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Sample records for clusters ii results

  1. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Retzlaff, Jörg [ESO, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meisenheimer, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schartel, Norbert [ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10{sup −12} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ {sub 8} and Ω{sub m}, yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  2. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim; Retzlaff, Jörg; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Schartel, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10 −12 erg s −1 cm −2 (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ 8 and Ω m , yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  3. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    , heat and ultraviolet radiation, our nearest star also emits a continuous stream of atomic particles - the solar wind - that sweeps out into space at speeds ranging from 280 to 1 000 km/s (1 800 times faster than Concorde). Sometimes, explosions on the Sun send millions of tonnes of gas towards the Earth. These clouds of high-energy particles can travel the 150 million km between the Sun and Earth in a few days. The most energetic particles of all, created by solar flares, can reach the Earth in just 30 minutes. This activity is particularly noticeable at times of solar maximum. When charged particles from the Sun enter the Earth's upper atmosphere, they create shimmering curtains of coloured light, known as auroras, in the polar night sky. Other effects can be much more serious: * Solar storms affect the Earth's ionosphere, causing disruption of short-wave radio communications, navigation systems on ships and aircraft, and military radar systems. * Surges in electricity transmission lines can cause widespread power blackouts, as happened in Quebec, Canada, in March 1989 when 6 million people were left without electricity as a result of a huge solar-induced magnetic storm. * Damage to microchips and electrical discharges can cause satellites to stop operating, disrupting telephone, TV and data communication services. (Aware of the potential dangers, the designers of the Cluster II spacecraft have built them to survive collisions with high- energy particles from the Earth's radiation belts and the solar wind.) * Radiation levels can become hazardous to astronauts and occupants of high-flying aircraft. * Variations in solar energy output cause global climate changes which affect plant growth, crop production and food supply. * High-energy particles hitting the Earth's upper atmosphere can damage the ozone layer which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation.

  4. Results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66 -13 +18 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73 -16 +18 (stat) -7 5 (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69 -11 +11 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  5. Planck intermediate results: II. Comparison of sunyaev-zeldovich measurements from planck and from the arcminute microkelvin imager for 11 galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Fromenteau, S.

    2013-01-01

    A comparison is presented of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements for 11 galaxy clusters as obtained by Planck and by the ground-based interferometer, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Assuming a universal spherically-symmetric Generalised Navarro, Frenk and White (GNFW) model for the cluster gas press...

  6. First results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76 -18 +21 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74 -12 +13 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  7. First results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76 +21 -18 (stat) +5 -7 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74 +13 -12 (stat) +5 -7 (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Recent results from DORIS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into γγ physics. 18 refs., 10 figs

  9. Dynamical processes in space: Cluster results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Escoubet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available After 12 years of operations, the Cluster mission continues to successfully fulfil its scientific objectives. The main goal of the Cluster mission, comprised of four identical spacecraft, is to study in three dimensions small-scale plasma structures in key plasma regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, plasmasphere and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied from 20 km to 36 000 km to study the scientific regions of interest at different scales. Since summer 2005, new multi-scale constellations have been implemented, wherein three spacecraft (C1, C2, C3 are separated by 10 000 km, while the fourth one (C4 is at a variable distance ranging between 20 km and 10 000 km from C3. Recent observations were conducted in the auroral acceleration region with the spacecraft separated by 1000s km. We present highlights of the results obtained during the last 12 years on collisionless shocks, magnetopause waves, magnetotail dynamics, plasmaspheric structures, and the auroral acceleration region. In addition, we highlight Cluster results on understanding the impact of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME on the Earth environment. We will also present Cluster data accessibility through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS, and the Cluster Active Archive (CAA, which was implemented to provide a permanent and public archive of high resolution Cluster data from all instruments.

  10. Stromvil Photometry of Clusters II. The Open Cluster M67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. P.; Philip, A. G. D.; Straižys, V.

    1998-12-01

    Use of the Stromgren four-color photometric system with the addition of three filters (P, Z, S) of the Vilnius system allows classifying all the types of stars, even in the presence of significant reddening by interstellar dust (Strai\\v{z}ys et al, 1996). With this Stromvil system we have begun a long-term observational program on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, (see Philip et al,1996). The Loral 2K by 2K CCD, prepared by M. Lesser of the University of Arizona CCD Lab, gives as high as 90% quantum efficiency in most of the filters and notably 65% at the u filter. To demonstrate the degree of success so far attained in this CCD Stromvil System, we present preliminary results on the open cluster M67. We will compare some of our photometry with the CCD results of B. A. Twarog (1987) and the photoelectric photometry of Nissen et al. (1987). REFERENCES Nissen, P.E., Twarog, B.A., and Crawford, D.L. 1987, A.J. 93,634 Philip, A.G. Davis, Boyle, R.P., Strai\\v{z}ys, V. 1996, Baltic Astronomy,5,445 Strai\\v{z}ys, V., Crawford, D.L., Philip, A.G.Davis 1996, Baltic Astronomy, 5,83 Twarog, B.A. 1987, A.J. 93,647

  11. The Globular Cluster NGC 6402 (M14). II. Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Peña, C.; Catelan, M.; Grundahl, F.; Stephens, A. W.; Smith, H. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present time-series BVI photometry for the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6402 (M14). The data consist of ∼137 images per filter, obtained using the 0.9 and 1.0 m SMARTS telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The images were obtained during two observing runs in 2006–2007. The image-subtraction package ISIS, along with DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME, was used to perform crowded-field photometry and search for variable stars. We identified 130 variables, eight of which are new discoveries. The variable star population is comprised of 56 ab-type RR Lyrae stars, 54 c-type RR Lyrae, 6 type II Cepheids, 1 W UMa star, 1 detached eclipsing binary, and 12 long-period variables. We provide Fourier decomposition parameters for the RR Lyrae, and discuss the physical parameters and photometric metallicity derived therefrom. The M14 distance modulus is also discussed, based on different approaches for the calibration of the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. The possible presence of second-overtone RR Lyrae in M14 is critically addressed, with our results arguing against this possibility. By considering all of the RR Lyrae stars as members of the cluster, we derive =0.589 {{d}}{{a}}{{y}}{{s}}. This, together with the position of the RR Lyrae stars of both Bailey types in the period–amplitude diagram, suggests an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the cluster. Such an intermediate Oosterhoff type is much more commonly found in nearby extragalactic systems, and we critically discuss several other possible indications that may point to an extragalactic origin for this cluster. Based on observations obtained with the 0.9 m and 1 m telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile, operated by the SMARTS consortium.

  12. THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 × 10 8 yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 × 10 37 W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

  13. Recent results from AMANDA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.; Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; De Young, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herque, P.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Koci, B.; Koepke, L.; Kuehn, K.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new data taken with the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope array. The AMANDA-II upgrade was completed at the beginning of 2000. It significantly extends the sensitivity of the 10-string AMANDA-B10 detector to high- and ultrahigh-energy neutrino fluxes into regions of interest for probing current astrophysical models which remain unexplored by other experiments

  14. Communications and Media: Grade 7. Cluster II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 7, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Communications and Media." It is divided into six units: advertising, film and photography, radio and television, journalism and publishing, library and periodicals, and transocean communications. Each unit is introduced by a statement of the topic, the…

  15. Cluster-collision frequency. II. Estimation of the collision rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadon, A.S.; Marlow, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster-collision rates, including effects of cluster morphology and long-range intermolecular forces, are calculated. Identical pairs of icosahedral or dodecahedral carbon tetrachloride clusters of 13, 33, and 55 molecules in two different relative orientations were discussed in the preceding paper [Phys. Rev. A 43, 5483 (1991)]: long-range interaction energies were derived based upon (i) exact calculations of the iterated, or many-body, induced-dipole interaction energies for the clusters in two fixed relative orientations; and (ii) bulk, or continuum descriptions (Lifshitz--van der Waals theory), of spheres of corresponding masses and diameters. In this paper, collision rates are calculated according to an exact description of the rates for small spheres interacting via realistic potentials. Utilizing the interaction energies of the preceding paper, several estimates of the collision rates are given by treating the discrete clusters in fixed relative orientations, by computing rotationally averaged potentials for the discrete clusters, and by approximating the clusters as continuum spheres. For the discrete, highly symmetric clusters treated here, the rates using the rotationally averaged potentials closely approximate the fixed-orientation rates and the values of the intercluster potentials for cluster surface separations under 2 A have negligible effect on the overall collision rates. While the 13-molecule cluster-collision rate differs by 50% from the rate calculated as if the cluster were bulk matter, the two larger cluster-collision rates differ by less than 15% from the macroscopic rates, thereby indicating the transition of microscopic to macroscopic behavior

  16. THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul, E-mail: antognini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: bird@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: martini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

  17. Early results from the Whisper instrument on Cluster: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decreau, P.M.E.; Fergeau, P.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Whisper instrument yields two data sets: (i) the electron density determined via the relaxation sounder, and (ii) the spectrum of natural plasma emissions in the frequency band 2-80 kHz. Both data sets allow for the three-dimensional exploration of the magnetosphere by the Cluster mission...... the drift velocity of density structures. Wave observations are also of crucial interest for studying small-scale structures, as demonstrated in an example in the fore-shock region. Early results from the Whisper instrument are very encouraging, and demonstrate that the four-point Cluster measurements...... largely overcomes the limited telemetry allocation. The natural emissions are usually related to the plasma frequency, as identified by the sounder, and the combination of an active sounding operation and a passive survey operation provides a time resolution for the total density determination of 2.2 s...

  18. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. II. EXPANDING THE METALLICITY RANGE FOR OLD CLUSTERS AND UPDATED ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ∼0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = −0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na i, Mg i, Al i, Si i, Ca i, Ti i, Ti ii, Sc ii, V i, Cr i, Mn i, Co i, Ni i, Cu i, Y ii, Zr i, Ba ii, La ii, Nd ii, and Eu ii. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe i, Ca i, Si i, Ni i, and Ba ii. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg i and Zr i. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements.

  19. Stellar activity with LAMOST - II. Chromospheric activity in open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang-Song; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2018-05-01

    We use the LAMOST spectra of member stars in Pleiades, M34, Praesepe, and Hyades to study how chromospheric activity varies as a function of mass and rotation at different age. We measured excess equivalent widths of H α, H β, and Ca II K based on estimated chromospheric contributions from old and inactive field dwarfs, and excess luminosities are obtained by normalizing bolometric luminosity, for more than 700 late-type stars in these open clusters. Results indicate two activity sequences in cool spot coverage and H α excess emission among GK dwarfs in Pleiades and M dwarfs in Praesepe and Hyades, paralleling with well-known rotation sequences. A weak dependence of chromospheric emission on rotation exists among ultrafast rotators in saturated regime with Rossby number Ro ≲ 0.1. In the unsaturated regime, chromospheric and coronal emission show similar dependence on Ro, but with a shift towards larger Ro, indicating chromospheric emission gets easily saturated than coronal emission, and/or convective turnover time-scales based on X-ray data do not work well with chromospheric emission. More interestingly, our analysis shows fully convective slow rotators obey the rotation-chromospheric activity relation similar to hotter stars, confirming the previous finding. We found correlations among H α, H β, and Ca II K emissions, in which H α losses are more important than Ca II K for cooler and more active stars. In addition, a weak correlation is seen between chromospheric emission and photospheric activity that shows dependence on stellar spectral type and activity level, which provides some clues on how spot configuration varies as a function of mass and activity level.

  20. Integrated-light spectroscopy of globular clusters at the infrared Ca II lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandroff, Taft E.; Zinn, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Integrated-light spectroscopy has been obtained for 27 globular clusters at the Ca II IR triplet. Line strengths and radial velocities have been measured from the spectra. For the well-studied clusters in the sample, the strength of the Ca II lines is very well correlated with previous metallicity estimates. Thus, the triplet is useful as a metallicity indicator in globular cluster integrated-light spectra. The greatly reduced effect of interstellar extinction at these wavelengths (compared to the blue region of the spectrum) has permitted observations of some of the most heavily reddened clusters in the Galaxy. For several such clusters, the Ca II triplet metallicities are in poor agreement with metallicity estimates from IR photometry by Malkan (1981). The strength of an interstellar band at 8621A has been used to estimate the amount of extinction towards these clusters. Using the new metallicity and radial-velocity data, the metallicity distribution, kinematics, and spatial distribution of the disk globular cluster system have been analyzed. Results very similar to those of Zinn (1985) have been found. The relation of the disk globulars to the stellar thick disk is discussed.

  1. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections

  2. Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Wada, Kei [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fukuyama, Keiichi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sako, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sako@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys{sup 295} and His{sup 261}. •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His{sup 261}, which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys{sup 295}, is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys{sup 295}, we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys{sup 295} substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys{sup 295} indirectly and His{sup 261} together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster.

  3. Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Wada, Kei; Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys 295 and His 261 . •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His 261 , which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys 295 , is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys 295 , we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys 295 substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys 295 indirectly and His 261 together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster

  4. Mining the National Career Assessment Examination Result Using Clustering Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagudpud, M. V.; Palaoag, T. T.; Padirayon, L. M.

    2018-03-01

    Education is an essential process today which elicits authorities to discover and establish innovative strategies for educational improvement. This study applied data mining using clustering technique for knowledge extraction from the National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE) result in the Division of Quirino. The NCAE is an examination given to all grade 9 students in the Philippines to assess their aptitudes in the different domains. Clustering the students is helpful in identifying students’ learning considerations. With the use of the RapidMiner tool, clustering algorithms such as Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN), k-means, k-medoid, expectation maximization clustering, and support vector clustering algorithms were analyzed. The silhouette indexes of the said clustering algorithms were compared, and the result showed that the k-means algorithm with k = 3 and silhouette index equal to 0.196 is the most appropriate clustering algorithm to group the students. Three groups were formed having 477 students in the determined group (cluster 0), 310 proficient students (cluster 1) and 396 developing students (cluster 2). The data mining technique used in this study is essential in extracting useful information from the NCAE result to better understand the abilities of students which in turn is a good basis for adopting teaching strategies.

  5. First results from Mark II at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.

    1979-05-01

    First results from the SLAC-LBL Mark II magnetic detector at SPEAR are presented. The performance of the detector is discussed and preliminary results are given on inclusive baryon production R/sub p + anti p/, R/sub Λ + anti Λ/, on decay modes of the D mesons and on two-photon production of eta' mesons

  6. Result diversification based on query-specific cluster ranking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, J.; Meij, E.; de Rijke, M.

    2011-01-01

    Result diversification is a retrieval strategy for dealing with ambiguous or multi-faceted queries by providing documents that cover as many facets of the query as possible. We propose a result diversification framework based on query-specific clustering and cluster ranking, in which diversification

  7. Result Diversification Based on Query-Specific Cluster Ranking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. He (Jiyin); E. Meij; M. de Rijke (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractResult diversification is a retrieval strategy for dealing with ambiguous or multi-faceted queries by providing documents that cover as many facets of the query as possible. We propose a result diversification framework based on query-specific clustering and cluster ranking,

  8. Intracluster light at the Frontier - II. The Frontier Fields Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Mireia; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2018-02-01

    Multiwavelength deep observations are a key tool to understand the origin of the diffuse light in clusters of galaxies: the intracluster light (ICL). For this reason, we take advantage of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) survey to investigate the properties of the stellar populations of the ICL of its six massive intermediate redshift (0.3 1015 M⊙) clusters is formed by the stripping of MW-like objects that have been accreted at z < 1, in agreement with current simulations. We do not find any significant increase in the fraction of light of the ICL with cosmic time, although the redshift range explored is narrow to derive any strong conclusion. When exploring the slope of the stellar mass density profile, we found that the ICL of the HFF clusters follows the shape of their underlying dark matter haloes, in agreement with the idea that the ICL is the result of the stripping of galaxies at recent times.

  9. The Globular Cluster NGC 6402 (M14). II. Variable Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contreras Peña, C.; Catelan, M.; Grundahl, F.

    2018-01-01

    approaches for the calibration of the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. The possible presence of second-overtone RR Lyrae in M14 is critically addressed, with our results arguing against this possibility. By considering all of the RR Lyrae stars as members of the cluster, we derive =0.589 {{d...

  10. Analysis of the PISC II trials results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, N.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis scheme of the Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components PISC II trial results. The objective of the PISC II exercise is to evaluate the effectiveness of current and advanced NDT techniques for inspection of reactor pressure vessel components. The analysis scheme takes data from the Round Robin Trial (RRT) and Destructive Examination, then reduces it to a manageable form in order to present useful conclusions on the effectiveness of NDT. A description is given of the data provided by RRT, the data analysis scheme, the definition of analysis parameters, and the main methods of data presentation. (U.K.)

  11. Salt Block II: description and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfelder, J.J.

    1980-06-01

    A description of and results from the Salt Block II experiment, which involved the heating of and measurement of water transport within a large sample of rock salt, are presented. These results include the measurement of water released into a heated borehole in the sample as well as measured temperatures within the salt. Measured temperatures are compared with the results of a mathematical model of the experiment

  12. Combination of the LEP II ffbar Results

    CERN Document Server

    Geweniger, C; Elsing, M; Goy, C; Holt, J; Liebig, W; Minard, M N; Renton, P B; Riemann, S; Sachs, K; Ward, P; Wynhoff, S

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary combinations of measurements of the 4 LEP collaborations of the process e+e-->ffbar at LEP-II are presented, using data from the full LEP-II data set where available. Cross-sections and forward-backward asymmetry measurements are combined for the full LEP-II data set. Combined differential cross-sections $\\frac{{\\rm d}\\sigma}{{\\rm d}\\cos\\theta}$ for electron-pairs, muon pair and tau-pair final states are presented. Measurements of the production of heavy flavours are combined. The combined results are interpreted in terms of contact interactions and the exchange Z' bosons and leptoquarks, and within models of low scale gravity in large extra dimensions.

  13. CLEO results, CLEO II and CESR improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartill, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the analysis of CLEO data are presented along with a status report of the installation progress for the new CLEO II detector. The physics results include new results on B semileptonic decays, B to charm, and B to u decays. In addition, new results on D** and D s decays are presented along with Y(1S)→Ψ and other Upsilon decays. The installation of CLEO II is more than 80% complete with first operation with CESR expected by late summer 1989. CESR luminosity upgrade plans are given along with a schedule for that upgrade, called CESR Plus, to become operational. Recently, a modest effort has started at Cornell to design a B-factory with a peak luminosity in region of 10 34 cm -2 sec -1 . Initial parameters for a symmetric energy storage ring design are given. (author)

  14. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  15. Experimental results of some cluster tests in NSRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shinsho; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Yoshimura, Tomio; Lussie, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    The NSRR programme is in progress in JAERI using a pulsed reactor to evaluate the behavior of reactor fuels under reactivity accident conditions. This report describes briefly the experimental results and preliminary analysis of two cluster tests. In the cluster configuration of five fuel rods, the power distribution in outer fuel rods are not symmetric due to neutron absorption in central fuel rod. The cladding temperature on the exterior boundaries of the cluster is higher than that in interior. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and measured cladding temperature histories. In the 3.8$ excess reactivity test, cluster averaged energy deposition of 237 cal/g.UO 2 , cladding melting and deformation were limited to the portions of the fuel rods that were on the exterior boundaries of the cluster. (auth.)

  16. Metallicity Variations in the Type II Globular Cluster NGC 6934

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A. F.; Yong, D.; Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; Lundquist, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Chené, A.-N.; Da Costa, G.; Asplund, M.; Jerjen, H.

    2018-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope photometric survey of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) has revealed a peculiar “chromosome map” for NGC 6934. In addition to a typical sequence, similar to that observed in Type I GCs, NGC 6934 displays additional stars on the red side, analogous to the anomalous Type II GCs, as defined in our previous work. We present a chemical abundance analysis of four red giants in this GC. Two stars are located on the chromosome map sequence common to all GCs, and another two lie on the additional sequence. We find (i) star-to-star Fe variations, with the two anomalous stars being enriched by ∼0.2 dex. Because of our small-size sample, this difference is at the ∼2.5σ level. (ii) There is no evidence for variations in the slow neutron-capture abundances over Fe, at odds with what is often observed in anomalous Type II GCs, e.g., M 22 and ω Centauri (iii) no large variations in light elements C, O, and Na, compatible with locations of the targets on the lower part of the chromosome map where such variations are not expected. Since the analyzed stars are homogeneous in light elements, the only way to reproduce the photometric splits on the sub-giant (SGB) and the red giant (RGB) branches is to assume that red RGB/faint SGB stars are enhanced in [Fe/H] by ∼0.2. This fact corroborates the spectroscopic evidence of a metallicity variation in NGC 6934. The observed chemical pattern resembles only partially the other Type II GCs, suggesting that NGC 6934 might belong either to a third class of GCs, or be a link between normal Type I and anomalous Type II GCs. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and Gemini Telescope at Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope.

  17. Capture cavity II results at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branlard, Julien; Chase, Brian; Cancelo, G.; Carcagno, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Hanna, B.; Harms, Elvan; Hocker, A.; Koeth, T.; Kucera, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of the research and development towards the International Linear Collider (ILC), several test facilities have been developed at Fermilab. This paper presents the latest Low Level RF (LLRF) results obtained with Capture Cavity II (CCII) at the ILC Test Accelerator (ILCTA) test facility. The main focus will be on controls and RF operations using the SIMCON based LLRF system developed in DESY [1]. Details about hardware upgrades and future work will be discussed.

  18. First results from GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    Gerda is designed for a background-free search of 76Ge neutrinoless double-β decay, using bare Ge detectors in liquid Ar. The experiment was upgraded after the successful completion of Phase I to double the target mass and further reduce the background. Newly-designed Ge detectors were installed along with LAr scintillation sensors. Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 with approximately 36 kg of Ge detectors and is currently ongoing. The first results based on 10.8 kg· yr of exposure are presented. The background goal of 10-3 cts/(keV· kg· yr) is achieved and a search for neutrinoless double-β decay is performed by combining Phase I and II data. No signal is found and a new limit is set at T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L.).

  19. Calix[4]arene supported clusters: a dimer of [Mn(III)Mn(II)] dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D; Beavers, Christine M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphinate ligands allow for the transformation of a calix[4]arene supported [Mn(III)(2)Mn(II)(2)] tetramer cluster motif into an unusual [Mn(III)Mn(II)](2) dimer of dimers; the clusters self-assemble in the crystal to form bi-layer arrays reminiscent of the typical packing of calixarene solvates....

  20. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  1. THE TYPE II SUPERNOVA RATE IN z {approx} 0.1 GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE MULTI-EPOCH NEARBY CLUSTER SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, M. L.; Sand, D. J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, C. J.; Pritchet, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Zaritsky, D.; Just, D. W.; Herbert-Fort, S. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hoekstra, H. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sivanandam, S. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Foley, R. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present seven spectroscopically confirmed Type II cluster supernovae (SNe II) discovered in the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey, a supernova survey targeting 57 low-redshift 0.05 < z < 0.15 galaxy clusters with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find the rate of Type II supernovae within R{sub 200} of z {approx} 0.1 galaxy clusters to be 0.026{sup +0.085}{sub -0.018}(stat){sup +0.003}{sub -0.001}(sys) SNuM. Surprisingly, one SN II is in a red-sequence host galaxy that shows no clear evidence of recent star formation (SF). This is unambiguous evidence in support of ongoing, low-level SF in at least some cluster elliptical galaxies, and illustrates that galaxies that appear to be quiescent cannot be assumed to host only Type Ia SNe. Based on this single SN II we make the first measurement of the SN II rate in red-sequence galaxies, and find it to be 0.007{sup +0.014}{sub -0.007}(stat){sup +0.009}{sub -0.001}(sys) SNuM. We also make the first derivation of cluster specific star formation rates (sSFR) from cluster SN II rates. We find that for all galaxy types the sSFR is 5.1{sup +15.8}{sub -3.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(sys) M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }){sup -1}, and for red-sequence galaxies only it is 2.0{sup +4.2}{sub -0.9}(stat) {+-} 0.4(sys) M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }){sup -1}. These values agree with SFRs measured from infrared and ultraviolet photometry, and H{alpha} emission from optical spectroscopy. Additionally, we use the SFR derived from our SNII rate to show that although a small fraction of cluster Type Ia SNe may originate in the young stellar population and experience a short delay time, these results do not preclude the use of cluster SN Ia rates to derive the late-time delay time distribution for SNe Ia.

  2. The Auroral Field-aligned Acceleration - Cluster Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaivads, A.; Cluster Auroral Team

    The four Cluster satellites cross the auroral field lines at altitudes well above most of acceleration region. Thus, the orbit is appropriate for studies of the generator side of this region. We consider the energy transport towards the acceleration region and different mechanisms for generating the potential drop. Using data from Cluster we can also for the first time study the dynamics of the generator on a minute scale. We present data from a few auroral field crossings where Cluster are in conjunction with DMSP satellites. We use electric and magnetic field data to estimate electrostatic po- tential along the satellite orbit, Poynting flux as well as the presence of plasma waves. These we can compare with data from particle and wave instruments on Cluster and on low latitude satellites to try to make a consistent picture of the acceleration region formation in these cases. Preliminary results show close agreement both between in- tegrated potential values at Cluster and electron peak energies at DMSP as well as close agreement between the integrated Poynting flux values at Cluster and the elec- tron energy flux at DMSP. At the end we draw a parallels between auroral electron acceleration and electron acceleration at the magnetopause.

  3. Selected new results from CUSB-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Franzini, J.

    1991-01-01

    Using the CUSB-II detector the inclusive photon spectrum was studied from 2.9x10 4 Υ(5S) decays. A strong signal has been observed due to B * → Bγ decays. The following results were obtained: (i) the average B * -B mass difference, (46.7±0.4) MeV, (ii) the photon yield per Υ(5S) decay, = 1.09±0.06 and (iii) the average velocity of the B * 's, = 0.156±0.010, for a mix of non strange (B) and strange (B s ) B * -mesons from Υ(5S) decays. The shape of the electron spectrum at the Υ(5S) indicates production of B mesons which are heavier than non-strange B's, presumably strange B's. Photon signals were observed in Υ(4S) decays, indicative of large decay rates involving annihilation of the bb-bar pair rather than decays to BB-bar meson pairs. A model independent upper limit of 3.3 to 5% has been obtained for the branching ratio of Υ(4S) → ggX, for 0 < M(X) < 1.2 GeV, at 90% confidence level. (R.P.) 19 refs., 1 tab

  4. VARIABLE STARS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. NGC 1786

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Smith, Horace A.; De Lee, Nathan; Catelan, Márcio; Pritzl, Barton J.; Borissova, Jura

    2012-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the variable stars in Large Magellanic Cloud globular clusters. The primary goal of this series is to study how RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to their counterparts in Oosterhoff I/II systems. In this paper, we present the results of our new time-series B–V photometric study of the globular cluster NGC 1786. A total of 65 variable stars were identified in our field of view. These variables include 53 RR Lyraes (27 RRab, 18 RRc, and 8 RRd), 3 classical Cepheids, 1 Type II Cepheid, 1 Anomalous Cepheid, 2 eclipsing binaries, 3 Delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables, and 2 variables of undetermined type. Photometric parameters for these variables are presented. We present physical properties for some of the RR Lyrae stars, derived from Fourier analysis of their light curves. We discuss several different indicators of Oosterhoff type which indicate that the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 1786 is not as clear cut as what is seen in most globular clusters.

  5. Clustering results - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Gclust Server Clustering results Data detail Data name Clustering results DOI 10.18908/lsdba...se Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Clustering results - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive ...

  6. Probing dark matter with star clusters: a dark matter core in the ultra-faint dwarf Eridanus II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contenta, Filippo; Balbinot, Eduardo; Petts, James A.; Read, Justin I.; Gieles, Mark; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Delorme, Maxime; Gualandris, Alessia

    2018-05-01

    We present a new technique to probe the central dark matter (DM) density profile of galaxies that harnesses both the survival and observed properties of star clusters. As a first application, we apply our method to the `ultra-faint' dwarf Eridanus II (Eri II) that has a lone star cluster ˜45 pc from its centre. Using a grid of collisional N-body simulations, incorporating the effects of stellar evolution, external tides and dynamical friction, we show that a DM core for Eri II naturally reproduces the size and the projected position of its star cluster. By contrast, a dense cusped galaxy requires the cluster to lie implausibly far from the centre of Eri II (>1 kpc), with a high inclination orbit that must be observed at a particular orbital phase. Our results, therefore, favour a DM core. This implies that either a cold DM cusp was `heated up' at the centre of Eri II by bursty star formation or we are seeing an evidence for physics beyond cold DM.

  7. Are clusters of dietary patterns and cluster membership stable over time? Results of a longitudinal cluster analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthouwer, Michel Jean Louis; Oenema, Anke; Soetens, Katja; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2014-11-01

    Developing nutrition education interventions based on clusters of dietary patterns can only be done adequately when it is clear if distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived and reproduced over time, if cluster membership is stable, and if it is predictable which type of people belong to a certain cluster. Hence, this study aimed to: (1) identify clusters of dietary patterns among Dutch adults, (2) test the reproducibility of these clusters and stability of cluster membership over time, and (3) identify sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. This study had a longitudinal design with online measurements at baseline (N=483) and 6 months follow-up (N=379). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed, followed by a K-means cluster analysis. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. At baseline and follow-up, a comparable three-cluster solution was derived, distinguishing a healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy dietary pattern. Male and lower educated participants were significantly more likely to have a less healthy dietary pattern. Further, 251 (66.2%) participants remained in the same cluster, 45 (11.9%) participants changed to an unhealthier cluster, and 83 (21.9%) participants shifted to a healthier cluster. Men and people living alone were significantly more likely to shift toward a less healthy dietary pattern. Distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived. Yet, cluster membership is unstable and only few sociodemographic factors were associated with cluster membership and cluster transition. These findings imply that clusters based on dietary intake may not be suitable as a basis for nutrition education interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated clustering procedure for TJ-II experimental signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, N.; Vega, J.; Dormido, R.; Farias, G.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Sanchez, J.; Santos, M.; Pajares, G.

    2006-01-01

    Databases in fusion experiments are made up of thousands of signals. For this reason, data analysis must be simplified by developing automatic mechanisms for fast search and retrieval of specific data in the waveform database. In particular, a method for finding similar waveforms would be very helpful. The term 'similar' implies the use of proximity measurements in order to quantify how close two signals are. In this way, it would be possible to define several categories (clusters) and to classify the waveforms according to them, where this classification can be a starting point for exploratory data analysis in large databases. The clustering process is divided in two stages. The first one is feature extraction, i.e., to choose the set of properties that allow us to encode as much information as possible concerning a signal. The second one establishes the number of clusters according to a proximity measure

  9. Bulgarian clusters under development: Political framework and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankova Yovka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of clusters is not new but nowadays clusters are in a highlight again. Through cluster policies the countries aim at raising their national competitiveness. The paper deals with two objectives - discussion and evaluation of the strategic framework for clusters in Bulgaria and an analysis of the state of Bulgarian clusters. The paper presents briefly general issues concerning the national competitiveness and clusters as being one of the possible instruments to achieve a sustainable competitiveness. The practice of the policy in the EU in the field of clusters is the basis for conclusions about the role of the governments. The second part deals with the strategic framework for the cluster initiatives in Bulgaria and with a selection of indicators about the SMEs and clusters in the country. On this basis a conclusion about the development stage of Bulgarian clusters is derived.

  10. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste, Italy 12Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535, Sotuh Africa 13Physics Department, University of Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535, South Africa 14South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box...IFTy cluster comparison project (Sembolini et al., 2015): a study of the latest state-of- the-art hydrodynamical codes using simulated galaxy clusters as a testbed for theories of galaxy formation. Simulations are indis- pensable tools in the interpretation...

  11. Variable Stars in Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Clusters. II. NGC 1786

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Márcio; Pritzl, Barton J.; De Lee, Nathan; Borissova, Jura

    2012-12-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the variable stars in Large Magellanic Cloud globular clusters. The primary goal of this series is to study how RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to their counterparts in Oosterhoff I/II systems. In this paper, we present the results of our new time-series B-V photometric study of the globular cluster NGC 1786. A total of 65 variable stars were identified in our field of view. These variables include 53 RR Lyraes (27 RRab, 18 RRc, and 8 RRd), 3 classical Cepheids, 1 Type II Cepheid, 1 Anomalous Cepheid, 2 eclipsing binaries, 3 Delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables, and 2 variables of undetermined type. Photometric parameters for these variables are presented. We present physical properties for some of the RR Lyrae stars, derived from Fourier analysis of their light curves. We discuss several different indicators of Oosterhoff type which indicate that the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 1786 is not as clear cut as what is seen in most globular clusters. Based on observations taken with the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium and observations taken at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  12. STAR CLUSTERS IN M31. II. OLD CLUSTER METALLICITIES AND AGES FROM HECTOSPEC DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Rose, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise spectroscopic data on the M31 globular cluster (GC) system, obtained with the Hectospec multifiber spectrograph on the 6.5 m MMT. More than 300 clusters have been observed at a resolution of 5 A and with a median S/N of 75 per A, providing velocities with a median uncertainty of 6 km s -1 . The primary focus of this paper is the determination of mean cluster metallicities, ages, and reddenings. Metallicities were estimated using a calibration of Lick indices with [Fe/H] provided by Galactic GCs. These match well the metallicities of 24 M31 clusters determined from Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams, the differences having an rms of 0.2 dex. The metallicity distribution is not generally bimodal, in strong distinction with the bimodal Galactic globular distribution. Rather, the M31 distribution shows a broad peak, centered at [Fe/H] = -1, possibly with minor peaks at [Fe/H] = -1.4, -0.7, and -0.2, suggesting that the cluster systems of M31 and the Milky Way had different formation histories. Ages for clusters with [Fe/H] > - 1 were determined using the automatic stellar population analysis program EZ A ges. We find no evidence for massive clusters in M31 with intermediate ages, those between 2 and 6 Gyr. Moreover, we find that the mean ages of the old GCs are remarkably constant over about a decade in metallicity (-0.95∼< [Fe/H] ∼<0.0).

  13. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  14. Ca II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. I. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, M. C.; Claria, J. J.; Grocholski, A. J.; Geisler, D.; Sarajedini, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained near-infrared spectra covering the Ca II triplet lines for a large number of stars associated with 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters using the VLT + FORS2. These data compose the largest available sample of SMC clusters with spectroscopically derived abundances and velocities. Our clusters span a wide range of ages and provide good areal coverage of the galaxy. Cluster members are selected using a combination of their positions relative to the cluster center as well as their location in the color-magnitude diagram, abundances, and radial velocities (RVs). We determine mean cluster velocities to typically 2.7 km s -1 and metallicities to 0.05 dex (random errors), from an average of 6.4 members per cluster. By combining our clusters with previously published results, we compile a sample of 25 clusters on a homogeneous metallicity scale and with relatively small metallicity errors, and thereby investigate the metallicity distribution, metallicity gradient, and age-metallicity relation (AMR) of the SMC cluster system. For all 25 clusters in our expanded sample, the mean metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.96 with σ = 0.19. The metallicity distribution may possibly be bimodal, with peaks at ∼-0.9 dex and -1.15 dex. Similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the SMC cluster system gives no indication of a radial metallicity gradient. However, intermediate age SMC clusters are both significantly more metal-poor and have a larger metallicity spread than their LMC counterparts. Our AMR shows evidence for three phases: a very early (>11 Gyr) phase in which the metallicity reached ∼-1.2 dex, a long intermediate phase from ∼10 to 3 Gyr in which the metallicity only slightly increased, and a final phase from 3 to 1 Gyr ago in which the rate of enrichment was substantially faster. We find good overall agreement with the model of Pagel and Tautvaisiene, which assumes a burst of star formation at 4 Gyr. Finally, we find that the mean RV of the cluster system

  15. Planck intermediate results: VIII. Filaments between interacting clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.

    2013-01-01

    of a fraction of these missing baryons between pairs of galaxy clusters. Methods. Cluster pairs are good candidates for searching for the hotter and denser phase of the intergalactic medium (which is more easily observed through the SZ effect). Using an X-ray catalogue of clusters and the Planck data, we...

  16. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE SWIFT/BAT ERA. II. 10 MORE CLUSTERS DETECTED ABOVE 15 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajello, M.; Reimer, O.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are Bullet, A85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters, we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters' emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and A3667), we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law-like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10 -12 erg cm -2 s -1 as detected in previous studies. For A3667, the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT ∼ 13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely a thermal origin.

  17. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Rebusco, P.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cappelluti, N.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Maryland U., Baltimore County; Reimer, O.; /SLAC /Palermo Observ.; Boehringer, H.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; /Palermo Observ.

    2010-10-27

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  18. Fingerprinting dark energy. II. Weak lensing and galaxy clustering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin; Amendola, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of dark energy is a central task of cosmology. To go beyond a cosmological constant, we need to introduce at least an equation of state and a sound speed and consider observational tests that involve perturbations. If dark energy is not completely homogeneous on observable scales, then the Poisson equation is modified and dark matter clustering is directly affected. One can then search for observational effects of dark energy clustering using dark matter as a probe. In this paper we exploit an analytical approximate solution of the perturbation equations in a general dark energy cosmology to analyze the performance of next-decade large-scale surveys in constraining equation of state and sound speed. We find that tomographic weak lensing and galaxy redshift surveys can constrain the sound speed of the dark energy only if the latter is small, of the order of c s < or approx. 0.01 (in units of c). For larger sound speeds the error grows to 100% and more. We conclude that large-scale structure observations contain very little information about the perturbations in canonical scalar field models with a sound speed of unity. Nevertheless, they are able to detect the presence of cold dark energy, i.e. a dark energy with nonrelativistic speed of sound.

  19. The journal of irreproducible results II

    CERN Document Server

    Scherr, George H

    1997-01-01

    Compilation of offbeat science papers from the Journal of Irreproducible Results, including: Emotion in the Rat Face; Foamy Beer; Cooking with Potential Energy; The Large-Cake Cutting Problem; Siamese Twinning in Gummy Bears; much more.

  20. Modelling of Krn+ Clusters. II. Photoabsorption Spectra of Small Clusters (n=2 - 5)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalus, R.; Paidarová, Ivana; Hrivňák, D.; Gadea, F. X.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 298, 1/3 (2004), s. 155-166 ISSN 0301-0104 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/1204 Grant - others:Barrande Program(XE) 2003-024-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : krypton * rare gases * cluster ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.316, year: 2004

  1. Intrinsic alignment in redMaPPer clusters - II. Radial alignment of satellites towards cluster centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Jin; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Freeman, Peter E.; Chen, Yen-Chi; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli

    2018-03-01

    We study the orientations of satellite galaxies in redMaPPer clusters constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at 0.1 measurement methods (re-Gaussianization, de Vaucouleurs, and isophotal shapes), which trace galaxy light profiles at different radii. The measured SA signal depends on these shape measurement methods. We detect the strongest SA signal in isophotal shapes, followed by de Vaucouleurs shapes. While no net SA signal is detected using re-Gaussianization shapes across the entire sample, the observed SA signal reaches a statistically significant level when limiting to a subsample of higher luminosity satellites. We further investigate the impact of noise, systematics, and real physical isophotal twisting effects in the comparison between the SA signal detected via different shape measurement methods. Unlike previous studies, which only consider the dependence of SA on a few parameters, here we explore a total of 17 galaxy and cluster properties, using a statistical model averaging technique to naturally account for parameter correlations and identify significant SA predictors. We find that the measured SA signal is strongest for satellites with the following characteristics: higher luminosity, smaller distance to the cluster centre, rounder in shape, higher bulge fraction, and distributed preferentially along the major axis directions of their centrals. Finally, we provide physical explanations for the identified dependences and discuss the connection to theories of SA.

  2. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  3. Some recent results from CLEO II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kass, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    The CLEO experiment has been operating for several years now collecting e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance (E{sub cm} {approx} 10.6 GeV). The accumulated event sample contains several million B{anti B} and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} pairs. These data are used to explore rare b, c, and {tau} decays. In this report, several recent CLEO results in the area of B-meson and {tau} decay are presented. The topics covered include: penguin decays of B-mesons, measurement of exclusive b {r_arrow} u semileptonic transitions, {tau} decays with an {eta} in the final state, precision measurement of the Michel parameters in leptonic {tau} decay, and a search for lepton number violation using {tau}`s. 39 refs., 26 figs.

  4. XCluSim: a visual analytics tool for interactively comparing multiple clustering results of bioinformatics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Though cluster analysis has become a routine analytic task for bioinformatics research, it is still arduous for researchers to assess the quality of a clustering result. To select the best clustering method and its parameters for a dataset, researchers have to run multiple clustering algorithms and compare them. However, such a comparison task with multiple clustering results is cognitively demanding and laborious. Results In this paper, we present XCluSim, a visual analytics tool that enables users to interactively compare multiple clustering results based on the Visual Information Seeking Mantra. We build a taxonomy for categorizing existing techniques of clustering results visualization in terms of the Gestalt principles of grouping. Using the taxonomy, we choose the most appropriate interactive visualizations for presenting individual clustering results from different types of clustering algorithms. The efficacy of XCluSim is shown through case studies with a bioinformatician. Conclusions Compared to other relevant tools, XCluSim enables users to compare multiple clustering results in a more scalable manner. Moreover, XCluSim supports diverse clustering algorithms and dedicated visualizations and interactions for different types of clustering results, allowing more effective exploration of details on demand. Through case studies with a bioinformatics researcher, we received positive feedback on the functionalities of XCluSim, including its ability to help identify stably clustered items across multiple clustering results. PMID:26328893

  5. First results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Gurnett

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report we present the first results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation. The four Cluster spacecraft were successfully placed in closely spaced, high-inclination eccentric orbits around the Earth during two separate launches in July – August 2000. Each spacecraft includes a wideband plasma wave instrument designed to provide high-resolution electric and magnetic field wave-forms via both stored data and direct downlinks to the NASA Deep Space Network. Results are presented for three commonly occurring magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena: (1 whistlers, (2 chorus, and (3 auroral kilometric radiation. Lightning-generated whistlers are frequently observed when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. Usually the same whistler can be detected by all spacecraft, indicating that the whistler wave packet extends over a spatial dimension at least as large as the separation distances transverse to the magnetic field, which during these observations were a few hundred km. This is what would be expected for nonducted whistler propagation. No case has been found in which a strong whistler was detected at one spacecraft, with no signal at the other spacecraft, which would indicate ducted propagation. Whistler-mode chorus emissions are also observed in the inner region of the magnetosphere. In contrast to lightning-generated whistlers, the individual chorus elements seldom show a one-to-one correspondence between the spacecraft, indicating that a typical chorus wave packet has dimensions transverse to the magnetic field of only a few hundred km or less. In one case where a good one-to-one correspondence existed, significant frequency variations were observed between the spacecraft, indicating that the frequency of the wave packet may be evolving as the wave propagates. Auroral kilometric radiation, which is an intense radio emission generated along the auroral field lines, is frequently observed over the polar regions. The

  6. First results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Gurnett

    Full Text Available In this report we present the first results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation. The four Cluster spacecraft were successfully placed in closely spaced, high-inclination eccentric orbits around the Earth during two separate launches in July – August 2000. Each spacecraft includes a wideband plasma wave instrument designed to provide high-resolution electric and magnetic field wave-forms via both stored data and direct downlinks to the NASA Deep Space Network. Results are presented for three commonly occurring magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena: (1 whistlers, (2 chorus, and (3 auroral kilometric radiation. Lightning-generated whistlers are frequently observed when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. Usually the same whistler can be detected by all spacecraft, indicating that the whistler wave packet extends over a spatial dimension at least as large as the separation distances transverse to the magnetic field, which during these observations were a few hundred km. This is what would be expected for nonducted whistler propagation. No case has been found in which a strong whistler was detected at one spacecraft, with no signal at the other spacecraft, which would indicate ducted propagation. Whistler-mode chorus emissions are also observed in the inner region of the magnetosphere. In contrast to lightning-generated whistlers, the individual chorus elements seldom show a one-to-one correspondence between the spacecraft, indicating that a typical chorus wave packet has dimensions transverse to the magnetic field of only a few hundred km or less. In one case where a good one-to-one correspondence existed, significant frequency variations were observed between the spacecraft, indicating that the frequency of the wave packet may be evolving as the wave propagates. Auroral kilometric radiation, which is an intense radio emission generated along the auroral field lines, is frequently observed over the polar regions. The

  7. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca ii triplet spectroscopy of open clusters. II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R ~ 8000) in the infrared region Ca ii triplet lines (~8500 Å) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca ii lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain ⟨Vr⟩ = 48.6 ± 3.4, -58.4 ± 6.8, 26.0 ± 4.3, and -65.3 ± 3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [ Fe/H ] = -0.25 ± 0.14 and -0.15 ± 0.18 for NGC 559 and NGC 7245, respectively. Berkeley 23 has low metallicity, [ Fe/H ] = -0.42 ± 0.13, which is similar to other open clusters in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. In contrast, we derived high metallicity ([ Fe/H ] = +0.43 ± 0.15) for NGC 6603, which places this system among the most metal-rich known open clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first determination of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for these clusters, except NGC 6603, for which radial velocities had been previously determined. We have also analysed ten stars in the line of sight to King 1. Because of the large dispersion obtained in both radial velocity and metallicity, we cannot be sure that we have sampled true cluster members. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  8. AN UPDATED CATALOG OF M33 CLUSTERS AND CANDIDATES: UBVRI PHOTOMETRY AND SOME STATISTICAL RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jun

    2012-01-01

    We present UBVRI photometry for 392 star clusters and candidates in the field of M33, which are selected from the most recent star cluster catalog. In this catalog, the authors listed star clusters' parameters such as cluster positions, magnitudes, colors in the UBVRIJHK s filters, and so on. However, a large fraction of objects in this catalog do not have previously published photometry. Photometry is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg 2 along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. Positions (right ascension and declination) for some clusters are corrected here. Combined with previous literature, ours constitute a large sample of M33 star clusters. Based on this cluster sample, we present some statistical results: none of the youngest M33 clusters (∼10 7 yr) have masses approaching 10 5 M ☉ ; roughly half the star clusters are consistent with the 10 4 -10 5 M ☉ mass models; the continuous distribution of star clusters along the model line indicates that M33 star clusters have been formed continuously from the epoch of the first star cluster formation until recent times; and there are ∼50 star clusters which are overlapped with the Galactic globular clusters on the color-color diagram, and these clusters are old globular cluster candidates in M33.

  9. Quantum dynamics of small H2 and D2 clusters in the large cage of structure II clathrate hydrate: Energetics, occupancy, and vibrationally averaged cluster structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastianelli, Francesco; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko

    2008-12-01

    We report diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations of the quantum translation-rotation (T-R) dynamics of one to five para-H2 (p-H2) and ortho-D2 (o-D2) molecules inside the large hexakaidecahedral (51264) cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate, which was taken to be rigid. These calculations provide a quantitative description of the size evolution of the ground-state properties, energetics, and the vibrationally averaged geometries, of small (p-H2)n and (o-D2)n clusters, n=1-5, in nanoconfinement. The zero-point energy (ZPE) of the T-R motions rises steeply with the cluster size, reaching 74% of the potential well depth for the caged (p-H2)4. At low temperatures, the rapid increase of the cluster ZPE as a function of n is the main factor that limits the occupancy of the large cage to at most four H2 or D2 molecules, in agreement with experiments. Our DMC results concerning the vibrationally averaged spatial distribution of four D2 molecules, their mean distance from the cage center, the D2-D2 separation, and the specific orientation and localization of the tetrahedral (D2)4 cluster relative to the framework of the large cage, agree very well with the low-temperature neutron diffraction experiments involving the large cage with the quadruple D2 occupancy.

  10. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. THE EFFECTS OF CLUSTER SIZE AND DYNAMICAL STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that magnetic fields from radio jets and lobes powered by their central super massive black holes can be an important source of magnetic fields in the galaxy clusters. This is Paper II in a series of studies where we present self-consistent high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus. We studied 12 different galaxy clusters with virial masses ranging from 1 x 10 14 to 2 x 10 15 M sun . In this work, we examine the effects of the mass and merger history on the final magnetic properties. We find that the evolution of magnetic fields is qualitatively similar to those of previous studies. In most clusters, the injected magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence during the cluster formation process with hierarchical mergers, while the amplification history and the magnetic field distribution depend on the cluster formation and magnetism history. This can be very different for different clusters. The total magnetic energies in these clusters are between 4 x 10 57 and 10 61 erg, which is mainly decided by the cluster mass, scaling approximately with the square of the total mass. Dynamically older relaxed clusters usually have more magnetic fields in their ICM. The dynamically very young clusters may be magnetized weakly since there is not enough time for magnetic fields to be amplified.

  11. Overview of TJ-II flexible heliac results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascasibar, E. E-mail: enrique.ascasibar@ciemat.es; Alejaldre, C.; Alonso, J.; Almoguera, L.; Baciero, A.; Balbin, R.; Blaumoser, M.; Botija, J.; Branas, B.; Cal, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Castellano, J.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Cepero, J.R.; Cremy, C.; Doncel, J.; Eguilior, S.; Estrada, T.; Fernandez, A.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, J.A.; Kirpitchev, I.; Krivenski, V.; Labrador, I.; Lapayese, F.; Likin, K.; Liniers, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.; Luna, E. de la; Martin, R.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Medrano, M.; Mendez, P.; McCarthy, K.J.; Medina, F.; Milligen, B. van; Ochando, M.; Pacios, L.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Pena, A. de la; Portas, A.; Qin, J.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Romero, J.; Salas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Tabares, F.; Tafalla, D.; Tribaldos, V.; Vega, J.; Zurro, B

    2001-10-01

    The TJ-II is a four period, low magnetic shear stellarator, with high degree of configuration flexibility (rotational transform from 0.9 to 2.5) which has been operating in Madrid since 1998 (R=1.5 m, a<0.22 m, B{sub 0}=1 T, P{sub ECRH}{<=}600 kW, P{sub NBI}{<=}3 MW under installation). This paper reviews the main technical aspects of the TJ-II heliac as well as the principal physics results obtained in the most recent TJ-II experimental campaign carried out in 2000.

  12. Overview of TJ-II flexible heliac results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascasibar, E.; Alejaldre, C.; Alonso, J.; Almoguera, L.; Baciero, A.; Balbin, R.; Blaumoser, M.; Botija, J.; Branas, B.; Cal, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Castellano, J.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Cepero, J.R.; Cremy, C.; Doncel, J.; Eguilior, S.; Estrada, T.; Fernandez, A.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, J.A.; Kirpitchev, I.; Krivenski, V.; Labrador, I.; Lapayese, F.; Likin, K.; Liniers, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.; Luna, E. de la; Martin, R.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Medrano, M.; Mendez, P.; McCarthy, K.J.; Medina, F.; Milligen, B. van; Ochando, M.; Pacios, L.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Pena, A. de la; Portas, A.; Qin, J.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Romero, J.; Salas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Tabares, F.; Tafalla, D.; Tribaldos, V.; Vega, J.; Zurro, B.

    2001-01-01

    The TJ-II is a four period, low magnetic shear stellarator, with high degree of configuration flexibility (rotational transform from 0.9 to 2.5) which has been operating in Madrid since 1998 (R=1.5 m, a 0 =1 T, P ECRH ≤600 kW, P NBI ≤3 MW under installation). This paper reviews the main technical aspects of the TJ-II heliac as well as the principal physics results obtained in the most recent TJ-II experimental campaign carried out in 2000

  13. The statistics of foreshock cavities: results of a Cluster survey

    OpenAIRE

    L. Billingham; S. J. Schwartz; D. G. Sibeck

    2008-01-01

    We use Cluster magnetic field, thermal ion, and energetic particle observations upstream of the Earth's bow shock to investigate the occurrence patterns of foreshock cavities. Such cavities are thought to form when bundles of magnetic field connect to the quasi-parallel bow shock. Shock-processed suprathermal ions can then stream along the field, back against the flow of the solar wind. These suprathermals enhance the pressure on shock-connected field lines causing them to expand into th...

  14. PEP-II design update and R ampersand D results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the present status of the PEP-II asymmetric β factory design undertaken by SLAC, LBL, and LLNL. Design optimization during the past year and changes from the original CDR design are described. R ampersand D activities have focused primarily on the key technology areas of vacuum, RF, and feedback system design. Recent progress in these areas is described. The R ampersand D results have verified our design assumptions and provide further confidence in the design of PEP-II

  15. Subaru Weak-Lensing Survey II: Multi-Object Spectroscopy and Cluster Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamana, Takashi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ellis, Richard S.; Massey, Richard J.; Refregier, Alexandre; Taylor, James E.

