing these test data, the following has been found: The break-through occurs where the water temperature at the tie plate area is subcooled and the core cooling is enhanced significantly in the break-through region. The break-through location changes, with some time lag, following the change of the water temperature distribution at the tie plate area. Furthermore, the core cooling in the non-break-through regions is almost the same regardless of the location of the break-through. (author)

  14. Detection of endotoxins in radiopharmaceutical preparations. III. Limulus test assessment using radiopharmaceutical preparations; correlation with the rabbit pyrogen test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Y; Bahri, F; Bruneau, J; Dubuis, M; Dubuis, N; Merlin, L; Michaud, T; Peysson, S

    1986-01-01

    Experiments using 17 radiopharmaceuticals containing known amounts of added endotoxin show that none of them inhibits the pyrogenic reaction of the rabbit. Gelation of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) is inhibited by 4 of them: colloidal erbium 169Er citrate, colloidal rhenium 186Re sulfide, colloidal technetium /sup 99m/Tc (Re) sulfide for liver scintigraphy and the colloidal technetium /sup 99m/Tc (Re) sulfide for lymphography. This inhibition is cancelled, either by dilution or after neutral pH adjustment. Both controls were performed on 313 batches of various radiopharmaceuticals, 95% of results were identical (93% negative, 2% positive). The remaining 5% correspond to positive LAL tests vs negative rabbit tests on the same batches. No negative LAL test vs positive rabbit test was observed.

  15. BWR 1 % main recirculation line break LOCA tests, RUNs 917 and 918, without HPCS at ROSA-III program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Okazaki, Motoaki; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1988-07-01

    In a case of small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) at a boiling water reactor (BWR) system, it is important to lower the system pressure to cool down the reactor system by using either the high pressure core spray (HPCS) or the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The report presents characteristic test results of RUNs 918 and 917, which were performed at the rig-of-safety assessment (ROSA)-III program simulating a 1 % break BWR LOCA with an assumption of HPCS failure, and clarifies effects of the ADS delay time on a small break LOCA. The ROSA-III test facility simulates principal components of a BWR/6 system with volumetric scaling factor of 1/424. It is experimentally concluded that the ADS delay time shorter than 4 minutes results in a similar PCT as that in a standard case, in which the PCT is observed after actuation of the low pressure core spray (LPCS). And the ADS delay time longer than 4 minutes results in higher PCT than in the standard case. In the latter, the PCT depends on the ADS time, a 220 K higher PCT, for example, in a case of 10 minutes ADS delay compared with the standard case. (author) 52 refs. 299 figs

  16. ITER ECRH Upper Launcher: Test plan for qualification of the Diamond Torus Window Prototype III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.schreck@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Aiello, Gaetano; Meier, Andreas; Strauss, Dirk [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gagliardi, Mario; Saibene, Gabriella [F4E, Antennas and Plasma Engineering, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Scherer, Theo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A qualification program for the ITER diamond torus window is being developed. • The testing program for the qualification of the bare diamond disk is defined. • First qualification tests show a very good quality of the diamond disk prototypes. - Abstract: The diamond window is part of the electron cyclotron heating upper launcher system for ITER. Together with the isolation valve it constitutes the primary vacuum boundary and it also acts as first tritium barrier. Therefore the window is classified as Safety/Protection Important Component (SIC/PIC) with the nuclear safety function “confinement”. As the diamond window unit is not entirely covered by standard codes, an ad-hoc qualification program needs to be defined, including analysis, prototyping and testing. In the framework of a contract with F4E, the test program for a diamond window prototype is being developed with the aim to prove its operability for normal, accidental and incidental conditions as identified in the ITER load specifications. Tests range from dielectric loss measurements for the bare Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond disk up to mechanical and vacuum tests for the complete window assembly. Finally mm-wave properties have to be characterized for the complete window. A clear definition of the testing requirements and of the acceptance criteria is necessary as well as a complete documentation of the process. This paper will present the development of the test plan for a window prototype, which is currently under manufacturing. First tests are directed to the characterization of the bare diamond disk with a focus on its dielectric properties.

  17. Topological Self-Assembly of Highly Symmetric Lanthanide Clusters: A Magnetic Study of Exchange-Coupling "Fingerprints" in Giant Gadolinium(III) Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Zhou, Guo-Jun; Yu, You-Zhu; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Schröder, Christian; Winpenny, Richard E P; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2017-11-15

    The creation of a perfect hollow nanoscopic sphere of metal centers is clearly an unrealizable synthetic challenge. It is, however, an inspirational challenge from the viewpoint of chemical architecture and also as finite molecular species may provide unique microscopic insight into the origin and onset of phenomena such as topological spin-frustration effects found in infinite 2D and 3D systems. Herein, we report a series of high-symmetry gadolinium(III) (S = 7/2) polyhedra, Gd 20 , Gd 32 , Gd 50 , and Gd 60 , to test an approach based on assembling polymetallic fragments that contain different polygons. Structural analysis reveals that the Gd 20 cage resembles a dodecahedron; the vertices of the Gd 32 polyhedron exactly reveal symmetry O h ; Gd 50 displays an unprecedented polyhedron in which an icosidodecahedron Gd 30 core is encapsulated by an outer Gd 20 dodecahedral shell with approximate I h symmetry; and the Gd 60 shows a truncated octahedron geometry. Experimental and theoretical magnetic studies show that this series produces the expected antiferromagnetic interaction that can be modeled based on classical spins at the Gd sites. From the magnetization analyses, we can roughly correlate the derivative bands to the Gd-O-Gd angles. Such a magneto-structural correlation may be used as "fingerprints" to identify these cages.

  18. Group of scientific experts third technical test (GSETT-III) experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlman, O.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the established verification system is to provide confidence through adequate monitoring, deter clandestine activities and counteract 'false arms'. The task og the Group of Scientific Experts was to design and test the seismic verification system including designing og the international system, sharing knowledge from national programs, encouraging establishment of new monitoring facilities, development of data analysis procedures, conducting large scale testing and training of experts

  19. Tritium test of the tritium processing components under the Annex III US-Japan Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Naruse, Yuji; Binning, K.E.; Carlson, R.V.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1993-03-01

    The process ready components for Fuel Cleanup System were tested at the TSTA under the US-Japan Collaboration program. Palladium diffuser for tritium purification and Ceramic Electrolysis Cell for decomposition of tritiated water respectively were tested with pure tritium for years. The characteristics of the components with hydrogen isotopes, effects of impurities, and long-term reliability of the components were studied. It was concluded that these components are suitable and attractive for fusion fuel processing systems. (author)

  20. Creating multithemed ecological regions for macroscale ecology: Testing a flexible, repeatable, and accessible clustering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Yuan, Shuai; Webster, Katherine E.; Tan, Pang-Ning; Lapierre, Jean-Francois; Collins, Sarah M.; Fergus, C. Emi; Scott, Caren E.; Norton Henry, Emily; Soranno, Patricia A.; Filstrup, Christopher T.; Wagner, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Understanding broad-scale ecological patterns and processes often involves accounting for regional-scale heterogeneity. A common way to do so is to include ecological regions in sampling schemes and empirical models. However, most existing ecological regions were developed for specific purposes, using a limited set of geospatial features and irreproducible methods. Our study purpose was to: (1) describe a method that takes advantage of recent computational advances and increased availability of regional and global data sets to create customizable and reproducible ecological regions, (2) make this algorithm available for use and modification by others studying different ecosystems, variables of interest, study extents, and macroscale ecology research questions, and (3) demonstrate the power of this approach for the research question—How well do these regions capture regional-scale variation in lake water quality? To achieve our purpose we: (1) used a spatially constrained spectral clustering algorithm that balances geospatial homogeneity and region contiguity to create ecological regions using multiple terrestrial, climatic, and freshwater geospatial data for 17 northeastern U.S. states (~1,800,000 km2); (2) identified which of the 52 geospatial features were most influential in creating the resulting 100 regions; and (3) tested the ability of these ecological regions to capture regional variation in water nutrients and clarity for ~6,000 lakes. We found that: (1) a combination of terrestrial, climatic, and freshwater geospatial features influenced region creation, suggesting that the oft-ignored freshwater landscape provides novel information on landscape variability not captured by traditionally used climate and terrestrial metrics; and (2) the delineated regions captured macroscale heterogeneity in ecosystem properties not included in region delineation—approximately 40% of the variation in total phosphorus and water clarity among lakes was at the regional

  1. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  2. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Modelling of FEBEX In-Situ Test. Task1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E.E.; Alcoverro, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)] (comps.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 1 of DECOVALEX III was conceived as a benchmark exercise supported by all field and laboratory data generated during the performance of the FEBEX experiment designed to study thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical processes of the buffer and rock in the near field. The task was defined as a series of three successive blind prediction exercises (Parts A, B and C), which cover the behaviour of both the rock and bentonite barrier. Research teams participating in the FEBEX task were given, for each of the three parts, a set of field and laboratory data theoretically sufficient to generate a proper model and were asked to submit predictions, at given locations and time, for some of the measured variables. The merits and limitations of different modeling approaches were therefore established. The teams could perform additional calculations, once the actual 'solution' was disclosed. Final calculations represented the best approximation that a given team could provide, always within the general time constraints imposed by the General DECOVALEX III Organization. This report presents the works performed for Task 1. It contains the case definitions and evaluations of modelling results for Part A, B and C, and the overall evaluation of the works performed. The report is completed by a CD-ROM containing a set of final reports provided by the modeling teams participating in each of the three parts defined. These reports provide the necessary details to better understand the nature of the blind or final predictions included in this report. The report closes with a set of conclusions, which provides a summary of the main findings and highlights the lessons learned, some of which were summarized below. The best predictions of the water inflow into the excavated tunnel are found when the hydro geological model is properly calibrated on the basis of other known flow measurements in the same area. The particular idealization of the rock mass (equivalent

  3. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Modelling of FEBEX In-Situ Test. Task1 Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E.E.; Alcoverro, J.

    2005-02-01

    Task 1 of DECOVALEX III was conceived as a benchmark exercise supported by all field and laboratory data generated during the performance of the FEBEX experiment designed to study thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical processes of the buffer and rock in the near field. The task was defined as a series of three successive blind prediction exercises (Parts A, B and C), which cover the behaviour of both the rock and bentonite barrier. Research teams participating in the FEBEX task were given, for each of the three parts, a set of field and laboratory data theoretically sufficient to generate a proper model and were asked to submit predictions, at given locations and time, for some of the measured variables. The merits and limitations of different modeling approaches were therefore established. The teams could perform additional calculations, once the actual 'solution' was disclosed. Final calculations represented the best approximation that a given team could provide, always within the general time constraints imposed by the General DECOVALEX III Organization. This report presents the works performed for Task 1. It contains the case definitions and evaluations of modelling results for Part A, B and C, and the overall evaluation of the works performed. The report is completed by a CD-ROM containing a set of final reports provided by the modeling teams participating in each of the three parts defined. These reports provide the necessary details to better understand the nature of the blind or final predictions included in this report. The report closes with a set of conclusions, which provides a summary of the main findings and highlights the lessons learned, some of which were summarized below. The best predictions of the water inflow into the excavated tunnel are found when the hydro geological model is properly calibrated on the basis of other known flow measurements in the same area. The particular idealization of the rock mass (equivalent porous media

  4. Algorithms of maximum likelihood data clustering with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giada, Lorenzo; Marsili, Matteo

    2002-12-01

    We address the problem of data clustering by introducing an unsupervised, parameter-free approach based on maximum likelihood principle. Starting from the observation that data sets belonging to the same cluster share a common information, we construct an expression for the likelihood of any possible cluster structure. The likelihood in turn depends only on the Pearson's coefficient of the data. We discuss clustering algorithms that provide a fast and reliable approximation to maximum likelihood configurations. Compared to standard clustering methods, our approach has the advantages that (i) it is parameter free, (ii) the number of clusters need not be fixed in advance and (iii) the interpretation of the results is transparent. In order to test our approach and compare it with standard clustering algorithms, we analyze two very different data sets: time series of financial market returns and gene expression data. We find that different maximization algorithms produce similar cluster structures whereas the outcome of standard algorithms has a much wider variability.

  5. COMPARISON OF A HEAD MOUNTED IMPACT MEASUREMENT DEVICE TO THE HYBRID III ANTHROPOMORPHIC TESTING DEVICE IN A CONTROLLED LABORATORY SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Eric; Stark, David; Bolte, John H; Kang, Yun Seok; Onate, James A

    2017-08-01

    Reports estimate that 1.6 to 3.8 million cases of concussion occur in sports and recreation each year in the United States. Despite continued efforts to reduce the occurrence of concussion, the rate of diagnosis continues to increase. The mechanisms of concussion are thought to involve linear and rotational head accelerations and velocities. One method of quantifying the kinematics experienced during sport participation is to place measurement devices into the athlete's helmet or directly on the athlete's head. The purpose of this research to determine the accuracy of a head mounted device for measuring the head accelerations experienced by the wearer. This will be accomplished by identifying the error in Peak Linear Acceleration (PLA), Peak Rotational Acceleration (PRA) and Peak Rotational Velocity (PRV) of the device. Laboratory study. A helmeted Hybrid III 50th percentile male headform was impacted via a pneumatic ram from the front, side, rear, front oblique and rear oblique at speeds from 1.5 to 5 m/s. The X2 Biosystems xPatch® (Seattle, WA) sensor was placed on the headform's right side at the approximate location of the mastoid process. Measures of PLA, PRA, PRV from the xPatch ® and Hybrid III were analyzed for Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and Absolute and Relative Error (AE, RE). Seventy-six impacts were analyzed. All measures of correlation, fixed through the origin, were found to be strong: PLA R 2 =0.967 pstandard yet above the average error of testing devices in both PLA and PRA, but a low error in PRV. PLA measures from the xPatch® system demonstrated a high level of correlation with the PLA data from the Hybrid III mounted data collection system. 3.

  6. Modeling and Testing Dark Energy and Gravity with Galaxy Cluster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapetti, David; Cataneo, Matteo; Heneka, Caroline; Mantz, Adam; Allen, Steven W.; Von Der Linden, Anja; Schmidt, Fabian; Lombriser, Lucas; Li, Baojiu; Applegate, Douglas; Kelly, Patrick; Morris, Glenn

    2018-06-01

    The abundance of galaxy clusters is a powerful probe to constrain the properties of dark energy and gravity at large scales. We employed a self-consistent analysis that includes survey, observable-mass scaling relations and weak gravitational lensing data to obtain constraints on f(R) gravity, which are an order of magnitude tighter than the best previously achieved, as well as on cold dark energy of negligible sound speed. The latter implies clustering of the dark energy fluid at all scales, allowing us to measure the effects of dark energy perturbations at cluster scales. For this study, we recalibrated the halo mass function using the following non-linear characteristic quantities: the spherical collapse threshold, the virial overdensity and an additional mass contribution for cold dark energy. We also presented a new modeling of the f(R) gravity halo mass function that incorporates novel corrections to capture key non-linear effects of the Chameleon screening mechanism, as found in high resolution N-body simulations. All these results permit us to predict, as I will also exemplify, and eventually obtain the next generation of cluster constraints on such models, and provide us with frameworks that can also be applied to other proposed dark energy and modified gravity models using cluster abundance observations.

  7. Industrial Arts Test Development, Book III. Resource Items for Graphics Technology, Power Technology, Production Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This booklet is designed to assist teachers in developing examinations for classroom use. It is a collection of 955 objective test questions, mostly multiple choice, for industrial arts students in the three areas of graphics technology, power technology, and production technology. Scoring keys are provided. There are no copyright restrictions,…

  8. Quality assessment in in vivo NMR spectroscopy: III. Clinical test objects: design, construction, and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J.; Keevil, S

    1995-01-01

    /Perspex interface produced minimum susceptibility effects. The design of the objects has been evaluated in trials on different magnetic resonance instruments, with size and loading being adjusted to allow use on currently available equipment. Appropriate test solutions for 31P and 1H measurements have been...

  9. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  10. 77 FR 11651 - Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... words, chin-to- chest contact often caused HIC to exceed the injury assessment reference value (HIC 36... bag tests).\\19\\ \\19\\ The computation of HIC applies a higher signal filter class (CFC 1000 vs. CFC 180... Dorel provided a picture of a torn bib assembly, without further discussion, in its response to the Part...

  11. Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume III: Test protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers' [ASME] Center for Research and Technology Development [CRTD] has been awarded a subcontract by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory [NREL] to demonstrate the technical performance and viability of flue gas temperature control in combination with dry acid gas reagent and activated carbon injection at an existing electrostatic precipitator [ESP] equipped municipal waste combustor [MWC]. The objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration test is to economically and reliably meet 40 CFR 60 Subpart Cb Emissions Guidelines for MWC's at existing ESP equipped facilities. The effort is being directed by a Subcommittee of tile ASME Research Committee on Industrial and Municipal Wastes [RCIMW] chaired by Dave Hoecke. Mr. Greg Barthold of ASME/CRTD is the Project Manager. ASME/CRTD contracted with Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc. in cooperation with A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd. to be the Principal Investigator for the project and manage the day-t o-day aspects of the program, conduct the testing reduce and interpret the data and prepare the report. Testing will be conducted at the 2 by 210 TPD, ESP equipped MWC at the Davis County Resource Recovery Facility in Layton, Utah. The test plan calls for duplicate metals (Cd, Pb and Hg), dioxin and acid gas runs.

  12. The dynamic version of the Bayley-III : Test results and the opinion of practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma; van der Meulen, Bieuwe; Ruijssenaars, Wied; Timmerman, Marieke

    When problems are suspected with the development of a child, developmental assessment is often carried out as part of the diagnostic process (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2001). The test scores obtained indicate the levels of functioning at that moment in time in the domains investigated. This

  13. GALEN skin test study III: Minimum battery of test inhalent allergens needed in epidemiological studies in patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, P-J; Burbach, G; Heinzerling, L M

    2009-01-01

    Background: The number of allergens to be tested in order to identify sensitized patients is important in order to have the most cost-effective approach in epidemiological studies. Objective: To define the minimal number and the type of skin prick test (SPT) allergens required to identify a patient...... the allergens selection. Result: Among the 3034 patients involved, 1996 (68.2%) were sensitized to at least one allergen. Overall, eight allergens (grass pollen, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, birch pollen, cat dander, Artemisia, olive pollen, Blatella and Alternaria) allowed to identified more than 95......% of sensitized subjects. However, differences were observed between countries, two allergens being sufficient for Switzerland (grass pollen and cat dander) as opposed to nine for France (grass pollen, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, olive pollen, cat dander, Blatella, cypress, dog dander, alder and [Artemisia...

  14. Testing a generalized cubic Galileon gravity model with the Coma Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Okabe, Nobuhiro [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Matsushita, Kyoko; Sasaki, Toru, E-mail: telkina@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: okabe@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp, E-mail: j1213703@ed.tus.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    We obtain a constraint on the parameters of a generalized cubic Galileon gravity model exhibiting the Vainshtein mechanism by using multi-wavelength observations of the Coma Cluster. The generalized cubic Galileon model is characterized by three parameters of the turning scale associated with the Vainshtein mechanism, and the amplitude of modifying a gravitational potential and a lensing potential. X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations of the intra-cluster medium are sensitive to the gravitational potential, while the weak-lensing (WL) measurement is specified by the lensing potential. A joint fit of a complementary multi-wavelength dataset of X-ray, SZ and WL measurements enables us to simultaneously constrain these three parameters of the generalized cubic Galileon model for the first time. We also find a degeneracy between the cluster mass parameters and the gravitational modification parameters, which is influential in the limit of the weak screening of the fifth force.

  15. Testing the Bose-Einstein Condensate dark matter model at galactic cluster scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Pengxiang; Liang, Shi-Dong; Mocanu, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The possibility that dark matter may be in the form of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) has been extensively explored at galactic scale. In particular, good fits for the galactic rotations curves have been obtained, and upper limits for the dark matter particle mass and scattering length have been estimated. In the present paper we extend the investigation of the properties of the BEC dark matter to the galactic cluster scale, involving dark matter dominated astrophysical systems formed of thousands of galaxies each. By considering that one of the major components of a galactic cluster, the intra-cluster hot gas, is described by King's β-model, and that both intra-cluster gas and dark matter are in hydrostatic equilibrium, bound by the same total mass profile, we derive the mass and density profiles of the BEC dark matter. In our analysis we consider several theoretical models, corresponding to isothermal hot gas and zero temperature BEC dark matter, non-isothermal gas and zero temperature dark matter, and isothermal gas and finite temperature BEC, respectively. The properties of the finite temperature BEC dark matter cluster are investigated in detail numerically. We compare our theoretical results with the observational data of 106 galactic clusters. Using a least-squares fitting, as well as the observational results for the dark matter self-interaction cross section, we obtain some upper bounds for the mass and scattering length of the dark matter particle. Our results suggest that the mass of the dark matter particle is of the order of μ eV, while the scattering length has values in the range of 10 −7 fm

  16. Comparison of Individual Performance in Intelligence Tests WAIS III and RPM (Raven's Progressive Matrices)

    OpenAIRE

    Petrů, Vít

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with replacement of performative scale of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd revision) through Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices and Advanced Progressive Matrices. In the theoretical part introduces the concepts of intelligence, approaches to its exploration and intelligence tests. The theoretical part is also devoted to the description of the used methods and presents an overview of the research on a similar theme as this work. In the empirical part of the thesis is...

  17. Graphic-Card Cluster for Astrophysics (GraCCA) -- Performance Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Chien, Chia-Hung; Wong, Shing-Kwong; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the architecture and performance of the GraCCA system, a Graphic-Card Cluster for Astrophysics simulations. It consists of 16 nodes, with each node equipped with 2 modern graphic cards, the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX. This computing cluster provides a theoretical performance of 16.2 TFLOPS. To demonstrate its performance in astrophysics computation, we have implemented a parallel direct N-body simulation program with shared time-step algorithm in this system. Our syste...

  18. Testing Gravity on Cosmological Scales with the Observed Abundance of Galaxy Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapetti Serra, David Angelo

    2011-01-01

    supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and cosmic microwave background data we find a tight correlation between the growth index and the normalization of the matter power spectrum. Allowing the growth index and the dark energy equation of state parameter to take any constant values, we find no evidence......, and obtain improved constraints on departures from General Relativity (GR) on cosmological scales. We parameterize the linear growth rate of cosmic structure with a power law of the mean matter density to the growth index. Combining the X-ray cluster growth data with cluster gas-mass fraction, type Ia...

  19. MORPHOLOGY OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: A COSMOLOGICAL MODEL-INDEPENDENT TEST OF THE COSMIC DISTANCE-DUALITY RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xiaolei; Zhang Tongjie; Zhan Hu; Wang Xin

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at comparing different morphological models of galaxy clusters, we use two new methods to make a cosmological model-independent test of the distance-duality (DD) relation. The luminosity distances come from the Union2 compilation of Supernovae Type Ia. The angular diameter distances are given by two cluster models (De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al.). The advantage of our methods is that they can reduce statistical errors. Concerning the morphological hypotheses for cluster models, it is mainly focused on the comparison between the elliptical β-model and spherical β-model. The spherical β-model is divided into two groups in terms of different reduction methods of angular diameter distances, i.e., the conservative spherical β-model and corrected spherical β-model. Our results show that the DD relation is consistent with the elliptical β-model at 1σ confidence level (CL) for both methods, whereas for almost all spherical β-model parameterizations, the DD relation can only be accommodated at 3σ CL, particularly for the conservative spherical β-model. In order to minimize systematic uncertainties, we also apply the test to the overlap sample, i.e., the same set of clusters modeled by both De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al. It is found that the DD relation is compatible with the elliptically modeled overlap sample at 1σ CL; however, for most of the parameterizations the DD relation cannot be accommodated even at 3σ CL for any of the two spherical β-models. Therefore, it is reasonable that the marked triaxial ellipsoidal model is a better geometrical hypothesis describing the structure of the galaxy cluster compared with the spherical β-model if the DD relation is valid in cosmological observations.

  20. KOH concentration effect on cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. III - Cycle life test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A cycle life test of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered type nickel electrode was carried out at 23 C using a 45 min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. One of three cells containing 26 percent KOH has achieved over 28,000 cycles, and the other two 19,000 cycles, without a sign of failure. Two other cells containing 31 percent KOH electrolyte, which is the concentration presently used in aerospace cells, failed after 2,979 and 3,620 cycles. This result indicates that the cycle life of the present type of Ni/H2 cells may be extended by a factor of 5 to 10 simply by lowering the KOH concentration. Long cycle life of a Ni/H2 battery at high depth-of-discharge operation is desired, particularly for an LEO spacecraft application. Typically, battery life of about 30,000 cycles is required for a five year mission in an LEO. Such a cycle life with presently available cells can be assured only at a very low depth-of-discharge operation. Results of testing already show that the cycle life of an Ni/H2 cell is tremendously improved by simply using an electrolyte of low KOH concentration.

  1. Development of deterioration models and tests of structural materials for nuclear containment structures(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The nuclear containment structures are very important infrastructures which require much cost for construction and maintenance. If these structures lose their functions and do not ensure their safety, great losses of human lives and properties will result. Therefore, the nuclear containment structures should secure appropriate safety and functions during these service lives. The nuclear concrete structures start to experience deterioration due to severe environmental condition, even though the concrete structures exhibit generally superior durability. It is, therefore, necessary to take appropriate actions at each stage of planning, design and construction to secure safety and functionability. Thorough examination of deterioration mechanism and comprehensive tests have been conducted to explore the durability characteristics of nuclear concrete structures. 88 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  2. Open clusters. III. Fundamental parameters of B stars in NGC 6087, NGC 6250, NGC 6383, and NGC 6530 B-type stars with circumstellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidelman, Y.; Cidale, L. S.; Zorec, J.; Panei, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Stellar physical properties of star clusters are poorly known and the cluster parameters are often very uncertain. Methods: Our goals are to perform a spectrophotometric study of the B star population in open clusters to derive accurate stellar parameters, search for the presence of circumstellar envelopes, and discuss the characteristics of these stars. The BCD spectrophotometric system is a powerful method to obtain stellar fundamental parameters from direct measurements of the Balmer discontinuity. To this end, we wrote the interactive code MIDE3700. The BCD parameters can also be used to infer the main properties of open clusters: distance modulus, color excess, and age. Furthermore, we inspected the Balmer discontinuity to provide evidence for the presence of circumstellar disks and identify Be star candidates. We used an additional set of high-resolution spectra in the Hα region to confirm the Be nature of these stars. Results: We provide Teff, log g, Mv, Mbol, and spectral types for a sample of 68 stars in the field of the open clusters NGC 6087, NGC 6250, NGC 6383, and NGC 6530, as well as the cluster distances, ages, and reddening. Then, based on a sample of 230 B stars in the direction of the 11 open clusters studied along this series of three papers, we report 6 new Be stars, 4 blue straggler candidates, and 15 B-type stars (called Bdd) with a double Balmer discontinuity, which indicates the presence of circumstellar envelopes. We discuss the distribution of the fraction of B, Be, and Bdd star cluster members per spectral subtype. The majority of the Be stars are dwarfs and present a maximum at the spectral type B2-B4 in young and intermediate-age open clusters (operating under agreement of CONICET and the Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina.Tables 1, 2, 9-16 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A30

  3. Electric dipole (hyper)polarizabilities of selected X2Y2 and X3Y3 (X = Al, Ga, In and Y = P, As): III-V semiconductor clusters. An ab initio comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Pouchan, Claude; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-12-25

    A systematic ab initio comparative study of the (hyper)polarizabilities of selected III-V stoichiometric semiconductor clusters has been carried out. Our investigation focuses on the ground state structures of the dimers and on two dissimilar trimer configurations of aluminum, gallium, indium phosphide and arsenide. The basis set effect on both the polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of the studied systems has been explicitly taken into account relying on the augmented correlation consistent aug-cc-pVnZ (n = D, T, Q, and 5) basis sets series. In addition, a rough estimation of the effects of the relativistic effects on the investigated properties is provided by extension of the study to include calculations performed with relativistic electron core potentials (or pseudopotentials). Electron correlation effects have been estimated utilizing methods of increasing predictive reliability, e.g., the Møller-Plesset many body perturbation theory and the couple cluster approach. Our results reveal that in the considered semiconductor species the Group III elements (Al, Ga, In) play a vital role on the values of their relative (hyper)polarizability. At all levels of theory employed the most hyperpolarizable clusters are the indium derivatives while the aluminum arsenide clusters also exhibit high, comparable hyperpolarizabilities. The less hyperpolarizable species are those composed of gallium and this is associated with the strong influence of the nuclear charge on the valence electrons of Ga due to the poor shielding that is provided by the semicore d electrons. In addition, the analysis of the electronic structure and the hyperpolarizability magnitudes reveals that clusters, in which their bonding is characterized by strong electron transfer from the electropositive to the electronegative atoms, are less hyperpolarizable than species in which the corresponding electron transfer is weaker. Lastly, from the methodological point of view our results point out that

  4. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. III. Kinetics of test-particle diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Kleva, R.G.