    2009-08-01

    We present the first results of a multi-object spectroscopic campaign to follow up cluster candidates located via weak lensing. Our main goals are to search for spatial concentrations of galaxies that are plausible optical counterparts of the weak-lensing signals, and to determine the cluster redshifts from those of member galaxies. Around each of 36 targeted cluster candidates, we obtained 15-32 galaxy redshifts. For 28 of these targets, we confirmed a secure cluster identification, with more than five spectroscopic galaxies within a velocity of ±3000km s-1. This includes three cases where two clusters at different redshifts are projected along the same line-of-sight. In 6 of the 8 unconfirmed targets, we found multiple small galaxy concentrations at different redshifts, each containing at least three spectroscopic galaxies. The weak-lensing signal around those systems was thus probably created by the projection of groups or small clusters along the same line-of-sight. In both of the remaining two targets, a single small galaxy concentration was found. In some candidate super-cluster systems, we found additional evidence of filaments connecting the main density peak to an additional nearby structure. For a subsample of our most cleanly measured clusters, we investigated the statistical relation between their weak-lensing mass (MNFW, σSIS) and the velocity dispersion of their member galaxies (σv), comparing our sample with optically and X-ray selected samples from the literature. Our lensing-selected clusters are consistent with σv = σSIS, with a similar scatter to that of optically and X-ray selected clusters. We also derived an empirical relation between the cluster mass and the galaxy velocity dispersion, M200E(z) = 11.0 × 1014 × (σv/1000km s-1)3.0 h-1 Modot, which is in reasonable agreement with predictions of N-body simulations in the Λ CDM cosmology.

  16. Selected results from the Mark II at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharre, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    Recent results on radiative transitions from the psi(3095), charmed meson decay, and the Cabibbo-suppressed decay tau → K* ν/sub tau/ are reviewed. The results come primarily from the Mark II experiment at SPEAR, but preliminary results from the Crystal Ball experiment on psi radiative transitions are also discussed

  17. Topology in two dimensions. II - The Abell and ACO cluster catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plionis, Manolis; Valdarnini, Riccardo; Coles, Peter

    1992-09-01

    We apply a method for quantifying the topology of projected galaxy clustering to the Abell and ACO catalogues of rich clusters. We use numerical simulations to quantify the statistical bias involved in using high peaks to define the large-scale structure, and we use the results obtained to correct our observational determinations for this known selection effect and also for possible errors introduced by boundary effects. We find that the Abell cluster sample is consistent with clusters being identified with high peaks of a Gaussian random field, but that the ACO shows a slight meatball shift away from the Gaussian behavior over and above that expected purely from the high-peak selection. The most conservative explanation of this effect is that it is caused by some artefact of the procedure used to select the clusters in the two samples.

  18. Improving the distinguishable cluster results: spin-component scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    The spin-component scaling is employed in the energy evaluation to improve the distinguishable cluster approach. SCS-DCSD reaction energies reproduce reference values with a root-mean-squared deviation well below 1 kcal/mol, the interaction energies are three to five times more accurate than DCSD, and molecular systems with a large amount of static electron correlation are still described reasonably well. SCS-DCSD represents a pragmatic approach to achieve chemical accuracy with a simple method without triples, which can also be applied to multi-configurational molecular systems.

  19. Randomised trial on episodic cluster headache with an angiotensin II receptor blocker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronvik, Erling; Wienecke, Troels; Monstad, Inge

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the angiotensin II receptor antagonist candesartan as prophylactic medication in patients with episodic cluster headache. METHODS: This study comprised a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-designed trial performed in seven cen...... the candesartan and placebo group was not significant with the pre-planned non-parametric ranking test, but a post-hoc exact Poisson test, which takes into account the temporal properties of the data, revealed a significant result ( P  ...... (primary efficacy variable) during the three-week treatment period was reduced from 14.3 ± 9.2 attacks in week 1 to 5.6 ± 7.0 attacks in week 3 (-61%) in the candesartan group and from 16.8 ± 14.1 attacks in week 1 to 10.5 ± 11.3 attacks in week 3 (-38%) in the placebo group. The difference between...

  20. The statistics of foreshock cavities: results of a Cluster survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Billingham

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We use Cluster magnetic field, thermal ion, and energetic particle observations upstream of the Earth's bow shock to investigate the occurrence patterns of foreshock cavities. Such cavities are thought to form when bundles of magnetic field connect to the quasi-parallel bow shock. Shock-processed suprathermal ions can then stream along the field, back against the flow of the solar wind. These suprathermals enhance the pressure on shock-connected field lines causing them to expand into the surrounding ambient solar wind plasma. Foreshock cavities exhibit depressions in magnetic field magnitude and thermal ion density, associated with enhanced fluxes of energetic ions. We find typical cavity duration to be few minutes with interior densities and magnetic field magnitudes dropping to ~60% of those in the surrounding solar wind. Cavities are found to occur preferentially in fast, moderate magnetic field strength solar wind streams. Cavities are observed in all parts of the Cluster orbit upstream of the bow shock. When localised in a coordinate system organised by the underlying physical processes in the foreshock, there is a systematic change in foreshock cavity location with IMF cone angle. At low (high cone angles foreshock cavities are observed outside (inside the expected upstream boundary of the intermediate ion foreshock.

  1. The statistics of foreshock cavities: results of a Cluster survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Billingham

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We use Cluster magnetic field, thermal ion, and energetic particle observations upstream of the Earth's bow shock to investigate the occurrence patterns of foreshock cavities. Such cavities are thought to form when bundles of magnetic field connect to the quasi-parallel bow shock. Shock-processed suprathermal ions can then stream along the field, back against the flow of the solar wind. These suprathermals enhance the pressure on shock-connected field lines causing them to expand into the surrounding ambient solar wind plasma. Foreshock cavities exhibit depressions in magnetic field magnitude and thermal ion density, associated with enhanced fluxes of energetic ions. We find typical cavity duration to be few minutes with interior densities and magnetic field magnitudes dropping to ~60% of those in the surrounding solar wind. Cavities are found to occur preferentially in fast, moderate magnetic field strength solar wind streams. Cavities are observed in all parts of the Cluster orbit upstream of the bow shock. When localised in a coordinate system organised by the underlying physical processes in the foreshock, there is a systematic change in foreshock cavity location with IMF cone angle. At low (high cone angles foreshock cavities are observed outside (inside the expected upstream boundary of the intermediate ion foreshock.

  2. Review of recent LHCb results and prospects for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, A

    2015-01-01

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  3. Review of recent LHCb results and expectations for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, Adlene

    2016-01-01

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  4. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  5. The Structure of the Young Star Cluster NGC 6231. II. Structure, Formation, and Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Sills, Alison; Gromadzki, Mariusz; Medina, Nicolás; Borissova, Jordanka; Kurtev, Radostin

    2017-12-01

    The young cluster NGC 6231 (stellar ages ˜2-7 Myr) is observed shortly after star formation activity has ceased. Using the catalog of 2148 probable cluster members obtained from Chandra, VVV, and optical surveys (Paper I), we examine the cluster’s spatial structure and dynamical state. The spatial distribution of stars is remarkably well fit by an isothermal sphere with moderate elongation, while other commonly used models like Plummer spheres, multivariate normal distributions, or power-law models are poor fits. The cluster has a core radius of 1.2 ± 0.1 pc and a central density of ˜200 stars pc-3. The distribution of stars is mildly mass segregated. However, there is no radial stratification of the stars by age. Although most of the stars belong to a single cluster, a small subcluster of stars is found superimposed on the main cluster, and there are clumpy non-isotropic distributions of stars outside ˜4 core radii. When the size, mass, and age of NGC 6231 are compared to other young star clusters and subclusters in nearby active star-forming regions, it lies at the high-mass end of the distribution but along the same trend line. This could result from similar formation processes, possibly hierarchical cluster assembly. We argue that NGC 6231 has expanded from its initial size but that it remains gravitationally bound.

  6. Structural insights into the light-driven auto-assembly process of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5-cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Bommer, Martin; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hussein, Rana; Yano, Junko; Dau, Holger; Kern, Jan; Dobbek, Holger; Zouni, Athina

    2017-07-18

    In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven splitting of water at a protein-bound Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster, the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). In the photosynthetic organisms, the light-driven formation of the WOC from dissolved metal ions is a key process because it is essential in both initial activation and continuous repair of PSII. Structural information is required for understanding of this chaperone-free metal-cluster assembly. For the first time, we obtained a structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus without the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. Surprisingly, cluster-removal leaves the positions of all coordinating amino acid residues and most nearby water molecules largely unaffected, resulting in a pre-organized ligand shell for kinetically competent and error-free photo-assembly of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. First experiments initiating (i) partial disassembly and (ii) partial re-assembly after complete depletion of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster agree with a specific bi-manganese cluster, likely a di-µ-oxo bridged pair of Mn(III) ions, as an assembly intermediate.

  7. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Results and insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the recently completed EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1. 6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The probability of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquake) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 . overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double, vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  8. Clusters of galaxies as tools in observational cosmology : results from x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weratschnig, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. They can be used as ideal tools to study large scale structure formation (e.g. when studying merger clusters) and provide highly interesting environments to analyse several characteristic interaction processes (like ram pressure stripping of galaxies, magnetic fields). In this dissertation thesis, we have studied several clusters of galaxies using X-ray observations. To obtain scientific results, we have applied different data reduction and analysis methods. With a combination of morphological and spectral analysis, the merger cluster Abell 514 was studied in much detail. It has a highly interesting morphology and shows signs for an ongoing merger as well as a shock. using a new method to detect substructure, we have analysed several clusters to determine whether any substructure is present in the X-ray image. This hints towards a real structure in the distribution of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and is evidence for ongoing mergers. The results from this analysis are extensively used with the cluster of galaxies Abell S1136. Here, we study the ICM distribution and compare its structure with the spatial distribution of star forming galaxies. Cluster magnetic fields are another important topic of my thesis. They can be studied in Radio observations, which can be put into relation with results from X-ray observations. using observational data from several clusters, we could support the theory that cluster magnetic fields are frozen into the ICM. (author)

  9. The globular cluster system of NGC 1316. II. The extraordinary object SH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtler, T.; Kumar, B.; Bassino, L. P.; Dirsch, B.; Romanowsky, A. J.

    2012-07-01

    Context. SH2 has been described as an isolated HII-region, located about 6.5' south of the nucleus of NGC 1316 (Fornax A), a merger remnant in the the outskirts of the Fornax cluster of galaxies. Aims: We give a first, preliminary description of the stellar content and environment of this remarkable object. Methods: We used photometric data in the Washington system and HST photometry from the Hubble Legacy Archive for a morphological description and preliminary aperture photometry. Low-resolution spectroscopy provides radial velocities of the brightest star cluster in SH2 and a nearby intermediate-age cluster. Results: SH2 is not a normal HII-region, ionized by very young stars. It contains a multitude of star clusters with ages of approximately 108 yr. A ring-like morphology is striking. SH2 seems to be connected to an intermediate-age massive globular cluster with a similar radial velocity, which itself is the main object of a group of fainter clusters. Metallicity estimates from emission lines remain ambiguous. Conclusions: The present data do not yet allow firm conclusions about the nature or origin of SH2. It might be a dwarf galaxy that has experienced a burst of extremely clustered star formation. We may witness how globular clusters are donated to a parent galaxy. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under the programmes 082.B-0680, on observations taken at the Interamerican Observatory, Cerro Tololo, Chile. Furthermore based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST, PI: A. Sandage, Prop.ID: 7504), and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

  10. Weighing galaxy clusters with gas. II. On the origin of hydrostatic mass bias in ΛCDM galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Yu, Liang; Lau, Erwin T.; Rudd, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of galaxy clusters as cosmological probes hinges on our ability to measure their masses accurately and with high precision. Hydrostatic mass is one of the most common methods for estimating the masses of individual galaxy clusters, which suffer from biases due to departures from hydrostatic equilibrium. Using a large, mass-limited sample of massive galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, in this work we show that in addition to turbulent and bulk gas velocities, acceleration of gas introduces biases in the hydrostatic mass estimate of galaxy clusters. In unrelaxed clusters, the acceleration bias is comparable to the bias due to non-thermal pressure associated with merger-induced turbulent and bulk gas motions. In relaxed clusters, the mean mass bias due to acceleration is small (≲ 3%), but the scatter in the mass bias can be reduced by accounting for gas acceleration. Additionally, this acceleration bias is greater in the outskirts of higher redshift clusters where mergers are more frequent and clusters are accreting more rapidly. Since gas acceleration cannot be observed directly, it introduces an irreducible bias for hydrostatic mass estimates. This acceleration bias places limits on how well we can recover cluster masses from future X-ray and microwave observations. We discuss implications for cluster mass estimates based on X-ray, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and gravitational lensing observations and their impact on cluster cosmology.

  11. Some first results from the mark II at SPEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, G S; Blocker, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, Martin; Broll, C.H.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, William; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Couchman, B.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Fischer, H.G.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Himel, T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, Walter R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, Alfred D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, Rudolf R.; Longo, Michael J.; Luke, D.; Luth, V.; Martin, J.F.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, Martin L.; Richter, Burton; Russell, J.J.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.; Shannon, S.; Siegrist, J.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Telnov, Valery I.; Tonutti, M.; Trilling, G.; Vella, E.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.; Zaccone, H.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary results are given from the Mark II experiment at SPEAR on radiative decays of the psi '(3684) and on inclusive baryon production from 3.67 to 7.4 GeV center-of-mass energy. A 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.12% is given for BR( psi ' to gamma eta /sub c/' (3455))*BR( eta /sub c/'(3455 to gamma psi )). (10 refs).

  12. ATCA observations of the MACS-Planck Radio Halo Cluster Project. II. Radio observations of an intermediate redshift cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Aviles, G.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Ferrari, C.; Venturi, T.; Democles, J.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Arnaud, M.; Aghanim, N.; Brown, S.; Douspis, M.; Hurier, J.; Intema, H. T.; Langer, M.; Macario, G.; Pointecouteau, E.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources whose origins are investigated through multi-wavelength studies of cluster samples. We investigate the presence of diffuse radio emission in a sample of seven galaxy clusters in the largely unexplored intermediate redshift range (0.3 http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A94

  13. PROSID - a program to evaluate SIMMER-II results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flad, M.; Kuefner, K.; Maschek, W.

    1990-02-01

    The PROSID program supports the evaluation of SIMMER-II results. PROSID enables the user to get a printout of variables, to get a linear combination of variables or quadrats of variables, to sum up variables or quadrats of variables, to compare variables or whole datasets, to interpolate to a new meshgrid and to get weighted mean values. As special options are available the calculation of the volume of connected gas regions, the evaluation of the fuel enrichment, an estimation of reactivity changes and the retransformation of interpolated velocity values. The results can be stored for further evaluations. (orig.) [de

  14. Results of tests with open fuel in KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, G.

    1987-03-01

    For the operation of Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors with cladding failures the consequences of increased contamination by fission products and fuel and the possibility of failure propagation to adjacent fuel pins due to fuel swelling have to be envisaged. To clarify some of these problems a KNK II test program involving open fuel was defined with the first experiments of this program being performed between October 1981 and May 1984. After the description of the test equipment and of the test program, the results will be presented on delayed neutron measurements, fission gas measurements and post irradiation examinations. The report will conclude with a discussion of the results [de

  15. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters II. Sersic 159-03

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    In a series of papers we investigate far-infrared emission from rich galaxy clusters. Maps have been obtained by ISO at 60 mu m, 100 mu m, 135 mu m, and 200 mu m using the PHT-C camera. Ground based imaging and spectroscopy were also acquired. Here we present the results for the cooling flow...

  16. The Electron Drift Instrument on Cluster: overview of first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Paschmann

    Full Text Available EDI measures the drift velocity of artificially injected electron beams. From this drift velocity, the perpendicular electric field and the local magnetic field gradients can be deduced when employing different electron energies. The technique requires the injection of two electron beams at right angles to the magnetic field and the search for those directions within the plane that return the beams to their associated detectors after one or more gyrations. The drift velocity is then derived from the directions of the two beams and/or from the difference in their times-of-flight, measured via amplitude-modulation and coding of the emitted electron beams and correlation with the signal from the returning electrons. After careful adjustment of the control parameters, the beam recognition algorithms, and the onboard magnetometer calibrations during the commissioning phase, EDI is providing excellent data over a wide range of conditions. In this paper, we present first results in a variety of regions ranging from the polar cap, across the magnetopause, and well into the magnetosheath.

    Key words. Electron drift velocity (electric fields; plasma convection; instruments and techniques

  17. Origins of ultra-diffuse galaxies in the Coma cluster - II. Constraints from their stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Alabi, Adebusola; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean; Pandya, Viraj; Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Bellstedt, Sabine; Wasserman, Asher; Stone, Maria B.; Okabe, Nobuhiro

    2018-06-01

    In this second paper of the series we study, with new Keck/DEIMOS spectra, the stellar populations of seven spectroscopically confirmed ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma cluster. We find intermediate to old ages (˜ 7 Gyr), low metallicities ([Z/H]˜ - 0.7 dex) and mostly super-solar abundance patterns ([Mg/Fe] ˜ 0.13 dex). These properties are similar to those of low-luminosity (dwarf) galaxies inhabiting the same area in the cluster and are mostly consistent with being the continuity of the stellar mass scaling relations of more massive galaxies. These UDGs' star formation histories imply a relatively recent infall into the Coma cluster, consistent with the theoretical predictions for a dwarf-like origin. However, considering the scatter in the resulting properties and including other UDGs in Coma, together with the results from the velocity phase-space study of the Paper I in this series, a mixed-bag of origins is needed to explain the nature of all UDGs. Our results thus reinforce a scenario in which many UDGs are field dwarfs that become quenched through their later infall onto cluster environments, whereas some UDGs could be be genuine primordial galaxies that failed to develop due to an early quenching phase. The unknown proportion of dwarf-like to primordial-like UDGs leaves the enigma of the nature of UDGs still open.

  18. CA II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. III. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF 14 CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Marcionni, N. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grocholski, A. J., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: nmarcionni@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: svillanova@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s{sup −1}, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at −1.1 and −0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age–metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  19. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  20. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  1. OSO 8 X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies. II - Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. W.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An observational description of X-ray clusters of galaxies is given based on OSO 8 X-ray results for spatially integrated spectra of 20 such clusters and various correlations obtained from these results. It is found from a correlation between temperature and velocity dispersion that the X-ray core radius should be less than the galaxy core radius or, alternatively, that the polytropic index is about 1.1 for most of the 20 clusters. Analysis of a correlation between temperature and emission integral yields evidence that more massive clusters accumulate a larger fraction of their mass as intracluster gas. Galaxy densities and optical morphology, as they correlate with X-ray properties, are reexamined for indications as to how mass injection by galaxies affects the density structure of the gas. The physical arguments used to derive iron abundances from observed equivalent widths of iron line features in X-ray spectra are critically evaluated, and the associated uncertainties in abundances derived in this manner are estimated to be quite large.

  2. The cluster burn up programme CCC and a comparison of its results with NPD experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.

    1976-10-01

    A brief description is given of the computer programme CCC, which can be used for rod/rod cluster burn up calculations. A comparison of CCC results with some Canadian measurements on NPD fuel is also included. (author)

  3. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  4. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, P. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Telles, E. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua Jose Cristino, 77, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Nigoche-Netro, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA), Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Carrasco, E. R., E-mail: plagos@astro.up.pt, E-mail: etelles@on.br, E-mail: nigoche@iaa.es, E-mail: rcarrasco@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory/AURA, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  5. THE FATE OF DWARF GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AND THE ORIGIN OF INTRACLUSTER STARS. II. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Hugo [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Barai, Paramita [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Brito, William [Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Quebec, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-09-20

    We combine an N-body simulation algorithm with a subgrid treatment of galaxy formation, mergers, and tidal destruction, and an observed conditional luminosity function {Phi}(L|M), to study the origin and evolution of galactic and extragalactic light inside a cosmological volume of size (100 Mpc){sup 3}, in a concordance {Lambda}CDM model. This algorithm simulates the growth of large-scale structures and the formation of clusters, the evolution of the galaxy population in clusters, the destruction of galaxies by mergers and tides, and the evolution of the intracluster light (ICL). We find that destruction of galaxies by mergers dominates over destruction by tides by about an order of magnitude at all redshifts. However, tidal destruction is sufficient to produce ICL fractions f{sub ICL} that are sufficiently high to match observations. Our simulation produces 18 massive clusters (M{sub cl} > 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) with values of f{sub ICL} ranging from 1% to 58% at z = 0. There is a weak trend of f{sub ICL} to increase with cluster mass. The bulk of the ICL ({approx}60%) is provided by intermediate galaxies of total masses 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} and stellar masses 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} that were tidally destroyed by even more massive galaxies. The contribution of low-mass galaxies to the ICL is small and the contribution of dwarf galaxies is negligible, even though, by numbers, most galaxies that are tidally destroyed are dwarfs. Tracking clusters back in time, we find that their values of f{sub ICL} tend to increase over time, but can experience sudden changes that are sometimes non-monotonic. These changes occur during major mergers involving clusters of comparable masses but very different intracluster luminosities. Most of the tidal destruction events take place in the central regions of clusters. As a result, the ICL is more centrally concentrated than the galactic light. Our results

  6. THE FATE OF DWARF GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AND THE ORIGIN OF INTRACLUSTER STARS. II. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Hugo; Barai, Paramita; Brito, William

    2012-01-01

    We combine an N-body simulation algorithm with a subgrid treatment of galaxy formation, mergers, and tidal destruction, and an observed conditional luminosity function Φ(L|M), to study the origin and evolution of galactic and extragalactic light inside a cosmological volume of size (100 Mpc) 3 , in a concordance ΛCDM model. This algorithm simulates the growth of large-scale structures and the formation of clusters, the evolution of the galaxy population in clusters, the destruction of galaxies by mergers and tides, and the evolution of the intracluster light (ICL). We find that destruction of galaxies by mergers dominates over destruction by tides by about an order of magnitude at all redshifts. However, tidal destruction is sufficient to produce ICL fractions f ICL that are sufficiently high to match observations. Our simulation produces 18 massive clusters (M cl > 10 14 M ☉ ) with values of f ICL ranging from 1% to 58% at z = 0. There is a weak trend of f ICL to increase with cluster mass. The bulk of the ICL (∼60%) is provided by intermediate galaxies of total masses 10 11 -10 12 M ☉ and stellar masses 6 × 10 8 M ☉ to 3 × 10 10 M ☉ that were tidally destroyed by even more massive galaxies. The contribution of low-mass galaxies to the ICL is small and the contribution of dwarf galaxies is negligible, even though, by numbers, most galaxies that are tidally destroyed are dwarfs. Tracking clusters back in time, we find that their values of f ICL tend to increase over time, but can experience sudden changes that are sometimes non-monotonic. These changes occur during major mergers involving clusters of comparable masses but very different intracluster luminosities. Most of the tidal destruction events take place in the central regions of clusters. As a result, the ICL is more centrally concentrated than the galactic light. Our results support tidal destruction of intermediate-mass galaxies as a plausible scenario for the origin of the ICL.

  7. The W40 region in the gould belt: An embedded cluster and H II region at the junction of filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Kumar, M. S. N. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 s/n Porto (Portugal); Bachiller, Rafael [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Samal, M. R. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille), UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Pirogov, L., E-mail: kshitiz@tifr.res.in [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Uljanov str., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 μm H{sub 2} narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ∼34' × 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pc—matching well with the extent of radio emission—with a peak density of 650 pc{sup –2}. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass—126 M {sub ☉} and 71 M {sub ☉} for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H{sub 2} narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)—followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even

  8. A semantics-based method for clustering of Chinese web search results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Deqing; Wang, Li; Bi, Zhuming; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Information explosion is a critical challenge to the development of modern information systems. In particular, when the application of an information system is over the Internet, the amount of information over the web has been increasing exponentially and rapidly. Search engines, such as Google and Baidu, are essential tools for people to find the information from the Internet. Valuable information, however, is still likely submerged in the ocean of search results from those tools. By clustering the results into different groups based on subjects automatically, a search engine with the clustering feature allows users to select most relevant results quickly. In this paper, we propose an online semantics-based method to cluster Chinese web search results. First, we employ the generalised suffix tree to extract the longest common substrings (LCSs) from search snippets. Second, we use the HowNet to calculate the similarities of the words derived from the LCSs, and extract the most representative features by constructing the vocabulary chain. Third, we construct a vector of text features and calculate snippets' semantic similarities. Finally, we improve the Chameleon algorithm to cluster snippets. Extensive experimental results have shown that the proposed algorithm has outperformed over the suffix tree clustering method and other traditional clustering methods.

  9. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  10. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  11. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - Young clusters in H II regions of M83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, R.C.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, J.K.; Stecher, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    UV images of M83 at 1540 and 2360 A reveal 18 compact sources that are associated with H II regions. E(B - V) values were estimated individually from the observed UV and optical colors and the Galactic UV extinction curve, using theoretical flux distributions. The dereddened colors are consistent with ages up to 3 x 10 to the 6th yr. A maximum possible age of 6.5 x 10 to the 6th yr is obtained assuming foreground reddening only. The distribution of observed colors is consistent with the Galactic reddening curve but not with enhanced far-UV extinction, as in the LMC 30 Dor curve. The H-alpha fluxes suggest either that dust within the H II regions absorbs up to 70 percent of the Lyman continuum radiation or that a similar fraction of the H-alpha flux is below the surface brightness detection limit. Cluster mass estimates depend on the range of stellar masses present but are probably in the range 10,000-100,000 solar masses. 25 refs

  12. Measuring age differences among globular clusters having similar metallicities - A new method and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, D.A.; Bolte, M.; Stetson, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    A color-difference technique for estimating the relative ages of globular clusters with similar chemical compositions on the basis of their CM diagrams is described and demonstrated. The theoretical basis and implementation of the procedure are explained, and results for groups of globular clusters with m/H = about -2, -1.6, and -1.3, and for two special cases (Palomar 12 and NGC 5139) are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that the more metal-deficient globular clusters are nearly coeval (differences less than 0.5 Gyr), whereas the most metal-rich globular clusters exhibit significant age differences (about 2 Gyr). This result is shown to contradict Galactic evolution models postulating halo collapse in less than a few times 100 Myr. 77 refs

  13. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  14. First results on the GOL-3-II facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agafonov, M.A.; Arzhannikov, A.V.; Astrelin, V.T.

    1996-01-01

    The first experiments on injection of 8-s, 200-kJ GOL-3-II relativistic electron beam into a plasma are reported. The possibility of a macroscopically stable beam transport through a plasma column 12 m long under the conditions of the developed plasma microturbulence is demonstrated. As a result of collective beam-plasma interaction the effective heating of a dense plasma (∼ 1015 cm -3 ) is observed. According to the data from Thomson scattering the plasma electrons are heated up to the temperature of ∼ 1 keV, the beam energy loss reaching 25-30 %. Putting the facility into operation opens up prospects to carry out the experiments with a dense and hot plasma in a multimirror trap. (J.U.). 4 figs., 10 refs

  15. The Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey II - Planetary Nebulae kinematics within 200 kpc of the cluster core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiniello, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Arnaboldi, M.; Tortora, C.; Coccato, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Gerhard, O.; Iodice, E.; Spavone, M.; Cantiello, M.; Peletier, R.; Paolillo, M.; Schipani, P.

    2018-06-01

    We present the largest and most spatially extended planetary nebulae (PNe) catalogue ever obtained for the Fornax cluster. We measured velocities of 1452 PNe out to 200 kpc in the cluster core using a counter-dispersed slitless spectroscopic technique with data from FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). With such an extended spatial coverage, we can study separately the stellar haloes of some of the cluster main galaxies and the intracluster light. In this second paper of the Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey, we identify and classify the emission-line sources, describe the method to select PNe, and calculate their coordinates and velocities from the dispersed slitless images. From the PN 2D velocity map, we identify stellar streams that are possibly tracing the gravitational interaction of NGC 1399 with NGC 1404 and NGC 1387. We also present the velocity dispersion profile out to ˜200 kpc radii, which shows signatures of a superposition of the bright central galaxy and the cluster potential, with the latter clearly dominating the regions outside R ˜ 1000 arcsec (˜100 kpc).

  16. The Centaurus cluster of galaxies. II. The bimodal-velocity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, J.R.; Currie, M.J.; Dickens, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series that describes an extensive study of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The paper concerns the bimodal velocity distribution of the galaxies in the cluster. The likely location of the two main cluster components is discussed. The data strongly favours the hypothesis that the two components lie within the same cluster. (UK)

  17. Testing lowered isothermal models with direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - II. Multimass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuten, M.; Zocchi, A.; Gieles, M.; Hénault-Brunet, V.

    2017-09-01

    Lowered isothermal models, such as the multimass Michie-King models, have been successful in describing observational data of globular clusters. In this study, we assess whether such models are able to describe the phase space properties of evolutionary N-body models. We compare the multimass models as implemented in limepy (Gieles & Zocchi) to N-body models of star clusters with different retention fractions for the black holes and neutron stars evolving in a tidal field. We find that multimass models successfully reproduce the density and velocity dispersion profiles of the different mass components in all evolutionary phases and for different remnants retention. We further use these results to study the evolution of global model parameters. We find that over the lifetime of clusters, radial anisotropy gradually evolves from the low- to the high-mass components and we identify features in the properties of observable stars that are indicative of the presence of stellar-mass black holes. We find that the model velocity scale depends on mass as m-δ, with δ ≃ 0.5 for almost all models, but the dependence of central velocity dispersion on m can be shallower, depending on the dark remnant content, and agrees well with that of the N-body models. The reported model parameters, and correlations amongst them, can be used as theoretical priors when fitting these types of mass models to observational data.

  18. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models - II. Galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-04-01

    We study the z = 0 properties of clusters (and large groups) of galaxies within the context of interacting and non-interacting quintessence cosmological models, using a series of adiabatic SPH simulations. Initially, we examine the average properties of groups and clusters, quantifying their differences in ΛCold Dark Matter (ΛCDM), uncoupled Dark Energy (uDE) and coupled Dark Energy (cDE) cosmologies. In particular, we focus upon radial profiles of the gas density, temperature and pressure, and we also investigate how the standard hydrodynamic equilibrium hypothesis holds in quintessence cosmologies. While we are able to confirm previous results about the distribution of baryons, we also find that the main discrepancy (with differences up to 20 per cent) can be seen in cluster pressure profiles. We then switch attention to individual structures, mapping each halo in quintessence cosmology to its ΛCDM counterpart. We are able to identify a series of small correlations between the coupling in the dark sector and halo spin, triaxiality and virialization ratio. When looking at spin and virialization of dark matter haloes, we find a weak (5 per cent) but systematic deviation in fifth force scenarios from ΛCDM.

  19. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. II. Effects of reaction dimensionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The black dot damage features which develop in iron at low temperatures exhibit significant mobility during in situ irradiation experiments via a series of discrete, intermittent, long range hops. By incorporating this mobility into cluster dynamics models, the temperature dependence of such damage structures can be explained with a surprising degree of accuracy. Such motion, however, is one dimensional in nature. This aspect of the physics has not been fully considered in prior models. This article describes one dimensional reaction kinetics in the context of cluster dynamics and applies them to the black dot problem. This allows both a more detailed description of the mechanisms by which defects execute irradiation-induced hops while allowing a full examination of the importance of kinetic assumptions in accurately assessing the development of this irradiation microstructure. Results are presented to demonstrate whether one dimensional diffusion alters the dependence of the defect population on factors such as temperature and defect hop length. Finally, the size of interstitial loops that develop is shown to depend on the extent of the reaction volumes between interstitial clusters, as well as the dimensionality of these interactions.

  20. Initial results from the Tokapole-II poloidal divertor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, A.P.; Dexter, R.N.; Groebner, R.J.; Holly, D.J.; Lipschultz, B.; Phillips, M.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The latest in a series of internal-ring devices, called Tokapole II, has recently begun operation at the University of Wisconsin. Its purpose is to permit the study of the production and confinement of hot, dense plasmas in either a toroidal octupole (with or without toroidal field) or a tokamak with a four-node poloidal divertor. The characteristics of the device and the results of its initial operation are described here. Quantitative measurements of impurity concentration and radiated power have been made. Poloidal divertor equilibria of square and dee shapes have been produced, and an axisymmetric instability has been observed with the inverse dee. Electron cyclotron resonance heating is used to initiate the breakdown near the axis and to control the initial influx of impurities. A 2-MW RF source at the second harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency is available and has been used to double the ion temperature when operated at low power with an unoptimized antenna. Initial results of operation as a pure octupole with poloidal Ohmic heating suggest a tokamak-like scaling of density (n proportional to Bsub(p)) and confinement time (tau proportional to n). (author)

  1. Au55, a stable glassy cluster: results of ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Vollath

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Structure and properties of small nanoparticles are still under discussion. Moreover, some thermodynamic properties and the structural behavior still remain partially unknown. One of the best investigated nanoparticles is the Au55 cluster, which has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically. However, up to now, the results of these studies are still inconsistent. Consequently, we have carried out the present ab initio study of the Au55 cluster, using up-to-date computational concepts, in order to clarify these issues. Our calculations have confirmed the experimental result that the thermodynamically most stable structure is not crystalline, but it is glassy. The non-crystalline structure of this cluster was validated by comparison of the coordination numbers with those of a crystalline cluster. It was found that, in contrast to bulk materials, glass formation is connected to an energy release that is close to the melting enthalpy of bulk gold. Additionally, the surface energy of this cluster was calculated using two different theoretical approaches resulting in values close to the surface energy for bulk gold. It shall be emphasized that it is now possible to give a confidence interval for the value of the surface energy.

  2. Ecosystem health pattern analysis of urban clusters based on emergy synthesis: Results and implication for management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Meirong; Fath, Brian D.; Yang, Zhifeng; Chen, Bin; Liu, Gengyuan

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of ecosystem health in urban clusters will help establish effective management that promotes sustainable regional development. To standardize the application of emergy synthesis and set pair analysis (EM–SPA) in ecosystem health assessment, a procedure for using EM–SPA models was established in this paper by combining the ability of emergy synthesis to reflect health status from a biophysical perspective with the ability of set pair analysis to describe extensive relationships among different variables. Based on the EM–SPA model, the relative health levels of selected urban clusters and their related ecosystem health patterns were characterized. The health states of three typical Chinese urban clusters – Jing-Jin-Tang, Yangtze River Delta, and Pearl River Delta – were investigated using the model. The results showed that the health status of the Pearl River Delta was relatively good; the health for the Yangtze River Delta was poor. As for the specific health characteristics, the Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta urban clusters were relatively strong in Vigor, Resilience, and Urban ecosystem service function maintenance, while the Jing-Jin-Tang was relatively strong in organizational structure and environmental impact. Guidelines for managing these different urban clusters were put forward based on the analysis of the results of this study. - Highlights: • The use of integrated emergy synthesis and set pair analysis model was standardized. • The integrated model was applied on the scale of an urban cluster. • Health patterns of different urban clusters were compared. • Policy suggestions were provided based on the health pattern analysis

  3. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, T.M.C.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We present cosmological results from a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing, using 1321 deg$^2$ of $griz$ imaging data from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1). We combine three two-point functions: (i) the cosmic shear correlation function of 26 million source galaxies in four redshift bins, (ii) the galaxy angular autocorrelation function of 650,000 luminous red galaxies in five redshift bins, and (iii) the galaxy-shear cross-correlation of luminous red galaxy positions and source galaxy shears. To demonstrate the robustness of these results, we use independent pairs of galaxy shape, photometric redshift estimation and validation, and likelihood analysis pipelines. To prevent confirmation bias, the bulk of the analysis was carried out while blind to the true results; we describe an extensive suite of systematics checks performed and passed during this blinded phase. The data are modeled in flat $\\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM cosmologies, marginalizing over 20 nuisance parameters, varying 6 (for $\\Lambda$CDM) or 7 (for $w$CDM) cosmological parameters including the neutrino mass density and including the 457 $\\times$ 457 element analytic covariance matrix. We find consistent cosmological results from these three two-point functions, and from their combination obtain $S_8 \\equiv \\sigma_8 (\\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.783^{+0.021}_{-0.025}$ and $\\Omega_m = 0.264^{+0.032}_{-0.019}$ for $\\Lambda$CDM for $w$CDM, we find $S_8 = 0.794^{+0.029}_{-0.027}$, $\\Omega_m = 0.279^{+0.043}_{-0.022}$, and $w=-0.80^{+0.20}_{-0.22}$ at 68% CL. The precision of these DES Y1 results rivals that from the Planck cosmic microwave background measurements, allowing a comparison of structure in the very early and late Universe on equal terms. Although the DES Y1 best-fit values for $S_8$ and $\\Omega_m$ are lower than the central values from Planck ...

  4. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  5. A MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, LluIs; Miquel, Ramon; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Ihara, Yutaka; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Marriner, John; Molla, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z ≤ 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37 +0.17+0.01 -0.12-0.01 ) SNur h 2 and (0.55 +0.13+0.02 -0.11-0.01 ) SNur h 2 (SNux = 10 -12 L -1 xsun yr -1 ) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31 +0.18+0.01 -0.12-0.01 ) SNur h 2 and (0.49 +0.15+0.02 -0.11-0.01 ) SNur h 2 in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04 +1.99+0.07 -1.11-0.04 ) SNur h 2 and (0.36 +0.84+0.01 -0.30-0.01 ) SNur h 2 in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94 +1.31+0.043 -0.91-0.015 and 3.02 +1.31+0.062 -1.03-0.048 , for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r L = [(0.49 +0.15 -0.14 )+(0.91 +0.85 -0.81 ) x z] SNuB h 2 . A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most three hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are hostless to be (9.4 +8.3 -5.1 )%.

  6. Planck intermediate results: IV. the XMM-Newton validation programme for new Planck galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present the final results from the XMM-Newton validation follow-up of new Planck galaxy cluster candidates. We observed 15 new candidates, detected with signal-to-noise ratios between 4.0 and 6.1 in the 15.5-month nominal Planck survey. The candidates were selected using ancillary data flags d...

  7. Preliminary Cluster Size and Efficiencies results of CMS RPC at GIF++

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Blanco Gonzalez, Genoveva

    2016-01-01

    A brief description and first preliminary results of the Efficiencies and Cluster Size measurements of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers, will be presented inside the Gamma Irradiation Facility GIF++ at CERN. Preliminary studies that sets the base performance measurements of CMS RPC for starting aging studies.

  8. POPULATION PARAMETERS OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. NEW INSIGHTS FROM EXTENDED MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFFS IN SEVEN STAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Puzia, Thomas H.; Chandar, Rupali

    2011-01-01

    We discuss new photometry from high-resolution images of seven intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr) star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We fit color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with several different sets of theoretical isochrones and determine systematic uncertainties for population parameters when derived using any one set of isochrones. The cluster CMDs show several interesting features, including extended main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) regions, narrow red giant branches, and clear sequences of unresolved binary stars. We show that the extended MSTOs are not caused by photometric uncertainties, contamination by field stars, or the presence of binary stars. Enhanced helium abundances in a fraction of cluster stars are also ruled out as the reason for the extended MSTOs. Quantitative comparisons with simulations indicate that the MSTO regions are better described by a spread in ages than by a bimodal age distribution, although we cannot formally rule out the latter for the three lowest-mass clusters in our sample (which have masses lower than ∼3 x 10 4 M sun ). This conclusion differs from that of some previous works which suggested that the age distribution in massive clusters in our sample is bimodal. This suggests that any secondary star formation occurred in an extended fashion rather than through short bursts. We discuss these results in the context of the nature of multiple stellar populations in star clusters.

  9. A novel dumbbell-like polyoxometalate assembled of copper(II)-disubstituted monovacant keggin polyoxoanions with a tetranuclear copper cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hao; Xu, Xiao; Ju, Wei-Wei; Wan, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Dun-Ru; Xu, Yan

    2014-03-17

    A dimeric Keggin polyoxometalate, [Cu(bpy)(μ2-OH)]4[(H2O)(bpy)2HPW11Cu2O39]2·2CH3CH2OH·10H2O (1), constructed from two dicopper(II)-substituted monovacant Keggin polyoxoanions bridged by a Cu4 cluster, has been hydrothermally synthesized. Magnetic analysis indicates predominantly an antiferromagnetic interaction between copper(II) centers. Compound 1 also shows very high catalytic activity for the esterification of phosphoric acid with equimolar lauryl alcohol to monoalkyl phosphate ester.

  10. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Auroral Turbulance II sounding rocket was launched on February 11, 1997 into moderately active nightside aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, US. The experiment consisted of three independent, completely instrumented payloads launched by a single vehicle. The aim of the experiment...

  11. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE IRAC DARK FIELD. II. MID-INFRARED SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, J. E.; Surace, J. A.; Yan, L.; Thompson, D.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Hora, J. L.; Gorjian, V.

    2009-01-01

    We present infrared (IR) luminosities, star formation rates (SFR), colors, morphologies, locations, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) properties of 24 μm detected sources in photometrically detected high-redshift clusters in order to understand the impact of environment on star formation (SF) and AGN evolution in cluster galaxies. We use three newly identified z = 1 clusters selected from the IRAC dark field; the deepest ever mid-IR survey with accompanying, 14 band multiwavelength data including deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging and deep wide-area Spitzer MIPS 24 μm imaging. We find 90 cluster members with MIPS detections within two virial radii of the cluster centers, of which 17 appear to have spectral energy distributions dominated by AGNs and the rest dominated by SF. We find that 43% of the star-forming sample have IR luminosities L IR > 10 11 L sun (luminous IR galaxies). The majority of sources (81%) are spirals or irregulars. A large fraction (at least 25%) show obvious signs of interactions. The MIPS-detected member galaxies have varied spatial distributions as compared to the MIPS-undetected members with one of the three clusters showing SF galaxies being preferentially located on the cluster outskirts, while the other two clusters show no such trend. Both the AGN fraction and the summed SFR of cluster galaxies increase from redshift zero to one, at a rate that is a few times faster in clusters than over the same redshift range in the field. Cluster environment does have an effect on the evolution of both AGN fraction and SFR from redshift one to the present, but does not affect the IR luminosities or morphologies of the MIPS sample. SF happens in the same way regardless of environment making MIPS sources look the same in the cluster and field, however the cluster environment does encourage a more rapid evolution with time as compared to the field.

  12. RF feedback simulation results for PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, R.; Corredoura, P.

    1995-06-01

    A model of the RF feedback system for PEP-II has been developed to provide time-domain simulation and frequency-domain analysis of the complete system. The model includes the longitudinal beam dynamics, cavity fundamental resonance, feedback loops, and the nonlinear klystron operating near saturation. Transients from an ion clearing gap and a reference phase modulation from the longitudinal feedback system are also studied. Growth rates are predicted and overall system stability examined

  13. GLOBULAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS: FIRST RESULTS FROM S{sup 4}G EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aravena, Manuel [Núcleo de Astronomía, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Astronomy Division, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Lácteas, E-38205 La Laguna (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Hinz, Joannah L. [MMT Observatory, P.O. Box 210065, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Holwerda, Benne [Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 4, NL-2333 Leiden (Netherlands); Sheth, Kartik, E-mail: dennis.zaritsky@gmail.com [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Using 3.6 μm images of 97 early-type galaxies, we develop and verify methodology to measure globular cluster populations from the S{sup 4}G survey images. We find that (1) the ratio, T {sub N}, of the number of clusters, N {sub CL}, to parent galaxy stellar mass, M {sub *}, rises weakly with M {sub *} for early-type galaxies with M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} when we calculate galaxy masses using a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF) but that the dependence of T {sub N} on M {sub *} is removed entirely once we correct for the recently uncovered systematic variation of IMF with M {sub *}; and (2) for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, there is no trend between N {sub CL} and M {sub *}, the scatter in T {sub N} is significantly larger (approaching two orders of magnitude), and there is evidence to support a previous, independent suggestion of two families of galaxies. The behavior of N {sub CL} in the lower-mass systems is more difficult to measure because these systems are inherently cluster-poor, but our results may add to previous evidence that large variations in cluster formation and destruction efficiencies are to be found among low-mass galaxies. The average fraction of stellar mass in clusters is ∼0.0014 for M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and can be as large as ∼0.02 for less massive galaxies. These are the first results from the S{sup 4}G sample of galaxies and will be enhanced by the sample of early-type galaxies now being added to S{sup 4}G and complemented by the study of later-type galaxies within S{sup 4}G.

  14. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey of the Disk Cluster Population of M31. II. Advanced Camera for Surveys Pointings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienke, O. K.; Hodge, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a survey of star clusters in M31 based on archival images from the Hubble Space Telescope. Paper I reported results from images obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and this paper reports results from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The ACS survey has yielded a total of 339 star clusters, 52 of which—mostly globular clusters—were found to have been cataloged previously. As for the previous survey, the luminosity function of the clusters drops steeply for absolute magnitudes fainter than MV = -3 the implied cluster mass function has a turnover for masses less than a few hundred solar masses. The color-integrated magnitude diagram of clusters shows three significant features: (1) a group of very red, luminous objects: the globular clusters, (2) a wide range in color for the fainter clusters, representing a considerable range in age and reddening, and (3) a maximum density of clusters centered approximately at V = 21, B - V = 0.30, V - I = 0.50, where there are intermediate-age, intermediate-mass clusters with ages close to 500 million years and masses of about 2000 solar masses. We give a brief qualitative interpretation of the distribution of clusters in the CMDs in terms of their formation and destruction rates. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for research in astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  15. Female cluster headache in the United States of America: what are the gender differences? Results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Todd D; Fishman, Royce S

    2012-06-15

    To present results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey regarding gender differences in cluster headache demographics, clinical characteristics, diagnostic delay, triggers, treatment response and personal burden. Very few studies have looked at the gender differences in cluster headache presentation. The United States Cluster Headache Survey is the largest study of cluster headache sufferers ever completed in the United States and it is also the largest study of female cluster headache patients ever presented. The total survey consisted of 187 multiple choice questions which dealt with various issues related to cluster headache including: demographics, clinical characteristics, concomitant medical conditions, family history, triggers, smoking history, diagnosis, treatment response and personal burden. A group of questions were specifically targeted to female cluster headache patients. The survey was placed on a website from October to December 2008. For all survey responders the diagnosis of cluster headache needed to be made by a neurologist but there was no validation of the headache diagnosis by the authors. 1134 individuals completed the survey (816 male, 318 female). Key Points that define the differences between female and male cluster headache include: a. Age of onset: women develop cluster headache at an earlier age than men and are more likely to develop a second peak of cluster headache onset after 50 years of age. b. Family history: woman cluster headache sufferers are more likely to have a family history of both cluster headache and migraine and have an increased familial risk of Parkinson's disease. c. Comorbid conditions: female cluster headaches sufferers are significantly more likely to experience depression and have asthma than males. d. Aura issues: aura with cluster headache is equally common in both sexes, but aura duration is shorter in women. Women are much more likely to experience sensory, language and brainstem auras. e. Pain

  16. The young star cluster population of M51 with LEGUS - II. Testing environmental dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Matteo; Adamo, A.; Calzetti, D.; Reina-Campos, M.; Colombo, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Chandar, R.; Dale, D. A.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Fumagalli, M.; Johnson, K. E.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Östlin, G.; Shabani, F.; Smith, L. J.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2018-06-01

    It has recently been established that the properties of young star clusters (YSCs) can vary as a function of the galactic environment in which they are found. We use the cluster catalogue produced by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) collaboration to investigate cluster properties in the spiral galaxy M51. We analyse the cluster population as a function of galactocentric distance and in arm and inter-arm regions. The cluster mass function exhibits a similar shape at all radial bins, described by a power law with a slope close to -2 and an exponential truncation around 105 M⊙. While the mass functions of the YSCs in the spiral arm and inter-arm regions have similar truncation masses, the inter-arm region mass function has a significantly steeper slope than the one in the arm region, a trend that is also observed in the giant molecular cloud mass function and predicted by simulations. The age distribution of clusters is dependent on the region considered, and is consistent with rapid disruption only in dense regions, while little disruption is observed at large galactocentric distances and in the inter-arm region. The fraction of stars forming in clusters does not show radial variations, despite the drop in the H2 surface density measured as a function of galactocentric distance. We suggest that the higher disruption rate observed in the inner part of the galaxy is likely at the origin of the observed flat cluster formation efficiency radial profile.

  17. Predicted continuum spectra of type II supernovae - LTE results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaviv, G.; Wehrse, R.; Wagoner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The continuum spectral energy distribution of the flux emerging from type II supernovae is calculated from quasi-static radiative transfer through a power-law density gradient, assuming radiative equilibrium and LTE. It is found that the Balmer jump disappears at high effective temperatures and low densities, while the spectrum resembles that of a dilute blackbody but is flatter with a sharper cutoff at the short-wavelength end. A significant UV excess is found in all models calculated. The calculation should be considered exploratory because of significant effects which are anticipated to arise from departure from LTE.

  18. The major results of the PISC II Round Robin test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the PISC-II programme were: - To evaluate the effectiveness of NDT techniques either in use or being developed for the inspection of reactor pressure vessel components, with regard mainly to detecting and charaterising service-induced flaws. - To identify techniques for acceptance tests, pre-service inspection (PSI) and in-service inspection (ISI) which could be generally accepted, and - to bring the conclusions of the programme to the attention of the Code, Standard and Regulatory Bodies concerned with ISI. (orig./HP)

  19. Challenges And Results of the Applications of Fuzzy Logic in the Classification of Rich Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girola Schneider, R.

    2017-07-01

    The fuzzy logic is a branch of the artificial intelligence founded on the concept that everything is a matter of degree. It intends to create mathematical approximations on the resolution of certain types of problems. In addition, it aims to produce exact results obtained from imprecise data, for which it is particularly useful for electronic and computer applications. This enables it to handle vague or unspecific information when certain parts of a system are unknown or ambiguous and, therefore, they cannot be measured in a reliable manner. Also, when the variation of a variable can produce an alteration on the others The main focus of this paper is to prove the importance of these techniques formulated from a theoretical analysis on its application on ambiguous situations in the field of the rich clusters of galaxies. The purpose is to show its applicability in the several classification systems proposed for the rich clusters, which are based on criteria such as the level of richness of the cluster, the distribution of the brightest galaxies, whether there are signs of type-cD galaxies or not or the existence of sub-clusters. Fuzzy logic enables the researcher to work with "imprecise" information implementing fuzzy sets and combining rules to define actions. The control systems based on fuzzy logic join input variables that are defined in terms of fuzzy sets through rule groups that produce one or several output values of the system under study. From this context, the application of the fuzzy logic's techniques approximates the solution of the mathematical models in abstractions about the rich galaxy cluster classification of physical properties in order to solve the obscurities that must be confronted by an investigation group in order to make a decision.

  20. Cardiometabolic risk clustering in spinal cord injury: results of exploratory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, Alexander; Tinsley, Emily A; Nash, Mark S; Mendez, Armando J; Burns, Patricia; Elrod, Matt; Hamm, Larry F; Groah, Suzanne L

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests an elevated prevalence of cardiometabolic risks among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI); however, the unique clustering of risk factors in this population has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study was to describe unique clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors differentiated by level of injury. One hundred twenty-one subjects (mean 37 ± 12 years; range, 18-73) with chronic C5 to T12 motor complete SCI were studied. Assessments included medical histories, anthropometrics and blood pressure, and fasting serum lipids, glucose, insulin, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The most common cardiometabolic risk factors were overweight/obesity, high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C). Risk clustering was found in 76.9% of the population. Exploratory principal component factor analysis using varimax rotation revealed a 3-factor model in persons with paraplegia (65.4% variance) and a 4-factor solution in persons with tetraplegia (73.3% variance). The differences between groups were emphasized by the varied composition of the extracted factors: Lipid Profile A (total cholesterol [TC] and LDL-C), Body Mass-Hypertension Profile (body mass index [BMI], systolic blood pressure [SBP], and fasting insulin [FI]); Glycemic Profile (fasting glucose and HbA1c), and Lipid Profile B (TG and HDL-C). BMI and SBP formed a separate factor only in persons with tetraplegia. Although the majority of the population with SCI has risk clustering, the composition of the risk clusters may be dependent on level of injury, based on a factor analysis group comparison. This is clinically plausible and relevant as tetraplegics tend to be hypo- to normotensive and more sedentary, resulting in lower HDL-C and a greater propensity toward impaired carbohydrate metabolism.

  1. Mesoscale structure of a morning sector ionospheric shear flow region determined by conjugate Cluster II and MIRACLE ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    Full Text Available We analyse a conjunction event of the Cluster II spacecraft with the MIRACLE ground-based instrument net-work in northern Fennoscandia on 6 February 2001, between 23:00 and 00:00 UT. Shortly after the spacecraft were located at perigee, the Cluster II satellites’ magnetic footpoints move northwards over Scandinavia and Svalbard, almost perfectly aligned with the central chain of the IMAGE magnetometer network, and cross a morning sector ionospheric shear zone during this passage. In this study we focus on the mesoscale structure of the ionosphere. Ionospheric conductances, true horizontal currents, and field-aligned currents (FAC are calculated from the ground-based measurements of the IMAGE magnetometers and the STARE coherent scatter radar, using the 1-D method of characteristics. An excellent agreement between these results and the FAC observed by Cluster II is reached after averaging the Cluster measurements to mesoscales, as well as between the location of the convection reversal boundary (CRB, as observed by STARE and by the Cluster II EFW instrument. A sheet of downward FAC is observed in the vicinity of the CRB, which is mainly caused by the positive divergence of the electric field there. This FAC sheet is detached by 0.5°–2° of latitude from a more equatorward downward FAC sheet at the poleward flank of the westward electrojet. This latter FAC sheet, as well as the upward FAC at the equatorward flank of the jet, are mainly caused by meridional gradients in the ionospheric conductances, which reach up to 25 S in the electrojet region, but only ~ 5 S poleward of it, with a minimum at the CRB. Particle measurements show that the major part of the downward FAC is carried by upward flowing electrons, and only a small part by downward flowing ions. The open-closed field line boundary is found to be located 3°–4° poleward of the CRB, implying significant errors if the latter is used as a proxy of the former.

    Key words

  2. Mesoscale structure of a morning sector ionospheric shear flow region determined by conjugate Cluster II and MIRACLE ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse a conjunction event of the Cluster II spacecraft with the MIRACLE ground-based instrument net-work in northern Fennoscandia on 6 February 2001, between 23:00 and 00:00 UT. Shortly after the spacecraft were located at perigee, the Cluster II satellites’ magnetic footpoints move northwards over Scandinavia and Svalbard, almost perfectly aligned with the central chain of the IMAGE magnetometer network, and cross a morning sector ionospheric shear zone during this passage. In this study we focus on the mesoscale structure of the ionosphere. Ionospheric conductances, true horizontal currents, and field-aligned currents (FAC are calculated from the ground-based measurements of the IMAGE magnetometers and the STARE coherent scatter radar, using the 1-D method of characteristics. An excellent agreement between these results and the FAC observed by Cluster II is reached after averaging the Cluster measurements to mesoscales, as well as between the location of the convection reversal boundary (CRB, as observed by STARE and by the Cluster II EFW instrument. A sheet of downward FAC is observed in the vicinity of the CRB, which is mainly caused by the positive divergence of the electric field there. This FAC sheet is detached by 0.5°–2° of latitude from a more equatorward downward FAC sheet at the poleward flank of the westward electrojet. This latter FAC sheet, as well as the upward FAC at the equatorward flank of the jet, are mainly caused by meridional gradients in the ionospheric conductances, which reach up to 25 S in the electrojet region, but only ~ 5 S poleward of it, with a minimum at the CRB. Particle measurements show that the major part of the downward FAC is carried by upward flowing electrons, and only a small part by downward flowing ions. The open-closed field line boundary is found to be located 3°–4° poleward of the CRB, implying significant errors if the latter is used as a proxy of the former.Key words. Ionosphere

  3. The MUSIC of galaxy clusters - II. X-ray global properties and scaling relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, V.; Sembolini, F.; De Petris, M.; Valdarnini, R.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present the X-ray properties and scaling relations of a large sample of clusters extracted from the Marenostrum MUltidark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) data set. We focus on a sub-sample of 179 clusters at redshift z ˜ 0.11, with 3.2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ mass. We employed the X-ray photon simulator PHOX to obtain synthetic Chandra observations and derive observable-like global properties of the intracluster medium (ICM), as X-ray temperature (TX) and luminosity (LX). TX is found to slightly underestimate the true mass-weighted temperature, although tracing fairly well the cluster total mass. We also study the effects of TX on scaling relations with cluster intrinsic properties: total (M500 and gas Mg,500 mass; integrated Compton parameter (YSZ) of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) thermal effect; YX = Mg,500 TX. We confirm that YX is a very good mass proxy, with a scatter on M500-YX and YSZ-YX lower than 5 per cent. The study of scaling relations among X-ray, intrinsic and SZ properties indicates that simulated MUSIC clusters reasonably resemble the self-similar prediction, especially for correlations involving TX. The observational approach also allows for a more direct comparison with real clusters, from which we find deviations mainly due to the physical description of the ICM, affecting TX and, particularly, LX.

  4. WebGimm: An integrated web-based platform for cluster analysis, functional analysis, and interactive visualization of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vineet K; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Hu, Zhen; Medvedovic, Mario

    2011-01-17

    Cluster analysis methods have been extensively researched, but the adoption of new methods is often hindered by technical barriers in their implementation and use. WebGimm is a free cluster analysis web-service, and an open source general purpose clustering web-server infrastructure designed to facilitate easy deployment of integrated cluster analysis servers based on clustering and functional annotation algorithms implemented in R. Integrated functional analyses and interactive browsing of both, clustering structure and functional annotations provides a complete analytical environment for cluster analysis and interpretation of results. The Java Web Start client-based interface is modeled after the familiar cluster/treeview packages making its use intuitive to a wide array of biomedical researchers. For biomedical researchers, WebGimm provides an avenue to access state of the art clustering procedures. For Bioinformatics methods developers, WebGimm offers a convenient avenue to deploy their newly developed clustering methods. WebGimm server, software and manuals can be freely accessed at http://ClusterAnalysis.org/.

  5. Grouping and clustering of maize Lancaster germplasm inbreds according to the results of SNP-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Derkach

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is the grouping and clustering of maize inbred lines based on the results of SNP-genotyping for the verification of a separate cluster of Lancaster germplasm inbred lines. As material for the study, we used 91 maize (Zea mays L. inbred lines, including 31 Lancaster germplasm lines and 60 inbred lines of other germplasms (23 Iodent inbreds, 15 Reid inbreds, 7 Lacon inbreds, 12 Mix inbreds and 3 exotic inbreds. The majority of the given inbred lines are included in the Dnipro breeding programme. The SNP-genotyping of these inbred lines was conducted using BDI-III panel of 384 SNP-markers developed by BioDiagnostics, Inc. (USA on the base of Illumina VeraCode Bead Plate. The SNP-markers of this panel are biallelic and are located on all 10 maize chromosomes. Their range of conductivity was >0.6. The SNP-analysis was made in completely automated regime on Illumina BeadStation equipment at BioDiagnostics, Inc. (USA. A principal component analysis was applied to group a general set of 91 inbreds according to allelic states of SNP-markers and to identify a cluster of Lancaster inbreds. The clustering and determining hierarchy in 31 Lancaster germplasm inbreds used quantitative cluster analysis. The share of monomorphic markers in the studied set of 91 inbred lines equaled 0.7%, and the share of dimorphic markers equaled 99.3%. Minor allele frequency (MAF > 0.2 was observed for 80.6% of dimorphic markers, the average index of shift of gene diversity equaled 0.2984, PIC on average reached 0.3144. The index of gene diversity of markers varied from 0.1701 to 0.1901, pairwise genetic distances between inbred lines ranged from 0.0316–0.8000, the frequencies of major alleles of SNP-markers were within 0.5085–0.9821, and the frequencies of minor alleles were within 0.0179–0.4915. The average homozygosity of inbred lines was 98.8%. The principal component analysis of SNP-distances confirmed the isolation of the Lancaster

  6. C II 158 ??bservations of a Sample of Late-type Galaxies from the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, K.; Volk, H.; Heinrichsen, I.; Hippelein, H.; Metcalfe, L.; Pierini, D.; Popescu, C.; Tuffs, R.; Xu, C.

    1999-01-01

    We have observed 19 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) obtaining spectra around the [CII] 157.741 ??ine structure line.

  7. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - II. Final results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2018-06-01

    Re-creating the observed diversity in the organization of baryonic mass within dark matter haloes represents a key challenge for galaxy formation models. To address the growth of galaxy discs in dark matter haloes, we have constrained the distribution of baryonic and non-baryonic matter in a statistically representative sample of 44 nearby galaxies defined from the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science (EDGES) Survey. The gravitational potentials of each galaxy are traced using rotation curves derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations of neutral hydrogen (H I). The measured rotation curves are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6 μm images for the stellar content, the H I observations for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. The H I kinematics are supplemented with optical integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations to measure the central ionized gas kinematics in 26 galaxies, including 13 galaxies that are presented for the first time in this paper. Distributions of baryonic-to-total mass ratios are determined from the rotation curve decompositions under different assumptions about the contribution of the stellar component and are compared to global and radial properties of the dominant stellar populations extracted from optical and near-infrared photometry. Galaxies are grouped into clusters of similar baryonic-to-total mass distributions to examine whether they also exhibit similar star and gas properties. The radial distribution of baryonic-to-total mass in a galaxy does not appear to correlate with any characteristics of its star formation history.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star clusters distances and extinctions. II. (Buckner+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, A. S. M.; Froebrich, D.

    2015-04-01

    Until now, it has been impossible to observationally measure how star cluster scaleheight evolves beyond 1Gyr as only small samples have been available. Here, we establish a novel method to determine the scaleheight of a cluster sample using modelled distributions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. This allows us to determine the scaleheight with a 25% accuracy for samples of 38 clusters or more. We apply our method to investigate the temporal evolution of cluster scaleheight, using homogeneously selected sub-samples of Kharchenko et al. (MWSC, 2012, Cat. J/A+A/543/A156, 2013, J/A+A/558/A53 ), Dias et al. (DAML02, 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl), WEBDA, and Froebrich et al. (FSR, 2007MNRAS.374..399F, Cat. J/MNRAS/374/399). We identify a linear relationship between scaleheight and log(age/yr) of clusters, considerably different from field stars. The scaleheight increases from about 40pc at 1Myr to 75pc at 1Gyr, most likely due to internal evolution and external scattering events. After 1Gyr, there is a marked change of the behaviour, with the scaleheight linearly increasing with log(age/yr) to about 550pc at 3.5Gyr. The most likely interpretation is that the surviving clusters are only observable because they have been scattered away from the mid-plane in their past. A detailed understanding of this observational evidence can only be achieved with numerical simulations of the evolution of cluster samples in the Galactic disc. Furthermore, we find a weak trend of an age-independent increase in scaleheight with Galactocentric distance. There are no significant temporal or spatial variations of the cluster distribution zero-point. We determine the Sun's vertical displacement from the Galactic plane as Z⊙=18.5+/-1.2pc. (1 data file).

  9. Recent results with NBI plasmas in TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liniers, M.; Ascasibar, E.; Estrada, T.; Tabares, F. L.; Acedo, M.; Alonso, J.; Balbin, R.; Blanco, B.; Branas, B.; Cappa, A.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Fernandez, A.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Hidalgo, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, R.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Marcon, G.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Medrano, M.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Rapisarda, D.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, M.; Sanchez, J.; Tafalla, D.; Wolfers, G.; Zurro, B.

    2005-07-01

    During the last experimental campaign Neutral Beam Injection into TJ-II plasmas has been available, with a single H0 beam aiming tangentially in the Co-direction. As the ion source conditioning was improved along the campaign, the injected power increased from 200 kW to 400 kW port-through, and the beam energy was raised from 26 kV to 30 kV [1]. Target plasmas are created by ECR heating, using two gyrotrons of 200 kW power, at the second harmonic frequency (53 GHz). The injection direction of the microwaves can be steered by means of movable mirrors placed inside the vacuum chamber, making it possible to vary the power deposition region from the plasma core (on-axis) to the outer regions near ?=0.5 (off-axis). The plasma temperature and density profiles obtained with on-axis or off axis ECRH are seen to differ widely, allowing us to study the neutral beam absorption in two qualitatively different plasma target scenarios. Other factors affecting the plasma profiles have also been investigated, such as the magnetic configuration or the OH-driven current. TJ-II has the capability of varying the magnetic configuration by changing the ratio of the current through the circular and helical conductors that form the Central Conductor. The iota values can be swept between 0.9 and 2.2 and the magnetic well between -1% and 6% giving rise to configurations with different confinement properties. A negative OH driven current has the effect of increasing the magnetic shear value, allowing low-order rationals in the central region which have been seen to modify density profiles in ECH plasmas. In most NBI discharges the central plasma density increases continuously from ECH typical values below 1.1 x 10 19 m-3 up to 6.5 x 10 19 m-3, as the beam is injected, until a thermal collapse that terminates the discharge is reached. So far, density control with NBI plasmas has not been achieved, although an improved behaviour is observed with wall cleaning. (Author)

  10. Recent results with NBI plasmas in TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liniers, M.; Ascasibar, E.; Estrada, T.; Tabares, F. L.; Acedo, M.; Alonso, J.; Balbin, R.; Blanco, B.; Branas, B.; Cappa, A.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Fernandez, A.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Hidalgo, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, R.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Marcon, G.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Medrano, M.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Rapisarda, D.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, M.; Sanchez, J.; Tafalla, D.; Wolfers, G.; Zurro, B.

    2005-01-01

    During the last experimental campaign Neutral Beam Injection into TJ-II plasmas has been available, with a single H0 beam aiming tangentially in the Co-direction. As the ion source conditioning was improved along the campaign, the injected power increased from 200 kW to 400 kW port-through, and the beam energy was raised from 26 kV to 30 kV [1]. Target plasmas are created by ECR heating, using two gyrotrons of 200 kW power, at the second harmonic frequency (53 GHz). The injection direction of the microwaves can be steered by means of movable mirrors placed inside the vacuum chamber, making it possible to vary the power deposition region from the plasma core (on-axis) to the outer regions near ?=0.5 (off-axis). The plasma temperature and density profiles obtained with on-axis or off axis ECRH are seen to differ widely, allowing us to study the neutral beam absorption in two qualitatively different plasma target scenarios. Other factors affecting the plasma profiles have also been investigated, such as the magnetic configuration or the OH-driven current. TJ-II has the capability of varying the magnetic configuration by changing the ratio of the current through the circular and helical conductors that form the Central Conductor. The iota values can be swept between 0.9 and 2.2 and the magnetic well between -1% and 6% giving rise to configurations with different confinement properties. A negative OH driven current has the effect of increasing the magnetic shear value, allowing low-order rationals in the central region which have been seen to modify density profiles in ECH plasmas. In most NBI discharges the central plasma density increases continuously from ECH typical values below 1.1 x 10 19 m-3 up to 6.5 x 10 19 m-3, as the beam is injected, until a thermal collapse that terminates the discharge is reached. So far, density control with NBI plasmas has not been achieved, although an improved behaviour is observed with wall cleaning. (Author)

  11. Study of II Galactic quadrant of Milky Way Galaxy using open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Devendra; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Baliyan, Kiran Singh; Yadav, Ramakant Singh; Durgapal, Alok

    2018-04-01

    We have made UBV I CCD observations for the open clusters Teutsch 1, Riddle 4 and Czernik 6 using 1.04-m Sampurnanand telescope located at the ARIES observatory (Manora peak, Nainital, India). We have used 2MASS JHKS data for the clusters Teutsch 126, Teutsch 54 and Czernik 3. For the estimation of fundamental parameters, we have plotted radial density profiles, colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams. Using these inputs, we have studied the structure of Milky Way Galaxy in the second Galactic quadrant. We have considered the open clusters that are younger than 1 Gyrs and lay in the longitude range from 90 to 180 deg. Our study shows that up to 3.5 Kpc, the Galactic disc bends towards the southern hemisphere while after 3.5 Kpc it bends towards the northern hemisphere. The distribution of reddening with longitude and age shows a decreasing trend with the longitude and age of the clusters. Our study also indicates that younger clusters have more reddening than older ones.

  12. z ~ 7-10 Galaxies Behind Lensing Clusters: Contrast with Field Search Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Rychard J.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Bradley, Larry D.; Ford, Holland; Franx, Marijn; Zheng, Wei; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Jee, M. James

    2009-01-01

    We conduct a search for z gsim 7 dropout galaxies behind 11 massive lensing clusters using 21 arcmin2 of deep Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS, ACS, and WFPC2 image data. In total, over this entire area, we find only one robust z ~ 7 z-dropout candidate (previously reported around Abell 1689). Four less robust z-dropout and J-dropout candidates are also found. The nature of the four weaker candidates could not be precisely determined due to the limited depth of the available optical data, but detailed simulations suggest that all four are likely to be low-redshift interlopers. By contrast, we estimate that our robust candidate A1689-zD1 has dropouts and 0.3 z ~ 9 J-dropouts over our cluster search area, in reasonable agreement with our observational results, given the small numbers. The number of z gsim 7 candidates we find in the present search is much lower than that which has been reported in several previous studies of the prevalence of z gsim 7 galaxies behind lensing clusters. To understand these differences, we examined z gsim 7 candidates in other studies and conclude that only a small fraction are likely to be z gsim 7 galaxies. Our findings support models that show that gravitational lensing from clusters is of the most value for detecting galaxies at magnitudes brighter than L* (H lsim 27) where the LF is expected to be very steep. Use of these clusters to constrain the faint-end slope or determine the full LF is likely of less value due to the shallower effective slope measured for the LF at fainter magnitudes, as well as significant uncertainties introduced from modeling both the gravitational lensing and incompleteness. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs #5352, 5935, 6488, 8249, 8882, 9289, 9452, 9717, 10150, 10154, 10200, 10325, 10504, 10863, 10996.

  13. Gas expulsion vs gas retention in young stellar clusters II: effects of cooling and mass segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2018-05-01

    Gas expulsion or gas retention is a central issue in most of the models for multiple stellar populations and light element anti-correlations in globular clusters. The success of the residual matter expulsion or its retention within young stellar clusters has also a fundamental importance in order to understand how star formation proceeds in present-day and ancient star-forming galaxies and if proto-globular clusters with multiple stellar populations are formed in the present epoch. It is usually suggested that either the residual gas is rapidly ejected from star-forming clouds by stellar winds and supernova explosions, or that the enrichment of the residual gas and the formation of the second stellar generation occur so rapidly, that the negative stellar feedback is not significant. Here we continue our study of the early development of star clusters in the extreme environments and discuss the restrictions that strong radiative cooling and stellar mass segregation provide on the gas expulsion from dense star-forming clouds. A large range of physical initial conditions in star-forming clouds which include the star-forming cloud mass, compactness, gas metallicity, star formation efficiency and effects of massive stars segregation are discussed. It is shown that in sufficiently massive and compact clusters hot shocked winds around individual massive stars may cool before merging with their neighbors. This dramatically reduces the negative stellar feedback, prevents the development of the global star cluster wind and expulsion of the residual and the processed matter into the ambient interstellar medium. The critical lines which separate the gas expulsion and the gas retention regimes are obtained.

  14. Near-IR search for lensed supernovae behind galaxy clusters. II. First detection and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Goobar, A.; Paech, K.; Stanishev, V.; Amanullah, R.; Dahlén, T.; Jönsson, J.; Kneib, J. P.; Lidman, C.; Limousin, M.; Mörtsell, E.; Nobili, S.; Richard, J.; Riehm, T.; von Strauss, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. Powerful gravitational telescopes in the form of massive galaxy clusters can be used to enhance the light collecting power over a limited field of view by about an order of magnitude in flux. This effect is exploited here to increase the depth of a survey for lensed supernovae at near-IR wavelengths. Methods. We present a pilot supernova search programme conducted with the ISAAC camera at VLT. Lensed galaxies behind the massive clusters A1689, A1835, and AC114 were observed for a tot...

  15. Evaluation of LLTR series II test A-7 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittle, D.E.; Amos, J.C.; Yang, T.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report evaluates the test A-7 data and assesses the capability of the analytical methodology (as a result of Series I program) to predict the thermal/hydraulic phenomena associated with a large SWR event occurring after the sodium system pressure has increased to near the rupture disc burst pressure due to a smaller size leak event. Evaluation of intertest examination data to determine the extent of test article damage resulting from test A-7 is also included

  16. IDENTIFYING REGIONAL CLUSTER MANAGEMENT POTENTIALS EMPIRICAL RESULTS FROM THREE NORTH RHINEWESTPHALIAN REGIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Rudiger Hamm; Christiane Goebel

    2010-01-01

    The development and support of clusters is an issue that became quite popular by players dealing with regional economic policy. But before a regional development agency can start to implement a cluster-oriented strategy there a two question that have to be answered: 1. What are the regional fields of competence (cluster potentials) that fulfill the requirements for a cluster-oriented regional development policy? 2. If you find such regional fields of competence, are the enterprises willing to...

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST/ACS Coma cluster survey. II. (Hammer+, 2010)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, D.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Hoyos, C.; den Brok, M.; Balcells, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Carter, D.; Guzman, R.; Peletier, R. F.; Smith, R. J.; Graham, A. W.; Trentham, N.; Peng, E.; Puzia, T. H.; Lucey, J. R.; Jogee, S.; Aguerri, A. L.; Batcheldor, D.; Bridges, T. J.; Chiboucas, K.; Davies, J. I.; Del Burgo, C.; Erwin, P.; Hornschemeier, A.; Hudson, M. J.; Huxor, A.; Jenkins, L.; Karick, A.; Khosroshahi, H.; Kourkchi, E.; Komiyama, Y.; Lotz, J.; Marzke, R. O.; Marinova, I.; Matkovic, A.; Merritt, D.; Miller, B. W.; Miller, N. A.; Mobasher, B.; Mouhcine, M.; Okamura, S.; Percival, S.; Phillipps, S.; Poggianti, B. M.; Price, J.; Sharples, R. M.; Tully, R. B.; Valentijn, E.

    2010-01-01

    This data release contains catalogs for the ACS Images in F475W and F814W bands of 25 fields in the Coma cluster of galaxies. Each field is about 202x202arcsec. Please see the release notes for further details. (25 data files).

  18. Age and helium content of the open cluster NGC 6791 from multiple eclipsing binary members. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, K.; VandenBerg, D. A.; Bruntt, H.

    2012-01-01

    Models of stellar structure and evolution can be constrained by measuring accurate parameters of detached eclipsing binaries in open clusters. Multiple binary stars provide the means to determine helium abundances in these old stellar systems, and in turn, to improve estimates of their age. In th...

  19. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  20. Planck 2015 results: II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release...

  1. Production Facility Prototype Blower 1000 Hour Test Results II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-08

    Long duration tests of the Aerzen GM 12.4 roots style blower in a closed loop configuration provides valuable data and lessons learned for long-term operation at the Mo-99 production facility. The blower was operated in a closed loop configuration with the flow conditions anticipated in plant operation with a Mo-100 target inline. The additional thermal energy generated from beam heating of the Mo-100 disks were not included in these tests. Five 1000 hour tests have been completed since the first test was performed in January of 2016. All five 1000 hour tests have proven successful in exposing preventable issues related to oil and helium leaks. All blower tests to this date have resulted in stable blower performance and consistency. A summary of the results for each test, including a review of the first and second tests, are included in this report.

  2. The major results of the PISC II RRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Jehenson, P.; McDonald, N.

    1989-01-01

    Non Destructive Testing (NDT) forms part of the in-service inspection (ISI) of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its associated pressure circuit, and the results of the NDT are used in conjunction with fracture mechanics or as part of a code-defined treatment to assess the significance of flaws. Detection, location and sizing of crack-like flaws play an important role in helping to establish the integrity of these reactor steel structures. (orig.)

  3. Preliminary result and upgrade from WISPDMX Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Le Hoang; Horns, Dieter [Institut fur Experimentalphysik, Universitat Hamburg (Germany); Lobanov, Andrei [Institut fur Experimentalphysik, Universitat Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The microwave cavity experiment WISPDMX is the first direct WISP (Weakly interactive slim particles) dark matter search experiment probing the particle masses in the 0.8-2.0 eV range. The first stage of WISPDMX measurements has been completed at nominal resonant frequencies of the cavity. The upgrading of the data acquisition and analysing has been done to increase the sensitivity of the experiment. We report preliminary result from the cavity tuning at second stage of WISPDMX.

  4. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the {open_quotes}sources{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  5. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  6. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the open-quotes sourcesclose quotes and open-quotes targetsclose quotes requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources

  7. Interpreting results of cluster surveys in emergency settings: is the LQAS test the best option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilukha, Oleg O; Blanton, Curtis

    2008-12-09

    Cluster surveys are commonly used in humanitarian emergencies to measure health and nutrition indicators. Deitchler et al. have proposed to use Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) hypothesis testing in cluster surveys to classify the prevalence of global acute malnutrition as exceeding or not exceeding the pre-established thresholds. Field practitioners and decision-makers must clearly understand the meaning and implications of using this test in interpreting survey results to make programmatic decisions. We demonstrate that the LQAS test--as proposed by Deitchler et al.--is prone to producing false-positive results and thus is likely to suggest interventions in situations where interventions may not be needed. As an alternative, to provide more useful information for decision-making, we suggest reporting the probability of an indicator's exceeding the threshold as a direct measure of "risk". Such probability can be easily determined in field settings by using a simple spreadsheet calculator. The "risk" of exceeding the threshold can then be considered in the context of other aggravating and protective factors to make informed programmatic decisions.

  8. Interpreting results of cluster surveys in emergency settings: is the LQAS test the best option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanton Curtis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster surveys are commonly used in humanitarian emergencies to measure health and nutrition indicators. Deitchler et al. have proposed to use Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS hypothesis testing in cluster surveys to classify the prevalence of global acute malnutrition as exceeding or not exceeding the pre-established thresholds. Field practitioners and decision-makers must clearly understand the meaning and implications of using this test in interpreting survey results to make programmatic decisions. We demonstrate that the LQAS test–as proposed by Deitchler et al. – is prone to producing false-positive results and thus is likely to suggest interventions in situations where interventions may not be needed. As an alternative, to provide more useful information for decision-making, we suggest reporting the probability of an indicator's exceeding the threshold as a direct measure of "risk". Such probability can be easily determined in field settings by using a simple spreadsheet calculator. The "risk" of exceeding the threshold can then be considered in the context of other aggravating and protective factors to make informed programmatic decisions.

  9. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P.R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places in which our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions on the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  10. Recent results of high p(T) physics at the CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Soushi; /Okayama U.

    2005-02-01

    The Tevatron Run II program has been in progress since 2001. The CDF experiment has accumulated roughly five times as much data as did Run I, with much improved detectors. Preliminary results from the CDF experiment are presented. The authors focus on recent high p{sub T} physics results in the Tevatron Run II program.

  11. Strained flamelets for turbulent premixed flames II: Laboratory flame results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolla, H.; Swaminathan, N. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The predictive ability of strained flamelets model for turbulent premixed flames is assessed using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) calculations of laboratory flames covering a wide range of conditions. Reactant-to-product (RtP) opposed flow laminar flames parametrised using the scalar dissipation rate of reaction progress variable are used as strained flamelets. Two turbulent flames: a rod stabilised V-flame studied by Robin et al. [Combust. Flame 153 (2008) 288-315] and a set of pilot stabilised Bunsen flames studied by Chen et al. [Combust. Flame 107 (1996) 223-244] are calculated using a single set of model parameters. The V-flame corresponds to the corrugated flamelets regime. The strained flamelet model and an unstrained flamelet model yield similar predictions which are in good agreement with experimental measurements for this flame. On the other hand, for the Bunsen flames which are in the thin reaction zones regime, the unstrained flamelet model predicts a smaller flame brush compared to experiment. The predictions of the strained flamelets model allowing for fluid-dynamics stretch induced attenuation of the chemical reaction are in good agreement with the experimental data. This model predictions of major and minor species are also in good agreement with experimental data. The results demonstrate that the strained flamelets model using the scalar dissipation rate can be used across the combustion regimes. (author)

  12. Evaluation of LLTR Series II Test A-3 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, J.C.; Chen, K.; Meyer, R.A.; Odegaard, T.K.; Whipple, J.C.

    1980-11-01

    Of the five secondary tubes failed in Test A-3, two were failed by impingement wastage, and the other three appear to have been caused by overheating possibly augmented by wastage. Since no secondary tube failures occurred during large leak tests, this spports the hypthesis that a small initial leak can create much more damage on neighboring tubes than an initial large leak. The overheating falures occurred in about 20 seconds after a second large hole had been produced in a thin wall (non-prototypical) primary tube. Continued water injection under static or low sodium flow conditions following an initial small leak will produce high temperatures which can result in deformation (bowing) of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steam tubes and interference at the tube-tubespacer interface. The damage caused by either impingement wastage or overheating will occur at or above the elevation plane of the initial leak. If water/steam injection continues after removal of the sodium, water steam blanketing will cool the tubes heated by the SWR. Additional tube failures can be caused by overheating prior to rupture disc operation when leak rate is increased by secondary tube penetrations caused by wastage. Acoustic emission measurement provides a rapid means of leak detection for intermediate size leaks

  13. Motivational Interviewing for Workers with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders: Results of a Cluster Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joanne; Esmail, Shaniff; Rayani, Fahreen; Norris, Colleen M; Gross, Douglas P

    2018-06-01

    Purpose Although functional restoration programs appear effective in assisting injured workers to return-to-work (RTW) after a work related musculoskeletal (MSK) disorder, the addition of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to these programs may result in higher RTW. Methods We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial with claimants attending an occupational rehabilitation facility from November 17, 2014 to June 30, 2015. Six clinicians provided MI in addition to the standard functional restoration program and formed an intervention group. Six clinicians continued to provide the standard functional restoration program based on graded activity, therapeutic exercise, and workplace accommodations. Independent t tests and chi square analysis were used to compare groups. Multivariable logistic regression was used to obtain the odds ratio of claimants' confirmed RTW status at time of program discharge. Results 728 workers' compensation claimants with MSK disorders were entered into 1 of 12 therapist clusters (MI group = 367, control group = 361). Claimants were predominantly employed (72.7%), males (63.2%), with moderate levels of pain and disability (mean pain VAS = 5.0/10 and mean Pain Disability Index = 48/70). Claimants were stratified based on job attachment status. The proportion of successful RTW at program discharge was 12.1% higher for unemployed workers in the intervention group (intervention group 21.6 vs. 9.5% in control, p = 0.03) and 3.0% higher for job attached workers compared to the control group (intervention group 97.1 vs. 94.1% in control, p = 0.10). Adherence to MI was mixed, but RTW was significantly higher among MI-adherent clinicians. The odds ratio for unemployed claimants was 2.64 (0.69-10.14) and 2.50 (0.68-9.14) for employed claimants after adjusting for age, sex, pain intensity, perceived disability, and therapist cluster. Conclusion MI in addition to routine functional restoration is more effective than routine

  14. Status and results from the decay spectroscopy project EURICA (Euroball-RIKEN cluster array)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Söderström, P.-A., E-mail: pasoder@ribf.riken.jp; Doornenbal, P.; Nishimura, S.; Baba, H.; Isobe, T.; Kiss, G. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Lorusso, G. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Wu, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Benzoni, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Browne, F. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4JG (United Kingdom); Gey, G. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); LPSC, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); ILL, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Jungclaus, A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Schaffner, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lubos, D. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physik Department E12, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Moschner, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); IKP, University of Cologne, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); and others

    2016-07-07

    β- and isomer-decay spectroscopy are sensitive probes of nuclear structure, and are often the only techniques capable of providing data for exotic nuclei that are produced with very low rates. Decay properties of exotic nuclei are also essential to model astrophysical events responsible for the evolution of the universe such as the rp- and r-processes. The EURICA project (EUROBALL RIKEN Cluster Array) has been launched in 2012 with the goal of performing spectroscopy of very exotic nuclei. Since 2012, five experimental campaigns have been successfully completed using fragmentation of {sup 124}Xe beam and in-flight-fission of {sup 238}U beam. In these proceedings we will introduce the experimental setup and highlight some key recent results around {sup 78}Ni, {sup 132}Sn, and {sup 110}Zn published during 2014 and 2015.

  15. The Globular Clusters of the Galactic Bulge: Results from Multiwavelength Follow-up Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Mauro, Francesco; Alonso Garcia, Javier; Hempel, Maren; Sarajedini, Ata

    2018-01-01

    The Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located towards the bulge of the Milky Way suffer from severe total and differential extinction and high field star densities. They have therefore been systematically excluded from deep, large-scale homogenous GGC surveys, and will present a challenge for Gaia. Meanwhile, existing observations of bulge GGCs have revealed tantalizing hints that they hold clues to Galactic formation and evolution not found elsewhere. Therefore, in order to better characterize these poorly studied stellar systems and place them in the context of their optically well-studied counterparts, we have undertaken imaging programs at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. We describe these programs and present a variety of results, including self-consistent measurement of bulge GGC ages and structural parameters. The limitations imposed by spatially variable extinction and extinction law are highlighted, along with the complimentary nature of forthcoming facilities, allowing us to finally complete our picture of the Milky Way GGC system.

  16. Results of Cesar II critical facility with low enriched fuel balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlet, G; Guerange, J; Laponche, B; Morier, F; Neef, R D; Bock, H J; Kring, F J; Scherer, W

    1972-06-15

    The Cesar facility has been transformed to load in its center a pebble bed fuel. This new Cesar assembly is called Cesar II. The program for the measurements with HTR type fuel balls is managed under a cooperation between physicists of CEA/CADARACHE and KFA/JUELICH. A description of the measuring zones of Cesar II and of the experimental results is given.

  17. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. II. DATA DESCRIPTION AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Balcells, Marc; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jogee, Shardha; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ∼50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (∼1.75 Mpc or 1 0 ) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin 2 . The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ∼73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described

  18. Multiple cluster axis II comorbidity and functional outcome in severe patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Nerea; McMaster, Antonia; Díaz-Marsá, Marina; de la Vega, Irene; Montes, Ana; Carrasco, José Luis

    2016-11-01

    Current literature suggests that personality disorder comorbidity negatively contributes to both the severity and prognosis of other disorders; however, little literature has been devoted to its influence on borderline personality disorder (BPD). The objective of the present work is to study comorbidity with other personality disorders in a severe clinical sample of patients with BPD, and its relationship with global functionality. A sample of 65 patients with severe borderline personality disorder was included in the study. Clinical and functionality measures were applied in order to study comorbidity of BPD with other disorders and its relationship with functionality. Associations with other comorbid PDs were analyzed with t-tests and linear correlations. Most patients (87%) presented comorbidity with other PDs. Almost half of the sample (42%) presented more than two PDs, and cluster A (paranoid) and C (obsessive and avoidant) PD were more frequent than cluster B (histrionic and antisocial). Only the presence of avoidant PD predicted a worse functional outcome in the long term (U Mann Withney ppersonality disorder might negatively predict for prognosis.

  19. Gas Phase Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Dmso, Part II: Towards the Terahertz Observation of 4-FOLD Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.

    2013-06-01

    Benefiting of the exceptional properties of the AILES synchrotron beamline, the gas phase Far-IR spectrum of DMSO has been recorded and resolved. The rovibrational analysis allowed to discover a new rotational behaviour for a polyatomic molecule: the gyroscopic destabilization. In order to explain this phenomenon, we looked for four-fold energy clusters in the high resolution ground state THz spectrum of DMSO recorded with a sub-THz spectrometer based on a frequency multiplication chain. Pure rotational lines in the 5 lowest vibrationnally excited levels have been recorded below 700 GHz. With near 1000 rotational transitions assigned, high quantum numbers have been reached allowing to discover sequence of four-fold clusters in the out of plane bending mode of DMSO and to study the vibrational dependence of an unusual rotational dynamics. J. B. Brubach et al., AIP Conf. Proc., 1214, (81), 2010. A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii,Chem. Phys. Lett., 492,(30),2010 A. Cuisset, O. Pirali, D. Sadovskii,Phys. Rev. Lett., 109,(094101), 2012. G. Mouret, M. Guinet, A. Cuisset, L. Croizet, S. Eliet, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, IEEE Sensors Journal, 13, 1, 2013.

  20. Effect of binary stars on the dynamical evolution of stellar clusters. II. Analytic evolutionary models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    We use analytic models to compute the evolution of the core of a stellar system due simultaneously to stellar evaporation which causes the system (core) to contract and to its binaries which cause it to expand by progressively decreasing its binding energy. The evolution of the system is determined by two parameters: the initial number of stars in the system N 0 , and the fraction f/subb/ of its stars which are binaries. For a fixed f/subb/, stellar evaporation initially dominates the dynamical evolution if N 0 is sufficiently large due to the fact that the rate of evaporation is determined chiefly by long-range encounters which increase in importance as the number of stars in the system increases. If stellar evaporation initially dominates, the system first contracts, but as N/subc/, the number of remaining stars in the system, decreases by evaporation, the system reaches a minimum radius and a maximum density and then it expands monotonically as N/subc/ decreases further. Open clusters expand monotonically from the beginning if they have anything approaching average Population I binary frequencies. Globular clusters are highly deficient in binaries in order to have formed and retained the high-density stellar cores observed in most of them. We estimate that for these system f/subb/ < or = 0.15

  1. Planck early results. XII. Cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich optical scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal-to-richness scaling relation (Y500 - N200) for the MaxBCG cluster catalogue. Employing a multi-frequency matched filter on the Planck sky maps, we measure the SZ signal for each cluster by adapting the filter according to weak-lensing calibrated mass-r...

  2. Planck 2015 results: XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present cluster counts and corresponding cosmological constraints from the Planck full mission data set. Our catalogue consists of 439 clusters detected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal down to a signal-to-noise ratio of 6, and is more than a factor of 2 larger than the 2013 Planck clus...

  3. Open clusters. II. Fundamental parameters of B stars in Collinder 223, Hogg 16, NGC 2645, NGC 3114, and NGC 6025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidelman, Y.; Cidale, L. S.; Zorec, J.; Panei, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The knowledge of accurate values of effective temperature, surface gravity, and luminosity of stars in open clusters is very important not only to derive cluster distances and ages but also to discuss the stellar structure and evolution. Unfortunately, stellar parameters are still very scarce. Aims: Our goal is to study five open clusters to derive stellar parameters of the B and Be star population and discuss the cluster properties. In a near future, we intend to gather a statistically relevant samples of Be stars to discuss their origin and evolution. Methods: We use the Barbier-Chalonge-Divan spectrophotometric system, based on the study of low-resolution spectra around the Balmer discontinuity, since it is independent of the interstellar and circumstellar extinction and provides accurate Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams and stellar parameters. Results: We determine stellar fundamental parameters, such as effective temperatures, surface gravities, spectral types, luminosity classes, absolute and bolometric magnitudes and colour gradient excesses of the stars in the field of Collinder 223, Hogg 16, NGC 2645, NGC 3114, and NGC 6025. Additional information, mainly masses and ages of cluster stellar populations, is obtained using stellar evolution models. In most cases, stellar fundamental parameters have been derived for the first time. We also discuss the derived cluster properties of reddening, age and distance. Conclusions: Collinder 223 cluster parameters are overline{E(B-V) = 0.25 ± 0.03} mag and overline{(mv - M_v)0 = 11.21 ± 0.25} mag. In Hogg 16, we clearly distinguish two groups of stars (Hogg 16a and Hogg 16b) with very different mean true distance moduli (8.91 ± 0.26 mag and 12.51 ± 0.38 mag), mean colour excesses (0.26 ± 0.03 mag and 0.63 ± 0.08 mag), and spectral types (B early-type and B late-/A-type stars, respectively). The farthest group could be merged with Collinder 272. NGC 2645 is a young cluster (age between 40 Myr and 69 Myr. In

  4. Intermittent thermal plasma acceleration linked to sporadic motions of the magnetopause, first Cluster results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-A. Sauvaud

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first observations with Cluster of a very dense population of thermal ionospheric ions (H+, He+, O+ locally "accelerated" perpendicularly to the local magnetic field in a region adjacent to the magnetopause and on its magnetospheric side. The observation periods follow a long period of very weak magnetic activity. Recurrent motions of the magnetopause are, in the presented cases, unexpectedly associated with the appearance inside closed field lines of recurrent energy structures of ionospheric ions with energies in the 5 eV to  ~1000 eV range. The heaviest ions were detected with the highest energies. Here, the ion behaviour is interpreted as resulting from local electric field enhancements/decreases which adiabatically enhance/lower the bulk energy of a local dense thermal ion population. This drift effect, which is directly linked to magnetopause motions caused by pressure changes, allows for the thermal ions to overcome the satellite potential and be detected by the suprathermal CIS Cluster experiment. When fast flowing, i.e. when detectable, the density (~ 1 cm-3 of these ions from a terrestrial origin is (in the cases presented here largely higher than the local density of ions from magnetospheric/plasma sheet origin which poses again the question of the relative importance of solar and ionospheric sources for the magnetospheric plasma even during very quiet magnetic conditions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (planetary ionosphere; plasma convection Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers

  5. Aero thermal test results obtained on the n. C 5 EL 4 Cluster in the atmospheric pressure cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasc, B.

    1964-01-01

    In the framework of thermal studies on the EL-4 cluster, the full-scale tests at atmospheric pressure are designed to permit measurement of local values of the wall temperature, of the velocity and of the temperature in the fluid. The experimental results, obtained with the help of an original measuring apparatus, make it possible to follow the changes in these values along the cluster and to predict in much detail the in-pile thermal behaviour. In particular it is shown that changes in the wall temperature along the cluster are greatly influenced by disruption of the flow caused by grids and supports. (author) [fr

  6. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  7. THE MASSIVE AND DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY. II. INITIAL SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF z ∼ 1 GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED FROM 10,000 deg2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Gettings, Daniel P.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy of galaxy clusters which were identified as part of an all-sky search for high-redshift galaxy clusters, the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS). The initial phase of MaDCoWS combined infrared data from the all-sky data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select probable z ∼ 1 clusters of galaxies over an area of 10,000 deg 2 . Our spectroscopy confirms 19 new clusters at 0.7 < z < 1.3, half of which are at z > 1, demonstrating the viability of using WISE to identify high-redshift galaxy clusters. The next phase of MaDCoWS will use the greater depth of the AllWISE data release to identify even higher redshift cluster candidates

  8. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume II: study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    In this second phase the impact of unscheduled maintenance, several vacuum wall arrangements, and maintenance of other reactor interfacing subsystems and maintenance equipment are added to the evaluation of the maintainability of the fusion power reactor concepts. Four concepts are normalized to common performance parameters and evaluated for their capability to achieve availability and cost of electricity goals considering both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. The results of this evaluation are used to generate a series of maintainability design guidelines and to select the more desirable features and design options which are used to configure a preliminary reactor concept having improved maintainability

  9. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  10. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project. II. Samples and X-Ray Data Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Ebeling, H.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the measurements of the galaxy cluster mass functions at z ≈ 0.05 and z ≈ 0.5 using high-quality Chandra observations of samples derived from the ROSAT PSPC All-Sky and 400 deg2 surveys. We provide a full reference for the data analysis procedures, present updated calibration of relati...... at a fixed mass threshold, e.g., by a factor of 5.0 ± 1.2 at M 500 = 2.5 × 1014 h –1 M sun between z = 0 and 0.5. This evolution reflects the growth of density perturbations, and can be used for the cosmological constraints complementing those from the distance-redshift relation....

  11. Plasma convection in the magnetotail lobes: statistical results from Cluster EDI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haaland

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A major part of the plasma in the Earth's magnetotail is populated through transport of plasma from the solar wind via the magnetotail lobes. In this paper, we present a statistical study of plasma convection in the lobes for different directions of the interplanetary magnetic field and for different geomagnetic disturbance levels. The data set used in this study consists of roughly 340 000 one-minute vector measurements of the plasma convection from the Cluster Electron Drift Instrument (EDI obtained during the period February 2001 to June 2007. The results show that both convection magnitude and direction are largely controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. For a southward IMF, there is a strong convection towards the central plasma sheet with convection velocities around 10 km s−1. During periods of northward IMF, the lobe convection is almost stagnant. A By dominated IMF causes a rotation of the convection patterns in the tail with an oppositely directed dawn-dusk component of the convection for the northern and southern lobe. Our results also show that there is an overall persistent duskward component, which is most likely a result of conductivity gradients in the footpoints of the magnetic field lines in the ionosphere.

  12. Baryon Distribution in Galaxy Clusters as a Result of Sedimentation of Helium Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin; Wu

    2000-01-20

    Heavy particles in galaxy clusters tend to be more centrally concentrated than light ones according to the Boltzmann distribution. An estimate of the drift velocity suggests that it is possible that the helium nuclei may have entirely or partially sedimented into the cluster core within the Hubble time. We demonstrate this scenario using the Navarro-Frenk-White profile as the dark matter distribution of clusters and assuming that the intracluster gas is isothermal and in hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that a greater fraction of baryonic matter is distributed at small radii than at large radii, which challenges the prevailing claim that the baryon fraction increases monotonically with cluster radius. It shows that the conventional mass estimate using X-ray measurements of intracluster gas along with a constant mean molecular weight may have underestimated the total cluster mass by approximately 20%, which in turn leads to an overestimate of the total baryon fraction by the same percentage. Additionally, it is pointed out that the sedimentation of helium nuclei toward cluster cores may at least partially account for the sharp peaks in the central X-ray emissions observed in some clusters.

  13. Five-Year Safety and Performance Results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D; Humayun, Mark S; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C; Ho, Allen C; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind as a result of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception resulting from end-stage RP. Prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the nonimplanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared with their vision with the Argus II. Thirty participants in 10 centers in the United States and Europe. The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by 3 computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively scored real-world tasks. Twenty-four of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years after implantation. Only 1 additional serious adverse event was experienced after the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the Argus II on than off on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. The 5-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind as a result of RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aqueous solvation of Mg(ii) and Ca(ii): A Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of microhydrated gas phase clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Pimentel, C. I.; Amaro-Estrada, J. I.; Hernández-Cobos, J.; Saint-Martin, H.; Ramírez-Solís, A.

    2018-04-01

    The hydration features of [Mg(H2O)n ] 2 + and [Ca(H2O)n ] 2 + clusters with n = 3-6, 8, 18, and 27 were studied by means of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level of theory. For both ions, it is energetically more favorable to have all water molecules in the first hydration shell when n ≤ 6, but stable lower coordination average structures with one water molecule not directly interacting with the ion were found for Mg2+ at room temperature, showing signatures of proton transfer events for the smaller cation but not for the larger one. A more rigid octahedral-type structure for Mg2+ than for Ca2+ was observed in all simulations, with no exchange of water molecules to the second hydration shell. Significant thermal effects on the average structure of clusters were found: while static optimizations lead to compact, spherically symmetric hydration geometries, the effects introduced by finite-temperature dynamics yield more prolate configurations. The calculated vibrational spectra are in agreement with infrared spectroscopy results. Previous studies proposed an increase in the coordination number (CN) from six to eight water molecules for [Ca(H2O)n ] 2 + clusters when n ≥ 12; however, in agreement with recent measurements of binding energies, no transition to a larger CN was found when n > 8. Moreover, the excellent agreement found between the calculated extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy spectra for the larger cluster and the experimental data of the aqueous solution supports a CN of six for Ca2+.

  15. Planck intermediate results I. Further validation of new Planck clusters with XMM-Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Collaboration, Planck; Arnaud, M.

    2012-01-01

    of candidates previously confirmed with XMM-Newton. The X-ray and optical redshifts for a total of 20 clusters are found to be in excellent agreement. We also show that useful lower limits can be put on cluster redshifts using X-ray data only via the use of the Y-X vs. Y-SZ and X-ray flux F-X vs. Y-SZ relations....

  16. New spectroscopic results in Xe II, Xe III, and Xe IV

    OpenAIRE

    Reyna Almandos, Jorge Guillermo; Gallardo, Mario; Garavaglia, Mario J.

    1982-01-01

    New results obtained in spontaneous xenon spectrum employing a conventional pulsed gaseous laser tube as light source, are presented in this work. A total of 626 spectral lines has been ionically assigned as follows: 50 to Xe II spectrum, 103 to Xe III spectrum, arid 222 to Xe IV spectrum. 30 Lines previously assigned to Xe II were reassigned as belonging to Xe III, 94 lines were assigned with some doubts to Xe II-III spectrum and 84 lines to Xe Ill-IV spectrum. Also there were clas...

  17. [The attitude of German veterinarians towards farm animal welfare: results of a cluster analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Heinke; Kemper, Nicole; Theuvsen, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the issue of animal welfare in intensive livestock production systems has been subjected to increasing criticism from the broad public. Some groups in society ask for higher animal welfare standards and there is an increas- ing number of consumers who prefer meat from more animal friendly husbandry systems. An intense social debate on animal welfare has flared up in the recent past. Veterinarians are considered as experts for the assessment of animal welfare. Nevertheless they are rarely consulted in the current debate. Therefore, only little is known about their attitude towards animal welfare in livestock farming. Even for Germany, there is so far no comprehensive analysis about their atti- tudes towards animal welfare and animal welfare programs. In the present study, 433 veterinarians were questioned via an online survey. The results show that veterinarians have a very differentiated perception of the issue animal welfare. Four groups (clusters) which have different attitudes towards livestock farming, voluntary animal welfare programs, farm size and the effects of national animal welfare standards were identified.

  18. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1985-12-01

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation

  19. Octa- and nonanuclear nickel(II) polyoxometalate clusters: synthesis and electrochemical and magnetic characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Céline; Mialane, Pierre; Dolbecq, Anne; Marrot, Jérôme; Rivière, Eric; Bassil, Bassem S; Kortz, Ulrich; Keita, Bineta; Nadjo, Louis; Sécheresse, Francis

    2008-12-01

    Three high-nuclearity NiII-substituted polyoxometalate compounds functionalized by exogenous ligands have been synthesized and characterized. The octanuclear complexes in Na15[Na{(A-R-SiW9O34)Ni4(CH3COO)3(OH)3}2] . 4NaCl . 36H2O (1) and Na15[Na{(A-R-SiW9O34)Ni4(CH3COO)3(OH)2(N3)}2] . 32H2O (2) can be described as two {Ni4} subunits connected via a {Na(CH3COO)6} group, with the acetato ligands also ensuring in each subunit the connection between the paramagnetic centers. In 2, two azido groups replace two of the six mu-hydroxo ligands present in 1. The nonanuclear complex K7Na7[(A-R-SiW9O34)2Ni9(OH)6(H2O)6(CO3)3] . 42H2O (3) exhibits a double cubanestructure with two [(A-R-SiW9O34)Ni4(OH)3]5- subunits linked by three carbonato ligands. A ninth NiII center connected to one subunit via a carbonato ligand and a O=W group completes this asymmetric polyoxometalate.Electronic spectroscopy and electrochemical studies indicate that, while compounds 1-3 decompose in a pure aqueous medium, these complexes are very stable in a pH 6 acetate medium. The cyclic voltammetry pattern of each complex is constituted by a first eight-electron reduction wave followed by a second large-current intensity wave. The characteristics of the first waves of the complexes are clearly distinct from those obtained for their lacunary precursor [A-R-SiW9O34]10-, a feature that is due to the Ni centers in the complexes. Such observations of electroactive, stable, and highly nickel-rich polyoxometalates are not common. Measurements of the magnetic susceptibility revealed the occurrence of concomitant ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in 1 and 3.For both of these compounds, the extension of the magnetic exchange has been determined by means of a spin Hamiltonian with three and four J constants, respectively.

  20. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  1. Evolution of cluster X-ray luminosities and radii: Results from the 160 square degree rosat survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; McNamara, B.R.; Forman, W.

    1998-01-01

    We searched for cluster X-ray luminosity and radius evolution using our sample of 203 galaxy clusters detected in the 160 deg(2) survey with the ROSAT PSPC (Vikhlinin et al.). With such a large area survey, it is possible, for the first time with ROSAT, to test the evolution of luminous clusters, L......-X > 3 x 10(44) ergs s(-1) in the 0.5-2 keV band. We detect a factor of 3-4 deficit of such luminous clusters at z > 0.3 compared with the present. The evolution is much weaker or absent at modestly lower luminosities, (1-3) x 10(44) ergs s(-1). At still lower luminosities, we find no evolution from...... the analysis of the log N-log S relation. The results in the two upper L, bins are in agreement with the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey evolution result (Gioia et al.; Henry ct al.), which was obtained using a completely independent cluster sample. The low-L-X results are in agreement with other...

  2. First results of GERDA Phase II and consistency with background models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode1, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) is an experiment for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge, located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN (Italy). GERDA operates bare high purity germanium detectors submersed in liquid Argon (LAr). Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 and is currently ongoing. In Phase II 35 kg of germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge including thirty newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors is operating to reach an exposure of 100 kg·yr within about 3 years data taking. The design goal of Phase II is to reduce the background by one order of magnitude to get the sensitivity for T1/20ν = O≤ft( {{{10}26}} \\right){{ yr}}. To achieve the necessary background reduction, the setup was complemented with LAr veto. Analysis of the background spectrum of Phase II demonstrates consistency with the background models. Furthermore 226Ra and 232Th contamination levels consistent with screening results. In the first Phase II data release we found no hint for a 0νββ decay signal and place a limit of this process T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L., sensitivity 4.0·1025 yr). First results of GERDA Phase II will be presented.