    1982-07-01

    A discussion is given of test particle transport in the presence of specified stochastic magnetic fields, with particular emphasis on the collisional limit. Certain paradoxes and inconsistencies in the literature regarding the form of the scaling laws are resolved by carefully distinguishing a number of physically distinct correlation lengths, and thus by identifying several collisional subregimes. The common procedure of averaging the conventional fluid equations over the statistics of a random field is shown to fail in some important cases because of breakdown of the Chapman-Enskog ordering in the presence of a stochastic field component with short autocorrelation length. A modified perturbation theory is introduced which leads to a Kubo-like formula valid in all collisionality regimes. The direct-interaction approximation is shown to fail in the interesting limit in which the orbit exponentiation length L/sub K/ appears explicitly. A higher order renormalized kinetic theory in which L/sub K/ appears naturally is discussed and used to rederive more systematically the results of the heuristic scaling arguments

  5. Home-based versus mobile clinic HIV testing and counseling in rural Lesotho: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhardt, Niklaus Daniel; Motlomelo, Masetsibi; Cerutti, Bernard; Pfeiffer, Karolin; Kamele, Mashaete; Hobbins, Michael A; Ehmer, Jochen

    2014-12-01

    The success of HIV programs relies on widely accessible HIV testing and counseling (HTC) services at health facilities as well as in the community. Home-based HTC (HB-HTC) is a popular community-based approach to reach persons who do not test at health facilities. Data comparing HB-HTC to other community-based HTC approaches are very limited. This trial compares HB-HTC to mobile clinic HTC (MC-HTC). The trial was powered to test the hypothesis of higher HTC uptake in HB-HTC campaigns than in MC-HTC campaigns. Twelve clusters were randomly allocated to HB-HTC or MC-HTC. The six clusters in the HB-HTC group received 30 1-d multi-disease campaigns (five villages per cluster) that delivered services by going door-to-door, whereas the six clusters in MC-HTC group received campaigns involving community gatherings in the 30 villages with subsequent service provision in mobile clinics. Time allocation and human resources were standardized and equal in both groups. All individuals accessing the campaigns with unknown HIV status or whose last HIV test was >12 wk ago and was negative were eligible. All outcomes were assessed at the individual level. Statistical analysis used multivariable logistic regression. Odds ratios and p-values were adjusted for gender, age, and cluster effect. Out of 3,197 participants from the 12 clusters, 2,563 (80.2%) were eligible (HB-HTC: 1,171; MC-HTC: 1,392). The results for the primary outcomes were as follows. Overall HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC group than in the MC-HTC group (92.5% versus 86.7%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.18-3.60; p = 0. 011). Among adolescents and adults ≥ 12 y, HTC uptake did not differ significantly between the two groups; however, in children versus 58.7%; aOR: 4.91; 95% CI: 2.41-10.0; pindividuals in the HB-HTC and in the MC-HTC arms, respectively, linked to HIV care within 1 mo after testing positive. Findings for secondary outcomes were as follows: HB-HTC reached more first-time testers

  6. Teste de inteligência WISC-III adaptando para a população brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. M. Figueiredo

    Full Text Available O presente artigo tem por objetivo mostrar alguns resultados encontrados até o momento, na pesquisa de adaptação do teste de inteligência WISC- III (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for ChildrenThird Edition. Os dados apresentados referem-se à aplicação do conjunto verbal do teste a uma amostra piloto de 116 crianças com idades entre 6 e 16 anos, matriculadas na rede de escolas públicas e privadas da cidade do Rio Grande (RS. Os resultados evidenciaram índices de validade e consistência interna do conjunto verbal do teste. Observou-se a relevância da idade, da repetência e do local da escola devendo estas variáveis serem controladas na pesquisa de adaptação. Há necessidade de alteração de alguns itens, principalmente nos subtestes Informação e Vocabulário.

  7. Uncovering and testing the fuzzy clusters based on lumped Markov chain in complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Fan; Jianbin, Xie; Jinlong, Wang; Jinshuai, Qu

    2013-01-01

    Identifying clusters, namely groups of nodes with comparatively strong internal connectivity, is a fundamental task for deeply understanding the structure and function of a network. By means of a lumped Markov chain model of a random walker, we propose two novel ways of inferring the lumped markov transition matrix. Furthermore, some useful results are proposed based on the analysis of the properties of the lumped Markov process. To find the best partition of complex networks, a novel framework including two algorithms for network partition based on the optimal lumped Markovian dynamics is derived to solve this problem. The algorithms are constructed to minimize the objective function under this framework. It is demonstrated by the simulation experiments that our algorithms can efficiently determine the probabilities with which a node belongs to different clusters during the learning process and naturally supports the fuzzy partition. Moreover, they are successfully applied to real-world network, including the social interactions between members of a karate club.

  8. Testing lowered isothermal models with direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - II. Multimass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuten, M.; Zocchi, A.; Gieles, M.; Hénault-Brunet, V.

    2017-09-01

    Lowered isothermal models, such as the multimass Michie-King models, have been successful in describing observational data of globular clusters. In this study, we assess whether such models are able to describe the phase space properties of evolutionary N-body models. We compare the multimass models as implemented in limepy (Gieles & Zocchi) to N-body models of star clusters with different retention fractions for the black holes and neutron stars evolving in a tidal field. We find that multimass models successfully reproduce the density and velocity dispersion profiles of the different mass components in all evolutionary phases and for different remnants retention. We further use these results to study the evolution of global model parameters. We find that over the lifetime of clusters, radial anisotropy gradually evolves from the low- to the high-mass components and we identify features in the properties of observable stars that are indicative of the presence of stellar-mass black holes. We find that the model velocity scale depends on mass as m-δ, with δ ≃ 0.5 for almost all models, but the dependence of central velocity dispersion on m can be shallower, depending on the dark remnant content, and agrees well with that of the N-body models. The reported model parameters, and correlations amongst them, can be used as theoretical priors when fitting these types of mass models to observational data.

  9. The "g" Factor and Cognitive Test Session Behavior: Using a Latent Variable Approach in Examining Measurement Invariance Across Age Groups on the WJ III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L.; Wang, Ze

    2016-01-01

    Data from the standardization sample of the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery--Third Edition (WJ III) Cognitive standard battery and Test Session Observation Checklist items were analyzed to understand the relationship between g (general mental ability) and test session behavior (TSB; n = 5,769). Latent variable modeling methods were used…

  10. Optimization of the test intervals of a nuclear safety system by genetic algorithms, solution clustering and fuzzy preference assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, E.; Bazzo, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure is developed for identifying a number of representative solutions manageable for decision-making in a multiobjective optimization problem concerning the test intervals of the components of a safety system of a nuclear power plant. Pareto Front solutions are identified by a genetic algorithm and then clustered by subtractive clustering into 'families'. On the basis of the decision maker's preferences, each family is then synthetically represented by a 'head of the family' solution. This is done by introducing a scoring system that ranks the solutions with respect to the different objectives: a fuzzy preference assignment is employed to this purpose. Level Diagrams are then used to represent, analyze and interpret the Pareto Fronts reduced to the head-of-the-family solutions

  11. [Comparison of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III and the Spain-Complutense Verbal Learning Test in acquired brain injury: construct validity and ecological validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Lario, P; Pena, J; Ojeda, N

    2017-04-16

    To perform an in-depth examination of the construct validity and the ecological validity of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) and the Spain-Complutense Verbal Learning Test (TAVEC). The sample consists of 106 adults with acquired brain injury who were treated in the Area of Neuropsychology and Neuropsychiatry of the Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra and displayed memory deficit as the main sequela, measured by means of specific memory tests. The construct validity is determined by examining the tasks required in each test over the basic theoretical models, comparing the performance according to the parameters offered by the tests, contrasting the severity indices of each test and analysing their convergence. The external validity is explored through the correlation between the tests and by using regression models. According to the results obtained, both the WMS-III and the TAVEC have construct validity. The TAVEC is more sensitive and captures not only the deficits in mnemonic consolidation, but also in the executive functions involved in memory. The working memory index of the WMS-III is useful for predicting the return to work at two years after the acquired brain injury, but none of the instruments anticipates the disability and dependence at least six months after the injury. We reflect upon the construct validity of the tests and their insufficient capacity to predict functionality when the sequelae become chronic.

  12. Dementia Screening Accuracy is Robust to Premorbid IQ Variation: Evidence from the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-III and the Test of Premorbid Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Joshua; Scior, Katrina; Mandy, William; Charlesworth, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Scores on cognitive screening tools for dementia are associated with premorbid IQ. It has been suggested that screening scores should be adjusted accordingly. However, no study has examined whether premorbid IQ variation affects screening accuracy. To investigate whether the screening accuracy of a widely used cognitive screening tool for dementia, the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination-III (ACE-III), is improved by adjusting for premorbid IQ. 171 UK based adults (96 memory service attendees diagnosed with dementia and 75 healthy volunteers over the age of 65 without subjective memory impairments) completed the ACE-III and the Test of Premorbid Function (TOPF). The difference in screening performance between the ACE-III alone and the ACE-III adjusted for TOPF was assessed against a reference standard; the presence or absence of a diagnosis of dementia (Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or others). Logistic regression and receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the ACE-III has excellent screening accuracy (93% sensitivity, 94% specificity) in distinguishing those with and without a dementia diagnosis. Although ACE-III scores were associated with TOPF scores, TOPF scores may be affected by having dementia and screening accuracy was not improved by accounting for premorbid IQ, age, or years of education. ACE-III screening accuracy is high and screening performance is robust to variation in premorbid IQ, age, and years of education. Adjustment of ACE-III cut-offs for premorbid IQ is not recommended in clinical practice. The analytic strategy used here may be useful to assess the impact of premorbid IQ on other screening tools.

  13. Simulation of rotary-drum and repose tests for frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The effects of rotation rate and interparticle friction on the bulk flow behavior in rotating horizontal cylinders are studied via particle-dynamic simulations. Assemblies of inelastic, frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters are utilized, and rotation rates from quasistatic to centrifuging are examined. Flow phenomena explored include size segregation, avalanching, slumping and centrifuging. Simulated drum flows with two sizes of frictional spheres showed very rapid segregation of species perpendicular to the drum axis; however, simulations of up to 10 revolutions, utilizing periodic-boundary ends, did not exhibit the experimentally observed axial segregation into stripes. Angles of repose for uniform-sized spheres in slowly rotating cylinders varied from 13 to 31 degrees as the friction coefficient varied from 0.02 to 1.0. For simulated rotation rates higher than the threshold to obtain uniform flow conditions, the apparent angle of repose increases as the rotation rats increases, consistent with experiments. Also, simulations with rigid clusters of 4 spheres in a tetrahedral shape or 8 spheres in a cubical arrangement, demonstrate that particle shape strongly influences the repose angle. Simulations of cubical 8-sphere clusters, with a surface coefficient of friction of 0.1, produced apparent angles of repose exceeding 35 degrees, compared to 23 degrees for assemblies of single spheres interacting with the same force model parameters. Centrifuging flows at very high rotation rates exist as stationary beds moving exactly as the outer rotating wall. At somewhat slower speeds the granular bed remains in contact with the wall but exhibits surface sliding down the rising inner bed surface, moving a short distance on each revolution. At still slower speeds particles rain from the surface of the upper half of the rotating bed.

  14. A π-π 3D network of tetranuclear μ2/μ3-carbonato Dy(III) bis-pyrazolylpyridine clusters showing single molecule magnetism features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Ian A; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Langley, Stuart K; Batten, Stuart R; Murray, Keith S

    2012-02-18

    2,6-Di(pyrazole-3-yl)pyridine, 3-bpp, forms a porous (4(9)·6(6)) π-π mediated 3D network of trigonal pyramidal [Dy(III)(4)] carbonato-bridged complexes, with hexagonal channels comprising 54% of the unit cell volume, the material displaying slow magnetisation reversal. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  15. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-07

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4

  16. M/L, Hα Rotation Curves, and H I Gas Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals. III. Evolution in Fundamental Galaxy Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry

    2004-06-01

    We have conducted a study of optical and H I properties of spiral galaxies (size, luminosity, Hα flux distribution, circular velocity, H I gas mass) to investigate causes (e.g., nature vs. nurture) for variation within the cluster environment. We find H I-deficient cluster galaxies to be offset in fundamental plane space, with disk scale lengths decreased by a factor of 25%. This may be a relic of early galaxy formation, caused by the disk coalescing out of a smaller, denser halo (e.g., higher concentration index) or by truncation of the hot gas envelope due to the enhanced local density of neighbors, although we cannot completely rule out the effect of the gas stripping process. The spatial extent of Hα flux and the B-band radius also decreases, but only in early-type spirals, suggesting that gas removal is less efficient within steeper potential wells (or that stripped late-type spirals are quickly rendered unrecognizable). We find no significant trend in stellar mass-to-light ratios or circular velocities with H I gas content, morphological type, or clustercentric radius, for star-forming spiral galaxies throughout the clusters. These data support the findings of a companion paper that gas stripping promotes a rapid truncation of star formation across the disk and could be interpreted as weak support for dark matter domination over baryons in the inner regions of spiral galaxies.

  17. International Network Performance and Security Testing Based on Distributed Abyss Storage Cluster and Draft of Data Lake Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ByungRae Cha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The megatrends and Industry 4.0 in ICT (Information Communication & Technology are concentrated in IoT (Internet of Things, BigData, CPS (Cyber Physical System, and AI (Artificial Intelligence. These megatrends do not operate independently, and mass storage technology is essential as large computing technology is needed in the background to support them. In order to evaluate the performance of high-capacity storage based on open source Ceph, we carry out the network performance test of Abyss storage with domestic and overseas sites using KOREN (Korea Advanced Research Network. And storage media and network bonding are tested to evaluate the performance of the storage itself. Additionally, the security test is demonstrated by Cuckoo sandbox and Yara malware detection among Abyss storage cluster and oversea sites. Lastly, we have proposed the draft design of Data Lake framework in order to solve garbage dump problem.

  18. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  19. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantereau, W.; Charbonnel, C.; Meynet, G.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims: We present the distribution of helium-rich stars in present-day globular clusters as it is expected in the original framework of the fast-rotating massive stars scenario (FRMS) as first-population polluters. We focus on NGC 6752. Methods: We completed a grid of 330 stellar evolution models for globular cluster low-mass stars computed with different initial chemical compositions corresponding to the predictions of the original FRMS scenario for [Fe/H] = -1.75. Starting from the initial helium-sodium relation that allows reproducing the currently observed distribution of sodium in NGC 6752, we deduce the helium distribution expected in that cluster at ages equal to 9 and 13 Gyr. We distinguish the stars that are moderately enriched in helium from those that are very helium-rich (initial helium mass fraction below and above 0.4, respectively), and compare the predictions of the FRMS framework with other scenarios for globular cluster enrichment. Results: The effect of helium enrichment on the stellar lifetime and evolution reduces the total number of very helium-rich stars that remain in the cluster at 9 and 13 Gyr to only 12% and 10%, respectively, from an initial fraction of 21%. Within this age range, most of the stars still burn their hydrogen in their core, which widens the MS band significantly in effective temperature. The fraction of very helium-rich stars drops in the more advanced evolution phases, where the associated spread in effective temperature strongly decreases. These

  20. The Influences of Arm Resist Motion on a CAR Crash Test Using Hybrid III Dummy with Human-Like Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Bae, Hanil; Choi, Hyeonki

    Safety of the occupant during the crash is very essential design element. Many researches have been investigated in reducing the fatal injury of occupant. They are focusing on the development of a dummy in order to obtain the real human-like motion. However, they have not considered the arm resist motion during the car accident. In this study, we would like to suggest the importance of the reactive force of the arm in a car crash. The influences of reactive force acting on the human upper extremity were investigated using the impedance experimental method with lumped mass model of hand system and a Hybrid III dummy with human-like arm. Impedance parameters (e.g. inertia, spring constant and damping coefficient) of the elbow joint in maximum activation level were measured by free oscillation test using single axis robot. The results showed that without seat belt, the reactive force of human arm reduced the head, chest, and femur injury, and the flexion moment of the neck is higher than that of the conventional dummy.

  1. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  2. CLASH-VLT: testing the nature of gravity with galaxy cluster mass profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzuti, L.; Sartoris, B.; Borgani, S.; Girardi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Università di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Amendola, L. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Umetsu, K. [5 Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Biviano, A.; Balestra, I.; Nonino, M. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Rosati, P. [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Mu\\' nchen (Germany); Caminha, G.B. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Frye, B. [Steward Observatory/Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grillo, C. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lombardi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Mercurio, A., E-mail: pizzuti@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: barbara.sartoris@gmail.com, E-mail: borgani@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uniheidelberg.de [Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    We use high-precision kinematic and lensing measurements of the total mass profile of the dynamically relaxed galaxy cluster MACS J1206.2-0847 at z=0.44 to estimate the value of the ratio η=Ψ/Φ between the two scalar potentials in the linear perturbed Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric. An accurate measurement of this ratio, called anisotropic stress, could show possible, interesting deviations from the predictions of the theory of General Relativity, according to which Ψ should be equal to Φ. Complementary kinematic and lensing mass profiles were derived from exhaustive analyses using the data from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and the spectroscopic follow-up with the Very Large Telescope (CLASH-VLT). Whereas the kinematic mass profile tracks only the time-time part of the perturbed metric (i.e. only Φ), the lensing mass profile reflects the contribution of both time-time and space-space components (i.e. the sum Φ+Ψ). We thus express η as a function of the mass profiles and perform our analysis over the radial range 0.5 Mpc≤ r≤ r{sub 200}=1.96 Mpc. Using a spherical Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile, which well fits the data, we obtain η(r{sub 200})=1.01 {sub −0.28}{sup +0.31} at the 68% C.L. We discuss the effect of assuming different functional forms for mass profiles and of the orbit anisotropy in the kinematic reconstruction. Interpreting this result within the well-studied f(R) modified gravity model, the constraint on η translates into an upper bound to the interaction length (inverse of the scalaron mass) smaller than 2 Mpc. This tight constraint on the f(R) interaction range is however substantially relaxed when systematic uncertainties in the analysis are considered. Our analysis highlights the potential of this method to detect deviations from general relativity, while calling for the need of further high-quality data on the total mass distribution of clusters and improved control on systematic

  3. Blue stragglers in open clusters - a test of the binary hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manteiga, M.; Martinez, R.C.; Beckman, J.E.; Pickles, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A search for binaries among 17 blue stragglers in five galactic clusters, NGC 7789, 6633, 6819, 6939, and M 67, has been performed using measurements of radial velocity variations. The spectra were obtained with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph attached to the f/15 Cassegrain focus of the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope at the Spanish Observatory of the Roque de los Muchachos. The wavelength coverage was 200 A, centered at 8510 A with a scale of 12.4 km/sec per pixel. All radial velocity determinations were made using cross-correlation techniques. A velocity resolution of about 3 km/sec/pixel was obtained for the standard radial velocity stars and the brighter program stars. For three of the blue stragglers variations in radial velocity greater than 30 km/sec are reported. 10 references

  4. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: theoretical systematics and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the galaxy correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, Antonio J.; O'Connell, Ross; Ross, Ashley J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Brownstein, Joel R.; Olmstead, Matthew; Thomas, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the potential sources of theoretical systematics in the anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements from the clustering of galaxies in configuration space using the final Data Release (DR12) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We perform a detailed study of the impact on BAO measurements from choices in the methodology such as fiducial cosmology, clustering estimators, random catalogues, fitting templates, and covariance matrices. The theoretical systematic uncertainties in BAO parameters are found to be 0.002 in the isotropic dilation α and 0.003 in the quadrupolar dilation ɛ. The leading source of systematic uncertainty is related to the reconstruction techniques. Theoretical uncertainties are sub-dominant compared with the statistical uncertainties for BOSS survey, accounting 0.2σstat for α and 0.25σstat for ɛ (σα, stat ˜ 0.010 and σɛ, stat ˜ 0.012, respectively). We also present BAO-only distance scale constraints from the anisotropic analysis of the correlation function. Our constraints on the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H(z), including both statistical and theoretical systematic uncertainties, are 1.5 per cent and 2.8 per cent at zeff = 0.38, 1.4 per cent and 2.4 per cent at zeff = 0.51, and 1.7 per cent and 2.6 per cent at zeff = 0.61. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are cross-checked with other BAO analysis in Alam et al. The systematic error budget concerning the methodology on post-reconstruction BAO analysis presented here is used in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  5. Process evaluation of a cluster-randomised trial testing a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; McInnes, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Wallis, Marianne; Banks, Merrilyn; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-02-13

    As pressure ulcers contribute to significant patient burden and increased health care costs, their prevention is a clinical priority. Our team developed and tested a complex intervention, a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle promoting patient participation in care, in a cluster-randomised trial. The UK Medical Research Council recommends process evaluation of complex interventions to provide insight into why they work or fail and how they might be improved. This study aimed to evaluate processes underpinning implementation of the intervention and explore end-users' perceptions of it, in order to give a deeper understanding of its effects. A pre-specified, mixed-methods process evaluation was conducted as an adjunct to the main trial, guided by a framework for process evaluation of cluster-randomised trials. Data was collected across eight Australian hospitals but mainly focused on the four intervention hospitals. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected across the evaluation domains: recruitment, reach, intervention delivery and response to intervention, at both cluster and individual patient level. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. In the context of the main trial, which found a 42% reduction in risk of pressure ulcer with the intervention that was not significant after adjusting for clustering and covariates, this process evaluation provides important insights. Recruitment and reach among clusters and individuals was high, indicating that patients, nurses and hospitals are willing to engage with a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle. Of 799 intervention patients in the trial, 96.7% received the intervention, which took under 10 min to deliver. Patients and nurses accepted the care bundle, recognising benefits to it and describing how it enabled participation in pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) care. This process evaluation found no major failures

  6. A Cluster Randomised Trial Introducing Rapid Diagnostic Tests into Registered Drug Shops in Uganda: Impact on Appropriate Treatment of Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Anthony K.; Magnussen, Pascal; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S.; Cundill, Bonnie; Chandler, Clare; Clarke, Siân E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inappropriate treatment of malaria is widely reported particularly in areas where there is poor access to health facilities and self-treatment of fevers with anti-malarial drugs bought in shops is the most common form of care-seeking. The main objective of the study was to examine the impact of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) in registered drug shops in Uganda, with the aim to increase appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in patients seeking treatment for fever in drug shops. Methods A cluster-randomized trial of introducing mRDTs in registered drug shops was implemented in 20 geographical clusters of drug shops in Mukono district, central Uganda. Ten clusters were randomly allocated to the intervention (diagnostic confirmation of malaria by mRDT followed by ACT) and ten clusters to the control arm (presumptive treatment of fevers with ACT). Treatment decisions by providers were validated by microscopy on a reference blood slide collected at the time of consultation. The primary outcome was the proportion of febrile patients receiving appropriate treatment with ACT defined as: malaria patients with microscopically-confirmed presence of parasites in a peripheral blood smear receiving ACT or rectal artesunate, and patients with no malaria parasites not given ACT. Findings A total of 15,517 eligible patients (8672 intervention and 6845 control) received treatment for fever between January-December 2011. The proportion of febrile patients who received appropriate ACT treatment was 72·9% versus 33·7% in the control arm; a difference of 36·1% (95% CI: 21·3 – 50·9), pshop vendors adhered to the mRDT results, reducing over-treatment of malaria by 72·6% (95% CI: 46·7– 98·4), pshop vendors using presumptive diagnosis (control arm). Conclusion Diagnostic testing with mRDTs compared to presumptive treatment of fevers implemented in registered drug shops substantially improved appropriate

  7. Effect of e-Learning and Repeated Performance Feedback on Spirometry Test Quality in Family Practice: A Cluster Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Crockett, Alan J.; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W.; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. RESULTS We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. CONCLUSIONS In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices. PMID:21747104

  8. Effect of e-learning and repeated performance feedback on spirometry test quality in family practice: a cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R; Akkermans, Reinier P; Crockett, Alan J; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices.

  9. Home-based versus mobile clinic HIV testing and counseling in rural Lesotho: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklaus Daniel Labhardt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of HIV programs relies on widely accessible HIV testing and counseling (HTC services at health facilities as well as in the community. Home-based HTC (HB-HTC is a popular community-based approach to reach persons who do not test at health facilities. Data comparing HB-HTC to other community-based HTC approaches are very limited. This trial compares HB-HTC to mobile clinic HTC (MC-HTC.The trial was powered to test the hypothesis of higher HTC uptake in HB-HTC campaigns than in MC-HTC campaigns. Twelve clusters were randomly allocated to HB-HTC or MC-HTC. The six clusters in the HB-HTC group received 30 1-d multi-disease campaigns (five villages per cluster that delivered services by going door-to-door, whereas the six clusters in MC-HTC group received campaigns involving community gatherings in the 30 villages with subsequent service provision in mobile clinics. Time allocation and human resources were standardized and equal in both groups. All individuals accessing the campaigns with unknown HIV status or whose last HIV test was >12 wk ago and was negative were eligible. All outcomes were assessed at the individual level. Statistical analysis used multivariable logistic regression. Odds ratios and p-values were adjusted for gender, age, and cluster effect. Out of 3,197 participants from the 12 clusters, 2,563 (80.2% were eligible (HB-HTC: 1,171; MC-HTC: 1,392. The results for the primary outcomes were as follows. Overall HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC group than in the MC-HTC group (92.5% versus 86.7%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.18-3.60; p = 0. 011. Among adolescents and adults ≥ 12 y, HTC uptake did not differ significantly between the two groups; however, in children <12 y, HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC arm (87.5% versus 58.7%; aOR: 4.91; 95% CI: 2.41-10.0; p<0.001. Out of those who took up HTC, 114 (4.9% tested HIV-positive, 39 (3.6% in the HB-HTC arm and 75 (6.2% in the MC-HTC arm (aOR: 0.64; 95% CI

  10. A PARAMETERIZED GALAXY CATALOG SIMULATOR FOR TESTING CLUSTER FINDING, MASS ESTIMATION, AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION IN OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jeeseon; Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Rude, Cody; Warren, Michael S.; Dolag, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We present a galaxy catalog simulator that converts N-body simulations with halo and subhalo catalogs into mock, multiband photometric catalogs. The simulator assigns galaxy properties to each subhalo in a way that reproduces the observed cluster galaxy halo occupation distribution, the radial and mass-dependent variation in fractions of blue galaxies, the luminosity functions in the cluster and the field, and the color-magnitude relation in clusters. Moreover, the evolution of these parameters is tuned to match existing observational constraints. Parameterizing an ensemble of cluster galaxy properties enables us to create mock catalogs with variations in those properties, which in turn allows us to quantify the sensitivity of cluster finding to current observational uncertainties in these properties. Field galaxies are sampled from existing multiband photometric surveys of similar depth. We present an application of the catalog simulator to characterize the selection function and contamination of a galaxy cluster finder that utilizes the cluster red sequence together with galaxy clustering on the sky. We estimate systematic uncertainties in the selection to be at the ≤15% level with current observational constraints on cluster galaxy populations and their evolution. We find the contamination in this cluster finder to be ∼35% to redshift z ∼ 0.6. In addition, we use the mock galaxy catalogs to test the optical mass indicator B gc and a red-sequence redshift estimator. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the B gc -mass relation to be approximately log normal with σ log10M ∼0.25 and we demonstrate photometric redshift accuracies for massive clusters at the ∼3% level out to z ∼ 0.7.