  3. Cluster as a wave telescope – first results from the fluxgate magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    Full Text Available The four Cluster spacecraft provide an excellent opportunity to study spatial structures in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. Propagating waves are amongst the interesting structures and for the first time, Cluster will allow one to measure the wave vector of low-frequency fluctuations in a space plasma. Based on a generalized minimum variance analysis wave vector estimates will be determined in the terrestrial magnetosheath and the near-Earth solar wind. The virtue and weakness of the wave telescope technique used is discussed in detail.

    Key words. Electromagnetics (wave propagation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; plasma waves and instabilities

  4. Cluster as a wave telescope – first results from the fluxgate magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The four Cluster spacecraft provide an excellent opportunity to study spatial structures in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. Propagating waves are amongst the interesting structures and for the first time, Cluster will allow one to measure the wave vector of low-frequency fluctuations in a space plasma. Based on a generalized minimum variance analysis wave vector estimates will be determined in the terrestrial magnetosheath and the near-Earth solar wind. The virtue and weakness of the wave telescope technique used is discussed in detail.Key words. Electromagnetics (wave propagation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; plasma waves and instabilities

  5. Planck intermediate results. X. Physics of the hot gas in the Coma cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of Planck satellite data on the Coma Cluster observed via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Planck is able, for the first time, to detect SZ emission up to r ~ 3 X R_500. We test previously proposed models for the pressure distribution in clusters against the azimuthally averaged...... data. We find that the Arnaud et al. universal pressure profile does not fit Coma, and that their pressure profile for merging systems provides a good fit of the data only at rR_500 than the mean pressure profile predicted by the simulations. The Planck image shows significant local steepening of the y...

  6. Planck early results. IX. XMM-Newton follow-up for validation of Planck cluster candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present the XMM-Newton follow-up for confirmation of Planck cluster candidates. Twenty-five candidates have been observed to date using snapshot (∼10 ks) exposures, ten as part of a pilot programme to sample a low range of signal-to-noise ratios (4

  7. Planck intermediate results: III. the relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Bucher, M.; Cardoso, J.-F.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal DA2 Y500 for a sample of 19 objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses are derived from XMM-N...

  8. Planck early results. XI. Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z <0.5) detected at high signal-to-noise in the first Planck all-sky data set. The sample spans approximately a decade in total mass, 2 × 1014 M

  9. Planck 2013 results. XX. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal-to-...

  10. Planck intermediate results: XLIII. Spectral energy distribution of dust in clusters of galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    Although infrared (IR) overall dust emission from clusters of galaxies has been statistically detected using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), it has not been possible to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission over its peak, and thus to break the degene...

  11. Planck early results. VIII. The all-sky early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This early SZ (ESZ) sample is comprised of 189 candidates, which have a high signal-to-noise ratio ranging from 6 to 29. Its ...

  12. First results from the IllustrisTNG simulations: matter and galaxy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pillepich, Annalisa; Weinberger, Rainer; Nelson, Dylan; Hernquist, Lars; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Marinacci, Federico; Naiman, Jill

    2018-03-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation have now reached sufficient volume to make precision predictions for clustering on cosmologically relevant scales. Here, we use our new IllustrisTNG simulations to study the non-linear correlation functions and power spectra of baryons, dark matter, galaxies, and haloes over an exceptionally large range of scales. We find that baryonic effects increase the clustering of dark matter on small scales and damp the total matter power spectrum on scales up to k ˜ 10 h Mpc-1 by 20 per cent. The non-linear two-point correlation function of the stellar mass is close to a power-law over a wide range of scales and approximately invariant in time from very high redshift to the present. The two-point correlation function of the simulated galaxies agrees well with Sloan Digital Sky Survey at its mean redshift z ≃ 0.1, both as a function of stellar mass and when split according to galaxy colour, apart from a mild excess in the clustering of red galaxies in the stellar mass range of109-1010 h-2 M⊙. Given this agreement, the TNG simulations can make valuable theoretical predictions for the clustering bias of different galaxy samples. We find that the clustering length of the galaxy autocorrelation function depends strongly on stellar mass and redshift. Its power-law slope γ is nearly invariant with stellar mass, but declines from γ ˜ 1.8 at redshift z = 0 to γ ˜ 1.6 at redshift z ˜ 1, beyond which the slope steepens again. We detect significant scale dependences in the bias of different observational tracers of large-scale structure, extending well into the range of the baryonic acoustic oscillations and causing nominal (yet fortunately correctable) shifts of the acoustic peaks of around ˜ 5 per cent.

  13. Test beam results for an upgraded forward tagger of the L3 experiment at LEP II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemarin, M.; Depasse, P.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Fredj, L.; Ille, B.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Susinno, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    We have tested new scintillator modules with silicon photodiode readout for the upgraded Active Lead Rings (ALR) of the L3 detector at LEP II. Results are presented from data recorded in muon and electron test beams with particular emphasis on the light production and collection as a function of the particle impact position on the scintillator modules. The results from the beam test data will be used for the design of the readout and trigger electronics in conjunction with the required ALR performance as an electron tagger and beam background monitor at LEP II. ((orig.))

  14. Five-year safety and performance results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D.; Humayun, Mark S.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E.; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B.; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V.; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L.; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Ho, Allen C.; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V.; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception due to end-stage RP. Design The study is a prospective, multicenter, single-arm, clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the non-implanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared to their vision when using the System. Subjects There were 30 subjects in 10 centers in the U.S. and Europe. Methods The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II System. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by three computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively-scored real-world tasks. Results Twenty-four out of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years post-implant. Only one additional serious adverse event was experienced since the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the System ON than OFF on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. Conclusions The five-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind from RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. PMID:27453256

  15. Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2010-01-01

    We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments

  16. Photoproduced fluorescent Au(I)@(Ag2/Ag3)-thiolate giant cluster: an intriguing sensing platform for DMSO and Pb(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Jana, Jayasmita; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-01-14

    Synergistic evolution of fluorescent Au(I)@(Ag2/Ag3)-thiolate core-shell particles has been made possible under the Sun in presence of the respective precursor coinage metal compounds and glutathione (GSH). The green chemically synthesized fluorescent clusters are giant (∼600 nm) in size and robust. Among all the common water miscible solvents, exclusively DMSO exhibits selective fluorescence quenching (Turn Off) because of the removal of GSH from the giant cluster. Again, only Pb(II) ion brings back the lost fluorescence (Turn On) leaving aside all other metal ions. This happens owing to the strong affinity of the sulfur donor of DMSO for Pb(II). Thus, employing the aqueous solution containing the giant cluster, we can detect DMSO contamination in water bodies at trace level. Besides, a selective sensing platform has emerged out for Pb(II) ion with a detection limit of 14 × 10(-8) M. Pb(II) induced fluorescence recovery is again vanished by I(-) implying a promising route to sense I(-) ion.

  17. Planck 2013 results. XX. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bohringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bourdin, H.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M.L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Democles, J.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal-to-noise threshold of seven, with each object confirmed as a cluster and all but one with a redshift estimate. We discuss the completeness of the sample and our construction of a likelihood analysis. Using a relation between mass $M$ and SZ signal $Y$ calibrated to X-ray measurements, we derive constraints on the power spectrum amplitude $\\sigma_8$ and matter density parameter $\\Omega_{\\mathrm{m}}$ in a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. We test the robustness of our estimates and find that possible biases in the $Y$--$M$ relation and the halo mass function are larger than the statistical uncertainties from the cluster sample. Assuming the X-ray determined mass to be biased low relative to the true mass by between zero and 30%, m...

  18. First results from the RAPID imaging energetic particle spectrometer on board Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wilken

    Full Text Available The advanced energetic particle spectrometer RAPID on board Cluster can provide a complete description of the relevant particle parameters velocity, V , and atomic mass, A, over an energy range from 30 keV up to 1.5 MeV. We present the first measurements taken by RAPID during the commissioning and the early operating phases. The orbit on 14 January 2001, when Cluster was travelling from a perigee near dawn northward across the pole towards an apogee in the solar wind, is used to demonstrate the capabilities of RAPID in investigating a wide variety of particle populations. RAPID, with its unique capability of measuring the complete angular distribution of energetic particles, allows for the simultaneous measurements of local density gradients, as reflected in the anisotropies of 90° particles and the remote sensing of changes in the distant field line topology, as manifested in the variations of loss cone properties. A detailed discussion of angle-angle plots shows considerable differences in the structure of the boundaries between the open and closed field lines on the nightside fraction of the pass and the magnetopause crossing. The 3 March 2001 encounter of Cluster with an FTE just outside the magnetosphere is used to show the first structural plasma investigations of an FTE by energetic multi-spacecraft observations.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetosheath

  19. First results from the RAPID imaging energetic particle spectrometer on board Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wilken

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The advanced energetic particle spectrometer RAPID on board Cluster can provide a complete description of the relevant particle parameters velocity, V , and atomic mass, A, over an energy range from 30 keV up to 1.5 MeV. We present the first measurements taken by RAPID during the commissioning and the early operating phases. The orbit on 14 January 2001, when Cluster was travelling from a perigee near dawn northward across the pole towards an apogee in the solar wind, is used to demonstrate the capabilities of RAPID in investigating a wide variety of particle populations. RAPID, with its unique capability of measuring the complete angular distribution of energetic particles, allows for the simultaneous measurements of local density gradients, as reflected in the anisotropies of 90° particles and the remote sensing of changes in the distant field line topology, as manifested in the variations of loss cone properties. A detailed discussion of angle-angle plots shows considerable differences in the structure of the boundaries between the open and closed field lines on the nightside fraction of the pass and the magnetopause crossing. The 3 March 2001 encounter of Cluster with an FTE just outside the magnetosphere is used to show the first structural plasma investigations of an FTE by energetic multi-spacecraft observations.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetosheath

  20. Planck intermediate results: V. Pressure profiles of galaxy clusters from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.

    2013-01-01

    that most clusters are individually detected at least out to R500. By stacking the radial profiles, we have statistically detected the radial SZ signal out to 3 × R500, i.e., at a density contrast of about 50-100, though the dispersion about the mean profile dominates the statistical errors across the whole......Taking advantage of the all-sky coverage and broadfrequency range of the Planck satellite, we study the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) and pressure profiles of 62 nearby massive clusters detected at high significance in the 14-month nominal survey. Careful reconstruction of the SZ signal indicates...... flatter than most predictions from numerical simulations. Combining the SZ and X-ray observed profiles into a joint fit to a generalised pressure profile gives best-fit parameters [P0,c500,γ, α,β] = [6.41,1.81,0.31,1.33,4.13]. Using a reasonable hypothesis for the gas temperature in the cluster outskirts...

  1. Why do ultrasoft repulsive particles cluster and crystallize? Analytical results from density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likos, Christos N; Mladek, Bianca M; Gottwald, Dieter; Kahl, Gerhard

    2007-06-14

    We demonstrate the accuracy of the hypernetted chain closure and of the mean-field approximation for the calculation of the fluid-state properties of systems interacting by means of bounded and positive pair potentials with oscillating Fourier transforms. Subsequently, we prove the validity of a bilinear, random-phase density functional for arbitrary inhomogeneous phases of the same systems. On the basis of this functional, we calculate analytically the freezing parameters of the latter. We demonstrate explicitly that the stable crystals feature a lattice constant that is independent of density and whose value is dictated by the position of the negative minimum of the Fourier transform of the pair potential. This property is equivalent with the existence of clusters, whose population scales proportionally to the density. We establish that regardless of the form of the interaction potential and of the location on the freezing line, all cluster crystals have a universal Lindemann ratio Lf=0.189 at freezing. We further make an explicit link between the aforementioned density functional and the harmonic theory of crystals. This allows us to establish an equivalence between the emergence of clusters and the existence of negative Fourier components of the interaction potential. Finally, we make a connection between the class of models at hand and the system of infinite-dimensional hard spheres, when the limits of interaction steepness and space dimension are both taken to infinity in a particularly described fashion.

  2. Inadequacy of ethical conduct and reporting of stepped wedge cluster randomized trials: Results from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljaard, Monica; Hemming, Karla; Shah, Lena; Giraudeau, Bruno; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Weijer, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Background/aims The use of the stepped wedge cluster randomized design is rapidly increasing. This design is commonly used to evaluate health policy and service delivery interventions. Stepped wedge cluster randomized trials have unique characteristics that complicate their ethical interpretation. The 2012 Ottawa Statement provides comprehensive guidance on the ethical design and conduct of cluster randomized trials, and the 2010 CONSORT extension for cluster randomized trials provides guidelines for reporting. Our aims were to assess the adequacy of the ethical conduct and reporting of stepped wedge trials to date, focusing on research ethics review and informed consent. Methods We conducted a systematic review of stepped wedge cluster randomized trials in health research published up to 2014 in English language journals. We extracted details of study intervention and data collection procedures, as well as reporting of research ethics review and informed consent. Two reviewers independently extracted data from each trial; discrepancies were resolved through discussion. We identified the presence of any research participants at the cluster level and the individual level. We assessed ethical conduct by tabulating reporting of research ethics review and informed consent against the presence of research participants. Results Of 32 identified stepped wedge trials, only 24 (75%) reported review by a research ethics committee, and only 16 (50%) reported informed consent from any research participants-yet, all trials included research participants at some level. In the subgroup of 20 trials with research participants at cluster level, only 4 (20%) reported informed consent from such participants; in 26 trials with individual-level research participants, only 15 (58%) reported their informed consent. Interventions (regardless of whether targeting cluster- or individual-level participants) were delivered at the group level in more than two-thirds of trials; nine trials (28

  3. Cluster Analysis of Maize Inbred Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiban Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of diversity among inbred lines is important for heterosis breeding. Sixty maize inbred lines were evaluated for their eight agro morphological traits during winter season of 2011 to analyze their genetic diversity. Clustering was done by average linkage method. The inbred lines were grouped into six clusters. Inbred lines grouped into Clusters II had taller plants with maximum number of leaves. The cluster III was characterized with shorter plants with minimum number of leaves. The inbred lines categorized into cluster V had early flowering whereas the group into cluster VI had late flowering time. The inbred lines grouped into the cluster III were characterized by higher value of anthesis silking interval (ASI and those of cluster VI had lower value of ASI. These results showed that the inbred lines having widely divergent clusters can be utilized in hybrid breeding programme.

  4. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geveci, Berk (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four

  5. Polar cap ion beams during periods of northward IMF: Cluster statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Above the polar caps and during prolonged periods of northward IMF, the Cluster satellites detect upward accelerated ion beams with energies up to a few keV. They are associated with converging electric field structures indicating that the acceleration is caused by a quasi-static field-aligned electric field that can extend to altitudes higher than 7 RE (Maggiolo et al., 2006; Teste et al., 2007. Using the AMDA science analysis service provided by the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas, we have been able to extract about 200 events of accelerated upgoing ion beams above the polar caps from the Cluster database. Most of these observations are taken at altitudes lower than 7 RE and in the Northern Hemisphere. We investigate the statistical properties of these ion beams. We analyze their geometry, the properties of the plasma populations and of the electric field inside and around the beams, as well as their dependence on solar wind and IMF conditions. We show that ~40 % of the ion beams are collocated with a relatively hot and isotropic plasma population. The density and temperature of the isotropic population are highly variable but suggest that this plasma originates from the plasma sheet. The ion beam properties do not change significantly when the isotropic, hot background population is present. Furthermore, during one single polar cap crossing by Cluster it is possible to detect upgoing ion beams both with and without an accompanying isotropic component. The analysis of the variation of the IMF BZ component prior to the detection of the beams indicates that the delay between a northward/southward turning of IMF and the appearance/disappearance of the beams is respectively ~2 h and 20 min. The observed electrodynamic characteristics of high altitude polar cap ion beams suggest that they are closely connected to polar cap auroral arcs. We discuss the implications of these Cluster observations above the polar cap on the magnetospheric

  6. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II. The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G.S.; Harnden, F.R. Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that of Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars. 77 refs

  7. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II - The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that of Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars.

  8. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  9. Comparison of vibration test results for Atucha II NPP and large scale concrete block models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, S.; Konno, T.; Prato, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the soil structure interaction of reactor building that could be constructed on a Quaternary soil, a comparison study of the soil structure interaction springs was performed between full scale vibration test results of Atucha II NPP and vibration test results of large scale concrete block models constructed on Quaternary soil. This comparison study provides a case data of soil structure interaction springs on Quaternary soil with different foundation size and stiffness. (author)

  10. Amorphous manganese-calcium oxides as a possible evolutionary origin for the CaMn₄ cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-06-01

    In this paper a few calcium-manganese oxides and calcium-manganese minerals are studied as catalysts for water oxidation. The natural mineral marokite is also studied as a catalyst for water oxidation for the first time. Marokite is made up of edge-sharing Mn(3+) in a distorted octahedral environment and eight-coordinate Ca(2+) centered polyhedral layers. The structure is similar to recent models of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II. Thus, the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II does not have an unusual structure and could be synthesized hydrothermally. Also in this paper, oxygen evolution is studied with marokite (CaMn₂O₄), pyrolusite (MnO₂) and compared with hollandite (Ba(0.2)Ca(0.15)K(0.3)Mn(6.9)Al(0.2)Si(0.3)O(16)), hausmannite (Mn₃O₄), Mn₂O₃.H₂O, Ca Mn₃O₆.H₂O, CaMn₄O₈.H₂O, CaMn₂O₄.H₂O and synthetic marokite (CaMn₂O₄). I propose that the origin of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II resulted from absorption of calcium and manganese ions that were precipitated together in the archean oceans by protocyanobacteria because of changing pH from ~5 to ~8-10. As reported in this paper, amorphous calcium-manganese oxides with different ratios of manganese and calcium are effective catalysts for water oxidation. The bond types and lengths of the calcium and manganese ions in the calcium-manganese oxides are directly comparable to those in the OEC. This primitive structure of these amorphous calcium-manganese compounds could be changed and modified by environmental groups (amino acids) to form the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II.

  11. The effect of different position of grape clusters on the bearing shoot on production results of Cabernet Sauvignon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čoloveić Ana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the differences were examined between clones of Cabernet sauvignon (clones ISV-F-V5, ISV-F-V6 and R5, i.e. the difference between uvological properties of grape clusters and grape berries, based on the different positions on the bearing shoot. Tests were conducted at the experimental field of the Faculty of Agriculture 'Radmilovac'. Standard ampelographic methods were used in numerous analyses of grape yield, as well as uvological properties of clones. All data were statistically analyzed and processed by the method of two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measuring of one factor (height and Tukey HSD test. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences between clones. The best results were achieved with grape clusters positioned in the base of bearing shoot. The first positioned grape clusters on the bearing shoot had the highest share in the total grape yield, the highest amount of sugar, and the highest positioned grape clusters had higher content of total acids. The differences determined between examined clones were in regard to productivity and quality of grapes which reflected also on production value.

  12. Synthesis, Structure and Electrochemistry of Tetranuclear Oxygen-Centered Copper(II) Clusters with Acetylacetone and Benz-pyrazole Hydrolyzed Derivatives as Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafazadeh, Rasoul; Willis, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Two copper(II) clusters Cu(4)OCl(6)(pyrazole)4, 1, and Cu(4)OBr(6)(Br-pyrazole)4, 2, have been synthesized by reacting acetylacetone and benzohydrazide (1:1 ratio) with CuX(2) (X = Cl for 1 and X= Br for 2) in methanol solutions. The structures of both clusters have been established by X-ray crystallography. The clusters contain four Cu, one O, six μ(2)-X atoms, and four pyrazole ligands. The pyrazoles was prepared in situ by the reaction of acetylacetone with benzohydrazide in methanol under reflux. In 2, the methine hydrogens of the pyrazole ligands have been replaced by bromine atoms. The four copper atoms encapsulate the central O atom in a tetrahedral arrangement. All copper atoms are five-coordinate and have similar coordination environments with slightly distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of the clusters 1 and 2 show a one-electron quasi-reversible reduction wave in the region 0.485 to 0.731 V, and a one-electron quasi-reversible oxidation wave in the region 0.767 to 0.898 V. In 1, one irreversible oxidative response is observed on the positive of side of the voltammogram at 1.512 V and this can be assigned to Cu(II) to Cu(III) oxidation.

  13. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s −1 . This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment

  14. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas (Σ gas ), molecular gas (Σ H 2 ), neutral gas (Σ H I ), and star formation rate (Σ SFR ) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M 3rd ∝Σ H I 0.4±0.2 , whereM 3rd is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation withΣ gas ,Σ H2 , orΣ SFR . For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M 3rd ∝Σ H I 0.6±0.1 and M 3rd ∝Σ gas 0.5±0.2 ; there is no correlation with either Σ H 2 orΣ SFR . The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M 3rd ∝Σ gas 3.8±0.3 , M 3rd ∝Σ H 2 1.2±0.1 , and M 3rd ∝Σ SFR 0.9±0.1 . For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet traveled too far from their birth sites, the poor resolution of the radio data compared to the physical sizes of the clusters results in measuredΣ that are likely quite diluted compared to the actual densities relevant for the formation of the clusters.

  15. New Wolf-Rayet stars in Galactic open clusters - Sher 1 and the giant H II region core Westerlund 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.; Potter, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Two new Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars were found in open clusters: a WN4 star in the O9 cluster Sher 1 and a WN7 star in the O7 cluster Westerlund 2. This confirms a previous trend, namely that fainter, hotter WN stars tend to be older than brighter, cooler WN stars. This may be a consequence of evolution via extreme mass loss.

  16. Evolution of rotating star clusters at the inelastic-collision stage. II. Dynamics of a disk of gas and stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a gas--star disk embedded in a dense, mildly oblate (flattening epsilon-c or approx. =0.2--0.3 the stable disk will survive for at least half the cluster evolution time. The possibility of a thin disk of stars existing inside a dense star cluster is considered. For small epsilon-c and for disk member stars having > or approx. =0.04 the mass of the cluster members, collisions between cluster and disk stars will have no effect on the disk evolution prior to instability

  17. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF LOW-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES. II. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ON GALAXY GROWTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlee, David W.; Martini, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters provide powerful laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, particularly the origin of correlations of morphology and star formation rate (SFR) with density. We construct visible to MIR spectral energy distributions of galaxies in eight low-redshift (z * (>99% confidence) with no dependence on R/R 200 or projected local density at fixed mass. A merged sample of galaxies from the five best measured clusters shows (SFR)∝(R/R 200 ) 1.1±0.3 for galaxies with R/R 200 ≤ 0.4. A decline in the fraction of SFGs toward the cluster center contributes most of this effect, but it is accompanied by a reduction in (SFR) for SFGs with R ≤ 0.1 R 200 . The increase in the fraction of SFGs toward larger R/R 200 and the isolation of SFGs with reduced SFRs near the cluster center are consistent with the truncation of star formation by ram-pressure stripping, as is the tendency for more massive SFGs to have higher SFRs. We conclude that stripping is more likely than slower processes to drive the properties of SFGs with R 200 in clusters. We also find that galaxies near the cluster center are more massive than galaxies farther out in the cluster at ∼3.5σ, which suggests that dynamical relaxation significantly impacts the distribution of cluster galaxies as the clusters evolve.

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage I/II seminoma: results for 212 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn S.; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Ago, C. Tetteh; Radwan, John S.; Dar, A. Rashid; Winquist, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review of patients with Stage I and II seminoma treated at a regional cancer center was performed to assess the long term efficacy and toxicity associated with post operative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1950 and 1995, 212 patients seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre received adjuvant radiotherapy following orchiectomy for Stage I (169) and II (43) seminoma. Median follow-up for the group was 7.5 years. Results: Progression free, cause specific, and overall survival were 95%, 98%, and 95% at 5 years, and 94%, 98%, and 94% at 10 years respectively. An increased risk of failure was noted among patients with bulky Stage II disease. No other prognostic factors for relapse were identified. Late toxicity was uncommon with only 12/212 (6%) developing any late GI toxicity potentially attributable to radiotherapy. The incidence of second malignancies (excluding second testicular tumors) was 6/212 (actuarial:1%, 1%, 6% at 5,10,15 years respectively). There was a trend toward increased acute complications for patients treated with larger volumes of radiation. No prognostic factors associated with increased risk of late toxicity or second malignancy were identified, likely a consequence of the small number of these events. Conclusion: Survival and toxicity were comparable to that reported in the literature. Post-operative radiotherapy remains a safe and efficacious adjuvant treatment for Stage I and early Stage II seminoma

  19. Long-term behavior of the population II Cepheid V1 in the globular cluster Messier 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.M.; Hogg, H.S.; Yee, A.

    1988-01-01

    Observations made over an interval of 73 yr have been used to study the period changes of the W Virginis star in M12. They show that the period has undergone a series of abrupt changes, both increasing and decreasing, instead of a smooth change as predicted by evolutionary theory. This result is compared with period changes of W Virginis and RV Tauri stars in other galactic globular clusters, and it is found that the long-term behavior of the periods of most of these stars is similar to that of the variable in M12. However, two stars, V42 in M5 and V1 in Omega Centauri, may be in their final blueward evolutionary phase. 45 references

  20. Planck intermediate results XL. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from the Virgo cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Virgo cluster is the largest Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) source in the sky, both in terms of angular size and total integrated flux. Planck's wide angular scale and frequency coverage, together with its high sensitivity, enable a detailed study of this big object through the SZ effect. Virgo is well...... and a constrained simulation of the environment of Virgo. Planck data suggest that significant amounts of low-density plasma surround Virgo, out to twice the virial radius. We find the SZ signal in the outskirts of Virgo to be consistent with a simple model that extrapolates the inferred pressure at lower radii...... warm/hot intergalactic medium. Taking the lack of symmetry of Virgo into account, we find that a prolate model is favoured by the combination of SZ and X-ray data, in agreement with predictions. Finally, based on the combination of the same SZ and X-ray data, we constrain the total amount of gas...

  1. First Cluster results of the magnetic field structure of the mid- and high-altitude cusps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    Full Text Available Magnetic field measurements from the four Cluster spacecraft from the mid- and high-altitude cusp are presented. Cluster underwent two encounters with the mid-altitude cusp during its commissioning phase (24 August 2000. Evidence for field-aligned currents (FACs was seen in the data from all three operating spacecraft from northern and southern cusps. The extent of the FACs was of the order of 1 RE in the X-direction, and at least 300 km in the Y-direction. However, fine-scale field structures with scales of the order of the spacecraft separation (300 km were observed within the FACs. In the northern crossing, two of the spacecraft appeared to lie along the same magnetic field line, and observed very well matched signals. However, the third spacecraft showed evidence for structuring transverse to the field on scales of a few hundred km. A crossing of the high-altitude cusp from 13 February 2001 is presented. It is revealed to be a highly dynamic structure with the boundaries moving with velocities ranging from a few km/s to tens of km/s, and having structure on timescales ranging from less than one minute up to several minutes. The cusp proper is associated with the presence of a very disordered magnetic field, which is entirely different from the magnetosheath turbulence.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers – Space plasma physics (discontinuities

  2. The experimental results on the quality of clustering diverse set of data using a modified algorithm chameleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Татьяна Борисовна Шатовская

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work results of modified Chameleon algorithm are discussed. Hierarchical multilevel algorithms consist of several stages: building the graph, coarsening, partitioning, recovering. Exploring of clustering quality for different data sets with different combinations of algorithms on different stages of the algorithm is the main aim of the article. And also aim is improving the construction phase through the optimization algorithm of choice k in the building the graph k-nearest neighbors

  3. Photometric and Spectroscopic Survey of the Cluster [DBS2003] 156 Associated with the H II Region G331.1-0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, M. C.; Ortiz, R.; Abraham, Z.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2016-05-01

    The Norma section of the Milky Way is especially interesting because it crosses three spiral arms: Sagittarius-Carina, Scutum-Crux and the Norma arm itself. Distance determinations of embedded young stellar clusters can contribute to define the spiral structure in this part of the Galaxy. However, spectrophotometric distances were obtained for only a few of these clusters in Norma. We present a photometric and spectroscopic study in the NIR of the [DBS2003] 156 stellar cluster, associated with the H II region G331.1-0.5. We aim to find the ionizing sources of the H II region and determine its distance. The cluster was observed in the J, H, and {K}{{s}} bands and eight potential massive stars were chosen among the detected sources according to color criteria; subsequent spectroscopy of these candidates was performed with the Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrometer spectrograph attached to the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research 4.1 m telescope. We identified and classified spectroscopically four early-type stars: IRS 176 (O8 V), IRS 308 (O-type), IRS 310 (O6 V), and IRS 71 (B1 Iab). Based on the proximity of IRS 176 and 308 with the radio continuum emission peaks and their relative positions with respect to the warm dust mid-infrared emission, we concluded that these two stars are the main ionizing sources of the H ii region G331.1-0.5. The mean spectrophotometric distance of IRS 176 and 310 of 3.38 ± 0.58 kpc is similar to that obtained in a previous work for two early-type stars of the neighbor cluster [DBS2003] 157 of 3.29 ± 0.58 kpc. The narrow range of radial velocities of radio sources in the area of the clusters [DBS2003] 156 and 157 and their similar visual extinction indicate that these clusters are physically associated. A common distance of 3.34 ± 0.34 kpc is derived for the system [DBS2003] 156 and 157. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR), a joint project of the Ministério de Ci

  4. Results on heat transfer to He II for use in superconducting magnet technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfert, P.

    1982-05-01

    The paper reviews several aspects of heat transfer to He II which are of practical interest for the cooling problem of superconductors. The heat transfer characteristics in the Kapitza boundary conductance regime are discussed and typical values for technical copper are given. It is shown how the peak heat flux depends on the boundary conditions of the bulk fluid and particularly on the time behaviour of heat sources. Results on transient recovery from film boiling applicable to superconductors are also presented

  5. Portal vein embolization using the Amplatzer vascular plug II. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicher, Martin; Herbrik, M.; Poggenborg, J.; Bovenschulte, H.; Schwabe, H.; Stippel, D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we examined the feasibility of portal vein embolization (PVE) by using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP-II). We measured the time of vessel occlusion after plug deployment and changes in plug length and diameter within 4 weeks of PVE. Materials and Methods: in 10 consecutive patients (4 women, age 64 ± 10 yrs, 48 - 82 yrs) an ipsilateral PVE of the right portal vein was performed prior to intended hemihepatectomy. After embolization with microparticles, the right portal vein was occluded using an AVP-II. We measured the time of complete vessel occlusion by angiography. Follow-up with computed tomography (CT) was performed within 72h and after 4 weeks. Results: PVE was performed in all 10 patients without acute complications. Complete vessel occlusion was achieved in 9.7 ± 5.1 min (range 1 - 21 min). On follow-up CT we found enhanced arterial vascularization of the embolized liver segments in 5/5 patients within 72 hours and in 6/10 patients after 4 weeks. The plug showed a contraction of 20 ± 9% and a dilatation of 23 ± 13%. Thus, the AVP-II dilated to 94 ± 8% (78 - 100%) of its nominal diameter. The plug diameter was significantly larger in men compared to women (17 ± 1.7 mm vs. 14 ± 1.4 mm, p < 0.02). We did not observe any recanalization or migration of the device. The volume of the left liver lobe increased significantly by 27% (p < 0.001) after 4 weeks. Conclusion: PVE with the AVP-II is a feasible and effective method. The AVP-II can dilate within 4 weeks up to its nominal diameter dependent on the grade of oversizing. Dilatation of the diameter is associated with a shortening in length. (orig.)

  6. Planck intermediate results: XL. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from the Virgo cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Virgo cluster is the largest Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) source in the sky, both in terms of angular size and total integrated flux. Planck’s wide angular scale and frequency coverage, together with its high sensitivity, enable a detailed study of this big object through the SZ effect. Virgo is well resolved by Planck, showing an elongated structure that correlates well with the morphology observed from X-rays, but extends beyond the observed X-ray signal. We find good agreement between the SZ signal (or Compton parameter, y_c) observed by Planck and the expected signal inferred from X-ray observations and simple analytical models. Owing to its proximity to us, the gas beyond the virial radius in Virgo can be studied with unprecedented sensitivity by integrating the SZ signal over tens of square degrees. In this paper, we study the signal in the outskirts of Virgo and compare it with analytical models and a constrained simulation of the environment of Virgo. Planck data suggest that significant amounts of low-density plasma surround Virgo, out to twice the virial radius. We find the SZ signal in the outskirts of Virgo to be consistent with a simple model that extrapolates the inferred pressure at lower radii, while assuming that the temperature stays in the keV range beyond the virial radius. The observed signal is also consistent with simulations and points to a shallow pressure profile in the outskirts of the cluster. This reservoir of gas at large radii can be linked with the hottest phase of the elusivewarm/hot intergalactic medium. Taking the lack of symmetry of Virgo into account, we find that a prolate model is favoured by the combination of SZ and X-ray data, in agreement with predictions. In conclusion, based on the combination of the same SZ and X-ray data, we constrain the total amount of gas in Virgo. Under the hypothesis that the abundance of baryons in Virgo is representative of the cosmic average, we also infer a distance for Virgo of approximately

  7. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF LOW-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES. II. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ON GALAXY GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atlee, David W.; Martini, Paul, E-mail: atlee@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Laboratory, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    Galaxy clusters provide powerful laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, particularly the origin of correlations of morphology and star formation rate (SFR) with density. We construct visible to MIR spectral energy distributions of galaxies in eight low-redshift (z < 0.3) clusters and use them to measure stellar masses and SFRs as a function of environment. A partial correlation analysis indicates that the SFRs of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) depend strongly on M{sub *} (>99% confidence) with no dependence on R/R{sub 200} or projected local density at fixed mass. A merged sample of galaxies from the five best measured clusters shows (SFR){proportional_to}(R/R{sub 200}){sup 1.1{+-}0.3} for galaxies with R/R{sub 200} {<=} 0.4. A decline in the fraction of SFGs toward the cluster center contributes most of this effect, but it is accompanied by a reduction in (SFR) for SFGs with R {<=} 0.1 R{sub 200}. The increase in the fraction of SFGs toward larger R/R{sub 200} and the isolation of SFGs with reduced SFRs near the cluster center are consistent with the truncation of star formation by ram-pressure stripping, as is the tendency for more massive SFGs to have higher SFRs. We conclude that stripping is more likely than slower processes to drive the properties of SFGs with R < 0.4 R{sub 200} in clusters. We also find that galaxies near the cluster center are more massive than galaxies farther out in the cluster at {approx}3.5{sigma}, which suggests that dynamical relaxation significantly impacts the distribution of cluster galaxies as the clusters evolve.

  8. Dietary habits and physical activity: Results from cluster analysis and market basket analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Hui-Peng

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity remains a major public health concern and there has been a significant increase in childhood obesity in the USA. This study seeks to uncover the major patterns of dietary habits in relation to physical activity, together with students' opinions about the quality of food in the school's cafeteria and vending machines. The empirical work of this study is based on the 2011 Healthy School Program (HSP) Evaluation. HSP assesses the demographic characteristics as well as the dietary habits and exercise patterns of a representative sample of elementary, middle, and high school students in the USA. Findings suggest that students assigned to different clusters have different eating habits, exercise patterns, weight status, weight management, and opinions about the quality of food in the school's cafeteria and vending machines. There is great variation in dietary profiles and lifestyle behaviors among students who identified themselves as either overweight or unsure about their weight status. Findings from this study may inform future interventions regarding how to promote student's healthy food choices when they are still in school. Health promotion initiatives should specifically target students with persistently unhealthier dietary profiles.

  9. Energy Balance 4 Kids with Play: Results from a Two-Year Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine; Linchey, Jennifer; Gerstein, Dana; Ross, Michelle; Myers, Esther; Brown, Katie; Crawford, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Identifying sustainable approaches to improving the physical activity (PA) and nutrition environments in schools is an important public health goal. This study examined the impact of Energy Balance for Kids with Play (EB4K with Play), a school-based intervention developed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation and Playworks, on students' PA, dietary habits and knowledge, and weight status over 2 years. This cluster-randomized, controlled trial took place in four intervention and two control schools over 2 years (n=879; third- to fifth-grade students). PA (fourth and fifth grades only), dietary knowledge and behaviors, school policies, and BMI z-score were assessed at baseline (fall 2011), midpoint (spring 2012), and endpoint (fall 2012 for accelerometers; spring 2013 for all other outcomes). At endpoint, there were no group differences in change in PA or dietary behaviors, although BMI z-score decreased overall by -0.07 (p=0.05). Students' dietary knowledge significantly increased, as did the amount of vegetables schools served. Post-hoc analyses stratified by grade revealed that, relative to control students, fourth-grade intervention students reduced school-day sedentary time by 15 minutes (p=0.023) and third-grade intervention students reduced BMI z-score by -0.2 (0.05; pchildren's dietary knowledge and may improve weight status and decrease sedentary behaviors among younger children. Future iterations should examine programming specific for different age groups.

  10. Results and implications of the EBR-II inherent safety demonstration tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3, 1986 two milestone tests were conducted in Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-II). The first test was a loss of flow without scram and the second was a loss of heat sink without scram. Both tests were initiated from 100% power and in both tests the reactor was shut down by natural processes, principally thermal expansion, without automatic scram, operator intervention or the help of special in-core devices. The temperature transients during the tests were mild, as predicted, and there was no damage to the core or reactor plant structures. In a general sense, therefore, the tests plus supporting analysis demonstrated the feasibility of inherent passive shutdown for undercooling accidents in metal-fueled LMRs. The results provide a technical basis for future experiments in EBR-II to demonstrate inherent safety for overpower accidents and provide data for validation of computer codes used for design and safety analysis of inherently safe reactor plants

  11. Creation of a 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and investigation of its functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, B К; Davletshina, L N; Seibert, M; Rubin, A B

    2018-01-01

    Extraction of Mn cations from the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Ca-depleted PSII membranes (PSII[-Ca,4Mn]) by reductants like hydroquinone (H 2 Q) occurs with lower efficiency at acidic pH (2Mn/reaction center [RC] are extracted at pH5.7) than at neutral pH (3Mn/RC are extracted at pH6.5) [Semin et al. Photosynth. Res. 125 (2015) 95]. Fe(II) also extracts Mn cations from PSII(-Ca,4Mn), but only 2Mn/RC at pH6.5, forming a heteronuclear 2Mn/2Fe cluster [Semin and Seibert, J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 48 (2016) 227]. Here we investigated the efficiency of Mn extraction by Fe(II) at acidic pH and found that Fe(II) cations can extract only 1Mn/RC from PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes at pH 5.7, forming a 3Mn/1Fe cluster. Also we found that the presence of Fe cations in a heteronuclear cluster (2Mn/2Fe) increases the resistance of the remaining Mn cations to H 2 Q action, since H 2 Q can extract Mn cations from homonuclear Mn clusters of PSII(-Ca,4Mn) and PSII(-Ca,2Mn) membranes but not from the heteronuclear cluster in PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) membranes. H 2 Q also cannot extract Mn from PSII membranes obtained by incubation of PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes with Fe(II) cations at pH5.7, which suggests the formation of a heteronuclear 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the OEC. Functional activity of PSII with a 3Mn/1Fe cluster was investigated. PSII preparations with a 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the OEC are able to photoreduce the exogenous electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, possibly due to incomplete oxidation of water molecules as is the case with PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) samples. However, in the contrast to PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) samples PSII(-Ca,3Mn,1Fe) membranes can evolve O 2 at a low rate in the presence of exogenous Ca 2+ (at about 27% of the rate of O 2 evolution in native PSII membranes). The explanation for this phenomenon (either water splitting and production of molecular O 2 by the 3Mn/1Fe cluster or apparent O 2 evolution due to minor contamination of PSII(3Mn,1Fe) samples with PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes

  12. UVA-induced DNA double-strand breaks result from the repair of clustered oxidative DNA damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, R.; Volkmer, B.; Henning, S.; Breitbart, E. W.; Greulich, K. O.; Cardoso, M. C.; Rapp, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    UVA (320–400 nm) represents the main spectral component of solar UV radiation, induces pre-mutagenic DNA lesions and is classified as Class I carcinogen. Recently, discussion arose whether UVA induces DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs). Only few reports link the induction of dsbs to UVA exposure and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the Comet-assay and γH2AX as markers for dsb formation, we demonstrate the dose-dependent dsb induction by UVA in G1-synchronized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and primary human skin fibroblasts. The number of γH2AX foci increases when a UVA dose is applied in fractions (split dose), with a 2-h recovery period between fractions. The presence of the anti-oxidant Naringin reduces dsb formation significantly. Using an FPG-modified Comet-assay as well as warm and cold repair incubation, we show that dsbs arise partially during repair of bi-stranded, oxidative, clustered DNA lesions. We also demonstrate that on stretched chromatin fibres, 8-oxo-G and abasic sites occur in clusters. This suggests a replication-independent formation of UVA-induced dsbs through clustered single-strand breaks via locally generated reactive oxygen species. Since UVA is the main component of solar UV exposure and is used for artificial UV exposure, our results shine new light on the aetiology of skin cancer. PMID:22941639

  13. Residential patterns in older homeless adults: Results of a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher Thomas; Guzman, David; Ponath, Claudia; Tieu, Lina; Riley, Elise; Kushel, Margot

    2016-03-01

    Adults aged 50 and older make up half of individuals experiencing homelessness and have high rates of morbidity and mortality. They may have different life trajectories and reside in different environments than do younger homeless adults. Although the environmental risks associated with homelessness are substantial, the environments in which older homeless individuals live have not been well characterized. We classified living environments and identified associated factors in a sample of older homeless adults. From July 2013 to June 2014, we recruited a community-based sample of 350 homeless men and women aged fifty and older in Oakland, California. We administered structured interviews including assessments of health, history of homelessness, social support, and life course. Participants used a recall procedure to describe where they stayed in the prior six months. We performed cluster analysis to classify residential venues and used multinomial logistic regression to identify individual factors prior to the onset of homelessness as well as the duration of unstable housing associated with living in them. We generated four residential groups describing those who were unsheltered (n = 162), cohabited unstably with friends and family (n = 57), resided in multiple institutional settings (shelters, jails, transitional housing) (n = 88), or lived primarily in rental housing (recently homeless) (n = 43). Compared to those who were unsheltered, having social support when last stably housed was significantly associated with cohabiting and institution use. Cohabiters and renters were significantly more likely to be women and have experienced a shorter duration of homelessness. Cohabiters were significantly more likely than unsheltered participants to have experienced abuse prior to losing stable housing. Pre-homeless social support appears to protect against street homelessness while low levels of social support may increase the risk for becoming homeless immediately after

  14. The TETRA-II Experiment to Observe Terrestrial Gamma Flashes at Ground Level - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Adams, C.; Al-Nussirat, S.; Bai, S.; Banadaki, Y.; Bitzer, P. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Khosravi, E.; Legault, M.; Orang, M.; Pleshinger, D. J.; Rodriguez, R.; Smith, D.; Trepanier, J. C.; Sunda-Meya, A.; Zimmer, N.

    2017-12-01

    An upgraded version of the TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA-II) consists of an array of BGO scintillators to detect bursts of gamma rays from thunderstorms at ground level in four separate locations: the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; the campus of the University of Puerto Rico at Utuado, Puerto Rico; the Centro Nacional de Metrologia de Panama (CENAMEP) in Panama City, Panama; and the Severe Weather Institute and Radar & Lightning Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. The original TETRA-I array of NaI scintillators at Louisiana State University detected 37 millisecond-scale bursts of gamma rays at energies 50 keV-2 MeV associated with nearby (brief description of the TETRA-I observations, a description of TETRA-II, and preliminary results of the first events observed by TETRA-II will be presented including frequency and time history of events, spectral information, and correlation with local radar and radio data.

  15. Clinical Results of Flexor Tendon Repair in Zone II Using a six Strand Double Loop Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidou, Christiana; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results after repair of flexor tendon zone II injuries utilizing a 6-strand double-loop technique and early post-operative active rehabilitation. We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients involving 51 cases with zone II flexor tendon repair using a six strand double loop technique from September 1996 to December 2012. Most common mechanism of injuries was sharp lacerations (86.5 %). Tendon injuries occurred equally in manual and non-manual workers and were work-related in 33 % of the cases. The Strickland score for active range of motion (ROM) postoperatively was excellent and good in the majority of the cases (81 %). The rupture rate was 1.9 %. The six strand double loop technique for Zone II flexor tendon repair leads to good and excellent motion in the majority of patients and low re- rupture rate. It is clinically effective and allows for early postoperative active rehabilitation.

  16. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE λ ORIONIS CLUSTER. II. DISKS AROUND SOLAR-TYPE AND LOW-MASS STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Jesus; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, L.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Luhman, K. L.; Stauffer, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar-type and the low-mass stellar population of the young (∼5 Myr) λ Orionis cluster. Combining optical and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 M sun to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with 'evolved disks' (with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and 'transitional disk' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ∼6% for K-type stars (R C - J C - J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the λ Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as ∼5 Myr.

  17. Characterisation of microcalcification clusters on 2D digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): does DBT underestimate microcalcification clusters? Results of a multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Stevanin, Carmen; Tagliafico, Giulio; Martino, Lucia; Bignotti, Bianca; Calabrese, Massimo; Houssami, Nehmat

    2015-01-01

    To compare DBT and FFDM in the classification of microcalcification clusters (MCs) using BI-RADS. This Institutional Review Board-approved study was undertaken in three centres. A total of 107 MCs evaluated with both DBT and FFDM were randomised for prospective reading by six experienced breast radiologists and classified using BI-RADS. The benign/malignant ratio of MC was 66/41. Of 11/107 discordant results, DBT classified MCs as R2 whereas FFDM classified them as R3 in 9 and R4 in 2. Three of these (3/107 = 2.8 %) were malignant; 8 (7.5 %) were nonmalignant and were correctly classified as R2 on DBT but incorrectly classified as R3 on FFDM. Estimated sensitivity and specificity, respectively, were 100 % (95 % CI: 91 % to 100 %) and 94.6 % (95 % CI: 86.7 % to 98.5 %) for FFDM and 91.1 % (95 % CI: 78.8 % to 97.5 %) and 100 % (95 % CI: 94.8 % to 100 %) for DBT. Overall intra- and interobserver agreements were 0.75 (95 % CI: 0.61-0.84) and 0.73 (95 % CI: 0.62-0.78). Most MCs are scored similarly on FFDM and DBT. Although a minority (11/107) of MCs are classified differently on FFDM (benign MC classified as R3) and DBT (malignant MC classified as R2), this may have clinical relevance. (orig.)

  18. Characterisation of microcalcification clusters on 2D digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): does DBT underestimate microcalcification clusters? Results of a multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine (DIMES), Genoa (Italy); Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Citta della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Radiology University of Torino, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, Torino (Italy); Stevanin, Carmen [Ospedale Regionale di Bolzano, Bolzano (Italy); Tagliafico, Giulio [Istituto di Matematica Applicata e Tecnologie Informatiche, CNR-IMATI, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Genova (Italy); Martino, Lucia; Bignotti, Bianca [University of Genoa, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Genoa (Italy); Calabrese, Massimo [IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Department of Breast Radiology, Genova (Italy); Houssami, Nehmat [University of Sydney, Screening and Test Evaluation Program (STEP), School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    To compare DBT and FFDM in the classification of microcalcification clusters (MCs) using BI-RADS. This Institutional Review Board-approved study was undertaken in three centres. A total of 107 MCs evaluated with both DBT and FFDM were randomised for prospective reading by six experienced breast radiologists and classified using BI-RADS. The benign/malignant ratio of MC was 66/41. Of 11/107 discordant results, DBT classified MCs as R2 whereas FFDM classified them as R3 in 9 and R4 in 2. Three of these (3/107 = 2.8 %) were malignant; 8 (7.5 %) were nonmalignant and were correctly classified as R2 on DBT but incorrectly classified as R3 on FFDM. Estimated sensitivity and specificity, respectively, were 100 % (95 % CI: 91 % to 100 %) and 94.6 % (95 % CI: 86.7 % to 98.5 %) for FFDM and 91.1 % (95 % CI: 78.8 % to 97.5 %) and 100 % (95 % CI: 94.8 % to 100 %) for DBT. Overall intra- and interobserver agreements were 0.75 (95 % CI: 0.61-0.84) and 0.73 (95 % CI: 0.62-0.78). Most MCs are scored similarly on FFDM and DBT. Although a minority (11/107) of MCs are classified differently on FFDM (benign MC classified as R3) and DBT (malignant MC classified as R2), this may have clinical relevance. (orig.)

  19. Physical activity after commitment lotteries: examining long-term results in a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Swaluw, Koen; Lambooij, Mattijs S; Mathijssen, Jolanda J P; Schipper, Maarten; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Berkhout, Stef; Polder, Johan J; Prast, Henriëtte M

    2018-02-26

    To overcome self-control difficulties, people can commit to their health goals by voluntarily accepting deadlines with consequences. In a commitment lottery, the winners are drawn from all participants, but can only claim their prize if they also attained their gym-attendance goals. In a 52-week, three-arm trial across six company gyms, we tested if commitment lotteries with behavioral economic underpinnings would promote physical activity among overweight adults. In previous work, we presented an effective 26-week intervention. In the present paper we analyzed maintenance of goal attainment at 52-week follow-up and the development of weight over time. We compared weight and goal attainment (gym attendance ≥ 2 per week) between three arms that-in the intervention period- consisted of (I) weekly short-term lotteries for 13 weeks; (II) the same short-term lotteries in combination with an additional long-term lottery after 26 weeks; and (III) a control arm without lottery-deadlines. After a successful 26-week intervention, goal attainment declined between weeks 27 and 52 in the long-term lottery arm, but remained higher than in the control group. Goal attainment did not differ between the short-term lottery arm and control arm. Weight declined slightly in all arms in the first 13 weeks of the trial and remained stable from there on. Commitment lotteries can support regular gym attendance up to 52 weeks, but more research is needed to achieve higher levels of maintenance and weight loss.

  20. The Problem of Hipparcos Distances to Open Clusters. II. Constraints from Nearby Field Theory. Report 2; ClustersConstraints from nearly Field Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, David R.; King, Jeremy R.; Hanson, Robert B.; Jones, Burton F.; Fischer, Debra; Stauffer, John R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the discrepancy between distances to nearby open clusters as determined by parallaxes from Hipparcos compared to traditional main-sequence fitting. The biggest difference is seen for the Pleiades, and our hypothesis is that if the Hipparcos distance to the Pleiades is correct, then similar subluminous zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) stars should exist elsewhere, including in the immediate solar neighborhood. We examine a color-magnitude diagram of very young and nearby solar-type stars and show that none of them lie below the traditional ZAMS, despite the fact that the Hipparcos Pleiades parallax would place its members 0.3 mag below that ZAMS. We also present analyses and observations of solar-type stars that do lie below the ZAMS, and we show that they are subluminous because of low metallicity and that they have the kinematics of old stars.

  1. Results on two-photon interactions from Mark II at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Preliminary results on two-photon interactions from the SLAC-LBL Mark II magnetic detector at SPEAR are presented. The cross section for eta' production by the reaction e + e - → e + e - eta' has been measured over the beam energy range from 2 to 4 GeV. The radiative width GAMMA/sub γγ/(eta') has been determined to be 5.8 +- 1.1 keV (+- 20% systematic uncertainty). Upper limits on the radiative widths of the f(1270), and A 2 (1310) and f'(1515) mesons have been determined

  2. Impact of an automated email notification system for results of tests pending at discharge: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Anuj K; Roy, Christopher L; Poon, Eric G; Williams, Deborah H; Nolido, Nyryan; Yoon, Cathy; Budris, Jonas; Gandhi, Tejal; Bates, David W; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Physician awareness of the results of tests pending at discharge (TPADs) is poor. We developed an automated system that notifies responsible physicians of TPAD results via secure, network email. We sought to evaluate the impact of this system on self-reported awareness of TPAD results by responsible physicians, a necessary intermediary step to improve management of TPAD results. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial at a major hospital affiliated with an integrated healthcare delivery network in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult patients with TPADs who were discharged from inpatient general medicine and cardiology services were assigned to the intervention or usual care arm if their inpatient attending physician and primary care physician (PCP) were both randomized to the same study arm. Patients of physicians randomized to discordant study arms were excluded. We surveyed these physicians 72 h after all TPAD results were finalized. The primary outcome was awareness of TPAD results by attending physicians. Secondary outcomes included awareness of TPAD results by PCPs, awareness of actionable TPAD results, and provider satisfaction. We analyzed data on 441 patients. We sent 441 surveys to attending physicians and 353 surveys to PCPs and received 275 and 152 responses from 83 different attending physicians and 112 different PCPs, respectively (attending physician survey response rate of 63%). Intervention attending physicians and PCPs were significantly more aware of TPAD results (76% vs 38%, adjusted/clustered OR 6.30 (95% CI 3.02 to 13.16), pemail notification represents a promising strategy for managing TPAD results, potentially mitigating an unresolved patient safety concern. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01153451).

  3. Clustering of health-related behaviors among early and mid-adolescents in Tuscany: results from a representative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Giacomo; Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Arata, Lucia; Pammolli, Andrea; Simi, Rita; Giacchi, Mariano Vincenzo; Amicizia, Daniela; Gasparini, Roberto

    2018-03-01

    A huge amount of literature suggests that adolescents' health-related behaviors tend to occur in clusters, and the understanding of such behavioral clustering may have direct implications for the effective tailoring of health-promotion interventions. Despite the usefulness of analyzing clustering, Italian data on this topic are scant. This study aimed to evaluate the clustering patterns of health-related behaviors. The present study is based on data from the Health Behaviors in School-aged Children (HBSC) study conducted in Tuscany in 2010, which involved 3291 11-, 13- and 15-year olds. To aggregate students' data on 22 health-related behaviors, factor analysis and subsequent cluster analysis were performed. Factor analysis revealed eight factors, which were dubbed in accordance with their main traits: 'Alcohol drinking', 'Smoking', 'Physical activity', 'Screen time', 'Signs & symptoms', 'Healthy eating', 'Violence' and 'Sweet tooth'. These factors explained 67% of variance and underwent cluster analysis. A six-cluster κ-means solution was established with a 93.8% level of classification validity. The between-cluster differences in both mean age and gender distribution were highly statistically significant. Health-compromising behaviors are common among Tuscan teens and occur in distinct clusters. These results may be used by schools, health-promotion authorities and other stakeholders to design and implement tailored preventive interventions in Tuscany.

  4. Preliminary results from a simulated laboratory experiment or an encounter of cluster satellite probes with a reconnection layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Ren, Y.; Ji, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Darfman, S.

    2006-12-01

    With the recent upgrade of the MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment) device[1], our experimental operation allows us to carry out a jog experiment in which a current sheet can be moved swiftly across an inserted probe assembly. A cluster of probes with variable distances can be inserted into a known desired position in the MRX device. This setup can be similar to the situation in which a cluster of satellites encounters a rapidly moving reconnection layer. If necessary, we can create a neutral sheet where the density of one side is significantly higher than the other, as is the case for the magnetopause. A variable guide field will be applied to study its effect on reconnection. We proposed[2] to document basic patterns of data during a simulated encounter of the MRX reconnection layer with the four-probe mock-up system and compare them with data acquired from past satellites. Relative position of the MMS satellites in the magnetosphere can then be determined. Optimum cluster configuration or distance between the four satellites can be determined for various diagnostics or research missions. The relationship of magnetic fluctuations[3] with the observed out-of- plane quadrupole field, a characteristic signature of the Hall MHD, can be also studied in this series of experiments. In this paper, results from a preliminary experiment will be presented. These experiments utilize effectively the unique MRX ability to accurately know the location of diagnostics with respect to the moving reconnection layer. Supported by DoE, NASA, NSF. [1] M. Yamada et al, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052119 (2006), [2] M.Yamada et al, MMS-IDS proposal (2006), [3] H. Ji et al, Phys. Rev. Letts. 92, 115001 (2004)

  5. Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark...

  6. Preliminary research results for generation and application of high power ion beams on FLASh II accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Zhang Jiasheng; He Xiaoping; Sun Jianfeng; Peng Jianchang; Tang Junping; Ren Shuqing; Ouyang Xiaoping; Zhang Guoguang; Huang Jianjun; Yang Li; Wang Haiyang; Li Jingya; Li Hongyu

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary results for the generation and application of the high power ion beam (HPIB) on the FLASH II accelerator are reported. The structure and principle of the pinch reflex ion beam diode are introduced. The equation of parapotential flow is corrected for the reduction of diode A-K gap due to the motion of cathode and anode plasma. The HPIB peak current of ∼160 kA is obtained with a peak energy of ∼500 keV. Experimental investigations of generating 6-7 MeV quasi-monoenergetic pulsed γ-rays with high power ion (proton) beams striking 19 F target are presented. In addition, the results of the thermal-mechanical effects on the material irradiated with HPIB, which are applied to the simulation of 1 keV black body radiation x-rays, are also discussed

  7. ONLINE PORNOGRAPHY AND SEXUALITY: SOME RESULTS OF EU KIDS ONLINE SURVEY II IN THE ROMANIAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA MARINESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article intends to analyze the exposure of Romanian children and teens to sexually explicit message and the so-called „sexting” activities they perform in the online environment. The main research topic to which we try to find some answers is: are young people more exposed to risks because they view sexually explicit content online and send sexual messages to others? Our results validate the risk migration hypothesis, the blurring boundaries between the online and offline worlds enabling the migration of risk from the real world to the internet and the reverse. At the same time, the date of EU Kinds Online II validate the vulnerability hypothesis, according to which the harm declared by the children following the exposure to sexually explicit images and the receiving the sexual messages is the result of their socio-demographic vulnerabilities

  8. Multi-instantons and exact results II: specific cases, higher-order effects, and numerical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn-Justin, Jean; Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2004-01-01

    In this second part of the treatment of instantons in quantum mechanics, the focus is on specific calculations related to a number of quantum mechanical potentials with degenerate minima. We calculate the leading multi-instanton contributions to the partition function, using the formalism introduced in the first part of the treatise [Ann. Phys. (N. Y.) (previous issue) (2004)]. The following potentials are considered: (i) asymmetric potentials with degenerate minima, (ii) the periodic cosine potential, (iii) anharmonic oscillators with radial symmetry, and (iv) a specific potential which bears an analogy with the Fokker-Planck equation. The latter potential has the peculiar property that the perturbation series for the ground-state energy vanishes to all orders and is thus formally convergent (the ground-state energy, however, is non-zero and positive). For the potentials (ii), (iii), and (iv), we calculate the perturbative B-function as well as the instanton A-function to fourth order in g. We also consider the double-well potential in detail, and present some higher-order analytic as well as numerical calculations to verify explicitly the related conjectures up to the order of three instantons. Strategies analogous to those outlined here could result in new conjectures for problems where our present understanding is more limited

  9. Combustion of Solids in Microgravity: Results from the BASS-II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Miller, Fletcher; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; T’ien, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS-II) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burned thin and thick flat samples, acrylic slabs, spheres, and cylinders. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 53 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and oxygen concentration on flame appearance, growth, spread rate, and extinction were examined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. The flames are quite sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. They can be sustained at very low flow speeds of less than 1 cms, when they become dim blue and stable. In this state they are not particularly dangerous from a fire safety perspective, but they can flare up quickly with a sudden increase in air flow speed. Including earlier BASS-I results, well over one hundred tests have been conducted of the various samples in the different geometries, flow speeds, and oxygen concentrations. There are several important implications related to fundamental combustion research as well as spacecraft fire safety. This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division (SLPSRA).

  10. A CFH12k lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters - II. Weak lensing analysis and global correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardeau, S.; Soucail, G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Czoske, O.; Ebeling, H.; Hudelot, P.; Smail, I.; Smith, G. P.

    Aims. We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. This sample, spanning a small range in both X-ray luminosity and redshift, is ideally suited to determining the

  11. The KMOS Cluster Survey (KCS). II. The Effect of Environment on the Structural Properties of Massive Cluster Galaxies at Redshift 1.39 < z < 1.61

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Stott, John P.; Bender, Ralf; Galametz, Audrey; Wilman, David J.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Prichard, Laura J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Wegner, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present results on the structural properties of massive passive galaxies in three clusters at 1.39 R-band sizes of these galaxies are a factor of ∼2–3 smaller than their local counterparts. The slopes of the relation between the stellar mass and the light-weighted size are consistent with recent studies in clusters and the field. Their mass-weighted sizes are smaller than the rest-frame R-band sizes, with an average mass-weighted to light-weighted size ratio that varies between ∼0.45 and 0.8 among the clusters. We find that the median light-weighted size of the passive galaxies in the two more evolved clusters is ∼24% larger than that for field galaxies, independent of the use of circularized effective radii or semimajor axes. These two clusters also show a smaller size ratio than the less evolved cluster, which we investigate using color gradients to probe the underlying {M}* /{L}{{{H}}160} gradients. The median color gradients are ∇z ‑ H ∼ ‑0.4 mag dex‑1, twice the local value. Using stellar populations models, these gradients are best reproduced by a combination of age and metallicity gradients. Our results favor the minor merger scenario as the dominant process responsible for the observed galaxy properties and the environmental differences at this redshift. The environmental differences support that clusters experience accelerated structural evolution compared to the field, likely via an epoch of enhanced minor merger activity during cluster assembly. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; program IDs: 092.A-0210; 093.A-0051; 094.A-0578; 095.A-0137(A); 096.A-0189(A); 097.A-0332(A)). This work is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA HST, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 13687, as well as with the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury

  12. Molecules based on M(v) (M=Mo, W) and Ni(II) ions: a new class of trigonal bipyramidal cluster and confirmation of SMM behavior for the pentadecanuclear molecule {NiII[NiII(tmphen)(MeOH)]6[Ni(H2O)3]2[micro-CN]30[WV(CN)3]6}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfiger, Matthew G; Zhao, Hanhua; Prosvirin, Andrey; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Dunbar, Kim R

    2009-07-14

    The preparation, single crystal X-ray crystallography, and magnetic properties are reported for four new clusters based on [M'V(CN)8]3- octacyanometallates (M'=Mo, W). Reactions of [M'V(CN)8]3- with mononuclear NiII ions in the presence of the tmphen blocking ligand (tmphen=3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) in a 2:3:6 ratio, respectively, lead to the formation of the trigonal bipyramidal clusters [NiII(tmphen)2]3[M'V(CN)8]2. Analogous reactions with the same starting materials performed in a 2:3:2 ratio, respectively, produce pentadecanuclear clusters of the type {NiII[NiII(tmphen)(MeOH)]6[Ni(H2O)3]2[micro-CN]30[WV(CN)3]6}. The W2Ni3 (1) and Mo2Ni3(2) pentanuclear clusters and the W6Ni9 (3) and Mo6Ni9 (4) pentadecanuclear molecules are isostructural to each other and crystallize in the space groups P2(1)/c and R3 respectively. Magnetic measurements indicate that the ground states for the trigonal bipyamidal clusters are S=4 as a consequence of ferromagnetic coupling with JW-Ni=9.5 cm(-1), JMo-Ni=10 cm(-1). The pentadecanuclear clusters exhibit ferromagnetic coupling as well, which leads to S=12 ground states (JW-Ni=12 cm(-1), JMo-Ni=12.2 cm(-1)). Reduced magnetization studies on the W-Ni analogues support the conclusion that they exhibit a negative axial anisotropy term; the fits give D values of -0.24 cm(-1) for the W2Ni3 cluster and D=-0.04 cm(-1)for the W6Ni9 cluster. AC susceptibility measurements indicate the beginning of an out-of-phase signal for the W2Ni3 and the W6Ni9 compounds, but detailed low temperature studies on small crystals by the microSQUID technique indicate that only the pentadecanuclear cluster exhibits hysteresis in accord with SMM behavior. Neither Mo cluster reveals any evidence for slow paramagnetic relaxation at low temperatures.

  13. Results on light dark matter particles with a low-threshold CRESST-II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Iachellini, N.F.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Pagliarone, C.; Schaeffner, K. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Defay, X.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Schoenert, S.; Trinh Thi, H.H.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Schieck, J.; Tuerkoglu, C. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Wien (Austria); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reindl, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The CRESST-II experiment uses cryogenic detectors to search for nuclear recoil events induced by the elastic scattering of dark matter particles in CaWO{sub 4} crystals. Given the low energy threshold of our detectors in combination with light target nuclei, low mass dark matter particles can be probed with high sensitivity. In this letter we present the results from data of a single detector module corresponding to 52 kg live days. A blind analysis is carried out. With an energy threshold for nuclear recoils of 307 eV we substantially enhance the sensitivity for light dark matter. Thereby, we extend the reach of direct dark matter experiments to the sub- GeV/c{sup 2} region and demonstrate that the energy threshold is the key parameter in the search for low mass dark matter particles. (orig.)

  14. Results of acoustic measurements with an electric boiling generator at KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, J.

    1987-08-01

    With regard to an integral core surveillance in sodium-cooled breeder reactors acoustic measurement techniques are under development. To determine experimentally the acoustic transfer function of a reactor core and to demonstrate the detectability of local sodium boiling, experiments with a so-called Boiling Generator were carried out in the KNK II reactor. The main part of this Boiling Generator was an electrically heated pin bundle which was equipped with a local blockage to obtain cooling disturbances. In this report the results of the acoustic measurements carried out with the Boiling Generator are presented. Main topic of the evaluation is the determination of the acoustic transfer function between the core and the upper sodium plenum. The signal conditioning necessary prior to this investigation is also explained. Great effort was required to suppress electrical disturbances which superimposed the acoustic signals and could not be eliminated by the hardware during the experiments. Finally, the detectability of local boiling using acoustic measurements is considered

  15. The PEP-II Asymmetric B Factory: Design details and R ampersand D results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.; DeStaebler, H.; Dorfan, J.

    1994-06-01

    PEP-II, a 9 GeV x 3.1 GeV electron-positron collider with a design luminosity of 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 has now been approved for construction by SLAC, LBL and LLNL for the purpose of studying CP violation in the B bar B system. This upgrade project involves replacing the vacuum and RF systeum of PEP, which will serve as the high-energy ring (HER), along with the addition of a new low-energy ring (LER) mounted atop the HER. Designs for both rings are described, and the anticipated project construction schedule is indicated. Collider operation will begin at the end of 1998. An aggressive R ampersand D program has been carried out to validate our design choices; key results in the areas of lattice design, vacuum, RF, and multibunch feedback are summarized

  16. Overlapping Open Clusters NGC 1750 and NGC 1758 behind the Taurus Dark Clouds. II. CCD Photometry in the Vilnius System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straižys V.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven-color photometry in the Vilnius system has been obtained for 420 stars down to V = 16 mag in the area containing the overlapping open clusters NGC 1750 and NGC 1758 in Taurus. Spectral and luminosity classes, color excesses, interstellar extinctions and distances are given for 287 stars. The classification of stars is based on their reddening-free Q-parameters. 18 stars observed photoelectrically were used as standards. The extinction vs. distance diagram exhibits the presence of one dust cloud at a distance of 175 pc which almost coincides with a distance of other dust clouds in the Taurus complex. The clusters NGC 1750 and NGC 1758 are found to be at the same distance of ~760 pc and may penetrate each other. Their interstellar extinction AV is 1.06 mag which corresponds to EB-V = 0.34 mag.

  17. Cluster Headache Clinical Phenotypes: Tobacco Nonexposed (Never Smoker and No Parental Secondary Smoke Exposure as a Child) versus Tobacco-Exposed: Results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Todd D

    2018-05-01

    To present results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey comparing the clinical presentation of tobacco nonexposed and tobacco-exposed cluster headache patients. Cluster headache is uniquely tied to a personal history of tobacco usage/cigarette smoking and, if the individual cluster headache sufferer did not smoke, it has been shown that their parent(s) typically did and that individual had significant secondary smoke exposure as a child. The true nontobacco exposed (no personal or secondary exposure) cluster headache sufferer has never been fully studied. The United States Cluster Headache Survey consisted of 187 multiple choice questions related to cluster headache including: patient demographics, clinical headache characteristics, family history, triggers, smoking history (personal and secondary), and headache-related disability. The survey was placed on a website from October through December 2008. One thousand one hundred thirty-four individuals completed the survey. One hundred thirty-three subjects or 12% of the surveyed population had no personal smoking/tobacco use history and no secondary smoke exposure as an infant/child, thus a nontobacco exposed population. In the nonexposed population, there were 87 males and 46 females with a gender ratio of 1.9:1. Episodic cluster headache occurred in 80% of nonexposed subjects. One thousand and one survey responders or 88% were tobacco-exposed (729 males and 272 females) with a gender ratio of 2.7:1. Eighty-three percent had a personal smoking history, while only 17% just had parents who smoked with secondary smoke exposure. Eighty-five percent of smokers had double exposure with a personal smoking history and secondary exposure as a child. Nonexposed cluster headache subjects are significantly more likely to develop cluster headache at ages 40 years and younger, while the exposed sufferers are significantly more likely to develop cluster headache at 40 years of age and older. Nonexposed patients have a

  18. THE MATRYOSHKA RUN. II. TIME-DEPENDENT TURBULENCE STATISTICS, STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION, AND MICROPHYSICS IMPACT IN A MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We use the Matryoshka run to study the time-dependent statistics of structure-formation-driven turbulence in the intracluster medium of a 10 15 M ☉ galaxy cluster. We investigate the turbulent cascade in the inner megaparsec for both compressional and incompressible velocity components. The flow maintains approximate conditions of fully developed turbulence, with departures thereof settling in about an eddy-turnover time. Turbulent velocity dispersion remains above 700 km s –1 even at low mass accretion rate, with the fraction of compressional energy between 10% and 40%. The normalization and the slope of the compressional turbulence are susceptible to large variations on short timescales, unlike the incompressible counterpart. A major merger occurs around redshift z ≅ 0 and is accompanied by a long period of enhanced turbulence, ascribed to temporal clustering of mass accretion related to spatial clustering of matter. We test models of stochastic acceleration by compressional modes for the origin of diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. The turbulence simulation model constrains an important unknown of this complex problem and brings forth its dependence on the elusive microphysics of the intracluster plasma. In particular, the specifics of the plasma collisionality and the dissipation physics of weak shocks affect the cascade of compressional modes with strong impact on the acceleration rates. In this context radio halos emerge as complex phenomena in which a hierarchy of processes acting on progressively smaller scales are at work. Stochastic acceleration by compressional modes implies statistical correlation of radio power and spectral index with merging cores distance, both testable in principle with radio surveys

  19. Prevalence of cluster headache in the Republic of Georgia: results of a population-based study and methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsarava, Z; Dzagnidze, A; Kukava, M

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the general-population prevalence of cluster headache in the Republic of Georgia and discuss the advantages and challenges of different methodological approaches. In a community-based survey, specially trained medical residents visited 500 adjacent households in the capital...... with possible cluster headache, who were then personally interviewed by one of two headache-experienced neurologists. Cluster headache was confirmed in one subject. The prevalence of cluster headache was therefore estimated to be 87/100,000 (95% confidence interval

  20. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Clarence Leeder [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of ~0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  1. ON THE CLUSTER PHYSICS OF SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH AND X-RAY SURVEYS. II. DECONSTRUCTING THE THERMAL SZ POWER SPECTRUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, N.; Bond, J. R.; Pfrommer, C.; Sievers, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are a treasure-trove of cosmological information. Interpreting current experiments probing them are limited by theoretical uncertainties rather than by measurement errors. Here we focus on the secondary anisotropies resulting from the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect; the amplitude of which depends critically on the average thermal pressure profile of galaxy groups and clusters. To this end, we use a suite of hydrodynamical TreePM-SPH simulations that include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, and energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei. We examine in detail how the pressure profile depends on cluster radius, mass, and redshift and provide an empirical fitting function. We employ three different approaches for calculating the tSZ power spectrum: an analytical approach that uses our pressure profile fit, a semianalytical method of pasting our pressure fit onto simulated clusters, and a direct numerical integration of our simulated volumes. We demonstrate that the detailed structure of the intracluster medium and cosmic web affect the tSZ power spectrum. In particular, the substructure and asphericity of clusters increase the tSZ power spectrum by 10%-20% at l ∼ 2000-8000, with most of the additional power being contributed by substructures. The contributions to the power spectrum from radii larger than R 500 is ∼20% at l = 3000, thus clusters interiors (r 500 ) dominate the power spectrum amplitude at these angular scales.

  2. ON THE CLUSTER PHYSICS OF SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH AND X-RAY SURVEYS. II. DECONSTRUCTING THE THERMAL SZ POWER SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bond, J. R.; Pfrommer, C.; Sievers, J. L. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-10-20

    Secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are a treasure-trove of cosmological information. Interpreting current experiments probing them are limited by theoretical uncertainties rather than by measurement errors. Here we focus on the secondary anisotropies resulting from the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect; the amplitude of which depends critically on the average thermal pressure profile of galaxy groups and clusters. To this end, we use a suite of hydrodynamical TreePM-SPH simulations that include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, and energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei. We examine in detail how the pressure profile depends on cluster radius, mass, and redshift and provide an empirical fitting function. We employ three different approaches for calculating the tSZ power spectrum: an analytical approach that uses our pressure profile fit, a semianalytical method of pasting our pressure fit onto simulated clusters, and a direct numerical integration of our simulated volumes. We demonstrate that the detailed structure of the intracluster medium and cosmic web affect the tSZ power spectrum. In particular, the substructure and asphericity of clusters increase the tSZ power spectrum by 10%-20% at l {approx} 2000-8000, with most of the additional power being contributed by substructures. The contributions to the power spectrum from radii larger than R {sub 500} is {approx}20% at l = 3000, thus clusters interiors (r < R {sub 500}) dominate the power spectrum amplitude at these angular scales.

  3. Aging of snubbers in nuclear service: Phase I study results and Phase II plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.L.; Bush, S.H.; Page, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two major research areas were investigated in the Phase I snubber aging studies. The first area involved a preliminary evaluation of the effects of various aging mechanisms on snubber operation; failure modes of mechanisms were identified and their contributions to aging degradation were assessed relative to other failure modes. The second area involved estimating the efficacy of existing tests and examinations that are intended to determine the effects of aging and degradation. Available data on snubber behavior and operating experience were reviewed, using licensee event reports and other historical data for the 10-year period from 1973 through 1983. Value-impact was considered in terms of (1) exposure of workers to radioactive environments for examination/testing and (2) the cost for expansion of the snubber testing program due to failed snubbers. Results from the Phase I studies identified the need to modify or improve examination and testing procedures to enhance snubber reliability. Based on the results of the Phase I snubber studies, the seals and fluids were identified as the two principal elements affected by aging degradation in hydraulic snubbers. Phase II work, which was initiated in FY 1987, will develop cooperative activities between PNL and operating utilities through the Snubber Utility Group (SNUG), who will work to establish a strong data and experience base for both hydraulic and mechanical snubbers based on actual operating and maintenance history at nuclear power plants. Application guidelines for snubbers will be recommended based on the study results

  4. Planck early results. X. Statistical analysis of Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations for X-ray galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    All-sky data from the Planck survey and the Meta-Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC) are combined to investigate the relationship between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and X-ray luminosity. The sample comprises ~1600 X-ray clusters with redshifts up to ~1 and spans...

  5. First results on dense plasma confinement at the multimirror open trap GOL-3-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koidan, V.S.; Arzhannikov, A.V.; Astrelin, V.T.

    2001-01-01

    First results of experiments on plasma confinement in multimirror open trap GOL-3-II are presented. This facility is an open trap with total length of 17 m intended for confinement of a relatively dense (10 15 -10 17 cm -3 ) plasma in axially-symmetrical magnetic system. The plasma heating is provided by a high-power electron beam (1 MeV, 30 kA, 8 ms, 200 kJ). New phase of the experiments is aimed to confinement of high-β thermalized plasma. Two essential modifications of the facility have been done. First, plasma column was separated by vacuum sections from the beam accelerator and exit beam receiver. Second, the magnetic field on part of the solenoid was reconfigured into multimirror system with H max /H min ∼1.5 and 22 cm cell length. Results of the experiments at modified configuration of the device indicate that the confinement time of the plasma with n e ∼(0, 5/5)·10 15 cm -3 and T e ∼1 keV increases more than order of magnitude. (author)

  6. PISC II: Parametric studies. Effect of defect characteristics on immersion focusing probe testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombret, P.

    1989-09-01

    The results of the Round-Robin trials conducted under the PISC I exercise (1976-1980) showed large discrepancies in the defect detection and sizing capability among different flaws. To identify the causes of such dispersions and quantify the effects, a Parametric Study was included in the PISC II project, taking into consideration most characteristics of planar flaws. A number of steel specimens containing various artificial defects was made available for the measurements. The defects were ultrasonically scanned by standard methods and by some advanced techniques the high performance of which had been established in the PISC Round-Robin Tests. This report deals with the beam focusing technique: 2 MHz 45 0 shear wave transducers have been used in immersion to collect the signals generated by the reference reflectors. The results show that the depth and the size of a defect do not affect significantly its detection and sizing, provided that the natural variation of sensitivity and of beam diameter along the propagation axis is taken into account. On the other hand, parameters such as the orientation and the roughness modify the conditions of impact and interference of the acoustic beam with the defect surface, and therefore strongly influence the energy partition in diffracted and specularly reflected rays. As an example, sharp smooth defects insonified under an angle of 45 0 return to the transducer signals approximately 10 times smaller than the ASME code calibration level

  7. Preliminary Results from the PrimEx-II experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparian, Ashot [NCA& T, Greensboro, NC; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Properties of the neutral pion, as the lightest hadron in Nature, are most sensitive to the basic symmetries and their partial breaking effects in the theory of the strong interaction (QCD). In particular, the po →gg decay width is primarily defined by the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking effect (chiral anomaly) in QCD. The next order corrections to the anomaly have been shown to be small and are known to a 1% precision level. The PrimEx Collaboration at JLab has developed and performed two Primakoff type experiments to measure the po →gg decay width with a similar precision. The published result from the PrimEx-I experiment, G(p0 →gg ) = 7.82±0.14 (stat.)±0.17 (syst.) eV, was a factor of two more precise than the average value quoted in PDG-2010 [1]. The second experiment was performed in 2010 with a goal of 1.4% total uncertainty to address the next-to-leading-order theory calculations. The preliminary results from the PrimEx-II experiment are presented and discussed in this note.

  8. Alignment of the CMS Tracker: Latest results from LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Mittag, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    The all-silicon design of the tracking system of the CMS experiment provides excellent measurements of charged-particle tracks and an efficient tagging of jets. Conditions of the CMS tracker changed repeatedly during the 2015/2016 shutdown and the 2016 data-taking period. Still the true position and orientation of each of the 15 148 silicon strip and 1440 silicon pixel modules need to be known with high precision for all intervals. The alignment constants also need to be promptly re-adjusted each time the state of the CMS magnet is changed between 0T and 3.8 T. Latest Run-II results of the CMS tracker alignment and resolution performance are presented, which are obtained using several millions of reconstructed tracks from collision and cosmic-ray data of 2016. The geometries and the resulting performance of physics observables are carefully validated. In addition to the offline alignment, an online procedure has been put in place which continuously monitors movements of the pixel high-level structures and tri...

  9. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin and radiotherapy: Results of the phase II study in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: usufruct ing the benefits of preoperative adjuvant (biological, functional, surgical, etc.), a phase II essay whose purpose was to evaluate the response and toxicity activated preoperative concomitant radio chemotherapy in the oncological pathology. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.03 and 31.12.09 64 consecutive patients were treated with rectal cancer and histopathology for adenocarcinoma; none of them had been received previous oncological treatment and did not have a second simultaneous neoplasia. The age of the patients had a range between 38 and 69 years with a mean of 57.3 years; 60% belonged to male and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All tumors were at a distance of 12cms ≤ anal margin and were staged as AJCC allowing recruiting 28 patients in stage II (T3, T4) and 36 patients in stage III (N1, N2). Staging was performed with clinical (general and proctologic examination), fibrocolonoscopy, systemic imaging and local (TAC, EER, MRI) and laboratory (CEA) total pelvic X 18 MV photons was irradiated by ICRU-50 in a normo fractionation with daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to a final dose of 45 Gy in 25 sessions using multiple fields (box technique) .The chemotherapy was administered Capecitabine 825mgr / m2 / day in 2 daily doses during the course of radiotherapy and oxaliplatin 50mgr / m2 on days 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 of the same therapy. All patients underwent surgery between 4 and 8 weeks after completing the coincidence. Follow-up it was full and the response was weighted according to the degree of tumor regression (GRT) of Dworak and Toxicity was graded according to RTOG / EORTC. Results: As the TSO the following pathological responses were obtained: GRT 0 (remission Full), 16% GRT 1 and 2 (moderate and low remission), 55% and TSO 3 and 4 (weak or absent remission) 29%. Although there were no deaths therapy, toxicity was severe and frequent with 30% Grade 3 and 4 (skin, gastrointestinal, hematological, neuropathies and

  10. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    clustering, in which some partial information about item assignments or other components of the resulting output are already known and must be accommodated by the solution. Some algorithms seek a partition of the data set into distinct clusters, while others build a hierarchy of nested clusters that can capture taxonomic relationships. Some produce a single optimal solution, while others construct a probabilistic model of cluster membership. More formally, clustering algorithms operate on a data set X composed of items represented by one or more features (dimensions). These could include physical location, such as right ascension and declination, as well as other properties such as brightness, color, temporal change, size, texture, and so on. Let D be the number of dimensions used to represent each item, xi ∈ RD. The clustering goal is to produce an organization P of the items in X that optimizes an objective function f : P -> R, which quantifies the quality of solution P. Often f is defined so as to maximize similarity within a cluster and minimize similarity between clusters. To that end, many algorithms make use of a measure d : X x X -> R of the distance between two items. A partitioning algorithm produces a set of clusters P = {c1, . . . , ck} such that the clusters are nonoverlapping (c_i intersected with c_j = empty set, i != j) subsets of the data set (Union_i c_i=X). Hierarchical algorithms produce a series of partitions P = {p1, . . . , pn }. For a complete hierarchy, the number of partitions n’= n, the number of items in the data set; the top partition is a single cluster containing all items, and the bottom partition contains n clusters, each containing a single item. For model-based clustering, each cluster c_j is represented by a model m_j , such as the cluster center or a Gaussian distribution. The wide array of available clustering algorithms may seem bewildering, and covering all of them is beyond the scope of this chapter. Choosing among them for a

  11. THE CHEMISTRY OF POPULATION III SUPERNOVA EJECTA. II. THE NUCLEATION OF MOLECULAR CLUSTERS AS A DIAGNOSTIC FOR DUST IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherchneff, Isabelle; Dwek, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We study the formation of molecular precursors to dust in the ejecta of Population III supernovae (Pop. III SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach to follow the evolution of small dust cluster abundances from day 100 to day 1000 after explosion. Our work focuses on zero-metallicity 20 M sun and 170 M sun progenitors, and we consider fully macroscopically mixed and unmixed ejecta. The dust precursors comprise molecular chains, rings, and small clusters of chemical composition relevant to the initial elemental composition of the ejecta under study. The nucleation stage for small silica, metal oxides and sulfides, pure metal, and carbon clusters is described with a new chemical reaction network highly relevant to the kinetic description of dust formation in hot circumstellar environments. We consider the effect of the pressure dependence of critical nucleation rates and test the impact of microscopically mixed He + on carbon dust formation. Two cases of metal depletion on silica clusters (full and no depletion) are considered to derive upper limits to the amounts of dust produced in SN ejecta at 1000 days, while the chemical composition of clusters gives a prescription for the type of dust formed in Pop. III SNe. We show that the cluster mass produced in the fully mixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor is ∼ 25 M sun whereas its 20 M sun counterpart forms ∼ 0.16 M sun of clusters. The unmixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor SN synthesize ∼5.6 M sun of small clusters, while its 20 M sun counterpart produces ∼0.103 M sun . Our results point to smaller amounts of dust formed in the ejecta of Pop. III SNe by a factor of ∼ 5 compared to values derived by previous studies, and to different dust chemical compositions. Such deviations result from some erroneous assumptions made, the inappropriate use of classical nucleation theory to model dust formation, and the omission of the synthesis of molecules in SN ejecta. We also find that the unmixed ejecta of massive Pop

  12. The Chemistry of Population III Supernova Ejecta. II. The Nucleation of Molecular Clusters as a Diagnostic for Dust in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherchneff, Isabelle; Dwek, Eli

    2010-04-01

    We study the formation of molecular precursors to dust in the ejecta of Population III supernovae (Pop. III SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach to follow the evolution of small dust cluster abundances from day 100 to day 1000 after explosion. Our work focuses on zero-metallicity 20 M sun and 170 M sun progenitors, and we consider fully macroscopically mixed and unmixed ejecta. The dust precursors comprise molecular chains, rings, and small clusters of chemical composition relevant to the initial elemental composition of the ejecta under study. The nucleation stage for small silica, metal oxides and sulfides, pure metal, and carbon clusters is described with a new chemical reaction network highly relevant to the kinetic description of dust formation in hot circumstellar environments. We consider the effect of the pressure dependence of critical nucleation rates and test the impact of microscopically mixed He+ on carbon dust formation. Two cases of metal depletion on silica clusters (full and no depletion) are considered to derive upper limits to the amounts of dust produced in SN ejecta at 1000 days, while the chemical composition of clusters gives a prescription for the type of dust formed in Pop. III SNe. We show that the cluster mass produced in the fully mixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor is ~ 25 M sun whereas its 20 M sun counterpart forms ~ 0.16 M sun of clusters. The unmixed ejecta of a 170 M sun progenitor SN synthesize ~5.6 M sun of small clusters, while its 20 M sun counterpart produces ~0.103 M sun. Our results point to smaller amounts of dust formed in the ejecta of Pop. III SNe by a factor of ~ 5 compared to values derived by previous studies, and to different dust chemical compositions. Such deviations result from some erroneous assumptions made, the inappropriate use of classical nucleation theory to model dust formation, and the omission of the synthesis of molecules in SN ejecta. We also find that the unmixed ejecta of massive Pop. III SNe

  13. Sound wave generation by a spherically symmetric outburst and AGN feedback in galaxy clusters II: impact of thermal conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaping; Churazov, Eugene

    2018-04-01

    We analyze the impact of thermal conduction on the appearance of a shock-heated gas shell which is produced when a spherically symmetric outburst of a supermassive black hole inflates bubbles of relativistic plasma at the center of a galaxy cluster. The presence of the hot and low-density shell can be used as an ancillary indicator for a high rate of energy release during the outburst, which is required to drive strong shocks into the gas. Here we show that conduction can effectively erase such shell, unless the diffusion of electrons is heavily suppressed. We conclude that a more robust proxy to the energy release rate is the ratio between the shock radius and bubble radius. We also revisited the issue of sound waves dissipation induced by thermal conduction in a scenario, where characteristic wavelength of the sound wave is set by the total energy of the outburst. For a fiducial short outburst model, the dissipation length does not exceed the cooling radius in a typical cluster, provided that the conduction is suppressed by a factor not larger than ˜100. For quasi-continuous energy injection neither the shock-heated shell nor the outgoing sound wave are important and the role of conduction is subdominant.

  14. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  15. Results of readiness review for start of Title II Design of ESF in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Readiness Review Board recommends that the ESF Title II Design be initiated after approval of revised Functional Design Criteria for Title II design. This review was conducted assuming a Deaf Smith location for ESF. Seventy-four open items and eight technical holds were identified during the Readiness Review that must be addressed and resolved to ensure successful completion of the ESF Title II Design. These items include definition and approval of surface based, EDH, and subsurface testing requirements; development of an approved OCRWM/SRPO licensing position for the ESF; and acquisition and availability of site-specific confirmatory data. A Risk Assessment should be conducted to define corrective action data and technical, cost and schedule impacts and associated program risks of continuation of Title II design activities beyond those dates

  16. Local Treatment of Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruers, Theo; Van Coevorden, Frits; Punt, Cornelis J A; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; Borel-Rinkes, Inne; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Poston, Graeme; Bechstein, Wolf; Lentz, Marie-Ange; Mauer, Murielle; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Cutsem, Eric; Ducreux, Michel; Nordlinger, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    Tumor ablation is often employed for unresectable colorectal liver metastases. However, no survival benefit has ever been demonstrated in prospective randomized studies. Here, we investigate the long-term benefits of such an aggressive approach. In this randomized phase II trial, 119 patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (n  38%) was met. We now report on long-term OS results. All statistical tests were two-sided. The analyses were according to intention to treat. At a median follow up of 9.7 years, 92 of 119 (77.3%) patients had died: 39 of 60 (65.0%) in the combined modality arm and 53 of 59 (89.8%) in the systemic treatment arm. Almost all patients died of progressive disease (35 patients in the combined modality arm, 49 patients in the systemic treatment arm). There was a statistically significant difference in OS in favor of the combined modality arm (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38 to 0.88, P = .01). Three-, five-, and eight-year OS were 56.9% (95% CI = 43.3% to 68.5%), 43.1% (95% CI = 30.3% to 55.3%), 35.9% (95% CI = 23.8% to 48.2%), respectively, in the combined modality arm and 55.2% (95% CI = 41.6% to 66.9%), 30.3% (95% CI = 19.0% to 42.4%), 8.9% (95% CI = 3.3% to 18.1%), respectively, in the systemic treatment arm. Median OS was 45.6 months (95% CI = 30.3 to 67.8 months) in the combined modality arm vs 40.5 months (95% CI = 27.5 to 47.7 months) in the systemic treatment arm. This phase II trial is the first randomized study demonstrating that aggressive local treatment can prolong OS in patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Resonant Frequency Control For the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ: Control Framework and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, A. L. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Edelen, J. P.; Nicklaus, D.; Steimel, J.

    2016-12-16

    For the PIP-II Injector Test (PI-Test) at Fermilab, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is designed to accelerate a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA, H- beam to 2.1 MeV under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) RF operation. The available headroom of the RF amplifiers limits the maximum allowable detuning to 3 kHz, and the detuning is controlled entirely via thermal regulation. Fine control over the detuning, minimal manual intervention, and fast trip recovery is desired. In addition, having active control over both the walls and vanes provides a wider tuning range. For this, we intend to use model predictive control (MPC). To facilitate these objectives, we developed a dedicated control framework that handles higher-level system decisions as well as executes control calculations. It is written in Python in a modular fashion for easy adjustments, readability, and portability. Here we describe the framework and present the first control results for the PI-Test RFQ under pulsed and CW operation.

  18. Impact of monovalent cations on soil structure. Part II. Results of two Swiss soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Elham; Emami, Hojat; Keller, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of adding solutions with different potassium and sodium concentrations on dispersible clay, water retention characteristics, air permeability, and soil shrinkage behaviour using two agricultural soils from Switzerland with different clay content but similar organic carbon to clay ratio. Three different solutions (including only Na, only K, and the combination of both) were added to soil samples at three different cation ratio of soil structural stability levels, and the soil samples were incubated for one month. Our findings showed that the amount of readily dispersible clay increased with increasing Na concentrations and with increasing cation ratio of soil structural stability. The treatment with the maximum Na concentration resulted in the highest water retention and in the lowest shrinkage capacity. This was was associated with high amounts of readily dispersible clay. Air permeability generally increased during incubation due to moderate wetting and drying cycles, but the increase was negatively correlated with readily dispersible clay. Readily dispersible clay decreased with increasing K, while readily dispersible clay increased with increasing K in Iranian soil (Part I of our study). This can be attributed to the different clay mineralogy of the studied soils (muscovite in Part I and illite in Part II).

  19. A new aberration-corrected, energy-filtered LEEM/PEEM instrument II. Operation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromp, R.M.; Hannon, J.B.; Wan, W.; Berghaus, A.; Schaff, O.

    2013-01-01

    In Part I we described a new design for an aberration-corrected Low Energy Electron Microscope (LEEM) and Photo Electron Emission Microscope (PEEM) equipped with an in-line electron energy filter. The chromatic and spherical aberrations of the objective lens are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror that provides independent control of the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients C c and C 3 , as well as the mirror focal length. In this Part II we discuss details of microscope operation, how the microscope is set up in a systematic fashion, and we present typical results. - Highlights: ► The C c and C 3 aberrations of a LEEM/PEEM instrument are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror. ► The mirror provides independent control over C c , C 3 and focal length in close agreement with theory. ► A detailed alignment procedure for the corrected microscope is given. ► Novel methods to measure C c and C 3 of the objective lens and the mirror are presented. ► We demonstrate a record spatial resolution of 2 nm

  20. [The external patello-tibial transfixation (EPTT). Part II: Clinical application and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaque, B; Gotzen, L; Ziring, E; Petermann, J

    1999-07-01

    In part I of the paper the biomechanical and technical background of the EPTT using the MPT fixator and the indications for this procedure have been described. In part II we report about the clinical application of the EPTT in 67 patients with a wide spectrum of repairs and reconstructions of the extensor mechanism. 48 patients had fresh injuries, 18 of them with severe concomitant knee lesions and 19 patients had neglected rsp. unsuccessfully operated injuries. There were 4 deep infections, two of them related to the MPT fixator. In the patients with uneventful healing the fixator remained in place for 7.3 weeks in average. The clinical, isokinetic and radiological results were reviewed in 17 patients with an average follow-up time of 37.3 months. There were 5 patients with partial patellectomy and tendon reattachment because of lower patella pole comminution and 12 patients with tendon reattachment ruptured at the inferior patella pole or suture repair in midsubstance rupture. The clinical results according to the IKDC score were rated in 3 patients as normal, in 10 patients as nearly normal and in 4 patients as abnormal. This rating was highly dependend on the subjective judgement by the patients who considered their operated knees not as normal as the contralateral knees. From our clinical experiences and results we can derive that the EPTT enables the surgical management of extensor mechanism disruptions with a minimum of internal fixation material and provides a safe protection of the repairs and reconstructions during the healing period. The EPTT allows immediate unrestricted functional rehabilitation and early walking without crutches. Thus the EPTT represents an effective alternative to the patello-tibial cerclage with a wire or synthetic ligaments.

  1. [Work-Related Medical Rehabilitation in Cancer Rehabilitation - Short-Term Results from a Cluster-Randomized Multicenter-Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Bethge, Matthias

    2018-05-25

    Rehabilitation programs that support return to work become increasingly relevant for cancer survivors. In Germany, such programs were established as work-related medical rehabilitation (WMR). The study investigated whether WMR leads to better results compared to medical rehabilitation (MR). We report effects on secondary outcomes when the rehabilitation program was completed. Clusters of participants were randomly assigned to WMR or MR. Patients of working age and an elevated risk of not returning to work were included. The grade of implementation was assessed by dose delivered and dose received. Study outcomes were assessed using scales measuring functioning and symptoms, coping with illness as well as self-reported work ability. Treatment effects were estimated using mixed linear models. From 232 planned randomized intervention groups, 165 (71%) were realized. In total, 476 patients were included. Mean age of participants was 50.7 years (SD=7.3). Most frequent primary diagnoses were malignant neoplasms of the breast. Participants in the WMR program reported significantly better outcomes regarding quality of life (SMD=0.17-0.25), fatigue (SMD=0.18-0.27), coping with illness (SMD=0.17-0.22), and self-reported work-ability (SMD=0.16) compared to participants in MR program (all p<0.05). The results indicate a positive effect in favor of WMR for cancer patients with an elevated risk of not returning to work at the end of their treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  3. Long term effectiveness on prescribing of two multifaceted educational interventions: results of two large scale randomized cluster trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Magrini

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Information on benefits and risks of drugs is a key element affecting doctors' prescribing decisions. Outreach visits promoting independent information have proved moderately effective in changing prescribing behaviours. OBJECTIVES: Testing the short and long-term effectiveness on general practitioners' prescribing of small groups meetings led by pharmacists. METHODS: Two cluster open randomised controlled trials (RCTs were carried out in a large scale NHS setting. Ad hoc prepared evidence based material were used considering a therapeutic area approach--TEA, with information materials on osteoporosis or prostatic hyperplasia--and a single drug oriented approach--SIDRO, with information materials on me-too drugs of 2 different classes: barnidipine or prulifloxacin. In each study, all 115 Primary Care Groups in a Northern Italy area (2.2 million inhabitants, 1737 general practitioners were randomised to educational small groups meetings, in which available evidence was provided together with drug utilization data and clinical scenarios. Main outcomes were changes in the six-months prescription of targeted drugs. Longer term results (24 and 48 months were also evaluated. RESULTS: In the TEA trial, one of the four primary outcomes showed a reduction (prescription of alfuzosin compared to tamsulosin and terazosin in benign prostatic hyperplasia: prescribing ratio -8.5%, p = 0.03. Another primary outcome (prescription of risedronate showed a reduction at 24 and 48 months (-7.6%, p = 0.02; and -9,8%, p = 0.03, but not at six months (-5.1%, p = 0.36. In the SIDRO trial both primary outcomes showed a statistically significant reduction (prescription of barnidipine -9.8%, p = 0.02; prescription of prulifloxacin -11.1%, p = 0.04, which persisted or increased over time. INTERPRETATION: These two cluster RCTs showed the large scale feasibility of a complex educational program in a NHS setting, and its potentially

  4. Generalized approximate spin projection calculations of effective exchange integrals of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the S1 and S3 states of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H; Shoji, M; Yamanaka, S; Mino, H; Umena, Y; Kawakami, K; Kamiya, N; Shen, J-R; Yamaguchi, K

    2014-06-28

    Full geometry optimizations followed by the vibrational analysis were performed for eight spin configurations of the CaMn4O4X(H2O)3Y (X = O, OH; Y = H2O, OH) cluster in the S1 and S3 states of the oxygen evolution complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). The energy gaps among these configurations obtained by vertical, adiabatic and adiabatic plus zero-point-energy (ZPE) correction procedures have been used for computation of the effective exchange integrals (J) in the spin Hamiltonian model. The J values are calculated by the (1) analytical method and the (2) generalized approximate spin projection (AP) method that eliminates the spin contamination errors of UB3LYP solutions. Using J values derived from these methods, exact diagonalization of the spin Hamiltonian matrix was carried out, yielding excitation energies and spin densities of the ground and lower-excited states of the cluster. The obtained results for the right (R)- and left (L)-opened structures in the S1 and S3 states are found to be consistent with available optical and magnetic experimental results. Implications of the computational results are discussed in relation to (a) the necessity of the exact diagonalization for computations of reliable energy levels, (b) magneto-structural correlations in the CaMn4O5 cluster of the OEC of PSII, (c) structural symmetry breaking in the S1 and S3 states, and (d) the right- and left-handed scenarios for the O-O bond formation for water oxidation.

  5. Measuring human rights violations in a conflict-affected country: results from a nationwide cluster survey in Central African Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Les

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring human rights violations is particularly challenging during or after armed conflict. A recent nationwide survey in the Central African Republic produced estimates of rates of grave violations against children and adults affected by armed conflict, using an approach known as the "Neighborhood Method". Methods In June and July, 2009, a random household survey was conducted based on population estimates from the 2003 national census. Clusters were assigned systematically proportional to population size. Respondents in randomly selected households were interviewed regarding incidents of killing, intentional injury, recruitment into armed groups, abduction, sexual abuse and rape between January 1, 2008 and the date of interview, occurring in their homes' and those of their three closest neighbors. Results Sixty of the selected 69 clusters were surveyed. In total, 599 women were interviewed about events in 2,370 households representing 13,669 persons. Estimates of annual rates of each violation occurring per 1000 people in each of two strata are provided for children between the ages of five and 17, adults 18 years of age and older and the entire population five years and older, along with a combined and weighted national rate. The national rates for children age five to 17 were estimated to be 0.98/1000/year (95% CI: 0.18 - 1.78 for recruitment, 2.56/1000/year (95% CI: 1.50 - 3.62 for abduction, 1.13/1000/year (95% CI: 0.33 - 1.93 for intentional injury, 10.72/1000 girls/year (95% CI: 7.40 - 14.04 for rape, and 4.80/1000 girls/year (95% CI: 2.61 - 6.00 for sexual abuse. No reports of any violation against a person under the age of five were recorded and there were no reports of rape or sexual abuse of males. No children were reported to have been killed during the recall period. Rape and abduction were the most frequently reported events. Conclusions The population-based figures greatly augment existing information on

  6. FADS1 FADS2 gene cluster, PUFA intake and blood lipids in children: results from the GINIplus and LISAplus studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Standl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated cholesterol levels in children can be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in later life. In adults, it has been shown that blood lipid levels are strongly influenced by polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS gene cluster in addition to nutritional and other exogenous and endogenous determinants. Our aim was to investigate whether lipid levels are determined by the FADS genotype already in children and whether this association interacts with dietary intake of n-3 fatty acids. METHODS: The analysis was based on data of 2006 children from two German prospective birth cohort studies. Total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides were measured at 10 years of age. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the FADS gene cluster were genotyped. Dietary n-3 fatty acid intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire. Linear regression modeling was used to assess the association between lipid levels, n-3 fatty acid intake and FADS genotype. RESULTS: Individuals carrying the homozygous minor allele had lower levels of total cholesterol [means ratio (MR ranging from 0.96 (p = 0.0093 to 0.98 (p = 0.2949, depending on SNPs] and LDL [MR between 0.94 (p = 0.0179 and 0.97 (p = 0.2963] compared to homozygous major allele carriers. Carriers of the heterozygous allele showed lower HDL levels [β between -0.04 (p = 0.0074 to -0.01 (p = 0.3318] and higher triglyceride levels [MR ranging from 1.06 (p = 0.0065 to 1.07 (p = 0.0028] compared to homozygous major allele carriers. A higher n-3 PUFA intake was associated with higher concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and lower triglyceride levels, but these associations did not interact with the FADS1 FADS2 genotype. CONCLUSION: Total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglyceride concentrations may be influenced by the FADS1 FADS2 genotype already in 10 year old children. Genetically determined blood lipid levels during childhood might

  7. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies supporting the interpretation of the results of TVO I/II PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for the TVO I/II nuclear power units. As a part of the PRA project, uncertainties of risk models and methods were systematically studied in order to describe them and to demonstrate their impact by way of results. The uncertainty study was divided into two phases: a qualitative and a quantitative study. The qualitative study contained identification of uncertainties and qualitative assessments of their importance. The PRA was introduced, and identified assumptions and uncertainties behind the models were documented. The most significant uncertainties were selected by importance measures or other judgements for further quantitative studies. The quantitative study included sensitivity studies and propagation of uncertainty ranges. In the sensitivity studies uncertain assumptions or parameters were varied in order to illustrate the sensitivity of the models. The propagation of the uncertainty ranges demonstrated the impact of the statistical uncertainties of the parameter values. The Monte Carlo method was used as a propagation method. The most significant uncertainties were those involved in modelling human interactions, dependences and common cause failures (CCFs), loss of coolant accident (LOCA) frequencies and pressure suppression. The qualitative mapping out of the uncertainty factors turned out to be useful in planning quantitative studies. It also served as internal review of the assumptions made in the PRA. The sensitivity studies were perhaps the most advantageous part of the quantitative study because they allowed individual analyses of the significance of uncertainty sources identified. The uncertainty study was found reasonable in systematically and critically assessing uncertainties in a risk analysis. The usefulness of this study depends on the decision maker (power company) since uncertainty studies are primarily carried out to support decision making when uncertainties are

  8. RESULTS OF ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING OF LCLS-II CAVITY TUNER MOTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2018-04-01

    An Accelerated Life Test (ALT) of the Phytron stepper motor used in the LCLS-II cavity tuner has been conducted at JLab. Since the motor will reside inside the cryomodule, any failure would lead to a very costly and arduous repair. As such, the motor was tested for the equivalent of 30 lifetimes before being approved for use in the production cryomodules. The 9-cell LCLS-II cavity is simulated by disc springs with an equivalent spring constant. Plots of the motor position vs. tuner position ' measured via an installed linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) ' are used to measure motor motion. The titanium spindle was inspected for loss of lubrication. The motor passed the ALT, and is set to be installed in the LCLS-II cryomodules.

  9. Staff Distress Improves by Treating Pain in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: Results From a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasmul, Irene; Husebo, Bettina Sandgathe; Flo, Elisabeth

    2016-12-01

    Most people with dementia develop neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs), which are distressing for their carers. Untreated pain may increase the prevalence and severity of NPSs and thereby staff burden. We investigated the association between NPSs and the impact of individual pain treatment on distress in nursing home staff. Nursing home (NH) units were cluster-randomized to an intervention group (33 NH units; n = 175) or control group (27 NH units; n = 177). Patients in the intervention group received individual pain treatment for eight weeks, followed by a four-week washout period; control groups received care as usual. Staff informants (n = 138) used the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-NH version (including caregiver distress) as primary outcome to assess their own distress. Other outcomes were pain (Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale) and cognitive functioning (Mini-Mental State Examination). Using hierarchical regression analysis, all NPS items at baseline were associated with staff distress (P pain treatment reduced staff distress in the intervention group compared to control group especially in regard to agitation-related symptoms and apathy. Furthermore, our results indicated a multifactorial model of staff distress, in which enhanced knowledge and understanding of NPSs and pain in people with advanced dementia may play an important role. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Deletion of the MBII-85 snoRNA gene cluster in mice results in postnatal growth retardation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris V Skryabin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS [MIM 176270] is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by decreased fetal activity, muscular hypotonia, failure to thrive, short stature, obesity, mental retardation, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It is caused by the loss of function of one or more imprinted, paternally expressed genes on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15. Several potential PWS mouse models involving the orthologous region on chromosome 7C exist. Based on the analysis of deletions in the mouse and gene expression in PWS patients with chromosomal translocations, a critical region (PWScr for neonatal lethality, failure to thrive, and growth retardation was narrowed to the locus containing a cluster of neuronally expressed MBII-85 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA genes. Here, we report the deletion of PWScr. Mice carrying the maternally inherited allele (PWScr(m-/p+ are indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. All those with the paternally inherited allele (PWScr(m+/p- consistently display postnatal growth retardation, with about 15% postnatal lethality in C57BL/6, but not FVB/N crosses. This is the first example in a multicellular organism of genetic deletion of a C/D box snoRNA gene resulting in a pronounced phenotype.