  11. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachan, Rosemary R C; Lawton, Rebecca J; Jackson, Cath; Conner, Mark; Meads, David M; West, Robert M

    2011-04-11

    Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations) were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form) and health outcomes were assessed. Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ) at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B=-1.79 mm/Hg) and resting heart rate (B=-2.08 beats) and significantly increased body mass index (B=.18 units) compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. © 2011 McEachan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Wake structure measurements at the MOD-2 cluster test facility at Goodnoe Hills, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano, T.G.; Gyatt, G.W.

    1983-12-01

    A field measurement programme was carried out at the cluster of three MOD-2 wind turbines located at Goodnoe Hills, Washington, to determine the rate of decay of wake velocity deficit with down-wind distance in various meteorological conditions. Measurements were taken at hub height (60 m). Wake wind speeds were measured using a radiosonde suspended from a tethered balloon, its position being determined from a grid of ground stakes. Instantaneous readings were recorded by each system every two seconds and averaged over ten-minute periods. As a control experiment, the sonde was also operated next to the meteorological tower to calibrate the instrumentation. Measurements were also made down wind with the turbine off to determine the magnitude of terrain-induced variations in wind speed. Downstream distances of 274.3, 457.2, 640.1 and 823.0 m from the turbine, corresponding to 3, 5, 7 and 9 rotor diameters D, were investigated. There was considerable scatter in the observed 10 min average downstream/free-stream velocity ratios. Turbine-on velocity ratios showed even greater scatter, suggesting that only some measurements were, in fact, representative of wake centre-line velocities, and that others were made off centre line due to wake meander or wind shift. Isolation of the high wind speed (13.4 to 20.1 m/s) velocity ratios, however, revealed velocity deficits of up to about 50% at 3D and 5% at 5D downstream. Measurements at greater downstream distances showed no wake deficit within the limits of resolution of the experiment, indicating that the wake had recovered to free-stream conditions.

  13. Promoting STI testing among senior vocational students in Rotterdam, the Netherlands: effects of a cluster randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfers Mireille

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents are a risk group for acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs. In the Netherlands, senior vocational school students are particular at risk. However, STI test rates among adolescents are low and interventions that promote testing are scarce. To enhance voluntary STI testing, an intervention was designed and evaluated in senior vocational schools. The intervention combined classroom health education with sexual health services at the school site. The purpose of this study was to assess the combined and single effects on STI testing of health education and school-based sexual health services. Methods In a cluster-randomized study the intervention was evaluated in 24 schools, using three experimental conditions: 1 health education, 2 sexual health services; 3 both components; and a control group. STI testing was assessed by self reported behavior and registrations at regional sexual health services. Follow-up measurements were performed at 1, 3, and 6-9 months. Of 1302 students present at baseline, 739 (57% completed at least 1 follow-up measurement, of these students 472 (64% were sexually experienced, and considered to be susceptible for the intervention. Multi-level analyses were conducted. To perform analyses according to the principle of intention-to-treat, missing observations at follow-up on the outcome measure were imputed with multiple imputation techniques. Results were compared with the complete cases analysis. Results Sexually experienced students that received the combined intervention of health education and sexual health services reported more STI testing (29% than students in the control group (4% (OR = 4.3, p Conclusions Despite a low dose of intervention that was received by the students and a high attrition, we were able to show an intervention effect among sexually experienced students on STI testing. This study confirmed our hypothesis that offering health education to vocational students

  14. Testing the Formation Pathway of a Transiting Brown Dwarf in a Middle-aged Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Thomas; Curtis, Jason; Morley, Caroline; Burrows, Adam; Montet, Benjamin; Wright, Jason

    2018-05-01

    We wish to use 15.7 hours of Spitzer time to observe two transits, one each at 3.6um and 4.5um, of the transiting brown dwarf CWW 89Ab (Nowak et al. 2017) to measure its nightside emission. This will allow us to either make the first positive identification of a brown dwarf that has formed through core accretion processes - or will provide a severe challenge to brown dwarf evolution models. CWW 89Ab is a 36.5+/-0.1 MJ, 0.937+/-0.042 RJ, brown dwarf on a 5.3 day orbit about a 5800K dwarf. The brown dwarf is a member of the 3.00+/-0.25 Gyr old open cluster Ruprecht 147 (Curtis et al. 2013). CWW 89Ab is one of two transiting brown dwarfs for which we have an isochronal age - giving us an age, a mass, and a radius that are all independent of evolutionary models. Surprisingly, Spitzer eclipse observations of CWW 89Ab (Beatty et al. 2018) show that the dayside emission requires an internal luminosity is 16 times higher than predicted by evolutionary models. In Beatty et al. (2018) we hypothesized that this is due to a stratospheric temperature inversion on CWW 89Ab's dayside. Atmospheric modeling by Molliere et al. (2015) shows that CWW 89Ab's temperature, an inversion can only happen if the atmospheric carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) is close to one. Since we know that the abundances of Ruprecht 147 and CWW 89A itself (Curtis et al. 2018) are close to the Solar value of C/O 0.54, a super-stellar value of C/O 1 in CWW 89Ab would mean that the material used to form the brown dwarf was processed through CWW 89A's proto-planetary disk (Oberg et al. 2011). It would necessarily follow that CWW 89Ab formed via core accretion within the proto-planetary disk, and not through gravitational collapse. We wish to observe CWW 89Ab to determine if the dayside over-luminosity is caused by a temperature inversion. Since inversions are caused by direct stellar irradiation and impossible at night, the nightside emission should be consistent with Tint=850K if an inversion is the cause of the

  15. Mechanical tests of the bolt of the gripper latch on the control rod cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, E.; Couet, D.; Molinie, D.; Grandjean, Y.; Radat, M.P.; Guttmann, D.

    1998-01-01

    Failure analysis and mechanical testing indicate that control rod drive mechanisms malfunctioning by 1995-96 is due to rupture by fatigue of a bolt inside the stationary gripper assembly. Fatigue is enhanced by free working following surface adaptation and unscrewing of the assembly. These results are taken into account for the choice of a new anti-rotation device. (authors)

  16. Predicting DMS-IV cluster B personality disorder criteria from MMPI-2 and Rorschach data: a test of incremental validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M A; Hilsenroth, M J; Castlebury, F; Fowler, J C; Baity, M R

    2001-02-01

    Despite their frequent conjoint clinical use, the incremental validity of Rorschach (Rorschach, 1921/1942) and MMPI (Hathaway & McKinley, 1943) data has not been adequately established, nor has any study to date explored the incremental validity of these tests for predicting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) personality disorders (PDs). In a reanalysis of existing data, we used select Rorschach variables and the MMPI PD scales to predict DSM-IV antisocial, borderline, histrionic, and narcissistic PD criteria in a sample of treatment-seeking outpatients. The correlational findings revealed alimited relation between Rorschach and MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) variables, with only 5 of 30 correlations reaching significance (p psychological characteristics of the DSM-IV Cluster B PDs.

  17. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  18. Experiment data of 200% recirculation pump discharge line break integral test run 961 with HPCS failure at ROSA-III and comparison with results of suction line break tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Nakamura, Hideo; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Murata, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1984-03-01

    This report presents the experimental data of RUN 961, a 200% double-ended break test at the recirculation pump discharge line in the ROSA-III test facility. The ROSA-III test facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) system of the BWR/6. The facility has the electrically heated core, the break simulator and the scaled ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). The MSIV (Main Steam Isolation Valve) closure and the ECCS actuation were tripped by the liquid level in the upper downcomer. The PCT (Peak Cladding Temperature) was 894 K, which was 107 K higher than a 200% pump suction line break test (RUN 926) due to the smaller depressurization rate. The effect of break location on transient LOCA phenomena was clarified by comparing the discharge and suction break tests. The whole core was quenched 71 s after LPCI actuation and the effectiveness of ECCS has been confirmed. (author)

  19. Incorporation of μ3-CO3 into an MnIII/MnIV Mn12 cluster: {[(cyclam)MnIV(μ-O)2MnIII(H2O)(μ-OH)]6(μ3-CO3)2}Cl8·24H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levaton, Ben B.; Olmstead, Marilyn M.

    2010-01-01

    The centrosymmetric title cluster, hexa­aquadi-μ3-carbonato-hexa­cyclamhexa-μ2-hydroxido-dodeca-μ2-oxido-hexa­mang­an­ese(IV)hexa­manganese(III) octa­chloride tetra­cosa­hydrate, [Mn12(CO3)2O12(OH)6(C10H24N4)6(H2O)6]Cl8·24H2O, has two μ3-CO3 groups that not only bridge octahedrally coordinated MnIII ions but also act as acceptors to two different kinds of hydrogen bonds. The carbonate anion is planar within experimental error and has an average C—O distance of 1.294 (4) Å. The crystal packing is stabilized by O—H⋯Cl, O—H⋯O, N—H⋯Cl and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Two of the four independent chloride ions are disordered over five positions, and eight of the 12 independent water mol­ecules are disordered over 21 positions. PMID:21587382

  20. A Reliability Assessment of the Hydrostatic Test of Pipeline with 0.8 Design Factor in the West–East China Natural Gas Pipeline III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of 0.8 design factor in Chinese pipeline industry is a breakthrough with the success of the test pipe section in the west–east China gas pipeline III. For such a design factor, the traditional P-V (Pressure-Volume curve based pressure test control cannot describe the details of the process, and the 0/1 type failure is not an efficient index to show the safety level of the pipeline. In this paper, a reliability based assessment method is proposed to monitor the real-time failure probability of the pipeline during the hydrostatic test process. The reliability index can be used as the degree of risk. Following the actual hydrostatic testing of a test pipe section with 0.8 design factor in the west–east China gas pipeline III, reliability analysis was performed using Monte Carlo technique. The basic values of input parameters of the limit state equations are based on the data collected from either the tested section or the recommended value in the codes. The analysis of limit states, i.e., the yielding deformation and the excessive plastic deformation of pipeline, proceeded based on these distributions. Finally, it is found that the gradually increased water pressure makes the failure probability increase accordingly. A reliability assessment method was proposed and illustrated with the practical pressure test process.

  1. Analysis, by Relap5 code, of boron dilution phenomena in a Small Break Loca Transient, performed in PKL III E 2.2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, G.; Vella, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present work is finalized to investigate the E2.2 thermal-hydraulics transient of the PKL III facility, which is a scaled reproduction of a typical German PWR, operated by FRAMATOME-ANP in Erlangen, Germany, within the framework of an international cooperation (OECD/SETH project). The main purpose of the project is to study boron dilution events in Pressurized Water Reactors and to contribute to the assessment of thermal-hydraulic system codes like Relap5. The experimental test PKL III E2.2 investigates the behavior of a typical PWR after a Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SB-LOCA) in a cold leg and an immediate injection of borated water in two cold legs. The main purpose of this work is to simulate the PKL III test facility and particularly its experimental transient by Relap5 system code. The adopted nodalization, already available at Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN), has been reviewed and applied with an accurate analysis of the experimental test parameters. The main result relies in a good agreement of calculated data with experimental measures for a number of main important variables. (author)

  2. Impact of an automated email notification system for results of tests pending at discharge: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Anuj K; Roy, Christopher L; Poon, Eric G; Williams, Deborah H; Nolido, Nyryan; Yoon, Cathy; Budris, Jonas; Gandhi, Tejal; Bates, David W; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Physician awareness of the results of tests pending at discharge (TPADs) is poor. We developed an automated system that notifies responsible physicians of TPAD results via secure, network email. We sought to evaluate the impact of this system on self-reported awareness of TPAD results by responsible physicians, a necessary intermediary step to improve management of TPAD results. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial at a major hospital affiliated with an integrated healthcare delivery network in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult patients with TPADs who were discharged from inpatient general medicine and cardiology services were assigned to the intervention or usual care arm if their inpatient attending physician and primary care physician (PCP) were both randomized to the same study arm. Patients of physicians randomized to discordant study arms were excluded. We surveyed these physicians 72 h after all TPAD results were finalized. The primary outcome was awareness of TPAD results by attending physicians. Secondary outcomes included awareness of TPAD results by PCPs, awareness of actionable TPAD results, and provider satisfaction. We analyzed data on 441 patients. We sent 441 surveys to attending physicians and 353 surveys to PCPs and received 275 and 152 responses from 83 different attending physicians and 112 different PCPs, respectively (attending physician survey response rate of 63%). Intervention attending physicians and PCPs were significantly more aware of TPAD results (76% vs 38%, adjusted/clustered OR 6.30 (95% CI 3.02 to 13.16), pemail notification represents a promising strategy for managing TPAD results, potentially mitigating an unresolved patient safety concern. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01153451).

  3. Test of Gravity on Large Scales with Weak Gravitational Lensing and Clustering Measurements of SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Seljak, U.; Gunn, J.; Lombriser, L.

    2009-01-01

    We perform a test of gravity on large scales (5-50 Mpc/h) using 70,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 with redshifts 0.16clustering-- that can discriminate between different theories of gravity and is largely independent of galaxy bias and sigma_8. In particular, E_G is sensitive to the relation between the spatial and temporal scalar perturbations in the space-time metric. While these two potentials are equivalent in concordance cosmology (GR+LCDM) in the absence of anisotropic stress, they are not equivalent in alternative theories of gravity in general, so that different models make different predictions for E_G. We find E_G=0.37±0.05 averaged over scales 5test in future galaxy surveys such as LSST, for which a very high signal-to-noise measurement will be possible.

  4. Rorschach and the WAIS-III after one and two years of psychotherapy O teste de Rorschach e a Escala WAIS-III após um e dois Anos de psicoterapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latife Yazigi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying what aspects of personality are modified after one and two years of psychoanalytic psychotherapy in adults attending a free university healthcare service in São Paulo, Brazil. The instruments were the Rorschach and the WAIS-III tests which were administered before and after one and two years of treatment. The participants were 34 adult individuals, both genders. After one year of psychotherapy in the Rorschach method there was an increase in effective and adaptive interpersonal relationship, an enhancement in sensitiveness related to the capacity of modulating affect, the need for close contact as well as the arousal of feelings of discomfort associated with intensification of self-regard, and a decrease in narcissistic tendencies. As well as in WAIS-III, there was an increase in motivation, attention and speed processing.O estudo teve por objetivo identificar quais aspectos da personalidade são modificados após um e dois anos de psicoterapia psicanalítica em adultos atendidos em um serviço público de saúde mental de uma universidade em São Paulo, no Brasil. Os instrumentos utilizados foram o Rorschach e a Escala de Inteligência Wechsler para adultos (WAIS-III, os quais foram administrados antes e após um e dois anos de tratamento. Os participantes foram 34 indivíduos adultos, de ambos os sexos. No Rorschach, após um ano de psicoterapia, ocorreu melhora da relação interpessoal adaptada e efetiva, melhora na sensibilidade relacionada à capacidade de modular afeto e da necessidade de contato mais próximo, e surgimento de sentimentos de desconforto associados à intensificação de auto-observação e diminuição de tendências narcisistas. No WAIS-III houve aumento de motivação, melhora atencional e de velocidade de processamento.

  5. Comparison of multianalyte proficiency test results by sum of ranking differences, principal component analysis, and hierarchical cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrbić, Biljana; Héberger, Károly; Durišić-Mladenović, Nataša

    2013-10-01

    Sum of ranking differences (SRD) was applied for comparing multianalyte results obtained by several analytical methods used in one or in different laboratories, i.e., for ranking the overall performances of the methods (or laboratories) in simultaneous determination of the same set of analytes. The data sets for testing of the SRD applicability contained the results reported during one of the proficiency tests (PTs) organized by EU Reference Laboratory for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (EU-RL-PAH). In this way, the SRD was also tested as a discriminant method alternative to existing average performance scores used to compare mutlianalyte PT results. SRD should be used along with the z scores--the most commonly used PT performance statistics. SRD was further developed to handle the same rankings (ties) among laboratories. Two benchmark concentration series were selected as reference: (a) the assigned PAH concentrations (determined precisely beforehand by the EU-RL-PAH) and (b) the averages of all individual PAH concentrations determined by each laboratory. Ranking relative to the assigned values and also to the average (or median) values pointed to the laboratories with the most extreme results, as well as revealed groups of laboratories with similar overall performances. SRD reveals differences between methods or laboratories even if classical test(s) cannot. The ranking was validated using comparison of ranks by random numbers (a randomization test) and using seven folds cross-validation, which highlighted the similarities among the (methods used in) laboratories. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis justified the findings based on SRD ranking/grouping. If the PAH-concentrations are row-scaled, (i.e., z scores are analyzed as input for ranking) SRD can still be used for checking the normality of errors. Moreover, cross-validation of SRD on z scores groups the laboratories similarly. The SRD technique is general in nature, i.e., it can

  6. The Durban Auto Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jochen; Robbins, Glen; Barnes, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the formation of the Durban Auto Cluster in the context of trade liberalization. It argues that the improvement of operational competitiveness of firms in the cluster is prominently due to joint action. It tests this proposition by comparing the gains from cluster activities...

  7. Construct validity of tests that measure kick performance for young soccer players based on cluster analysis: exploring the relationship between coaches rating and actual measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palucci Vieira, Luiz H; de Andrade, Vitor L; Aquino, Rodrigo L; Moraes, Renato; Barbieri, Fabio A; Cunha, Sérgio A; Bedo, Bruno L; Santiago, Paulo R

    2017-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to verify the relationship between the classification of coaches and actual performance in field tests that measure the kicking performance in young soccer players, using the K-means clustering technique. Twenty-three U-14 players performed 8 tests to measure their kicking performance. Four experienced coaches provided a rating for each player as follows: 1: poor; 2: below average; 3: average; 4: very good; 5: excellent as related to three parameters (i.e. accuracy, power and ability to put spin on the ball). The scores interval established from k-means cluster metric was useful to originating five groups of performance level, since ANOVA revealed significant differences between clusters generated (Pperformance. The Wall Volley Test seems to be a good predictor of other tests. Five tests showed reasonable construct validity and can be used to predict the accuracy (penalty kick, free kick, kicking a rolling ball and Wall Volley Test) and ability to put spin on the ball (free kick and corner kick tests) when kicking in soccer. In contrast, the goal kick, kicking the ball when airborne and the vertical kick tests exhibited low power of discrimination and using them should be viewed with caution.

  8. Analysis, by RELAP5 code, of boron dilution phenomena in a mid-loop operation transient, performed in PKL III F2.1 RUN 1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascari, F.; Vella, G.; Del Nevo, A.; D'Auria, F.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper deals with the post test analysis and accuracy quantification of the test PKL III F2.1 RUN 1 by RELAP5/Mod3.3 code performed in the framework of the international OECD/SETH PKL III Project. The PKL III is a full-height integral test facility (ITF) that models the entire primary system and most of the secondary system (except for turbine and condenser) of pressurized water reactor of KWU design of the 1300-MW (electric) class on a scale of 1:145. Detailed design was based to the largest possible extent on the specific data of Philippsburg nuclear power plant, unit 2. As for the test facilities of this size, the scaling concept aims to simulate overall thermal hydraulic behavior of the full-scale power plant [1]. The main purpose of the project is to investigate PWR safety issues related to boron dilution and in particular this experiment investigates (a) the boron dilution issue during mid-loop operation and shutdown conditions, and (b) assessing primary circuit accident management operations to prevent boron dilution as a consequence of loss of heat removal [2]. In this work the authors deal with a systematic procedure (developed at the university of Pisa) for code assessment and uncertainty qualification and its application to RELAP5 system code. It is used to evaluate the capability of RELAP5 to reproduce the thermal hydraulics of an inadvertent boron dilution event in a PWR. The quantitative analysis has been performed adopting the Fast Fourier Transform Based Method (FFTBM), which has the capability to quantify the errors in code predictions as compared to the measured experimental signal. (author)

  9. U.S. EPA Water Technology Innovation Cluster Leaders Meeting - "Successfully Supporting Early-Stage Companies: The Role of Technology Testing" Meeting Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of this workshop were to: (1) increase the cluster leaders’ level of knowledge regarding past and current water technology testing programs, facilities and requirements; (2) learn from the experiences of technology vendors in getting innovative, commercial-ready product...

  10. Test of a workforce development intervention to expand opioid use disorder treatment pharmacotherapy prescribers: protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Molfenter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overdoses due to non-medical use of prescription opioids and other opiates have become the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone are key evidence-based pharmacotherapies available to addiction treatment providers to address opioid use disorder (OUD and prevent overdose deaths. Treatment organizations’ efforts to provide these pharmacotherapies have, however, been stymied by limited success in recruiting providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants to prescribe these medications. Historically, the addiction treatment field has not attracted physicians, and many barriers to implementing OUD pharmacotherapy exist, ranging from lack of confidence in treating OUD patients to concerns regarding reimbursement. Throughout the USA, the prevalence of OUD far exceeds the capacity of the OUD pharmacotherapy treatment system. Poor access to OUD pharmacotherapy prescribers has become a workforce development need for the addiction treatment field and a significant health issue. Methods This cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT is designed to increase buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone treatment capacity for OUD. The implementation intervention to be tested is a bundle of OUD pharmacotherapy capacity building practices called the Prescriber Recruitment Bundle (PRB, which was developed and piloted in a previous statewide buprenorphine implementation study. For this cluster RCT, organizational sites will be recruited and then randomized into one of two arms: (1 control, with treatment as usual and access to a website with PRB resources, or (2 intervention, with organizations implementing the PRB using the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment organizational change model over a 24-month intervention period and a 10-month sustainability period. The primary treatment outcomes for each organizational site are self-reported monthly counts of

  11. Test of a workforce development intervention to expand opioid use disorder treatment pharmacotherapy prescribers: protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Knudsen, Hannah K; Brown, Randy; Jacobson, Nora; Horst, Julie; Van Etten, Mark; Kim, Jee-Seon; Haram, Eric; Collier, Elizabeth; Starr, Sanford; Toy, Alexander; Madden, Lynn

    2017-11-15

    Overdoses due to non-medical use of prescription opioids and other opiates have become the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone are key evidence-based pharmacotherapies available to addiction treatment providers to address opioid use disorder (OUD) and prevent overdose deaths. Treatment organizations' efforts to provide these pharmacotherapies have, however, been stymied by limited success in recruiting providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to prescribe these medications. Historically, the addiction treatment field has not attracted physicians, and many barriers to implementing OUD pharmacotherapy exist, ranging from lack of confidence in treating OUD patients to concerns regarding reimbursement. Throughout the USA, the prevalence of OUD far exceeds the capacity of the OUD pharmacotherapy treatment system. Poor access to OUD pharmacotherapy prescribers has become a workforce development need for the addiction treatment field and a significant health issue. This cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to increase buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone treatment capacity for OUD. The implementation intervention to be tested is a bundle of OUD pharmacotherapy capacity building practices called the Prescriber Recruitment Bundle (PRB), which was developed and piloted in a previous statewide buprenorphine implementation study. For this cluster RCT, organizational sites will be recruited and then randomized into one of two arms: (1) control, with treatment as usual and access to a website with PRB resources, or (2) intervention, with organizations implementing the PRB using the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment organizational change model over a 24-month intervention period and a 10-month sustainability period. The primary treatment outcomes for each organizational site are self-reported monthly counts of buprenorphine slots, extended

  12. Fabrication and testing of the sintered ceramic UO{sub 2} fuel - I - III, Part III - testing of sintered uranium dioxide properties dependent on the fabrication procedure; Izrada i ispitivanje keramickog goriva na bazi UO{sub 2}- I-III, III Deo - Ispitivanje osobina sinterovanog urandioksida u zavisnosti od procesa dobijanja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M; Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za termotehniku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The objective of this task was testing the influence of some parameters on the properties of sintered UO{sub 2}. The influence of parameters tested were as follows: adhesives; pressure in the pressing procedure; temperature of sintering of the UO{sub 2} powder. Other parameters were chosen according to the theoretical study. Sintering was done in argon atmosphere. Characterization of the UO{sub 2} powder was performed meaning determining the needed chemical, physical and physico-chemical properties. Some new methods were developed within this task: SET method for measuring the specific surfaces, DTA, TGA, high-temperature torsion.

  13. Wechsler Memory Scale-III Faces test performance in patients with mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelye, Adriana M; Howieson, Diane B; Wild, Katherine V; Moore, Mindy Milar; Kaye, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    Little is known about the sensitivity of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) Faces subtest to memory impairment associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this study, Faces performance was examined in 24 MCI patients, 46 mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and 98 elderly controls. We hypothesized that participants with diagnoses of MCI or AD would be impaired relative to controls on Faces. Analyses showed that AD participants performed significantly worse than MCI and intact participants, although there were no significant differences between MCI and intact participants. Data suggest that brain areas specialized for face recognition memory may be less affected by MCI and mild AD than regions specialized for verbal memory.

  14. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  15. A general framework to test gravity using galaxy clusters - I. Modelling the dynamical mass of haloes in f(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Myles A.; He, Jian-hua; Arnold, Christian; Li, Baojiu

    2018-06-01

    We propose a new framework for testing gravity using cluster observations, which aims to provide an unbiased constraint on modified gravity models from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) and X-ray cluster counts and the cluster gas fraction, among other possible observables. Focusing on a popular f(R) model of gravity, we propose a novel procedure to recalibrate mass scaling relations from Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) to f(R) gravity for SZ and X-ray cluster observables. We find that the complicated modified gravity effects can be simply modelled as a dependence on a combination of the background scalar field and redshift, fR(z)/(1 + z), regardless of the f(R) model parameter. By employing a large suite of N-body simulations, we demonstrate that a theoretically derived tanh fitting formula is in excellent agreement with the dynamical mass enhancement of dark matter haloes for a large range of background field parameters and redshifts. Our framework is sufficiently flexible to allow for tests of other models and inclusion of further observables, and the one-parameter description of the dynamical mass enhancement can have important implications on the theoretical modelling of observables and on practical tests of gravity.

  16. 40 CFR 53.35 - Test procedure for Class II and Class III methods for PM2.5 and PM-2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... purposes of this outlier test only. (i) Calculate the quantities 2 × R1,j/(R1,j + R2,j) and 2 × R1,j/(R1,j... of the interval, (0.93, 1.07), then R2,j is an outlier. (iii) Calculate the quantities 2 × R3,j/(R3,j... site B shall be in a western city characterized by a high ratio of PM10−2.5 to PM2.5, with exposure to...