  11. Determinants of child maltreatment in Nepal: Results from the 2014 Nepal multiple indicator cluster survey (the 2014 NMICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteraya, Madhu Sudhan; Ebrahim, Nasser B; Gnawali, Shreejana

    2018-02-01

    We examined the prevalence of child maltreatment as measured by the level of physical (moderate to severe) and emotional abuse and child labor, and the associated household level determinants of child maltreatment in Nepal. We used a nationally representative data set from the fifth round of the Nepal Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (the 2014 NMICS). The main independent variables were household level characteristics. Dependent variables included child experience of moderate to severe physical abuse, emotional abuse, and child labor (domestic work and economic activities). Bivariate analyses and logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between independent and dependent variables. The results showed that nearly half of the children (49.8%) had experienced moderate physical abuse, 21.5% experienced severe physical abuse, and 77.3% experienced emotional abuse. About 27% of the children had engaged in domestic work and 46.7% in various economic activities. At bivariate level, educational level of household's head and household wealth status had shown significant statistical association with child maltreatment (pchild labor. In general, child maltreatment is a neglected social issue in Nepal and the high rates of child maltreatment calls for mass awareness programs focusing on parents, and involving all stakeholders including governments, local, and international organizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Results of a lay health education intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among Filipino Americans: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaresma, Charlene F; Sy, Angela U; Nguyen, Tung T; Ho, Reginald C S; Gildengorin, Ginny L; Tsoh, Janice Y; Jo, Angela M; Tong, Elisa K; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Stewart, Susan L

    2018-04-01

    Filipino colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates fall below Healthy People 2020 goals. In this study, the authors explore whether a lay health educator (LHE) approach can increase CRC screening among Filipino Americans ages 50 to 75 years in Hawai'i. A cluster randomized controlled trial from 2012 through 2015 compared an intervention, which consisted of LHEs delivering 2 education sessions and 2 telephone follow-up calls on CRC screening plus a CRC brochure versus an attention control, in which 2 lectures and 2 follow-up calls on nutrition and physical activity plus a CRC brochure were provided. The primary outcome was change in self-reported ever receipt of CRC screening at 6 months. Among 304 participants (77% women, 86% had > 10 years of residence in the United States), the proportion of participants who reported ever having received CRC screening increased significantly in the intervention group (from 80% to 89%; P = .0003), but not in the control group (from 73% to 74%; P = .60). After covariate adjustment, there was a significant intervention effect (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.5). There was no intervention effect on up-to-date screening. This first randomized controlled trial for CRC screening among Hawai'i's Filipinos used an LHE intervention with mixed, but promising, results. Cancer 2018;124:1535-42. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  13. The Effects of Skill Training on Social Workers' Professional Competences in Norway: Results of a Cluster-Randomised Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg-Heimonen, Ira; Natland, Sidsel; Tøge, Anne Grete; Hansen, Helle Cathrine

    2016-01-01

    Using a cluster-randomised design, this study analyses the effects of a government-administered skill training programme for social workers in Norway. The training programme aims to improve social workers' professional competences by enhancing and systematising follow-up work directed towards longer-term unemployed clients in the following areas: encountering the user, system-oriented efforts and administrative work. The main tools and techniques of the programme are based on motivational interviewing and appreciative inquiry. The data comprise responses to baseline and eighteen-month follow-up questionnaires administered to all social workers (n = 99) in eighteen participating Labour and Welfare offices randomised into experimental and control groups. The findings indicate that the skill training programme positively affected the social workers' evaluations of their professional competences and quality of work supervision received. The acquisition and mastering of combinations of specific tools and techniques, a comprehensive supervision structure and the opportunity to adapt the learned skills to local conditions were important in explaining the results. PMID:27559232

  14. Mathematical models and illustrative results for the RINGBEARER II monopole/dipole beam-propagation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, F.W.; Masamitsu, J.A.; Lee, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    RINGBEARER II is a linearized monopole/dipole particle simulation code for studying intense relativistic electron beam propagation in gas. In this report the mathematical models utilized for beam particle dynamics and pinch field computation are delineated. Difficulties encountered in code operations and some remedies are discussed. Sample output is presented detailing the diagnostics and the methods of display and analysis utilized

  15. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier

    2013-01-01

    al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III...

  16. Tetranuclear cluster-based Pb(II)-MOF: Synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence sensing for CS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanli

    2018-05-01

    A new Pb(II) coordination polymer, namely [Pb2(bptc)(DMA)]n (1, H4bptc = biphenyl-3,3‧,5,5‧-tetracarboxylic acid, DMA = N, N‧- dimethylacetamide), has been synthesized by the combination of H4bptc with Pb(NO3)2 under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that compound 1 features a 3D framework based on tetranuclear [Pb4(COO)6] subunits, and topological analysis revealed that compound represents a binodal (4, 8)-connected scu-type topological network with the point symbol of {416,612}{44,62}2. Luminescence studies indicated that 1 and 1' (1‧ represents the desolvated samples) showed intense yellow emissions. Significantly, 1‧ exhibited sensitive luminescence sensing for CS2 solvent molecules at a low concentration.

  17. Descriptive analysis of factors that influence economical results in the furniture cluster of Bento Gonçalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Afonso Sellitto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to analyze factors that can influence the competitiveness of companies in the furniture cluster of Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul. By a literature review, we identify four factors that can influence competition in clusters: the region's productivity, innovation, relationship with suppliers, and cooperation between companies. The research method is the single case study. The research techniques are the review of specific bibliographic and documentation of the studied cluster, and interviews with experts of the cluster. The main findings are: the cluster has high productivity, mainly by hi-tech machinery employed by the main companies; innovation is permanent and motivated by the imposition to medium and short companies of business goals by the main companies; the relationship with suppliers is problematic regarding the large-scale vendors by the lack of the practice of collective purchases in the area; and cooperation between enterprises is small, by the culture of the region that don´t appreciate depending on resources available outside the companies. Such factors can contribute to produce hypotheses for further research.

  18. EDELWEISS-II, direct Dark Matter search experiment: first data analysis and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorza, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    relies in the measurement of nuclear recoils that produce measurable effects in the crystal such ionization and heat. My PhD thesis is organized as follows. The first chapter aims to provide an introduction to the theoretical framework and the scientific motivation for the following work. The nature of DM has been one of the most challenging topics in contemporary physics since the first evidences of its existence had been found in the 1930's. Cosmologists and astrophysicists on one side, together with particle theorists on the other have put a lot of effort into this field: I will briefly account for their achievements and for the experimental strategies which can be set in this scenario. Since this thesis work was carried out within the EDELWEISS-II direct dark matter experiment, I will focus the next chapter on this topic, describing the main features. The second chapter is related to the set-up of the EDELWEISS-II, the current stage of the EDELWEISS experiment necessary after a first phase that achieved the best upper limit on the WIMP elastic scattering on nucleon as a function of WIMP mass in 2004. The set-up was conceived to reduce radioactive background observed in the first experiment phase. Thus, describing the starting point for this second stage, I will present detectors involved in, with a peculiar regard to the Ge-NTD type, the same implied in EDELWEISS-I, on which I have focused my thesis work. In the third chapter the performed Ge-NTD analysis chain is presented. Starting with the signal processing of the recorded data, I will enter in the essential analysis steps from calibration signals passing through measurements of thresholds and resolutions in order to predict nuclear and electronic recoil band and definition of fiducial zone to conclude determining a selection for likely WIMP candidate. These suggestions are applied in the fourth chapter, which presents the analysis and the results of the 8. cool down that takes places from November 2007 to March

  19. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark. Volume II: Summary Results of Exercise 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Olson, Andy M.

    2005-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) completed under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship a PWR main steam line break (MSLB) benchmark against coupled system three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic codes. Another OECD/NRC coupled-code benchmark was recently completed for a BWR turbine trip (TT) transient and is the object of the present report. Turbine trip transients in a BWR are pressurisation events in which the coupling between core space-dependent neutronic phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. The data made available from actual experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 plant make the present benchmark particularly valuable. While defining and coordinating the BWR TT benchmark, a systematic approach and level methodology not only allowed for a consistent and comprehensive validation process, but also contributed to the study of key parameters of pressurisation transients. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises, two initial states and five transient scenarios. The BWR TT Benchmark will be published in four volumes as NEA reports. CD-ROMs will also be prepared and will include the four reports and the transient boundary conditions, decay heat values as a function of time, cross-section libraries and supplementary tables and graphs not published in the paper version. BWR TT Benchmark - Volume I: Final Specifications was issued in 2001 [NEA/NSC/DOC(2001)]. The benchmark team [Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in co-operation with Exelon Nuclear and the NEA] has been responsible for coordinating benchmark activities, answering participant questions and assisting them in developing their models, as well as analysing submitted solutions and providing reports summarising the results for each phase. The benchmark team has also been involved in the technical aspects of the benchmark, including sensitivity studies for the different exercises. Volume II summarises the results for Exercise 1 of the

  20. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  1. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER MOTION (HSTPROMO) CATALOGS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION, DATA REDUCTION, AND NGC 7078 RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Watkins, L. L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); King, I. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bianchini, P. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chanamé, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul 782-0436, Santiago (Chile); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Cool, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Ferraro, F. R.; Massari, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Ford, H., E-mail: bellini@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present the first study of high-precision internal proper motions (PMs) in a large sample of globular clusters, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained over the past decade with the ACS/WFC, ACS/HRC, and WFC3/UVIS instruments. We determine PMs for over 1.3 million stars in the central regions of 22 clusters, with a median number of ∼60,000 stars per cluster. These PMs have the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the internal kinematics of globular clusters by extending past line-of-sight (LOS) velocity measurements to two- or three-dimensional velocities, lower stellar masses, and larger sample sizes. We describe the reduction pipeline that we developed to derive homogeneous PMs from the very heterogeneous archival data. We demonstrate the quality of the measurements through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We also discuss the PM errors introduced by various systematic effects and the techniques that we have developed to correct or remove them to the extent possible. We provide in electronic form the catalog for NGC 7078 (M 15), which consists of 77,837 stars in the central 2.'4. We validate the catalog by comparison with existing PM measurements and LOS velocities and use it to study the dependence of the velocity dispersion on radius, stellar magnitude (or mass) along the main sequence, and direction in the plane of the sky (radial or tangential). Subsequent papers in this series will explore a range of applications in globular-cluster science and will also present the PM catalogs for the other sample clusters.

  2. Comparison of multianalyte proficiency test results by sum of ranking differences, principal component analysis, and hierarchical cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrbić, Biljana; Héberger, Károly; Durišić-Mladenović, Nataša

    2013-10-01

    Sum of ranking differences (SRD) was applied for comparing multianalyte results obtained by several analytical methods used in one or in different laboratories, i.e., for ranking the overall performances of the methods (or laboratories) in simultaneous determination of the same set of analytes. The data sets for testing of the SRD applicability contained the results reported during one of the proficiency tests (PTs) organized by EU Reference Laboratory for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (EU-RL-PAH). In this way, the SRD was also tested as a discriminant method alternative to existing average performance scores used to compare mutlianalyte PT results. SRD should be used along with the z scores--the most commonly used PT performance statistics. SRD was further developed to handle the same rankings (ties) among laboratories. Two benchmark concentration series were selected as reference: (a) the assigned PAH concentrations (determined precisely beforehand by the EU-RL-PAH) and (b) the averages of all individual PAH concentrations determined by each laboratory. Ranking relative to the assigned values and also to the average (or median) values pointed to the laboratories with the most extreme results, as well as revealed groups of laboratories with similar overall performances. SRD reveals differences between methods or laboratories even if classical test(s) cannot. The ranking was validated using comparison of ranks by random numbers (a randomization test) and using seven folds cross-validation, which highlighted the similarities among the (methods used in) laboratories. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis justified the findings based on SRD ranking/grouping. If the PAH-concentrations are row-scaled, (i.e., z scores are analyzed as input for ranking) SRD can still be used for checking the normality of errors. Moreover, cross-validation of SRD on z scores groups the laboratories similarly. The SRD technique is general in nature, i.e., it can

  3. Assessment of the accuracy of coupled cluster perturbation theory for open-shell systems. II. Quadruples expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Janus J; Matthews, Devin A; Jørgensen, Poul; Gauss, Jürgen

    2016-05-21

    We extend our assessment of the potential of perturbative coupled cluster (CC) expansions for a test set of open-shell atoms and organic radicals to the description of quadruple excitations. Namely, the second- through sixth-order models of the recently proposed CCSDT(Q-n) quadruples series [J. J. Eriksen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064108 (2014)] are compared to the prominent CCSDT(Q) and ΛCCSDT(Q) models. From a comparison of the models in terms of their recovery of total CC singles, doubles, triples, and quadruples (CCSDTQ) energies, we find that the performance of the CCSDT(Q-n) models is independent of the reference used (unrestricted or restricted (open-shell) Hartree-Fock), in contrast to the CCSDT(Q) and ΛCCSDT(Q) models, for which the accuracy is strongly dependent on the spin of the molecular ground state. By further comparing the ability of the models to recover relative CCSDTQ total atomization energies, the discrepancy between them is found to be even more pronounced, stressing how a balanced description of both closed- and open-shell species-as found in the CCSDT(Q-n) models-is indeed of paramount importance if any perturbative CC model is to be of chemical relevance for high-accuracy applications. In particular, the third-order CCSDT(Q-3) model is found to offer an encouraging alternative to the existing choices of quadruples models used in modern computational thermochemistry, since the model is still only of moderate cost, albeit markedly more costly than, e.g., the CCSDT(Q) and ΛCCSDT(Q) models.

  4. Algorithms of maximum likelihood data clustering with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giada, Lorenzo; Marsili, Matteo

    2002-12-01

    We address the problem of data clustering by introducing an unsupervised, parameter-free approach based on maximum likelihood principle. Starting from the observation that data sets belonging to the same cluster share a common information, we construct an expression for the likelihood of any possible cluster structure. The likelihood in turn depends only on the Pearson's coefficient of the data. We discuss clustering algorithms that provide a fast and reliable approximation to maximum likelihood configurations. Compared to standard clustering methods, our approach has the advantages that (i) it is parameter free, (ii) the number of clusters need not be fixed in advance and (iii) the interpretation of the results is transparent. In order to test our approach and compare it with standard clustering algorithms, we analyze two very different data sets: time series of financial market returns and gene expression data. We find that different maximization algorithms produce similar cluster structures whereas the outcome of standard algorithms has a much wider variability.

  5. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  6. [Effects of daily physical exercise at school on cardiovascular risk--results of a 2-year cluster-randomized study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, C; Mende, M; Gaede, L; Müller, U; Machalica, K; Schuler, G

    2011-11-01

    It was the aim of this study to measure the effects over two years of daily sport activity during the school-day on their physical fitness (primary endpoint), motor coordination and blood pressure (secondary endpoints). A total of 232 children from eleven different 6 (th) grade classes were enrolled after informed parental consent. Their mean age was 11.1  ±  0.6 years. Six classes were randomly assigned for intervention (n=141), five as control (n=91). Those of the intervention cohort undertook, for five days weekly during the school year one hour of regulated sport exercise, including 15 min of endurance training. The pupils of the control group undertook customary sport activity (two hours a week). Anthropometric data were recorded and maximal oxygen uptake measured in each pupil, as well as blood pressure and motor coordination at the beginning and at the end of each of the two years of the study. The data were analyzed using the cluster randomization method. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO (2)max) had improved among the intervention group after two years, compared with the controls (3.12 m/kg/min, 95% confindence interval [CI] 0.06-6.19), while improvement in motor coordination just failed to reach statistical significance (3.06, 95% CI -0.17-6.29). There was no significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but a downward trend in the prevalence of overweight and obesity from 12.1% to 7.8% in the intervention group. The results indicate that daily physical exercise during school hours should be given greater importance. But it will require a long-term trial to determine whether promotion of increased physical activity at school influences the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors when the pupils reach adulthood. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Sex Differences in Civilian Injury in Baghdad From 2003 to 2014: Results of a Randomized Household Cluster Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaak, Kyle; Lafta, Riyadh; Stewart, Barclay T; Fowler, Thomas R; Al-Shatari, Sahar A Esa; Burnham, Gilbert; Cherewick, Megan; Wren, Sherry M; Groen, Reinou S; Kushner, Adam L

    2018-06-01

    To examine sex differences in injury mechanisms, injury-related death, injury-related disability, and associated financial consequences in Baghdad since the 2003 invasion of Iraq to inform prevention initiatives, health policy, and relief planning. Reliable estimates of injury burden among civilians during conflict are lacking, particularly among vulnerable subpopulations, such as women. A 2-stage, cluster randomized, community-based household survey was conducted in May 2014 to determine the civilian burden of injury in Baghdad since 2003. Households were surveyed regarding injury mechanisms, healthcare required, disability, deaths, connection to conflict, and resultant financial hardship. We surveyed 900 households (5148 individuals), reporting 553 injuries, 162 (29%) of which were injuries among women. The mean age of injury was higher among women compared with men (34 ± 21.3 vs 27 ± 16.5 years; P < 0.001). More women than men were injured while in the home [104 (64%) vs 82 (21%); P < 0.001]. Fewer women than men died from injuries [11 (6.8%) vs 77 (20%); P < 0.001]; however, women were more likely than men to live with reduced function [101 (63%) vs 192 (49%); P = 0.005]. Of intentional injuries, women had higher rates of injury by shell fragments (41% vs 26%); more men were injured by gunshots [76 (41%) vs 6 (17.6%); P = .011). Women experienced fewer injuries than men in postinvasion Baghdad, but were more likely to suffer disability after injury. Efforts to improve conditions for injured women should focus on mitigating financial and provisional hardships, providing counseling services, and ensuring access to rehabilitation services.

  8. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  9. Emergent properties resulting from type-II band alignment in semiconductor nanoheterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun S; Mirkovic, Tihana; Chuang, Chi-Hung; Burda, Clemens; Scholes, Gregory D

    2011-01-11

    The development of elegant synthetic methodologies for the preparation of monocomponent nanocrystalline particles has opened many possibilities for the preparation of heterostructured semiconductor nanostructures. Each of the integrated nanodomains is characterized by its individual physical properties, surface chemistry, and morphology, yet, these multicomponent hybrid particles present ideal systems for the investigation of the synergetic properties that arise from the material combination in a non-additive fashion. Of particular interest are type-II heterostructures, where the relative band alignment of their constituent semiconductor materials promotes a spatial separation of the electron and hole following photoexcitation, a highly desirable property for photovoltaic applications. This article highlights recent progress in both synthetic strategies, which allow for material and architectural modulation of novel nanoheterostructures, as well as the experimental work that provides insight into the photophysical properties of type-II heterostructures. The effects of external factors, such as electric fields, temperature, and solvent are explored in conjunction with exciton and multiexciton dynamics and charge transfer processes typical for type-II semiconductor heterostructures.

  10. Cold Test Results of the ISAC-II Medium Beta High Gradient Cryomodule

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, R E; Clark, G S; Fong, K; Mitra, A K; Poirier, R L; Rawnsley, B; Ries, T; Sekatchev, I; Stanford, G; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    Many proposals (RIA, Eurisol, ISAC-II) are emerging for a new generation of high gradient heavy ion accelerators. The ISAC-II medium beta cryomodule represents the first realized application that encorporates many new techniques to improve the performance over machines presently being used for beam delivery. The machine lattice, compatible with multi-charge acceleration, uses high field (9T) superconducting solenoids with bucking coils for active fringe field compensation. The bulk niobium quarter wave medium beta cavity produces 6 MV/m over an effective length of 18cm with a peak surface field of ~30 MV/m. TRIUMF has developed a mechanical tuner capable of both coarse (kHz) and fine (Hz) frequency adjustments of the cavity. The demonstrated tuner resolution is better than 0.1 μm (0.6 Hz). A new rf coupling loop has been developed that operates at 200 Watts forward power with less than 0.5 Watt of power being added to the helium load. Cold alignment in ISAC-II has been done with rf pick-ups using a ...

  11. I. Cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II). Aquation equilibria and isotopic exchange of chloride ligands with free chloride and tetrachloroplatinate(II). II. The Szilard--Chalmers effect in solid-state systems containing the octa-μ3-chloro-octahedro-hexamolybdenum(II) cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.

    1976-06-01

    A titration technique was utilized to determine the equilibrium quotients for the first and second aquation steps of cis-Pt(NH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 . At 25.0 0 C and an ionic strength of 0.318 M the first and second aquation equilibrium constants are: K 1 = 3.63 +- 0.22 x 10 -3 M, ΔH 1 0 = 3.4 kcal and K 2 = 1.11 +- 0.14 x 10 -4 M, ΔH 2 0 = 10 kcal. In the ternary system, cis-Pt(NH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 :PtCl 4 2- :Cl - , the kinetics of isotopic exchange of chlorine was investigated. In addition to the expected route of exchange via aquation, a direct exchange of chlorine ligands between cis-Pt(NH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 and PtCl 4 2- occurred which is described by the rate expression. Separation procedures were devised for partial resolution of component yields resulting from dissolving a neutron-irradiated sample of (H 3 O) 2 [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 6 ] . 6H 2 O in 1.5 N HCl. A recrystallization procedure was formulated to determine the retention of activity in the parent compound of molybdenum(II) chloride clusters after neutron irradiation. The retention found in an aqueous 1.5 N HCl solution containing 1 percent (H 3 O) 2 [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 6 ] . 6H 2 O is 0.64 percent. For a solid sample of (H 3 O) 2 [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 6 ] . 6H 2 O aged 24 hours in Dry Ice after neutron irradiation, a retention of 7.0 percent was observed. Under the same conditions, a sample of (Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 with 0.8 percent and 2.7 percent water had retentions of 25.0 percent and 11.1 percent, respectively. Effects of thermal annealing and gamma ray treatment on solid samples of [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] . 2H 2 O were investigated

  12. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  13. Oral fingolimod (FTY720) in multiple sclerosis: two-year results of a phase II extension study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, P; Comi, G; Montalban, X

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a 24-month extension of a phase II trial assessing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the once-daily oral sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator, fingolimod (FTY720), in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In the randomized, double-blind, pla...

  14. Stage I and II malt lymphoma: results of treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Richard W.; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Pintilie, Melania; Bezjak, Andrea; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Crump, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a distinct disease with specific clinical and pathologic features that may affect diverse organs. We analyzed our recent experience with Stage I/II MALT lymphoma presenting in the stomach and other organs to assess the outcome following involved field radiation therapy (RT). Patients and Methods: Seventy patients with Stage IE (62) and IIE (8) disease were treated between 1989 and 1998. Patients with transformed MALT were excluded. The median age was 62 years (range, 24-83 years), M:F ratio 1:2.2. Presenting sites included stomach, 15; orbital adnexa, 19; salivary glands, 15; thyroid, 8; lung, 5; upper airways, 3 (nasopharynx, 2; larynx, 1); urinary bladder, 3; breast, 1; and rectum, 1. Staging included site-specific imaging, CT abdomen in 66 patients (94%) and bone marrow biopsy in 54 (77%). Sixty-two patients received radiation therapy: 52 received RT alone, 7 received chemotherapy and RT, and 3 received antibiotics followed by RT. Median RT dose was 30 Gy (range, 17.5-35 Gy). Most frequently used RT prescriptions were 25 Gy (26 patients--18 orbit, 6 stomach, and 2 salivary glands), 30 Gy (23 patients), and 35 Gy (8 patients). Five patients had complete surgical excision of lymphoma and no other treatment (stomach 1, salivary 2, lung 2), whereas 2 patients with gastric lymphoma received antibiotics only. One patient refused treatment and was excluded from the analysis of treatment outcome, leaving 69 patients with a median follow-up of 4.2 years (range, 0.3-11.4 years). Results: A complete response was achieved in 66/69 patients, and 3 patients had partial response (2 lung, 1 orbit). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76%, and the overall survival was 96%. No relapses were observed in patients with stomach and thyroid lymphoma. The 5-year DFS for these patients was 93%, in contrast to 69% for patients presenting in other sites (p 0.006). Among the 5 patients treated with surgery only, 2

  15. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  16. A qualitative multi-attribute model for the selection of the private hydropower plant investments in Turkey: By foundation of the search results clustering engine (Carrot2), hydropower plant clustering, DEXi and DEXiTree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saracoglu, B.O.

    2016-07-01

    The electricity demand in Turkey has been increasing for a while. Hydropower is one of the major electricity generation types to compensate this electricity demand in Turkey. Private investors (domestic and foreign) in the hydropower electricity generation sector have been looking for the most appropriate and satisfactory new private hydropower investment (PHPI) options and opportunities in Turkey. This study aims to present a qualitative multi-attribute decision making (MADM) model, that is easy, straightforward, and fast for the selection of the most satisfactory reasonable PHPI options during the very early investment stages (data and information poorness on projects). The data and information of the PHPI options was gathered from the official records on the official websites. A wide and deep literature review was conducted for the MADM models and for the hydropower industry. The attributes of the model were identified, selected, clustered and evaluated by the expert decision maker (EDM) opinion and by help of an open source search results clustering engine (Carrot2) (helpful for also comprehension). The PHPI options were clustered according to their installed capacities main property to analyze the options in the most appropriate, decidable, informative, understandable and meaningful way. A simple clustering algorithm for the PHPI options was executed in the current study. A template model for the selection of the most satisfactory PHPI options was built in the DEXi (Decision EXpert for Education) and the DEXiTree software. The basic attributes for the selection of the PHPI options were presented and afterwards the aggregate attributes were defined by the bottom-up structuring for the early investment stages. The attributes were also analyzed by help of Carrot2. The most satisfactory PHPI options in Turkey in the big options data set were selected for each PHPI options cluster by the EDM evaluations in the DEXi. (Author)

  17. QGSJET-II: physics, recent improvements, and results for air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapchenko S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of high energy hadronic and nuclear interactions by the QGSJET-II generator is discussed. Recent updates related to the treatment of nonlinear effects inthe interaction dynamics and to the model calibration with new LHC data are described. A special attention is devoted to the predictions of the new model version forcharacteristics of extensive air showers initiated by high energy cosmic rays. In particular, an improved description of charge exchange processes in pion collisionsis discussed and the respective enhancement of the shower muon content is analyzed.

  18. Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

    2005-12-01

    This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and

  19. PHISICS/RELAP5-3D RESULTS FOR EXERCISES II-1 AND II-2 OF THE OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 BENCHMARK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Methods group currently leads the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) 350 benchmark. The benchmark consists of a set of lattice-depletion, steady-state, and transient problems that can be used by HTGR simulation groups to assess the performance of their code suites. The paper summarizes the results obtained for the first two transient exercises defined for Phase II of the benchmark. The Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS), coupled with the INL system code RELAP5-3D, was used to generate the results for the Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) (exercise II-1a) and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) (exercise II-2) transients. These exercises require the time-dependent simulation of coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics phenomena, and utilize the steady-state solution previously obtained for exercise I-3 of Phase I. This paper also includes a comparison of the benchmark results obtained with a traditional system code “ring” model against a more detailed “block” model that include kinetics feedback on an individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher spatial fidelity that can be obtained by the block model is illustrated with comparisons of the maximum fuel temperatures, especially in the case of natural convection conditions that dominate the DCC and PCC events. Differences up to 125 K (or 10%) were observed between the ring and block model predictions of the DCC transient, mostly due to the block model’s capability of tracking individual block decay powers and more detailed helium flow distributions. In general, the block model only required DCC and PCC calculation times twice as long as the ring models, and it therefore seems that the additional development and calculation time required for the block model could be worth the gain that can be

  20. Cluster analysis technique for assessing variability in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp accessions from Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajayi Abiola Toyin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability among 10 accessions of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp was studied by the use of 13 qualitative and 13 quantitative traits. From the results on qualitative traits, dendrogram grouped the 10 accessions into two major clusters, 1 and 2.Cluster 1 had 3 accessions and cluster 2 had 2 sub-clusters (I and II, having 2 accessions in sub-cluster I and 5 accessions in sub-cluster II. The dendrogram revealed two major clusters, 1 and 2, for quantitative data, for the 10 accessions. At distance of 4 and 6, cluster 1 had two sub-clusters (I and II, with sub-cluster I having 5 accessions, sub-cluster II having 4 accessions while cluster 2 had only 1 accession. This study made the observation that identification of the right agro-morphological traits of high discriminating capacity is essential, before embarking on any genetic diversity; as it was revealed that some traits discriminated more efficiently among the accessions than others. A group of accessions, which are NGSA1, NGSA2, NGSA3, NGSA4, NGSA7, NGSA9 and NGSA10, was identified as being different from the others for number of seeds per pod, pod length, plant height, peduncle length, seed weight and number of pods per plant. These accessions may be good for cowpea improvement programs.

  1. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bosqued

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of relevant CIS plasma

  2. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bosqued

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of

  3. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  4. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 4: Results of SURV-4 and SURV-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Hayner, G.O.; Carlson, B.G.; Ebersole, E.R.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. For both the irradiated and thermally aged samples, one half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In addition to the fifteen types of metal samples, graphite blocks were irradiated in the SURV subassemblies to determine the effect of irradiation on the graphite neutron shield. In this report, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 2.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (over 2,994 days) are compared with those of similar specimens thermally aged at 370 C for 2,994 days in the storage basket of the reactor. The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, impact strength, and creep

  5. PEP-II asymmetric B Factory: Design update and R ampersand D results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.; Bell, R.A.; Dorfan, J.; Schwarz, H.; Barletta, W.A.; Calderon, M.

    1992-07-01

    PEP-II, a 9 GeV x 3.1 GeV e + e - collider with a design luminosity of 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 , was proposed jointly by SLAC, LBL, and LLNL. Recent efforts have continued towards an optimized design. In addition, an aggressive R ampersand D program is under way to validate our design choices. Fabrication of a low-power prototype RF cavity is complete, and impedance measurements are beginning. A 500-kW, 476-MHz klystron has been completed; it will be used for testing both high-power RF windows and a prototype high-power cavity (now under design in collaboration with Chalk River Laboratory). Vacuum studies have demonstrated that chambers with suitable photodesorption properties can be fabricated. A mockup of the two-ring arc area has been completed and used to investigate alignment and stability issues. The PEP-II project is ready to begin construction as soon as funds become available

  6. Result of Radiation Therapy for Stage I, II Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Chul Yong; Choi, Myung Sun

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done for 69 patients with Stage I and II non-Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated from May 1981 to December 1990, in the Department of Radiadtion Oncology, Korea University Hospital. We used Ann Arbor Staging system and Working Formulation for histological classification. Forty-three patients(43/69, 62.3%) were Stage I and 26 patients (26/69, 37.7%) were Stage II, and B symptom was found in 10.1%(7/69). Local control rate for all patients was 88.4%(61/69), with 80% (12/15) for nodal lymphoma and 90.7%(49/54) for extra nodal lymphoma. The total failure rate was 34.8%(24/69). Five of 24 (20.8%) patients who were failed developed local failure only, 12.5%(3/24) local failure with distant failure, and distant failure only were found in 66.7%(16/24). Between nodal lymphoma and extra nodal lymphoma, there was no significant survival difference, but extra nodal lymphoma showed higher incidence

  7. Evaluation of LLTR Series II tests A-1A and A-1B test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoopak, B.F.; Amos, J.C.; Norvell, T.J.

    1980-03-01

    The standard methodology, with minor modifications provides conservative yet realistic predictions of leaksite and other sodium system pressures in the LLTR Series II vessel and piping. The good agreement between predicted and measured pressures indicates that the TRANSWRAP/RELAP modeling developed from the Series I tests is applicable to larger scale units prototypical of the Clinch River steam generator design. Calculated sodium system pressures are sensitive to several modeling parameters including rupture disc modeling, acoustic velocity in the test vessel, and flow rate from the rupture tube. The acoustic velocity which produced best agreement with leaksite pressures was calculated based on the shroud diameter and shroud wall thickness. The corresponding rupture tube discharge coefficient was that of the standard design methodology developed from Series I testing. As found in Series I testing, the Series II data suggests that the leading edge of the flow in the relief line is two phase for a single, doubled-ended guillotine tube rupture. The steam generator shroud acts as if it is relatively transparent to the transmission of radial pressures to the vessel wall. Slightly lower sodium system maximum pressures measured during Test A-1b compared to Test A-1a are attributed to premature failure (failure at a lower pressure) of the rupture disc in contact with the sodium for test A-1b. The delay in failure of the second disc in Test A-1b, which was successfully modeled with TRANSWRAP, is attributed to the limited energy in the nitrogen injection

  8. Evaluation of the Web-Based Computer-Tailored FATaintPHAT Intervention to Promote Energy Balance Among Adolescents Results From a School Cluster Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, N.P.M.; Brug, J.; Oenema, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the short- and long-term results of FATaintPHAT, a Web-based computer-tailored intervention aiming to increase physical activity, decrease sedentary behavior, and promote healthy eating to contribute to the prevention of excessive weight gain among adolescents. Design: Cluster

  9. Behavioural graded activity results in better exercise adherence and more physical activity than usual care in people with osteoarthritis: a cluster-randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; de Bakker, D.H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Question: Does behavioural graded activity result in better exercise adherence and more physical activity than usual care in people with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee? Design: Analysis of secondary outcomes of a cluster-randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and

  10. Aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid sclerotherapy for Goligher Grades II and III hemorrhoids: Results from a multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hidenori; Hada, Takenori; Ishiyama, Gentaro; Ono, Yoshito; Watanabe, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To show that aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid (ALTA) sclerotherapy has a high success rate for Grade II and III hemorrhoids. METHODS: This study was based on the clinical data of 604 patients with hemorrhoids who underwent ALTA sclerotherapy between January 2009 and February 2015. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of this treatment for Grades II and III hemorrhoids. Preoperative and postoperative symptoms, complications and success rate were all assessed retrospectively. Follow-up consisted of a simple questionnaire, physical examination and an anoscopy. Patients were followed-up at one day, one week, two weeks, one month, one year, two years, three years, four years and five years after the ALTA sclerotherapy. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were diagnosed with Grade II hemorrhoids and 435 patients were diagnosed with Grade III hemorrhoids. The one year, three year and five year cumulative success rates of ALTA sclerotherapy for Grades II and III hemorrhoids were 95.9% and 93.1%; 89.3% and 83.7%; and 89.3% and 78.2%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the cumulative success rates after ALTA sclerotherapy between Grades II and III hemorrhoids (P = 0.09). There were forty-seven post-operative complications (low grade fever; anal pain; urinary retention; rectal ulcer; and others). No serious or life-threatening complications occurred and all cases improved through conservative treatment. At univariate analysis there were no predictive factors of failure. CONCLUSION: ALTA sclerotherapy has had a high success rate for Grade II and III hemorrhoids during five years of post-operative treatment. However, additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this ALTA sclerotherapy in the management of hemorrhoidal disease. PMID:27458504

  11. Intracellular Zn(II) Intoxication Leads to Dysregulation of the PerR Regulon Resulting in Heme Toxicity in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions (Zn(II), Cu(II)/(I), Fe(III)/(II), Mn(II)) are essential for life and participate in a wide range of biological functions. Cellular Zn(II) levels must be high enough to ensure that it can perform its essential roles. Yet, since Zn(II) binds to ligands with high avidity, excess Zn(II) can lead to protein mismetallation. The major targets of mismetallation, and the underlying causes of Zn(II) intoxication, are not well understood. Here, we use a forward genetic selection to identify targets of Zn(II) toxicity. In wild-type cells, in which Zn(II) efflux prevents intoxication of the cytoplasm, extracellular Zn(II) inhibits the electron transport chain due to the inactivation of the major aerobic cytochrome oxidase. This toxicity can be ameliorated by depression of an alternate oxidase or by mutations that restrict access of Zn(II) to the cell surface. Conversely, efflux deficient cells are sensitive to low levels of Zn(II) that do not inhibit the respiratory chain. Under these conditions, intracellular Zn(II) accumulates and leads to heme toxicity. Heme accumulation results from dysregulation of the regulon controlled by PerR, a metal-dependent repressor of peroxide stress genes. When metallated with Fe(II) or Mn(II), PerR represses both heme biosynthesis (hemAXCDBL operon) and the abundant heme protein catalase (katA). Metallation of PerR with Zn(II) disrupts this coordination, resulting in depression of heme biosynthesis but continued repression of catalase. Our results support a model in which excess heme partitions to the membrane and undergoes redox cycling catalyzed by reduced menaquinone thereby resulting in oxidative stress. PMID:27935957

  12. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  13. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation of the ligand vibrations of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5 cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shin; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-10-11

    During photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water performed by photosystem II (PSII) provides electrons necessary to fix CO 2 , in turn supporting life on Earth by liberating molecular oxygen. Recent high-resolution X-ray images of PSII show that the water-oxidizing center (WOC) is composed of an Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster with six carboxylate, one imidazole, and four water ligands. FTIR difference spectroscopy has shown significant structural changes of the WOC during the S-state cycle of water oxidation, especially within carboxylate groups. However, the roles that these carboxylate groups play in water oxidation as well as how they should be properly assigned in spectra are unresolved. In this study, we performed a normal mode analysis of the WOC using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to simulate FTIR difference spectra on the S 1 to S 2 transition in the carboxylate stretching region. By evaluating WOC models with different oxidation and protonation states, we determined that models of high-oxidation states, Mn(III) 2 Mn(IV) 2 , satisfactorily reproduced experimental spectra from intact and Ca-depleted PSII compared with low-oxidation models. It is further suggested that the carboxylate groups bridging Ca and Mn ions within this center tune the reactivity of water ligands bound to Ca by shifting charge via their π conjugation.

  14. A qualitative multi-attribute model for the selection of the private hydropower plant investments in Turkey: By foundation of the search results clustering engine (Carrot2, hydropower plant clustering, DEXi and DEXiTree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Omer Saracoglu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The electricity demand in Turkey has been increasing for a while. Hydropower is one of the major electricity generation types to compensate this electricity demand in Turkey. Private investors (domestic and foreign in the hydropower electricity generation sector have been looking for the most appropriate and satisfactory new private hydropower investment (PHPI options and opportunities in Turkey. This study aims to present a qualitative multi-attribute decision making (MADM model, that is easy, straightforward, and fast for the selection of the most satisfactory reasonable PHPI options during the very early investment stages (data and information poorness on projects. Design/methodology/approach: The data and information of the PHPI options was gathered from the official records on the official websites. A wide and deep literature review was conducted for the MADM models and for the hydropower industry. The attributes of the model were identified, selected, clustered and evaluated by the expert decision maker (EDM opinion and by help of an open source search results clustering engine (Carrot2 (helpful for also comprehension. The PHPI options were clustered according to their installed capacities main property to analyze the options in the most appropriate, decidable, informative, understandable and meaningful way. A simple clustering algorithm for the PHPI options was executed in the current study. A template model for the selection of the most satisfactory PHPI options was built in the DEXi (Decision EXpert for Education and the DEXiTree software. Findings: The basic attributes for the selection of the PHPI options were presented and afterwards the aggregate attributes were defined by the bottom-up structuring for the early investment stages. The attributes were also analyzed by help of Carrot2. The most satisfactory PHPI options in Turkey in the big options data set were selected for each PHPI options cluster by the EDM evaluations in

  15. Family history study of the familial coaggregation of borderline personality disorder with axis I and nonborderline dramatic cluster axis II disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C; Barison, Leah K; Frankenburg, Frances R; Reich, D Bradford; Hudson, James I

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the familial coaggregation of borderline personality disorder (BPD) with a full array of axis I disorders and four axis II disorders (antisocial personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, and sadistic personality disorder) in the first-degree relatives of borderline probands and axis II comparison subjects. Four hundred and forty-five inpatients were interviewed about familial psychopathology using the Revised Family History Questionnaire-a semistructured interview of demonstrated reliability. Of these 445 subjects, 341 met both DIB-R and DSM-III-R criteria for BPD and 104 met DSM-III-R criteria for another type of personality disorder (and neither criteria set for BPD). The psychopathology of 1,580 first-degree relatives of borderline probands and 472 relatives of axis II comparison subjects was assessed. Using structural models for familial coaggregation, it was found that BPD coaggregates with major depression, dysthymic disorder, bipolar I disorder, alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence, panic disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatoform pain disorder, and all four axis II disorders studied. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that common familial factors, particularly in the areas of affective disturbance and impulsivity, contribute to borderline personality disorder.

  16. Dark Matter Results from 54-Ton-Day Exposure of PandaX-II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangyi; Abdukerim, Abdusalam; Chen, Wei; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Dong, Binbin; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gu, Linhui; Gu, Yikun; Guo, Xuyuan; Guo, Zhifan; Han, Ke; He, Changda; Huang, Di; He, Shengming; Huang, Xingtao; Huang, Zhou; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Li, Shaoli; Li, Yao; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixiang; Ning, Jinhua; Ren, Xiangxiang; Shi, Fang; Tan, Andi; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Xuming; Wu, Qinyu; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Mengjiao; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Tianqi; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jifang; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Xiaopeng; PandaX-II Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    We report a new search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the combined low background data sets acquired in 2016 and 2017 from the PandaX-II experiment in China. The latest data set contains a new exposure of 77.1 live days, with the background reduced to a level of 0.8 ×10-3 evt /kg /day , improved by a factor of 2.5 in comparison to the previous run in 2016. No excess events are found above the expected background. With a total exposure of 5.4 ×104 kg day , the most stringent upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section is set for a WIMP with mass larger than 100 GeV /c2 , with the lowest 90% C.L. exclusion at 8.6 ×10-47 cm2 at 40 GeV /c2 .

  17. Postprocedural CT for perivertebral cement leakage in percutaneous vertebroplasty is not necessary - results from VERTOS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venmans, Alexander; Klazen, Caroline A.; Rooij, Willem Jan van; Lohle, Paul N.; Vries, Jolanda de; Mali, Willem P.

    2011-01-01

    During percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), perivertebral cement leakage frequently occurs. There is some concern that cement deposits may migrate towards the lungs via the veins during follow-up. We used baseline and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to assess the incidence and extend of late cement migration in a large consecutive patient cohort. VERTOS II is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing PV with conservative therapy for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Patients assigned to PV had baseline postprocedural CT scans of the treated vertebral bodies. After a mean follow-up of 22 months, 54 of 78 patients (69%) had follow-up CT. CT scans were analyzed and compared for perivertebral venous, discal, and soft tissue leakage. Perivertebral cement leakage occurred in 64 of 80 treated vertebrae (80%; 95% CI, 70% to 87%). All patients remained asymptomatic. Perivertebral venous leakage was present in 56 vertebrae (88%), mostly in the anterior external venous plexus (46 of 56, 82%). Discal leakage occurred in 22 of 64 vertebrae (34%) and soft tissue leakage in two of 64 (4%). Mean injected cement volume in vertebrae with leakage was higher (4.5 versus 3.7 cm 3 , p = 0.04). Follow-up CT scan showed unchanged perivertebral cement leakages without late cement migration. Perivertebral cement leaks during PV for OVCFs occurred frequently in the VERTOS II trial. Cement leakage occurred more frequently with higher injected volumes. However, all patients remained asymptomatic, and late cement migration during follow-up did not occur. Standard postprocedural CT of the treated vertebral body in PV is not necessary. (orig.)

  18. Postprocedural CT for perivertebral cement leakage in percutaneous vertebroplasty is not necessary - results from VERTOS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venmans, Alexander; Klazen, Caroline A.; Rooij, Willem Jan van; Lohle, Paul N. [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis Tilburg, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Vries, Jolanda de [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis Tilburg, Department of Medical Psychology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    During percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), perivertebral cement leakage frequently occurs. There is some concern that cement deposits may migrate towards the lungs via the veins during follow-up. We used baseline and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to assess the incidence and extend of late cement migration in a large consecutive patient cohort. VERTOS II is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing PV with conservative therapy for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Patients assigned to PV had baseline postprocedural CT scans of the treated vertebral bodies. After a mean follow-up of 22 months, 54 of 78 patients (69%) had follow-up CT. CT scans were analyzed and compared for perivertebral venous, discal, and soft tissue leakage. Perivertebral cement leakage occurred in 64 of 80 treated vertebrae (80%; 95% CI, 70% to 87%). All patients remained asymptomatic. Perivertebral venous leakage was present in 56 vertebrae (88%), mostly in the anterior external venous plexus (46 of 56, 82%). Discal leakage occurred in 22 of 64 vertebrae (34%) and soft tissue leakage in two of 64 (4%). Mean injected cement volume in vertebrae with leakage was higher (4.5 versus 3.7 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.04). Follow-up CT scan showed unchanged perivertebral cement leakages without late cement migration. Perivertebral cement leaks during PV for OVCFs occurred frequently in the VERTOS II trial. Cement leakage occurred more frequently with higher injected volumes. However, all patients remained asymptomatic, and late cement migration during follow-up did not occur. Standard postprocedural CT of the treated vertebral body in PV is not necessary. (orig.)

  19. Formulation, computation and improvement of steady state security margins in power systems. Part II: Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarren, F.M.; Lobato, E.; Rouco, L.; Gomez, T.

    2011-01-01

    A steady state security margin for a particular operating point can be defined as the distance from this initial point to the secure operating limits of the system. Four of the most used steady state security margins are the power flow feasibility margin, the contingency feasibility margin, the load margin to voltage collapse, and the total transfer capability between system areas. This is the second part of a two part paper. Part I has proposed a novel framework of a general model able to formulate, compute and improve any steady state security margin. In Part II the performance of the general model is validated by solving a variety of practical situations in modern real power systems. Actual examples of the Spanish power system will be used for this purpose. The same computation and improvement algorithms outlined in Part I have been applied for the four security margins considered in the study, outlining the convenience of defining a general framework valid for the four of them. The general model is used here in Part II to compute and improve: (a) the power flow feasibility margin (assessing the influence of the reactive power generation limits in the Spanish power system), (b) the contingency feasibility margin (assessing the influence of transmission and generation capacity in maintaining a correct voltage profile), (c) the load margin to voltage collapse (assessing the location and quantity of loads that must be shed in order to be far away from voltage collapse) and (d) the total transfer capability (assessing the export import pattern of electric power between different areas of the Spanish system). (author)

  20. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2

  1. Formulation, computation and improvement of steady state security margins in power systems. Part II: Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echavarren, F.M.; Lobato, E.; Rouco, L.; Gomez, T. [School of Engineering of Universidad Pontificia Comillas, C/Alberto Aguilera, 23, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    A steady state security margin for a particular operating point can be defined as the distance from this initial point to the secure operating limits of the system. Four of the most used steady state security margins are the power flow feasibility margin, the contingency feasibility margin, the load margin to voltage collapse, and the total transfer capability between system areas. This is the second part of a two part paper. Part I has proposed a novel framework of a general model able to formulate, compute and improve any steady state security margin. In Part II the performance of the general model is validated by solving a variety of practical situations in modern real power systems. Actual examples of the Spanish power system will be used for this purpose. The same computation and improvement algorithms outlined in Part I have been applied for the four security margins considered in the study, outlining the convenience of defining a general framework valid for the four of them. The general model is used here in Part II to compute and improve: (a) the power flow feasibility margin (assessing the influence of the reactive power generation limits in the Spanish power system), (b) the contingency feasibility margin (assessing the influence of transmission and generation capacity in maintaining a correct voltage profile), (c) the load margin to voltage collapse (assessing the location and quantity of loads that must be shed in order to be far away from voltage collapse) and (d) the total transfer capability (assessing the export import pattern of electric power between different areas of the Spanish system). (author)

  2. Radioembolisation for liver metastases: results from a prospective 151 patient multi-institutional phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Al B; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Mulcahy, Mary F; Rilling, William; Siskin, Gary; Wiseman, Greg; Cunningham, James; Houghton, Bonny; Ross, Mason; Memon, Khairuddin; Andrews, James; Fleming, Chad J; Herman, Joseph; Nimeiri, Halla; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the safety, response rate, progression-free and overall survival of patients with liver metastases treated with (90)Y (glass) radioembolisation in a prospective, multicenter phase II study. 151 patients with liver metastases (colorectal n=61, neuroendocrine n=43 and other tumour types n=47) refractory to standard of care therapies were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, phase II study under an investigational device exemption. Clinical/laboratory/imaging follow-up were obtained at 30 days followed by 3-month intervals for 1 year and every 6 months thereafter. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end-points included safety, hepatic progression-free survival (HPFS), response rate and overall survival. Median age was 66 (range 25-88). Grade 3/4 adverse events included pain (12.8%), elevated alkaline phospatase (8.1%), hyperbilirubinemia (5.3%), lymphopaenia (4.1%), ascites (3.4%) and vomiting (3.4%). Treatment parameters including dose delivery were reproducible among centers. Disease control rates were 59%, 93% and 63% for colorectal, neuroendocrine and other primaries, respectively. Median PFS was 2.9 and 2.8 months for colorectal and other primaries, respectively. PFS was not achieved in the neuroendocrine group. Median survival from (90)Y treatment was 8.8 months for colorectal and 10.4 months for other primaries. Median survival for neuroendocrine patients has not been reached. Patients with liver metastases can be safely treated with (90)Y microspheres. This study is the first to demonstrate technical and dose reproducibility of (90)Y glass microspheres between centers in a prospective setting. Based on these promising data, three international, multicenter, randomised phase III studies in colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma have been initiated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  4. Modelling and observation of transionospheric propagation results from ISIS II in preparation for ePOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Gillies

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP is scheduled to be launched as part of the Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE satellite in early 2008. A Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI on ePOP will receive HF transmissions from various ground-based transmitters. In preparation for the ePOP mission, data from a similar transionospheric experiment performed by the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS II satellite has been studied. Prominent features in the received 9.303-MHz signal were periodic Faraday fading of signal intensity at rates up to 13 Hz and a time of arrival delay between the O- and X-modes of up to 0.8 ms. Both features occurred when the satellite was above or south of the Ottawa transmitter. Ionospheric models for ray tracing were constructed using both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI profiles and local peak electron density values from ISIS ionograms. Values for fade rate and differential mode delay were computed and compared to the values observed in the ISIS II data. The computed values showed very good agreement to the observed values of both received signal parameters when the topside sounding foF2 values were used to scale IRI profiles, but not when strictly modelled IRI profiles were used. It was determined that the primary modifier of the received signal parameters was the foF2 density and not the shape of the profile. This dependence was due to refraction, at the 9.303-MHz signal frequency, causing the rays to travel larger distances near the peak density where essentially all the mode splitting occurred. This study should assist in interpretation of ePOP RRI data when they are available.

  5. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-07

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4

  6. Effect of cyanato, azido, carboxylato, and carbonato ligands on the formation of cobalt(II) polyoxometalates: characterization, magnetic, and electrochemical studies of multinuclear cobalt clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisnard, Laurent; Mialane, Pierre; Dolbecq, Anne; Marrot, Jérôme; Clemente-Juan, Juan Modesto; Coronado, Eugenio; Keita, Bineta; de Oliveira, Pedro; Nadjo, Louis; Sécheresse, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Five Co(II) silicotungstate complexes are reported. The centrosymmetric heptanuclear compound K(20)[{(B-beta-SiW(9)O(33)(OH))(beta-SiW(8)O(29)(OH)(2))Co(3)(H(2)O)}(2)Co(H(2)O)(2)]47 H(2)O (1) consists of two {(B-beta-SiW(9)O(33)(OH))(beta-SiW(8)O(29)(OH)(2))Co(3)(H(2)O)} units connected by a {CoO(4)(H(2)O)(2)} group. In the chiral species K(7)[Co(1.5)(H(2)O)(7))][(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(beta-SiW(8)O(30)(OH))Co(4)(OH)(H(2)O)(7)]36 H(2)O (2), a {gamma-SiW(10)O(36)} and a {beta-SiW(8)O(30)(OH)} unit enclose a mononuclear {CoO(4)(H(2)O)(2)} group and a {Co(3)O(7)(OH)(H(2)O)(5)} fragment. The two trinuclear Co(II) clusters present in 1 enclose a mu(4)-O atom, while in 2 a mu(3)-OH bridging group connects the three paramagnetic centers of the trinuclear unit, inducing significantly larger Co-L-Co (L=mu(4)-O (1), mu(3)-OH (2)) bridging angles in 2 (theta(av(Co-L-Co))=99.1 degrees ) than in 1 (theta(av(Co-L-Co))=92.8 degrees ). Weaker ferromagnetic interactions were found in 2 than in 1, in agreement with larger Co-L-Co angles in 2. The electrochemistry of 1 was studied in detail. The two chemically reversible redox couples observed in the positive potential domain were attributed to the redox processes of Co(II) centers, and indicated that two types of Co(II) centers in the structure were oxidized in separate waves. Redox activity of the seventh Co(II) center was not detected. Preliminary experiments indicated that 1 catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and NO. Remarkably, a reversible interaction exists with NO or related species. The hybrid tetranuclear complexes K(5)Na(3)[(A-alpha-SiW(9)O(34))Co(4)(OH)(3)(CH(3)COO)(3)]18 H(2)O (3) and K(5)Na(3)[(A-alpha-SiW(9)O(34))Co(4)(OH)(N(3))(2)(CH(3)COO)(3)]18 H(2)O (4) were characterized: in both, a tetrahedral {Co(4)(L(1))(L(2))(2)(CH(3)COO)(3)} (3: L(1)=L(2)=OH; 4: L(1)=OH, L(2)=N(3)) unit capped the [A-alpha-SiW(9)O(34)](10-) trivacant polyanion. The octanuclear complex K(8)Na(8)[(A-alpha-SiW(9)O(34))(2)Co(8)(OH)(6)(H(2)O)(2)(CO(3

  7. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  8. Predictors of BMI Vary along the BMI Range of German Adults – Results of the German National Nutrition Survey II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kilson; Krems, Carolin; Heuer, Thorsten; Roth, Alexander; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to identify predictors of BMI in German adults by considering the BMI distribution and to determine whether the association between BMI and its predictors varies along the BMI distribution. Methods The sample included 9,214 adults aged 18–80 years from the German National Nutrition Survey II (NVS II). Quantile regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between BMI and the following predictors: age, sports activities, socio-economic status (SES), healthy eating index-NVS II (HEI-NVS II), dietary knowledge, sleeping duration and energy intake as well as status of smoking, partner relationship and self-reported health. Results Age, SES, self-reported health status, sports activities and energy intake were the strongest predictors of BMI. The important outcome of this study is that the association between BMI and its predictors varies along the BMI distribution. Especially, energy intake, health status and SES were marginally associated with BMI in normal-weight subjects; this relationships became stronger in the range of overweight, and were strongest in the range of obesity. Conclusions Predictors of BMI and the strength of these associations vary across the BMI distribution in German adults. Consequently, to identify predictors of BMI, the entire BMI distribution should be considered. PMID:28219069

  9. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marble, Justin [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  10. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg; Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian; Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David; Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan; Marble, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  11. Triggered cluster formation in the RMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Zeng; Smith, Michael D.

    An investigation based on data from the spatially complete 2MASS Survey reveals that a remarkable burst of clustered star formation is taking place throughout the south-east quadrant of the Rosette Molecular Cloud. Compact clusters are forming in a multi-seeded mode, in parallel and at various places. In addition, sparse aggregates of embedded young stars are extensively distributed. Here we present the primary results and implications for high-mass and clustered star formation in this giant molecular cloud. In particular, we incorporate for the first time the birth of medium to low-mass stars into the scenario of sequential formation of OB clusters. Following the emergence of the young OB cluster NGC 2244, a variety of manifestations of forming clusters of medium to high mass appear in the vicinity of the swept-up layer of the H II region as well as further into the molecular cloud. The embedded clusters appear to form in a structured manner, which suggests they follow tracks laid out by the decay of macroturbulence. We address the possible origins of the turbulence. This leads us to propose a tree model to interpret the neat spatial distribution of clusters within a large section of the Rosette complex. Prominent new generation OB clusters are identified at the root of the tree pattern.

  12. Militarization, human rights violations and community responses as determinants of health in southeastern Myanmar: results of a cluster survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William W; Mullany, Luke C; Schissler, Matt; Albert, Saw; Beyrer, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Myanmar army and ethnic armed groups agreed to a preliminary ceasefire in 2012, but a heavy military presence remains in southeastern Myanmar. Qualitative data suggested this militarization can result in human rights abuses in the absence of armed engagements between the parties, and that rural ethnic civilians use a variety of self-protection strategies to avoid these abuses or reduce their negative impacts. We used data from a household survey to determine prevalence of select self-protection activities and to examine exposure to armed groups, human rights violations and self-protection activities as determinants of health in southeastern Myanmar. Data collected from 463 households via a two-stage cluster survey of conflict-affected areas in eastern Myanmar in January 2012, were analyzed using logistic regression models to identify associations between exposure to state and non-state armed groups, village self-protection, human rights abuses and health outcomes. Close proximity to a military base was associated with human rights abuses (PRR 1.30, 95 % CI: 1.14-1.48), inadequate food production (PRR 1.08, 95 % CI: 1.03-1.13), inability to access health care (PRR 1.29, 95 % CI: 1.04-1.60) and diarrhea (PRR 1.15, 95 % CI: 1.05-1.27. Direct exposure to armed groups was associated with household hunger (PRR1.71, 95 % CI: 1.30-2.23). Among households that reported no human rights abuses, risk of household hunger (PRR 5.64, 95 % CI: 1.88-16.91), inadequate food production (PRR 1.95, 95 % CI: 1.11-3.41) and diarrhea (PRR 2.53, 95 % CI: 1.45-4.42) increased when neighbors' households reported experiencing human rights abuses. Households in villages that reported negotiating with the Myanmar army had lower risk of human rights violations (PRR 0.91, 95 % CI: 0.85-0.98), household hunger (PRR 0.85, 95 % CI: 0.74-0.96), inadequate food production (PRR 0.93, 95 % CI:0.89-0.98) and diarrhea (PRR 0.89, 95 % CI:0.82-0.97). Stratified analysis suggests that self

  13. Interview-Based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L.; Meisel, Zachary; Choo, Esther K.; Garro, Aris; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. PMID:26284572

  14. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. New LUX and PandaX-II results illuminating the simplest Higgs-portal dark matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Tandean, Jusak

    2016-01-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the spin-independent elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real singlet scalar named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses roughly from 4 to 450 GeV, except a small range around the resonance point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDM II+D, which is the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model combined with a darkon, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective interactions with nucleons at some values of the ratios of Higgs couplings to the up and down quarks, making the interactions significantly isospin-violating. However, in either model, if the 125-GeV Higgs boson is the portal between the dark and SM sectors, DM masses less than 50 GeV or so are already ruled out by the LHC constraint on the Higgs invisible decay. In the THDM II+D, if the heavier CP-even Higgs boson is the portal, theoretical restrictions from perturbativity, vacuum stability, and unitarity requirements turn out to be important instead and exclude much of the region below 100 GeV. For larger DM masses, the THDM II+D has plentiful parameter space that corresponds to interaction cross-sections under the neutrino-background floor and therefore is likely to be beyond the reach of future direct searches without directional sensitivity.

  16. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  17. The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders: Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Prina, A Matthew; Jones, Andy; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol

    2017-07-01

    Built environment features have been related to behavior modification and might stimulate cognitive activity with a potential impact on cognitive health in later life. This study investigated cross-sectional associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment and dementia, and also explored urban and rural differences in these associations. Postcodes of the 7,505 community-based participants (aged ≥65 years) in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II (collected in 2008-2011) were linked to environmental data from government statistics. Multilevel logistic regression investigated associations between cognitive impairment (defined as Mini-Mental State Examination score ≤25) and dementia (Geriatric Mental Status and Automatic Geriatric Examination for Computer-Assisted Taxonomy organicity level ≥3) and land use features, including natural environment availability and land use mix, fitting interaction terms with three rural/urban categories. Data were analyzed in 2015. Associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were not linear. After adjusting for individual-level factors and area deprivation, living in areas with high land use mix was associated with a nearly 30% decreased odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.58, 0.89). This was similar, yet non-significant, for dementia (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.46, 1.06). In conurbations, living in areas with high natural environment availability was associated with 30% reduced odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.50, 0.97). Non-linear associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were confirmed in this new cohort of older people in England. Both lack of and overload of environmental stimulation may be detrimental to cognition in later life. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Polypharmacy as a Risk Factor for Clinically Relevant Sarcopenia: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Maximilian; Spira, Dominik; Demuth, Ilja; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Norman, Kristina

    2017-12-12

    Sarcopenia affects more than 10% of older adults. Next to age-associated physiologic changes, diseases like diabetes or inflammatory, neurological, malignant and endocrine disorders may contribute to the development of sarcopenia. Likewise, polypharmacy, i.e., multiple drug use, is common among older adults. Although the two conditions frequently co-occur, the association of polypharmacy with sarcopenia has not yet been examined. We investigated the association of polypharmacy and sarcopenia in a large cohort of community-dwelling older adults (60-84 years). Thousand five hundred and two participants from the Berlin Aging Study II were included. Polypharmacy was defined as concurrent use of 5 or more drugs (prescription and nonprescription). Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and appendicular lean mass (ALM) was calculated as sum of the four limbs' lean mass. Sarcopenia was defined as low ALM-to-body mass index (BMI)-ratio using validated sex-specific cutoffs. Mean age was 68.7 ± 3.7 years, 50.7% were female. The median (interquartile range) number of drugs was 2 (1-4); 21.1% of subjects reported regular use of ≥5 drugs. Subjects with polypharmacy were more often sarcopenic according to the applied ALM/BMI-cutoffs (16.3% vs 6.9%, p sarcopenia (odds ratio = 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-3.75). Polypharmacy is associated with clinically relevant sarcopenia, as assessed by a low ALM/BMI. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Work stress, caregiving, and allostatic load: prospective results from the Whitehall II cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis; Head, Jenny; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2015-06-01

    Studies investigating health effects of work and family stress usually consider these factors in isolation. The present study investigated prospective interactive effects of job strain and informal caregiving on allostatic load (AL), a multisystem indicator of physiological dysregulation. Participants were 7007 British civil servants from the Whitehall II cohort study. Phase 3 (1991-1994) served as the baseline, and Phases 5 (1997-1999) and 7 (2002-2004) served as follow-ups. Job strain (high job demands combined with low control) and caregiving (providing care to aged or disabled relatives) were assessed at baseline. AL index (possible range, 0-9) was assessed at baseline and both follow-ups based on nine cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune biomarkers. Linear mixed-effect models were used to examine the association of job strain and caregiving with AL. High caregiving burden (above the sample median weekly hours of providing care) predicted higher AL levels, with the effect strongest in those also reporting job strain (b = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.01-0.71); however, the interaction between job strain and caregiving was not significant (p = .56). Regardless of job strain, participants with low caregiving burden (below sample median) had lower subsequent AL levels than did non-caregivers (b = -0.22, 95% confidence interval = -0.06--0.37). The study provides some evidence for adverse effects of stress at work combined with family demands on physiological functioning. However, providing care to others may also have health protective effects if it does not involve excessive time commitment.

  20. Deficiency of Carbonic Anhydrase II Results in a Urinary Concentrating Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devishree Krishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII is expressed along the nephron where it interacts with a number of transport proteins augmenting their activity. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1 interacts with CAII to increase water flux through the water channel. Both CAII and aquaporin-1 are expressed in the thin descending limb (TDL; however, the physiological role of a CAII-AQP1 interaction in this nephron segment is not known. To determine if CAII was required for urinary concentration, we studied water handling in CAII-deficient mice. CAII-deficient mice demonstrate polyuria and polydipsia as well as an alkaline urine and bicarbonaturia, consistent with a type III renal tubular acidosis. Natriuresis and hypercalciuria cause polyuria, however, CAII-deficient mice did not have increased urinary sodium nor calcium excretion. Further examination revealed dilute urine in the CAII-deficient mice. Urinary concentration remained reduced in CAII-deficient mice relative to wild-type animals even after water deprivation. The renal expression and localization by light microscopy of NKCC2 and aquaporin-2 was not altered. However, CAII-deficient mice had increased renal AQP1 expression. CAII associates with and increases water flux through aquaporin-1. Water flux through aquaporin-1 in the TDL of the loop of Henle is essential to the concentration of urine, as this is required to generate a concentrated medullary interstitium. We therefore measured cortical and medullary interstitial concentration in wild-type and CAII-deficient mice. Mice lacking CAII had equivalent cortical interstitial osmolarity to wild-type mice: however, they had reduced medullary interstitial osmolarity. We propose therefore that reduced water flux through aquaporin-1 in the TDL in the absence of CAII prevents the generation of a maximally concentrated medullary interstitium. This, in turn, limits urinary concentration in CAII deficient mice.

  1. Treatment of geographic atrophy with subconjunctival sirolimus: results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai T; Dresner, Samuel; Forooghian, Farzin; Glaser, Tanya; Doss, Lauren; Zhou, Mei; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2013-04-26

    To investigate the safety and effects of subconjunctival sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor and immunosuppressive agent, for the treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). The study was a single-center, open-label phase II trial, enrolling 11 participants with bilateral GA; eight participants completed 24 months of follow-up. Sirolimus (440 μg) was administered every 3 months as a subconjunctival injection in only one randomly assigned eye in each participant for 24 months. Fellow eyes served as untreated controls. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in the total GA area at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in visual acuity, macular sensitivity, central retinal thickness, and total drusen area. The study drug was well tolerated with few symptoms and related adverse events. Study treatment in study eyes was not associated with structural or functional benefits relative to the control fellow eyes. At month 24, mean GA area increased by 54.5% and 39.7% in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.41), whereas mean visual acuity decreased by 21.0 letters and 3.0 letters in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.03). Substantial differences in mean changes in drusen area, central retinal thickness, and macular sensitivity were not detected for all analysis time points up to 24 months. Repeated subconjunctival sirolimus was well-tolerated in patients with GA, although no positive anatomic or functional effects were identified. Subconjunctival sirolimus may not be beneficial in the prevention of GA progression, and may potentially be associated with effects detrimental to visual acuity. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00766649.).

  2. Zinc Deficiency Is associated With Depressive Symptoms-Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Alissa; Spira, Dominik; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina

    2017-08-01

    Zinc plays an important role for behavioral and mental function, maintaining the correct functions of intracellular signal transduction, cellular and trans-membrane transport, protein synthesis, and antioxidant system. We investigated both dietary zinc intake and plasma zinc levels and the correlation with depressive symptoms in a large sample of community-dwelling old. One thousand five hundred fourteen older people (aged 60-84 years, 772 women) from the Berlin Aging Study II were included. Zinc intake was assessed by the EPIC Food Frequency Questionnaire. Plasma zinc levels were assessed with atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the "Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale" and the "Geriatric Depression Scale." Zinc deficiency in blood plasma was found in 18.7% of participants, and depressive symptoms in 15.7%. Participants with depressive symptoms had lower energy-adjusted zinc intake (median 11.1 vs 11.6 µmol/L; p = .048) and lower plasma zinc levels (median 12.2 vs12.3 mg/dL; p = .037). Even after adjustment for known predictors of depression, plasma zinc deficiency remained significantly associated with depressive symptoms (odds ratio: 1.490, 95% confidence interval: 1.027-2.164; p = .036). In the multiple logistic regression model stratified by sex, we found that plasma zinc deficiency was strongly associated with a higher risk for depressive symptoms in women (odds ratio: 1.739, 95% confidence interval: 1.068-2.833; p = .026). Plasma zinc deficiency was common in our old study population. An increase in dietary zinc and higher plasma zinc levels may reduce the risk of depressive symptoms. A screening for reduced dietary zinc intake or plasma zinc deficiency might be beneficial in older people at risk of depressive symptoms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. First results from the IllustrisTNG simulations: the stellar mass content of groups and clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Torrey, Paul; Weinberger, Rainer; Genel, Shy; Naiman, Jill P.; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2018-03-01

    The IllustrisTNG project is a new suite of cosmological magnetohydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation performed with the AREPO code and updated models for feedback physics. Here, we introduce the first two simulations of the series, TNG100 and TNG300, and quantify the stellar mass content of about 4000 massive galaxy groups and clusters (1013 ≤ M200c/M⊙ ≤ 1015) at recent times (z ≤ 1). The richest clusters have half of their total stellar mass bound to satellite galaxies, with the other half being associated with the central galaxy and the diffuse intracluster light. Haloes more massive than about 5 × 1014 M⊙ have more diffuse stellar mass outside 100 kpc than within 100 kpc, with power-law slopes of the radial mass density distribution as shallow as the dark matter's ( - 3.5 ≲ α3D ≲ -3). Total halo mass is a very good predictor of stellar mass, and vice versa: at z = 0, the 3D stellar mass measured within 30 kpc scales as ∝(M500c)0.49 with a ˜0.12 dex scatter. This is possibly too steep in comparison to the available observational constraints, even though the abundance of The Next Generation less-massive galaxies ( ≲ 1011 M⊙ in stars) is in good agreement with the measured galaxy stellar mass functions at recent epochs. The 3D sizes of massive galaxies fall too on a tight (˜0.16 dex scatter) power-law relation with halo mass, with r^stars_0.5 ∝ (M_200c)^{0.53}. Even more fundamentally, halo mass alone is a good predictor for the whole stellar mass profiles beyond the inner few kiloparsecs, and we show how on average these can be precisely recovered given a single-mass measurement of the galaxy or its halo.

  4. The Modern U.S. High School Astronomy Course, Its Status and Makeup II: Additional Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumenaker, Larry

    2009-01-01

    A postal survey of high school astronomy teachers strongly confirms many results of an earlier electronic survey. Additional and new results include a measure of the level of inquiry (more structured inquiry and teacher-led) in the classroom as well as data showing that more emphasis is given to traditional topics than to contemporary astronomy…

  5. Development of computer code SIMPSEX for simulation of FBR fuel reprocessing flowsheets: II. additional benchmarking results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhar Kumar; Koganti, S.B.

    2003-07-01

    Benchmarking and application of a computer code SIMPSEX for high plutonium FBR flowsheets was reported recently in an earlier report (IGC-234). Improvements and recompilation of the code (Version 4.01, March 2003) required re-validation with the existing benchmarks as well as additional benchmark flowsheets. Improvements in the high Pu region (Pu Aq >30 g/L) resulted in better results in the 75% Pu flowsheet benchmark. Below 30 g/L Pu Aq concentration, results were identical to those from the earlier version (SIMPSEX Version 3, code compiled in 1999). In addition, 13 published flowsheets were taken as additional benchmarks. Eleven of these flowsheets have a wide range of feed concentrations and few of them are β-γ active runs with FBR fuels having a wide distribution of burnup and Pu ratios. A published total partitioning flowsheet using externally generated U(IV) was also simulated using SIMPSEX. SIMPSEX predictions were compared with listed predictions from conventional SEPHIS, PUMA, PUNE and PUBG. SIMPSEX results were found to be comparable and better than the result from above listed codes. In addition, recently reported UREX demo results along with AMUSE simulations are also compared with SIMPSEX predictions. Results of the benchmarking SIMPSEX with these 14 benchmark flowsheets are discussed in this report. (author)

  6. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.; Hou, Siqing

    2017-01-01

    baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number

  7. Gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy for carcinoma of unknown primary: results of a multicenter phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shernan G Holtan

    Full Text Available Metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP has a very poor prognosis, and no standard first-line therapy currently exists. Here, we report the results of a phase II study utilizing a combination of gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy. Treatment was with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 weekly times four on a six week cycle (Cohort I. Due to excessive toxicity, the dose and schedule were modified as follows: gemcitabine 750 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 given weekly times three on a four week cycle (Cohort II. The primary endpoint was the confirmed response rate (CR + PR. Secondary endpoints consisted of adverse events based upon the presence or absence of the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1*28 (UGT1A1*28 polymorphism, time to progression, and overall survival. Thirty-one patients were enrolled with a median age of 63 (range: 38-94, and 26 patients were evaluable for efficacy. Significant toxicity was observed in Cohort 1, characterized by 50% (7/14 patients experiencing a grade 4+ adverse event, but not in cohort II. The confirmed response rate including patients from both cohorts was 12% (95% CI: 2-30%, which did not meet the criteria for continued enrollment. Overall median survival was 7.2 months (95% CI: 4.0 to 11.6 for the entire cohort but notably longer in cohort II than in cohort I (9.3 months (95% CI: 4.1 to 12.1 versus 4.0 months (95% CI: 2.2 to 15.6. Gemcitabine and irinotecan is not an active combination when used as first line therapy in patients with metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary. Efforts into developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches remain important for improving the outlook for this heterogeneous group of patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00066781.

  8. Ink dating part II: Interpretation of results in a legal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Agnès; Weyermann, Céline

    2018-01-01

    The development of an ink dating method requires an important investment of resources in order to step from the monitoring of ink ageing on paper to the determination of the actual age of a questioned ink entry. This article aimed at developing and evaluating the potential of three interpretation models to date ink entries in a legal perspective: (1) the threshold model comparing analytical results to tabulated values in order to determine the maximal possible age of an ink entry, (2) the trend tests that focusing on the "ageing status" of an ink entry, and (3) the likelihood ratio calculation comparing the probabilities to observe the results under at least two alternative hypotheses. This is the first report showing ink dating interpretation results on a ballpoint be ink reference population. In the first part of this paper three ageing parameters were selected as promising from the population of 25 ink entries aged during 4 to 304days: the quantity of phenoxyethanol (PE), the difference between the PE quantities contained in a naturally aged sample and an artificially aged sample (R NORM ) and the solvent loss ratio (R%). In the current part, each model was tested using the three selected ageing parameters. Results showed that threshold definition remains a simple model easily applicable in practice, but that the risk of false positive cannot be completely avoided without reducing significantly the feasibility of the ink dating approaches. The trend tests from the literature showed unreliable results and an alternative had to be developed yielding encouraging results. The likelihood ratio calculation introduced a degree of certainty to the ink dating conclusion in comparison to the threshold approach. The proposed model remains quite simple to apply in practice, but should be further developed in order to yield reliable results in practice. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lean and Virginia's wood industry - Part II: Results and need for support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian F. Fricke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This two-part publication about Lean practices by Viriginia’s wood products and furniture manufacturing industries reports results from researching the awareness, the implementation status, the business results, and the need for external implementation support of Virginian companies. This second manuscript focuses on business results and the need for external implementation support. Except for “sales per employee,” where less than half of respondents reported an improvement due to the implementation of Lean in their operation, a majority of respondents indicated improved business results for “lead time,” “on-time delivery,” “inventory turnover,” and “cost per unit.” With respect to the need for external Lean implementation support, only 23 percent of respondents answered in the affirmative. “Training management,” “training shop floor employees,” and “implementing [Lean] with extensive employee involvement” were, with 67, 58, and 48 percent frequencies, the most often named forms of Lean implementation support requested. Results from this study seem to indicate an opportunity to support the well-being of Virginia’s wood products and furniture manufacturing industries through improved communication of the benefits of Lean and offering specific types of training to companies.

  10. Multiple Stellar Populations of Globular Clusters from Homogeneous Ca-CN Photometry. II. M5 (NGC 5904) and a New Filter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Woo

    2017-07-01

    Using our ingeniously designed new filter systems, we investigate multiple stellar populations of the red giant branch (RGB) and the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) in the globular cluster (GC) M5. Our results are the following. (1) Our {{cn}}{JWL} index accurately traces nitrogen abundances in M5, while other color indices fail to do so. (2) We find bimodal CN distributions in both RGB and AGB sequences, with number ratios between CN-weak (CN-w) and CN-strong (CN-s) of n(CN-w):n(CN-s) = 29:71 (±2) and 21:79 (±7), respectively. (3) We also find a bimodal photometric [N/Fe] distribution for M5 RGB stars. (4) Our {{cn}}{JWL}-[O/Fe] and {{cn}}{JWL}-[Na/Fe] relations show clear discontinuities between the two RGB populations. (5) Although small, the RGB bump of CN-s is slightly brighter, {{Δ }}{V}{bump} = 0.07 ± 0.04 mag. If real, the difference in the helium abundance becomes {{Δ }}Y = 0.028 ± 0.016, in the sense that CN-s is more helium enhanced. (6) Very similar radial but different spatial distributions with comparable center positions are found for the two RGB populations. The CN-s RGB and AGB stars are more elongated along the NW-SE direction. (7) The CN-s population shows a substantial net projected rotation, while that of the CN-w population is nil. (8) Our results confirm the deficiency of CN-w AGB stars previously noted by others. We show that it is most likely due to stochastic truncation in the outer part of the cluster. Finally, we discuss the formation scenario of M5. Based on observations made with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 1 m telescope, which is operated by the SMARTS consortium.

  11. Spallative nucleosynthesis in supernova remnants. II. Time-dependent numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizot, Etienne; Drury, Luke

    1999-06-01

    We calculate the spallative production of light elements associated with the explosion of an isolated supernova in the interstellar medium, using a time-dependent model taking into account the dilution of the ejected enriched material and the adiabatic energy losses. We first derive the injection function of energetic particles (EPs) accelerated at both the forward and the reverse shock, as a function of time. Then we calculate the Be yields obtained in both cases and compare them to the value implied by the observational data for metal-poor stars in the halo of our Galaxy, using both O and Fe data. We find that none of the processes investigated here can account for the amount of Be found in these stars, which confirms the analytical results of Parizot & Drury (1999). We finally analyze the consequences of these results for Galactic chemical evolution, and suggest that a model involving superbubbles might alleviate the energetics problem in a quite natural way.

  12. Ink dating part II: Interpretation of results in a legal perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Agnès; Weyermann, Céline

    2018-01-01

    The development of an ink dating method requires an important investment of resources in order to step from the monitoring of ink ageing on paper to the determination of the actual age of a questioned ink entry. This article aimed at developing and evaluating the potential of three interpretation models to date ink entries in a legal perspective: (1) the threshold model comparing analytical results to tabulated values in order to determine the maximal possible age of an ink entry, (2) the tre...

  13. Global optimization of truss topology with discrete bar areas-Part II: Implementation and numerical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achtziger, Wolfgang; Stolpe, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    we use the theory developed in Part I to design a convergent nonlinear branch-and-bound method tailored to solve large-scale instances of the original discrete problem. The problem formulation and the needed theoretical results from Part I are repeated such that this paper is self-contained. We focus...... the largest discrete topology design problems solved by means of global optimization....

  14. ONLINE PORNOGRAPHY AND SEXUALITY: SOME RESULTS OF EU KIDS ONLINE SURVEY II IN THE ROMANIAN CASE

    OpenAIRE

    VALENTINA MARINESCU

    2014-01-01

    The present article intends to analyze the exposure of Romanian children and teens to sexually explicit message and the so-called „sexting” activities they perform in the online environment. The main research topic to which we try to find some answers is: are young people more exposed to risks because they view sexually explicit content online and send sexual messages to others? Our results validate the risk migration hypothesis, the blurring boundaries between the online and offline world...

  15. Initial results for electrochemical dissolution of spent EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-01-01

    Initial results are reported for the anode behavior of spent metallic nuclear fuel in an electrorefining process. The anode behavior has been characterized in terms of the initial spent fuel composition and the final composition of the residual cladding hulls. A variety of results have been obtained depending on the experimental conditions. Some of the process variables considered are average and maximum cell voltage, average and maximum anode voltage, amount of electrical charge passed (coulombs or amp-hours) during the experiment, and cell resistance. The main goal of the experiments has been the nearly complete dissolution of uranium with the retention of zirconium and noble metal fission products in the cladding hulls. Analysis has shown that the most indicative parameters for determining an endpoint to the process, recognizing the stated goal, are the maximum anode voltage and the amount of electrical charge passed. For the initial experiments reported here, the best result obtained is greater than 98% uranium dissolution with approximately 50% zirconium retention. Noble metal fission product retention appears to be correlated with zirconium retention

  16. The Test for Flow Characteristics of Tubular Fuel Assembly(II) - Experimental results and CFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, H. T.; Park, C.; Kim, H.

    2006-12-01

    A test facility had been established for the experiment of velocity distribution and pressure drop in a tubular fuel. A basic test had been conducted to examine the performance of the test loop and to verify the accuracy of measurement by pitot-tube. In this report, test results and CFD analysis for the hydraulic characteristics of a tubular fuel, following the previous tests, are described. Coolant velocities in all channels were measured using pitot-tube and the effect of flow rate change on the velocity distribution was also examined. The pressure drop through the tubular fuel was measured for various flow rates in range of 1 kg/s to 21 kg/s to obtain a correlation of pressure drop with variation of flow rate. In addition, a CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis was also done to find out the hydraulic characteristics of tubular fuel such as velocity distribution and pressure drop. As the results of CFD analysis can give us a detail insight on coolant flow in the tubular fuel, the CFD method is a very useful tool to understand the flow structure and phenomena induced by fluid flow. The CFX-10, a commercial CFD code, was used in this study. The two results by the experiment and the CFD analysis were investigated and compared with each other. Overall trend of velocity distribution by CFD analysis was somewhat different from that of experiment, but it would be reasonable considering measurement uncertainties. The CFD prediction for pressure drop of a tubular fuel shows a tolerably good agreement with experiment within 8% difference

  17. The JESSICA experiment. Part II. Results from the JESSICA-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, Ch.; Conrad, H.; Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Neef, R.D.; Nuenighoff, K.; Schaal, H.; Stelzer, H.; Tietze-Jaensch, H.; Paul, N.; Wohlmuther, W.; Ninaus, W.; Smirnov, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this article we like to report on the latest results of the JESSICA experiment. We focus on the experiments with an ice moderator at 20 K and 70 K. The measured time of flight spectra and the derived energy spectra will be presented. For the ice moderator we will show also the time of flight spectra for specific wavelengths. For the first time we investigated the moderation properties of a methane-hydrate moderator in a realistic environment. We compared this new data with the previous obtained ice data. (orig.)

  18. Post surgical radiotherapy in colon neoplasm: preliminary results of the study in phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Garcia, S.; Tasende, B.

    1993-01-01

    Radiotherapy was not used profusely in the the cancer of the colon treatment be it in the therapy form or administration. In the actual moment for a better understandings in its history natural and the knowledge of the factors presage recurrence, the radiotherapy have precise indications about the surgery. It analyze the population of the patients with cancer of the colon to determine the value of the radiant proceeding in the regional control and it tolerance. Finally, is emphasized in the necessity of the integration of the other procedures, being a therapeutic method that diminishes the-regional results with a permissible toxicity (AU) [es

  19. Initial results with time series forecasting of TJ-II heliac waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, G.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Vega, J.; Díaz, N.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses about how to apply forecasting techniques to predict future samples of plasma signals during a discharge. One application of the forecasting could be to detect in real time anomalous behaviors in fusion waveforms. The work describes the implementation of three prediction techniques; two of them based on machine learning methods such as artificial neural networks and support vector machines for regression. The results have shown that depending on the temporal horizon, the predictions match the real samples in most cases with an error less than 5%, even more the forecasting of five samples ahead can reach accuracy over 90% in most signals analyzed.

  20. Some results of periodical analysis of the behavior of unit 4 at the Dukovany NPP - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a detailed spectral analysis of noise signals recorded at the unit 4 reactor of the Dukovany NPP during and after the start-up stage are presented. The changes in the noise source signal spectra during the start-up and in normal operation were evaluated by multidimensional autoregression analysis. The temperature dependence of the signal spectra peaks from individual detectors is described. The sources of the peaks at 27.9 and 37 Hz during normal operation were identified as standing pressure waves in the primary circuit of the reactor. 3 tabs., 23 figs., 6 refs

  1. Cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice. II. Results in the unitary limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dean; Schaefer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This is the second of two articles that investigate cold dilute neutron matter on the lattice using pionless effective field theory. In the unitary limit, where the effective range is zero and scattering length is infinite, simple scaling relations relate thermodynamic functions at different temperatures. When the second virial coefficient is properly tuned, we find that the lattice results obey these scaling relations. We compute the energy per particle, pressure, spin susceptibility, dineutron correlation function, and an upper bound for the superfluid critical temperature

  2. Tailored graph ensembles as proxies or null models for real networks II: results on directed graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, E S; Coolen, A C C; Schlitt, T

    2011-01-01

    We generate new mathematical tools with which to quantify the macroscopic topological structure of large directed networks. This is achieved via a statistical mechanical analysis of constrained maximum entropy ensembles of directed random graphs with prescribed joint distributions for in- and out-degrees and prescribed degree-degree correlation functions. We calculate exact and explicit formulae for the leading orders in the system size of the Shannon entropies and complexities of these ensembles, and for information-theoretic distances. The results are applied to data on gene regulation networks.

  3. Sodium leak and combustion experiment-II report. Evaluation result of damage of mild steel liner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoto, K.; Hirakawa, Y.; Kuroda, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1996-09-01

    Several material analyses on damage of the floor liner made of a mild steel which was in the test cell of the second sodium leak and combustion experiment (Test-2) performed in OEC/PNC on June 7 in 1996 were carried out to clarify the following issues. (1) Difference of the corrosion mechanism of Test-2 liner to that of the first sodium leak and combustion experiment (Test-1) liner. (2) The vital factor which can desides corrosion mechanism and damage location. The following analyses were accomplished. (1) Microstructure observation, (2) EPMA for cross-section of vicinity of corroded area, (3) X-ray diffraction (XRD) for the interface between corrosion product-liner (mild steel). The differences between the corrosion mechanism of Test-1 liner which is seemed to be the same that of `MONJU` liner and that of Test-2 liner is discussed based on the results of these material analyses. As the result, the Na-Fe double oxidization with mechanical/chemical removal of reaction product can be occurred on the Test-1 and `MONJU` liner. On the other hand, a hot-corrosion, that is the molten salt type corrosion is subject to be thinning of the Test-2 liner. All failures of Test-2 liner surround at the halfway up a convex. Considering the above corrosion mechanism, that fact leads that significant damage is occurred at the molten salt level. (author)

  4. Continuous integrity evaluation of corroded pipelines using complemented FEA results – Part II: Procedure application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, László; Fekete, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    The general objective of this paper is to execute the continuous integrity evaluation of corroded pipelines with the developed procedure has been presented in the Part I. This aim was performed with a large dataset of complemented finite element analysis (FEA) results and burst test values can be found in the References. The numerical investigations have been done with an assumed sample-case taking spherical and spheroid shaped characteristic and mobile defects into account. The most important achievements are the supplemented ductile failure analysis, the continuous suitability of the weak link, the strain-based design criteria and the continuous integrity assessment diagrams. - Highlights: • Finite Element Analysis (FEA) examinations are performed for selection of a sample-case to investigate corrosion defects. • Serial calculations are carried out to determine the continuous suitability of the corroded pipeline sections. • We investigate the shape and size effects of corrosion defects on load carrying capacities (LCCs) of defective pipelines. • Continuous integrity assessment diagram (CIAD) showing the decreasing competent LCCs in the operation time is introduced. • Verification of the proposed method is performed by comparing the FEA results with burst pressure values measured.

  5. Parameter sampling capabilities of sequential and simultaneous data assimilation: II. Statistical analysis of numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossum, Kristian; Mannseth, Trond

    2014-01-01

    We assess and compare parameter sampling capabilities of one sequential and one simultaneous Bayesian, ensemble-based, joint state-parameter (JS) estimation method. In the companion paper, part I (Fossum and Mannseth 2014 Inverse Problems 30 114002), analytical investigations lead us to propose three claims, essentially stating that the sequential method can be expected to outperform the simultaneous method for weakly nonlinear forward models. Here, we assess the reliability and robustness of these claims through statistical analysis of results from a range of numerical experiments. Samples generated by the two approximate JS methods are compared to samples from the posterior distribution generated by a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, using four approximate measures of distance between probability distributions. Forward-model nonlinearity is assessed from a stochastic nonlinearity measure allowing for sufficiently large model dimensions. Both toy models (with low computational complexity, and where the nonlinearity is fairly easy to control) and two-phase porous-media flow models (corresponding to down-scaled versions of problems to which the JS methods have been frequently applied recently) are considered in the numerical experiments. Results from the statistical analysis show strong support of all three claims stated in part I. (paper)

  6. FORMATION OF TOILET HABITS IN CHILDREN IN MOSCOW. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY RESULTS. PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Karkashadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the first Russian study of toilet habits formation in children have been obtained. The article was planned to be published in 2 subsequent parts due to the extensiveness of the material. This article is the 2nd part*. It presents and comments on the remaining part of results in the form of the connection between main parameters and characteristics of toilet habits training processes and physiological, psychological and social factors; it also presents the discussion and conclusions. Comparative data (with foreign studies is given. A multitude of both physiological and social factors affect the process of children’s toilet habits training. The following physiological factors have been revealed: stool frequency, physiological involuntary night urination, peculiarities of falling asleep and pernicious habits – processes, which reflect the intestinal motility regulation and defecation states, urination control and neuropsychic activity. The selected training strategy and tactics, style of communication with a child also affect the training process. The most influential family-social factors in terms of toilet habits training processes are: two- or one-parent family, mother’s education and twins in the family. 

  7. Recent results from the HIT-II and HIT-SI helicity injection current drive experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Hamp, W.T.; Izzo, V.A.; Nelson, B.A.; O'Neill, R.G.; Raman, R.; Redd, A.J.; Sieck, P.E.; Smith, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three important results are reported. 1) CHI startup has produced 100 kA of closed current without using poloidal field (PF) coils or any transformer action. The initial equilibrium is then driven to 240 kA with a 3 V transformer loop voltage, indicating high quality plasma. 2) For the first time CHI alone has produced toroidal currents (350 kA) that far exceed q a I inj , and with I p /I tf as high as 1.2. The key to these new results appears to be having the toroidal field small enough that relaxation will occur. 3) The steady inductive helicity injection spheromak experiment has operated at 5 kHz for 6 ms with current amplitudes up to 11 kA in each injector. The helicity injection rate is nearly constant with the ExB flow always into the plasma and not into the walls. NIMROD simulations of HIT-SI show a buildup of spheromak fields. (author)

  8. VEGAS-SSS. II. Comparing the globular cluster systems in NGC 3115 and NGC 1399 using VEGAS and FDS survey data. The quest for a common genetic heritage of globular cluster systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Michele; D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Spavone, Marilena; Paolillo, Maurizio; Capaccioli, Massimo; Limatola, Luca; Grado, Aniello; Iodice, Enrica; Raimondo, Gabriella; Napolitano, Nicola; Blakeslee, John P.; Brocato, Enzo; Forbes, Duncan A.; Hilker, Michael; Mieske, Steffen; Peletier, Reynier; van de Ven, Glenn; Schipani, Pietro

    2018-04-01

    We analyze the globular cluster (GC) systems in two very different galaxies, NGC 3115 and NGC 1399. With the papers of this series, we aim at highlighting common and different properties in the GC systems in galaxies covering a wide range of parameter space. We compare the GCs in NGC 3115 and NGC 1399 as derived from the analysis of one square degree u-, g-, and i-band images taken with the VST telescope as part of the VST early-type galaxy survey (VEGAS) and Fornax deep survey (FDS). We selected GC candidates using as reference the morpho-photometric and color properties of confirmed GCs. The surface density maps of GCs in NGC 3115 reveal a morphology similar to the light profile of field stars; the same is true when blue and red GCs are taken separately. The GC maps for NGC 1399 are richer in structure and confirm the existence of an intra-cluster GC component. We confirm the presence of a spatial offset in the NGC 1399 GC centroid and find that the centroid of the GCs for NGC 3115 coincides well with the galaxy center. Both GC systems show unambiguous color bimodality in (g - i) and (u - i); the color-color relations of the two GC systems are slightly different with NGC 3115 appearing more linear than NGC 1399. The azimuthal average of the radial density profiles in both galaxies reveals a larger spatial extent for the total GCs population with respect to the galaxy surface brightness profile. For both galaxies, the red GCs have radial density profiles compatible with the galaxy light profile, while the radial profiles for blue GCs are shallower. As for the specific frequency of GCs, SN, we find it is a factor of two higher in NGC 1399 than for NGC 3115; this is mainly the result of extra blue GCs. By inspecting the radial behavior of the specific frequency, SN(

  9. Characterization of Tank 16H Annulus Samples Part II: Leaching Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-01-01

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO 2 ) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na 8 (Al 6 Si 6 O 24 )(NO 3 ) 2 .4H 2 O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ), sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ), gibbsite (Al(OH) 3 ), hydrated sodium bicarbonate (Na 3 H(CO 3 ) 2 .2H 2 O), and muscovite (KAl 2 (AlSi 3 O 10 )(OH) 2 ). Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and approximately 1/3 of the 99 Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The oxalic acid leaching test result indicate approximately 34-47% of the solids in the four annulus samples will dissolve after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of acid to solids at 45 C. The same sodium salts found in the water leaching test comprise the majority of dissolved material in the oxalic acid leaching test. However, the oxalic acid was somewhat more effective in dissolving radionuclides than the water leach. In

  10. Results of the EURAMET.RI(II)-S6.I-129 supplementary comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, Eduardo; Altzitzoglou, Timotheos; Auerbach, Pavel; Bé, Marie-Martine; Lourenço, Valérie; Bobin, Christophe; Cassette, Philippe; Dersch, Rainer; Kossert, Karsten; Nähle, Ole; Peyrés, Virginia; Pommé, Stefaan; Rozkov, Andrej; Sanchez-Cabezudo, Anabel; Sochoro&vacute; , Jana

    2015-01-01

    An international comparison of the long-lived gamma-ray emitter 129I has been recently completed. A total of 5 laboratories measured a solution prepared by Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT). Aliquots of the master solution were standardized in terms of activity per mass unit by participant laboratories using 4 different techniques. The results of the comparison can be used as the basis for establishing the equivalence among the laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Adamo, Angela [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schaerer, Daniel [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofísica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain); Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire dAstrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Kunth, Daniel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Laursen, Peter [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Herenz, E. Christian, E-mail: matthew@astro.su.se [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    We report new results regarding the Lyα output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Lyα, Hα, and UV, and maps of Hα/Hβ, Lyα equivalent width (EW), and Lyα/Hα. We present Lyα and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Sérsic profiles, but Lyα profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ≈ 1-2 instead of ≳ 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Lyα that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Lyα than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ≈10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Lyα luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Lyα throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Lyα emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Lyα and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 Å, and one shows f{sub esc}{sup Lyα} of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  12. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger; Adamo, Angela; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Herenz, E. Christian

    2014-01-01

    We report new results regarding the Lyα output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Lyα, Hα, and UV, and maps of Hα/Hβ, Lyα equivalent width (EW), and Lyα/Hα. We present Lyα and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Sérsic profiles, but Lyα profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ≈ 1-2 instead of ≳ 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Lyα that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Lyα than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ≈10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Lyα luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Lyα throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Lyα emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Lyα and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 Å, and one shows f esc Lyα of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  13. Integration of family planning services into HIV care clinics: Results one year after a cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R Cohen

    Full Text Available To determine if integration of family planning (FP and HIV services led to increased use of more effective contraception (i.e. hormonal and permanent methods, and intrauterine devices and decreased pregnancy rates.Cohort analysis following cluster randomized trial, when the Kenya Ministry of Health led integration of the remaining control (delayed integration sites and oversaw integrated services at the original intervention (early integration sites.Eighteen health facilities in Kenya.Women aged 18-45 receiving care: 5682 encounters at baseline, and 11628 encounters during the fourth quarter of year 2."One-stop shop" approach to integrating FP and HIV services.Use of more effective contraceptive methods and incident pregnancy across two years of follow-up.Following integration of FP and HIV services at the six delayed integration clinics, use of more effective contraception increased from 31.7% to 44.2% of encounters (+12.5%; Prevalence ratio (PR = 1.39 (1.19-1.63. Among the twelve early integration sites, the proportion of encounters at which women used more effective contraceptive methods was sustained from the end of the first to the second year of follow-up (37.5% vs. 37.0%. Pregnancy incidence including all 18 integrated sites in year two declined in comparison to the control arm in year one (rate ratio: 0.72; 95% CI 0.60-0.87.Integration of FP services into HIV clinics led to a sustained increase in the use of more effective contraceptives and decrease in pregnancy incidence 24 months following implementation of the integrated service model.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01001507.

  14. 10C survey of radio sources at 15.7 GHz - II. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMI Consortium; Davies, Mathhew L.; Franzen, Thomas M. O.; Waldram, Elizabeth M.; Grainge, Keith J. B.; Hobson, Michael P.; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Lasenby, Anthony; Olamaie, Malak; Pooley, Guy G.; Riley, Julia M.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Carmen; Saunders, Richard D. E.; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Schammel, Michel P.; Scott, Paul F.; Shimwell, Timothy W.; Titterington, David J.; Zwart, Jonathan T. L.

    2011-08-01

    In a previous paper (Paper I), the observational, mapping and source-extraction techniques used for the Tenth Cambridge (10C) Survey of Radio Sources were described. Here, the first results from the survey, carried out using the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array (LA) at an observing frequency of 15.7 GHz, are presented. The survey fields cover an area of ≈27 deg2 to a flux-density completeness of 1 mJy. Results for some deeper areas, covering ≈12 deg2, wholly contained within the total areas and complete to 0.5 mJy, are also presented. The completeness for both areas is estimated to be at least 93 per cent. The 10C survey is the deepest radio survey of any significant extent (≳0.2 deg2) above 1.4 GHz. The 10C source catalogue contains 1897 entries and is available online. The source catalogue has been combined with that of the Ninth Cambridge Survey to calculate the 15.7-GHz source counts. A broken power law is found to provide a good parametrization of the differential count between 0.5 mJy and 1 Jy. The measured source count has been compared with that predicted by de Zotti et al. - the model is found to display good agreement with the data at the highest flux densities. However, over the entire flux-density range of the measured count (0.5 mJy to 1 Jy), the model is found to underpredict the integrated count by ≈30 per cent. Entries from the source catalogue have been matched with those contained in the catalogues of the NRAO VLA Sky Survey and the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (both of which have observing frequencies of 1.4 GHz). This matching provides evidence for a shift in the typical 1.4-GHz spectral index to 15.7-GHz spectral index of the 15.7-GHz-selected source population with decreasing flux density towards sub-mJy levels - the spectra tend to become less steep. Automated methods for detecting extended sources, developed in Paper I, have been applied to the data; ≈5 per cent of the sources are found to be extended

  15. Prediction of 222 Rn exhalation rates from phosphogypsum based stacks. Part II: preliminary numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabi, Jose A.; Mohamad, Abdulmajeed A.

    2004-01-01

    The first part of this paper proposes a steady-state 2-D model for 222 Rn transport in phosphogypsum stacks. In this second part, the dimensionless model equations are solved numerically with the help of an existing finite-volume simulator that has been successfully used to solve heat and mass transfer problems in porous media. As a test case, a rectangular shaped stack is considered in order to verify the ability of the proposed parametric approach to account for concurrent effects on the 222 Rn exhalation into the local atmosphere. Air flow is supposed to be strictly buoyancy driven and the ground is assumed to be impermeable to 222 Rn and at a higher temperature under the stack base. Dimensionless controlling parameters are set to representative values and results are presented for Grashof number in the range 10 6 ≤Gr≤ 10 8 , corresponding to very small to small temperature differences between incoming air and ground underneath the stack base. For the particular set of parameters and inasmuch as Gr increases, streamlines presented basically the same pattern while internal isotherms and iso concentration lines remained almost unchanged. Total average Sherwood number proved to be rather insensitive to Gr while total average Nusselt increased slightly with Gr. (author)

  16. Study of a scanning HIFU therapy protocol, Part II: Experiment and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Marilee A.; Kaczkowski, Peter; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Kargl, Steven G.

    2003-04-01

    Instrumentation and protocols for creating scanned HIFU lesions in freshly excised bovine liver were developed in order to study the in vitro HIFU dose response and validate models. Computer-control of the HIFU transducer and 3-axis positioning system provided precise spatial placement of the thermal lesions. Scan speeds were selected in the range of 1 to 8 mm/s, and the applied electrical power was varied from 20 to 60 W. These parameters were chosen to hold the thermal dose constant. A total of six valid scans of 15 mm length were created in each sample; a 3.5 MHz single-element, spherically focused transducer was used. Treated samples were frozen, then sliced in 1.27 mm increments. Digital photographs of slices were downloaded to computer for image processing and analysis. Lesion characteristics, including the depth within the tissue, axial length, and radial width, were computed. Results were compared with those generated from modified KZK and BHTE models, and include a comparison of the statistical variation in the across-scan lesion radial width. [Work supported by USAMRMC.

  17. The Impact of the Proposed delta Gp Limits on Glass Formulation Efforts: Part II. Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEELER, DAVID

    2004-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has initiated studies to assess alternative durability options that may provide access to compositional regions of interest in support of the accelerated cleanup mission at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). One of the options being pursued is the redefinition of the durability model acceptability limits. Some of the conservative steps used in establishing the current limits without compromising the high confidence required for meeting the specification on the waste form quality were identified and eliminated. The results led to a set of three new Property Acceptability Region (PAR) values for the preliminary glass dissolution estimator that has the potential to allow access to compositional regions of interest to improve melt rate or waste loading. Although these limits are available for implementation, there is no driving force to do so with the current sludge batch (i.e., the current Frit 418 - Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) system is TL limited). The objectives of this task were to investigate (and generate) the incentive of applying the proposed durability limits in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) from a glass formulation perspective. Glass compositions were identified or developed to transition into and through the region of GP acceptability as defined by the current and proposed durability limits. The progression through the newly defined acceptability region was accomplished by increasing the total alkali in the glass via higher alkali frits and/or waste loading (WL). The focus of this report is on the measured durability response as it compares to model predictions to assess the applicability and/or potential conservatism of the various limits or durability approaches. The normalized boron release values (NL [B] g/L) for the study glasses ranged from approximately 1.0 g/L to 2.0 g/L. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses provide evidence that implementation of the proposed GP limits will

  18. Cladding oxidation during air ingress. Part II: Synthesis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, E.; Haurais, F.; Bals, C.; Coindreau, O.; Fernandez-Moguel, L.; Vasiliev, A.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A state-of-the-art for air oxidation modelling in the frame of severe accident is done. • Air oxidation models from main severe accident codes are detailed. • Simulations from main severe accident codes are compared against experimental results. • Perspectives in terms of need for further model development and experiments are given. - Abstract: Air ingress is a potential risk in some low probable situations of severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced Zr-based cladding oxidation and core degradation affecting the release of fission products. This is particularly true speaking about ruthenium release, due to its high radiotoxicity and its ability to form highly volatile oxides in a significant manner in presence of air. The oxygen affinity is decreasing from the Zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions. It is consequently of great need to understand the phenomena governing cladding oxidation by air as a prerequisite for the source term issues in such scenarios. In the past years, many works have been done on cladding oxidation by air under severe accident conditions. This paper with in addition the paper “Cladding oxidation during air ingress – Part I: Synthesis of experimental results” of this journal issue aim at assessing the state of the art on this phenomenon. In this paper, the modelling of air ingress phenomena in the main severe accident codes (ASTEC, ATHLET-CD, MAAP, MELCOR, RELAP/SCDAPSIM, SOCRAT) is described in details, as well as the validation against the integral experiments QUENCH-10, QUENCH-16 and PARAMETER-SF4. A full review of cladding oxidation by air is thus established.

  19. Preliminary results of phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated (SMART) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hong; Lee, Sang Wook; Back, Geum Mun [College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for non-metastatic NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. IMRT was delivered using the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume (GTV), 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume (CTV) and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received concurrent chemotherapy using cisplatin once per week. The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had RTOG grade 3 mucositis, whereas nine (45%) had grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no grade 3 or 4 chronic xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and loco-regional recurrence, respectively. IMRT using the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and may also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  20. Phase II Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer: Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Woo Young; Nam, Hee Rim; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical carcinoma (FIGO stage IB2-IVA) were treated with external beam radiation therapy to the whole pelvis (50.4 Gy) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (24 Gy to point A). Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m 2 (Days 1-5) were given every 3 weeks starting concurrently with the radiation and followed by 3 more cycles of consolidation for a total of 6 cycles. Results: Thirty patients (94%) received 3 more cycles of post-CCRT consolidation chemotherapy and were evaluable for the toxicity and efficacy of consolidation. The most common toxicities of Grade 2 or higher were nausea or vomiting (47%) and anemia (33%). Late complications of the rectum and bladder occurred in 13% and 6% of the patients, respectively. The clinical complete response rate was 87% (95% CI, 75%-99%). During a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-58 months), 5 patients (17%) had recurrence; the sites of failure were 3 (10%) inside the radiation field and 2 (7%) outside the radiation field. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate was 83% (95% CI, 67%-99%) and overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 79%-100%). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A prospective randomized trial to compare this treatment strategy with standard CCRT seems to be worthwhile

  1. Elevated source SF6-tracer dispersion experiments in the Copenhagen area. Preliminary results II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryning, S.E.; Lyck, E.