  17. Detoxification of Pesticide-Containing Wastewater with FeIII, Activated Carbon and Fenton Reagent and Its Control Using Three Standardized Bacterial Inhibition Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Rott

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Discharge of toxic industrial wastewaters into biological wastewater treatment plants may result in inhibition of activated sludge bacteria (ASB. In order to find an appropriate method of detoxification, the wastewater of a pesticide-processing plant in Vietnam was treated with three different methods (FeIII, powdered activated carbon (PAC, Fenton (FeII/H2O2 analyzing the detoxification effect with the nitrification inhibition test (NIT, respiration inhibition test (RIT and luminescent bacteria test (LBT. The heterotrophic ASB were much more resistant to the wastewater than the autotrophic nitrificants. The NIT turned out to be more suitable than the RIT since the NIT was less time-consuming and more reliable. In addition, the marine Aliivibrio fischeri were more sensitive than the nitrificants indicating that a lack of inhibition in the very practical and time-efficient LBT correlates with a lack of nitrification inhibition. With 95%, the Fenton method showed the highest efficiency regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD removal. Although similar COD removal (60–65% was found for both the FeIII and the PAC method, the inhibitory effect of the wastewater was reduced much more strongly with PAC. Both the NIT and the LBT showed that the PAC and Fenton methods led to a similar reduction in the inhibitory effect.

  18. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  19. Rapid and sensitive lateral flow immunoassay method for determining alpha fetoprotein in serum using europium (III) chelate microparticles-based lateral flow test strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Rong-Liang; Xu, Xu-Ping; Liu, Tian-Cai; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Wang, Xian-Guo; Ren, Zhi-Qi [Institute of Antibody Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong (China); Hao, Fen [DaAn Gene Co. Ltd. of Sun Yat-sen University, 19 Xiangshan Road, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wu, Ying-Song, E-mail: wg@smu.edu.cn [Institute of Antibody Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong (China)

    2015-09-03

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a primary marker for many diseases including various cancers, is important in clinical tumor diagnosis and antenatal screening. Most immunoassays provide high sensitivity and accuracy for determining AFP, but they are expensive, often complex, time-consuming procedures. A simple and rapid point-of-care system that integrates Eu (III) chelate microparticles with lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) has been developed to determine AFP in serum with an assay time of 15 min. The approach is based on a sandwich immunoassay performed on lateral flow test strips. A fluorescence strip reader was used to measure the fluorescence peak heights of the test line (H{sub T}) and the control line (H{sub C}); the H{sub T}/H{sub C} ratio was used for quantitation. The Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based LFIA assay exhibited a wide linear range (1.0–1000 IU mL{sup −1}) for AFP with a low limit of detection (0.1 IU mL{sup −1}) based on 5ul of serum. Satisfactory specificity and accuracy were demonstrated and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) for AFP were both <10%. Furthermore, in the analysis of human serum samples, excellent correlation (n = 284, r = 0.9860, p < 0.0001) was obtained between the proposed method and a commercially available CLIA kit. Results indicated that the Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based LFIA system provided a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for determining AFP in serum, indicating that it would be suitable for development in point-of-care testing. - Highlights: • Europium (III) chelate microparticles was used as a label for LIFA. • Quantitative detection by using H{sub T}/H{sub C} ratio was achieved. • LIFA for simple and rapid AFP detection in human serum. • The sensitivity and linearity was more excellent compared with QD-based ICTS. • This method could be developed for rapid point-of-care screening.

  20. First level analysis report: comparative testing of HVS Mk IV+ and HVS Mk III on road D2388 near Cullinan

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Morton, B

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available , result in variations in pavement response and test results. Based on this concern and in an effort to ensure uniformity throughout APT with the HVS, a comparative testing project was initiated to compare the effect of the two machines on pavement...

  1. Significance of Iron(II,III) Hydroxycarbonate Green Rust in Arsenic Remediation Using Zerovalent Iron in Laboratory Column Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted three- to four-months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50 : 50 (w : w, Peerless iron : sand) in t...

  2. 4 August 2011 - Austrian Head of Protocol, Directorate General III, Federal Ministry of Science and Research I. Friedrich (3rd from left) in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Benedkit, C. Wulz and C. Fabjan.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4 August 2011 - Austrian Head of Protocol, Directorate General III, Federal Ministry of Science and Research I. Friedrich (3rd from left) in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Benedkit, C. Wulz and C. Fabjan.

  3. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  4. Lattice QCD production on commodity clusters at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the construction and results to date of Fermilab's three Myrinet-networked lattice QCD production clusters (an 80-node dual Pentium III cluster, a 48-node dual Xeon cluster, and a 128-node dual Xeon cluster). We examine a number of aspects of performance of the MILC lattice QCD code running on these clusters

  5. Testing the leadership and organizational change for implementation (LOCI) intervention in substance abuse treatment: a cluster randomized trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Ehrhart, Mark G; Moullin, Joanna C; Torres, Elisa M; Green, Amy E

    2017-03-03

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation represents a strategic change in organizations that requires effective leadership and alignment of leadership and organizational support across organizational levels. As such, there is a need for combining leadership development with organizational strategies to support organizational climate conducive to EBP implementation. The leadership and organizational change for implementation (LOCI) intervention includes leadership training for workgroup leaders, ongoing implementation leadership coaching, 360° assessment, and strategic planning with top and middle management regarding how they can support workgroup leaders in developing a positive EBP implementation climate. This test of the LOCI intervention will take place in conjunction with the implementation of motivational interviewing (MI) in 60 substance use disorder treatment programs in California, USA. Participants will include agency executives, 60 program leaders, and approximately 360 treatment staff. LOCI will be tested using a multiple cohort, cluster randomized trial that randomizes workgroups (i.e., programs) within agency to either LOCI or a webinar leadership training control condition in three consecutive cohorts. The LOCI intervention is 12 months, and the webinar control intervention takes place in months 1, 5, and 8, for each cohort. Web-based surveys of staff and supervisors will be used to collect data on leadership, implementation climate, provider attitudes, and citizenship. Audio recordings of counseling sessions will be coded for MI fidelity. The unit of analysis will be the workgroup, randomized by site within agency and with care taken that co-located workgroups are assigned to the same condition to avoid contamination. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) will be used to analyze the data to account for the nested data structure. LOCI has been developed to be a feasible and effective approach for organizations to create a positive climate and

  6. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  7. Effects of high temperature ECC injection on small and large break BWR LOCA simulation tests in ROSA-III program (RUNs 940 and 941)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Anoda, Yoshinari; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Murata, Hideo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1990-03-01

    The ROSA-III program, of which principal results are summarized in a report of JAERI 1307, conducted small and large-break loss-of-coolant experiments (RUNs 940 and 941) with high water temperature of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) are one of the parametric study with respect to the ECCS effect on core cooling. This report presents all the experiment results of these two tests and describes additional finding with respect to the hot ECC effects on core cooling phenomena. By comparing these two tests (water temperature of 393 K) with the standard ECC tests of RUNs 922 and 926 (water temperature of 313 K), it was found that the ECC subcooling variation had a small influence on the core cooling phenomena in 5 % small break tests but had larger influence on them in 200 % break tests. The ECC subcooling effects described in the previous report are reviewed and the temperature distribution in the pressure vessel is investigated for these four tests. (author)

  8. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin

  9. Study protocol for the optimisation, feasibility testing and pilot cluster randomised trial of Positive Choices: a school-based social marketing intervention to promote sexual health, prevent unintended teenage pregnancies and address health inequalities in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Ruth; Allen, Elizabeth; Campbell, Rona; Elbourne, Diana; Hadley, Alison; Lohan, Maria; Melendez-Torres, G J; Mercer, Catherine H; Morris, Steve; Young, Honor; Bonell, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS), England's under-18 conception rate has fallen by 55%, but a continued focus on prevention is needed to maintain and accelerate progress. The teenage birth rate remains higher in the UK than comparable Western European countries. Previous trials indicate that school-based social marketing interventions are a promising approach to addressing teenage pregnancy and improving sexual health. Such interventions are yet to be trialled in the UK. This study aims to optimise and establish the feasibility and acceptability of one such intervention: Positive Choices. Design: Optimisation, feasibility testing and pilot cluster randomised trial.Interventions: The Positive Choices intervention comprises a student needs survey, a student/staff led School Health Promotion Council (SHPC), a classroom curriculum for year nine students covering social and emotional skills and sex education, student-led social marketing activities, parent information and a review of school sexual health services.Systematic optimisation of Positive Choices will be carried out with the National Children's Bureau Sex Education Forum (NCB SEF), one state secondary school in England and other youth and policy stakeholders.Feasibility testing will involve the same state secondary school and will assess progression criteria to advance to the pilot cluster RCT.Pilot cluster RCT with integral process evaluation will involve six different state secondary schools (four interventions and two controls) and will assess the feasibility and utility of progressing to a full effectiveness trial.The following outcome measures will be trialled as part of the pilot:Self-reported pregnancy and unintended pregnancy (initiation of pregnancy for boys) and sexually transmitted infections,Age of sexual debut, number of sexual partners, use of contraception at first and last sex and non-volitional sexEducational attainmentThe feasibility of linking administrative

  10. Cluster Analysis of Maize Inbred Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiban Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of diversity among inbred lines is important for heterosis breeding. Sixty maize inbred lines were evaluated for their eight agro morphological traits during winter season of 2011 to analyze their genetic diversity. Clustering was done by average linkage method. The inbred lines were grouped into six clusters. Inbred lines grouped into Clusters II had taller plants with maximum number of leaves. The cluster III was characterized with shorter plants with minimum number of leaves. The inbred lines categorized into cluster V had early flowering whereas the group into cluster VI had late flowering time. The inbred lines grouped into the cluster III were characterized by higher value of anthesis silking interval (ASI and those of cluster VI had lower value of ASI. These results showed that the inbred lines having widely divergent clusters can be utilized in hybrid breeding programme.

  11. Introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into drug shops in Uganda: design and implementation of a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Magnussen, Pascal; Chandler, Clare I R; Hansen, Kristian S; Lal, Sham; Cundill, Bonnie; Lynch, Caroline A; Clarke, Siân E

    2014-07-29

    An intervention was designed to introduce rapid diagnostics tests for malaria (mRDTs) into registered drug shops in Uganda to encourage rational and appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). We conducted participatory training of drug shop vendors and implemented supporting interventions to orientate local communities (patients) and the public sector (health facility staff and district officials) to the behavioral changes in diagnosis, treatment and referral being introduced in drug shops. The intervention was designed to be evaluated through a cluster randomized trial. In this paper, we present detailed design, implementation and evaluation experiences in order to help inform future studies of a complex nature. Three preparatory studies (formative, baseline and willingness-to-pay) were conducted to explore perceptions on diagnosis and treatment of malaria at drug shops, and affordable prices for mRDTs and ACTs in order to inform the design of the intervention and implementation modalities. The intervention required careful design with the intention to be acceptable, sustainable and effective. Critical components of intervention were: community sensitization and creating awareness, training of drug shop vendors to diagnose malaria with mRDTs, treat and refer customers to formal health facilities, giving pre-referral rectal artesunate and improved record-keeping. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients receiving appropriately-targeted treatment with ACT, evaluated against microscopy on a research blood slide. Introducing mRDTs in drug shops may seem simple, but our experience of intervention design, conduct and evaluation showed this to be a complex process requiring multiple interventions and evaluation components drawing from a combination of epidemiological, social science and health economics methodologies. The trial was conducted in phases sequenced such that each benefited from the other. The main challenges

  12. A cluster randomised trial testing an intervention to improve parents' recognition of their child's weight status: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Kathryn N; Jones, Angela R; Tovee, Martin J; Ells, Louisa J; Pearce, Mark S; Araujo-Soares, Vera; Adamson, Ashley J

    2015-06-12

    Parents typically do not recognise their child's weight status accurately according to clinical criteria, and thus may not take appropriate action if their child is overweight. We developed a novel visual intervention designed to improve parental perceptions of child weight status according to clinical criteria for children aged 4-5 and 10-11 years. The Map Me intervention comprises age- and sex-specific body image scales of known body mass index and supporting information about the health risks of childhood overweight. This cluster randomised trial will test the effectiveness of the Map Me intervention. Primary schools will be randomised to: paper-based Map Me; web-based Map Me; no information (control). Parents of reception (4-5 years) and year 6 (10-11 years) children attending the schools will be recruited. The study will work with the National Child Measurement Programme which measures the height and weight of these year groups and provides feedback to parents about their child's weight status. Before receiving the feedback, parents will complete a questionnaire which includes assessment of their perception of their child's weight status and knowledge of the health consequences of childhood overweight. The control group will provide pre-intervention data with assessment soon after recruitment; the intervention groups will provide post-intervention data after access to Map Me for one month. The study will subsequently obtain the child height and weight measurements from the National Child Measurement Programme. Families will be followed-up by the study team at 12 months. The primary outcome is any difference in accuracy in parental perception of child weight status between pre-intervention and post-intervention at one month. The secondary outcomes include differences in parent knowledge, intention to change lifestyle behaviours and/or seek advice or support, perceived control, action planning, coping planning, and child weight status at 12 month follow-up. The

  13. Results of tests and studies of American materials in the channel of the MHD facility U-02 (Phase III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenkov, D.K.; Borodina, T.I.; Vysotsky, D.A.; Zalkind, V.I.; Kirillov, V.V.; Romanov, A.I.; Telegin, G.P.; Strekalov, N.V.

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the US--USSR Cooperative Program in MHD joint US--USSR tests were conducted in May 1978 at the U-02 facility of an MHD generator section consisting of U.S.-built electrode blocks and USSR-built insulating walls. The main purpose of the experiment was to conduct continuous 100-hour duration tests of materials and structures of electrode blocks; in particular, to study the behavior of ceramic electrodes and insulators in operating conditions of an MHD generator, the electro-physical and thermal characteristics of the working section as a whole and electrodes in particular, and to analyze the change in the phase composition and structure of materials during the test. The main thrust of the experiment was a study of electrode material behavior. Six varieties of electrodes based on doped lanthanum chromite were tested and investigated. The electrodes were made of fine grained, hot-pressed mass (the porosity of the ceramic was 2 to 3%). The interelectrode insulators were made of magnesial and magnesial-spinel ceramic also manufactured by the hot pressing method. Results are presented and discussed

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 414: Clean Slate III Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 414 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 414 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate III (CSIII) storage transportation test conducted on June 9, 1963. CAU 414 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-03CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 414 are the result of the atmospheric dispersal of contamination from the 1963 CSIII test. The CSIII test was a nonnuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 8 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily uranium and plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 414 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 7, 2016, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 414.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 414: Clean Slate III Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 414 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 414 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate III (CSIII) storage–transportation test conducted on June 9, 1963. CAU 414 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-03CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 414 are the result of the atmospheric dispersal of contamination from the 1963 CSIII test. The CSIII test was a nonnuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 8 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily uranium and plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 414 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 7, 2016, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 414.

  16. International Benchmark based on Pressurised Water Reactor Sub-channel and Bundle Tests. Volume III: Departure from Nucleate Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Adam; Avramova, Maria; Velazquez-Lozada, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    This report summarised the second phase of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Benchmark Based on NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Tests (PSBT), which was intended to provide data for the verification of Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) prediction in existing thermal-hydraulics codes and provide direction in the development of future methods. This phase was composed of three exercises; Exercise 1: fluid temperature benchmark, Exercise 2: steady-state rod bundle benchmark and Exercise 3: transient rod bundle benchmark. The experimental data provided to the participants of this benchmark is from a series of void measurement tests using full-size mock-up tests for both BWRs and PWRs. These tests were performed from 1987 to 1995 by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) in Japan and made available by the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation (JNES) for the purposes of this benchmark, which was organised by Pennsylvania State University. Nine institutions from seven countries participated in this benchmark. Nine different computer codes were used in Exercise 1, 2 and 3. Among the computer codes were porous media, sub-channel and systems thermal-hydraulic code. The improvement between FLICA-OVAP (sub-channel) and FLICA (sub-channel) was noticeable. The main difference between the two was that FLICA-OVAP implicitly assigned flow regime based on drift flux, while FLICA assumes single phase flows. In Exercises 2 and 3, the codes were generally able to predict the Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) power as well as the axial location of the onset of DNB (for the steady-state cases) and the time of DNB (for the transient cases). It was noted that the codes that used the Electric-Power-Research- Institute (EPRI) Critical-Heat-Flux (CHF) correlation had the lowest mean error in Exercise 2 for the predicted DNB power

  17. Preliminary temperature Accelerated Life Test (ALT) on III-V commercial concentrator triple-junction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Espinet González, Pilar; Algora del Valle, Carlos; Orlando Carrillo, Vincenzo; Nuñez Mendoza, Neftali; Vázquez López, Manuel; Bautista Villares, Jesus; Xiugang, He; Barrutia Poncela, Laura; Rey-Stolle Prado, Ignacio; Araki, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative temperature accelerated life test on sixty GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple-junction commercial concentrator solar cells is being carried out. The final objective of this experiment is to evaluate the reliability, warranty period, and failure mechanism of high concentration solar cells in a moderate period of time. The acceleration of the degradation is realized by subjecting the solar cells at temperatures markedly higher than the nominal working temperature under a concentrator Three e...

  18. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  19. The sky is falling III: The effect of deposition from static solid rocket motor tests on juvenile crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, William J; Curry, Eric; McNeill, Laurie S; Heavilin, Justin

    2017-12-01

    A mixture of combustion products (mainly hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water) and entrained soil, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), can be deposited on crops during static solid rocket motor tests. The impact of a reported worst-case event was previously evaluated by exposing corn and alfalfa to 3200-gTFS/m 2 at 54days after emergence. Exposures via soil and leaves were evaluated separately. Reduced growth (soil exposure) and leaf "scorch" (leaf exposure) were attributed mainly to the high chloride concentrations in the TFS (56,000mg/kg). A follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a typical deposition event (70-gTFS/m 2 , estimated by radar during several tests) and exposure (soil and leaves simultaneously) on juvenile corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat. Younger crops were used to examine potential age sensitivity differences. Impact was evaluated by comparing the growth, elemental composition, and leaf chlorophyll content of treated and untreated plants. The relationship between deposition exposure and response was also addressed. Growth of corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat exposed to a typical TFS loading was not impacted, although slightly elevated concentrations of aluminum and iron were found in the leaves. At the highest loadings used for the exposure-response experiment, concentrations of chloride and calcium were higher in TFS-exposed corn leaves than in the untreated leaves. Overall results indicate that exposure to a typical deposition event does not adversely impact juvenile crops and that younger plants may be less vulnerable to TFS. However, higher TFS loadings can cause leaf scorch and increase the leaf concentrations of some elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  1. Infrared imaging systems: Design, analysis, modeling, and testing III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Gerald C.

    This volume discusses today's thermal imaging systems, modeling of thermal imaging systems, sampling and aliasing, and systems and testing. Individual papers are on single-frame multispectral thermal imagery, measurement of the MTF of IR staring-array imaging systems, IRC-64 infrared focal-plane-array camera, performance and application of serial-scan FLIRs, and nondestructive thermal analysis with portable pyroelectric television camera. Attention is also given to standard night vision thermal modeling parameters, the analysis of a proposed infrared sensor focal plane, spatial aliasing effects in ground vehicle IR imagery, spatial sampling effects of multipixel sensors on the guided-missile system performance, and the perception of unwanted signals in displayed imagery. Other papers are on the assessment of environment-driven infrared intensity components, measurements of optical transfer function of discretely sampled thermal imaging systems, and the status of uncooled infrared imagers.

  2. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  3. The impact of providing rapid diagnostic malaria tests on fever management in the private retail sector in Ghana: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansah, Evelyn K; Narh-Bana, Solomon; Affran-Bonful, Harriet; Bart-Plange, Constance; Cundill, Bonnie; Gyapong, Margaret; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2015-03-04

    To examine the impact of providing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on fever management in private drug retail shops where most poor rural people with fever present, with the aim of reducing current massive overdiagnosis and overtreatment of malaria. Cluster randomized trial of 24 clusters of shops. Dangme West, a poor rural district of Ghana. Shops and their clients, both adults and children. Providing rapid diagnostic tests with realistic training. The primary outcome was the proportion of clients testing negative for malaria by a double-read research blood slide who received an artemisinin combination therapy or other antimalarial. Secondary outcomes were use of antibiotics and antipyretics, and safety. Of 4603 clients, 3424 (74.4%) tested negative by double-read research slides. The proportion of slide-negative clients who received any antimalarial was 590/1854 (32%) in the intervention arm and 1378/1570 (88%) in the control arm (adjusted risk ratio 0.41 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.58), Pretail sector significantly reduced dispensing of antimalarials to patients without malaria, did not reduce prescribing of antimalarials to true malaria cases, and appeared safe. Rapid diagnostic tests should be considered for the informal private drug retail sector.Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01907672. © Ansah et al 2015.

  4. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Robin N.

    2005-02-01

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of the boiling and condensation periods on

  5. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of

  6. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part III. Long-term aluminum hydroxide precipitation tests in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Aluminum hydroxide precipitation boundary is similar to that for amorphous phase. → Various precipitation tests are combined into one map in temperature-'pH + p[Al] T '. → Flocculation tendency of precipitates depend on pH and total Al concentration. → DLVO theory explains qualitatively the dependency of flocculation tendency on pH. - Abstract: Long-term aluminum (Al) hydroxide precipitation tests were conducted in slightly alkaline solutions containing 2500 ppm boron. The solution temperature was cycled to obtain a temperature history more representative of emergency core cooling system temperatures after a loss-of-coolant accident. The observed Al precipitation boundary was close to predicted results for amorphous precipitates, which are higher than the solubility expected for crystalline forms. Bench-scale and loop head loss test results under various conditions were successfully combined into single map in a temperature - 'pH + p[Al] T ' domain, which yielded two bounding lines for Al hydroxide solubility in borated alkaline water that depend on whether or not loop head loss tests with Al alloy coupons are included. Precipitates were observed to form either as fine, cloudy suspensions, which showed very little tendency to settle, or as flocculated precipitates. The flocculation tendency of the precipitates can be qualitatively explained by a colloid stability theory or a phase diagram for protein solutions.

  7. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  8. Evaluation of hydrophobic treatments applied to stones used in andalusian cathedrals. III.-Accelerated weathering test with polluted atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Sánchez, R.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY In this work we study the weathering resistance of samples of five types of stone used in Andalusian Cathedrals, treated with six water repellent products, by subjecting the samples to a SO2 polluted atmosphere. To evaluate the alteration of the samples, besides visual observation of macroscopic aspect, changes in weight and the quantity of sulfate that remains on the surface have been measured. Also properties related with water have been measured after the test to determine if there have been any changes in the hydrophobic characteristics.

    En el presente artículo se estudia el comportamiento de muestras de cinco tipos de piedra utilizados en catedrales andaluzas, tratadas con seis productos hidrófugos, sometiéndolas a un ensayo acelerado de alteración en atmósfera contaminada con SO2 . Para evaluar la alteración, además de la observación visual de las manifestaciones macroscópicas, se ha medido la variación de peso de las muestras expuestas y la cantidad de sulfato que permanece en la superficie tras el ensayo. Así mismo, se han detectado los cambios experimentados en las propiedades hidrófugas conferidas por los tratamientos, mediante la medida de propiedades relacionadas con el movimiento del agua.

  9. Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests on A508-III and A533B steel in de-ionized and PWR water at 563K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, P.; Appleton, D.A.; Banks, P.; Raffel, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental programme is being undertaken to assess the extent to which PWR pressure vessel steels, including weldments, may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under relevant water chemistry and flow rate conditions. Initial results from slow strain rate tests on parent A533B and A508-III steels together with a weldment are described. No susceptibility to stress corrosion was observed for either steel, when tested in the rolling (L) direction, at a potential characteristic of normal quality PWR water. For cracking to occur on such specimens the potential must be displaced by 400 to 500 mV in the positive direction, requiring (in the case of high flow de-ionized water) the presence of ca 200 ppb oxygen. Some cracking was observed on transverse (S) direction specimens in water containing 2 , indicating that there may be micro-structural features which can cause cracking even in low oxygen water. This orientation is not directly relevant to pressure vessels and the cracking may only arise as a consequence of the deformation encountered in the slow strain rate test. (author)

  10. Combining multiple hypothesis testing and affinity propagation clustering leads to accurate, robust and sample size independent classification on gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakellariou Argiris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A feature selection method in microarray gene expression data should be independent of platform, disease and dataset size. Our hypothesis is that among the statistically significant ranked genes in a gene list, there should be clusters of genes that share similar biological functions related to the investigated disease. Thus, instead of keeping N top ranked genes, it would be more appropriate to define and keep a number of gene cluster exemplars. Results We propose a hybrid FS method (mAP-KL, which combines multiple hypothesis testing and affinity propagation (AP-clustering algorithm along with the Krzanowski & Lai cluster quality index, to select a small yet informative subset of genes. We applied mAP-KL on real microarray data, as well as on simulated data, and compared its performance against 13 other feature selection approaches. Across a variety of diseases and number of samples, mAP-KL presents competitive classification results, particularly in neuromuscular diseases, where its overall AUC score was 0.91. Furthermore, mAP-KL generates concise yet biologically relevant and informative N-gene expression signatures, which can serve as a valuable tool for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, as well as a source of potential disease biomarkers in a broad range of diseases. Conclusions mAP-KL is a data-driven and classifier-independent hybrid feature selection method, which applies to any disease classification problem based on microarray data, regardless of the available samples. Combining multiple hypothesis testing and AP leads to subsets of genes, which classify unknown samples from both, small and large patient cohorts with high accuracy.

  11. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Robin N.

    2005-02-01

    Task 2A concerns coupled TH modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and requiring predictions for distributions and evolutions of the temperature and saturation fields. Three teams of ENRESA (Spain), DOE (USA), and NRC (USA) teams participated the task with different approaches, using FEM code Bright with a double porosity structure (ENRESA), a FDM code MULTIFLO with a dual continuum approach and an active fracture model (NRC) and a FDM code TOUGH 2 with a dual permeability approach (DOE), respectively. Based on the results of the temperature and moisture distributions and temperature histories, it can be concluded that in general, the three models capture the TH response of the DST fairly well, although there are some differences between the teams' results. Conduction is the dominant heat-transfer mechanism in the fractured unsaturated rock in the DST, especially in the sub-boiling regime. However, the pore water plays an important role near the boiling point as it goes through cycles of vaporization and condensation causing the so called heat-pipe effect. A characteristic signature of heatpipes - a short lull in the rise of temperature - was captured by all three teams. The 2D modeling of the DST carried out by the ENRESA team initially was characterized by very little diffusion of vapor because the tortuosity factor was set at a low value of 0.05 and is referred to as the ND (No Diffusion) case. The recent 3D model with a tortuosity factor set at 1 and a vapor diffusion enhancement coefficient allows maximum vapor diffusion and is referred to as the MD (maximum diffusion) case. Comparative analyses of the modeling results for ND and MD cases

  12. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2A concerns coupled TH modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and requiring predictions for distributions and evolutions of the temperature and saturation fields. Three teams of ENRESA (Spain), DOE (USA), and NRC (USA) teams participated the task with different approaches, using FEM code Bright with a double porosity structure (ENRESA), a FDM code MULTIFLO with a dual continuum approach and an active fracture model (NRC) and a FDM code TOUGH 2 with a dual permeability approach (DOE), respectively. Based on the results of the temperature and moisture distributions and temperature histories, it can be concluded that in general, the three models capture the TH response of the DST fairly well, although there are some differences between the teams' results. Conduction is the dominant heat-transfer mechanism in the fractured unsaturated rock in the DST, especially in the sub-boiling regime. However, the pore water plays an important role near the boiling point as it goes through cycles of vaporization and condensation causing the so called heat-pipe effect. A characteristic signature of heatpipes - a short lull in the rise of temperature - was captured by all three teams. The 2D modeling of the DST carried out by the ENRESA team initially was characterized by very little diffusion of vapor because the tortuosity factor was set at a low value of 0.05 and is referred to as the ND (No Diffusion) case. The recent 3D model with a tortuosity factor set at 1 and a vapor diffusion enhancement coefficient allows maximum vapor diffusion and is referred to as the MD (maximum diffusion) case. Comparative analyses of the modeling results for ND and MD

  13. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  14. The effectiveness of educational interventions to enhance the adoption of fee-based arsenic testing in Bangladesh: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Inauen, Jennifer; Rahman, Sheikh Masudur; Zheng, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Arsenic (As) testing could help 22 million people, using drinking water sources that exceed the Bangladesh As standard, to identify safe sources. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of household education and local media in the increasing demand for fee-based As testing. Randomly selected households (N = 452) were divided into three interventions implemented by community workers: 1) fee-based As testing with household education (HE); 2) fee-based As testing with household education and a local media campaign (HELM); and 3) fee-based As testing alone (Control). The fee for the As test was US$ 0.28, higher than the cost of the test (US$ 0.16). Of households with untested wells, 93% in both intervention groups HE and HELM purchased an As test, whereas only 53% in the control group. In conclusion, fee-based As testing with household education is effective in the increasing demand for As testing in rural Bangladesh.

  15. Cauchy cluster process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an instance of the well-know Neyman–Scott cluster process model with clusters having a long tail behaviour. In our model the offspring points are distributed around the parent points according to a circular Cauchy distribution. Using a modified Cramér-von Misses test...

  16. Assessing child belt fit, volume II : effect of restraint configuration, booster seat designs, seating procedure, and belt fit on the dynamic response of the hybrid III 10-year-old ATD in sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    A total of 49 dynamic sled tests were performed with the Hybrid III 10YO to examine issues relating to child belt fit. The goals of these tests were to evaluate ATD response to realistic belt geometries and belt fit, develop methods for accurate, rep...

  17. How Do Executive Functions Fit with the Cattell-Horn-Carroll Model? Some Evidence from a Joint Factor Analysis of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Randy G.; Bergeron, Renee; Hamilton, Gloria; Parra, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among executive functions and cognitive abilities through a joint exploratory factor analysis and joint confirmatory factor analysis of 25 test scores from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. Participants were 100 children and adolescents…

  18. Cluster size matters: Size-driven performance of subnanometer clusters in catalysis, electrocatalysis and Li-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the strongly size-dependent performance of subnanometer cluster based catalysts in 1) heterogeneous catalysis, 2) electrocatalysis and 3) Li-air batteries. The experimental studies are based on I. fabrication of ultrasmall clusters with atomic precision control of particle size and their deposition on oxide and carbon based supports; II. test of performance, III. in situand ex situ X-ray characterization of cluster size, shape and oxidation state; and IV.electron microscopies. Heterogeneous catalysis. The pronounced effect of cluster size and support on the performance of the catalyst (catalyst activity and the yield of Cn products) will be illustrated on the example of nickel and cobalt clusters in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Electrocatalysis. The study of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on size-selected palladium clusters supported on ultrananocrystalline diamond show pronounced size effects. While Pd4 clusters show no reaction, Pd6 and Pd17 clusters are among the most active catalysts known (in in terms of turnover rate per Pd atom). The system (soft-landed Pd4, Pd6, or Pd17 clusters on an UNCD Si coated electrode) shows stable electrochemical potentials over several cycles, and the characterization of the electrodes show no evidence for evolution or dissolution of either the support Theoretical calculations suggest that this striking difference may be a demonstration that bridging Pd-Pd sites, which are only present in three-dimensional clusters, are active for the oxygen evolution reaction in Pd6O6. Li-air batteries. The studies show that sub-nm silver clusters have dramatic size-dependent effect on the lowering of the overpotential, charge capacity, morphology of the discharge products, as well as on the morphology of the nm size building blocks of the discharge products. The results suggest that by precise control of the active surface sites on the cathode, the performance of Li-air cells can be significantly improved

  19. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  20. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  1. Forecasting craniofacial growth in individuals with class III malocclusion by computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auconi, Pietro; Scazzocchio, Marco; Defraia, Efisio; McNamara, James A; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    To develop a mathematical model that adequately represented the pattern of craniofacial growth in class III subject consistently, with the goal of using this information to make growth predictions that could be amenable to longitudinal verification and clinical use. A combination of computational techniques (i.e. Fuzzy clustering and Network analysis) was applied to cephalometric data derived from 429 untreated growing female patients with class III malocclusion to visualize craniofacial growth dynamics and correlations. Four age groups of subjects were examined individually: from 7 to 9 years of age, from 10 to 12 years, from 13 to 14 years, and from 15 to 17 years. The connections between pathway components of class III craniofacial growth can be visualized from Network profiles. Fuzzy clustering analysis was able to define further growth patterns and coherences of the traditionally reported dentoskeletal characteristics of this structural imbalance. Craniofacial growth can be visualized as a biological, space-constraint-based optimization process; the prediction of individual growth trajectories depends on the rate of membership to a specific 'winner' cluster, i.e. on a specific individual growth strategy. The reliability of the information thus gained was tested to forecast craniofacial growth of 28 untreated female class III subjects followed longitudinally. The combination of Fuzzy clustering and Network algorithms allowed the development of principles for combining multiple auxological cephalometric features into a joint global model and to predict the individual risk of the facial pattern imbalance during growth.

  2. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  3. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a role. Unlike migraine and tension headache, cluster headache generally isn't associated with triggers, such as foods, hormonal changes or stress. Once a cluster period begins, however, drinking alcohol ...

  4. Testing feedback message framing and comparators to address prescribing of high-risk medications in nursing homes: protocol for a pragmatic, factorial, cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Noah M; Desveaux, Laura; Presseau, Justin; Reis, Catherine; Witteman, Holly O; Taljaard, Monica K; McCleary, Nicola; Thavorn, Kednapa; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2017-07-14

    Audit and feedback (AF) interventions that leverage routine administrative data offer a scalable and relatively low-cost method to improve processes of care. AF interventions are usually designed to highlight discrepancies between desired and actual performance and to encourage recipients to act to address such discrepancies. Comparing to a regional average is a common approach, but more recipients would have a discrepancy if compared to a higher-than-average level of performance. In addition, how recipients perceive and respond to discrepancies may depend on how the feedback itself is framed. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of different comparators and framing in feedback on high-risk prescribing in nursing homes. This is a pragmatic, 2 × 2 factorial, cluster-randomized controlled trial testing variations in the comparator and framing on the effectiveness of quarterly AF in changing high-risk prescribing in nursing homes in Ontario, Canada. We grouped homes that share physicians into clusters and randomized these clusters into the four experimental conditions. Outcomes will be assessed after 6 months; all primary analyses will be by intention-to-treat. The primary outcome (monthly number of high-risk medications received by each patient) will be analysed using a general linear mixed effects regression model. We will present both four-arm and factorial analyses. With 160 clusters and an average of 350 beds per cluster, assuming no interaction and similar effects for each intervention, we anticipate 90% power to detect an absolute mean difference of 0.3 high-risk medications prescribed. A mixed-methods process evaluation will explore potential mechanisms underlying the observed effects, exploring targeted constructs including intention, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, descriptive norms, and goal prioritization. An economic analysis will examine cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the publicly funded health care system. This protocol

  5. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Iris

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  6. Categorias Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Dayane Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos as categorias cluster, que foram introduzidas por Aslak Bakke Buan, Robert Marsh, Markus Reineke, Idun Reiten e Gordana Todorov, com o objetivo de categoriíicar as algebras cluster criadas em 2002 por Sergey Fomin e Andrei Zelevinsky. Os autores acima, em [4], mostraram que existe uma estreita relação entre algebras cluster e categorias cluster para quivers cujo grafo subjacente é um diagrama de Dynkin. Para isto desenvolveram uma teoria tilting na estrutura triang...

  7. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  8. Horticultural cluster

    OpenAIRE

    SHERSTIUK S.V.; POSYLAYEVA K.I.

    2013-01-01

    In the article there are the theoretical and methodological approaches to the nature and existence of the cluster. The cluster differences from other kinds of cooperative and integration associations. Was develop by scientific-practical recommendations for forming a competitive horticultur cluster.

  9. Beryllium abundances along the evolutionary sequence of the open cluster IC 4651 - A new test for hydrodynamical stellar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, R.; Pasquini, L.; Charbonnel, C.; Lagarde, N.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Previous analyses of lithium abundances in main sequence and red giant stars have revealed the action of mixing mechanisms other than convection in stellar interiors. Beryllium abundances in stars with Li abundance determinations can offer valuable complementary information on the nature of these mechanisms. Aims: Our aim is to derive Be abundances along the whole evolutionary sequence of an open cluster. We focus on the well-studied open cluster IC 4651. These Be abundances are used with previously determined Li abundances, in the same sample stars, to investigate the mixing mechanisms in a range of stellar masses and evolutionary stages. Methods: Atmospheric parameters were adopted from a previous abundance analysis by the same authors. New Be abundances have been determined from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise UVES spectra using spectrum synthesis and model atmospheres. The careful synthetic modeling of the Be lines region is used to calculate reliable abundances in rapidly rotating stars. The observed behavior of Be and Li is compared to theoretical predictions from stellar models including rotation-induced mixing, internal gravity waves, atomic diffusion, and thermohaline mixing. Results: Beryllium is detected in all the main sequence and turn-off sample stars, both slow- and fast-rotating stars, including the Li-dip stars, but is not detected in the red giants. Confirming previous results, we find that the Li dip is also a Be dip, although the depletion of Be is more modest than for Li in the corresponding effective temperature range. For post-main-sequence stars, the Be dilution starts earlier within the Hertzsprung gap than expected from classical predictions, as does the Li dilution. A clear dispersion in the Be abundances is also observed. Theoretical stellar models including the hydrodynamical transport processes mentioned above are able to reproduce all the observed features well. These results show a good theoretical understanding of the

  10. Effect of non-monetary incentives on uptake of couples' counselling and testing among clients attending mobile HIV services in rural Zimbabwe: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Euphemia L; Tumushime, Mary; Mufuka, Juliet; Mavedzenge, Sue Napierala; Gudukeya, Stephano; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Hatzold, Karin; Thirumurthy, Harsha; McCoy, Sandra I; Padian, Nancy; Copas, Andrew; Cowan, Frances M

    2017-09-01

    Couples' HIV testing and counselling (CHTC) is associated with greater engagement with HIV prevention and care than individual testing and is cost-effective, but uptake remains suboptimal. Initiating discussion of CHTC might result in distrust between partners. Offering incentives for CHTC could change the focus of the pre-test discussion. We aimed to determine the impact of incentives for CHTC on uptake of couples testing and HIV case diagnosis in rural Zimbabwe. In this cluster-randomised trial, 68 rural communities (the clusters) in four districts receiving mobile HIV testing services were randomly assigned (1:1) to incentives for CHTC or not. Allocation was not masked to participants and researchers. Randomisation was stratified by district and proximity to a health facility. Within each stratum random permutation was done to allocate clusters to the study groups. In intervention communities, residents were informed that couples who tested together could select one of three grocery items worth US$1·50. Standard mobilisation for testing was done in comparison communities. The primary outcome was the proportion of individuals testing with a partner. Analysis was by intention to treat. 3 months after CHTC, couple-testers from four communities per group individually completed a telephone survey to evaluate any social harms resulting from incentives or CHTC. The effect of incentives on CHTC was estimated using logistic regression with random effects adjusting for clustering. The trial was registered with the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry, number PACTR201606001630356. From May 26, 2015, to Jan 29, 2016, of 24 679 participants counselled with data recorded, 14 099 (57·1%) were in the intervention group and 10 580 (42·9%) in the comparison group. 7852 (55·7%) testers in the intervention group versus 1062 (10·0%) in the comparison group tested with a partner (adjusted odds ratio 13·5 [95% CI 10·5-17·4]). Among 427 (83·7%) of 510 eligible

  11. Occupant kinematics of the Hybrid III, THOR-M, and postmortem human surrogates under various restraint conditions in full-scale frontal sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Devon L; Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R

    2018-02-28

    The objective of this research was to compare the occupant kinematics of the Hybrid III (HIII), THOR-M, and postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) during full-scale frontal sled tests under 3 safety restraint conditions: knee bolster (KB), knee bolster and steering wheel airbag (KB/SWAB), and knee bolster airbag and steering wheel airbag (KBAB/SWAB). A total of 20 frontal sled tests were performed with at least 2 tests performed per restraint condition per surrogate. The tests were designed to match the 2012 Toyota Camry New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) full-scale crash test. Rigid polyurethane foam surrogates with compressive strength ratings of 65 and 19 psi were used to simulate the KB and KBAB, respectively. The excursions of the head, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles were collected using motion capture. Linear acceleration and angular velocity data were also collected from the head, thorax, and pelvis of each surrogate. Time histories were compared between surrogates and restraint conditions using ISO/TS 18571. All surrogates showed some degree of sensitivity to changes in restraint condition. For example, the use of a KBAB decreased the pelvis accelerations and the forward excursions of the knees and hips for all surrogates. However, these trends were not observed for the thorax, shoulders, and head, which showed more sensitivity to the presence of a SWAB. The average scores computed using ISO/TS 18571 for the HIII/PMHS and THOR-M/PMHS comparisons were 0.527 and 0.518, respectively. The HIII had slightly higher scores than the THOR-M for the excursions (HIII average = 0.574; THOR average = 0.520). However, the THOR-M had slightly higher scores for the accelerations and angular rates (HIII average = 0.471; THOR average = 0.516). The data from the current study showed that both KBABs and SWABs affected the kinematics of all surrogates during frontal sled tests. The results of the objective rating analysis indicated that the HIII and THOR-M had comparable

  12. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country...... of this handbook, which focuses on the role of CSR in MSMEs. Hence we contribute to the literature on CSR in industrial clusters and specifically CSR in Indian industrial clusters by investigating the drivers of CSR in India’s industrial clusters....

  13. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  14. Comparison of geochemical data obtained using four brine sampling methods at the SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test CO2 injection site, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher; Thordsen, James J.; Manning, Michael A.; Cook, Paul J.; Trautz, Robert C.; Thomas, Burt; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of formation water and associated gases from the lower Cretaceous Paluxy Formation was determined using four different sampling methods at a characterization well in the Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama, as part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Anthropogenic Test, which is an integrated carbon capture and storage project. In this study, formation water and gas samples were obtained from well D-9-8 #2 at Citronelle using gas lift, electric submersible pump, U-tube, and a downhole vacuum sampler (VS) and subjected to both field and laboratory analyses. Field chemical analyses included electrical conductivity, dissolved sulfide concentration, alkalinity, and pH; laboratory analyses included major, minor and trace elements, dissolved carbon, volatile fatty acids, free and dissolved gas species. The formation water obtained from this well is a Na–Ca–Cl-type brine with a salinity of about 200,000 mg/L total dissolved solids. Differences were evident between sampling methodologies, particularly in pH, Fe and alkalinity. There was little gas in samples, and gas composition results were strongly influenced by sampling methods. The results of the comparison demonstrate the difficulty and importance of preserving volatile analytes in samples, with the VS and U-tube system performing most favorably in this aspect.

  15. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III, sampled March 28, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999

  16. Promoting STI testing among senior vocational students in Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Effects of a cluster randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E.G. Wolfers (Mireille); G.J. Kok (Gerjo); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); O. de Zwart (Onno); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Adolescents are a risk group for acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In the Netherlands, senior vocational school students are particular at risk. However, STI test rates among adolescents are low and interventions that promote testing are scarce. To enhance

  17. A cluster-randomized trial of provider-initiated (opt-out) HIV counseling and testing of tuberculosis patients in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S; Deluca, Andrea N; Kali, Paula; Hausler, Harry; Sheard, Carol; Hoosain, Ebrahim; Chaudhary, Mohammad A; Celentano, David D; Chaisson, Richard E

    2008-06-01

    To determine whether implementation of provider-initiated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counseling would increase the proportion of tuberculosis (TB) patients who received HIV counseling and testing. Cluster-randomized trial with clinic as the unit of randomization. Twenty, medium-sized primary care TB clinics in the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality, Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. A total of 754 adults (18 years and older) newly registered as TB patients in the 20 study clinics. Implementation of provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing. Percentage of TB patients HIV counseled and tested. SECONDARY: Percentage of patients with HIV test positive, and percentage of those who received cotrimoxazole and who were referred for HIV care. : A total of 754 adults newly registered as TB patients were enrolled. In clinics randomly assigned to implement provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing, 20.7% (73/352) patients were counseled versus 7.7% (31/402) in the control clinics (P = 0.011), and 20.2% (n = 71) versus 6.5% (n = 26) underwent HIV testing (P = 0.009). Of those patients counseled, 97% in the intervention clinics accepted testing versus 79% in control clinics (P = 0.12). The proportion of patients identified as HIV infected in intervention clinics was 8.5% versus 2.5% in control clinics (P = 0.044). Fewer than 40% of patients with a positive HIV test were prescribed cotrimoxazole or referred for HIV care in either study arm. Provider-initiated HIV counseling significantly increased the proportion of adult TB patients who received HIV counseling and testing, but the magnitude of the effect was small. Additional interventions to optimize HIV testing for TB patients urgently need to be evaluated.

  18. A cluster randomized trial of provider-initiated (Opt-out) HIV counseling and testing of tuberculosis patients in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Kali, Paula; Hausler, Harry; Sheard, Carol; Hoosain, Ebrahim; Chaudhary, Mohammed A.; Celentano, David D.; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether implementation of provider-initiated HIV counseling would increase the proportion of tuberculosis patients that received HIV counseling and testing. Design Cluster-randomized trial with clinic as unit of randomization Setting Twenty, medium-sized primary care TB clinics in the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality, Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa Subjects A total of 754 adults (≥ 18 years) newly registered as tuberculosis patients the twenty study clinics Intervention Implementation of provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing. Main outcome measures Percentage of TB patients HIV counseled and tested. Secondary Percentage of patients HIV test positive and percentage of those that received cotrimoxazole and who were referred for HIV care. Results A total of 754 adults newly registered as tuberculosis patients were enrolled. In clinics randomly assigned to implement provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing, 20.7% (73/352) patients were counseled versus 7.7% (31/402) in the control clinics (p = 0.011), and 20.2 % (n = 71) versus 6.5% (n = 26) underwent HIV testing (p = 0.009). Of those patients counseled, 97% in the intervention clinics accepted testing versus 79% in control clinics (p =0.12). The proportion of patients identified as HIV-infected in intervention clinics was 8.5% versus 2.5% in control clinics (p=0.044). Fewer than 40% of patients with a positive HIV test were prescribed cotrimoxazole or referred for HIV care in either study arm. Conclusions Provider-initiated HIV counseling significantly increased the proportion of adult TB patients that received HIV counseling and testing, but the magnitude of the effect was small. Additional interventions to optimize HIV testing for TB patients urgently need to be evaluated. PMID:18520677

  19. Creating a synergy effect: A cluster randomized controlled trial testing the effect of a tailored multimedia intervention on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Annemiek J; van Dijk, Liset; van Weert, Julia C M; Gebeyehu, Beniam G; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Smit, Edith G

    2018-03-17

    Improving adherence is a challenge and multiple barriers are likely to explain non-adherence. These barriers differ per patient and over course of the regimen. Hence, personalized interventions tailored to the specific barriers are needed. In a theoretical and evidence-based Tailored Multimedia Intervention, technology (online preparatory assessment, text messaging) was used as an add-on to a tailored counseling session (learned during a communication skills training), with the expectation of synergistic effects. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in six hospitals, eight nurses and 160 chronic patients. Patient satisfaction with communication, beliefs about medication, self-efficacy and medication adherence were assessed at initiation of the treatment and after six months. Intervention effects were found for patient satisfaction with nurses' affective communication and self-efficacy at the initiation of treatment. The effect on self-efficacy remained after six months. By combining tailored counseling with technology, this intervention resulted in positive changes in important prerequisites of medication adherence. Technology can contribute significantly to health care providers' ability to tailor information to the patients' needs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Sparkle/PM3 for the modeling of europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2009-01-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes. The validation procedure was carried out using only high quality crystallographic structures, for a total of ninety-six Eu(III) complexes, seventy Gd(III) complexes, and forty-two Tb(III) complexes. The Sparkle/PM3 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is: 0.080 A for Eu(III); 0.063 A for Gd(III); and 0.070 A for Tb(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.082 A, 0.061 A, and 0.068 A respectively, indicating they are all comparable parameterizations. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective core potential full geometry optimization calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Finally, we report a preliminary attempt to show that Sparkle/PM3 geometry predictions are reliable. For one of the Eu(III) complexes, BAFZEO, we created hundreds of different input geometries by randomly varying the distances and angles of the ligands to the central Eu(III) ion, which were all subsequently fully optimized. A significant trend was unveiled, indicating that more accurate local minima geometries cluster at lower total energies, thus reinforcing the validity of sparkle model calculations. (author)

  1. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  2. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2B/2C Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Robin N.

    2005-02-01

    , ENRESA and NRC teams. All teams discretized the DST test area into two-dimensional vertical cross sections through the center of the heated drift and derived material properties suitable for their respective modeling approaches using the site testing data from Yucca Mountain project reports. The generally good agreement between simulated and measured temperature, displacements, and changes in air permeability shows that the numerical models and underlying conceptual models are adequate for simulating coupled THM processes at the DST. From the analyses and discussions presented, the following specific conclusions were drawn: i) A continuum model approach is adequate for simulating relevant coupled THM processes at the DST; ii) TM-induced rock deformations are generally well simulated using an elastic model, although some individual displacements appear to be captured using an elasto-plastic model; iii) The highest potential for inelastic deformation in the form of fracture shear slip occurs near the drift wall and in a zone of thermal stress decrease located more than 15 m above the heated drift and iv) Despite potential shear slip along fractures, fracture closure/opening caused by change in normal stress across fractures is the dominant mechanism for TM-induced changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, whereas fracture shear dilation appears to be less significant at the DST. This conclusion indicates that TM-induced changes in permeability at the DST, which are within one order of magnitude, tend to be reversible

  3. A Comprehensive Investigation of Facility Effects on the Testing of High-Power Monolithic and Clustered Hall Thruster Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallimore, Alec D; Walker, Mitchell M; Beal, Brian E; Smith, Timothy B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is difficult for researchers to make adequate comparisons between data sets because of both differences in instrumentation and back pressures due to the wide range of facilities used in Hall thruster testing...

  4. Direct provision versus facility collection of HIV self-tests among female sex workers in Uganda: A cluster-randomized controlled health systems trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Ortblad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV self-testing allows HIV testing at any place and time and without health workers. HIV self-testing may thus be particularly useful for female sex workers (FSWs, who should test frequently but face stigma and financial and time barriers when accessing healthcare facilities.We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled health systems trial among FSWs in Kampala, Uganda, to measure the effect of 2 HIV self-testing delivery models on HIV testing and linkage to care outcomes. FSW peer educator groups (1 peer educator and 8 participants were randomized to either (1 direct provision of HIV self-tests, (2 provision of coupons for free collection of HIV self-tests in a healthcare facility, or (3 standard of care HIV testing. We randomized 960 participants in 120 peer educator groups from October 18, 2016, to November 16, 2016. Participants' median age was 28 years (IQR 24-32. Our prespecified primary outcomes were self-report of any HIV testing at 1 month and at 4 months; our prespecified secondary outcomes were self-report of HIV self-test use, seeking HIV-related medical care and ART initiation. In addition, we analyzed 2 secondary outcomes that were not prespecified: self-report of repeat HIV testing-to understand the intervention effects on frequent testing-and self-reported facility-based testing-to quantify substitution effects. Participants in the direct provision arm were significantly more likely to have tested for HIV than those in the standard of care arm, both at 1 month (risk ratio [RR] 1.33, 95% CI 1.17-1.51, p < 0.001 and at 4 months (RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.22, p < 0.001. Participants in the direct provision arm were also significantly more likely to have tested for HIV than those in the facility collection arm, both at 1 month (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07-1.31, p = 0.001 and at 4 months (RR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05, p = 0.02. At 1 month, fewer participants in the intervention arms had sought medical care for HIV than in the standard of care arm

  5. Innovation performance and clusters : a dynamic capability perspective on regional technology clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röttmer, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    This research provides a novel, empirically tested, actionable theory of cluster innovativeness. Cluster innovativeness has for long been subject of research and resulting policy efforts. The cluster's endowment with assets, such as specialized labor, firms, research institutes, existing regional

  6. Cluster evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, R.

    1987-01-01

    The galaxy and cluster luminosity functions are constructed from a model of the mass distribution based on hierarchical clustering at an epoch where the matter distribution is non-linear. These luminosity functions are seen to reproduce the present distribution of objects as can be inferred from the observations. They can be used to deduce the redshift dependence of the cluster distribution and to extrapolate the observations towards the past. The predicted evolution of the cluster distribution is quite strong, although somewhat less rapid than predicted by the linear theory

  7. Category fluency test: effects of age, gender and education on total scores, clustering and switching in Brazilian Portuguese-speaking subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brucki S.M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Verbal fluency tests are used as a measure of executive functions and language, and can also be used to evaluate semantic memory. We analyzed the influence of education, gender and age on scores in a verbal fluency test using the animal category, and on number of categories, clustering and switching. We examined 257 healthy participants (152 females and 105 males with a mean age of 49.42 years (SD = 15.75 and having a mean educational level of 5.58 (SD = 4.25 years. We asked them to name as many animals as they could. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the effect of demographic variables. No significant effect of gender was observed for any of the measures. However, age seemed to influence the number of category changes, as expected for a sensitive frontal measure, after being controlled for the effect of education. Educational level had a statistically significant effect on all measures, except for clustering. Subject performance (mean number of animals named according to schooling was: illiterates, 12.1; 1 to 4 years, 12.3; 5 to 8 years, 14.0; 9 to 11 years, 16.7, and more than 11 years, 17.8. We observed a decrease in performance in these five educational groups over time (more items recalled during the first 15 s, followed by a progressive reduction until the fourth interval. We conclude that education had the greatest effect on the category fluency test in this Brazilian sample. Therefore, we must take care in evaluating performance in lower educational subjects.

  8. Oral Assessment Kit, Levels II & III. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelo-Gonzalez, Maria; And Others

    The assessment packet includes a series of oral tests to help develop speaking as an integral part of second language instruction at levels II and III. It contains: 8 mini-tests for use at level II; 9 mini-tests for use at level III; a rating scale and score sheet masters for evaluating performance on these tests; and a collection of suggested…

  9. Market optimization of a cluster of DG-RES, micro-CHP, heat pumps and energy storage within network constraints: The Power Matching City field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliek, F.W.; Van den Noort, A. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands); Roossien, B.; Kamphuis, I.G. [ECN Efficiency and Infrastructure, Petten (Netherlands); De Wit, J.; Van de Velde, J. [HumiQ, Barendrecht (Netherlands); Eijgelaar, M. [Essent, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    The share of renewable energy resources for electricity production, in a distributed setting (DG-RES), increases. The amount of energy transported via the electricity grid by substitution of fossil fuels for mobility applications (electric vehicles) and domestic heating (heat pumps) increases as well. Apart from the volume of electricity also the simultaneity factor increases at all grid levels. This poses unprecedented challenges to capacity management of the electricity infrastructure. A solution for tackling this challenge is using more active distribution networks, intelligent coordination of supply and demand using ICT and using the gas distribution network to mitigate electricity distribution bottlenecks. In the EU FP6 Energy Program Integral project, a large scale heterogeneous field test has been designed for application of the software agent based PowerMatcher technology. The test is conducted in a suburb of Groningen, Hoogkerk, and entails approximately 30 homes with either a 'dual fuel' heating system (electrical heat pump with gas-fired peak-burners) or a micro-CHP. Homes also may have PV. Furthermore, a wind production facility and nodes with electricity chargers for EVs and electricity storage are part of the Virtual Power Plant cluster, constructed in this way. Domestic heating systems have intrinsic operational flexibility in comfort management through the thermal mass of the dwellings. Furthermore, the field test comfort systems are equipped with possibilities for hot water storage for central heating as well as for tap-water. Finally, having additional gas-fired heating capacity for electrical heat pumps adds to increasing flexibility by switching the energy source dependent on the status of the electricity grid. Purpose of the field test is using this flexibility to react to phenomena in the electricity system. From a commercial perspective, the aggregated cluster reacts on small-time scale events like real-time portfolio imbalance

  10. What do You Need to Get Male Partners of Pregnant Women Tested for HIV in Resource Limited Settings? The Baby Shower Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Obiefune, Michael C; Yang, Wei; Ezeanolue, Chinenye O; Pharr, Jennifer; Osuji, Alice; Ogidi, Amaka G; Hunt, Aaron T; Patel, Dina; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ehiri, John E

    2017-02-01

    Male partner involvement has the potential to increase uptake of interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Finding cultural appropriate strategies to promote male partner involvement in PMTCT programs remains an abiding public health challenge. We assessed whether a congregation-based intervention, the Healthy Beginning Initiative (HBI), would lead to increased uptake of HIV testing among male partners of pregnant women during pregnancy. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of forty churches in Southeastern Nigeria randomly assigned to either the HBI (intervention group; IG) or standard of care referral to a health facility (control group; CG) was conducted. Participants in the IG received education and were offered onsite HIV testing. Overall, 2498 male partners enrolled and participated, a participation rate of 88.9%. Results showed that male partners in the IG were 12 times more likely to have had an HIV test compared to male partners of pregnant women in the CG (CG = 37.71% vs. IG = 84.00%; adjusted odds ratio = 11.9; p HIV testing and counseling among male partners of pregnant women.

  11. Increasing chlamydia screening tests in general practice: a modified Zelen prospective Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial evaluating a complex intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Hogan, Angela H; Ricketts, Ellie J; Wallace, Louise; Oliver, Isabel; Campbell, Rona; Kalwij, Sebastian; O'Connell, Elaine; Charlett, Andre

    2014-05-01

    To determine if a structured complex intervention increases opportunistic chlamydia screening testing of patients aged 15-24 years attending English general practitioner (GP) practices. A prospective, Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial with a modified Zelen design involving 160 practices in South West England in 2010. The intervention was based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). It comprised of practice-based education with up to two additional contacts to increase the importance of screening to GP staff and their confidence to offer tests through skill development (including videos). Practical resources (targets, posters, invitation cards, computer reminders, newsletters including feedback) aimed to actively influence social cognitions of staff, increasing their testing intention. Data from 76 intervention and 81 control practices were analysed. In intervention practices, chlamydia screening test rates were 2.43/100 15-24-year-olds registered preintervention, 4.34 during intervention and 3.46 postintervention; controls testing rates were 2.61/100 registered patients prior intervention, 3.0 during intervention and 2.82 postintervention. During the intervention period, testing in intervention practices was 1.76 times as great (CI 1.24 to 2.48) as controls; this persisted for 9 months postintervention (1.57 times as great, CI 1.27 to 2.30). Chlamydia infections detected increased in intervention practices from 2.1/1000 registered 15-24-year-olds prior intervention to 2.5 during the intervention compared with 2.0 and 2.3/1000 in controls (Estimated Rate Ratio intervention versus controls 1.4 (CI 1.01 to 1.93). This complex intervention doubled chlamydia screening tests in fully engaged practices. The modified Zelen design gave realistic measures of practice full engagement (63%) and efficacy of this educational intervention in general practice; it should be used more often. The trial was registered on the UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio database

  12. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles (mi)) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan

  13. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  14. Clustering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romli

    1997-01-01

    Cluster analysis is the name of group of multivariate techniques whose principal purpose is to distinguish similar entities from the characteristics they process.To study this analysis, there are several algorithms that can be used. Therefore, this topic focuses to discuss the algorithms, such as, similarity measures, and hierarchical clustering which includes single linkage, complete linkage and average linkage method. also, non-hierarchical clustering method, which is popular name K -mean method ' will be discussed. Finally, this paper will be described the advantages and disadvantages of every methods

  15. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  16. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side...

  17. Application of Docker Swarm cluster for testing programs, developed for system of devices within paradigm of Internet of things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichkina, Y. A.; Kupriyanov, M. S.; Moldachev, S. O.

    2018-05-01

    Today, a description of various Internet devices very often appears on the Internet. For the efficient operation of the Industrial Internet of things, it is necessary to provide a modern level of data processing starting from getting them from devices ending with returning them to devices in a processed form. Current solutions of the Internet of Things are mainly focused on the development of centralized decisions, projecting the Internet of Things on the set of cloud-based platforms that are open, but limit the ability of participants of the Internet of Things to adapt these systems to their own problems. Therefore, it is often necessary to create specialized software for specific areas of the Internet of Things. This article describes the solution of the problem of virtualization of the system of devices based on the Docker system. This solution allows developers to test any software on any number of devices forming a mesh.

  18. Yellow supergiants in open clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowell, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Superluminous giant stars (SLGs) have been reported in young globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These stars appear to be in the post-asymptotic-giant-branch phase of evolution. This program was an investigation of galactic SLG candidates in open clusters, which are more like the LMC young globular clusters. These were chosen because luminosity, mass, and age determinations can be made for members since cluster distances and interstellar reddenings are known. Color magnitude diagrams were searched for candidates, using the same selection criteria as for SLGs in the LMC. Classification spectra were obtained of 115 program stars from McGraw-Hill Observatory and of 68 stars from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Chile. These stars were visually classified on the MK system using spectral scans of standard stars taken at the respective observations. Published information was combined with this program's data for 83 stars in 30 clusters. Membership probabilities were assigned to these stars, and the clusters were analyzed according to age. It was seen that the intrinsically brightest supergiants are found in the youngest clusters. With increasing cluster age, the absolute luminosities attained by the supergiants decline. Also, it appears that the evolutionary tracks of luminosity class II stars are more similar to those of class I than of class III

  19. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  20. A Comparative Test of the Interval-Scale Properties of Magnitude Estimation and Case III Scaling and Recommendations for Equal-Interval Frequency Response Anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriesheim, Chester A.; Novelli, Luke, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between recommended sets of equal-interval response anchors derived from scaling techniques using magnitude estimations and Thurstone Case III pair-comparison treatment of complete ranks were compared. Differences in results for 205 undergraduates reflected differences in the samples as well as in the tasks and computational…

  1. Occupational Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  2. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A symptom is a condition indicating the presence of a disease, especially, when regarded as an aid in diagnosis.Symptoms are the smallest units indicating the existence of a disease. A syndrome on the other hand is an aggregate, set or cluster of concurrent symptoms which together indicate...... and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c......-mean clustering is an easy and well improved tool, which has been applied in many medical fields. We used c-mean fuzzy clustering after feature extraction from an aphasia database. Factor analysis was applied on a correlation matrix of 26 symptoms of language disorders and led to five factors. The factors...

  3. Cluster generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Todor I [Urbana, IL; Petrov, Ivan G [Champaign, IL

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  4. Cluster Bulleticity

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657−56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025−12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary ‘baryonic’ matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. C...

  5. Cluster headache

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur ...

  6. FOREST Unbiased Galactic plane Imaging survey with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (FUGIN). III. Possible evidence for formation of NGC 6618 cluster in M 17 by cloud-cloud collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Atsushi; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Fujita, Shinji; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Yusuke; Kohno, Mikito; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Tsuda, Yuya; Kuriki, Mika; Kuno, Nario; Torii, Kazufumi; Tsutsumi, Daichi; Okawa, Kazuki; Sano, Hidetoshi; Tachihara, Kengo; Ohama, Akio; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    We present 12CO (J = 1-0), 13CO (J = 1-0), and C18O (J = 1-0) images of the M 17 giant molecular clouds obtained as part of the FUGIN (FOREST Ultra-wide Galactic Plane Survey In Nobeyama) project. The observations cover the entire area of the M 17 SW and M 17 N clouds at the highest angular resolution (˜19″) to date, which corresponds to ˜0.18 pc at the distance of 2.0 kpc. We find that the region consists of four different velocity components: a very low velocity (VLV) clump, a low velocity component (LVC), a main velocity component (MVC), and a high velocity component (HVC). The LVC and the HVC have cavities. Ultraviolet photons radiated from NGC 6618 cluster penetrate into the N cloud up to ˜5 pc through the cavities and interact with molecular gas. This interaction is correlated with the distribution of young stellar objects in the N cloud. The LVC and the HVC are distributed complementarily after the HVC is displaced by 0.8 pc toward the east-southeast direction, suggesting that collision of the LVC and the HVC created the cavities in both clouds. The collision velocity and timescale are estimated to be 9.9 km s-1 and 1.1 × 105 yr, respectively. The high collision velocity can provide a mass accretion rate of up to 10^{-3} M_{⊙}yr-1, and the high column density (4 × 1023 cm-2) might result in massive cluster formation. The scenario of cloud-cloud collision likely explains well the stellar population and the formation history of the NGC 6618 cluster proposed by Hoffmeister et al. (2008, ApJ, 686, 310).

  7. Zambian Peer Educators for HIV Self-Testing (ZEST) study: rationale and design of a cluster randomised trial of HIV self-testing among female sex workers in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Catherine E; Ortblad, Katrina F; Chanda, Michael M; Mwanda, Kalasa; Nicodemus, Wendy; Sikaundi, Rebecca; Fullem, Andrew; Barresi, Leah G; Harling, Guy; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-04-20

    HIV testing and knowledge of status are starting points for HIV treatment and prevention interventions. Among female sex workers (FSWs), HIV testing and status knowledge remain far from universal. HIV self-testing (HIVST) is an alternative to existing testing services for FSWs, but little evidence exists how it can be effectively and safely implemented. Here, we describe the rationale and design of a cluster randomised trial designed to inform implementation and scale-up of HIVST programmes for FSWs in Zambia. The Zambian Peer Educators for HIV Self-Testing (ZEST) study is a 3-arm cluster randomised trial taking place in 3 towns in Zambia. Participants (N=900) are eligible if they are women who have exchanged sex for money or goods in the previous 1 month, are HIV negative or status unknown, have not tested for HIV in the previous 3 months, and are at least 18 years old. Participants are recruited by peer educators working in their communities. Participants are randomised to 1 of 3 arms: (1) direct distribution (in which they receive an HIVST from the peer educator directly); (2) fixed distribution (in which they receive a coupon with which to collect the HIVST from a drug store or health post) or (3) standard of care (referral to existing HIV testing services only, without any offer of HIVST). Participants are followed at 1 and 4 months following distribution of the first HIVST. The primary end point is HIV testing in the past month measured at the 1-month and 4-month visits. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, USA and ERES Converge in Lusaka, Zambia. The findings of this trial will be presented at local, regional and international meetings and submitted to peer-reviewed journals for publication. Pre-results; NCT02827240. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Use of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities to improve women's informed decision making: a cluster randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN22532458].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, C; Gunn, J; Bell, R; Lewis, S; Meiser, B; Metcalfe, S; Ukoumunne, O C; Halliday, J

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities compared with a pamphlet in supporting women's decision making. A cluster randomised controlled trial. Primary health care. Women in early pregnancy consulting a GP. GPs were randomised to provide women with either a decision aid or a pamphlet. The decision aid was a 24-page booklet designed using the Ottowa Decision Framework. The pamphlet was an existing resource available in the trial setting. Validated scales were used to measure the primary outcomes, informed choice and decisional conflict, and the secondary outcomes, anxiety, depression, attitudes to the pregnancy/fetus and acceptability of the resource. Outcomes were measured at 14 weeks of gestation from questionnaires that women completed and returned by post. Women in the intervention group were more likely to make an informed decision 76% (126/165) than those in the control group 65% (107/165) (adjusted OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.14-3.81). A greater proportion of women in the intervention group 88% (147/167) had a 'good' level of knowledge than those in the control group 72% (123/171) (adjusted OR 3.43; 95% CI 1.79-6.58). Mean (SD) decisional conflict scores were low in both groups, decision aid 1.71 (0.49), pamphlet 1.65 (0.55) (adjusted mean difference 0.10; 95% CI -0.02 to 0.22). There was no strong evidence of differences between the trial arms in the measures of psychological or acceptability outcomes. A tailored prenatal testing decision aid plays an important role in improving women's knowledge of first and second trimester screening tests and assisting them to make decisions about screening and diagnostic tests that are consistent with their values.

  9. Making progress with PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Nichols, R.; McDonald, N.

    1989-01-01

    The thirdphase of the Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC III) was begun in 1986 with the aim of assessing inspection capability and reliability for actual defects in full scale components under realistic nuclear power plant conditions. It is organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Ispra Joint Research Centre of the European Communities Commission. The objectives and status of each of the seven areas of PISC III are given. The areas are: real contaminated structures; full scale vessel tests; nozzles and dissimilar metal welds; austenitic steel testing; steam generator integrity testing; mathematical modelling of non-destructive examination; and human reliability studies. (U.K.)

  10. Orbitally invariant internally contracted multireference unitary coupled cluster theory and its perturbative approximation: theory and test calculations of second order approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Hoffmann, Mark R

    2012-07-07

    A unitary wave operator, exp (G), G(+) = -G, is considered to transform a multiconfigurational reference wave function Φ to the potentially exact, within basis set limit, wave function Ψ = exp (G)Φ. To obtain a useful approximation, the Hausdorff expansion of the similarity transformed effective Hamiltonian, exp (-G)Hexp (G), is truncated at second order and the excitation manifold is limited; an additional separate perturbation approximation can also be made. In the perturbation approximation, which we refer to as multireference unitary second-order perturbation theory (MRUPT2), the Hamiltonian operator in the highest order commutator is approximated by a Mo̸ller-Plesset-type one-body zero-order Hamiltonian. If a complete active space self-consistent field wave function is used as reference, then the energy is invariant under orbital rotations within the inactive, active, and virtual orbital subspaces for both the second-order unitary coupled cluster method and its perturbative approximation. Furthermore, the redundancies of the excitation operators are addressed in a novel way, which is potentially more efficient compared to the usual full diagonalization of the metric of the excited configurations. Despite the loss of rigorous size-extensivity possibly due to the use of a variational approach rather than a projective one in the solution of the amplitudes, test calculations show that the size-extensivity errors are very small. Compared to other internally contracted multireference perturbation theories, MRUPT2 only needs reduced density matrices up to three-body even with a non-complete active space reference wave function when two-body excitations within the active orbital subspace are involved in the wave operator, exp (G). Both the coupled cluster and perturbation theory variants are amenable to large, incomplete model spaces. Applications to some widely studied model systems that can be problematic because of geometry dependent quasidegeneracy, H4, P4

  11. Connection between Seyfert galaxies and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    To identify Seyfert galaxies that are members of clusters, the sample of known Seyfert galaxies (464 objects) is tested against the Zwicky, Abell, and southern clusters. On the basis of the criteria adopted in the paper, 67 Seyfert galaxies are selected as probable members of Zwicky clusters, 15 as members of Abell clusters, and 18 as members of southern clusters. Lists of these objects are given

  12. Implementation of immunochemical faecal occult blood test in general practice: a study protocol using a cluster-randomised stepped-wedge design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Bro, Flemming; Hornung, Nete; Andersen, Berit Sanne; Laurberg, Søren; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-07-11

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer-related death. Half of patients with colorectal cancer initially present with non-specific or vague symptoms. In the need for a safe low-cost test, the immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) may be part of the evaluation of such patients in primary care. Currently, Danish general practitioners have limited access to this test. The aim of this article is to describe a study that will assess the uptake and clinical use of iFOBT in general practice. Furthermore, it will investigate the diagnostic value and the clinical implications of using iFOBT in general practice on patients presenting with non-alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer. The study uses a cluster-randomised stepped-wedge design and is conducted in the Central Denmark Region among 836 GPs in 381 general practices. The municipalities of the Region and their appertaining general practitioners will be included sequentially in the study during the first 7 months of the 1-year study period. The following intervention has been developed for the study: a mandatory intervention providing all general practitioners with a starting package of 10 iFOBTs, a clinical instruction on iFOBT use in general practice and online information material from the date of inclusion, and an optional intervention consisting of a continuous medical education on colorectal cancer diagnostics and use of iFOBT. This study is among the first and largest trials to investigate the diagnostic use and the clinical value of iFOBT on patients presenting with non-alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer. The findings will be of national and international importance for the future planning of colorectal cancer diagnostics, particularly for 'low-risk-but-not-no-risk' patients with non-alarm symptoms of colorectal cancer. A Trial of the Implementation of iFOBT in General Practice NCT02308384 . Date of registration: 26 November 2014.

  13. Statistical Significance for Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, Patrick K.; Liu, Yufeng; Hayes, D. Neil; Marron, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cluster analysis has proved to be an invaluable tool for the exploratory and unsupervised analysis of high dimensional datasets. Among methods for clustering, hierarchical approaches have enjoyed substantial popularity in genomics and other fields for their ability to simultaneously uncover multiple layers of clustering structure. A critical and challenging question in cluster analysis is whether the identified clusters represent important underlying structure or are artifacts of natural sampling variation. Few approaches have been proposed for addressing this problem in the context of hierarchical clustering, for which the problem is further complicated by the natural tree structure of the partition, and the multiplicity of tests required to parse the layers of nested clusters. In this paper, we propose a Monte Carlo based approach for testing statistical significance in hierarchical clustering which addresses these issues. The approach is implemented as a sequential testing procedure guaranteeing control of the family-wise error rate. Theoretical justification is provided for our approach, and its power to detect true clustering structure is illustrated through several simulation studies and applications to two cancer gene expression datasets. PMID:28099990

  14. Mapping glaucoma patients' 30-2 and 10-2 visual fields reveals clusters of test points damaged in the 10-2 grid that are not sampled in the sparse 30-2 grid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Asaoka

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To cluster test points in glaucoma patients' 30-2 and 10-2 visual field (VF (Humphrey Field Analyzer: HFA, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA in order to map the different regions damaged by the disease. METHOD: This retrospective study included 128 eyes from 128 patients. 142 total deviation (TD values (74 from the 30-2 VF and 68 from the 10-2 VF were clustered using the 'Hierarchical Ordered Partitioning And Collapsing Hybrid-Partitioning Around Medoids' algorithm. The stability of the identified clusters was evaluated using bootstrapping. RESULTS: 65 sectors were identified in total: 38 sectors were located outside the 10-2 VF whereas 29 sectors were located inside the 10-2 VF (two sectors overlap in both grids. The mapping of many sectors appeared to follow the distribution of retinal nerve fiber bundles. The results of bootstrapping suggested clusters were stable whether they were outside or inside the 10-2 VF. CONCLUSION: A considerable number of sectors were identified in the 10-2 VF area, despite the fact that clustering was carried out on all points in both the 30-2 VF and 10-2 VF simultaneously. These findings suggest that glaucomatous central VF deterioration cannot be picked up by the 30-2 test grid alone, because of poor spatial sampling; denser estimation of the central ten degrees, than offered by the 30-2 test grid alone, is needed. It may be beneficial to develop a new VF test grid that combines test points from 30-2 and 10-2 VFs--the results of this study could help to devise this test grid.

  15. Are clusters of dietary patterns and cluster membership stable over time? Results of a longitudinal cluster analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthouwer, Michel Jean Louis; Oenema, Anke; Soetens, Katja; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2014-11-01

    Developing nutrition education interventions based on clusters of dietary patterns can only be done adequately when it is clear if distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived and reproduced over time, if cluster membership is stable, and if it is predictable which type of people belong to a certain cluster. Hence, this study aimed to: (1) identify clusters of dietary patterns among Dutch adults, (2) test the reproducibility of these clusters and stability of cluster membership over time, and (3) identify sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. This study had a longitudinal design with online measurements at baseline (N=483) and 6 months follow-up (N=379). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed, followed by a K-means cluster analysis. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. At baseline and follow-up, a comparable three-cluster solution was derived, distinguishing a healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy dietary pattern. Male and lower educated participants were significantly more likely to have a less healthy dietary pattern. Further, 251 (66.2%) participants remained in the same cluster, 45 (11.9%) participants changed to an unhealthier cluster, and 83 (21.9%) participants shifted to a healthier cluster. Men and people living alone were significantly more likely to shift toward a less healthy dietary pattern. Distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived. Yet, cluster membership is unstable and only few sociodemographic factors were associated with cluster membership and cluster transition. These findings imply that clusters based on dietary intake may not be suitable as a basis for nutrition education interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparison between burn-out data for 19-rod cluster test-sections cooled by Freon-12 at 155 lb/in2 (abs), and by water at 1000 lb/in2 in vertical upflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.F.; Wood, R.W.

    1966-01-01

    Previous experiments on the Winfrith Freon Rig have produced scaling factors which relate these Freon experiments to the corresponding experiments in water with an accuracy of about 10%. It has also been found that the Freon rig is accurate, economical and easy to use. The scaling factors so obtained have now been tested against data for 19-rod clusters which had previously been tested at Columbia University. This report presents the results of the rod cluster tests in which comparison is made between Freon-12 and water for three test-sections which differ in the means of spacing the individual rods. All the test-sections were heated uniformly with respect to length, but had a radial flux depression of nominally 0.70/1.0. The results provide strong evidence that the scaling factor method using Freon-12 at 155 lb/in 2 (abs) is a useful technique for predicting the behaviour at burn-out of complicated test-sections cooled by boiling water at 1000 lb/in 2 with only one-eighteenth of the power required for the water experiment. In particular, the Freon tests reproduce closely the relative burn-out powers previously measured in water. It has also been found that repeated rebuilding of a nominally unchanged cluster from the same components can produce burn-out powers differing by ± 6%. This new result illustrates the power and value of the Freon technique. (author)

  17. Performance test of Spectran-F and Spectran-III computer programs for resolving the 137Cs-110Ag double peak in gamma-ray spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, H.; Malinowski, J.; Blick, H.

    1981-09-01

    The performance of the computer programs (Spectran F and Spectran-III) in resolving the 137 Cs-sup(110m)Ag double peak at 661.6-657.7 keV in the gamma-ray spectrum was investigated. In the experiments, the intensity ratios of both lines in the double peak were varied from 0.1 to 60. The results obtained show, that both programs have almost the same performance in resolving the double peak investigated, with slight superiority of Spectran-F. If accuracy better than 5% is desired, the peak intensity ratio in the dublet must be kept below 10. (orig.)

  18. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemi, Ahmad [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-08-11

    The objective of this is to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I, II, and III (tensile, shear, and out-of-plane) propagation of multiple fractures and fracture clusters to accurately predict geothermal reservoir stimulation using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB). Effective development of enhanced geothermal systems can significantly benefit from improved modeling of hydraulic fracturing. In geothermal reservoirs, where the temperature can reach or exceed 350oC, thermal and poro-mechanical processes play an important role in fracture initiation and propagation. In this project hydraulic fracturing of hot subsurface rock mass will be numerically modeled by extending the virtual multiple internal bond theory and implementing it in a finite element code, WARP3D, a three-dimensional finite element code for solid mechanics. The new constitutive model along with the poro-thermoelastic computational algorithms will allow modeling the initiation and propagation of clusters of fractures, and extension of pre-existing fractures. The work will enable the industry to realistically model stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. The project addresses the Geothermal Technologies Office objective of accurately predicting geothermal reservoir stimulation (GTO technology priority item). The project goal will be attained by: (i) development of the VMIB method for application to 3D analysis of fracture clusters; (ii) development of poro- and thermoelastic material sub-routines for use in 3D finite element code WARP3D; (iii) implementation of VMIB and the new material routines in WARP3D to enable simulation of clusters of fractures while accounting for the effects of the pore pressure, thermal stress and inelastic deformation; (iv) simulation of 3D fracture propagation and coalescence and formation of clusters, and comparison with laboratory compression tests; and (v) application of the model to interpretation of injection experiments (planned by our

  19. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.; Hou, Siqing

    2017-01-01

    baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number

  20. Testing the implementation and sustainment facilitation (ISF) strategy as an effective adjunct to the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) strategy: study protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Zehner, Mark; Roosa, Mathew R; Martino, Steve; Gotham, Heather J; Ball, Elizabeth L; Stilen, Patricia; Speck, Kathryn; Vandersloot, Denna; Rieckmann, Traci R; Chaple, Michael; Martin, Erika G; Kaiser, David; Ford, James H

    2017-11-17

    Improving the extent to which evidence-based practices (EBPs)-treatments that have been empirically shown to be efficacious or effective-are integrated within routine practice is a well-documented challenge across numerous areas of health. In 2014, the National Institute on Drug Abuse funded a type 2 effectiveness-implementation hybrid trial titled the substance abuse treatment to HIV Care (SAT2HIV) Project. Aim 1 of the SAT2HIV Project tests the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing-based brief intervention (MIBI) for substance use as an adjunct to usual care within AIDS service organizations (ASOs) as part of its MIBI Experiment. Aim 2 of the SAT2HIV Project tests the effectiveness of implementation and sustainment facilitation (ISF) as an adjunct to the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) model for training staff in motivational interviewing as part of its ISF Experiment. The current paper describes the study protocol for the ISF Experiment. Using a cluster randomized design, case management and leadership staff from 39 ASOs across the United States were randomized to receive either the ATTC strategy (control condition) or the ATTC + ISF strategy (experimental condition). The ATTC strategy is staff-focused and includes 10 discrete strategies (e.g., provide centralized technical assistance, conduct educational meetings, provide ongoing consultation). The ISF strategy is organization-focused and includes seven discrete strategies (e.g., use an implementation advisor, organize implementation team meetings, conduct cyclical small tests of change). Building upon the exploration-preparation-implementation-sustainment (EPIS) framework, the effectiveness of the ISF strategy is examined via three staff-level measures: (1) time-to-proficiency (i.e., preparation phase outcome), (2) implementation effectiveness (i.e., implementation phase outcome), and (3) level of sustainment (i.e., sustainment phase outcome). Although not without limitations, the ISF

  1. Testing the implementation and sustainment facilitation (ISF strategy as an effective adjunct to the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC strategy: study protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Garner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the extent to which evidence-based practices (EBPs—treatments that have been empirically shown to be efficacious or effective—are integrated within routine practice is a well-documented challenge across numerous areas of health. In 2014, the National Institute on Drug Abuse funded a type 2 effectiveness–implementation hybrid trial titled the substance abuse treatment to HIV Care (SAT2HIV Project. Aim 1 of the SAT2HIV Project tests the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing-based brief intervention (MIBI for substance use as an adjunct to usual care within AIDS service organizations (ASOs as part of its MIBI Experiment. Aim 2 of the SAT2HIV Project tests the effectiveness of implementation and sustainment facilitation (ISF as an adjunct to the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC model for training staff in motivational interviewing as part of its ISF Experiment. The current paper describes the study protocol for the ISF Experiment. Methods Using a cluster randomized design, case management and leadership staff from 39 ASOs across the United States were randomized to receive either the ATTC strategy (control condition or the ATTC + ISF strategy (experimental condition. The ATTC strategy is staff-focused and includes 10 discrete strategies (e.g., provide centralized technical assistance, conduct educational meetings, provide ongoing consultation. The ISF strategy is organization-focused and includes seven discrete strategies (e.g., use an implementation advisor, organize implementation team meetings, conduct cyclical small tests of change. Building upon the exploration–preparation–implementation–sustainment (EPIS framework, the effectiveness of the ISF strategy is examined via three staff-level measures: (1 time-to-proficiency (i.e., preparation phase outcome, (2 implementation effectiveness (i.e., implementation phase outcome, and (3 level of sustainment (i.e., sustainment phase outcome

  2. THE METALLICITY BIMODALITY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS: A TEST OF GALAXY ASSEMBLY AND OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    We build a theoretical model to study the origin of the globular cluster metallicity bimodality in the hierarchical galaxy assembly scenario. The model is based on empirical relations such as the galaxy mass-metallicity relation [O/H]-M star as a function of redshift, and on the observed galaxy stellar mass function up to redshift z ∼ 4. We make use of the theoretical merger rates as a function of mass and redshift from the Millennium simulation to build galaxy merger trees. We derive a new galaxy [Fe/H]-M star relation as a function of redshift, and by assuming that globular clusters share the metallicity of their original parent galaxy at the time of their formation, we populate the merger tree with globular clusters. We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations of the galaxy hierarchical assembly, and study the properties of the final globular cluster population as a function of galaxy mass, assembly and star formation history, and under different assumptions for the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation. The main results and predictions of the model are the following. (1) The hierarchical clustering scenario naturally predicts a metallicity bimodality in the galaxy globular cluster population, where the metal-rich subpopulation is composed of globular clusters formed in the galaxy main progenitor around redshift z ∼ 2, and the metal-poor subpopulation is composed of clusters accreted from satellites, and formed at redshifts z ∼ 3-4. (2) The model reproduces the observed relations by Peng et al. for the metallicities of the metal-rich and metal-poor globular cluster subpopulations as a function of galaxy mass; the positions of the metal-poor and metal-rich peaks depend exclusively on the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation and the [O/Fe], both of which can be constrained by this method. In particular, we find that the galaxy [O/Fe] evolves linearly with redshift from a value of ∼0.5 at redshift z ∼ 4 to a value of ∼0.1 at

  3. Convex Clustering: An Attractive Alternative to Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary K.; Chi, Eric C.; Ranola, John Michael O.; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal in cluster analysis is to discover natural groupings of objects. The field of cluster analysis is crowded with diverse methods that make special assumptions about data and address different scientific aims. Despite its shortcomings in accuracy, hierarchical clustering is the dominant clustering method in bioinformatics. Biologists find the trees constructed by hierarchical clustering visually appealing and in tune with their evolutionary perspective. Hierarchical clustering operates on multiple scales simultaneously. This is essential, for instance, in transcriptome data, where one may be interested in making qualitative inferences about how lower-order relationships like gene modules lead to higher-order relationships like pathways or biological processes. The recently developed method of convex clustering preserves the visual appeal of hierarchical clustering while ameliorating its propensity to make false inferences in the presence of outliers and noise. The solution paths generated by convex clustering reveal relationships between clusters that are hidden by static methods such as k-means clustering. The current paper derives and tests a novel proximal distance algorithm for minimizing the objective function of convex clustering. The algorithm separates parameters, accommodates missing data, and supports prior information on relationships. Our program CONVEXCLUSTER incorporating the algorithm is implemented on ATI and nVidia graphics processing units (GPUs) for maximal speed. Several biological examples illustrate the strengths of convex clustering and the ability of the proximal distance algorithm to handle high-dimensional problems. CONVEXCLUSTER can be freely downloaded from the UCLA Human Genetics web site at http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/ PMID:25965340

  4. Cluster Based Text Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    We propose a cluster based classification model for suspicious email detection and other text classification tasks. The text classification tasks comprise many training examples that require a complex classification model. Using clusters for classification makes the model simpler and increases...... the accuracy at the same time. The test example is classified using simpler and smaller model. The training examples in a particular cluster share the common vocabulary. At the time of clustering, we do not take into account the labels of the training examples. After the clusters have been created......, the classifier is trained on each cluster having reduced dimensionality and less number of examples. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the existing classification models for the task of suspicious email detection and topic categorization on the Reuters-21578 and 20 Newsgroups...

  5. Dynamical evolution of galaxies in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostriker, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In addition to the processes involved in the evolution of star clusters, there are three kinds of processes that are peculiar to, or far more important in, galaxy clusters than in star clusters: galaxy interactions with gas, high-velocity tidal interactions, and accretion and cannibalism. The latter is discussed at some length; analytical calculations for the apparent luminosity evolution of the first brightest galaxy and the apparent luminosity evolution of M 12 are described, along with the numerical simulation of cluster evolution. It appears that many of the notable features of centrally condensed clusters of galaxies, particularly the presence of very luminous but low-surface-brightness central cD systems, can be understood in terms of a straightforward dynamical theory of galactic cannibalism. It is possible to maintain the hypothesis that dynamical evolution gradually transforms Bautz--Morgan III clusters to type II systems or type I systems. 36 references, 5 figures

  6. Results of Additional Bioventing Respiration Testing at Sites ST61, ST71, and ST43/55 (Pumphouse III and Valve Pit 3-4)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ...). Vent well and monitoring point construction, respiration and air permeability testing, soil and soil gas sampling, and blower system installation and startup was performed at each site as part of the initial testing...

  7. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands...... or management. Both the Accelerate Wales and the Accelerate Cluster programmes target this issue by trying to establish networks between companies that can be used to supply knowledge from research institutions to manufacturing companies. The paper concludes that public sector interventions can make...... businesses. The universities were not considered by the participating companies to be important parts of the local business environment and inputs from universities did not appear to be an important source to access knowledge about new product development or new techniques in production, distribution...

  8. MEASURING DETAILED CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES FROM CO-ADDED MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. I. TESTS USING MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lei; Peng, Eric W.; Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Cheng, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The ability to measure metallicities and α-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R ≈ 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and α-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements.

  9. Measuring Detailed Chemical Abundances from Co-added Medium-resolution Spectra. I. Tests Using Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies and Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Cheng, Lucy

    2013-05-01

    The ability to measure metallicities and α-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R ≈ 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and α-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  11. Cluster analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mucha, Hans-Joachim; Sofyan, Hizir

    2000-01-01

    As an explorative technique, duster analysis provides a description or a reduction in the dimension of the data. It classifies a set of observations into two or more mutually exclusive unknown groups based on combinations of many variables. Its aim is to construct groups in such a way that the profiles of objects in the same groups are relatively homogenous whereas the profiles of objects in different groups are relatively heterogeneous. Clustering is distinct from classification techniques, ...

  12. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-08-05

    The NTS is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. NNSA/NSO is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and NSTec is the Management & Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The U10C Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of Area 9 at the NTS (Figure 1) and is located in a subsidence crater created by two underground nuclear events, one in October 1962 and another in April 1964. The disposal site opened in 1971 for the disposal of rubbish, refuse, pathological waste, asbestos-containing material, and industrial solid waste. A Notice of Intent form to operate the disposal site as a Class II site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 26, 1994, and was acknowledged in a letter to the DOE on February 8, 1994. It operated as a state of Nevada Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS) until it closed on October 5, 1995, for retrofit as a Class III SWDS. The retrofit consisted of the installation of a minimum four-foot compacted soil layer to segregate the different waste types and function as a liner to inhibit leachate and water flow into the lower waste zone. Five neutron monitoring tubes were installed in this layer to monitor possible leachate production and water activity. Upon acceptance of the installed barrier and approval of an Operating Plan by NDEP/BFF, the site reopened in January 1996 as a Class III SWDS for the disposal of industrial solid waste and other inert waste.

  13. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  14. Reduction of anti-malarial consumption after rapid diagnostic tests implementation in Dar es Salaam: a before-after and cluster randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swai Ndeniria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment of all febrile patients with anti-malarials leads to massive over-treatment. The aim was to assess the effect of implementing malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs on prescription of anti-malarials in urban Tanzania. Methods The design was a prospective collection of routine statistics from ledger books and cross-sectional surveys before and after intervention in randomly selected health facilities (HF in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The participants were all clinicians and their patients in the above health facilities. The intervention consisted of training and introduction of mRDTs in all three hospitals and in six HF. Three HF without mRDTs were selected as matched controls. The use of routine mRDT and treatment upon result was advised for all patients complaining of fever, including children under five years of age. The main outcome measures were: (1 anti-malarial consumption recorded from routine statistics in ledger books of all HF before and after intervention; (2 anti-malarial prescription recorded during observed consultations in cross-sectional surveys conducted in all HF before and 18 months after mRDT implementation. Results Based on routine statistics, the amount of artemether-lumefantrine blisters used post-intervention was reduced by 68% (95%CI 57-80 in intervention and 32% (9-54 in control HF. For quinine vials, the reduction was 63% (54-72 in intervention and an increase of 2.49 times (1.62-3.35 in control HF. Before-and-after cross-sectional surveys showed a similar decrease from 75% to 20% in the proportion of patients receiving anti-malarial treatment (Risk ratio 0.23, 95%CI 0.20-0.26. The cluster randomized analysis showed a considerable difference of anti-malarial prescription between intervention HF (22% and control HF (60% (Risk ratio 0.30, 95%CI 0.14-0.70. Adherence to test result was excellent since only 7% of negative patients received an anti-malarial. However, antibiotic

  15. Community-based intermittent mass testing and treatment for malaria in an area of high transmission intensity, western Kenya: study design and methodology for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Aaron M; Awino, Nobert; Odongo, Wycliffe; Abong'o, Benard; Gimnig, John; Otieno, Kephas; Shi, Ya Ping; Were, Vincent; Allen, Denise Roth; Were, Florence; Sang, Tony; Obor, David; Williamson, John; Hamel, Mary J; Patrick Kachur, S; Slutsker, Laurence; Lindblade, Kim A; Kariuki, Simon; Desai, Meghna

    2017-06-07

    Most human Plasmodium infections in western Kenya are asymptomatic and are believed to contribute importantly to malaria transmission. Elimination of asymptomatic infections requires active treatment approaches, such as mass testing and treatment (MTaT) or mass drug administration (MDA), as infected persons do not seek care for their infection. Evaluations of community-based approaches that are designed to reduce malaria transmission require careful attention to study design to ensure that important effects can be measured accurately. This manuscript describes the study design and methodology of a cluster-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a MTaT approach for malaria transmission reduction in an area of high malaria transmission. Ten health facilities in western Kenya were purposively selected for inclusion. The communities within 3 km of each health facility were divided into three clusters of approximately equal population size. Two clusters around each health facility were randomly assigned to the control arm, and one to the intervention arm. Three times per year for 2 years, after the long and short rains, and again before the long rains, teams of community health volunteers visited every household within the intervention arm, tested all consenting individuals with malaria rapid diagnostic tests, and treated all positive individuals with an effective anti-malarial. The effect of mass testing and treatment on malaria transmission was measured through population-based longitudinal cohorts, outpatient visits for clinical malaria, periodic population-based cross-sectional surveys, and entomological indices.

  16. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; hide

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  17. Cluster structures influenced by interaction with a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Christopher; Dieterich, Johannes M; Hartke, Bernd

    2018-05-30

    Clusters on surfaces are vitally important for nanotechnological applications. Clearly, cluster-surface interactions heavily influence the preferred cluster structures, compared to clusters in vacuum. Nevertheless, systematic explorations and an in-depth understanding of these interactions and how they determine the cluster structures are still lacking. Here we present an extension of our well-established non-deterministic global optimization package OGOLEM from isolated clusters to clusters on surfaces. Applying this approach to intentionally simple Lennard-Jones test systems, we produce a first systematic exploration that relates changes in cluster-surface interactions to resulting changes in adsorbed cluster structures.

  18. The Impact of Automated Notification on Follow-up of Actionable Tests Pending at Discharge: a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Anuj K; Schaffer, Adam; Gershanik, Esteban F; Papanna, Ranganath; Eibensteiner, Katyuska; Nolido, Nyryan V; Yoon, Cathy S; Williams, Deborah; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Roy, Christopher L; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-03-12

    Follow-up of tests pending at discharge (TPADs) is poor. We previously demonstrated a twofold increase in awareness of any TPAD by attendings and primary care physicians (PCPs) using an automated email intervention OBJECTIVE: To determine whether automated notification improves documented follow-up for actionable TPADs DESIGN: Cluster-randomized controlled trial SUBJECTS: Attendings and PCPs caring for adult patients discharged from general medicine and cardiology services with at least one actionable TPAD between June 2011 and May 2012 INTERVENTION: An automated system that notifies discharging attendings and network PCPs of finalized TPADs by email MAIN MEASURES: The primary outcome was the proportion of actionable TPADs with documented action determined by independent physician review of the electronic health record (EHR). Secondary outcomes included documented acknowledgment, 30-day readmissions, and adjusted median days to documented follow-up. Of the 3378 TPADs sampled, 253 (7.5%) were determined to be actionable by physician review. Of these, 150 (123 patients discharged by 53 attendings) and 103 (90 patients discharged by 44 attendings) were assigned to intervention and usual care groups, respectively, and underwent chart review. The proportion of actionable TPADs with documented action was 60.7 vs. 56.3% (p = 0.82) in the intervention vs. usual care groups, similar for documented acknowledgment. The proportion of patients with actionable TPADs readmitted within 30 days was 22.8 vs. 31.1% in the intervention vs. usual care groups (p = 0.24). The adjusted median days [95% CI] to documented action was 9 [6.2, 11.8] vs. 14 [10.2, 17.8] (p = 0.04) in the intervention vs. usual care groups, similar for documented acknowledgment. In sub-group analysis, the intervention had greater impact on documented action for patients with network PCPs compared with usual care (70 vs. 50%, p = 0.03). Automated notification of actionable TPADs shortened time to

  19. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-III tests S3-14, S3-15 and S3-16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ohnuki, Akira; Sakaki, Isao; Adachi, Hiromichi; Murao, Yoshio

    1988-03-01

    It was revealed from previous reflood tests using Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) that the heat transfer was enhanced in high power bundles and degraded in low power bundles due to the radial power distribution. In the present study, the effects of local power ratio itself and the shape of radial power distribution were separately investigated by comparing three tests: S3-14 (flat power distribution), S3-15 (inclined power distribution) and S3-16 (steep power distribution). Those three tests were performed under the same boundary conditions, total power and initial stored energy. The emergency core cooling (ECC) water was injected into the lower plenum. The test results indicated that the heat transfer enhancement and degradation was governed mainly by the bundlewise radial power ratio and less dependent on the shape of radial power distribution when the difference in power ratios between adjacent bundles is less than 0.44. The degree of heat transfer enhancement at high power bundles was increased with the radial peak power ratio. Even at an average power bundle, the heat transfer was enhanced in the non-uniform radial power distribution tests. (author)

  20. Diametrical clustering for identifying anti-correlated gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M; Roshan, Usman

    2003-09-01

    Clustering genes based upon their expression patterns allows us to predict gene function. Most existing clustering algorithms cluster genes together when their expression patterns show high positive correlation. However, it has been observed that genes whose expression patterns are strongly anti-correlated can also be functionally similar. Biologically, this is not unintuitive-genes responding to the same stimuli, regardless of the nature of the response, are more likely to operate in the same pathways. We present a new diametrical clustering algorithm that explicitly identifies anti-correlated clusters of genes. Our algorithm proceeds by iteratively (i). re-partitioning the genes and (ii). computing the dominant singular vector of each gene cluster; each singular vector serving as the prototype of a 'diametric' cluster. We empirically show the effectiveness of the algorithm in identifying diametrical or anti-correlated clusters. Testing the algorithm on yeast cell cycle data, fibroblast gene expression data, and DNA microarray data from yeast mutants reveals that opposed cellular pathways can be discovered with this method. We present systems whose mRNA expression patterns, and likely their functions, oppose the yeast ribosome and proteosome, along with evidence for the inverse transcriptional regulation of a number of cellular systems.

  1. Filaments and clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltan, A.

    1987-01-01

    A statistical test to investigate filaments of galaxies is performed. Only particular form of filaments is considered, viz. filaments connecting Abell clusters of galaxies. Relative position of triplets ''cluster - field object - cluster'' is analysed. Though neither cluster sample nor field object sample are homogeneous and complete only peculiar form of selection effects could affect the present statistics. Comparison of observational data with simulations shows that less than 15 per cent of all field galaxies is concentrated in filaments connecting rich clusters. Most of the field objects used in the analysis are not normal galaxies and it is possible that this conclusion is not in conflict with apparent filaments seen in the Lick counts and in some nearby 3D maps of the galaxy distribution. 26 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  2. Nuclear clustering - a cluster core model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Selvi, G.; Nandhini, N.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear clustering, similar to other clustering phenomenon in nature is a much warranted study, since it would help us in understanding the nature of binding of the nucleons inside the nucleus, closed shell behaviour when the system is highly deformed, dynamics and structure at extremes. Several models account for the clustering phenomenon of nuclei. We present in this work, a cluster core model study of nuclear clustering in light mass nuclei

  3. Assessment of Technologies for the Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System and Recommendations for Technology Improvement - Part III: Material Property Characterization, Analysis, and Test Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Johnson, Theodore F.; Whitley, Karen S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this report is to contribute to the independent assessment of the Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Material. This report specifically addresses material modeling, characterization testing, data reduction methods, and data pedigree. A brief description of the External Tank foam materials, locations, and standard failure modes is provided to develop suitable background information. A review of mechanics based analysis methods from the open literature is used to provide an assessment of the state-of-the-art in material modeling of closed cell foams. Further, this report assesses the existing material property database and investigates sources of material property variability. The report presents identified deficiencies in testing methods and procedures, recommendations for additional testing as required, identification of near-term improvements that should be pursued, and long-term capabilities or enhancements that should be developed.

  4. Gene cluster statistics with gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Narayanan; Durand, Dannie

    2009-05-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such "gene clusters" is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  5. Results of tests and studies of American materials in the channel of the MHD facility U-02 (Phase III). [LaCrO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burenkov, D.K.; Borodina, T.I.; Vysotsky, D.A.; Zalkind, V.I.; Kirillov, V.V.; Romanov, A.I.; Telegin, G.P.; Strekalov, N.V.

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the US--USSR Cooperative Program in MHD joint US--USSR tests were conducted in May 1978 at the U-02 facility of an MHD generator section consisting of U.S.-built electrode blocks and USSR-built insulating walls. The main purpose of the experiment was to conduct continuous 100-hour duration tests of materials and structures of electrode blocks; in particular, to study the behavior of ceramic electrodes and insulators in operating conditions of an MHD generator, the electro-physical and thermal characteristics of the working section as a whole and electrodes in particular, and to analyze the change in the phase composition and structure of materials during the test. The main thrust of the experiment was a study of electrode material behavior. Six varieties of electrodes based on doped lanthanum chromite were tested and investigated. The electrodes were made of fine grained, hot-pressed mass (the porosity of the ceramic was 2 to 3%). The interelectrode insulators were made of magnesial and magnesial-spinel ceramic also manufactured by the hot pressing method. Results are presented and discussed.

  6. Creep-rupture-test on the stainless steel X6CRNI1811 (DIN 1.4948) in the frame of the ''Extrapolation-Program''. (Part III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, R.; Las Rivas, M. de; Barroso, S.

    1982-01-01

    The austenitic stainless steel X6CrNi1811 (DIN 1.4948) used as a structure material for the German Fast Breeder Reactor SNR 300 was creep tested in a temperature range of 550-650 deg under base material condition as well as welded material condition. The main point of this program (''Extrapolation-Program'') lies in the knowledge of the creep-rupture-strength and creepbehaviour up to 3 x 10 4 hours at higher temperatures in order to extrapolate up to >=10 5 hours for operating temperatures. In order to study the stress dependency of the minimum creep rate additional tests were carried out of 550 deg - 750 deg C. The present report describes the state in the running program with test-times of 23.000 hours and results from tests up to 55.000 hours belonging to other parallel programs are taken into account. Besides the creep-rupture behaviour it is also made a study of ductility between 550 and 750 deg C. Extensive metallographic examinations have been made to study the fracture behaviour and changes in structure. (author)

  7. Creep-rupture-test on the stainless steel X6crni1811 (Din 1.494.8) in the frame of the Extrapolation-Program. (Part III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, R.; Schirra, M.; Rivas, M. de la; Barroso, S.; Seith, B.

    1982-01-01

    The austenitic stainless steel X6crni1811 (Din 1.4948) used as a structure material for the German Fast Breeder Reactor SNR 300 was creep tested in a temperature range of 550-650 degree centigree material condition as well as welded material condition. The main point of this program (Extrapolation-Program) lies in the knowledge of the creep-rupture-strength and creep-behaviour up to 3 x 10 4 hours higher temperatures in order to extrapolated up to ≥10 5 hours for operating temperatures. In order to study the stress dependency of the minimum creep rate additional tests were carried out of 550 degree centigree - 750 degree centigree. The present report describes the state in the running program with test-times of 23.000 hours and results from tests up to 55.000 hours belonging to other parallel programs are taken into account. Besides the creep-rupture behaviour it is also made a study of ductility between 550 and 750 degree centigree. Extensive metallographic examinations have been made to study the fracture behaviour and changes in structure. (Author)

  8. A Phase III Diagnostic Accuracy Study of a Rapid Diagnostic Test for Diagnosis of Second-Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Boelaert

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The high sensitivity of the HAT Sero K-SeT is in line with previously published estimates, though the sample of HAT cases in this study was small. The specificity estimate was very high and precise. This test, when negative, allows the clinician to rule out HAT in a clinical suspect in a hospital setting in this endemic region.

  9. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a containment level-III laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-24

    In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating/chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80 degrees C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This process is vital to establish in

  10. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a

  11. Comparison of Bayesian clustering and edge detection methods for inferring boundaries in landscape genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safner, T.; Miller, M.P.; McRae, B.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Manel, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, techniques available for identifying clusters of individuals or boundaries between clusters using genetic data from natural populations have expanded rapidly. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate these different techniques. We used spatially-explicit simulation models to compare three spatial Bayesian clustering programs and two edge detection methods. Spatially-structured populations were simulated where a continuous population was subdivided by barriers. We evaluated the ability of each method to correctly identify boundary locations while varying: (i) time after divergence, (ii) strength of isolation by distance, (iii) level of genetic diversity, and (iv) amount of gene flow across barriers. To further evaluate the methods' effectiveness to detect genetic clusters in natural populations, we used previously published data on North American pumas and a European shrub. Our results show that with simulated and empirical data, the Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms outperformed direct edge detection methods. All methods incorrectly detected boundaries in the presence of strong patterns of isolation by distance. Based on this finding, we support the application of Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms for boundary detection in empirical datasets, with necessary tests for the influence of isolation by distance. ?? 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  12. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  13. METIER (Modular Ecotoxicity Tests Incorporating Ecological Relevance) for difficult substances--III. Effects of medium renewal and use of a carrier on the bioavailability of parathion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhermino, L; Ribeiro, R; Gonçalves, F; Soares, A M

    1996-01-01

    In this work we compared the effects of medium renewal and use of a carrier (ethanol) in the lethal toxicity of parathion to Daphnia magna Straus. Actual concentrations measured in test solutions with and without ethanol were not significantly different, indicating that there is no need for a carrier solution to assist dissolution of parathion, up to a concentration of 5 mg litre(-1). LC50 values at 48 h from bioassays with and without medium renewal were identical, indicating that in our experimental conditions, degradation of parathion was not a significant consideration. Similar 48-h LC50 values were obtained in all tests, with or without ethanol present. Thus, potential interactions between carrier and toxicant had no effect on the lethal toxicity of parathion to D. magna.

  14. Effect of More vs Less Frequent Follow-up Testing on Overall and Colorectal Cancer-Specific Mortality in Patients With Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer: The COLOFOL Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Syk, Ingvar; Smedh, Kenneth; Laurberg, Søren; Nielsen, Dennis T; Petersen, Sune H; Renehan, Andrew G; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Påhlman, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2018-05-22

    Intensive follow-up of patients after curative surgery for colorectal cancer is common in clinical practice, but evidence of a survival benefit is limited. To examine overall mortality, colorectal cancer-specific mortality, and colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rates among patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer who were randomized after curative surgery to 2 alternative schedules for follow-up testing with computed tomography and carcinoembryonic antigen. Unblinded randomized trial including 2509 patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer treated at 24 centers in Sweden, Denmark, and Uruguay from January 2006 through December 2010 and followed up for 5 years; follow-up ended on December 31, 2015. Patients were randomized either to follow-up testing with computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen and serum carcinoembryonic antigen at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after surgery (high-frequency group; n = 1253 patients) or at 12 and 36 months after surgery (low-frequency group; n = 1256 patients). The primary outcomes were 5-year overall mortality and colorectal cancer-specific mortality rates. The secondary outcome was the colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rate. Both intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were performed. Among 2555 patients who were randomized, 2509 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis (mean age, 63.5 years; 1128 women [45%]) and 2365 (94.3%) completed the trial. The 5-year overall patient mortality rate in the high-frequency group was 13.0% (161/1253) compared with 14.1% (174/1256) in the low-frequency group (risk difference, 1.1% [95% CI, -1.6% to 3.8%]; P = .43). The 5-year colorectal cancer-specific mortality rate in the high-frequency group was 10.6% (128/1248) compared with 11.4% (137/1250) in the low-frequency group (risk difference, 0.8% [95% CI, -1.7% to 3.3%]; P = .52). The colorectal cancer-specific recurrence rate was 21.6% (265/1248) in the high-frequency group compared with 19

  15. Operational tests and irradiation programming proposal for the industrial production of 131 I in the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the Nuclear Centre (ININ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanis M, J.; Reyes J, J.L.; Ruiz C, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research it was recently finished the project for the production of I-131 at industrial level, the one which can divide basically in: (a) Preparation of the raw materials (TeO 2 ), (b) Sintering, (c) Neutron irradiation and (d) Separation of the I-131. With the end of starting the industrial production of this process, in this work it is presented the operational tests and an irradiation proposal of the TeO 2 to obtain quantities of I-131 that cover, if not totally, partially the national market. For this, they were carried out irradiation tests of 6 samples to different flows of neutrons. The result of these tests settles down that irradiating a mass of 240 g TeO 2 to a neutron flow of 6.53 x 10 12 n/cm 2 s in 4 cycles of 30 h per week approximately 2.54 Ci/week of I-131 distilled are obtained, which represents 35% of the demand of the Plant of Radioisotopes production of the ININ. (Author)

  16. Part III: Comparing observed growth of selected test organisms in food irradiation studies with growth predictions calculated by ComBase softwares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrassy, E.; Meszaros, L.; Beczner, J.; Polyak-Feher, K.; Gaal, O.; Lebovics, V.K.; Lugasi, A.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of intensive predictive microbiological modelling activities, several computer programs and softwares became available recently for facilitating microbiological risk assessment. Among these tools, the establishment of the ComBase, an international database and its predictive modelling softwares of the Pathogen Modelling Program (PMP) set up by the USDA Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmore, PA, and the Food Micromodel/Growth Predictor by the United Kingdom's Institute of Food Research, Norwich, are most important. The authors have used the PMP 6.1 software version of ComBase as a preliminary trial to compare observed growth of selected test organisms in relation to their food irradiation work during recent years within the FAO/IAEA Coordinated Food Irradiation Research Projects (D6.10.23 and D6.20.07) with the predicted growth on the basis of growth models available in ComBase for the same species as those of the authors' test organisms. The results of challenge tests with Listeria monocytogenes inoculum in untreated or irradiated experimental batches of semi-prepared breaded turkey meat steaks (cordon bleu), sliced tomato, sliced watermelon, sliced cantaloupe and sous vide processed mixed vegetables, as well as Staphylococcus aureus inoculum of a pasta product, tortellini, were compared with their respective growth models under relevant environmental conditions. This comparison showed good fits in the case of non-irradiated and high moisture food samples, but growth of radiation survivors lagged behind the predicted values. (author)

  17. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  18. Development and test of ion emitter modules for the projects ASPOC/CLUSTER (8th project year) and EQUATOR-S (4th project year). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, H.M.; Ruedenauer, F.G.; Steiger, W.

    1997-02-01

    Not only was the failure of flight V001 of the newly developed ARIANE-V rocket a disaster for the European space industry and a drawback in the highly competitive launcher business, with the loss of its payload, ESA's 4 scientific CLUSTER satellites, also the work and expectations of hundreds of scientists and engineers were buried in the swamps of French Guyana. The Austrian experiment ASPOC, for which ion emitters have been developed under the contract reported here, was one of the 12 instruments onboard. In a meeting following the launch failure ESA's Science Policy Committee (SPC) decided to immediately rebuild one CLUSTER satellite and use the instrument spare models as the payload. This new mission was called PHOENIX. Furthermore, the SPC initiated studies to look for options of a CLUSTER reflight. The final decision about the future of the CLUSTER project is now due in February 1997. Since ASPOC has been lost, this report only very shortly deals with the work done up to the launch date. More important are two aspects: First, the ion emitters, the product which has been developed within this long term project, are of such high quality that they survived both the explosion of the rocket and the subsequent free fall from 3.6 km height. Ten ion emitters have been recovered from the debris and all of them were still working well. Second, new applications both in the scientific and in the commercial area have been found for the indium ion sources. Under an ESA contract their potential use as ion thrusters has recently successfully been studied. A further contract now has been placed for the development of a prototype ion thruster. Furthermore, the indium ion source has been selected as the primary ion emitter for the time of flight mass spectrometer COSIMA, a key instrument of the ROSETTA mission. Concerning EQUATOR-S, a new set of ion emitter modules has to be built, as those originally foreseen for EQUATOR-S are now being used for PHOENIX. The respective

  19. Analysis of benchmark experiments for testing the IKE multigroup cross-section libraries based on ENDF/B-III and IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinert, J.; Mattes, M.

    1975-01-01

    Benchmark experiments offer the most direct method for validation of nuclear cross-section sets and calculational methods. For 16 fast and thermal critical assemblies containing uranium and/or plutonium of different compositions we compared our calculational results with measured integral quantities, such as ksub(eff), central reaction rate ratios or fast and thermal activation (dis)advantage factors. Cause of the simple calculational modelling of these assemblies the calculations proved as a good test for the IKE multigroup cross-section libraries essentially based on ENDF/B-IV. In general, our calculational results are in excellent agreement with the measured values. Only with some critical systems the basic ENDF/B-IV data proved to be insufficient in calculating ksub(eff), probably due to Pu neutron data and U 238 fast capture cross-sections. (orig.) [de

  20. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in REXCESS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, L.; Bruch, S.; Donahue, M.

    2009-01-01

    Most galaxy clusters contain a Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) which is larger than the other cluster ellipticals and has a more extended profile. In the hierarchical model, the BCG forms through many galaxy mergers in the crowded center of the cluster, and thus its properties give insight into the assembly of the cluster as a whole. In this project, we are working with the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) team (Boehringer et al 2007) to study BCGs in 33 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters, 0.055 < z < 0.183. We are imaging the BCGs in R band at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) in Chile. In this poster, we discuss our methods and give preliminary measurements of the BCG magnitudes, morphology, and stellar mass. We compare these BCG properties with the properties of their host clusters, particularly of the X-ray emitting gas.

  1. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  2. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...... the putative differences between the rat brain MT isoforms, namely MT-I+II and MT-III, in the freeze lesion model of brain damage, and for developing an ELISA for MT-III suitable for brain samples. In the normal rat brain, MT-III was mostly present primarily in astrocytes. However, lectin staining indicated...

  3. Uptake of Home-Based HIV Testing, Linkage to Care, and Community Attitudes about ART in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Descriptive Results from the First Phase of the ANRS 12249 TasP Cluster-Randomised Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C Iwuji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The 2015 WHO recommendation of antiretroviral therapy (ART for all immediately following HIV diagnosis is partially based on the anticipated impact on HIV incidence in the surrounding population. We investigated this approach in a cluster-randomised trial in a high HIV prevalence setting in rural KwaZulu-Natal. We present findings from the first phase of the trial and report on uptake of home-based HIV testing, linkage to care, uptake of ART, and community attitudes about ART.Between 9 March 2012 and 22 May 2014, five clusters in the intervention arm (immediate ART offered to all HIV-positive adults and five clusters in the control arm (ART offered according to national guidelines, i.e., CD4 count ≤ 350 cells/μl contributed to the first phase of the trial. Households were visited every 6 mo. Following informed consent and administration of a study questionnaire, each resident adult (≥16 y was asked for a finger-prick blood sample, which was used to estimate HIV prevalence, and offered a rapid HIV test using a serial HIV testing algorithm. All HIV-positive adults were referred to the trial clinic in their cluster. Those not linked to care 3 mo after identification were contacted by a linkage-to-care team. Study procedures were not blinded. In all, 12,894 adults were registered as eligible for participation (5,790 in intervention arm; 7,104 in control arm, of whom 9,927 (77.0% were contacted at least once during household visits. HIV status was ever ascertained for a total of 8,233/9,927 (82.9%, including 2,569 ascertained as HIV-positive (942 tested HIV-positive and 1,627 reported a known HIV-positive status. Of the 1,177 HIV-positive individuals not previously in care and followed for at least 6 mo in the trial, 559 (47.5% visited their cluster trial clinic within 6 mo. In the intervention arm, 89% (194/218 initiated ART within 3 mo of their first clinic visit. In the control arm, 42.3% (83/196 had a CD4 count ≤ 350 cells/μl at first

  4. Mutagens from the cooking of food. III. Survey by Ames/Salmonella test of mutagen formation in secondary sources of cooked dietary protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjeldanes, L F [Univ. of California, Berkeley; Morris, M M; Felton, J S; Healy, S; Stuermer, D; Berry, P; Timourian, H; Hatch, F T

    1982-01-01

    A survey of mutagen formation during the cooking of a variety of protein-rich foods that are minor sources of protein intake in the American diet is reported (see Bjeldanes, Morris, Felton et al. (1982) for survey of major protein foods). Milk, cheese, tofu and organ meats showed negligible mutagen formation except following high-temperature cooking for long periods of time. Even under the most extreme conditions, tofu, cheese and milk exhibited fewer than 500 Ames/Salmonella typhimurium revertants/100 g equivalents (wet weight of uncooked food), and organ meats only double that amount. Beans showed low mutagen formation after boiling followed by frying (with and without oil). Only boiling of beans followed by baking for 1 hr gave appreciable mutagenicity (3650 revertants/100 g equivalents). Seafood samples gave a variety of results: red snapper, salmon, trout, halibut and rock cod all gave more than 1000 revertants/100 g wet weight equivalents when pan-fried or griddle-fried for about 6 min/side. Baked or poached rock cod and deep-fried shrimp showed no significant mutagen formation. Broiled lamb chops showed mutagen formation similar to that in red meats tested in the preceding paper: 16,000 revertants/100 g equivalents. These findings show that as measured by bioassay in S. typhimurium, most of the food that are minor sources of protein in the American diet are also minor sources of cooking-induced mutagens.

  5. Mutagens from the cooking of food. III. Survey by Ames/Salmonella test of mutagen formation in secondary sources of cooked dietary protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjeldanes, L F; Morris, M M; Felton, J S; Healy, S; Stuermer, D; Berry, P; Timourian, H; Hatch, F T

    1982-08-01

    A survey of mutagen formation during the cooking of a variety of protein-rich foods that are minor sources of protein intake in the American diet is reported (see Bjeldanes, Morris, Felton et al. (1982) for survey of major protein foods). Milk, cheese, tofu and organ meats showed negligible mutagen formation except following high-temperature cooking for long periods of time. Even under the most extreme conditions, tofu, cheese and milk exhibited fewer than 500 Ames/Salmonella typhimurium revertants/100 g equivalents (wet weight of uncooked food), and organ meats only double that amount. Beans showed low mutagen formation after boiling and boiling followed by frying (with and without oil). Only boiling of beans followed by baking for 1 hr gave appreciable mutagenicity (3650 revertants/100g equivalents). Seafood samples gave a variety of results: red snapper, salmon, trout, halibut and rock cod all gave more than 1000 revertants/100 g wet weight equivalents when pan-fried or griddle-fried for about 6 min/side. Baked or poached rock and deep-fried shrimp showed no significant mutagen formation. Broiled lamb chops showed mutagen formation similar to that in red meats tested in the preceding paper: 16,000 revertants/100 g equivalents. These findings show that as measured by bioassay in S. typhimurium, most of the foods that are minor sources of protein in the American diet are also minor sources of cooking-induced mutagens.

  6. Innovation performance and clusters: a dynamic capability perspective on regional technology clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Röttmer, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    This research provides a novel, empirically tested, actionable theory of cluster innovativeness. Cluster innovativeness has for long been subject of research and resulting policy efforts. The cluster's endowment with assets, such as specialized labor, firms, research institutes, existing regional networks and a specific culture are, among others, recognized as sources of innovativeness. While the asset structure of clusters as been subject to a variety of research efforts, the evidence on the...

  7. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  8. Temporal development of cross-neutralization between HTLV-III B and HTLV-III RF in experimentally infected chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Thiriart, C.; Smit, L.; Bruck, C.; Gibbs, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Sera from chimpanzees inoculated respectively with HTLV-III B, LAV, HTLV-III RF and brain tissue from an AIDS patient were analysed for neutralizing activity by two methods: a cell fusion inhibition test (CFI) using HTLV-III B infected cells as inoculum and CD4+ cells as target and a replication

  9. Diversity among galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, M.F.; Rood, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The classification of galaxy clusters is discussed. Consideration is given to the classification scheme of Abell (1950's), Zwicky (1950's), Morgan, Matthews, and Schmidt (1964), and Morgan-Bautz (1970). Galaxies can be classified based on morphology, chemical composition, spatial distribution, and motion. The correlation between a galaxy's environment and morphology is examined. The classification scheme of Rood-Sastry (1971), which is based on clusters's morphology and galaxy population, is described. The six types of clusters they define include: (1) a cD-cluster dominated by a single large galaxy, (2) a cluster dominated by a binary, (3) a core-halo cluster, (4) a cluster dominated by several bright galaxies, (5) a cluster appearing flattened, and (6) an irregularly shaped cluster. Attention is also given to the evolution of cluster structures, which is related to initial density and cluster motion

  10. WISC-III e WAIS-III na avaliação da inteligência de cegos WISC-III/WAIS-III en ciegos WISC-III and WAIS-III in intellectual assessment of blind people

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth do Nascimento; Carmen Elvira Flores-Mendoza

    2007-01-01

    Diante da escassez de pesquisas nacionais e de testes psicológicos destinados a avaliar pessoas cegas, desenvolveu-se um estudo psicométrico com as escalas verbais dos testes WISC-III e WAIS-III. Após as adaptações de alguns estímulos e das instruções, os testes foram aplicados em crianças (N = 120) e adultos (N = 52) residentes em Belo Horizonte. Os resultados indicaram que as escalas verbais modificadas apresentam uma boa consistência interna (alfa> 0,80). Além disso, a investigação da vali...

  11. The steam generator programme of PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.; Herkenrath, H.

    1990-12-01

    The PISC III Actions are intended to extend the results and methodologies of the previous PISC excercises, i.e. the validation of the capabilities of the various examination techniques when used on real defects in real components under real conditions of inspection. Being aware of the important safety role that steam generator tubes play as barrier between primary and secondary cooling system and of the industrial problems that the degradation of these tubes can create, the PISC III Management Board agreed to include in the PISC III Programme a special Action on Steam Generator Tubes Testing (SGT). It was decided to organize the programme in three phases, including Round Robin Tests (RRT): - capability tests on loose tubes, - capability tests on transportable mock-ups, - reliability tests on fixed mock-ups including some interesting SURRY tubes

  12. Limiting Factors for Microbial Fe(III)-Reduction In a Landfill Leachate Polluted Aquifer (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Aquifer sediment samples from two locations within the anaerobic leachate plume of a municipal landfill were compared with respect to microbiology (especially Fe(III)-reduction) and geochemistry. The samples close to the landfill were characterized by low contents of Fe(III), whereas samples from...... the more distant cluster were rich in Fe(III)-oxides. The active microbial population seemed to be less dense in samples more distant from the landfill (measured by ATP and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA)), but the microbial communities were very similar in the two sample clusters according...... to the composition of PLFA. Very little, if any, Fe(III)-reduction was observed close to the landfill, but all the more distant samples showed evident microbially mediated Fe(III)-reduction. After amendment with both acetate and Fe(III), all the samples showed a potential for Fe(III)-reduction, and the in situ Fe...

  13. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds, are not incorporated in the...

  14. Hadoop cluster deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Zburivsky, Danil

    2013-01-01

    This book is a step-by-step tutorial filled with practical examples which will show you how to build and manage a Hadoop cluster along with its intricacies.This book is ideal for database administrators, data engineers, and system administrators, and it will act as an invaluable reference if you are planning to use the Hadoop platform in your organization. It is expected that you have basic Linux skills since all the examples in this book use this operating system. It is also useful if you have access to test hardware or virtual machines to be able to follow the examples in the book.

  15. Common Variance Among Three Measures of Nonverbal Cognitive Ability: WISC-R Performance Scale, WJPB-TCA Reasoning Cluster, and Halstead Category Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzrow, Cathy F.; Harr, Gale A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the relationships among two psychometric measures of nonverbal cognitive ability - The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Tests of Cognitive Ability (WJPB-TCA) and a neuropsychological test of abstract reasoning and concept formation (Halstead Category Test) in 25…

  16. On a New Near-Infrared Method to Estimate the Absolute Ages of Star Clusters: NGC 3201 as a First Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; VandenBerg, D. A.; Calamida, A.; Dall'Ora, M.; Iannicola, G.; Amico, P.; Di Cecco, A.; Marchetti, E.; Monelli, M.; Sanna, N.; Walker, A. R.; Zoccali, M.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Corsi, C. E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Ferraro, I.; Gilmozzi, R.; Melnick, J.; Nonino, M.; Ortolani, S.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.; Storm, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method to estimate the absolute ages of stellar systems. This method is based on the difference in magnitude between the main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) and a well-defined knee located along the lower main sequence (MSK). This feature is caused by the collisionally induced absorption of molecular hydrogen, and it can easily be identified in near-infrared (NIR) and in optical-NIR color-magnitude diagrams of stellar systems. We took advantage of deep and accurate NIR images collected with the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator temporarily available on the Very Large Telescope and of optical images collected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope and with ground-based telescopes to estimate the absolute age of the globular NGC 3201 using both the MSTO and the Δ(MSTO-MSK). We have adopted a new set of cluster isochrones, and we found that the absolute ages based on the two methods agree to within 1σ. However, the errors of the ages based on the Δ(MSTO-MSK) method are potentially more than a factor of 2 smaller, since they are not affected by uncertainties in cluster distance or reddening. Current isochrones appear to predict slightly bluer (≈0.05 mag) NIR and optical-NIR colors than observed for magnitudes fainter than the MSK. Based on near infrared observations made with ESO telescopes SOFI at NTT, La Silla; MAD at VLT Paranal, projects: 66.D-0557, 074.D-0655, ID96406, and with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) telescope ISPI at 4m Blanco, La Serena. Based on optical data collected with ESO telescopes and retrieved from the ESO Science Archive Facility. This research used the facilities of the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre operated by the National Research Council of Canada with the support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  17. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2018.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  18. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  19. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  20. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  1. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark. The longit...... but being quick to withdraw in times of crisis....

  2. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  3. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  4. Validation Test Report for WAVEWATCH III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    now to run on the HPC computer, DaVinci , on the DSRC with all ten domains in place as described above for a 48-hour forecast from start in the PBS...will soon replace DaVinci , so those optimizations are yet to be discovered. So, our focus can now point towards how the domains are set up, whether...References ALADIN International Team, (1997). The ALADIN project: Mesoscale modelling seen as a basic tool for weather forecasting and atmospheric

  5. Membership determination of open clusters based on a spectral clustering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Hua

    2018-06-01

    We present a spectral clustering (SC) method aimed at segregating reliable members of open clusters in multi-dimensional space. The SC method is a non-parametric clustering technique that performs cluster division using eigenvectors of the similarity matrix; no prior knowledge of the clusters is required. This method is more flexible in dealing with multi-dimensional data compared to other methods of membership determination. We use this method to segregate the cluster members of five open clusters (Hyades, Coma Ber, Pleiades, Praesepe, and NGC 188) in five-dimensional space; fairly clean cluster members are obtained. We find that the SC method can capture a small number of cluster members (weak signal) from a large number of field stars (heavy noise). Based on these cluster members, we compute the mean proper motions and distances for the Hyades, Coma Ber, Pleiades, and Praesepe clusters, and our results are in general quite consistent with the results derived by other authors. The test results indicate that the SC method is highly suitable for segregating cluster members of open clusters based on high-precision multi-dimensional astrometric data such as Gaia data.

  6. Cluster ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popok, V.N.; Prasalovich, S.V.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Campbell, E.E.B.

    2001-01-01

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  7. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  8. Assessment of genetic divergence in tomato through agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Q.; Saleem, M.Y.; Hameed, A.; Asghar, M.

    2014-01-01

    For the improvement of qualitative and quantitative traits, existence of variability has prime importance in plant breeding. Data on different morphological and reproductive traits of 47 tomato genotypes were analyzed for correlation,agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) to select genotypes and traits for future breeding program. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive association between yield and yield components like fruit diameter, single fruit weight and number of fruits plant-1. Principal component (PC) analysis depicted first three PCs with Eigen-value higher than 1 contributing 81.72% of total variability for different traits. The PC-I showed positive factor loadings for all the traits except number of fruits plant-1. The contribution of single fruit weight and fruit diameter was highest in PC-1. Cluster analysis grouped all genotypes into five divergent clusters. The genotypes in cluster-II and cluster-V exhibited uniform maturity and higher yield. The D2 statistics confirmed highest distance between cluster- III and cluster-V while maximum similarity was observed in cluster-II and cluster-III. It is therefore suggested that crosses between genotypes of cluster-II and cluster-V with those of cluster-I and cluster-III may exhibit heterosis in F1 for hybrid breeding and for selection of superior genotypes in succeeding generations for cross breeding programme. (author)

  9. Management of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe...... or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness...... and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment...

  10. Symmetries of cluster configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, P.

    1975-01-01

    A deeper understanding of clustering phenomena in nuclei must encompass at least two interrelated aspects of the subject: (A) Given a system of A nucleons with two-body interactions, what are the relevant and persistent modes of clustering involved. What is the nature of the correlated nucleon groups which form the clusters, and what is their mutual interaction. (B) Given the cluster modes and their interaction, what systematic patterns of nuclear structure and reactions emerge from it. Are there, for example, families of states which share the same ''cluster parents''. Which cluster modes are compatible or exclude each other. What quantum numbers could characterize cluster configurations. There is no doubt that we can learn a good deal from the experimentalists who have discovered many of the features relevant to aspect (B). Symmetries specific to cluster configurations which can throw some light on both aspects of clustering are discussed

  11. The Mark III vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 μm at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 μm using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin

  12. 4C radio sources in clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHardy, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of a complete sample of 4C and 4CT radio sources in Abell clusters with the Cambridge One-Mile telescope are analysed. It is concluded that radio sources are strongly concentrated towards the cluster centres and are equally likely to be found in clusters of any richness. The probability of a galaxy of a given absolute magnitude producing a source above a given luminosity does not depend on cluster membership. 4C and 4CT radio sources in clusters, selected at 178 MHz, occur preferentially in Bautz-Morgan (BM) class 1 clusters, whereas those selected at 1.4 GHz do not. The most powerful radio source in the cluster is almost always associated with the optically brightest galaxy. The average spectrum of 4C sources in the range 408 to 1407 MHz is steeper in BM class 1 than in other classes. Spectra also steepen with cluster richness. the morphology of 4C sources in clusters depends strongly on BM class and, in particular, radio-trail sources occur only in BM classes II, II-III and III. (author)

  13. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  14. Can child restraint product information developed using consumer testing sustain correct use 6 months after child restraint purchase? Study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie; Elkington, Jane; Hall, Alexandra; Keay, Lisa; Charlton, Judith L; Hunter, Kate; Koppel, Sjaan; Hayen, Andrew; Bilston, Lynne E

    2018-03-07

    With long-standing and widespread high rates of errors in child restraint use, there is a need to identify effective methods to address this problem. Information supplied with products at the point of sale may be a potentially efficient delivery point for such a countermeasure. The aim of this study is to establish whether product materials developed using a consumer-driven approach reduce errors in restraint use among purchasers of new child restraint systems. A cluster randomised controlled trial (cRCT) will be conducted. Retail stores (n=22) in the greater Sydney area will be randomised into intervention sites (n=11) and control sites (n=11), stratified by geographical and socioeconomic indicators. Participants (n=836) will enter the study on purchase of a restraint. Outcome measures are errors in installation of the restraint as observed by a trained researcher during a 6-month follow-up home assessment, and adjustment checks made by the parent when the child is placed into the restraint (observed using naturalistic methods). Process evaluation measures will also be collected during the home visit. An intention-to-treat approach will be used for all analyses. Correct use and adjustment checks made by the parent will be compared between control and intervention groups using a logistic regression model. The number of installation errors between groups will be compared using Poisson regression. This cRCT will determine the effectiveness of targeted, consumer-driven information on actual error rates in use of restraints. More broadly, it may provide a best practice model for developing safety product information. ACTRN12617001252303p; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark, 1963......-2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing...... in new resources to the cluster but being quick to withdraw in times of crisis....

  16. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  17. Effect of two additional interventions, test and reflection, added to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on seventh grade students' practical skills and willingness to act: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Anette; Hult, Håkan; Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this research is to investigate if two additional interventions, test and reflection, after standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training facilitate learning by comparing 13-year-old students' practical skills and willingness to act. Seventh grade students in council schools of two municipalities in south-east Sweden. School classes were randomised to CPR training only (O), CPR training with a practical test including feedback (T) or CPR training with reflection and a practical test including feedback (RT). Measures of practical skills and willingness to act in a potential life-threatening situation were studied directly after training and at 6 months using a digital reporting system and a survey. A modified Cardiff test was used to register the practical skills, where scores in each of 12 items resulted in a total score of 12-48 points. The study was conducted in accordance with current European Resuscitation Council guidelines during December 2013 to October 2014. 29 classes for a total of 587 seventh grade students were included in the study. The total score of the modified Cardiff test at 6 months was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were the total score directly after training, the 12 individual items of the modified Cardiff test and willingness to act. At 6 months, the T and O groups scored 32 (3.9) and 30 (4.0) points, respectively (ptraining improved the students' acquisition of practical CPR skills. Reflection did not increase further CPR skills. At 6-month follow-up, no intervention effect was found regarding willingness to make a life-saving effort. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Asteroids and Archaean crustal evolution: Tests of possible genetic links between major mantle/crust melting events and clustered extraterrestrial bombardments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, A. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Since the oldest intact terrestrial rocks of ca. 4.0 Ga and oldest zircon xenocrysts of ca. 4.3 Ga measured to date overlap with the lunar late heavy bombardment, the early Precambrian record requires close reexamination vis a vis the effects of megaimpacts. The identification of microtektite-bearing horizons containing spinals of chondritic chemistry and Ir anomalies in 3.5-3.4-Ga greenstone belts provides the first direct evidence for large-scale Archaean impacts. The Archaean crustal record contains evidence for several major greenstone-granite-forming episodes where deep upwelling and adiabatic fusion of the mantle was accompanied by contemporaneous crustal anatexis. Isotopic age studies suggest evidence for principal age clusters about 3.5, 3.0, and 2.7 (+/- 0.8) Ga, relics of a ca. 3.8-Ga event, and several less well defined episodes. These peak events were accompanied and followed by protracted thermal fluctuations in intracrustal high-grade metamorphic zones. Interpretations of these events in terms of internal dynamics of the Earth are difficult to reconcile with the thermal behavior of silicate rheologies in a continuously convecting mantle regime. A triggering of these episodes by mantle rebound response to intermittent extraterrestrial asteroid impacts is supported by (1) identification of major Archaean impacts from microtektite and distal ejecta horizons marked by Ir anomalies; (2) geochemical and experimental evidence for mantle upwelling, possibly from levels as deep as the transition zone; and (3) catastrophic adiabatic melting required to generate peridotitic komatites. Episodic differentiation/accretion growth of sial consequent on these events is capable of resolving the volume problem that arises from comparisons between modern continental crust and the estimated sial produced by continuous two-stage mantle melting processes. The volume problem is exacerbated by projected high accretion rates under Archaean geotherms. It is suggested that

  19. LMC clusters: young

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    The young globular clusters of the LMC have ages of 10 7 -10 8 y. Their masses and structure are similar to those of the smaller galactic globular clusters. Their stellar mass functions (in the mass range 6 solar masses to 1.2 solar masses) vary greatly from cluster to cluster, although the clusters are similar in total mass, age, structure and chemical composition. It would be very interesting to know why these clusters are forming now in the LMC and not in the Galaxy. The author considers the 'young globular' or 'blue populous' clusters of the LMC. The ages of these objects are 10 7 to 10 8 y, and their masses are 10 4 to 10 5 solar masses, so they are populous enough to be really useful for studying the evolution of massive stars. The author concentrates on the structure and stellar content of these young clusters. (Auth.)

  20. Star clusters and associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruprecht, J.; Palous, J.

    1983-01-01

    All 33 papers presented at the symposium were inputted to INIS. They dealt with open clusters, globular clusters, stellar associations and moving groups, and local kinematics and galactic structures. (E.S.)

  1. Cluster beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiglioni, F.; Coutant, J.; Fois, M.

    1978-01-01

    Areas of possible applications of cluster injection are discussed. The deposition inside the plasma of molecules, issued from the dissociation of the injected clusters, has been computed. Some empirical scaling laws for the penetration are given

  2. Genetic Diversity and Relationships of Neolamarckia cadamba (Roxb. Bosser progenies through cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Preethi Shree

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity analysis was conducted for biometric attributes in 20 progenies of Neolamarckia cadamba. The application of D2 clustering technique in Neolamarckia cadamba genetic resources resolved the 20 progenies into five clusters. The maximum intra cluster distance was shown by the cluster II. The maximum inter cluster distance was recorded between cluster III and V which indicated the presence of wider genetic distance between Neolamarckia cadamba progenies. Among the growth attributes, volume (36.84 % contributed maximum towards genetic divergence followed by bole height, basal diameter, tree height, number of branches in Neolamarckia cadamba progenies.

  3. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  4. Determining characteristic principal clusters in the “cluster-plus-glue-atom” model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin; 2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, 75 University Ave West, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada))" data-affiliation=" (M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, 75 University Ave West, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada))" >Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The “cluster-plus-glue-atom” model can easily describe the structure of complex metallic alloy phases. However, the biggest obstacle limiting the application of this model is that it is difficult to determine the characteristic principal cluster. In the case when interatomic force constants (IFCs) inside the cluster lead to stronger interaction than the interaction between the clusters, a new rule for determining the characteristic principal cluster in the “cluster-plus-glue-atom” model has been proposed on the basis of IFCs. To verify this new rule, the alloy phases in Cu–Zr and Al–Ni–Zr systems have been tested, and our results indicate that the present new rule for determining characteristic principal clusters is effective and reliable

  5. Clustering at high redshifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence for clustering of and with high-redshift QSOs is discussed. QSOs of different redshifts show no clustering, but QSOs of similar redshifts appear to be clustered on a scale comparable to that of galaxies at the present epoch. In addition, spectroscopic studies of close pairs of QSOs indicate that QSOs are surrounded by a relatively high density of absorbing matter, possibly clusters of galaxies

  6. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor M. Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard LCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant ($Lambda$ and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM, structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging.Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang,hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics.The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions:the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulenceare developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thusour review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In princip