    1980-01-01

    The results from 10 experiments, performed in neutral to unstable meteorological conditions, are reported from an ongoing series of elevated-source, urban-scale tracer dispersion experiments in the Copenhagen area. The tracer is released at a height of 115 m from the TV-tower in GLADSAXE, a suburb of Copenhagen, with tracer sampling units positioned at ground-level in 1 to 3 crosswind series, 2 to 6 km downwind of the tower. The lateral dispersion parameter, sigma(y), was estimated from the measured tracer concentration distribution and compared with values of sigma(y), computed by 1) methods based on wind variance measured during the experiments and 2) methods based on a stability classification of the atmospheric conditions. The wind-variance based methods proved superior in predicting the variation of sigma(y) compared with the stability based methods. Moreover, some of the former methods produced significantly biased estimates of sigma(y). The measured tracer concentration distributions were also crosswind integrated, chi(CWI). Estimates of chi(CWI) were computed using sigma (z) -values derived from the aforementioned computations assuming a Gaussian-type vertical tracer concentration distribution. A comparison is measured and calculated values of chi(CWI) showed no significant differences in the ability of the methods to predict the variation of chi(CWI). Only one method, the EPA, came out with a mean fractional error outside the range +-20% which constitutes the uncertainty in the absolute tracer concentration associated with the calibration of the gas chromatograph for tracer analysis

  2. Intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas. First clinical results of Tsukuba phase I/II trial using JAERI mixed thermal-epithermal beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Shibata, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1999, a clinical trial of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) is in progress at JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using mixed thermal-epithermal beam (thermal neutron beam I: TNB-I). Compared to pure thermal beam (thermal neutron beam II: TNB-II), TNB-I has an improved neutron delivery into the deep region than TNB-II. The clinical protocol and the preliminary results will be discussed. (author)

  3. Parenteral nutrition support for patients with pancreatic cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riess Hanno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cachexia is a common problem in patients (pts suffering from upper gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, most of these patients suffer from malabsorption and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract due to their illness. Various methods of supplementary nutrition (enteral, parenteral are practised. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC, phase angle, determined by bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA, seems to be a survival predictor. The positive influence of BIA determinate predictors by additional nutrition is currently under discussion. Methods To examine the impact of additional parenteral nutrition (APN we assessed outpatients suffering from APC and progressive cachexia. The assessment based on the BIA method. Assessment parameters were phase angle, ECM/BCM index (ratio of extracellular mass to body cell mass, and BMI (body mass index. Patients suffering from progressive weight loss in spite of additional enteral nutritional support were eligible for the study. Results Median treatment duration in 32 pts was 18 [8-35] weeks. Response evaluation showed a benefit in 27 pts (84% in at least one parameter. 14 pts (43.7% improved or stabilised in all three parameters. The median ECM/BCM index was 1.7 [1.11-3.14] at start of APN and improved down to 1.5 [1.12-3.36] during therapy. The median BMI increased from 19.7 [14.4-25.9] to 20.5 [15.4-25.0]. The median phase angle improved by 10% from 3.6 [2.3-5.1] to 3.9 [2.2-5.1]. Conclusions We demonstrated the positive impact of APN on the assessed parameters, first of all the phase angle, and we observed at least a temporary benefit or stabilisation of the nutritional status in the majority of the investigated patients. Based on these findings we are currently investigating the impact of APN on survival in a larger patient cohort. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00919659

  4. Investigation of sol-gel transition by rheological methods. Part II. Results and discussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work rheological studies of the gelling process were carried out. We have developed a measuring system for studying the rheology of the gelation process. It consisted of several measuring cells of the Weiler-Rebinder type, system for automatic regulation of the composition of the medium and thermostabilization system. This complex is designed to measure the dependence of the value of the ultimate shear stress as a function of time, from the start of the sol-gel transition to the complete conversion of the sol to the gel. The developed device has a wide range of measured values of critical shear stresses τ0 = (0,05÷50000 Dyne/cm2. Using the developed instrument, it was possible to establish the shape of the initial section of the curve τ0 = f(t and develop a methodology for more accurate determination of gelation time. The developed method proved that the classical method for determining the start time of the sol-gel transition using the point of intersection of the tangent to the linear part of the rheological curve τ0 = f(t, gives significantly distorted results. A new phenomenon has been discovered: the kinetic curves in the coordinates of the Avrami-Erofeev-Bogolyubov equation have an inflection point which separates the kinetic curve into two parts, the initial and the final. It was found that the constant k in the Avrami–Erofeev–Bogolyubov equation does not depend on the temperature and is the same for both the initial and final parts of the kinetic curve. It depends only on the chemical nature of the reacting system. It was found that for the initial section of the kinetic curves, the value of the parameter n in the Avrami-Erofeev-Bogolyubov equation was n = 23,4±2,8 and, unlike the final section of the rheological curve, does not depend on temperature. A large value of this parameter can be interpreted as the average number of directions of growth of a fractal aggregate during its growth. The value of this parameter

  5. Orbital atherectomy for treating de novo, severely calcified coronary lesions: 3-year results of the pivotal ORBIT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael; Généreux, Philippe; Shlofmitz, Richard; Phillipson, Daniel; Anose, Bynthia M; Martinsen, Brad J; Himmelstein, Stevan I; Chambers, Jeff W

    2017-06-01

    The presence of heavy coronary artery calcification increases the complexity of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and increases the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE): death, myocardial infarction (MI), target vessel revascularization (TVR), and stent thrombosis. The ORBIT II (Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of OAS in Treating Severely Calcified Coronary Lesions) trial reported low rates of procedural, 30-day, 1-year, and 2-year ischemic complications after treatment of de novo, severely calcified lesions with the Diamondback 360° Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) (Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.). ORBIT II was a single-arm trial that enrolled 443 patients at 49U.S. sites; in this study, de novo, severely calcified coronary lesions were treated with OAS prior to stenting. The primary safety endpoint was 30-day MACE: the composite of cardiac death, MI, and TVR (inclusive of target lesion revascularization (TLR)). The primary efficacy endpoint was procedural success: stent delivery with a residual stenosis of atherectomy. There were 360 (81.3%) subjects who completed the protocol-mandated 3-year visit.The overall cumulative rate of 3-year MACE was 23.5%, including cardiac death (6.7%), MI (11.2%), and TVR (10.2%). The 3-year target lesion revascularization rate was 7.8%. In the final 3-year analysis of the ORBIT II trial, orbital atherectomy of severely calcified coronary lesions followed by stenting resulted in a low rate of adverse ischemic events compared with historical controls.Orbital atherectomy represents a safe and effective revascularization strategy for patients with severely calcified coronary lesions. The ORBIT II trial enrolled 443 subjects to study orbital atherectomy followed by stenting for de novo severely calcified coronary lesions. The overall cumulative 3-year MACE rate was 23.5%, including cardiac death (6.7%), MI (11.2%), and TVR (10.2%); the 3-year target lesion revascularization rate was 7.8%. Orbital atherectomy

  6. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junius, Sara; Haustermans, Karin; Bussels, Barbara; Oyen, Raymond; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Depuydt, Tom; Verstraete, Jan; Joniau, Steven; Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  7. Community risk factors for ocular Chlamydia infection in Niger: pre-treatment results from a cluster-randomized trachoma trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdou Amza

    Full Text Available Trachoma control programs utilize mass azithromycin distributions to treat ocular Chlamydia trachomatis as part of an effort to eliminate this disease world-wide. But it remains unclear what the community-level risk factors are for infection.This cluster-randomized, controlled trial entered 48 randomly selected communities in a 2×2 factorial design evaluating the effect of different treatment frequencies and treatment coverage levels. A pretreatment census and examination established the prevalence of risk factors for clinical trachoma and ocular chlamydia infection including years of education of household head, distance to primary water source, presence of household latrine, and facial cleanliness (ocular discharge, nasal discharge, and presence of facial flies. Univariate and multivariate associations were tested using linear regression and Bayes model averaging.There were a total of 24,536 participants (4,484 children aged 0-5 years in 6,235 households in the study. Before treatment in May to July 2010, the community-level prevalence of active trachoma (TF or TI utilizing the World Health Organization [WHO] grading system was 26.0% (95% CI: 21.9% to 30.0% and the mean community-level prevalence of chlamydia infection by Amplicor PCR was 20.7% (95% CI: 16.5% to 24.9% in children aged 0-5 years. Univariate analysis showed that nasal discharge (0.29, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.54; P = 0.03, presence of flies on the face (0.40, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.64; P = 0.001, and years of formal education completed by the head of household (0.07, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.13; P = 0.03 were independent risk factors for chlamydia infection. In multivariate analysis, facial flies (0.26, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.49; P = 0.03 and years of formal education completed by the head of household (0.06, 95% CI: 0.008 to 0.11; P = 0.02 were associated risk factors for ocular chlamydial infection.We have found that the presence of facial flies and years of education of the head

  8. Reduced in-hospital mortality for heart failure with clinical pathways: the results of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella, M; Marchisio, S; Demarchi, M L; Manzoli, L; Di Stanislao, F

    2009-10-01

    Hospital treatment of heart failure (HF) frequently does not follow published guidelines, potentially contributing to HF high morbidity, mortality and economic cost. The Experimental Prospective Study on the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Implementation of Clinical Pathways was undertaken to determine how clinical pathways (CP) for hospital treatment of HF affected care variability, guidelines adherence, in-hospital mortality and outcomes at discharge. Methods/ Two-arm, cluster-randomised trial. Fourteen community hospitals were randomised either to the experimental arm (CP: appropriate therapeutic guidelines use, new organisation and procedures, patient education) or to the control arm (usual care). The main outcome was in-hospital mortality; secondary outcomes were length and appropriateness of the stay, rate of unscheduled readmissions, customer satisfaction, usage of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures during hospital stay and quality indicators at discharge. All outcomes were measured using validated instruments available in literature. In-hospital mortality was 5.6% in the experimental arm (n = 12); 15.4% in controls (n = 33, p = 0.001). In CP and usual care groups, the mean rates of unscheduled readmissions were 7.9% and 13.9%, respectively. Adjusting for age, smoking, New York Heart Association score, hypertension and source of referral, patients in the CP group, as compared to controls, had a significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.46) and unscheduled readmissions (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.20 to 0.87). No differences were found between CP and control with respect to the appropriateness of the stay, costs and patient's satisfaction. Except for electrocardiography, all recommended diagnostic procedures were used more in the CP group. Similarly, pharmaceuticals use was significantly greater in CP, with the exception of diuretics and anti-platelets agents. The introduction of a specifically tailored CP for the hospital

  9. Civilians in World War II and DSM-IV mental disorders: Results from the World Mental Health Survey Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frounfelker, Rochelle; Gilman, Stephen E.; Betancourt, Theresa S.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gluzman, Semyon; Gureje, Oye; Karam, Elie G.; Lee, Sing; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Ono, Yutaka; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Popovici, Daniela G.; Have, Margreet ten; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Understanding the effects of war on mental disorders is important for developing effective post-conflict recovery policies and programs. The current study uses cross-sectional, retrospectively reported data collected as part of the World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative to examine the associations of being a civilian in a war zone/region of terror in World War II with a range of DSM-IV mental disorders. Methods Adults (n= 3,370)who lived in countries directly involved in World War II in Europe and Japan were administered structured diagnostic interviews of lifetime DSM-IV mental disorders. The associations of war-related traumas with subsequent disorder onset-persistence were assessed with discrete-time survival analysis (lifetime prevalence) and conditional logistic regression (12-month prevalence). Results Respondents who were civilians in a war zone/region of terror had higher lifetime risks than other respondents of major depressive disorder (MDD; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 1.9) and anxiety disorder (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 2.0). The association of war exposure with MDD was strongest in the early years after the war, whereas the association with anxiety disorders increased over time. Among lifetime cases, war exposure was associated with lower past year risk of anxiety disorders. (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2, 0.7). Conclusions Exposure to war in World War II was associated with higher lifetime risk of some mental disorders. Whether comparable patterns will be found among civilians living through more recent wars remains to be seen, but should be recognized as a possibility by those projecting future needs for treatment of mental disorders. PMID:29119266

  10. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  11. OSART results II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States for enhancing the operational safety of nuclear power plants. OSART reviews are available to all countries with nuclear power plants in operation or approaching operation. Most of these countries have participated in the programme, by hosting one or more OSART missions or by making experts available to participate in missions. The observations of the OSART members are documented in technical notes which are then used as source material for the official OSART Report submitted to the government of the host country. The technical notes contain recommendations for improvements and description of commendable good practices. The same notes have been used to compile the present summary report which is intended for wide distribution to all organizations constructing, operating or regulating nuclear power plants. This report is the second in a series that was started by IAEA-TECDOC-458. The next report is planned to be a summary of OSART missions during the twelve months from June 1988 to May 1989

  12. An observational study of disk-population globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armandroff, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Integrated-light spectroscopy was obtained for twenty-seven globular clusters at the Ca II infrared triplet. Line strengths and radial velocities were measured from the spectra. For the well-studied clusters in the sample, the strength of the CA II lines is very well correlated with previous metallicity estimates obtained using a variety of techniques. The greatly reduced effect of interstellar extinction at these wavelengths compared to the blue region of the spectrum has permitted observations of some of the most heavily reddened clusters in the Galaxy. For several such clusters, the Ca II triplet metallicities are in poor agreement with metallicity estimates from infrared photometry by Malkan. Color-magnitude diagrams were constructed for six previously unstudied metal-rich globular clusters and for the well-studied cluster 47 Tuc. The V magnitudes of the horizontal branch stars in the six clusters are in poor agreement with previous estimates based on secondary methods. The horizontal branch morphologies and reddenings of the program clusters were also determined. Using the improved set of metallicities, radial velocities, and distance moduli, the spatial distribution, kinematics, and metallicity distribution of the Galactic globulars were analyzed. The revised data supports Zinn's conclusion that the metal-rich clusters form a highly flattened, rapidly rotating disk system, while the metal-poor clusters make up the familiar, spherically distributed, slowly rotating halo population. The scale height, metallicity distribution, and kinematics of the metal-rich globulars are in good agreement with those of the stellar thick disk. Luminosity functions were constructed, and no significant difference is found between disk and halo samples. Metallicity gradients seem to be present in the disk cluster system. The implications of these results for the formation and evol

  13. Accuracy of Korean-Mini-Mental Status Examination Based on Seoul Neuro-Psychological Screening Battery II Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, In-Woong; Beom, In-Gyu; Cho, Ji-Yeon; Son, Hyo-Rim

    2016-05-01

    The Korean-Mini-Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE) is a dementia-screening test that can be easily applied in both community and clinical settings. However, in 20% to 30% of cases, the K-MMSE produces a false negative response. This suggests that it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy of K-MMSE as a screening test for dementia, which can be achieved through comparison of K-MMSE and Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery (SNSB)-II results. The study included 713 subjects (male 534, female 179; mean age, 69.3±6.9 years). All subjects were assessed using K-MMSE and SNSB-II tests, the results of which were divided into normal and abnormal in 15 percentile standards. The sensitivity of the K-MMSE was 48.7%, with a specificity of 89.9%. The incidence of false positive and negative results totaled 10.1% and 51.2%, respectively. In addition, the positive predictive value of the K-MMSE was 87.1%, while the negative predictive value was 55.6%. The false-negative group showed cognitive impairments in regions of memory and executive function. Subsequently, in the false-positive group, subjects demonstrated reduced performance in memory recall, time orientation, attention, and calculation of K-MMSE items. The results obtained in the study suggest that cognitive function might still be impaired even if an individual obtained a normal score on the K-MMSE. If the K-MMSE is combined with tests of memory or executive function, the accuracy of dementia diagnosis could be greatly improved.

  14. Preliminary research results for the generation and diagnostics of high power ion beams on FLASH II accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Sun Jianfeng; He Xiaoping; Tang Junping; Wang Haiyang; Li Jingya; Ren Shuqing; Ouyang Xiaoping; Zhang Guoguang; Li Hongyu

    2004-01-01

    The preliminary experimental results of the generation and diagnostics of high-power ion beams on FLASH II accelerator are reported. The high-power ion beams presently are being produced in a pinched diode. The method for enhancing the ratio of ion to electron current is to increase the electron residing time by pinching the electron flow. Furthermore, electron beam pinching can be combined with electron reflexing to achieve ion beams with even higher efficiency and intensity. The anode plasma is generated by anode foil bombarded with electron and anode foil surface flashover. In recent experiments on FLASH II accelerator, ion beams have been produced with a current of 160 kA and an energy of 500 keV corresponding to an ion beam peak power of about 80 GW. The ion number and current of high power ion beams were determined by monitoring delayed radioactivity from nuclear reactions induced in a 12 C target by the proton beams. The prompt γ-rays and diode Bremsstrahlung X-rays were measured with a PIN semi-conductor detector and a plastic scintillator detector. The current density distribution of ion beam was measured with a biased ion collector array. The ion beams were also recorded with a CR-39 detector. (authors)

  15. Measurement of H, He, C and O Cosmic ray primaries preliminary results from the CREAM II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mognet, Samuel

    The direct measurement of the energy spectrum and composition of the incoming cosmic-ray flux at multi-TeV energies is of great interest. A feature located somewhere between 1000-10,000 TeV in the all-particle spectrum, referred to as the ‘knee’ characterized by a steepening of the power-law flux, has been observed by ground-based detectors for many years. It is believed to be related to an upper limit or change in efficiency of the Galactic accelerators of cosmic rays and/or properties of the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Presented here is a preliminary analysis of the flux of primary H, He, C and O cosmic-ray species measured using the CREAM II instrument. This analysis is conducted using the Penn State-built Timing Charge Detector, distinct from other charge detectors used in alternative published CREAM II results. The second Antarctic flight of the CREAM instrument had a ∼ 28 day flight in the 2005-2006 Antarctic flight season. The instrument was launched on December 16th 2005 from Willi...

  16. Fluorouracil and high-dose leucovorin with radiotherapy as adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giralt, J. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Rubio, D. [Medical Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Maldonado, X. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Naval, J. [Dept. of Surgery, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Casado, S. [Medical Oncology Service, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Lara, F. [Dept. of Surgery, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Rosello, J.M. [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Armengol, M. [Dept. of Surgery, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fluorouracil and high-dose leucovorin (5-FU/LV) with pelvic irradiation as adjuvant therapy for patients with macroscopical resected rectal or recto-sigmoid cancer. Following surgery for stages II-III primary (52) or recurrent rectal cancer (4), 56 patients received 8 cycles of 5-FU/LV and pelvic irradiation. 5-FU doses were 200 mgr/m{sup 2} for cycles 2-3 and 300 mgr/m{sup 2} for cycles 1 and 4-8. LV doses remained fixed at 200 mgr/m{sup 2}. Pelvic radiation was started in the third week, between the first and second cycle. The total dose was 50.4 Gy. No serve complications had been recorded. The incidence of grade 3 diarrhea was 19%. Three patients presented leukopenia grade 3 (5%). In 44 patients (78%) the planned treatment could be administered. The median follow-up was 40 months (range 22-66). Seven patients had a local relapse (13%) and 6 developed distant metastasis (10%). The 3-year disease-free survival was 72% and the overall survival was 76%. These preliminary results show that combined post-operative 5-FU/LV and pelvic radiotherapy are well tolerated and present a reasonable local control and survival rates. This adjuvant treatment should be evaluated in randomized trials. (orig.).

  17. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  18. An in-situ field ion microscope study of irradiated tungsten and tungsten alloys. II. The recovery behavior in Stages I and II: experimental results. Report No. 2347

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Seidman, D.N.

    1974-12-01

    The low temperature FIM isochronal annealing spectrum of four different purity levels of tungsten (resistivity ratios R of 5 . 10 4 , 1.5 . 10 4 , 50 and 15), irradiated in-situ with 30 keV W + ions to a dose of 5 . 10 12 ion cm -2 at 18 K, consisted of distinct recovery peaks at approximately 38, 50, 65 and 80 K with a small amount of recovery observed up to 120 K. The spectra were essentially identical between 18 and 120 K, but a fifth group of W specimens with approximately equal to 5 began to exhibit some deviations from the standard spectrum. This result indicates that the distribution of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced by the ion irradiations in the W FIM tips was such that the SIA-SIA reaction dominated the recovery behavior. The isochronal peak width at half-maximum for the 38 K long-range SIA migration peak and the Stage II peaks in pure W were shown to be approximately equal to the value predicted by a diffusion model. The isochronal recovery spectra for W--0.5 at. per cent and 3 at. per cent Re alloys were radically different from the isochronal recovery spectra of pure W. For both W--Re alloys, the amount of recovery for the long-range migration peak was suppressed, and, for the 3 at. per cent Re alloy, it was almost eliminated. High-purity W (R = 5 . 10 4 ), doped with 50-100 appm carbon, showed a 20 per cent reduction in the amount of recovery observed for the long-range migration peak at 38 K. (U.S.)

  19. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  20. Orbital Atherectomy for Treating De Novo Severely Calcified Coronary Narrowing (1-Year Results from the Pivotal ORBIT II Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Généreux, Philippe; Lee, Arthur C; Kim, Christopher Y; Lee, Michael; Shlofmitz, Richard; Moses, Jeffrey W; Stone, Gregg W; Chambers, Jeff W

    2015-06-15

    Percutaneous coronary intervention of severely calcified lesions has historically been associated with major adverse cardiac event (MACE) rates as high as 30%. In the ORBIT II (Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of OAS in Treating Severely Calcified Coronary Lesions) trial, treatment of de novo severely calcified lesions with the Diamondback 360° Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) resulted in low rates of procedural and 30-day adverse ischemic events. The long-term results from this trial have not been reported. We sought to determine the 1-year outcomes after orbital atherectomy of severely calcified coronary lesions. ORBIT II was a single-arm trial enrolling 443 subjects at 49 US sites with severely calcified lesions usually excluded from randomized trials. OAS utilizes a centrifugal differential sanding mechanism of action for plaque modification prior to stent implantation. After OAS drug-eluting stents were implanted in 88.2% of the patients. The primary safety end point was 30-day MACE, the composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or target vessel revascularization [TVR]. The present analysis reports the 1-year follow-up results from ORBIT II. One-year data were available in 433 of 443 patients (97.7%), with median follow-up time of 16.7 months. The 1-year MACE rate was 16.4%, including cardiac death (3.0%), myocardial infarction (9.7%), and target vessel revascularization (5.9%). The 1-year target lesion revascularization rate was 4.7%, and stent thrombosis occurred in 1 patient (0.2%). Independent predictors of 1-year MACE and target vessel revascularization were diameter stenosis at baseline and the use of bare-metal stents. In patients with severely calcified lesions who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, the use of OAS was associated with low rates of 1-year adverse ischemic events compared with historical controls. This finding has important clinical implications for the selection of optimum treatment strategies for patients

  1. THE CANDIDATE CLUSTER AND PROTOCLUSTER CATALOG (CCPC). II. SPECTROSCOPICALLY IDENTIFIED STRUCTURES SPANNING 2 <  z  < 6.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, J. R.; McGaugh, S. S. [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    The Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog (CCPC) is a list of objects at redshifts z  > 2 composed of galaxies with spectroscopically confirmed redshifts that are coincident on the sky and in redshift. These protoclusters are identified by searching for groups in volumes corresponding to the expected size of the most massive protoclusters at these redshifts. In CCPC1 we identified 43 candidate protoclusters among 14,000 galaxies between 2.74 <  z  < 3.71. Here we expand our search to more than 40,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts z  > 2.00, resulting in an additional 173 candidate structures. The most significant of these are 36 protoclusters with overdensities δ {sub gal} > 7. We also identify three large proto-supercluster candidates containing multiple protoclusters at z  = 2.3, 3.5 and z  = 6.56. Eight candidates with N  ≥ 10 galaxies are found at redshifts z  > 4.0. The last system in the catalog is the most distant spectroscopic protocluster candidate known to date at z  = 6.56.

  2. The role of chemometrics in single and sequential extraction assays: a review. Part II. Cluster analysis, multiple linear regression, mixture resolution, experimental design and other techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomino, Agnese; Abollino, Ornella; Malandrino, Mery; Mentasti, Edoardo

    2011-03-04

    Single and sequential extraction procedures are used for studying element mobility and availability in solid matrices, like soils, sediments, sludge, and airborne particulate matter. In the first part of this review we reported an overview on these procedures and described the applications of chemometric uni- and bivariate techniques and of multivariate pattern recognition techniques based on variable reduction to the experimental results obtained. The second part of the review deals with the use of chemometrics not only for the visualization and interpretation of data, but also for the investigation of the effects of experimental conditions on the response, the optimization of their values and the calculation of element fractionation. We will describe the principles of the multivariate chemometric techniques considered, the aims for which they were applied and the key findings obtained. The following topics will be critically addressed: pattern recognition by cluster analysis (CA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and other less common techniques; modelling by multiple linear regression (MLR); investigation of spatial distribution of variables by geostatistics; calculation of fractionation patterns by a mixture resolution method (Chemometric Identification of Substrates and Element Distributions, CISED); optimization and characterization of extraction procedures by experimental design; other multivariate techniques less commonly applied. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Planck early results. XXVI. Detection with Planck and confirmation by XMM-Newton of PLCK G266.6-27.3, an exceptionally X-ray luminous and massive galaxy cluster at z ~ 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present first results on PLCKG266.6-27.3, a galaxy cluster candidate detected at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 in the Planck All Sky survey. An XMM-Newton validation observation has allowed us to confirm that the candidate isa bona fide galaxy cluster. With these X-ray data we measure an accurate...

  4. Dark Matter Results from First 98.7 Days of Data from the PandaX-II Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andi; Xiao, Mengjiao; Cui, Xiangyi; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gong, Haowei; Guo, Xuyuan; Han, Ke; Hu, Shouyang; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xinglong; Liang, Hao; Lin, Qing; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixuan; Ren, Xiangxiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, Manbin; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jimin; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Xiang; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xionghui; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Huanqiao; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Xiaopeng

    2016-09-16

    We report the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter search results using the first physics-run data of the PandaX-II 500 kg liquid xenon dual-phase time-projection chamber, operating at the China JinPing underground laboratory. No dark matter candidate is identified above background. In combination with the data set during the commissioning run, with a total exposure of 3.3×10^{4}  kg day, the most stringent limit to the spin-independent interaction between the ordinary and WIMP dark matter is set for a range of dark matter mass between 5 and 1000  GeV/c^{2}. The best upper limit on the scattering cross section is found 2.5×10^{-46}  cm^{2} for the WIMP mass 40  GeV/c^{2} at 90% confidence level.

  5. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used.

  6. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D.

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 x 10 -8 Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used

  7. Distribution of shallow very low frequency earthquakes in the eastern Nankai trough influenced by a subducted oceanic ridge: Results from cluster analysis applied to ocean bottom seismographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, A.; Obana, K.; Araki, E.

    2016-12-01

    The activity of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in the shallow accretionary prism of the eastern Nankai trough has been observed frequently in the past. In this study, we investigated the distribution of VLFEs that occurred in October 2015, which were recorded by an array of broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) of DONET1 network. The size of the network is much wider (>80 km) compared to previous BBOBS networks that were used for close-in observations of VLFEs; therefore the new dataset provides a broader overview of the VLFE distribution of this region. We first located the detected events using conventional methods such as the envelope correlation method. However, the results seemed to be largely scattered due to noise and the effect of 3D structures that could not be properly handled. Then, we introduced hierarchal clustering analysis, based on measured travel time patterns among stations obtained for each event. The analyses enabled the assessment of relative locations among events. Finally, the locations of event-clusters were estimated, instead of individual events, so that the obtained locations seemed less scattered. The obtained results indicate that the VLFE distribution is strongly influenced by a subducted ridge (Park et al., 2003) that exists beneath the northeastern side of the DONET1 network. Though the VLFEs are distributed from an area near the outer ridge toward the trench axis in the region with a smooth plate boundary, they are clustered at a shallow depth near the outer ridge in the region of the rough plate boundary. The VLFEs are clustered on the landward side of the peak of the subducted ridge; this could be explained by an elevated pore pressure in the region caused by the low-permeability oceanic ridge that may clog the up-dip pathway of the fluid along the decollement zone. The along-strike variation of the stress state, inferred from the VLFE distribution, should be an important factor in assessing the strain release

  8. Formation of stable products from cluster-cluster collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanova, Denitsa; Grigoryan, Valeri G; Springborg, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of stable products from copper cluster-cluster collisions is investigated by using classical molecular-dynamics simulations in combination with an embedded-atom potential. The dependence of the product clusters on impact energy, relative orientation of the clusters, and size of the clusters is studied. The structures and total energies of the product clusters are analysed and compared with those of the colliding clusters before impact. These results, together with the internal temperature, are used in obtaining an increased understanding of cluster fusion processes

  9. False Immunohistochemical Results for Herpesviridae and Other Clusters of Differentiation Due To Biotin Intranuclear Inclusions in the Gestational Endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Rivasi

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions. Immunohistochemical investigations of the gestational endometrium (particularly in pregnancies near to term may yield false results for several herpes viruses, as well as for other immunohistochemical reactions obtained using the ABC method without prior biotin inactivation. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(1.000: 32-37

  10. A validation of direct grey Dancoff factors results for cylindrical cells in cluster geometry by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Leticia Jenisch; Bogado, Sergio; Vilhena, Marco T.

    2008-01-01

    The WIMS code is a well known and one of the most used codes to handle nuclear core physics calculations. Recently, the PIJM module of the WIMS code was modified in order to allow the calculation of Grey Dancoff factors, for partially absorbing materials, using the alternative definition in terms of escape and collision probabilities. Grey Dancoff factors for the Canadian CANDU-37 and CANFLEX assemblies were calculated with PIJM at five symmetrically distinct fuel pin positions. The results, obtained via Direct Method, i.e., by direct calculation of escape and collision probabilities, were satisfactory when compared with the ones of literature. On the other hand, the PIJMC module was developed to calculate escape and collision probabilities using Monte Carlo method. Modifications in this module were performed to determine Black Dancoff factors, considering perfectly absorbing fuel rods. In this work, we proceed further in the task of validating the Direct Method by the Monte Carlo approach. To this end, the PIJMC routine is modified to compute Grey Dancoff factors using the cited alternative definition. Results are reported for the mentioned CANDU-37 and CANFLEX assemblies obtained with PIJMC, at the same fuel pin positions as with PIJM. A good agreement is observed between the results from the Monte Carlo and Direct methods

  11. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  12. Efficacy and effectiveness of an rVSV-vectored vaccine expressing Ebola surface glycoprotein: interim results from the Guinea ring vaccination cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Restrepo, Ana Maria; Longini, Ira M; Egger, Matthias; Dean, Natalie E; Edmunds, W John; Camacho, Anton; Carroll, Miles W; Doumbia, Moussa; Draguez, Bertrand; Duraffour, Sophie; Enwere, Godwin; Grais, Rebecca; Gunther, Stephan; Hossmann, Stefanie; Kondé, Mandy Kader; Kone, Souleymane; Kuisma, Eeva; Levine, Myron M; Mandal, Sema; Norheim, Gunnstein; Riveros, Ximena; Soumah, Aboubacar; Trelle, Sven; Vicari, Andrea S; Watson, Conall H; Kéïta, Sakoba; Kieny, Marie Paule; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-08-29

    A recombinant, replication-competent vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine expressing a surface glycoprotein of Zaire Ebolavirus (rVSV-ZEBOV) is a promising Ebola vaccine candidate. We report the results of an interim analysis of a trial of rVSV-ZEBOV in Guinea, west Africa. For this open-label, cluster-randomised ring vaccination trial, suspected cases of Ebola virus disease in Basse-Guinée (Guinea, west Africa) were independently ascertained by Ebola response teams as part of a national surveillance system. After laboratory confirmation of a new case, clusters of all contacts and contacts of contacts were defined and randomly allocated 1:1 to immediate vaccination or delayed (21 days later) vaccination with rVSV-ZEBOV (one dose of 2 × 10(7) plaque-forming units, administered intramuscularly in the deltoid muscle). Adults (age ≥18 years) who were not pregnant or breastfeeding were eligible for vaccination. Block randomisation was used, with randomly varying blocks, stratified by location (urban vs rural) and size of rings (≤20 vs >20 individuals). The study is open label and masking of participants and field teams to the time of vaccination is not possible, but Ebola response teams and laboratory workers were unaware of allocation to immediate or delayed vaccination. Taking into account the incubation period of the virus of about 10 days, the prespecified primary outcome was laboratory-confirmed Ebola virus disease with onset of symptoms at least 10 days after randomisation. The primary analysis was per protocol and compared the incidence of Ebola virus disease in eligible and vaccinated individuals in immediate vaccination clusters with the incidence in eligible individuals in delayed vaccination clusters. This trial is registered with the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, number PACTR201503001057193. Between April 1, 2015, and July 20, 2015, 90 clusters, with a total population of 7651 people were included in the planned interim analysis. 48 of

  13. Stellar-mass black holes in young massive and open stellar clusters and their role in gravitational-wave generation - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar-remnant black holes (BH) in dense stellar clusters is now in the spotlight, especially due to their intrinsic ability to form binary black holes (BBH) through dynamical encounters, which potentially coalesce via gravitational-wave (GW) radiation. In this work, which is a continuation from a recent study (Paper I), additional models of compact stellar clusters with initial masses ≲ 105 M⊙ and also those with small fractions of primordial binaries (≲ 10 per cent) are evolved for long term, applying the direct N-body approach, assuming state-of-the-art stellar-wind and remnant-formation prescriptions. That way, a substantially broader range of computed models than that in Paper I is achieved. As in Paper I, the general-relativistic BBH mergers continue to be mostly mediated by triples that are bound to the clusters rather than happen among the ejected BBHs. In fact, the number of such in situ BBH mergers, per cluster, tends to increase significantly with the introduction of a small population of primordial binaries. Despite the presence of massive primordial binaries, the merging BBHs, especially the in situ ones, are found to be exclusively dynamically assembled and hence would be spin-orbit misaligned. The BBHs typically traverse through both the LISA's and the LIGO's detection bands, being audible to both instruments. The 'dynamical heating' of the BHs keeps the electron-capture-supernova (ECS) neutron stars (NS) from effectively mass segregating and participating in exchange interactions; the dynamically active BHs would also exchange into any NS binary within ≲1 Gyr. Such young massive and open clusters have the potential to contribute to the dynamical BBH merger detection rate to a similar extent as their more massive globular-cluster counterparts.

  14. Wear of control rod cluster assemblies and of instrumentation thimbles: first results obtained with the vibrateau wear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.; Hersant, D.

    1993-07-01

    Several REP components are affected by a particular sort of damage called impact/sliding wear. This kind of wear, originating from flow induced vibrations, affects loosely supported tubular structures. The main involved components are: - the RCCAs claddings and the guides tubes, - the instrumentation thimbles, - the fuel rods claddings, - the SG tubes. The R and D Division is concerned with studies aiming to understand and to master the phenomena leading to this wear. The MTC Branch is charged of the study of the wear itself. Tests are carried out on wear rigs to understand and to model wear mechanisms. The following work is related to the two first wear tests campaigns on the VIBRATEAU wear simulator: - a reproducibility test series in order to assess the spreading of the experimental results, - a comparative test series on surface treatments used to improve the components war resistance. (authors). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 4 refs

  15. Analysis of cosmetic results and complications in patients with Stage I and II breast cancer treated by biopsy and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.; Martinez, A.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Between May, 1973 and December, 1980, 78 Stage I and II breast carcinomas in 76 patients were treated by biopsy and radiotherapy with curative intent. With a maximum follow-up of 10 years, a minimum of 2 1/2 years and a median follow-up of 3 1/2 years, a loco-regional control rate of 97% was obtained. Cosmetic results and treatment complications were studied. Patient characteristics, tumor size, excisional biopsy technique, axillary staging procedure and radiotherapy techniques were analyzed and all found to be important factors affecting cosmesis and complications. The most common complications included transient breast edema observed in 51% of patients, breast fibrosis (usually mild) seen in 23% of the population, axillary hematoma or seroma formation in 15%, mild arm edema in 14% and basilic vein thrombosis in 10% of patients. The causes of these and other less frequent complications are discussed. The overall cosmetic result was excellent in 78%, satisfactory in 18% and unsatisfactory in 4% of patients. Recommendations for improving cosmetic results and minimizing complications are made

  16. Analysis of cosmetic results following primary radiation therapy for stages I and II carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.; Svensson, G.; Hellman, S.

    1979-01-01

    In 31 cases of Stages I or II carcinoma of the breast treated by primary radiation therapy, the cosmetic results were analyzed with regard to the details of treatment. Three principal treatment factors were identified which influenced the cosmetic outcome: (1) the extent and location of the biopsy procedure; (2) the time/dose factors of the radiation therapy; and (3) the technique of the radiation therapy. Cosmetic results were lessened when the biopsy procedure included a wide resection of adjacent breast tissue or when the biopsy scar was obvious. Increasing doses of external beam radiation were associated with greater degrees of retraction and fibrosis of the treated breast. All 6 patients who received 6000 rad by external beam had significant retraction, and fibrosis while patients who received 5000 rad rarely showed significant changes. Local boost doses by interstitial implantation did not diminsh the cosmetic outcome. All patients were treated using supervoltage equipment without bolus and skin changes secondary to treatment were infrequent. Seventeen patients developed localized areas of fibrosis and skin changes at the matchline between adjacent radiation fields. Recommendations are made for improved cosmetic results based on these findings

  17. Results of level-ii oncoplasty in breast cancer patients: an early experience from a tertiary care hospital in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, S.; Ghazanfar, S.; Quraishy, S.; Iqbal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy using Level II oncoplasty techniques. Methods: The prospective, non-randomised and descriptive study was conducted at the Department of Surgery, Unit IV of Civil Hospital, Karachi, from December 2009 to November 2011 in which 21 consecutive women with breast carcinoma who underwent wide local excision with remodeling mammoplasty were enrolled. All patients were reviewed by the surgeon and medical oncologist every 3 months for the first year. A grading system of 5-1 (excellent to poor) was employed and those with 3 or more were considered to have acceptable results. Results: The mean patient age was 45.38+-10.09 years (range: 26-70); 11 (52.3%) were premenopausal and 10 (47.7%) were postmenopausal; and 5 (27.8%) had family history of breast cancer. The mean size of the tumour determined by histology was 59.9+-3.18 mm (range: 25-150). Eight (30%) patients received preoperative chemotherapy to downsize the tumour. Three (14.2%) patients received preoperative radiotherapy. Mean operative time was 1.59+-0.52 hours (range: 1-2.5 hours). Mean volume of breast tissue excised from the breast containing the tumour was 545.27+-412.06 cm3 (range: 43.70-1456). Assessment of excision margins showed no tumour at the margins of 19 (90.4%) patients. Two (9.5%) patients had close but negative margins. The mean hospital stay was 7.10+-3.30 days (range: 4-15). There were early complications in 4 (19%) patients. One (4.76%) patient had late complications. Two (9.5%) patients developed tumour recurrence; both had an ipsilateral tumour recurrence. None of the patients developed metastases and one died of cardiac problem. Twenty (95.2%) patients had an acceptable post-surgical cosmetic result. Conclusion: Level II oncoplasty was a safe option in breast conservation allowing large sized and difficult-location tumour excision with good cosmetic outcome in the study

  18. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  19. The effect of a brief social intervention on the examination results of UK medical students: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacre Jane

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnic minority (EM medical students and doctors underperform academically, but little evidence exists on how to ameliorate the problem. Psychologists Cohen et al. recently demonstrated that a written self-affirmation intervention substantially improved EM adolescents' school grades several months later. Cohen et al.'s methods were replicated in the different setting of UK undergraduate medical education. Methods All 348 Year 3 white (W and EM students at one UK medical school were randomly allocated to an intervention condition (writing about one's own values or a control condition (writing about another's values, via their tutor group. Students and assessors were blind to the existence of the study. Group comparisons on post-intervention written and OSCE (clinical assessment scores adjusted for baseline written assessment scores were made using two-way analysis of covariance. All assessment scores were transformed to z-scores (mean = 0 standard deviation = 1 for ease of comparison. Comparisons between types of words used in essays were calculated using t-tests. The study was covered by University Ethics Committee guidelines. Results Groups were statistically identical at baseline on demographic and psychological factors, and analysis was by intention to treat [intervention group EM n = 95, W n = 79; control group EM n = 77; W n = 84]. As predicted, there was a significant ethnicity by intervention interaction [F(4,334 = 5.74; p = 0.017] on the written assessment. Unexpectedly, this was due to decreased scores in the W intervention group [mean difference = 0.283; (95% CI = 0.093 to 0.474] not improved EM intervention group scores [mean difference = -0.060 (95% CI = -0.268 to 0.148]. On the OSCE, both W and EM intervention groups outperformed controls [mean difference = 0.261; (95%CI = -0.047 to -0.476; p = 0.013]. The intervention group used more optimistic words (p Discussion Cohen et al.'s finding that a brief self

  20. Developmental Decline in the MicroRNA 199a (miR-199a)/miR-214 Cluster in Human Fetal Lung Promotes Type II Cell Differentiation by Upregulating Key Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ritu; Benlhabib, Houda; Guo, Wei; Lerma Cervantes, Connie B; Mendelson, Carole R

    2018-06-01

    The major surfactant protein, SP-A (a product of the SFTPA gene), serves as a marker of type II pneumocyte differentiation and surfactant synthesis. SFTPA expression in cultured human fetal lung (HFL) epithelial cells is upregulated by hormones that increase cyclic AMP (cAMP) and activate TTF-1/NKX2.1 and NF-κB. To further define mechanisms for type II cell differentiation and induction of SP-A, we investigated roles of microRNAs (miRNAs). Using microarray to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in HFL epithelial cells during type II cell differentiation in culture, we observed that members of the miRNA 199a (miR-199a)/miR-214 cluster were significantly downregulated during differentiation. Validated and predicted targets of miR-199a-3p/miR-199a-5p and miR-214, which serve roles in type II cell differentiation (COX-2, NF-κB p50/p65, and CREB1), and the CREB1 target, C/EBPβ, were coordinately upregulated. Accordingly, overexpression of miR-199a-5p, miR-199a-3p, or miR-214 mimics in cultured HFL epithelial cells decreased COX-2, NF-κB p50/p65, CREB1, and C/EBPβ proteins, with an associated inhibition of SP-A expression. Interestingly, overexpression of the EMT factor, ZEB1, which declines during cAMP-induced type II cell differentiation, increased pri-miR-199a and reduced the expression of the targets NF-κB/p50 and COX-2. Collectively, these findings suggest that the developmental decline in miR-199a/miR-214 in HFL causes increased expression of critical targets that enhance type II cell differentiation and SP-A expression. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Systematical investigations of the emission of carbon 14 from a TRIGA-Mark-II reactor - methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    Almost no information is available about the extent of the carbon-14 releases from a research reactor. For this reason this report is dealing with the emission of C-14 from the Vienna TRIGA-Mark-II reactor. In addition the resulting radiation exposure is estimated. Due to the low activity concentrations of C-14 in research reactor effluents special requirements are necessary for sampling and measuring. A technique providing both sufficient lower limit of detection and little effort of sample preparation was developed. Carbon dioxide was trapped by bubbling air taken from the stack through washing bottles containing an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide. After sampling a precipitate of CaCO 3 was formed and about 8 g of calcium carbonate were counted as a gel suspension by liquid scintillation counting. The formation of the gel was provided by mixing water with a scintillation cocktail originally developed for uptake of high quantities of aqueous solutions. The resulting lower limit of detection was about 50 Bq/kg carbon being equivalent to 9mBq/m 3 air. Concluding the measurements, which were carried out by weekly counting and a period of some 14 months, a normalized release rate of about 280 Bq (7, 1μCi) was found. This release rate is somewhat higher than the reported values for power reactors, because the main activity is produced by activation of air in experimental equipments. (author)

  2. In-situ tritium recovery from Li2O irradiated in fast neutron flux: BEATRIX-II initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, T.; Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Verrall, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    The BEATRIX-II experiment in FFTF is an in-situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of Li 2 O and its stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This experiment includes two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature transients and a larger temperature gradient specimen. During the first 85 days of the operating cycle of the reactor, the tritium recovery rate of a temperature transient capsule was examined as a function of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition and burnup. Temperature changes in the range from 525 to 625 degree C resulted in decreasing tritium inventory with increasing temperature. Lower gas flow rates resulted in slightly lower tritium release rates while gas composition changes affected the tritium release rate significantly, more than either flow rate or temperature changes. Three different sweep gases were used: He with 0.1% H 2 , He with 0.01% H 2 , and pure He. Decreasing the amount of hydrogen in the sweep gas decreased the steady-state release rate by as much as a factor of two. A temperature gradient capsule is more prototypic of the conditions expected in a fusion blanket and was designed to provide data that can be used in evaluating the operational parameters of a solid breeder in a blanket environment. The operation of this canister during the first 85 EFPD cycle suggests that Li 2 O is a viable solid breeder material. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Binuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) clusters in coordination polymers derived from semirigid tetracarboxylate and N‑donor ligands: syntheses, new topology structures and magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Ling [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); Liu, Guang-Zhen, E-mail: gzliuly@126.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); Xin, Ling-Yun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); Wang, Li-Ya [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmacy Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang, Henan 473061 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Two topologically new Mn(II) coordination polymers, namely ([Mn{sub 2}(H{sub 4}ipca)(4,4′-bpy){sub 1.5}(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.5}]·0.5CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH·2.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1) and (Mn{sub 4}(H{sub 4}ipca){sub 2}(bze)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}){sub n} (2) were prepared by the solvothermal reactions of Mn(II) acetate with 5-(2’,3’-dicarboxylphenoxy)isophthalic acid (H{sub 4}ipca) in the presence of different N-donor coligands (4,4′-bpy=4,4′-bipyridyl and bze=1, 4-bis(1-imidazoly)benzene). The single crystal X-ray diffractions reveal that two complexes display 3D metal-organic frameworks with binuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) units, respectively. Complex 1 features a (3,4,6)-connected porous framework based on dinuclear Mn(II) unit with the (4.5{sup 2}){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.6{sup 8}.8{sup 3}.9{sup 2})(5{sup 2}.8.9{sup 2}.10) new topology, and complex 2 possesses a (3,8)-connected network based on tetranuclear Mn(II) unit with the (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 4}.6{sup 14}.7{sup 7}.8{sup 2}.9) new topology. Magnetic analyses indicate that both two compounds show weak antiferromagnetic interactions within binuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) units. - Graphical abstract: Two topologically new Mn(II) metal-organic frameworks with dinuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) units respectively were assembled by using 5-(2′,3′-Dicarboxylphenoxy)isophthalic acid and N-donor ancillary coligands. Magnetic analysis revealed the existence of dominant antiferromagnetic interactions within the polynuclear Mn(II) units. - Highlights: • Mixed ligand strategy produces two topologically new MOFs with dinuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) respectively. • Magnetic fitting gives weak antiferromagnetic interactions within the polynuclear Mn(II) units.

  4. FAMILY HISTORY STUDY OF THE FAMILIAL COAGGREGATION OF BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER WITH AXIS I AND NON-BORDERLINE DRAMATIC CLUSTER AXIS II DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Barison, Leah K.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Reich, D. Bradford; Hudson, James I.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the familial coaggregation of borderline personality disorder (BPD) with a full array of axis I disorders and four axis II disorders (antisocial personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, and sadistic personality disorder) in the first-degree relatives of borderline probands and axis II comparison subjects. Four hundred and forty-five inpatients were interviewed about familial psychopathology using the Revi...

  5. Galaxy interactions and star formation: Results of a survey of global H-alpha emission in spiral galaxies in 8 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C.

    1990-01-01

    Kennicutt and Kent (1983) have shown that the global H alpha emission from a spiral galaxy is an indicator of the formation rate of massive stars. Moss, Whittle and Irwin (1988) have surveyed two clusters (Abell 347 and 1367) for galaxies with H alpha emission using a high dispersion objective prism technique. The purpose of the survey is to investigate environmental effects on star formation in spiral galaxies, and in particular to ascertain whether star formation is enhanced in cluster spirals. Approximately 20 percent of CGCG galaxies were detected in emission. Two plates of excellent quality were obtained for each of the two clusters, and galaxies were only identified to have emission if this was detected on both plates of a plate pair. In this way, plate flaws and other spurious identifications of emission could be rejected, and weak emission confirmed. The results of this survey have been discussed by Moss (1987). The detected galaxies are of types SO-a and later. The frequency with which galaxies are detected in emission increases towards later morphological type as expected (cf. Kennicutt and Kent 1983). There is no evidence of any dependence of the frequency of detected emission on the absolute magnitude of the galaxy (cf. Moss and Whittle 1990), but there is a strong correlation between a disturbed morphological appearance of the galaxy and the detection of emission. Furthermore it is found that the emission is more centrally concentrated in those galaxies which show a disturbed morphology. It may be noted that the objective prism plate gives a spectrum of a 400 A region around rest wavelength H alpha, but superposed on this is the H alpha emission from the galaxy which, because the light is essentially monochromatic, results in a true two-dimensional image of the H alpha distribution. The visual appearance of the emission on the prism plates was classified according to its diffuseness on a 5 point scale (very diffuse, diffuse, intermediate, compact, and

  6. Contribution of the calving interval to dairy farm profitability: results of a cluster analysis of FADN data for a major milk production area in southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dono

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the potential economic impact of good management of the calving interval on dairy farms. This involved the assessment of economics and production of a sample of farms, selected from the Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN, and located in Sardinia, Italy. Two farm models were derived from clustering the sample by k-means, which were validated by verifying their consistency in relation to nutritional needs, feed supply and milk production of the herds. Differences in indices of performance and dynamics were found (e.g. ROE is -0.8% vs 4.7%, with evident linkages between economic performance, greater efficiency, reproductive capacity, and potential turnover. The model better performing reflected greater economic feeding efficiency and a shorter calving interval. Hence, management, more than structural aspects, determined the economic results of the sampled farms.

  7. Outer Magnetospheric Boundaries Cluster Results

    CERN Document Server

    Paschmann, Goetz; Schwartz, S J

    2006-01-01

    When the stream of plasma emitted from the Sun (the solar wind) encounters Earth's magnetic field, it slows down and flows around it, leaving behind a cavity, the magnetosphere. The magnetopause is the surface that separates the solar wind on the outside from the Earth's magnetic field on the inside. Because the solar wind moves at supersonic speed, a bow shock must form ahead of the magnetopause that acts to slow the solar wind to subsonic speeds. Magnetopause, bow shock and their environs are rich in exciting processes in collisionless plasmas, such as shock formation, magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration and wave-particle interactions. They are interesting in their own right, as part of Earth's environment, but also because they are prototypes of similar structures and phenomena that are ubiquitous in the universe, having the unique advantage that they are accessible to in situ measurements. The boundaries of the magnetosphere have been the target of direct in-situ measurements since the beginning ...

  8. Shamba Maisha: Pilot agricultural intervention for food security and HIV health outcomes in Kenya: design, methods, baseline results and process evaluation of a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Craig R; Steinfeld, Rachel L; Weke, Elly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Hatcher, Abigail M; Shiboski, Stephen; Rheingans, Richard; Scow, Kate M; Butler, Lisa M; Otieno, Phelgona; Dworkin, Shari L; Weiser, Sheri D

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment of people living with HIV, morbidity and mortality remains unacceptably high in sub-Saharan Africa, largely due to parallel epidemics of poverty and food insecurity. We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a multisectoral agricultural and microfinance intervention (entitled Shamba Maisha) designed to improve food security, household wealth, HIV clinical outcomes and women's empowerment. The intervention was carried out at two HIV clinics in Kenya, one randomized to the intervention arm and one to the control arm. HIV-infected patients >18 years, on antiretroviral therapy, with moderate/severe food insecurity and/or body mass index (BMI) loan (~$150) to purchase the farming commodities, 2) a micro-irrigation pump, seeds, and fertilizer, and 3) trainings in sustainable agricultural practices and financial literacy. Enrollment of 140 participants took four months, and the screening-to-enrollment ratio was similar between arms. We followed participants for 12 months and conducted structured questionnaires. We also conducted a process evaluation with participants and stakeholders 3-5 months after study start and at study end. Baseline results revealed that participants at the two sites were similar in age, gender and marital status. A greater proportion of participants at the intervention site had a low BMI in comparison to participants at the control site (18% vs. 7%, p = 0.054). While median CD4 count was similar between arms, a greater proportion of participants enrolled at the intervention arm had a detectable HIV viral load compared with control participants (49% vs. 28%, respectively, p loans, agricultural challenges due to weather patterns, and a challenging partnership with the microfinance institution. We expect the results from this pilot study to provide useful data on the impacts of livelihood interventions and will help in the design of a definitive cluster RCT. This trial is registered at Clinical

  9. From collisions to clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    -principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong