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Sample records for cluster star formation

  1. Star Cluster Formation and Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R; Arce, Hector G; Dale, James E; Gutermuth, Robert; Klein, Richard I; Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-01

    Stars do not generally form in isolation. Instead, they form in clusters, and in these clustered environments newborn stars can have profound effects on one another and on their parent gas clouds. Feedback from clustered stars is almost certainly responsible for a number of otherwise puzzling facts about star formation: that it is an inefficient process that proceeds slowly when averaged over galactic scales; that most stars disperse from their birth sites and dissolve into the galactic field over timescales $\\ll 1$ Gyr; and that newborn stars follow an initial mass function (IMF) with a distinct peak in the range $0.1 - 1$ $M_\\odot$, rather than an IMF dominated by brown dwarfs. In this review we summarize current observational constraints and theoretical models for the complex interplay between clustered star formation and feedback.

  2. When efficient star formation drives cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, G

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the star formation efficiency in cluster forming cores on the evolution of the mass in star clusters over the age range 1-100Myr, when star clusters undergo their infant weight-loss/mortality phase. Assuming a constant formation rate of gas-embedded clusters and a weak tidal field, we show that the ratio between the total mass in stars bound to the clusters over that age range and the total mass in stars initially formed in gas-embedded clusters is a strongly increasing function of the averaged local SFE, with little influence from any assumed core mass-radius relation. Our results suggest that, for young starbursts with estimated tidal field strength and known recent star formation history, observed cluster-to-star mass ratios, once corrected for the undetected clusters, constitute promising probes of the local SFE, without the need of resorting to gas mass estimates. Similarly, the mass ratio of stars which remain in bound clusters at the end of the infant mortality/weight-loss ...

  3. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  4. Star formation in dense clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Philip C

    2011-01-01

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion, and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star IMF from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosi...

  5. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  6. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Taranu, Dan S; Balogh, Michael L; Smith, Russell J; Power, Chris; Krane, Brad

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation within rich clusters, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from lambdaCDM cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. The orbits are combined with models of star formation followed by quenching in the cluster environment to predict colours and spectroscopic line indices of satellite galaxies. Simple models with only halo mass-dependent quenching and without environmental (i.e. cluster-dependent) quenching fail to reproduce the observed cluster-centric colour and absorption linestrength gradients. Models in which star formation is instantly quenched at the virial radius also fail to match the observations. Better matches to the data are achieved by more complicated bulge-disc models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc quenching depends on the cluster environment. In the most successful models quenching begins at pericentre, operating on an exponential timescale of 2 -- 3...

  7. Modeling Formation of Globular Clusters: Beacons of Galactic Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Oleg Y

    2010-01-01

    Modern hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation are able to predict accurately the rates and locations of the assembly of giant molecular clouds in early galaxies. These clouds could host star clusters with the masses and sizes of real globular clusters. I describe current state-of-the-art simulations aimed at understanding the origin of the cluster mass function and metallicity distribution. Metallicity bimodality of globular cluster systems appears to be a natural outcome of hierarchical formation and gradually declining fraction of cold gas in galaxies. Globular cluster formation was most prominent at redshifts z>3, when massive star clusters may have contributed as much as 20% of all galactic star formation.

  8. Star Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gieles, M.

    1993-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of stars and star clusters. These complexes share similar properties with giant molecular clouds, from which they are formed. Many (70%) of the young clusters will not survive the fist 10 Myr, due to t...

  9. Formation of runaway stars in a star-cluster potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taeho; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Perna, Rosalba

    2017-09-01

    We study the formation of runaway stars due to binary-binary (2+2) interactions in young star-forming clusters and/or associations. This is done using a combination of analytic methods and numerical simulations of 2+2 scattering interactions, both in isolation and in a homogeneous background potential. We focus on interactions that produce two single stars and a binary, and study the outcomes as a function of the depth of the background potential, within a range typical of cluster cores. As reference parameters for the observational properties, we use those observed for the system of runaway stars AE Aur and μ Col and binary ι Ori. We find that the outcome fractions have no appreciable dependence on the depth of the potential, and neither do the velocities of the ejected single stars. However, as the potential gets deeper and a larger fraction of binaries remain trapped, two binary populations emerge, with the escaped component having higher speeds and shorter semimajor axes than the trapped one. Additionally, we find that the relative angles between the ejected products are generally large. In particular, the angle between the ejected fastest star and the escaped binary is typically ≳120°-135°, with a peak at around 160°. However, as the potential gets deeper, the angle distribution becomes broader. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the interpretation of the properties of the runaway stars AE Aur and μ Col.

  10. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, L Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Beerman, Lori C; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Bell, Eric F; Dolphin, Andrew E; Larsen, Søren S; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D

    2016-01-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey dataset to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency ($\\Gamma$), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda's cluster and field populations over the last $\\sim$300 Myr. We measure $\\Gamma$ of 4-8% for young, 10-100 Myr old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These $\\Gamma$ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an HI-dominated, low intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where $\\Gamma$ increases with increasing star formation r...

  11. The star formation history of the Large Magellanic Cloud as seen by star clusters and stars

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to test to what extent the star cluster population of a galaxy can be utilised to constrain or estimate the star formation history, with the Large Magellanic Cloud as our testbed. We follow two methods to extract information about the star formation rate from star clusters, either using only the most massive clusters (Maschberger & Kroupa 2007) or using the whole cluster population, albeit this is only possible for a shorter age span. We compare these results with the ...

  12. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Villa, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. We aim to constrain the amount of star formation happening in long-lived clusters for four galaxies through the homogeneous study of field stars and star clusters. Using HST/ACS-WFPC2 images of the galaxies NGC45, NGC1313, NGC5236 and NGC7793, we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Masses and ages of star clusters are estimated using simple stellar population model fitting. Comparing observed and modeled luminosity functions we estimate cluster formation rates. By randomly sampling the stellar IMF, we construct artificial star clusters and quantify how stochastic effects influence cluster detection, integrated colors and age estimates. Star formation rates appear to be constant over the past 10-100 Myr. The number of clu...

  13. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%-8% for young, 10-100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  14. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Zeimann, G. R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pope, A.; Alberts, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brown, M. J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Chary, R.-R. [Spitzer Science Center, MC 220-6, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Galametz, A. [INAF—Osservatorio di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Jannuzi, B. T. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85121 (United States); Miller, E. D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Moustakas, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  15. Star formation properties of galaxy cluster A1767

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abell 1767 is a dynamically relaxed, cD cluster of galaxies with a redshift of 0.0703. Among 250 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within a projected radius of 2.5r_{200}, 243 galaxies (~ 97%) are spectroscopically covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on this homogeneous spectral sample, the stellar evolutionary synthesis code, STARLIGHT, is applied to investigate the stellar populations and star formation histories (SFHs) of cluster galaxies. The star formation properties of galaxies, such as mean stellar ages, metallicities, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs), are presented as the functions of local galaxy density. Strong environmental effect is found in the manner that massive galaxies in the high-density core region of cluster tend to have higher metallicities, longer mean stellar ages, and lower specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and their recent star formation activities have been remarkably suppressed. In addition, the correlations of the metallicity and SSFR...

  16. The Era of Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brodwin, M; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zeimann, G R; Snyder, G F; Mancone, C L; Pope, A; Eisenhardt, P R; Stern, D; Alberts, S; Ashby, M L N; Brown, M J I; Chary, R -R; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A; Gettings, D P; Jannuzi, B T; Miller, E D; Moustakas, J; Moustakas, L A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at $1 1.35$. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/MIPS observations at 24 $\\mu$m, along with robust optical+IRAC photometric redshifts and SED-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that $z\\sim 1.4$ represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at $z>1.4$ environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. Combining these obse...

  17. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  18. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. Ultimately this may lead to a better understanding of star formation in galaxies, and galaxy evolution in general. Aims: We aim to constrain the amount of star formation happening in long-lived clusters for four galaxies through the homogeneous, simultaneous study of field stars and star clusters. Methods: Using HST/ACS and HST/WFPC2 images of the galaxies NGC 45, NGC 1313, NGC 5236, and NGC 7793, we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Masses and ages of star clusters are estimated using simple stellar population model fitting. Comparing observed and modeled luminosity functions, we estimate cluster formation rates. By randomly sampling the stellar initial mass function (SIMF), we construct artificial star clusters and quantify how stochastic effects influence cluster detection, integrated colors, and age estimates. Results: Star formation rates appear to be constant over the past 107 - 108 years within the fields covered by our observations. The number of clusters identified per galaxy varies, with a few detected massive clusters (M ≥ 105 M⊙) and a few older than 1 Gyr. Among our sample of galaxies, NGC 5236 and NGC 1313 show high star and cluster formation rates, while NGC 7793 and NGC 45 show lower values. We find that stochastic sampling of the SIMF has a strong impact on the estimation of ages, colors, and completeness for clusters with masses ≤ 103 - 104 M⊙, while the effect is less pronounced for high masses. Stochasticity also makes size measurements highly uncertain at young ages (τ ≲ 108 yr), making it difficult to distinguish between clusters and stars based on sizes. Conclusions: The ratio of star formation happening in clusters (Γ) compared to

  19. The formation and dynamical evolution of young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed a variety of young star clusters, including embedded systems, young massive clusters, and associations. We study the formation and dynamical evolution of these clusters using a combination of simulations and theoretical models. Our simulations start with a turbulent molecular cloud that collapses under its own gravity. The stars are assumed to form in the densest regions in the collapsing cloud after an initial free-fall times of the molecular cloud. The dynamical evolution of these stellar distributions are continued by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The molecular clouds typical for the Milky Way Galaxy tend to form embedded clusters which evolve to resemble open clusters. The associations were initially considerably more clumpy, but lost their irregularity in about a dynamical time scale due to the relaxation process. The densest molecular clouds, which are absent in the Milky Way but are typical in starburst galaxies, form massive young star clusters. They indeed ar...

  20. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier, E-mail: kuza@umich.edu [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 72-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michocán 58089, México (Mexico)

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  1. Implications for the formation of star clusters from extra-galactic star-formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C; Larsen, S S

    2004-01-01

    Observations indicate that young massive star clusters in spiral and dwarf galaxies follow a relation between luminosity of the brightest young cluster and the star-formation rate (SFR) of the host galaxy, in the sense that higher SFRs lead to the formation of brighter clusters. Assuming that the empirical relation between maximum cluster luminosity and SFR reflects an underlying similar relation between maximum cluster mass (M_ecl,max) and SFR, we compare the resulting SFR(M_ecl,max) relation with different theoretical models. The empirical correlation is found to suggest that individual star clusters form on a free-fall time-scale with their pre-cluster molecular-cloud-core radii typically being a few pc independent of mass. The cloud cores contract by factors of 5 to 10 while building-up the embedded cluster. A theoretical SFR(M_ecl,max) relation in very good agreement with the empirical correlation is obtained if the cluster mass function of a young population has a Salpeter exponent beta approx. 2.35 and...

  2. Star Formation in High-Redshift Cluster Ellipticals

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Cory R; Snyder, Gregory F; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Stanford, S A; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Stern, Daniel; Zeimann, Gregory R; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter R M; Mancone, Conor L; Moustakas, John

    2014-01-01

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive ($M_{\\star}>10^{10.1}M_{\\odot}$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift ($1.0 < z < 1.5$) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 $\\mu$m data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local Universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at $1 < z < 1.5$. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in $1 < z < 1.5$ clusters. We find that new ETGs are l...

  3. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  4. Star formation in shocked cluster spirals and their tails

    CERN Document Server

    Roediger, E; Owers, M S; Ebeling, H; Sun, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in clusters revealed details of the stripping process, i.e., the truncation of all interstellar medium (ISM) phases and of star formation (SF) in the disk, and multiphase star-forming tails. Some stripped galaxies, in particular in merging clusters, develop spectacular star-forming tails, giving them a jellyfish-like appearance. In merging clusters, merger shocks in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are thought to have overrun these galaxies, enhancing the ambient ICM pressure and thus triggering SF, gas stripping and tail formation. We present idealised hydrodynamical simulations of this scenario, including standard descriptions for SF and stellar feedback. To aid the interpretation of recent and upcoming observations, we focus on particular structures and dynamics in SF patterns in the remaining gas disk and in the near tails, which are easiest to observe. The observed jellyfish morphology is qualitatively reproduced for, both, face-on and edge-on st...

  5. Starbursts versus Truncated Star Formation in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, J A; Caldwell, N; Chaboyer, B; Rose, James A.; Gaba, Alejandro E.; Caldwell, Nelson; Chaboyer, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopy, B and R bandpass imaging, and 21 cm observations of a sample of early-type galaxies in nearby clusters which are known to be either in a star-forming phase or to have had star formation which recently terminated. From the long-slit spectra, obtained with the Blanco 4-m telescope, we find that emission lines in the star-forming cluster galaxies are significantly more centrally concentrated than in a sample of field galaxies. The broadband imaging reveals that two currently star-forming early-type galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster have blue nuclei, again indicating that recent star formation has been concentrated. In contrast, the two galaxies for which star formation has already ended show no central color gradient. The Pegasus I galaxy with the most evident signs of ongoing star formation (NGC7648), exhibits signatures of a tidal encounter. Neutral hydrogen observations of that galaxy with the Arecibo radiotelescope reveal the presence of ~4 x 10^8 solar masses of HI. Arecib...

  6. Detecting Star Formation in Brightest Cluster Galaxies with GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Amalia; Donahue, Megan

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of GALEX observations of 17 cool core (CC) clusters of galaxies. We show that GALEX is easily capable of detecting star formation in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) out to $z\\ge 0.45$ and 50-100 kpc. In most of the CC clusters studied, we find significant UV luminosity excesses and colors that strongly suggest recent and/or current star formation. The BCGs are found to have blue UV colors in the center that become increasingly redder with radius, indicating that the UV signature of star formation is most easily detected in the central regions. Our findings show good agreement between UV star formation rates and estimates based on H$\\alpha$ observations. IR observations coupled with our data indicate moderate-to-high dust attenuation. Comparisons between our UV results and the X-ray properties of our sample suggest clear correlations between UV excess, cluster entropy, and central cooling time, confirming that the star formation is directly and incontrovertibly related to the cooling g...

  7. STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Cory R.; Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zeimann, Gregory R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, MC 220-6, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John, E-mail: cwagner@astro.queensu.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.1} M {sub ☉}) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift (1.0 < z < 1.5) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red-sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 μm data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at 1 < z < 1.5. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in 1 < z < 1.5 clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from z ∼ 1.5 → 1.25. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming (SFR ≥ 26 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at z ≳ 1.25, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs—likely mergers, at least among the most massive—were both recent and gas-rich.

  8. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, Nicolas; Emsellem, Eric; Renaud, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this `wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a prerequisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the ongoing local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destroyed via tidal forces, or have high angular momentum preventing them to interact with the NC and contribute to its growth. The proposed updated scenario emphasizes the role of gas reservoirs associated with the densest star clusters formed in a gas-rich low-mass galaxy.

  9. Star Cluster Formation in Cosmological Simulations. I. Properties of Young Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Meng, Xi; Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new implementation of star formation in cosmological simulations by considering star clusters as a unit of star formation. Cluster particles grow in mass over several million years at the rate determined by local gas properties, with high time resolution. The particle growth is terminated by its own energy and momentum feedback on the interstellar medium. We test this implementation for Milky Way-sized galaxies at high redshift by comparing the properties of model clusters with observations of young star clusters. We find that the cluster initial mass function is best described by a Schechter function rather than a single power law. In agreement with observations, at low masses the logarithmic slope is α ≈ 1.8{--}2, while the cutoff at high mass scales with the star formation rate (SFR). A related trend is a positive correlation between the surface density of the SFR and fraction of stars contained in massive clusters. Both trends indicate that the formation of massive star clusters is preferred during bursts of star formation. These bursts are often associated with major-merger events. We also find that the median timescale for cluster formation ranges from 0.5 to 4 Myr and decreases systematically with increasing star formation efficiency. Local variations in the gas density and cluster accretion rate naturally lead to the scatter of the overall formation efficiency by an order of magnitude, even when the instantaneous efficiency is kept constant. Comparison of the formation timescale with the observed age spread of young star clusters provides an additional important constraint on the modeling of star formation and feedback schemes.

  10. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters (`star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster (`main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted onto the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2 - 5] × 105M⊙ can accrete more than 105M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  11. Gamma Rays from Star Formation in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission. The detection of gamma rays from star-forming galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity (Ackermann et. al. 2012). Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 micrometers) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study we apply the relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities derived in Ackermann et. al. 2012 to a sample of galaxy clusters from Ackermann et. al. 2010 in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with sta...

  12. Formation of stars and clusters over cosmological time

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    The concept that stars form in the modern era began some 60 years ago with the key observation of expanding OB associations. Now we see that these associations are an intermediate scale in a cascade of hierarchical structures that begins on the ambient Jeans length close to a kiloparsec in size and continues down to the interiors of clusters, perhaps even to binary and multiple stellar systems. The origin of this structure lies with the dynamical nature of cloud and star formation, driven by supersonic turbulence and interstellar gravity. Dynamical star formation is relatively fast compared to the timescale for cosmic accretion, and then the star formation rate keeps up with the accretion rate, leading to a sequence of near-equilibrium states during galaxy formation and evolution. Dynamical star formation also helps to explain the formation of bound clusters, which require a local efficiency that exceeds the average by more than an order of magnitude. Efficiency increases with density in a hierarchically stru...

  13. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M$_\\odot$, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  14. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillard, Nicolas; Renaud, Florent

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this 'wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a pre-requisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the on-going local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destro...

  15. The formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Moupiya; Li, Yuexing; Charlton, Jane; Hernquist, Lars; Knebe, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Observations of globular clusters show that they have universal lognormal mass functions with a characteristic peak at $\\sim 2\\times 10^{5}\\, {\\rm{M_{\\odot}}}$, but the origin of this peaked distribution is highly debated. Here we investigate the formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations performed with two different codes in order to mitigate numerical artifacts. We find that massive star clusters in the range of $\\sim 10^{5.5} - 10^{7.5}\\, {\\rm{M_{\\odot}}}$ form preferentially in the highly-shocked regions produced by galaxy interactions. The nascent cluster-forming clouds have high gas pressures in the range of $P/k \\sim 10^8 - 10^{12}\\, \\rm{K}\\,\\rm{cm^{-3}}$, which is $\\sim 10^4 - 10^8$ times higher than the typical pressure of the interstellar medium but consistent with recent observations of a pre-super star cluster cloud in the Antennae Galaxies. Furthermore, these massive star clusters have quasi-lognormal initial mass functions wi...

  16. Quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, A.; Roehlly, Y.; Fossati, M.; Buat, V.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Ciesla, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Serra, P.

    2016-11-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SEDs of the target galaxies were fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies was parametrised using a specific star formation history with two free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These two parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism, which acts on long timescales when starvation processes are at work, but is rapid and efficient when ram pressure occurs. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combined twenty photometric bands in the UV to far-infrared in a new way with three age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution (R 1000) integrated spectroscopy and with Hα narrow-band imaging data. The use of a truncated star formation history significantly increases the quality of the fit in HI-deficient galaxies of the sample, that is to say, in those objects whose atomic gas content has been removed during the interaction with the hostile cluster environment. The typical quenching age of the perturbed late-type galaxies is QA ≲ 300 Myr whenever the activity of star formation is reduced by 50% 80%, while that of the quiescent early-type objects is QA ≃ 1-3 Gyr. The fraction of late-type galaxies with a star formation activity reduced by QF > 80% and with an HI-deficiency parameter HI-def > 0.4 drops by a factor of 5 from the inner half virial radius of the Virgo cluster (R/Rvir 4). The efficient quenching of the star formation activity observed in Virgo suggests that the dominant stripping process is ram pressure. We discuss the implication of this result in

  17. Stellar Collisions in Young Clusters: Formation of (Very) Massive Stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Marc

    2007-01-01

    In young star clusters, the density can be high enough and the velocity dispersion low enough for stars to collide and merge with a significant probability. This has been suggested as a possible way to build up the high-mass portion of the stellar mass function and as a mechanism leading to the formation of one or two very massive stars (M > 150 Msun) through a collisional runaway. I quickly review the standard theory of stellar collisions, covering both the stellar dynamics of dense clusters and the hydrodynamics of encounters between stars. The conditions for collisions to take place at a significant rate are relatively well understood for idealised spherical cluster models without initial mass segregation, devoid of gas and composed of main-sequence (MS) stars. In this simplified situation, 2-body relaxation drives core collapse through mass segregation and a collisional phase ensues if the core collapse time is shorter than the MS lifetime of the most massive stars initially present. The outcome of this p...

  18. The role of low-mass star clusters in massive star formation. The Orion Case

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Jimenez-Serra, I; Rodriguez-Franco, A

    2013-01-01

    To distinguish between the different theories proposed to explain massive star formation, it is crucial to establish the distribution, the extinction, and the density of low-mass stars in massive star-forming regions. We analyze deep X-ray observations of the Orion massive star-forming region using the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) catalog. We studied the stellar distribution as a function of extinction, with cells of 0.03 pc x 0.03 pc, the typical size of protostellar cores. We derived stellar density maps and calculated cluster stellar densities. We found that low-mass stars cluster toward the three massive star-forming regions: the Trapezium Cluster (TC), the Orion Hot Core (OHC), and OMC1-S. We derived low-mass stellar densities of 10^{5} stars pc^{-3} in the TC and OMC1-S, and of 10^{6} stars pc^{-3} in the OHC. The close association between the low-mass star clusters with massive star cradles supports the role of these clusters in the formation of massive stars. The X-ray observations show for ...

  19. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. Ultimately this may lead to a bet

  20. STAR FORMATION AND RELAXATION IN 379 NEARBY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and level of relaxation in a sample of 379 galaxy clusters at z < 0.2. We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure cluster membership and level of relaxation, and to select star-forming galaxies based on mid-infrared emission detected with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. For galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub r} < −19.5, we find an inverse correlation between SF fraction and cluster relaxation: as a cluster becomes less relaxed, its SF fraction increases. Furthermore, in general, the subtracted SF fraction in all unrelaxed clusters (0.117 ± 0.003) is higher than that in all relaxed clusters (0.097 ± 0.005). We verify the validity of our SF calculation methods and membership criteria through analysis of previous work. Our results agree with previous findings that a weak correlation exists between cluster SF and dynamical state, possibly because unrelaxed clusters are less evolved relative to relaxed clusters.

  1. The life-cycle of star formation in distant clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, A J; Ellis, Richard S; Couch, W J; Smail, I; Sharples, R M

    1995-01-01

    We analyse the detailed distribution of star-forming and post-starburst members in three distant (z = 0.31) galaxy clusters in terms of evolutionary sequences that incorporate secondary bursts of star formation on pre-existing stellar populations. Using the number density of spectroscopically-confirmed members on the EW(H\\delta) versus B-R plane from existing data, and for a larger K'-limited sample on the U-I versus I-K' plane from newly-acquired infrared images, we demonstrate that the proportion of cluster members undergoing secondary bursts of star formation during the last ~2 Gyr prior to the epoch of observation is probably as high as 30 per cent of the member galaxies. A key observation leading to this conclusion is the high proportion of H\\delta strong galaxies in all three clusters. The evolutionary modelling, whilst necessarily approximate, returns the correct proportions of galaxies in various stages of the star formation cycle both in terms of spectral and colour properties. HST images for the thr...

  2. Star cluster formation in cosmological simulations. I. properties of young clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Meng, Xi; Semenov, Vadim A; Kravtsov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a new implementation of star formation in cosmological simulations, by considering star clusters as a unit of star formation. Cluster particles grow in mass over several million years at the rate determined by local gas properties, with high time resolution. The particle growth is terminated by its own energy and momentum feedback on the interstellar medium. We test this implementation for Milky Way-sized galaxies at high redshift, by comparing the properties of model clusters with observations of young star clusters. We find that the cluster initial mass function is best described by a Schechter function rather than a single power law. In agreement with observations, at low masses the logarithmic slope is $\\alpha\\approx 1.8-2$, while the cutoff at high mass scales with the star formation rate. A related trend is a positive correlation between the surface density of star formation rate and fraction of stars contained in massive clusters. Both trends indicate that the formation of massive star clust...

  3. Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744

    CERN Document Server

    Rawle, T D; Egami, E; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Richard, J; Santos, J S; Valtchanov, I; Walth, G; Bouy, H; Haines, C P; Okabe, N

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of star-forming (SF) galaxies in the HST Frontier Field recent cluster merger A2744 (z=0.308). Wide-field, ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) imaging enables a direct constraint of the total star formation rate (SFR) for 53 cluster galaxies, with SFR{UV+IR}=343+/-10 Msun/yr. Within the central 4 arcmin (1.1 Mpc) radius, the integrated SFR is complete, yielding a total SFR{UV+IR}=201+/-9 Msun/yr. Focussing on obscured star formation, this core region exhibits a total SFR{IR}=138+/-8 Msun/yr, a mass-normalised SFR{IR} of Sigma{SFR}=11.2+/-0.7 Msun/yr per 10^14 Msun and a fraction of IR-detected SF galaxies f{SF}=0.080(+0.010,-0.037). Overall, the cluster population at z~0.3 exhibits significant intrinsic scatter in IR properties (total SFR{IR}, Tdust distribution) apparently unrelated to the dynamical state: A2744 is noticeably different to the merging Bullet cluster, but similar to several relaxed clusters. However, in A2744 we identify a trail of SF sources including jellyfish galax...

  4. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Postman, Marc [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  5. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N.; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and Hα (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Hα luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Hα morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Hα luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Hα ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) ~ 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from ~0.05 M sun yr-1 in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to ~5 M sun yr-1 in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, Hα, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14+18 - 8%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  6. star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 Cluster Survey. We use Wide Field Camera 3 grism data to spectroscopically identify Hα emitters in both the cores of galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 star-forming galaxies in galaxy clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  7. Star Formation and Chemical Enrichment for Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林清; 束成钢; 常瑞香; 赵君亮

    2001-01-01

    A model considering gas outflows due to supernova explosions is developed for the star formation and chemical enrichment for the globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way galaxy. Through Monte Carlo simulations, the observed global properties of GCs can be well reproduced, including the metallicity distribution, no-correlation between cluster masses and galactocentric distances, etc. The predicted mass function of the parent clouds for the observed GCs at present day can be well described as a power law with the index of-1.8, which is consistent with the current observations for the molecular clouds.

  8. Progressive star formation in the young galactic super star cluster NGC 3603

    CERN Document Server

    Beccari, Giacomo; De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Andersen, Morten; Panagia, Nino; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C Marcella; Disney, Michael J; Dopita, Michael A; Frogel, Jay A; Hall, Donald N B; Holtzman, Jon A; Kimble, Randy A; McCarthy, Patrick J; O'Connell, Robert W; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I; Trauger, John T; Walker, Alistair R; Whitmore, Bradley C; Windhorst, Rogier A

    2010-01-01

    Early release science observations of the cluster NGC3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished HST allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with Halpha excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with Halpha excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  9. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-12-10

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  10. The extended star formation history of the star cluster NGC 2154 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Baume, G; Costa, E; Méndez, R A; Girardi, L; Baume, Gustavo; Carraro, Giovanni; Costa, Edgardo; B., Rene' A. Mendez; Girardi, Leo

    2006-01-01

    The color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star cluster NGC 2154 and its adjacent field, has been analyzed using Padova stellar models to determine the cluster's fundamental parameters and its Star Formation History (SFH). Deep $BR$ CCD photometry, together with synthetic CMDs and Integrated Luminosity Functions (ILFs), has allowed us to infer that the cluster experienced an extended star formation period of about 1.2 Gyrs, which began approximately 2.3 Gyr and ended 1.1 Gyr ago. The physical reality of such a prolonged period of star formation is however questionable, and could be the result of inadequacies in the stellar evolutionary tracks themselves. A substantial fraction of binaries (70%) seems to exist in NGC 2154.

  11. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fang Huang; Jin-Zeng Li

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H Ⅱ region IC 1396 and its star forming activity,in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the nearand far-infrared were employed.The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H Ⅱ region,HD 206267.The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission,selected based on archived 2MASS data,reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region.One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37.The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H Ⅱ region.All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data.An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I,15 CLASS Ⅱ and 15 CLASS Ⅲ sources in IC 1396.Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis.Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages,the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one.This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region.Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE,on the other hand,indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111,which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation.So we infer that the star formation process in this H Ⅱ region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  12. Star Formation in Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Haynes, Martha P.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Troischt, Parker; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around 36 nearby (zALFALFA HI observations, optical observations, and digital databases like SDSS, and incorporates work undertaken by faculty and students at different institutions within the UAT. Here we present results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO, including an analysis of radial star formation rates and extents of galaxies in the NGC 5846, Abell 779, NRGb331, and HCG 69 groups/clusters. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  13. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Rupke, David S N; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Solar Blind Channel) and Halpha (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Halpha luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Halpha morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (Abell 1991, Abell 2052, Abell 2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star-forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Halpha luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Halpha ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming in...

  14. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  15. The Orion Nebula Cluster as a Paradigm of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberto, Massimo

    2014-10-01

    We propose a 52-orbit Treasury Program to investigate two fundamental questions of star formation: a) the low-mass tail of the IMF, down to a few Jupiter masses; b) the dynamical evolution of clusters, as revealed by stellar proper motions. We target the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) using WFC3 and ACS in coordinated parallel mode to perform a synoptic survey in the 1.345micron H2O feature and Ic broad-band. Our main objectives are: 1) to discover and classify ~500 brown dwarfs and planetary-mass objects in the field, extending the IMF down to lowest masses formed by gravitational collapse. Using the latest generation of high contrast image processing we will also search for faint companions, reaching down to sub-arcsecond separations and 1E-4 flux ratios. 2) to derive high precision (~0.2km/s) relative proper motions of low-mass stars and substellar objects (about 1000 sources total), leveraging on first epoch data obtained by our previous HST Treasury Program about 10 years ago. These data will unveil the cluster dynamics: velocity dispersion vs. mass, substructures, and the fraction of escaping sources. Only HST can access the IR H2O absorption feature sensitive to the effective temperature of substellar objects, while providing the exceptionally stable PSF needed for the detection of faint companions, and the identical ACS platform for our second epoch proper-motion survey. This program will provide the definitive HST legacy dataset on the ONC. Our High-Level Science Products will be mined by the community, both statistically to constrain competing theories of star formation, and to study in depth the multitude of exotic sources harboured by the cluster.

  16. The effect of magnetic fields on star cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic fields on star cluster formation by performing simulations following the self-gravitating collapse of a turbulent molecular cloud to form stars in ideal MHD. The collapse of the cloud is computed for global mass-to-flux ratios of infinity, 20, 10, 5 and 3, that is using both weak and strong magnetic fields. Whilst even at very low strengths the magnetic field is able to significantly influence the star formation process, for magnetic fields with plasma beta < 1 the results are substantially different to the hydrodynamic case. In these cases we find large-scale magnetically-supported voids imprinted in the cloud structure; anisotropic turbulent motions and column density structure aligned with the magnetic field lines, both of which have recently been observed in the Taurus molecular cloud. We also find strongly suppressed accretion in the magnetised runs, leading to up to a 75% reduction in the amount of mass converted into stars over the course of the calculations and a m...

  17. The quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Fossati, M; Buat, V; Boissier, S; Boquien, M; Burgarella, D; Ciesla, L; Gavazzi, G; Serra, P

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the SED of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SED are fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies is parametrised using a specific SFH with 2 free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These 2 parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism which acts on long timescales if starvation while rapid and efficient if ram pressure. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combine in a new way 20 UV to FIR photometric bands with 3 age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution integrated spectroscopy and with Halpha narrow band imaging data. The use of a truncated SFH significantly increases the...

  18. Star Formation and Supercluster Environment of 107 nearby Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between star formation (SF), substructure, and supercluster environment in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Previous works have investigated the relationships between SF and cluster substructure, and cluster substructure and supercluster environment, but definitive conclusions relating all three of these variables has remained elusive. We find an inverse relationship between cluster SF fraction (fSF) and supercluster environment density, calculated using the Galaxy luminosity density field at a smoothing length of 8 h‑1 Mpc (D8). The slope of fSF versus D8 is ‑0.008 ± 0.002. The fSF of clusters located in low-density large-scale environments, 0.244 ± 0.011, is higher than for clusters located in high-density supercluster cores, 0.202 ± 0.014. We also divide superclusters, according to their morphology, into filament- and spider-type systems. The inverse relationship between cluster fSF and large-scale density is dominated by filament- rather than spider-type superclusters. In high-density cores of superclusters, we find a higher fSF in spider-type superclusters, 0.229 ± 0.016, than in filament-type superclusters, 0.166 ± 0.019. Using principal component analysis, we confirm these results and the direct correlation between cluster substructure and SF. These results indicate that cluster SF is affected by both the dynamical age of the cluster (younger systems exhibit higher amounts of SF); the large-scale density of the supercluster environment (high-density core regions exhibit lower amounts of SF); and supercluster morphology (spider-type superclusters exhibit higher amounts of SF at high densities).

  19. Environments and Morphologies of Red Sequence Galaxies with Residual Star Formation in Massive Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Stott, John P; Jones, D. Heath

    2013-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX NUV photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by blue NUV-R colour), regardless of cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer ...

  20. Star Cluster Luminosity Functions and Cluster Formation Efficiencies in LEGUS Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Lee, Janice C.; Adamo, Angela; Kim, Hwiyun; Ryon, Jenna E.; LEGUS Team

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results of star cluster luminosity functions (LFs) and cluster formation efficiencies (Γ) in the LEGUS dwarf galaxy sub-sample. We have used a combination of automated and visual identification techniques to allow us to construct a more complete sample of clusters in these low-mass, low-SFR environments compared to previous studies of dwarf galaxies. Cluster properties are derived from fitting UV and optical (NUV-I) HST photometry to both deterministic and stochastic single-aged stellar populations models. We compare the cluster formation efficiencies and LF slopes to those of previous studies in both dwarf and massive spiral galaxy environments. Recent studies have found that both the LF slope and Γ form trends with galaxy environment. Our LF slope and Γ measurements in the LEGUS dwarfs will allow us to test these trends in the extreme, low-SFR regime and provide a better understanding of the star formation process.

  1. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    /ISM heating by AGN feedback is directly observed. The ˜15 kpc soft excess filament, part of which is cospatial with extended 1.3 GHz radio emission, may be associated with dredge-up of low entropy gas by the propagating radio source. Results from our study of the hot X-ray gas are framed in the context of inferred young stellar component ages associated with the central emission line nebula in the BCG. We find that inferred ages of the young stellar component are both younger and older than the inferred ages of the X-ray cavities, suggesting that low levels of star formation have managed to persist amid the AGN feedback-driven excavation of the X-ray cavity network. In Chapter 3 we present Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet imaging of seven BCGs in cool core clusters selected on the basis of elevated star formation rates. We find that even at low levels, star formation provides a dominant contribution to the ionizing photon reservoir required to power the observed luminosities of the emission line nebula. Weak, compact radio sources are observed in each of these seven BCGs. The combination of higher SFR and lower radio power is consistent with a scenario wherein a low state of AGN feedback allows for increased residual condensation from the ambient X-ray atmosphere, accounting for the elevated star formation rates. In Chapter 4 we present a comparison study of episodic star formation and AGN activity in the giant radio galaxy 3C 236, which is not associated with a cluster. We find that an episodic AGN/starburst connection can be fostered by a non-steady transport of gas to the nucleus. These results are then compared with Abell 2597, enabling a better understanding of the roles that may be played by cooling flows vs. mergers and hot vs. cold accretion modes in depositing the gaseous reservoirs that fuel both star formation and AGN activity. In Chapter 5 we broaden the context of the thesis with a search for high redshift Fanaroff-Riley class I radio galaxies, which may

  2. Spatial Clustering from GALEX-SDSS samples: Star Formation History and large-scale clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Heinis, Sebastien; Szalay, A S; Arnouts, Stephane; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Wyder, Ted K; Barlow, Tom A; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2009-01-01

    We measure the projected spatial correlation function w_p(r_p) from a large sample combining GALEX ultraviolet imaging with the SDSS spectroscopic sample. We study the dependence of the clustering strength for samples selected on (NUV - r)_abs color, specific star formation rate (SSFR), and stellar mass. We find that there is a smooth transition in the clustering of galaxies as a function of this color from weak clustering among blue galaxies to stronger clustering for red galaxies. The clustering of galaxies within the "green valley" has an intermediate strength, and is consistent with that expected from galaxy groups. The results are robust to the correction for dust extinction. The comparison with simple analytical modeling suggests that the halo occupation number increases with older star formation epochs. When splitting according to SSFR, we find that the SSFR is a more sensitive tracer of environment than stellar mass.

  3. Open star cluster: formation, parameters, membership and importance

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Gireesh C

    2016-01-01

    We have been represented the collective information of estimation procedures of parameters of the open clusters and put them together for showing the importance of clusters to understand their role in stellar evolution phenomenon. Moreover, we have been discussed about analytic techniques to determine the structural and dynamical properties of galactic clusters. The members of clusters provide unique opportunity to determine their basic parameters such as: age, metallicity, distance, reddening etc. The membership probabilities of stars of clusters is assigned through the various approaches and each approach provides different number of probable members of the cluster. Here, we have been briefly discussed about various approaches to determine the stellar membership within clusters.

  4. The galactocentric radius dependent upper mass limit of young star clusters: stochastic star formation ruled out

    CERN Document Server

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the distribution function of the masses of young star clusters is universal and can be purely interpreted as a probability density distribution function with a constant upper mass limit. As a result of this picture the masses of the most-massive objects are exclusively determined by the size of the sample. Here we show, with very high confidence, that the masses of the most-massive young star clusters in M33 decrease with increasing galactocentric radius in contradiction to the expectations from a model of a randomly sampled constant cluster mass function with a constant upper mass limit. Pure stochastic star formation is thereby ruled out. We use this example to elucidate how naive analysis of data can lead to unphysical conclusions.

  5. Star Cluster Formation from Turbulent Clumps. I. The Fast Formation Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Juan P.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the formation and early evolution of star clusters, assuming that they form from a turbulent starless clump of a given mass bounded inside a parent self-gravitating molecular cloud characterized by a particular mass surface density. As a first step, we assume instantaneous star cluster formation and gas expulsion. We draw our initial conditions from observed properties of starless clumps. We follow the early evolution of the clusters up to 20 Myr, investigating the effects of different star formation efficiencies, primordial binary fractions and eccentricities, and primordial mass segregation levels. We investigate clumps with initial masses of {M}{cl}=3000 {M}ȯ embedded in ambient cloud environments with mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{cloud}=0.1 and 1 {{g}} {{cm}}-2. We show that these models of fast star cluster formation result, in the fiducial case, in clusters that expand rapidly, even considering only the bound members. Clusters formed from higher {{{Σ }}}{cloud} environments tend to expand more quickly and thus are soon larger than clusters born from lower {{{Σ }}}{cloud} conditions. To form a young cluster of a given age, stellar mass, and mass surface density, these models need to assume a parent molecular clump that is many times denser, which is unrealistic compared to observed systems. We also show that, in these models, the initial binary properties are only slightly modified by interactions, meaning that the binary properties, e.g., at 20 Myr, are very similar to those at birth. With this study, we set up the foundation for future work, where we will investigate more realistic models of star formation compared to this instantaneous, baseline case.

  6. The spatial distribution of star and cluster formation in M 51

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, R.A.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.; Anders, P.; Larsen, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. We study the connection between spatially resolved star formation and young star clusters across the disc of M 51. Methods. We combine star cluster data based on B, V, and I-band Hubble Space Telescope ACS imaging, together with new WFPC2 U-band photometry to derive ages, masses, and extinctio

  7. THE RELATION BETWEEN COOL CLUSTER CORES AND HERSCHEL-DETECTED STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Fiedler, A.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Portouw, J.; Walth, G. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Smith, G. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500 {mu}m), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22{sup +6.2}{sub -5.3}% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR = 1-150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing H{alpha} emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), only a small ({approx}<0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(H{alpha}) to agree with SFR{sub FIR}. The relatively low H{alpha} extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate from normal stellar mass loss.

  8. The life-cycle of young star-clusters; the role of the galactic environment on cluster formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of star formation on galactic scales has been fairly grasped (e.g. the rate at which stars form scales proportionally to the molecular gas content) both in the local and high redshift universe. However, our knowledge on how star formation proceeds at small scales (e.g. the fraction of star formation happening in stellar clusters, the time-scales for star-forming regions to dissolve, the impact of the galactic environment on star and cluster formation) remains a challenge. Gravitationally bound young stellar clusters appear to be a commune product of star formation. There are tantalizing similarities between young star clusters and globular clusters, the latter formed by gravitationally bound ancient stellar populations. However, the young and globular cluster populations show statistical properties (mass functions, formation efficiencies, and survival times) that have been claimed incompatible, leaving the two populations being the results of distinct processes of formation. In my contribution, I will discuss the latest results produced with the analysis of the young cluster populations in several nearby galaxies. The use of new statistical methods, the link with dense gas fueling star formation, the access to homogenous datasets show, for the first time, clear evidence of the influence of the galactic environment in shaping the properties of young star cluster populations. After all, the differences between the two cluster populations may not be so pronounced, suggesting that the same physical formation process under different environmental conditions has been (and currently is) at work at high redshift (when globular clusters were formed) and in the local universe.

  9. Using young massive star clusters to understand star formation and feedback in high-redshift-like environments

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven; Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Dale, James; Henshaw, Jonathan; Walker, Daniel; Rathborne, Jill; Testi, Leonardo; Ott, Juergen; Ginsburg, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The formation environment of stars in massive stellar clusters is similar to the environment of stars forming in galaxies at a redshift of 1 - 3, at the peak star formation rate density of the Universe. As massive clusters are still forming at the present day at a fraction of the distance to high-redshift galaxies they offer an opportunity to understand the processes controlling star formation and feedback in conditions similar to those in which most stars in the Universe formed. Here we describe a system of massive clusters and their progenitor gas clouds in the centre of the Milky Way, and outline how detailed observations of this system may be able to: (i) help answer some of the fundamental open questions in star formation and (ii) quantify how stellar feedback couples to the surrounding interstellar medium in this high-pressure, high-redshift analogue environment.

  10. The star cluster mass--galactocentric radius relation: Implications for cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Weijia; Fan, Zhou; Cameron, Ewan

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the initial star cluster mass function is established through a universal, galactocentric-distance-independent stochastic process, on the scales of individual galaxies, remains an unsolved problem. This debate has recently gained new impetus through the publication of a study that concluded that the maximum cluster mass in a given population is not solely determined by size-of-sample effects. Here, we revisit the evidence in favor and against stochastic cluster formation by examining the young ($\\lesssim$ a few $\\times 10^8$ yr-old) star cluster mass--galactocentric radius relation in M33, M51, M83, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. To eliminate size-of-sample effects, we first adopt radial bin sizes containing constant numbers of clusters, which we use to quantify the radial distribution of the first- to fifth-ranked most massive clusters using ordinary least-squares fitting. We supplement this analysis with an application of quantile regression, a binless approach to rank-based regression takin...

  11. Star Formation in the First Galaxies - II: Clustered Star Formation and the Influence of Metal Line Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Bromm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Population III stars are believed to have been more massive than typical stars today and to have formed in relative isolation. The thermodynamic impact of metals is expected to induce a transition leading to clustered, low-mass Population II star formation. In this work, we present results from three cosmological simulations, only differing in gas metallicity, that focus on the impact of metal fine-structure line cooling on the formation of stellar clusters in a high-redshift atomic cooling halo. Introduction of sink particles allows us to follow the process of gas hydrodynamics and accretion onto cluster stars for 4 Myr corresponding to multiple local free-fall times. At metallicities at least 10^-3 Zsun, gas is able to reach the CMB temperature floor and fragment pervasively resulting in a stellar cluster of size ~1 pc and total mass ~1000 Msun. The masses of individual sink particles vary, but are typically ~100 Msun, consistent with the Jeans mass when gas cools to the CMB temperature, though some solar m...

  12. M82, Starbursts, Star Clusters, and the Formation of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Keto, E; Lo, K Y; Keto, Eric; Ho, Luis C.

    2005-01-01

    We observed the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in CO in the higher frequency (2--1) transition to achieve an angular resolution below 1 arc second or 17 pc at the target. We resolved the molecular gas into a large number of compact clouds, with masses ranging from about 2x10^3 to 2x10^6 solar masses. The mass spectrum scales as N(M) ~ M^-1.5, similar to the mass spectra of young massive star clusters suggesting that individual molecular clouds are transformed in the starburst into individual star clusters. The larger clouds are surrounded by supernovae and HII regions suggesting that star formation proceeds from the outside of the clouds and progresses inward consistent with triggering by a sudden increase in external pressure. The clouds with internal star formation have velocity gradients and inverse P-Cygni spectral line profiles indicating inward motions of 35 kms consistent with shock driven compression. Diffuse free-free radio emission and X-ray emission around the clouds provides evidence for superheated ...

  13. Star and Stellar Cluster Formation: ALMA-SKA Synergies

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, G A; Rathborne, J M; Longmore, S; Molinari, S

    2015-01-01

    Over the next decade, observations conducted with ALMA and the SKA will reveal the process of mass assembly and accretion onto young stars and will be revolutionary for studies of star formation. Here we summarise the capabilities of ALMA and discuss recent results from its early science observations. We then review infrared and radio variability observations of both young low-mass and high-mass stars. A time domain SKA radio continuum survey of star forming regions is then outlined. This survey will produce radio light-curves for hundreds of young sources, providing for the first time a systematic survey of radio variability across the full range of stellar masses. These light-curves will probe the magnetospheric interactions of young binary systems, the origins of outflows, trace episodic accretion on the central sources and potentially constrain the rotation rates of embedded sources.

  14. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

  15. Hierarchically Clustered Star Formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Ossenkopf, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S; Dolphin, Andrew E

    2012-01-01

    We present a cluster analysis of the bright main-sequence and faint pre--main-sequence stellar populations of a field ~ 90 x 90 pc centered on the HII region NGC 346/N66 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, from imaging with HST/ACS. We extend our earlier analysis on the stellar cluster population in the region to characterize the structuring behavior of young stars in the region as a whole with the use of stellar density maps interpreted through techniques designed for the study of the ISM structuring. In particular, we demonstrate with Cartwrigth & Whitworth's Q parameter, dendrograms, and the Delta-variance wavelet transform technique that the young stellar populations in the region NGC 346/N66 are hierarchically clustered, in agreement with other regions in the Magellanic Clouds observed with HST. The origin of this hierarchy is currently under investigation.

  16. The Role of Ram Pressure Stripping in the Quenching of Cluster Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Book, Laura G

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations of galaxy clusters have shown that environmental effects apparently associated with the cluster begin to lower the star formation rates of galaxies at distances as great as three times the cluster virial radius. These observations may indicate preprocessing of cluster galaxies in groups or in the cluster core for galaxies on highly elliptical orbits, but may also imply that the environmental effects due to the cluster are directly affecting galaxies on their first infall. To explore these issues, we investigate different models of ram pressure stripping as it acts on satellite galaxies in clusters, and compare to observations of the radial star formation gradient in clusters. We calculate the location of the accretion shock around model clusters, and use this as the radius of onset of ram pressure stripping in the Galform semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. Comparison of the results of our model, and previously considered, simpler ram pressure models, with recent observations indicate...

  17. Environments and Morphologies of Red Sequence Galaxies with Residual Star Formation in Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Crossett, Jacob P; Stott, John P; Jones, D Heath

    2013-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX NUV photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by blue NUV-R colour), regardless of cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer to occupy low density, high cluster radius environments. The morphology of these UV bright galaxies suggests that they are in fact red spirals, which we confirm with light curves and Galaxy Zoo voting percentages as morphological proxies. These UV bright galaxies are therefore seen to be either truncated spiral galaxies, caught by ram pressure in falling into the cluster, or high mass spirals, with the photometry dominated by the older stellar population.

  18. A parsec-resolution simulation of the Antennae galaxies: Formation of star clusters during the merger

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2014-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical simulation of an Antennae-like galaxy merger at parsec resolution, including a multi-component model for stellar feedback and reaching numerical convergence in the global star formation rate for the first time. We analyse the properties of the dense stellar objects formed during the different stages of the interaction. Each galactic encounter triggers a starburst activity, but the varying physical conditions change the triggering mechanism of each starburst. During the first two pericenter passages, the starburst is spatially extended and forms many star clusters. However, the starburst associated to the third, final passage is more centrally concentrated: stars form almost exclusively in the galactic nucleus and no new star cluster is formed. The maximum mass of stars clusters in this merger is more than 30 times higher than those in a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy. Antennae-like mergers are therefore a formation channel of young massive clusters possibly leading...

  19. Clustered star formation as a natural explanation for the Halpha cut-off in disk galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2008-10-02

    The rate of star formation in a galaxy is often determined by the observation of emission in the Halpha line, which is related to the presence of short-lived massive stars. Disk galaxies show a strong cut-off in Halpha radiation at a certain galactocentric distance, which has led to the conclusion that star formation is suppressed in the outer regions of disk galaxies. This is seemingly in contradiction to recent observations in the ultraviolet which imply that disk galaxies have star formation beyond the Halpha cut-off, and that the star-formation-rate surface density is linearly related to the underlying gas surface density, which is a shallower relationship than that derived from Halpha luminosities. In a galaxy-wide formulation, the clustered nature of star formation has recently led to the insight that the total galactic Halpha luminosity is nonlinearly related to the galaxy-wide star formation rate. Here we show that a local formulation of the concept of clustered star formation naturally leads to a steeper radial decrease in the Halpha surface luminosity than in the star-formation-rate surface density, in quantitative agreement with the observations, and that the observed Halpha cut-off arises naturally.

  20. Star Clusters within FIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  1. STAR CLUSTER FORMATION WITH STELLAR FEEDBACK AND LARGE-SCALE INFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Jumper, Peter H., E-mail: matzner@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2015-12-10

    During star cluster formation, ongoing mass accretion is resisted by stellar feedback in the form of protostellar outflows from the low-mass stars and photo-ionization and radiation pressure feedback from the massive stars. We model the evolution of cluster-forming regions during a phase in which both accretion and feedback are present and use these models to investigate how star cluster formation might terminate. Protostellar outflows are the strongest form of feedback in low-mass regions, but these cannot stop cluster formation if matter continues to flow in. In more massive clusters, radiation pressure and photo-ionization rapidly clear the cluster-forming gas when its column density is too small. We assess the rates of dynamical mass ejection and of evaporation, while accounting for the important effect of dust opacity on photo-ionization. Our models are consistent with the census of protostellar outflows in NGC 1333 and Serpens South and with the dust temperatures observed in regions of massive star formation. Comparing observations of massive cluster-forming regions against our model parameter space, and against our expectations for accretion-driven evolution, we infer that massive-star feedback is a likely cause of gas disruption in regions with velocity dispersions less than a few kilometers per second, but that more massive and more turbulent regions are too strongly bound for stellar feedback to be disruptive.

  2. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengyuan; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Stars in star clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old globular clusters -- with ages greater than 10 billion years and masses of several hundred thousand solar masses -- often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often invoked as second-generation star-formation trigger. The initial cluster masses should be at least 10 times more massive than they are today for this to work. However, large populations of clusters with masses greater than a few million solar masses are not found in the local Universe. Here we report on three 1-2 billion-year-old, massive star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, which show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could accrete sufficient gas ...

  3. The relation between star formation, morphology and local density in high redshift clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Poggianti, Bianca M; Finn, Rose; Bamford, Steven; De Lucia, Gabriella; Varela, Jesus; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Halliday, Claire; Noll, Stefan; Saglia, Roberto; Zaritsky, Dennis; Best, Philip; Clowe, Douglas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Jablonka, Pascale; Pello, Roser; Rudnick, Gregory; Simard, Luc; von der Linden, Anja; White, Simon

    2008-01-01

    We investigate how the [OII] properties and the morphologies of galaxies in clusters and groups at z=0.4-0.8 depend on projected local galaxy density, and compare with the field at similar redshifts and clusters at low-z. In both nearby and distant clusters, higher-density regions contain proportionally fewer star-forming galaxies, and the average [OII] equivalent width of star-forming galaxies is independent of local density. However, in distant clusters the average current star formation rate (SFR) in star-forming galaxies seems to peak at densities ~15-40 galaxies Mpc^{-2}. At odds with low-z results, at high-z the relation between star-forming fraction and local density varies from high- to low-mass clusters. Overall, our results suggest that at high-z the current star formation (SF) activity in star-forming galaxies does not depend strongly on global or local environment, though the possible SFR peak seems at odds with this conclusion. We find that the cluster SFR normalized by cluster mass anticorrelate...

  4. Evidence for a fundamental stellar upper mass limit from clustered star formation, and some implications therof

    CERN Document Server

    Kroupa, P; Kroupa, Pavel; Weidner, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical considerations lead to the expectation that stars should not have masses larger than about m_{max*}=60-120Msun, while the observational evidence has been ambiguous. Only very recently has a physical stellar mass limit near 150Msun emerged thanks to modern high-resolution observations of local star-burst clusters. But this limit does not appear to depend on metallicity, in contradiction to theory. Important uncertainties remain though. It is now also emerging that star-clusters limit the masses of their constituent stars, such that a well-defined relation between the mass of the most massive star in a cluster and the cluster mass, m_{max}=F(M_ecl) \\le m_{max*}\\approx 150Msun, exists. One rather startling finding is that the observational data strongly favour clusters being built-up by consecutively forming more-massive stars until the most massive stars terminate further star-formation. The relation also implies that composite populations, which consist of many star clusters, most of which may be d...

  5. Clustered star formation and outflows in AFGL 2591

    CERN Document Server

    Sanna, A; Carrasco-Gonzàlez, C; Menten, K M; Brunthaler, A; Moscadelli, L; Rygl, K L J

    2011-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of the water maser kinematics and radio continuum emission toward the most massive and young object in the star-forming region AFGL 2591. Our analysis shows at least two spatial scales of multiple star formation, one projected across 0.1 pc on the sky and another one at about 2000 AU from a ZAMS star of about 38 Solar masses. This young stellar object drives a powerful jet- and wind-driven outflow system with the water masers associated to the outflow walls, previously detected as a limb-brightened cavity in the NIR band. At about 1300 AU to the north of this object a younger protostar drives two bow shocks, outlined by arc-like water maser emission, at 200 AU either side of the source. We have traced the velocity profile of the gas that expands along these arc-like maser structures and compared it with the jet-driven outflow model. This analysis suggests that the ambient medium around the northern protostar is swept up by a jet-driven shock (>66 km/s) and perhaps a lower-velocit...

  6. Star Formation Close to Sgr A* and Beyond the Nuclear Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2016-01-01

    Two modes of star formation are involved to explain the origin of young stars near Sgr A*. One is a disk-based mode, which explains the disk of stars orbiting Sgr A*. The other is the standard cloud-based mode observed in the Galactic disk. We discuss each of these modes of star formation and apply these ideas to the inner few parsecs of Sgr A*. In particular, we focus on the latter mode in more detail. We also discuss how the tidal force exerted by the nuclear cluster makes the Roche density approaching zero and contributes to the collapse of molecular clouds located tens of parsecs away from Sgr A*.

  7. Studies on the formation, evolution, and destruction of massive star clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastian, Nathan John

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of mainly observational studies on the formation, evolution, and destruction of massive star clusters. We show, using a variety of observational techniques, that globular clusters which were once thought to only be able to form in the early universe are in fact still

  8. A Multi-Wavelength View of the Environments of Extreme Clustered Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buizer, James M.

    2017-01-01

    It is believed that the vast majority of, if not all, stars form within OB clusters. Most theories of star formation assume a star forms in isolation and ignore the fact that the cluster environment and, especially, the presence of extremely energetic and high mass young stellar objects nearby, may have a profound impact on the formation process of a typical cluster member. Giant HII (GHII) regions are Galactic analogs to starburst regions seen in external galaxies, hosting the most active areas of clustered star formation. As such, GHII regions represent a population of objects that can reveal a wealth of information on the environment of the earliest stages of clustered star formation and how it is affected by feedback from the most massive cluster members. This study employs new mid-infrared imaging data obtained from the airborne observatory, SOFIA, as well as archival imaging data from the near-infrared to cm radio wavelengths to create a rich multi-wavelength dataset of a dozen galactic GHII regions. These data allow quantification of the detailed physical conditions within GHII regions individually and as a population on both global and small scales.

  9. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the buildup of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are fully consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracked a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation - although transport of Fe into the ICM may have been more prolonged and star formation likely continued beyond redshift 1. The means of this prompt enrichment consisted of SNII yielding greater than or equal to 0.1 solar mass per explosion (if the SNIa rate normalization is scaled down from its value in the field according to the relative number of candidate progenitor stars in the 3 - 8 solar mass range) and/or SNIa with short delay times originating during the rapid star formation epoch. Star formation is greater than 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day stellar mass in the form of stellar remnants, are substantially greater in clusters than in the field.

  10. The 100 Myr Star Formation History of NGC 5471 from Cluster and Resolved Stellar Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    García-Benito, Rubén; Díaz, Ángeles I; Apellániz, Jesús Maíz; Cerviño, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    We show that star formation in the giant HII region NGC 5471 has been ongoing during the past 100 Myr. Using HST/WFPC2 F547M and F675W, ground based JHKs, and GALEX FUV and NUV images, we have conducted a photometric study of the star formation history in the massive giant extragalactic HII region NGC 5471 in M101. We perform a photometric study of the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the resolved stars, and an integrated analysis of the main individual star forming clusters and of NGC 5471 as a whole. The integrated UV-optical-nIR photometry for the whole region provides two different reference ages, 8 Myr and 60 Myr, revealing a complex star formation history, clearly confirmed by the CMD resolved stellar photometry analysis. The spatial distribution of the stars shows that the star formation in NGC 5471 has proceeded along the whole region during, at least, the last 100 Myr. The current ionizing clusters are enclosed within a large bubble, which is likely to have been produced by the stars that formed in ...

  11. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Li, Zhi-Yun; /Virginia U., Astron. Dept.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication

  12. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - II. Mass dependence of cloud destruction and cluster properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2017-09-01

    The process of radiative feedback in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) is an important mechanism for limiting star cluster formation through the heating and ionization of the surrounding gas. We explore the degree to which radiative feedback affects early (≲5 Myr) cluster formation in GMCs having masses that range from 104 to 106 M⊙ using the flash code. The inclusion of radiative feedback lowers the efficiency of cluster formation by 20-50 per cent relative to hydrodynamic simulations. Two models in particular - 5 × 104 and 105 M⊙ - show the largest suppression of the cluster formation efficiency, corresponding to a factor of ∼2. For these clouds only, the internal energy, a measure of the energy injected by radiative feedback, exceeds the gravitational potential for a significant amount of time. We find a clear relation between the maximum cluster mass, Mc,max, formed in a GMC and the mass of the GMC itself, MGMC: Mc,max ∝ M_{GMC}^{0.81}. This scaling result suggests that young globular clusters at the necessary scale of 106 M⊙ form within host GMCs of masses near ∼5 × 107 M⊙. We compare simulated cluster mass distributions to the observed embedded cluster mass function [d log (N)/dlog (M) ∝ Mβ where β = -1] and find good agreement (β = -0.99 ± 0.14) only for simulations including radiative feedback, indicating this process is important in controlling the growth of young clusters. However, the high star formation efficiencies, which range from 16 to 21 per cent, and high star formation rates compared to locally observed regions suggest other feedback mechanisms are also important during the formation and growth of stellar clusters.

  13. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Loewenstein, M

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the build-up of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracks a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation -- although transport of Fe into the ICM may be more prolonged and star formation likely continues to redshifts 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day st...

  14. Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Models of Super Star Clusters with a Positive Star Formation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Wünsch, R; Palous, J; Silich, S

    2008-01-01

    Using the hydrodynamic code ZEUS, we perform 2D simulations to determine the fate of the gas ejected by massive stars within super star clusters. It turns out that the outcome depends mainly on the mass and radius of the cluster. In the case of less massive clusters, a hot high velocity ($\\sim 1000$ km s$^{-1}$) stationary wind develops and the metals injected by supernovae are dispersed to large distances from the cluster. On the other hand, the density of the thermalized ejecta within massive and compact clusters is sufficiently large as to immediately provoke the onset of thermal instabilities. These deplete, particularly in the central densest regions, the pressure and the pressure gradient required to establish a stationary wind, and instead the thermally unstable parcels of gas are rapidly compressed, by a plethora of re-pressurizing shocks, into compact high density condensations. Most of these are unable to leave the cluster volume and thus accumulate to eventually feed further generations of star for...

  15. The influence of the cluster environment on the star formation efficiency of 12 Virgo spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Braine, J; Chung, A; Kenney, J D P

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the environment on gas surface density and star formation efficiency of cluster spiral galaxies is investigated. We extend previous work on radial profiles by a pixel-to pixel analysis looking for asymmetries due to environmental interactions. The star formation rate is derived from GALEX UV and Spitzer total infrared data. As in field galaxies, the star formation rate for most Virgo galaxies is approximately proportional to the molecular gas mass. Except for NGC 4438, the cluster environment does not affect the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas. Gas truncation is not associated with major changes in the total gas surface density distribution of the inner disk of Virgo spiral galaxies. In three galaxies, possible increases in the molecular fraction and the star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, of factors of 1.5 to 2, are observed on the windward side of the galactic disk. A significant increase of the star formation efficiency with respect to the m...

  16. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound ('clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ($\\sim10$ Myr) timescales ('associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters ($\\Gamma$) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that $\\Gamma$ increases with the gas surface density ($\\Sigma$) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the $total$ number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of $\\Gamma$ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$, d...

  17. On star formation in stellar systems. I - Photoionization effects in protoglobular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1986-01-01

    The progressive ionization and subsequent dynamical evolution of nonhomogeneously distributed low-metal-abundance diffuse gas after star formation in globular clusters are investigated analytically, taking the gravitational acceleration due to the stars into account. The basic equations are derived; the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and solution methods are explained; and numerical results for three standard cases (ionization during star formation, ionization during expansion, and evolution resulting in a stable H II region at its equilibrium Stromgren radius) are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. The time scale of residual-gas loss in typical clusters is found to be about the same as the lifetime of a massive star on the main sequence.

  18. Star Formation In The Cluster Merger DLSCL J0916.2+2953

    CERN Document Server

    Mansheim, A S; Dawson, W A; Lubin, L M; Wittman, D; Schmidt, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate star formation in DLSCL J0916.2+2953, a dissociative merger of two clusters at z=0.53 that has progressed $1.1^{+1.3}_{-0.4}$ Gyr since first pass-through. We attempt to reveal the effects a collision may have had on the evolution of the cluster galaxies by tracing their star formation history. We probe current and recent activity to identify a possible star formation event at the time of the merger using EW(Hd), EW([OII]), and D$_{n}$4000 measured from the composite spectra of 64 cluster and 153 coeval field galaxies. We supplement $Keck$ DEIMOS spectra with DLS and $HST$ imaging to determine the color, stellar mass, and morphology of each galaxy and conduct a comprehensive study of the populations in this complex structure. Spectral results indicate the average cluster and cluster red sequence galaxies experienced no enhanced star formation relative to the surrounding field during the merger, ruling out a predominantly merger-quenched population. We find that the average blue galaxy in the No...

  19. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeja, Stefan [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States); Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' , Universita di Pisa, largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  20. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations...

  1. Stellar populations in star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengyuan; Deng, Licai

    2016-01-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star clus- ter formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ...

  2. The Formation of First Generation Stars and Globular Clusters in Protogalactic Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, S

    2003-07-07

    Within collapsing protogalaxies, thermal instability leads to the formation of a population of cool fragments which are confined by the pressure of a residual hot background medium. The critical mass required for the cold clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form stars is determined by both their internal temperature and external pressure. Massive first generation stars form in primordial clouds with sufficient column density to shield themselves from external UV photons emitted by nearby massive stars or AGNs. Less massive photoionized clouds gain mass due to ram pressure stripping by the residual halo gas. Collisions may also trigger thermal instability and fragmentation into cloudlets. While most cloudlets have substellar masses, the largest become self-gravitating and collapse to form protostellar cores without further fragmentation. The initial stellar mass function is established as these cores capture additional residual cloudlets. Energy dissipation from the mergers ensures that the cluster remains bound in the limit of low star formation efficiency. Dissipation also promotes the formation and retention of the most massive stars in the cluster center. On the scale of the protogalactic clouds, the formation of massive stars generates intense UV radiation which photoionizes gas and quenches star formation in nearby regions. As gas density accumulates in the center of the galactic potential, the self-regulated star formation rate increases. At the location where most of the residual gas can be converted into stars on its internal dynamical timescale, a galaxy attains its asymptotic kinematic structure such as exponential profiles, Tully-Fisher, and Faber-Jackson laws.

  3. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, Matteo; Fadda, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the star formation and central black hole accretion activity of the galaxies hosted in the two nearby (z$\\sim$0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We are able to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy @ 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations ($\\sim$ 3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. The analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with re...

  4. The location, clustering, and propagation of massive star formation in giant molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ochsendorf, B B; Chastenet, J; Tielens, A G G M; Roman-Duval, J

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars are key players in the evolution of galaxies, yet their formation pathway remains unclear. In this work, we use data from several galaxy-wide surveys to build an unbiased dataset of ~700 massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), ~200 giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and ~100 young (<10 Myr) optical stellar clusters (SCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We employ this data to quantitatively study the location and clustering of massive star formation and its relation to the internal structure of GMCs. We reveal that massive stars do not typically form at the highest column densities nor centers of their parent GMCs at the ~6 pc resolution of our observations. Massive star formation clusters over multiple generations and on size scales much smaller than the size of the parent GMC. We find that massive star formation is significantly boosted in clouds near SCs. Yet, whether a cloud is associated with a SC does not depend on either the cloud's mass or global surface density. These results reveal a conne...

  5. Star formation efficiency as a function of metallicity: from star clusters to galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, Sami; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Braine, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We explore how the star formation efficiency in a protocluster clump is regulated by metallicity dependent stellar winds from the newly formed OB stars (Mstar > 5 Msol). The model describes the co-evolution of the mass function of gravitationally bound cores and of the IMF in a protocluster clump. Dense cores are generated uniformly in time at different locations in the clump, and contract over lifetimes that are a few times their free fall times. The cores collapse to form stars that power strong stellar winds whose cumulative kinetic energy evacuates the gas from the clump and quenches further core and star formation. This sets the final star formation efficiency, SFEf. Models are run with various metallicities in the range Z/Zsol=[0.1,2]. We find that the SFEf decreases strongly with increasing metallicity. The SFEf-metallicity relation is well described by a decaying exponential whose exact parameters depend weakly on the value of the core formation efficiency. We find that there is almost no dependence o...

  6. Stellar contents and star formation in the young open cluster Stock 8

    CERN Document Server

    Jose, Jessy; Ojha, D K; Ogura, K; Chen, W P; Bhatt, B C; Ghosh, S K; Mito, H; Maheswar, G; Sharma, Saurabh

    2007-01-01

    We present $UBVI_c$ CCD photometry of the young open cluster Stock 8 with the aim to study the basic properties and star formation scenario in this region. The radius of the cluster is found to be $\\sim 6^{\\prime}$ ($\\sim 3.6$ pc) and the reddening within the cluster region varies from $E(B-V)=0.40$ to 0.60 mag. The cluster is located at a distance of $2.05 \\pm 0.10$ kpc. Using H$\\alpha$ slitless spectroscopy and 2MASS NIR data we identified H$\\alpha$ emission and NIR excess young stellar objects (YSOs), respectively. The colour-magnitude diagrams of these YSOs reveal that majority of these objects have ages between 1 to 5 Myr indicating a non-coeval star formation in the cluster. Massive stars in the cluster region reveal an average age of $\\le$ 2 Myr. In the cluster region ($r \\le 6^\\prime$) the slope of the mass function (MF), $\\Gamma$, in the mass range $\\sim 1.0 \\le M/M_\\odot < 13.4$ can be represented by a power law having a slope of $-1.38\\pm0.12$, which agrees well with Salpeter value (-1.35). In t...

  7. Star Formation in Intermediate Redshift 0.2 < Z < 0.7 Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Kevin C; Baum, Stefi A; Tremblay, Grant R; Cox, Isabella G; Gladders, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric and spectroscopic study of 42 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in two samples of clusters of galaxies chosen for the study of gravitational lensing. The study's initial sample combines 25 BCGs from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) sample and 37 BCGs from the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS) with a total redshift range of 0.2 < Z < 0.7. Using archival GALEX, HST, WISE, Herschel, and VLA data we determine the BCGs' stellar mass, radio power, and star formation rates. The radio power is higher than expected if due to star formation, consistent with the BCGs being AGN-powered radio sources. This suggests that the AGN and star formation are both fueled by cold gas in the host galaxy. The specific star formation rate (sSFR) is low and constant with redshift. The mean sSFR is 9.42 * 10^-12 yr^-1 which corresponds to a mass doubling time of 105 billion years. These findings are consistent with models for hierarchical formation of BCGs which su...

  8. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate

    2016-03-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound (`clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ({˜ }10 { Myr}) time-scales (`associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters (Γ) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that Γ increases with the gas surface density (Σ) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the total number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of Γ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with ΣSFR, due to the mass-radius-SFR relation of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies. The environmental variation of Γ should therefore be probed as a function of area-normalized quantities, such as Σ or ΣSFR. We present a set of guidelines for meaningful observational tests of cluster formation theories and show that these resolve the reported discrepancy.

  9. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Loubser, S I; Hoekstra, H; Mahdavi, A; Donahue, M; Bildfell, C; Voit, G M

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) shows bright emission in the UV and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broadband photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3, a subset from the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP) sample. We identify plausible star formation histories of the galaxies by fitting Simple Stellar Populations (SSPs) as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (~200 Myr) stellar populations in 4 of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star forming BCG...

  10. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  11. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  12. Halpha-Derived Star-Formation Rates For Three z ~ 0.75 EDisCS Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, R A; Poggianti, B M; Rudnick, G; Halliday, C; Milvang-Jensen, B; Pellò, R; Simard, L; Finn, Rose A.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jr., Donald W. McCarthy; Poggianti, Bianca; Rudnick, Gregory; Halliday, Claire; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Pello, Roser; Simard, Luc

    2005-01-01

    We present Halpha-derived star-formation rates (SFRs) for three z ~ 0.75 galaxy clusters. Our 1 sigma flux limit corresponds to a star-formation rate of 0.10-0.24 solar mass per year, and our minimum reliable Halpha + [N II] rest-frame equivalent width is 10\\AA. We show that Halpha narrowband imaging is an efficient method for measuring star formation in distant clusters. In two out of three clusters, we find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with projected distance from the cluster center. We also find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies decreases with increasing local galaxy surface density in the same two clusters. We compare the median rate of star formation among star-forming cluster galaxies to a small sample of star-forming field galaxies from the literature and find that the median cluster SFRs are \\~50% less than the median field SFR. We characterize cluster evolution in terms of the mass-normalized integrated cluster SFR and find that the z ~ 0.75 clusters have more SFR per...

  13. Simulating galaxy Clusters -II: global star formation histories and galaxy populations

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A D; Sommer-Larsen, J

    2004-01-01

    Cosmological (LambdaCDM) TreeSPH simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy groups and clusters have been performed. The simulations invoke star formation, chemical evolution with non-instantaneous recycling, metal dependent radiative cooling, strong star burst and (optionally) AGN driven galactic super winds, effects of a meta-galactic UV field and thermal conduction. The properties of the galaxy populations in two clusters, one Virgo-like (T~3 keV) and one (sub) Coma-like (T~6 keV), are discussed. The global star formation rates of the cluster galaxies are found to decrease very significantly with time from redshift z=2 to 0, in agreement with observations. The total K-band luminosity of the cluster galaxies correlates tightly with total cluster mass, and for models without additional AGN feedback, the zero point of the relation matches the observed one fairly well. The match to observed galaxy luminosity functions is reasonable, except for a deficiency of bright galaxies (M_B < -20), which bec...

  14. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using Enzo-based MHD simulations with accreting sink particles and effective resolution $2048^3$. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of $\\sim 1,600$ solar masses, along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized "core" that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which di...

  15. Star formation activity in a young galaxy cluster at z=0.866

    CERN Document Server

    Laganá, T F; Martins, L P; da Cunha, E

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster RXJ1257$+$4738 at $z=0.866$ is one of the highest redshift clusters with a richness of multi-wavelength data, and thus a good target to study the star formation-density relation at early epochs. Using a sample of spectroscopically-confirmed cluster members, we derive the star formation rates of our galaxies using two methods, (I) the relation between SFR and total infrared luminosity extrapolated from the observed \\textit{Spitzer} MIPS 24$\\mu$m imaging data, and (II) spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting using the MAGPHYS code, including eight different bands. We show that, for this cluster, the SFR-density relation is very weak and seems to be dominated by the two central galaxies and the SFR presents a mild dependence on stellar mass, with more massive galaxies having higher SFR. However, the specific SFR (SSFR) decreases with stellar mass, meaning that more massive galaxies are forming less stars per unit of mass, and thus suggesting that the increase in star-forming members is driv...

  16. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Combes, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68% plausible intervals from them. The 68% plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the star formation rates available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition...

  17. The formation of very wide binaries during the star cluster dissolution phase

    CERN Document Server

    Kouwenhoven, M B N; Parker, Richard J; Davies, M B; Malmberg, D; Kroupa, P

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous wide (>1000 au) binaries in the Galactic field and halo have been discovered. Their existence cannot be explained by the process of star formation or by dynamical interactions in the field, and their origin has long been a mystery. We explain the origin of these wide binaries by formation during the dissolution phase of young star clusters: an initially unbound pair of stars may form a binary when their distance in phase-space is small. Using N-body simulations, we find that the resulting wide binary fraction in the semi-major axis range 1000 au - 0.1 pc for individual clusters is 1-30%, depending on the initial conditions. The existence of numerous wide binaries in the field is consistent with observational evidence that most clusters start out with a large degree of substructure. The wide binary fraction decreases strongly with increasing cluster mass, and the semi-major axis of the newly formed binaries is determined by the initial cluster size. The resulting eccentricit...

  18. The IMF and Star Formation History of the Stellar Clusters in the Vela D Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Massi, F; Vanzi, L; Massi, Fabrizio; Testi, Leonardo; Vanzi, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a Near-Infrared deep photometric survey of a sample of six embedded star clusters in the Vela-D molecular cloud, all associated with luminous (~10^3 Lsun) IRAS sources. The clusters are unlikely to be older than a few 10^6 yrs, since all are still associated with molecular gas. We employed the fact that all clusters lie at the same distance and were observed with the same instrumental setting to derive their properties in a consistent way, being affected by the same instrumental and observational biases. We extracted the clusters' K Luminosity Functions (KLF) and developed a simple method to correct them for extinction, based on colour-magnitude diagrams. The reliability of the method has been tested by constructing synthetic clusters from theoretical tracks for pre-main sequence stars and a standard Initial Mass Function (IMF). The clusters' IMFs have been derived from the dereddened KLFs by adopting a set of pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks and assuming coeval star formation. ...

  19. Young stellar clusters in the Rosette molecular cloud. Arguments against triggered star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Cambrésy, L; Feher, O; Tóth, L V; Schneider, N

    2013-01-01

    The Rosette complex is a well studied region of the galactic plane which presents the apparent characteristics of a triggered star forming region. This is however still debated as no strong evidence corroborates this statement. In this study, we focus on characterizing the young stellar population in the Rosette to improve our understanding of the processes that regulate the star formation in this region. We propose an original method relying on the joint analysis of the star color and density in the near-infrared. It leads to the mapping of the molecular cloud spatial distribution and the detection of the embedded clusters with their characterization in term of member number and age estimation. We identified 13 clusters, 2 of them are new discoveries, and we estimated that the total number of young stellar objects in the Rosette ranges between 4000 and 8000 members. We found the age distribution of the young clusters is not consistent with a general triggered scenario for the star formation in this molecular...

  20. Characterizing the Formation of the Most Massive Star Clusters in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Liu, H. B.; Ginsburg, A.; Pineda, J. E.

    2017-07-01

    We give an update on our comprehensive gas surveys of some of the most luminous Lbol > 105 to 107 L⊙ deeply embedded - optically obscured - star formation regions in the Milky Way, which are the local cases of massive star clusters and/or associations in the making. Our approach emphasizes multi-scale, multi-resolution imaging in dust and gas in its different phases through a combination of data taken with ALMA, JVLA, SMA, Herschel, and single-dish telescopes including the LMT in Mexico.

  1. The Link Between the Formation Rates of Clusters and Stars in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to test whether the formation rate of star clusters is proportional to the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. As a first step, we present the mass functions of compact clusters younger than 10 Myr in seven star-forming galaxies of diverse masses, sizes, and morphologies: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, NGC 4214, NGC 4449, M83, M51, and the Antennae. These cluster mass functions (CMFs) are well represented by power laws, dN/dM~M^b, with similar exponents b=-1.92+/-0.27, but with amplitudes that differ by factors up to ~10^3, corresponding to vast differences in the sizes of the cluster populations in these galaxies. We then normalize these CMFs by the SFRs in the galaxies, derived from dust-corrected H-alpha luminosities, and find that the spread in the amplitudes collapses, with a remaining rms deviation of only sigma_(logA)= 0.2. This is close to the expected dispersion from random uncertainties in the CMFs and SFRs. Thus, the data presented here are consistent with exact...

  2. Star Cluster Formation and Destruction in the Merging Galaxy NGC 3256

    CERN Document Server

    Mulia, Alexander J; Whitmore, Bradley C

    2016-01-01

    We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the rich population of young massive star clusters in the main body of NGC 3256, a merging pair of galaxies with a high star formation rate (SFR) and SFR per unit area ($\\Sigma_{\\rm{SFR}}$). These clusters have luminosity and mass functions that follow power laws, $dN/dL \\propto L^{\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha = -2.23 \\pm 0.07$, and $dN/dM \\propto M^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta = -1.86 \\pm 0.34$ for $\\tau < 10$ Myr clusters, similar to those found in more quiescent galaxies. The age distribution can be described by $dN/d\\tau \\propto \\tau ^ \\gamma$, with $\\gamma \\approx -0.67 \\pm 0.08$ for clusters younger than about a few hundred million years, with no obvious dependence on cluster mass. This is consistent with a picture where $\\sim 80 \\%$ of the clusters are disrupted each decade in time. We investigate the claim that galaxies with high $\\Sigma_{\\rm{SFR}}$ form clusters more efficiently than quiescent systems by determining the fraction of sta...

  3. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY HALO TRACED BY THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY AMONG GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sohee; Lee, Young-Wook, E-mail: ywlee2@yonsei.ac.kr [Center for Galaxy Evolution Research and Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-22

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm, we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters (GCs) of Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III are produced mostly by first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with a relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (∼0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ∼0.8 Gyr with a more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (∼1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the dual origin of the Milky Way halo. Despite the difference in detail, our models show that the Oosterhoff period groups observed in both outer and inner halo GCs are all manifestations of the “population-shift” effect within the instability strip, for which the origin can be traced back to the two or three discrete episodes of star formation in GCs.

  4. Massive Star Formation Rates and Radial Distributions from Halpha Imaging of 84 Virgo Cluster and Isolated Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2002-01-01

    The massive star formation properties of 55 Virgo Cluster and 29 isolated S0-Scd spiral galaxies are compared via analyses of R and Halpha surface photometry and integrated fluxes as functions of Hubble type and central R light concentration. The total massive star formation rates in Virgo Cluster spirals have been reduced by factors up to 2.5 in the median compared to isolated spirals. The inner disk star formation rates of most Virgo Cluster spirals are similar or enhanced by factors up to 2.5 in the median, while outer disk star formation rates are reduced by factors up to 7.1 in the median. Thus the reduction in total star formation of Virgo Cluster spirals is caused primarily by truncation of the star-forming disks. The star formation morphologies of Virgo Cluster spirals compared to isolated spirals can be divided into four categories: normal (27%), anemic (6%), enhanced (15%), and truncated (52%). Several galaxies with truncated star-forming disks have anemic inner disks, but the majority have normal-e...

  5. New Constraints on the Star Formation History of the Star Cluster NGC 1856

    CERN Document Server

    Correnti, Matteo; Puzia, Thomas H; de Mink, Selma E

    2015-01-01

    We use the Wide Field Camera 3 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain deep, high-resolution photometry of the young (age ~ 300 Myr) star cluster NGC1856 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We compare the observed colour-magnitude diagram (CMD), after having applied a correction for differential reddening, with Monte Carlo simulations of simple stellar populations (SSPs) of various ages. We find that the main sequence turn-off (MSTO) region is wider than that derived from the simulation of a single SSP. Using constraints based on the distribution of stars in the MSTO region and the red clump, we find that the CMD is best reproduced using a combination of two different SSPs with ages separated by 80 Myr (0.30 and 0.38 Gyr, respectively). However, we can not formally exclude that the width of the MSTO could be due to a range of stellar rotation velocities if the efficiency of rotational mixing is higher than typically assumed. Using a King-model fit to the surface number density profile in conjunction with dyna...

  6. Dust-Obscured Star-Formation in Intermediate Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Rose A; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca; Bell, Eric F; Hinz, Joannah; Jablonka, Pascale; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Moustakas, John; Rines, Kenneth; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS 24-micron observations of 16 0.45A, and ~75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected cluster-centric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (< 1.5xR200). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an expo nentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by ~1 Gyr relative to the clusters.

  7. Chemical evolution of star clusters

    OpenAIRE

    van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old globular clusters, in relation to their formation histories. Globular clusters clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxi...

  8. Watching the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, J L; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara C.

    2003-01-01

    Subarcsecond infrared and radio observations yield important information about the formation of super star clusters from their surrounding gas. We discuss the general properties of ionized and molecular gas near young, forming SSCs, as illustrated by the prototypical young forming super star cluster nebula in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. This super star cluster appears to have a gravitationally bound nebula. The lack of molecular gas suggests a very high star formation efficiency, consistent with the formation of a large, bound star cluster.

  9. Ultraviolet Morphologies and Star-Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star-formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few s...

  10. Slow quenching of star formation in OMEGAWINGS clusters: galaxies in transition in the local universe

    CERN Document Server

    Paccagnella, Angela; Poggianti, Bianca Maria; Moretti, Alessia; Fritz, Jacopo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Couch, Warrick; Bettoni, Daniela; Cava, Antonio; Fasano, Giovanni; D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\\ast>10^{9.8}M_\\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs which is rare in the field. These {\\it transition} galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius ($R_{200}$) but they impact on the SFR-M$_*$ relation only within 0.6R$_{200}$. The ratio of transition to PSF galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R$_{200}$ and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with $M_*$. As ...

  11. Stellar Masses, Star Formation Rates and X-ray Constraints on Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrinda, Greg; Desjardins, T. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S.; Hammer, D.; Miller, N. A.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report on new measurements of star formation rates and stellar masses in the “infall” region of the nearby Coma cluster of galaxies. This region is approximately 1 Mpc from the cluster core, where relatively gas-rich galaxies are interacting with the hot intracluster medium, providing an important view of the impact of cluster processes on galaxy evolution. We have used infrared and ultraviolet data available from both ground and spaced-based observations to make these measurements. The star formation rates and stellar mass values were verified via comparison with published results in the Coma core as well as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral measurements. The infall region has also been observed by XMM-Newton to faint limits to obtain X-ray luminosities for the galaxies in this field. Specifically, we present X-ray photometry of approximately 20 galaxies with XMM-Newton coverage to constrain the X-ray - SFR correlation in a cluster environment. This project was supported by the Baltimore Excellence in STEM Teaching program via summer internship funding to Hrinda.

  12. Stellar populations in star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  13. Efficient star cluster formation in the core of a galaxy cluster: The dwarf irregular NGC 1427A in Fornax

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, Marcelo D; Puzia, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    Gas-rich galaxies in dense environments such as galaxy clusters and massive groups are affected by a number of possible types of interactions with the cluster environment, which make their evolution radically different than that of field galaxies. The dIrr galaxy NGC 1427A, presently infalling towards the core of the Fornax galaxy cluster, offers a unique opportunity to study those processes in a level of detail not possible to achieve for galaxies at higher redshits. Using HST/ACS and auxiliary VLT/FORS ground-based observations, we study the properties of the most recent episodes of star formation in this gas-rich galaxy, the only one of its type near the core of the Fornax cluster. We study the structural and photometric properties of young star cluster complexes in NGC 1427A, identifying 12 bright such complexes with exceptionally blue colors. The comparison of our broadband near-UV/optical photometry with simple stellar population models yields ages below ~4x10^6 yr and stellar masses from a few thousand...

  14. Dynamics of the Tidal Fields and Formation of Star Clusters in Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent

    2010-01-01

    In interacting galaxies, strong tidal forces disturb the global morphology of the progenitors and give birth to the long stellar, gaseous and dusty tails often observed. In addition to this destructive effect, tidal forces can morph into a transient, protective setting called compressive mode. Such modes then shelter the matter in their midst by increasing its gravitational binding energy. This thesis focuses on the study of this poorly known regime by quantifying its properties thanks to numerical and analytical tools applied to a spectacular merging system of two galaxies, commonly known as the Antennae galaxies. N-body simulations of this pair yield compressive modes in the regions where observations reveal a burst of star formation. Furthermore, characteristic time- and energy scales of these modes match well those of self-gravitating substructures such as star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. These results suggest that the compressive modes of tidal fields plays an important role in the formation and e...

  15. Star formation in grand-design, spiral galaxies. Young, massive clusters in the near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: Spiral structure is a prominent feature in many disk galaxies and is often outlined by bright, young objects. We study the distribution of young stellar clusters in grand-design spiral galaxies and thereby determine whether strong spiral perturbations can influence star formation. Methods: Deep, near-infrared JHK-maps were observed for ten nearby, grand-design, spiral galaxies using HAWK-I at the Very Large Telescope. Complete, magnitude-limited candidate lists of star-forming complexes were obtained by searching within the K-band maps. The properties of the complexes were derived from (H - K) - (J - H) diagrams including the identification of the youngest complexes (i.e. ≲7 Myr) and the estimation of their extinction. Results: Young stellar clusters with ages ≲7 Myr have significant internal extinction in the range of AV = 3-7m, while older ones typically have AV pattern, the star formation rate in the arms is higher by a factor of 2-5 than in the inter-arm regions. The CLF in the arms is also shifted towards brighter MK by at least 0.4m. We also detect clusters with colors compatible with Large Magellanic Cloud intermediate age clusters and Milky Way globular clusters. The (J - K) - MK diagram of several galaxies shows, for the brightest clusters, a clear separation between young clusters that are highly attenuated by dust and older ones with low extinction. Conclusions: The gap in the (J - K) - MK diagrams implies that there has been a rapid expulsion of dust at an age around 7 Myr, possibly triggered by supernovae. Strong spiral perturbations concentrate the formation of clusters in the arm regions and shifts their CLF towards brighter magnitudes. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile; program: ESO 82.B-0331.Appendices A-C are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http

  16. Star Formation in the Extreme Outer Galaxy: Digel Cloud 2 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T; Terada, Hiroshi; Saito, Masao

    2007-01-01

    As a first step for studying star formation in the extreme outer Galaxy (EOG), we obtained deep near-infrared images of two embedded clusters at the northern and southern CO peaks of Cloud 2, which is one of the most distant star forming regions in the outer Galaxy (galactic radius R_g ~ 19 kpc). With high spatial resolution (FWHM ~ 0".35) and deep imaging (K ~ 21 mag) with the IRCS imager at the Subaru telescope, we detected cluster members with a mass detection limit of < 0.1 M_{sun}, which is well into the substellar regime. These high quality data enables a comparison of EOG to those in the solar neighborhood on the same basis for the first time. Before interpreting the photometric result, we have first constructed the NIR color-color diagram (dwarf star track, classical T Tauri star (CTTS) locus, reddening law) in the Mauna Kea Observatory filter system and also for the low metallicity environment since the metallicity in EOG is much lower than those in the solar neighborhood. The estimated stellar de...

  17. ALFALFA HI Content and Star Formation in Virgo Cluster Early-Type Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A; Haynes, M P; Brosch, N

    2009-01-01

    The ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) blind survey is providing a census of HI in galaxies of all types in a range of environments. Here we report on ALFALFA results for Virgo Cluster early-type dwarfs between declinations of 4 and 16 degrees. Less than 2% of the Virgo early-type dwarf population is detected, compared to 70-80% of the Im/BCD dwarf population. Most of the dwarfs detected in HI show evidence for ongoing or recent star formation. Early-type galaxies with HI tend to be located in the outer regions of the cluster and to be brighter. Early-type dwarfs with HI may be undergoing morphological transition due to cluster environmental effects.

  18. The Structure, Dynamics and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rio, Nicola; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues on the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC, and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the ISM density, estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content...

  19. Star formation history of the Milky Way halo traced by the Oosterhoff dichotomy among globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Sohee

    2015-01-01

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm (Jang et al. 2014), we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III globular clusters (GCs) are produced mostly by the first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (~0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ~0.8 Gyr with more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (~1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the...

  20. LoCuSS: The slow quenching of star formation in cluster galaxies and the need for pre-processing

    CERN Document Server

    Haines, C P; Smith, G P; Egami, E; Babul, A; Finoguenov, A; Ziparo, F; McGee, S L; Rawle, T D; Okabe, N; Moran, S M

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15cluster members. The fraction (f_SF) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r200, but remains well below field values even at 3r200. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r200 of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing f_SF-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ~15x from the core to 2r200. This requires star-formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2--3Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters...

  1. Basic Tools for Studies on the Formation and Disruption of Star Clusters: the Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Gieles, M

    2009-01-01

    The luminosity function (LF) of young star clusters is often approximated by a power law function. For clusters in a wide range of galactic environments this has resulted in fit indices near -2, but on average slightly steeper. A fundamental property of the -2 power law function is that the luminosity of the brightest object (L_max) scales linearly with the total number of clusters, which is close to what is observed. This suggests that the formation of Young Massive Clusters (YMCs) is a result of the size of the sample, i.e. when the SFR is high it is statistically more likely to form YMCs, but no particular physical conditions are required. In this contribution we provide evidence that the LF of young clusters is not a -2 power law, but instead is curved, showing a systematic decrease of the (logarithmic) slope from roughly -1.8 at low luminosities to roughly -2.8 at high luminosities. The empirical LFs can be reproduced by model LFs using an underlying cluster IMF with a Schechter type truncation around M*...

  2. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. X. Quantifying the Star Cluster Formation Efficiency of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David O; Dale, Daniel A; Johnson, L Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R; Fouesneau, Morgan; Olsen, Knut A G; Engelbracht, Charles W; Dalcanton, Julianne J

    2012-01-01

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t_age < 100Myr) cluster sample. Our data provides the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low star formation rate regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data suggesting there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample gala...

  3. Where does the gas fueling star formation in brightest cluster galaxies originate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molendi, S.; Tozzi, P.; Gaspari, M.; De Grandi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Ghizzardi, S.; Rossetti, M.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the relationship between X-ray cooling and star formation in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Methods: We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the inner regions, 10-40 kpc, of six nearby cool core clusters (z < 0.35) observed with Chandra ACIS. This sample is selected on the basis of the high star formation rate (SFR) observed in the BCGs. We restrict our search for cooling gas to regions that are roughly cospatial with the starburst. We fit single- and multi-temperature mkcflow models to constrain the amount of isobarically cooling intracluster medium. Results: We find that in all clusters, below a threshold temperature ranging between 0.9 and 3 keV, only upper limits can be obtained. In four out of six objects, the upper limits are significantly below the SFR and in two, namely A1835 and A1068, they are less than a tenth of the SFR. Conclusions: Our results suggests that a number of mechanisms conspire to hide the cooling signature in our spectra. In a few systems the lack of a cooling signature may be attributed to a relatively long delay time between the X-ray cooling and the star burst. However, for A1835 and A1068, where the X-ray cooling time is shorter than the timescale of the starburst, a possible explanation is that the region where gas cools out of the X-ray phase extends to very large radii, likely beyond the core of these systems.

  4. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  5. The shape of the initial cluster mass function: what it tells us about the local star formation efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, G; Kroupa, P; Baumgardt, H

    2008-01-01

    We explore how the expulsion of gas from star-cluster forming cloud-cores due to supernova explosions affects the shape of the initial cluster mass function, that is, the mass function of star clusters when effects of gas expulsion are over. We demonstrate that if the radii of cluster-forming gas cores are roughly constant over the core mass range, as supported by observations, then more massive cores undergo slower gas expulsion. Therefore, for a given star formation efficiency, more massive cores retain a larger fraction of stars after gas expulsion. The initial cluster mass function may thus differ from the core mass function substantially, with the final shape depending on the star formation efficiency. A mass-independent star formation efficiency of about 20 per cent turns a power-law core mass function into a bell-shaped initial cluster mass function, while mass-independent efficiencies of order 40 per cent preserve the shape of the core mass function.

  6. Suppression of Star Formation in the central 200 kpc of a z = 1.4 Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Grutzbauch, Ruth; Jørgensen, Inger; Varela, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an extended narrow-band H{\\alpha} study of the massive galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557 at z = 1.39. This paper represents a follow up study to our previous investigation of star-formation in the cluster centre, extending our analysis out to a projected cluster radius of 1.5 Mpc. Using the Near InfraRed Imager and Spectrograph (NIRI) on Gemini North we obtained deep H narrow-band imaging corresponding to the rest-frame wavelength of H{\\alpha} at the cluster's redshift. We identify a total of 163 potential cluster members in both pointings, excluding stars based on their near-IR colours derived from VLT/HAWK-I imaging. Of these 163 objects 14 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, and 20% are excess line-emitters. We find no evidence of star formation activity within a radius of 200 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy in the cluster core. Dust-corrected star formation rates (SFR) of excess emitters outside this cluster quenching radius, RQ \\sim 200 kpc, are on average = 2.7...

  7. KAT-7 Science Verification: Cold Gas, Star Formation, and Substructure in the Nearby Antlia Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Kelley M; Carignan, Claude; Passmoor, Sean S; Goedhart, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The Antlia Cluster is a nearby, dynamically young structure, and its proximity provides a valuable opportunity for detailed study of galaxy and group accretion onto clusters. We present a deep HI mosaic completed as part of spectral line commissioning of the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), and identify infrared counterparts from the WISE extended source catalog to study neutral atomic gas content and star formation within the cluster. We detect 37 cluster members out to a radius of ~0.9 Mpc with M_HI > 5x10^7 M_Sun. Of these, 35 are new HI detections, 27 do not have previous spectroscopic redshift measurements, and one is the Compton thick Seyfert II, NGC 3281, which we detect in HI absorption. The HI galaxies lie beyond the X-ray emitting region 200 kpc from the cluster center and have experienced ram pressure stripping out to at least 600 kpc. At larger radii, they are distributed asymmetrically suggesting accretion from surrounding filaments. Combining HI with optical redshifts, we perform a detailed dynami...

  8. The Evolution of Star Formation Activity in Cluster Galaxies Over $0.15

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Cory R; Brodwin, Mark; Stanford, S A; Snyder, Gregory F; Stern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in the star formation activity of massive ($M_{\\star}>10^{10.1}\\,M_{\\odot}$) cluster galaxies using a sample of 25 clusters over $0.15Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble and 11 clusters over $1Cluster Survey. Galaxy morphologies are determined visually using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images. Using the spectral energy distribution fitting code CIGALE, we measure star formation rates, stellar masses, and 4000 \\AA\\ break strengths. The latter are used to separate quiescent and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). From $z\\sim1.3$ to $z\\sim0.2$, the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of cluster SFGs and quiescent galaxies decreases by factors of three and four, respectively. Over the same redshift range, the sSFR of the entire cluster population declines by a factor of 11, from $0.48\\pm0.06\\;\\mathrm{Gyr}^{-1}$ to $0.043\\pm0.009\\;\\mathrm{Gyr}^{-1}$. This strong overall sSFR evolution is driven by t...

  9. Constraining the high redshift formation of black hole seeds in nuclear star clusters with gas inflows

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, Alessandro; Devecchi, Bernadetta; Galanti, Giorgio; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we explore a possible route of black hole seed formation that appeal to a model by Davies, Miller & Bellovary who considered the case of the dynamical collapse of a dense cluster of stellar black holes subjected to an inflow of gas. Here, we explore this case in a broad cosmological context. The working hypotheses are that (i) nuclear star clusters form at high redshifts in pre-galactic discs hosted in dark matter halos, providing a suitable environment for the formation of stellar black holes in their cores, (ii) major central inflows of gas occur onto these clusters due to instabilities seeded in the growing discs and/or to mergers with other gas-rich halos, and that (iii) following the inflow, stellar black holes in the core avoid ejection due to the steepening to the potential well, leading to core collapse and the formation of a massive seed of $<~ 1000\\, \\rm M_\\odot$. We simulate a cosmological box tracing the build up of the dark matter halos and there embedded baryons, and explore...

  10. On the extreme stationary outflows from super-star clusters: from superwinds to supernebulae and further massive star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Rodríguez-Gónzalez, A; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Ary; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2004-01-01

    The properties of star cluster winds in the supercritical, catastrophic cooling regime are discussed. We demonstrate that strong radiative cooling may inhibit superwinds and, after a rapid phase of accumulation of the ejected material within the star-forming volume, a new stationary isothermal regime, supported by the ionizing radiation from the central cluster, is established. The expected appearance of this core/halo supernebula in the visible line regime and possible late evolutionary tracks for super-star cluster winds, in the absence of ionizing radiation, are thoroughly discussed.

  11. LoCuSS: THE SLOW QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AND THE NEED FOR PRE-PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, C. P. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Correo Central, Santiago (Chile); Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Rawle, T. D. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.; McGee, S. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Babul, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Finoguenov, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-0014 Helsinki (Finland); Okabe, N. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Moran, S. M., E-mail: cphaines@das.uchile.cl [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining wide-field Spitzer 24 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet imaging with highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members. The fraction (f{sub SF}) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r{sub 200}, but remains well below field values even at 3r{sub 200}. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r{sub 200} of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing f{sub SF}-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ∼15× from the core to 2r{sub 200}. This requires star formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2–3 Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters. The velocity dispersion profile of the star-forming galaxy population shows a sharp peak of 1.44 σ{sub ν} at 0.3r{sub 500}, and is 10%–35% higher than that of the inactive cluster members at all cluster-centric radii, while their velocity distribution shows a flat, top-hat profile within r{sub 500}. All of these results are consistent with star-forming cluster galaxies being an infalling population, but one that must also survive ∼0.5–2 Gyr beyond passing within r{sub 200}. By comparing the observed distribution of star-forming galaxies in the stacked caustic diagram with predictions from the Millennium simulation, we obtain a best-fit model in which star formation rates decline exponentially on quenching timescales of 1.73 ± 0.25 Gyr upon accretion into the cluster.

  12. Effects of the Equation of State on the Formation of Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; MacLow, M M; Li, Yuexing; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of varying the equation of state on the formation of stellar clusters in turbulent molecular clouds, using three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our results show that the equation of state helps determine how strongly self-gravitating gas fragments. The degree of fragmentation decreases with increasing adiabatic index gamma in the range 0.2 1 probably results in the formation of isolated and massive stars. Fragmentation and collapse ceases entirely for gamma > 1.4 as expected from analytic arguments. The mass spectrum of overdense gas clumps is roughly log-normal for non-self-gravitating turbulent gas, but changes to a power-law under the action of gravity. The spectrum of collapsed cores, on the other hand, remains log-normal for gamma 1. The density PDFs approach log-normal, with widths that decrease with increasing gamma. Primordial gas may have effective gamma > 1, in which case these results could help explain why models of the formation of the first stars te...

  13. Megaparsec-Scale Triggers for Star Formation: Clusters and Filaments of Galaxies in the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster

    CERN Document Server

    Fleenor, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Specific indications of star-formation are presented within cluster and filament galaxies that are members of the Horologium-Reticulum supercluster (HRS, z ~0.06). These indicators arise from multi-wavelength observations, primarily emission lines from optical spectroscopy and faint excess from radio continuum (1.4 GHz) photometry. HRS galaxies exhibiting current star formation are consistent with previous studies in that the star-forming populations organize around megaparsec-scale filament axes as well as near the cluster core. Therefore with support from optical photometry, mechanisms for triggering star formation in these galaxies are most likely due to merger interactions in lower density (and lower velocity) environments and possible bursts prior to stripping within the higher density (and higher velocity) environments.

  14. The onset of cluster formation around Herbig Ae/Be stars

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, L; Natta, A

    1999-01-01

    The large body of near infrared observations presented in Testi et al. (1997; 1998) are analysed with the aim of characterizing the young stellar clusters surrounding Herbig Ae/Be stars. The results confirm the tendency of early Be stars to be surrounded by dense clusters of lower mass "companions", while Ae stars are never found to be associated with conspicuous groups. The transition between the different environments appears to occur smoothly from Ae to Be stars without a sharp threshold. No correlation of the richness of the stellar groups detected is found with the galactic position or the age of the central Herbig Ae/Be star. The stellar volume densities estimated for the groups surrounding pre-main-sequence stars of intermediate mass show the transition from the low density aggregates of T Tauri stars and the dense clusters around massive stars. Only the most massive stars (10-20Msun) are found to be associated with dense (10^3 pc^-3) stellar clusters. This is exactly the mass regime at which the conve...

  15. Star formation quenching in simulated group and cluster galaxies: When, how, and why?

    CERN Document Server

    Bahe, Yannick M

    2014-01-01

    Star formation is observed to be suppressed in group and cluster galaxies compared to the field. To gain insight into the quenching process, we have analysed ~2000 galaxies formed in the GIMIC suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The time of quenching varies from ~2 Gyr before accretion (first crossing of r200,c) to >4 Gyr after, depending on satellite and host mass. Once begun, quenching is rapid (>~ 500 Myr) in low-mass galaxies (M* < 10^10 M_Sun), but significantly more protracted for more massive satellites. The simulations predict a substantial role of outflows driven by ram pressure -- but not tidal forces -- in removing the star-forming interstellar matter (ISM) from satellite galaxies, especially dwarfs (M* ~ 10^9 M_Sun) where they account for nearly two thirds of ISM loss in both groups and clusters. Immediately before quenching is complete, this fraction rises to ~80% even for Milky Way analogues (M* ~ 10^10.5 M_Sun) in groups (M_host ~ 10^13.5 M_Sun). We show that (i) ISM stripping ...

  16. The IMACS Cluster Building Survey: IV. The Log-normal Star Formation History of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, Michael D; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta; Abramson, Louis

    2013-01-01

    We present here a simple model for the star formation history of galaxies that is successful in describing both the star formation rate density over cosmic time, as well as the distribution of specific star formation rates of galaxies at the current epoch, and the evolution of this quantity in galaxy populations to a redshift of z=1. We show first that the cosmic star formation rate density is remarkably well described by a simple log-normal in time. We next postulate that this functional form for the ensemble is also a reasonable description for the star formation histories of individual galaxies. Using the measured specific star formation rates for galaxies at z~0 from Paper III in this series, we then construct a realisation of a universe populated by such galaxies in which the parameters of the log-normal star formation history of each galaxy are adjusted to match the specific star formation rates at z~0 as well as fitting, in ensemble, the cosmic star formation rate density from z=0 to z=8. This model pr...

  17. The formation of massive black holes through collision runaway in dense young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, S P; Hut, P; Makino, J; McMillan, S

    2004-01-01

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with a cluster (MGG-11) of young stars \\~200pc from the center of the starburst galaxy M82. The properties of the X-ray source are best explained by a black hole with a mass of at least 350Msun, which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive star cluster (MGG-9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and the motions of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to mergers with each other. We find that for MGG-11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the center of the cluster to participate in a runaway collision, thereby producing a star of 800-3000Msun, which ultimately collapses to an black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG-9 because the larger cluster radius leads ...

  18. Differences in the structural properties and star-formation rates of field and cluster galaxies at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Rebecca J; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H; Spitler, Lee R; Straatman, Caroline M S; Cowley, Michael; Nanayakkara, Themiya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dependance of galaxy sizes and star-formation rates (SFRs) on environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with M>10^9.5 at z=0.92 selected from the NMBS survey. Using the GEEC2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (sigma=490 km/s) galaxies within two virial radius, Rvir, intervals of 0.51, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalised average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2-2.5 (7-9 sigma) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.

  19. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  20. Stellar Evolution of the Star Cluster NGC 602 and Massive Star Formation in the Low-Density Wing of the SMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Leah; Oskinova, Lida; Ramachandran, Varsha; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Gallagher, John S.

    2017-01-01

    The young star cluster NGC 602 and its surroundings in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) exhibit active star formation despite the sparse supply of dense gas from which to form stars. This region is also associated with the huge ionized gas ring DEM167 in the SMC. Using archival optical photometric data from the Uppsala Schmidt Telescope and new near-UV photometric data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, we determine the colors and consequently the relative ages of ~1000 stars in this region. Furthermore, we incorporate spectra obtained with the ESO-VLT to more accurately determine the properties of luminous massive stars. These measurements are combined to explore the recent star formation history of this region near the tip of the SMC and to study how the young stellar populations relate to the ISM.

  1. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  2. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF THE W3 GMC: CLUES TO THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS OF HIGH-MASS STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Martin, P. G.; Luong, Q. Nguyen; Roy, A. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Hennemann, M.; Men' shchikov, A.; Andre, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Hill, T.; Minier, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU-CNRS/INSU-Universite Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bontemps, S. [Universite Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Bernard, J.-Ph. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Avenue colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Di Francesco, J.; Fallscheer, C. [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Elia, D.; Pezzuto, S. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Li, J. Z. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2013-04-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for the study of the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have used Herschel data from the HOBYS key program to produce and analyze column density and temperature maps. Two preliminary catalogs were produced by extracting sources from the column density map and from Herschel maps convolved to 500 {mu}m resolution. Herschel reveals that among the compact sources (FWHM < 0.45 pc), W3 East, W3 West, and W3 (OH) are the most massive and luminous and have the highest column density. Considering the unique properties of W3 East and W3 West, the only clumps with ongoing high-mass star formation, we suggest a 'convergent constructive feedback' scenario to account for the formation of a cluster with decreasing age and increasing system/source mass toward the innermost regions. This process, which relies on feedback by high-mass stars to ensure the availability of material during cluster formation, could also lead to the creation of an environment suitable for the formation of Trapezium-like systems. In common with other scenarios proposed in other HOBYS studies, our results indicate that an active/dynamic process aiding in the accumulation, compression, and confinement of material is a critical feature of the high-mass star/cluster formation, distinguishing it from classical low-mass star formation. The environmental conditions and availability of triggers determine the form in which this process occurs, implying that high-mass star/cluster formation could arise from a range of scenarios: from large-scale convergence of turbulent flows to convergent constructive feedback or mergers of filaments.

  3. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first stellar cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low metallicity (0.01 Zsun) stellar cluster in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z~14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks with the MESA code. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 Msun. Their masses range from ~0.1 Msun to 14.4 Msun with a median mass ~0.5-1 Msun. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while...

  4. The Molecular Gas Contents of z=1.62 cluster galaxies and their Last Gasp of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gregory; Walter, Fabian; Hodge, Jacqueline; Papovich, Casey J.; Tran, Kim-Vy; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Willmar, Christopher; Saintonge, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    I will present JVLA CO imaging in the 1-0 transition of a z=1.62 galaxy cluster located in the UKIDSS/UDS and covered by the 3D-HST data. These are the deepest existing data in CO(1-0), corresponding to nearly 100 hours of JVLA observations, and are giving us the powerful ability to study the molecular gas contents of massive cluster galaxies when they were in the last throes of their star formation. The 3D-HST data are crucial to this endeavor as they 1) give us accurate redshifts with which to confirm membership, 2) give us the ability to reject cluster interlopers, and 3) serve as a strong redshift prior to search for weak CO lines. We securely detect two cluster members in CO(1-0) at the expected frequency given the grism redshifts. This nearly doubles the number of published CO(1-0) detections of normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift. These two galaxies are massive, with log(Mstar~11) and extremely gas rich (Mgas/Mbaryon~0.6-0.7). One hosts a non-energetically important x-ray AGN and the other is an edge-on star-forming disk. Despite their very large gas reservoirs they are forming stars at a sedate pace for their stellar mass and lie on or below the main star formation sequence. Coupling with rest-frame optical size measurements from CANDELS we are able to measure the star formation rate and molecular gas surface densities and find that these two galaxies are at the very low end of star formation efficiency for high redshift star forming galaxies. Our molecular gas masses are unusually robust as we use the CO(1-0) line, which has minimal excitation corrections compared to higher CO transitions. I will comment on the implications of this interesting finding for understanding the truncation of gas accretion onto distant cluster galaxies, the end of star formation in the massive cluster galaxy population, and the biases in existing CO surveys that target galaxies based primarily on their star formation rates.

  5. Chemical evolution of star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old globular clusters, in relation to their formation histories. Globular clusters clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the globular clusters formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter minihaloes might be favoured. Not all globular clusters may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic halo from Galactic bulge clusters.

  6. Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Analysis of Spatially-Resolved Star-Formation in Nearby Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Rose; Collova, Natasha; Spicer, Sandy; Whalen, Kelly; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, we are conducting a survey of the gas and star-formation properties of galaxies in 36 groups and clusters in the local universe. The galaxies in our sample span a large range of galactic environments, from the centers of galaxy groups and clusters to the surrounding infall regions. One goal of the project is to map the spatial distribution of star-formation; the relative extent of the star-forming and stellar disks provides important information about the internal and external processes that deplete gas and thus drive galaxy evolution. We obtained wide-field H-alpha observations with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory for galaxies in the vicinity of the MKW11 and NRGb004 galaxy groups and the Abell 1367 cluster. We present a preliminary analysis of the relative size of the star-forming and stellar disks as a function of galaxy morphology and local galaxy density, and we calculate gas depletion times using star-formation rates and HI gas mass. We will combine these results with those from other UAT members to determine if and how environmentally-driven gas depletion varies with the mass and X-ray properties of the host group or cluster. This work has supported by NSF grants AST-0847430, AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  7. Observations of Lyα and O vi: Signatures of Cooling and Star Formation in a Massive Central Cluster Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Megan; Connor, Thomas; Voit, G. Mark; Postman, Marc

    2017-02-01

    We report new Hubble Space Telescope COS and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopy of a star-forming region (∼ 100 {M}ȯ yr‑1) in the center of the X-ray cluster RX J1532.9+3021 (z = 0.362), to follow-up the CLASH team discovery of luminous UV filaments and knots in the central massive galaxy. We detect broad (∼500 km s‑1) Lyα emission lines with extraordinarily high equivalent widths (EQW ∼ 200 Å) and somewhat less broadened Hα (∼220 km s‑1). Ultraviolet emission lines of N v and O vi are not detected, which constrains the rate at which gas cools through temperatures of 106 K to be ≲10 M⊙ yr‑1. The COS spectra also show a flat rest-frame UV continuum with weak stellar photospheric features, consistent with the presence of recently formed hot stars forming at a rate of ∼10 M⊙ yr‑1, uncorrected for dust extinction. The slope and absorption lines in these UV spectra are similar to those of Lyman Break Galaxies at z≈ 3, albeit those with the highest Lyα equivalent widths and star formation rates. This high-EQW Lyα source is a high-metallicity galaxy rapidly forming stars in structures that look nothing like disks. This mode of star formation could significantly contribute to the spheroidal population of galaxies. The constraint on the luminosity of any O vi line emission is stringent enough to rule out steady and simultaneous gas cooling and star formation, unlike similar systems in the Phoenix Cluster and Abell 1795. The fact that the current star formation rate differs from the local mass cooling rate is consistent with recent simulations of episodic active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation in a cluster atmosphere.

  8. Globular Cluster Formation at High Density: A Model for Elemental Enrichment with Fast Recycling of Massive-star Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2017-02-01

    The self-enrichment of massive star clusters by p-processed elements is shown to increase significantly with increasing gas density as a result of enhanced star formation rates and stellar scatterings compared to the lifetime of a massive star. Considering the type of cloud core where a globular cluster (GC) might have formed, we follow the evolution and enrichment of the gas and the time dependence of stellar mass. A key assumption is that interactions between massive stars are important at high density, including interactions between massive stars and massive-star binaries that can shred stellar envelopes. Massive-star interactions should also scatter low-mass stars out of the cluster. Reasonable agreement with the observations is obtained for a cloud-core mass of ∼4 × 106 M ⊙ and a density of ∼2 × 106 cm‑3. The results depend primarily on a few dimensionless parameters, including, most importantly, the ratio of the gas consumption time to the lifetime of a massive star, which has to be low, ∼10%, and the efficiency of scattering low-mass stars per unit dynamical time, which has to be relatively large, such as a few percent. Also for these conditions, the velocity dispersions of embedded GCs should be comparable to the high gas dispersions of galaxies at that time, so that stellar ejection by multistar interactions could cause low-mass stars to leave a dwarf galaxy host altogether. This could solve the problem of missing first-generation stars in the halos of Fornax and WLM.

  9. The fate of spiral galaxies in clusters: the star formation history of the anemic Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4569

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Cortese, L; De Paz, A G; Seibert, M; Madore, B F; Buat, V; Martin, D C

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method for studying the star formation history of late-type, cluster galaxies undergoing gas starvation or a ram-pressure stripping event by combining bidimensional multifrequency observations with multi-zones models of galactic chemical and spectrophotometricevolution. This method is applied to the Virgo cluster anemic galaxy NGC 4569. We extract radial profiles from recently obtained UV GALEX images at 1530 and 2310 A, from visible and near-IR narrow (Halpha) and broad band images at different wavelengths (u, B, g, V, r, i, z, J, H, K), from Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images and from atomic and molecular gas maps. The model in the absence of interaction (characterized by its rotation velocity and spin parameter) is constrained by the unperturbed H band light profile and by the Halpha rotation curve. We can reconstruct the observed total-gas radial-density profile and the light surface-brightness profiles at all wavelengths in a ram-pressure stripping scenario by making simple assumptions about t...

  10. Massive Star Cluster Formation and Destruction in Luminous Infrared Galaxies in GOALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, S. T.; Evans, A. S.; Rich, J.; Larson, K. L.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Privon, G. C.; Howell, J.; Inami, H.; Kim, D.-C.; Chien, L.-H.; Vavilkin, T.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Modica, F.; Surace, J. A.; Manning, S.; Abdullah, A.; Blake, A.; Yarber, A.; Lambert, T.

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope ACS/HRC FUV, ACS/WFC optical study into the cluster populations of a sample of 22 Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey. Through integrated broadband photometry, we have derived ages and masses for a total of 484 star clusters contained within these systems. This allows us to examine the properties of star clusters found in the extreme environments of LIRGs relative to lower luminosity star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We find that by adopting a Bruzual & Charlot simple stellar population model and Salpeter initial mass function, the age distribution of the clusters declines as {dN}/dτ ={τ }-0.9+/-0.3, consistent with the age distribution derived for the Antennae Galaxies, and interpreted as evidence for rapid cluster disruption occurring in the strong tidal fields of merging galaxies. The large number of {10}6 {M}⊙ young clusters identified in the sample also suggests that LIRGs are capable of producing more high-mass clusters than what is observed to date in any lower luminosity star-forming galaxy in the local universe. The observed cluster mass distribution of {dN}/{dM}={M}-1.95+/-0.11 is consistent with the canonical -2 power law used to describe the underlying initial cluster mass function (ICMF) for a wide range of galactic environments. We interpret this as evidence against mass-dependent cluster disruption, which would flatten the observed CMF relative to the underlying ICMF distribution.

  11. Is the Escape Velocity in Star Clusters Linked to Extended Star Formation Histories? Using NGC 7252: W3 as a Test Case

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera-Ziri, I; Hilker, M; Davies, B; Schweizer, F; Kruijssen, J M D; Mejía-Narváez, A; Niederhofer, F; Brandt, T D; Rejkuba, M; Bruzual, G; Magris, G

    2016-01-01

    The colour-magnitude diagrams of some intermediate-age clusters (1-2 Gyr) star clusters show unexpectedly broad main-sequence turnoffs, raising the possibility that these clusters have experienced more than one episode of star formation. Such a scenario predicts the existence of an extended main sequence turn off (eMSTO) only in clusters with escape velocities above a certain threshold ($>15$ km s$^{-1}$), which would allow them to retain or accrete gas that eventually would fuel a secondary extended star-formation episode. This paper presents a test of this scenario based on the study of the young and massive cluster NGC 7252: W3. We use the HST photometry from WFPC2 and WFC3 images obtained with UV and optical filters, as well as MagE echellette spectrograph data from the Las Campanas Clay 6.5m telescope, in order to construct the observed UV/optical SED of NGC 7252: W3. The observations are then compared with synthetic spectra based on different star formation histories consistent with those of the eMSTO c...

  12. The clustered nature of star formation. Pre--main-sequence clusters in the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Dolphin, Andrew E; Gennaro, Mario; Tognelli, Emanuele; Moroni, Pier Giorgio Prada

    2012-01-01

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC602/N90 is characterized by the HII nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre--main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main sequence stars NGC602. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with HST/ACS camera in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster, low-mass PMS stars are congregated in thirteen additional small compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC602. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction (~60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the inter-cluster area. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age-difference of ~2.5Myr between NGC602 and the compact sub-clusters which appear younger. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally conc...

  13. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  14. Star Formation Rates for z>1 Galaxy Clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey Using WFC3 IR Grism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimann, Gregory; Stanford, A.; Brodwin, M.; Dey, A.; Stern, D.; Gonzalez, A.

    2011-05-01

    We present new HST WFC3 grism data for 17 z>1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). Using the G141 grism (λ = 1.10 - 1.65 μm, 46.5 A/pixel), we identified ˜5-15 new cluster members in each cluster candidate with a visual inspection of emission line galaxies in the reduced 1-d and 2-d spectral extractions. Given the redshift range of the cluster candidates and the wavelength coverage of the G141 grism, the emission line most identified was the blended Hα+NII. Correlations found in the literature between the EW of Hα+NII and the line ratio of NII to Hα were used to deblend the two fluxes. Hα emission was used as an indicator of star formation. Our program is sensitive to an unobscured star formation rate of 4 M⊙ / Year for z=1.5 and a nominal 1:4 ratio of NII to Hα. Concurrent MIPS 24μm data allows for the comparison of different SFR tracers. Whenever possible, we also use the ratio of Hβ/Hα to estimate dust obscuration and correct the SFRs. This dataset allows the study of a wide-range of star formation rates in dense cluster cores during the peak epoch of galaxy formation.

  15. A Chandra Study of the Rosette Star-Forming Complex. III. The NGC 2237 Cluster and the Region's Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Townsley, Leisa K; Broos, Patrick S; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G; Lada, Elizabeth; Garmire, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray images of the NGC 2237 young star cluster on the periphery of the Rosette Nebula. We detect 168 X-ray sources, 80% of which have counterparts in USNO, 2MASS, and deep FLAMINGOS images. These constitute the first census of the cluster members with 0.2<~M<~2 Msun. Star locations in near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams indicate a cluster age around 2 Myr with a visual extinction of 1cluster NGC 2244. We derive the K-band luminosity function and the X-ray luminosity function of the cluster, which indicate a population ~400-600 stars. The X-ray-selected sample shows a K-excess disk frequency of 13%. The young Class II counterparts are aligned in an arc ~3 pc long suggestive of a triggered formation process induced by the O stars in NGC 2244. The diskless Class III sources are more dispersed. Several X-ray emitting stars are located inside the molecular cloud and around gaseous pillars projecting from the cloud. These...

  16. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs: 1. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Corey; Harris, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (< 5 Myr) of turbulent, 10$^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an IMF with an efficiency of 20% per freefall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster formation efficiency, measured via the total particle mass, by a few percent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of clust...

  17. Formation of Massive Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters. II. IMF and Primordial Mass Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Bierbaum, Matt; Rasio, Frederic A

    2011-01-01

    A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is the runaway merger in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole. In this paper we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code for N-body systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our code now includes an explicit treatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Moreover, primordial mass segregation increases the average mass in the core, thus reducing the central relaxation time,...

  18. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-09-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the `Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission line galaxies in the `Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much H I gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large H I reservoirs are expected to be consumed within ˜0.75-1.0 Gyr by the vigorous SF and active galactic nuclei activity and/or driven out by the outflows we observe. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a large fraction of H α emission line cluster galaxies correlates well with the radio broad-band emission, tracing supernova remnant emission. This suggests that the cluster galaxies, all located in post-shock regions, may have been undergoing sustained SFR for at least 100 Myr. This fully supports the interpretation proposed by Stroe et al. and Sobral et al. that gas-rich cluster galaxies have been triggered to form stars by the passage of the shock.

  19. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3 I. Star formation activity of cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Braglia, F G; Biviano, A; Böhringer, H

    2009-01-01

    The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z ~ 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies, RXCJ0014.3-3022 and RXCJ2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [OII] and Hdelta features, and the D4000 break, available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star formation history in galaxies. In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star formation activity, the average star-for...

  20. Clustering Properties of restframe UV selected galaxies II: Migration of Star Formation sites with cosmic time from GALEX and CFHTLS

    CERN Document Server

    Heinis, Sebastien; Arnouts, Stephane; Blaizot, Jeremy; Schiminovich, David; Budavari, Tamas; Ilbert, Olivier; Treyer, Marie; Wyder, Ted K; McCracken, Henry J; Barlow, Tom A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Bianchi, Luciana; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K; Xu, C K

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the clustering properties of ultraviolet selected galaxies by using GALEX-SDSS data at z 2) to low redshift (b ~ 0.79^{+0.1}_{-0.08}). When accounting for the fraction of the star formation activity enclosed in the different samples, our results suggest that the bulk of star formation migrated from high mass dark matter halos at z>2 (10^12 < M_min < 10^13 M_sun, located in high density regions), to less massive halos at low redshift (M_min < 10^12 M_sun, located in low density regions). This result extends the ``downsizing'' picture (shift of the star formation activity from high stellar mass systems at high z to low stellar mass at low z) to the dark matter distribution.

  1. Recent galaxy mergers and residual star formation of red sequence galaxies in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Ree, Chang H; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the GALEX ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in 4 rich Abell clusters at z \\leq 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r' colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5), and that number was doubled (~ 72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5xR_{200}. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R_{200}. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the sub-structures in ...

  2. Arcus: Exploring the Formation and Evolution of Clusters, Galaxies, and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Arcus Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    The Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the Universe grew via the gravitational collapse of dark matter, but the visible components that trace the LSS-galaxies, groups and clusters-have a more complex history. Their baryons experience shock heating, radiative cooling and feedback from black holes and star formation, which leave faint signatures of hot (T~10^5-10^8 K), metal-enriched gas in the interstellar and intergalactic media (ISM and IGM). While recent Planck and X-ray studies support this scenario, no current mission possesses the instrumentation necessary to provide direct observational evidence for these “missing baryons." Arcus, a proposed MIDEX mission, leverages recent advances in critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings and silicon pore optics (SPOs), using CCDs with strong Suzaku heritage and electronics based on the Swift mission; both the spacecraft and mission operations reuse highly successful designs. To be launched in 2023, Arcus will be the only observatory capable of studying, in detail, the hot galactic and intergalactic gas-the dominant baryonic component in the present-day Universe and ultimate reservoir of entropy, metals and the output from cosmic feedback. Its superior soft X-ray sensitivity will complement the forthcoming post-Hitomi and Athena calorimeters, which will have comparably high spectral resolution above 2 keV but poorer spectral resolution than XMM or Chandra in the Arcus bandpass.

  3. Gas giants in hot water: inhibiting giant planet formation and planet habitability in dense star clusters through cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-05-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice-line temperature (TIce ≈ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation time-scale. The protoplanetary discs within these systems will thus, not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive discs. I show that cluster irradiation can in many cases dominate the thermodynamics and structure of passive and active protoplanetary discs for semi-major axes larger than ˜1-5 au. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441 and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteristic stellar surface density above which TIce is exceeded in star clusters is ˜ 6 × 103 M⊙ pc- 2 f- 1/2dg, MW, where fdg, MW is the dust-to-gas ratio of the embedding material, normalized to the Milky Way value. Simple estimates suggest that ˜5-50 per cent of the stars in the universe formed in an environment exceeding this surface density. Future microlensing planet searches that directly distinguish between the bulge and disc planet populations of the Galaxy and M31 can test these predictions. Caveats and uncertainties are detailed.

  4. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. I. The flocculent galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, M_max, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H2) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the flocculent galaxy M33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M_max is proportional to Sigma_gas^4.7, M_max is proportional Sigma_H2^1.3, and M_max is proportional to Sigma_SFR^1.0. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

  5. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the center of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 solar masses/yr. However, very few number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and e...

  6. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; McDonald, M.; Whelan, John T.; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2017-03-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the centre of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 M⊙ yr-1. However, a very small number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and extinction law. We find that in the absence of any prior except that the maximum cooling rate Phoenix. The SFR dependence on the extinction is a reflection of the standard age-extinction degeneracy, which can be overcome by using a prior on one of the two quantities in question.

  7. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, C; Kroupa, P; Pflamm-Altenburg, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. A large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also that of NGC 1399. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are star clusters (SCs) and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different times. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope $-\\beta$ and a stellar upper mass limit, $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$ of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribut...

  8. A VLT/NACO Study of Star Formation in the Massive Embedded Cluster RCW 38

    CERN Document Server

    DeRose, K L; Gutermuth, R A; Wolk, S J; Megeath, S T; Alves, J; Nürnberger, D

    2009-01-01

    We present adaptive optics (AO) near-infrared (JHKs) observations of the deeply embedded massive cluster RCW 38 using NACO on the VLT. Narrowband AO observations centered at wavelengths of 1.28, 2.12, and 2.17 micron were also obtained. The area covered by these observations is about 0.5 pc square, centered on the O star RCW 38 IRS2. We use the JHKs colors to identify young stars with infrared excess. Through a detailed comparison to a nearby control field, we find that most of the 337 stars detected in all three infrared bands are cluster members (~317), with essentially no contamination due to background or foreground sources. Five sources have colors suggestive of deeply embedded protostars, while 53 sources are detected at Ks only; their spatial distribution with respect to the extinction suggests they are highly reddened cluster members. Detectable Ks-band excess is found toward 29 +/- 3 % of the stars. For comparison to a similar area of Orion observed in the near-infrared, mass and extinction cuts are ...

  9. A Chandra X-ray Analysis of Abell 1664: Cooling, Feedback and Star Formation in the Central Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C; Rafferty, D A; Nulsen, P E J; Birzan, L; Kazemzadeh, F; Wise, M W; Gitti, M; Cavagnolo, K W

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of ~ 23 M_{\\sun} yr^{-1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5x10^8 yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm^2 are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, "bar-like" X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, ~ 10^{10} M_{\\sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of Birzan et al. 2008 to show that the AGN is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low-state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and...

  10. Clues to Nuclear Star Cluster Formation from Edge-on Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Seth, A C; Hodge, P W; Debattista, V P; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Hodge, Paul W.; Debattista, Victor P.

    2006-01-01

    We find 9 nuclear cluster candidates in a sample of 14 edge-on, late-type galaxies observed with HST/ACS. These clusters have magnitudes (M_I ~ -11) and sizes (r_eff ~ 3pc) similar to those found in previous studies of face-on, late-type spirals and dE galaxies. However, three of the nuclear clusters are significantly flattened and show evidence for multiple, coincident structural components. The elongations of these three clusters are aligned to within 10 degrees of the galaxies' major axes. Structurally, the flattened clusters are well fit by a combination of a spheroid and a disk or ring. The nuclear cluster disks/rings have F606W-F814W (~V-I) colors 0.3-0.6 magnitudes bluer than the spheroid components, suggesting that the stars in these components have ages < 1 Gyr. In NGC 4244, the nearest of the nuclear clusters, we further constrain the stellar populations and provide a lower limit on the dynamical mass via spectroscopy. We also present tentative evidence that another of the nuclear clusters (in NG...

  11. The Nature and Nurture of Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2009-01-01

    Star clusters have hierarchical patterns in space and time, suggesting formation processes in the densest regions of a turbulent interstellar medium. Clusters also have hierarchical substructure when they are young, which makes them all look like the inner mixed parts of a pervasive stellar hierarchy. Young field stars share this distribution, presumably because some of them came from dissolved clusters and others formed in a dispersed fashion in the same gas. The fraction of star formation that ends up in clusters is apparently not constant, but may increase with interstellar pressure. Hierarchical structure explains why stars form in clusters and why many of these clusters are self-bound. It also explains the cluster mass function. Halo globular clusters share many properties of disk clusters, including what appears to be an upper cluster cutoff mass. However, halo globulars are self-enriched and often connected with dwarf galaxy streams. The mass function of halo globulars could have initially been like th...

  12. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. II. The grand-design galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H_2), neutral gas (Sigma_HI) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the grand design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. We find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M_3rd, the median of the 5 most massive clusters, is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.4. There is no correlation with Sigma_gas, Sigma_H2, or Sigma_SFR. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.6, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_gas^0.5; there is no correlation with either Sigma_H_2 or Sigma_SFR. The results could hardly be more different than those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_g...

  13. The Molecular Gas Contents Of Z=1.6 (Proto)-Cluster Galaxies And Their Last Gasp Of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gregory

    2017-06-01

    In this talk I present two related topics. First, I discuss the constraints on the quenching efficiency and the age in stellar populations that we derive from deep HST G102 and G141 grism observations in a z=1.62 proto-cluster galaxy. We use the grism data to establish unambiguous membership for passive and star-forming galaxies and to measure the strength of the 4000-Angstrom break strength. We find a strongly mass-dependent passive fraction that is in excess of the field at the highest stellar masses. However, the strength of D4000 for passive galaxies is independent of mass and we interpret this as a lack of strong trends of stellar age with mass. We discuss possible explanations for our observations that there is no stellar age trend although more massive galaxies clearly quench more efficiently than lower mass galaxies. We then discuss the molecular gas properties in a set of 4 clusters at z=1.6. We find that most galaxies have gas fractions that are elevated with respect to the field for galaxies at similar redshift, stellar mass, and star formation rate. However, there is a significant cluster-to-cluster dispersion with galaxies in one cluster having molecular gas properties indistinguishable from the field. There is also some suggestion that the most quenched clusters have the lowest gas fractions but this requires more cluster molecular gas data to confirm this tentative picture.

  14. Star formation in the filament of S254-S258 OB complex: a cluster in the process of making

    CERN Document Server

    Samal, M R; Jose, J; Zavagno, A; Takahashi, S; Neichel, B; Kim, J S; Chauhan, N; Pandey, A K; Zinchenko, I; Tamura, M; Ghosh, S K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds are ideal laboratories to study the initial processes of high-mass star and star cluster formation. We investigated star formation activity of an unexplored filamentary dark cloud (~5.7pc x 1.9pc), which itself is part of a large filament (~20pc) located in the S254-S258 OB complex at a distance of 2.5kpc. Using MIPS Spitzer 24 micron data, we uncover 49 sources with SNR greater than 5. We identified 45 sources as candidate YSOs of Class I, Flat-spectrum & Class II nature. Additional 17 candidate YSOs (9 Class I & 8 Class II) are also identified using JHK and WISE photometry. We find that the protostar to Class II sources ratio (~2) and the protostar fraction (~70%) of the region are high. When the protostar fraction compared to other young clusters, it suggests that the star formation in the dark cloud was possibly started only 1 Myr ago. Combining the NIR photometry of the YSO candidates with the theoretical evolutionary models, we infer that most of the candidate YSOs formed in...

  15. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T. [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dawson, J. R. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay, TAS 7005 (Australia); Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H. [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Mizuno, A., E-mail: fukui@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  16. Chemical evolution of star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2010-02-28

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old Galactic globular clusters (GCs), in relation to their formation histories. GCs are clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of GCs in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the GCs formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter mini-haloes might be favoured. Not all GCs may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic Halo from Galactic Bulge clusters.

  17. The rise and fall of star-formation in $\\bf z\\sim0.2$ merging galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William; Jee, M James; Hoekstra, Henk; Wittman, David; van Weeren, Reinout J; Brüggen, Marcus; Röttgering, Huub J A

    2014-01-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`Sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`Toothbrush') are two low-redshift ($z\\sim0.2$), massive ($\\sim2\\times10^{15}M_\\odot$), post-core passage merging clusters, which host shock waves traced by diffuse radio emission. To study their star-formation properties, we uniformly survey the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' clusters in broad and narrow band filters and select a sample of $201$ and $463$ line emitters, down to a rest-frame equivalent width ($13${\\AA}). We robustly separate between H$\\alpha$ and higher redshift emitters using a combination of optical multi-band (B, g, V, r, i, z) and spectroscopic data. We build H$\\alpha$ luminosity functions for the entire cluster region, near the shock fronts, and away from the shock fronts and find striking differences between the two clusters. In the dynamically younger, $1$ Gyr old `Sausage' cluster we find numerous ($59$) H$\\alpha$ emitters above a star-formation rate (SFR) of $0.17$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ surprisingly located in close proximity to the sh...

  18. Submillimetre observations of galaxy clusters with BLAST: the star-formation activity in Abell 3112

    CERN Document Server

    Braglia, Filiberto G; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Edge, Alastair; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Valiante, Elisabetta; Viero, Marco P; Wiebe, Donald V

    2010-01-01

    We present observations at 250, 350, and 500 um of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 3112 (z=0.075) carried out with BLAST, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. Five cluster members are individually detected as bright submillimetre sources. Their far-infrared SEDs and optical colours identify them as normal star-forming galaxies of high mass, with globally evolved stellar populations. They all have B-R colours of 1.38+/-0.08, transitional between the blue, active population and the red, evolved galaxies that dominate the cluster core. We stack to determine the mean submillimetre emission from all cluster members, which is determined to be 16.6+/-2.5, 6.1+/-1.9, and 1.5+/-1.3 mJy at 250, 350, and 500 um, respectively. Stacking analyses of the submillimetre emission of cluster members reveal trends in the mean far-infrared luminosity with respect to cluster-centric radius and Ks-band magnitude. We find that a large fraction of submillimetre emission comes from the boundary of the inner, viria...

  19. The Formation of Secondary Stellar Generations in Massive Young Star Clusters from Rapidly Cooling Shocked Stellar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, R.; Palouš, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Ehlerová, S.

    2017-01-01

    We study a model of rapidly cooling shocked stellar winds in young massive clusters and estimate the circumstances under which secondary star formation, out of the reinserted winds from a first stellar generation (1G), is possible. We have used two implementations of the model: a highly idealized, computationally inexpensive, spherically symmetric semi-analytic model, and a complex, three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic, simulation; they are in a good mutual agreement. The results confirm our previous findings that, in a cluster with 1G mass 107 M⊙ and half-mass–radius 2.38 pc, the shocked stellar winds become thermally unstable, collapse into dense gaseous structures that partially accumulate inside the cluster, self-shield against ionizing stellar radiation, and form the second generation (2G) of stars. We have used the semi-analytic model to explore a subset of the parameter space covering a wide range of the observationally poorly constrained parameters: the heating efficiency, ηhe, and the mass loading, ηml. The results show that the fraction of the 1G stellar winds accumulating inside the cluster can be larger than 50% if ηhe ≲ 10%, which is suggested by the observations. Furthermore, for low ηhe, the model provides a self-consistent mechanism predicting 2G stars forming only in the central zones of the cluster. Finally, we have calculated the accumulated warm gas emission in the H30α recombination line, analyzed its velocity profile, and estimated its intensity for super star clusters in interacting galaxies NGC4038/9 (Antennae) showing that the warm gas should be detectable with ALMA.

  20. Planetary systems in star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kouwenhoven, M B N; Cai, Maxwell Xu; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of confirmed and candidate exoplanets have been identified in recent years. Consequently, theoretical research on the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems has seen a boost, and the processes of planet-planet scattering, secular evolution, and interaction between planets and gas/debris disks have been well-studied. Almost all of this work has focused on the formation and evolution of isolated planetary systems, and neglect the effect of external influences, such as the gravitational interaction with neighbouring stars. Most stars, however, form in clustered environments that either quickly disperse, or evolve into open clusters. Under these conditions, young planetary systems experience frequent close encounters with other stars, at least during the first 1-10 Myr, which affects planets orbiting at any period range, as well as their debris structures.

  1. The Origin of S0s in Clusters: evidence from the bulge and disc star formation histories

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Evelyn J; Merrifield, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The individual star formation histories of bulges and discs of lenticular (S0) galaxies can provide information on the processes involved in the quenching of their star formation and subsequent transformation from spirals. In order to study this transformation in dense environments, we have decomposed long-slit spectroscopic observations of a sample of 21 S0s from the Virgo Cluster to produce one-dimensional spectra representing purely the bulge and disc light for each galaxy. Analysis of the Lick indices within these spectra reveals that the bulges contain consistently younger and more metal-rich stellar populations than their surrounding discs, implying that the final episode of star formation within S0s occurs in their central regions. Analysis of the $\\alpha$-element abundances in these components further presents a picture in which the final episode of star formation in the bulge is fueled using gas that has previously been chemically enriched in the disc, indicating the sequence of events in the transfo...

  2. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  3. Gas Giants in Hot Water: Inhibiting Giant Planet Formation and Planet Habitability in Dense Star Clusters Through Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Todd A

    2012-01-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies, and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice line temperature (T_Ice ~ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation timescale. The protoplanetary disks within these systems will thus not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive disks. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441, and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteris...

  4. A constraint on the formation timescale of the young open cluster NGC 2264: Lithium abundance of pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Kim, Jinyoung S; Bessell, Michael S; Hwang, Narae; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-01-01

    The timescale of cluster formation is an essential parameter in order to understand the formation process of star clusters. Pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in nearby young open clusters reveal a large spread in brightness. If the spread were considered as a result of a real spread in age, the corresponding cluster formation timescale would be about 5 -- 20 Myr. Hence it could be interpreted that star formation in an open cluster is prolonged for up to a few tens of Myr. However, difficulties in reddening correction, observational errors, and systematic uncertainties introduced by imperfect evolutionary models for PMS stars, can result in an artificial age spread. Alternatively, we can utilize Li abundance as a relative age indicator of PMS star to determine the cluster formation timescale. The optical spectra of 134 PMS stars in NGC 2264 have been obtained with MMT/Hectochelle. The equivalent widths have been measured for 86 PMS stars with a detectable Li line (3500 < T_eff [K] <= 6500). Li abundance unde...

  5. The Evolution of Star formation Activity in Cluster Galaxies over 0.15 < z < 1.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Cory R.; Courteau, Stéphane; Brodwin, Mark; Stanford, S. A.; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in the star formation activity of massive ({M}\\star > {10}10.1 {M}ȯ ) cluster galaxies using a sample of 25 clusters over 0.15visually using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images. Using the spectral energy distribution fitting code Code Investigating GALaxy Emission, we measure star formation rates, stellar masses, and 4000 Å break strengths. The latter are used to separate quiescent and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). From z∼ 1.3 to z∼ 0.2, the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of cluster SFGs and quiescent galaxies decreases by factors of three and four, respectively. Over the same redshift range, the sSFR of the entire cluster population declines by a factor of 11, from 0.48+/- 0.06 {{Gyr}}-1 to 0.043+/- 0.009 {{Gyr}}-1. This strong overall sSFR evolution is driven by the growth of the quiescent population over time; the fraction of quiescent cluster galaxies increases from {28}-19+8 % to {88}-4+5 % over z ∼ 1.3 to 0.2. The majority of the growth occurs at z≳ 0.9, where the quiescent fraction increases by 0.41. While the sSFR of the majority of star-forming cluster galaxies is at the level of the field, a small subset of cluster SFGs have low field-relative star formation activity, suggestive of long-timescale quenching. The large increase in the fraction of quiescent galaxies above z∼ 0.9, coupled with the field-level sSFRs of cluster SFGs, suggests that higher-redshift cluster galaxies are likely being quenched quickly. Assessing those timescales will require more accurate stellar population ages and star formation histories.

  6. Effects of cooling and star formation on the baryon fractions in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kravtsov, A V; Vikhlinin, A A; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.

    2005-01-01

    We study the effects of dissipation on the baryon fractions in clusters using high-resolution cosmological simulations of nine clusters that resolve formation of cluster galaxies. The simulations of each cluster are performed with the shock-capturing eulerian adaptive mesh refinement N-body+gasdynamics ART code with and without radiative cooling. We show that dissipation and associated galaxy formation increase the total baryon fractions within radii as large as the virial radius. The effect is the strongest within cluster cores, where the simulations with cooling have baryon fractions larger than the universal value, while the fraction of baryons in adiabatic simulations are smaller than universal. At larger radii (r >~ r_500) the cumulative baryon fractions in simulations with cooling are close to, while those in the adiabatic runs remain below than, the universal value. The gas fractions in simulations with dissipation are reduced by ~20-40% at r0.2, but differ systematically by up to 10% at small radii.

  7. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star-formation in galaxies in and around the 'Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Rottgering, Huub J A; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-01-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 ($z = 0.188$, nicknamed 'Sausage') is an extremely massive ($M_{200}\\sim 2.0 \\times 10^{15}M_\\odot$ ), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission-line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope HI observations of the 'Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission-line galaxies in the 'Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much HI gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large HI reservoirs are expected to be consumed within $\\sim0.75-1.0$ Gyr by the vigorous SF and AGN activity and/or driven out by t...

  8. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  9. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  10. THE TWO MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN RCW 38: EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF THE YOUNGEST SUPER STAR CLUSTER IN THE MILKY WAY TRIGGERED BY CLOUD–CLOUD COLLISION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Ohama, A.; Hasegawa, K.; Hattori, Y.; Sano, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Ohashi, S.; Fujii, K.; Kuwahara, S. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Mizuno, N.; Okuda, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Dawson, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Onishi, T. [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Mizuno, A., E-mail: torii@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-03-20

    We present distributions of two molecular clouds having velocities of 2 and 14 km s{sup −1} toward RCW 38, the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, in the {sup 12}CO J = 1–0 and 3–2 and {sup 13}CO J = 1–0 transitions. The two clouds are likely physically associated with the cluster as verified by the high intensity ratio of the J = 3–2 emission to the J = 1–0 emission, the bridging feature connecting the two clouds in velocity, and their morphological correspondence with the infrared dust emission. The velocity difference is too large for the clouds to be gravitationally bound. We frame a hypothesis that the two clouds are colliding with each other by chance to trigger formation of the ∼20 O stars that are localized within ∼0.5 pc of the cluster center in the 2 km s{sup −1} cloud. We suggest that the collision is currently continuing toward part of the 2 km s{sup −1} cloud where the bridging feature is localized. This is the third super star cluster alongside Westerlund 2 and NGC 3603 where cloud–cloud collision has triggered the cluster formation. RCW 38 is the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, holding a possible sign of on-going O star formation, and is a promising site where we may be able to witness the moment of O star formation.

  11. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  12. Star clusters as tracers of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S

    2009-01-01

    Star clusters represent the most common 'mode' of star formation. They are found in all types of environments, cascading down from galaxy groups and merging pairs through starbursts to normal galaxies and dwarves and even isolated regions in extragalactic space. As they maintain a link to the overall star formation in a system, they can be used as tracers of the star formation history of environments located at distances prohibitive to the study of individual stars. This makes them ideally suited to the study of mergers and interactions in galaxy pairs and groups. In this work we present observations of the star cluster populations in the local starburst galaxy M82, post-interaction spiral NGC 6872, the "Antennae" merging pair and two compact groups, "Stephan's Quintet" and HCG 7. In each case, we extract information on the clusters and their hosts using mainly HST photometry and Gemini spectroscopy.

  13. Physics of star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, F

    2002-01-01

    Begining with a historical introduction, ""Star Formation: The Early History"", this text then presents two long articles on ""Pre-Main-Sequence Evolution of Stars and Young Clusters"" and ""Observations of Young Stellar Objects"".

  14. Multicolor Photometry of the Galaxy Cluster A98: Substructures and Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L; Zhou, X; Jiang, Z -J; Yang, Y -B; Ma, J; Wu, J -H; Wu, Z -Y

    2009-01-01

    An optical photometric observation with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) multicolor system is carried out for A98 (z=0.104), a galaxy cluster with two large enhancements in X-ray surface brightness. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) covering 15 intermediate bands are obtained for all sources detected down to V ~ 20 mag in a field of $58' \\times 58'$. After the star-galaxy separation by the color-color diagrams, a photometric redshift technique is applied to the galaxy sample for further membership determination. The color-magnitude relation is taken as a further restriction of the early-type cluster galaxies. As a result, a list of 198 faint member galaxies is achieved. Based on newly generated sample of member galaxies, the dynamical substructures, A98N, A98S, and A98W, are investigated in detail. A separate galaxy group, A98X, is also found to the south of main concentration of A98, which is gravitationally unbound to A98. For 74 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies, the environme...

  15. Multi-seeded multi-mode formation of embedded clusters in the RMC: Structured star formation toward the south-east boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, J Z L M D

    2005-01-01

    The Rosette Molecular Complex contains embedded clusters with diverse properties and origins. We have previously explored the shell mode of formation in the north (Regions A & B) and the massive concentrations in the ridge (Region C). Here, we explore star formation towards the south of the complex, Region D, based on data from the spatially complete 2 Micron All Sky Survey. We find that stars are forming prolifically throughout this region in a highly structured mode with both clusters and loose aggregates detected. The most prominent cluster (Region D1) lies in the north-center. This cluster is over 20 pc to the south of the Monoceros ridge, the interface of the emerging young OB cluster NGC 2244 with its ambient molecular clouds. In addition, there are several branches stemming from AFGL 961 in Region C and extending to the south-east boundary of the cloud. We invoke a tree model to interpret this pattern, corresponding to probable tracks of abrupt turbulent excitation and subsequent decay. Alternative...

  16. Massive Stars in the Quintuplet Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Figer, D F; Morris, M; Figer, Donald F.; Lean, Ian S. Mc

    1999-01-01

    We present near-infrared photometry and K-band spectra of newly-identified massive stars in the Quintuplet Cluster, one of the three massive clusters projected within 50 pc of the Galactic Center. We find that the cluster contains a variety of massive stars, including more unambiguously identified Wolf-Rayet stars than any cluster in the Galaxy, and over a dozen stars in earlier stages of evolution, i.e., LBV, Ofpe/WN9, and OB supergiants. One newly identified star is the second ``Luminous Blue Variable'' in the cluster, after the ``Pistol Star.'' Given the evolutionary stages of the identified stars, the cluster appears to be about 4 \\pm 1 Myr old, assuming coeval formation. The total mass in observed stars is $\\sim 10^3 \\Msun$, and the implied mass is initial mass function. The implied mass density in stars is at least a few thousand $\\Msun pc^{-3}$. The newly-identified stars increase the estimated ionizing flux from this cluster by about an order of magnitude with respect to earlier estimates, to 10^{50.9...

  17. The evolution of dust-obscured star formation activity in galaxy clusters relative to the field over the last 9 billion years

    CERN Document Server

    Alberts, Stacey; Brodwin, Mark; Atlee, David W; Lin, Yen-Ting; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter R M; Gettings, Daniel P; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Jannuzi, Buell T; Mancone, Conor L; Moustakas, John; Snyder, Gregory F; Stanford, S Adam; Stern, Daniel; Weiner, Benjamin J; Zeimann, Gregory R

    2013-01-01

    We compare the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies to the field from z=0.3-1.5 using $Herschel$ SPIRE 250$\\mu$m imaging. We utilize 274 clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS) selected as rest-frame near-infrared overdensities over the 9 square degree Bootes field . This analysis allows us to quantify the evolution of SF in clusters over a long redshift baseline without bias against active cluster systems. Using a stacking analysis, we determine the average star formation rates (SFRs) and specific-SFRs (SSFR=SFR/M$_{\\star}$) of stellar mass-limited (M>1.3x10$^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$), statistical samples of cluster and field galaxies, probing both the star forming and quiescent populations. We find a clear indication that the average SF in cluster galaxies is evolving more rapidly than in the field, with field SF levels at z>1.2 in the cluster cores (r0.5 Mpc). These general trends in the cluster cores and outskirts are driven by the lower mass galaxies in our sample. Blue cluster galaxies...

  18. Massive star clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, William E

    2009-01-01

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCSs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GCS research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  19. A large Hα survey of star formation in relaxed and merging galaxy cluster environments at z ∼ 0.15-0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Paulino-Afonso, Ana; Alegre, Lara; Calhau, João; Santos, Sergio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2017-03-01

    We present the first results from the largest Hα survey of star formation and active galactic nucleus activity in galaxy clusters. Using nine different narrow-band filters, we select >3000 Hα emitters within 19 clusters and their larger scale environment over a total volume of 1.3 × 105 Mpc3. The sample includes both relaxed and merging clusters, covering the 0.15-0.31 redshift range and spanning from 5 × 1014 to 30 × 1014 M⊙. We find that the Hα luminosity function for merging clusters has a higher characteristic density ϕ* compared to relaxed clusters. ϕ* drops from cluster core to cluster outskirts for both merging and relaxed clusters, with the merging cluster values ∼0.3 dex higher at each projected radius. The characteristic luminosity L* drops over the 0.5-2.0 Mpc distance from the cluster centre for merging clusters and increases for relaxed objects. Among disturbed objects, clusters hosting large-scale shock waves (traced by radio relics) are overdense in Hα emitters compared to those with turbulence in their intracluster medium (traced by radio haloes). We speculate that the increase in star formation activity in disturbed, young, massive galaxy clusters can be triggered by interactions between gas-rich galaxies, shocks and/or the intracluster medium, as well as accretion of filaments and galaxy groups. Our results indicate that disturbed clusters represent vastly different environments for galaxy evolution compared to relaxed clusters or average field environments.

  20. Filamentary star formation in NGC 1275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, R. E. A.; Ryon, J. E.; Gallagher, J. S.; Kotulla, R.; O'Connell, R. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Conselice, C. J.; Hicks, A.; Rosario, D.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-10-01

    We examine the star formation in the outer halo of NGC 1275, the central galaxy in the Perseus cluster (Abell 426), using far-ultraviolet and optical images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We have identified a population of very young, compact star clusters with typical ages of a few Myr. The star clusters are organized on multiple kiloparsec scales. Many of these star clusters are associated with `streaks' of young stars, the combination of which has a cometary appearance. We perform photometry on the star clusters and diffuse stellar streaks, and fit their spectral energy distributions to obtain ages and masses. These young stellar populations appear to be normal in terms of their masses, luminosities and cluster formation efficiency; <10 per cent of the young stellar mass is located in star clusters. Our data suggest star formation is associated with the evolution of some of the giant gas filaments in NGC 1275 that become gravitationally unstable on reaching and possibly stalling in the outer galaxy. The stellar streaks then could represent stars moving on ballistic orbits in the potential well of the galaxy cluster. We propose a model where star-forming filaments, switched on ˜50 Myr ago and are currently feeding the growth of the NGC 1275 stellar halo at a rate of ≈-2 to 3 M⊙ yr-1. This type of process may also build stellar haloes and form isolated star clusters in the outskirts of youthful galaxies.

  1. Dissecting 30 Doradus: Optical and Near Infrared Star Formation History of the starburst cluster NGC2070 from the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignoni, Michele

    2015-08-01

    I will present new results on the star formation history of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on the panchromatic imaging survey Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). Here the focus is on the starburst cluster NGC2070. The star formation history is derived by comparing the deepest ever optical and NIR color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with state-of-the-art synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PARSEC models, which include all stellar phases from pre-main sequence (PMS) to post-main sequence. For the first time in this region we are able to measure the star formation using intermediate and low mass stars simultaneously. Our results suggest that NGC2070 experienced a prolonged activity. I will discuss the detailed star formation history, initial mass function and reddening distribution and how these relate to previous studies of this starburst region.

  2. The Pan-STARRS1 Medium-deep Survey: Star Formation Quenching in Group and Cluster Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hung-Yu; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Kai-Yang; Foucaud, Sebastien; Chen, Chin-Wei; Chiueh, Tzihong; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Chen, Wen-Ping; Burgett, W. S.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-08-01

    We make use of a catalog of 1600 Pan-STARRS1 groups produced by the probability friends-of-friends algorithm to explore how the galaxy properties, i.e., the specific star formation rate (SSFR) and quiescent fraction, depend on stellar mass and group-centric radius. The work is the extension of Lin et al. In this work, powered by a stacking technique plus a background subtraction for contamination removal, a finer correction and more precise results are obtained than in our previous work. We find that while the quiescent fraction increases with decreasing group-centric radius, the median SSFRs of star-forming galaxies in groups at fixed stellar mass drop slightly from the field toward the group center. This suggests that the main quenching process in groups is likely a fast mechanism. On the other hand, a reduction in SSFRs by ˜0.2 dex is seen inside clusters as opposed to the field galaxies. If the reduction is attributed to the slow quenching effect, the slow quenching process acts dominantly in clusters. In addition, we also examine the density-color relation, where the density is defined by using a sixth-nearest-neighbor approach. Comparing the quiescent fractions contributed from the density and radial effect, we find that the density effect dominates the massive group or cluster galaxies, and the radial effect becomes more effective in less massive galaxies. The results support mergers and/or starvation as the main quenching mechanisms in the group environment, while harassment and/or starvation dominate in clusters.

  3. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagg, Jeff [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Bussmann, Robert S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Le Floc' h, Emeric [AIM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Melbourne, Jason [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: jwagg@eso.org [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  4. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Escala, A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Ryder, S., E-mail: zara@saao.ac.za [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  5. Sketching Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jeremy

    The next time you plan a quiet evening under a salted sky, with hopes of bathing your eyes in the ancient light of a majestic star cluster, be sure that your sketching kit comes with you! A casual glance at these celestial marvels will not give you a decent appreciation for an object whose history and character are as unique as the fingerprints you should be pressing into the side of your trusty pencil. I can think of no better way to connect with these stellar ballets, to understand their intricacies, and to recall your view later than to spend time sketching the soft glow or blazing pinpricks you see through the eyepiece.

  6. Formation of an O-Star Cluster by Hierarchical Accretion in G20.08-0.14 N

    CERN Document Server

    Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Zhang, Qizhou; Kurtz, Stan; Rodríguez, Luis F; Ho, Paul T P

    2009-01-01

    Spectral line and continuum observations of the ionized and molecular gas in G20.08-0.14 N explore the dynamics of accretion over a range of spatial scales in this massive star forming region. Very Large Array observations of NH_3 at 4'' angular resolution show a large scale (0.5 pc) molecular accretion flow around and into a star cluster with three small, bright HII regions. Higher resolution (0.4'') observations with the Submillimeter Array in hot core molecules (CH_3CN, OCS, and SO_2) and the VLA in NH_3, show that the two brightest and smallest HII regions are themselves surrounded by smaller scale (0.05 pc) accretion flows. The axes of rotation of the large and small scale flows are aligned, and the time scale for the contraction of the cloud is short enough, 0.1 Myr, for the large scale accretion flow to deliver significant mass to the smaller scales within the star formation time scale. The flow structure appears to be continuous and hierarchical from larger to smaller scales. Millimeter radio recombin...

  7. Massive Stars in the Quintuplet Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figer, Donald F.; McLean, Ian S.; Morris, Mark

    1999-03-01

    We present near-infrared photometry and K-band spectra of newly identified massive stars in the Quintuplet cluster, one of the three massive clusters projected within 50 pc of the Galactic center. We find that the cluster contains a variety of massive stars, including more unambiguously identified Wolf-Rayet stars than any cluster in the Galaxy, and over a dozen stars in earlier stages of evolution, i.e., luminous blue variables (LBVs), Ofpe/WN9, and OB supergiants. One newly identified star is the second luminous blue variable in the cluster, after the ``Pistol star.'' Although we are unable to provide certain spectral classifications for the five enigmatic Quintuplet-proper members, we tentatively propose that they are extremely dusty versions of the WC stars found elsewhere in the cluster and similar to the dozen or so known examples in the Galaxy. Although the cluster parameters are uncertain because of photometric errors and uncertainties in stellar models, i.e., extrapolating initial masses and estimating ionizing fluxes, we have the following conclusions. Given the evolutionary stages of the identified stars, the cluster appears to be about 4+/-1 Myr old, assuming coeval formation. The total mass in observed stars is ~103 Msolar, and the implied mass is ~104 Msolar, assuming a lower mass cutoff of 1 Msolar and a Salpeter initial mass function. The implied mass density in stars is greater than or similar to a few thousand Msolar pc-3. The newly identified stars increase the estimated ionizing flux from this cluster by about an order of magnitude with respect to earlier estimates, to 1050.9 photons s-1, or roughly what is required to ionize the nearby ``Sickle'' H II region (G0.18-0.04). The total luminosity from the massive cluster stars is ~107.5 Lsolar, enough to account for the heating of the nearby molecular cloud, M0.20-0.033. We propose a picture that integrates most of the major features in this part of the sky, excepting the nonthermal filaments. We

  8. A Multi-Wavelength Photometric Census of AGN and Star Formation Activity in the Brightest Cluster Galaxies of X-ray Selected Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Green, T S; Stott, J P; Ebeling, H; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Metcalfe, N; Kaiser, N; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2016-01-01

    Despite their reputation as being "red and dead", the unique environment inhabited by Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and AGN activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of "active" BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and Mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3pi, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14% of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show...

  9. A Chandra X-ray analysis of Abell 1664: cooling, feedback, and star formation in the central cluster galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkpatrick, C.C.; McNamara, B.R.; Rafferty, D.A.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Bîrzan, L.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Wise, M.W.; Gitti, M.; Cavagnolo, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of similar to 23 M-circle dot yr(-1). The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10(8) yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm(2) are consistent with other star

  10. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  11. Star-formation efficiency and metal enrichment of the intracluster medium in local massive clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Pierini, Daniele; Puchwein, Ewald; Schneider, Peter; Reiprich, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the baryon-mass content in a subsample of 19 clusters of galaxies extracted from the X-ray flux-limited sample HIFLUGCS according to their positions in the sky. For these clusters, we have measured total masses and characteristic radii on the basis of a rich optical spectroscopic data set, physical properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) using XMM-Newton and ROSAT X-ray data, and total (galaxy) stellar masses utilizing the SDSS DR7 multi-band imaging. The observed (hot) gas-mass fractions are almost constant in this mass range. We confirm that the stellar mass fraction decreases as the total mass increases and shows (20+/-4)% scatter; in addition, we show that it decreases as the central entropy increases. The latter behavior supports a twofold interpretation: heating from merging quenches the star-formation activity of galaxies in massive systems and feedback from supernovae and/or radio galaxies drives a significant amount of gas to the regions beyond r_{500} or, alternatively, a s...

  12. MC$^2$: Boosted AGN and star-formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z=0.19

    CERN Document Server

    Sobral, David; Dawson, William A; Wittman, David; Jee, James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. (2014) revealed unexpected over-densities of candidate H$\\alpha$ emitters near the ~1 Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (~2x10$^{15}$M$_{\\odot}$) "Sausage" merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used Keck/DEIMOS and WHT/AF2 to confirm 83 H$\\alpha$ emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster sub-cores (away from the shock fronts) show high [SII]6716/[SII]6761 and high [SII]6716/H$\\alpha$, implying very low electron densities (2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (~10$^{15}$M$_\\odot$) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star-formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given h...

  13. The evolution of dust-obscured star formation activity in galaxy clusters relative to the field over the last 9 billion years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Brodwin, Mark; Atlee, David W.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gettings, Daniel P.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Mancone, Conor L.; Moustakas, John; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies to the field from z = 0.3 to 1.5 using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver 250 μm imaging and utilizing 274 clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). These clusters were selected as rest-frame near-infrared overdensities over the 9 square degree Boötes field. This sample allows us to quantify the evolution of SF in clusters over a long redshift baseline without bias against active cluster systems. Using a stacking analysis, we determine the average star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (SSFR = SFR/M⋆) of stellar mass-limited (M ≥ 1.3 × 1010 M⊙), statistical samples of cluster and field galaxies, probing both the star-forming and quiescent populations. We find a clear indication that the average SF in cluster galaxies is evolving more rapidly than in the field, with field SF levels at z ≳ 1.2 in the cluster cores (r 0.5 Mpc). These general trends in the cluster cores and outskirts are driven by the lower mass galaxies in our sample. Blue cluster galaxies have systematically lower SSFRs than blue field galaxies, but otherwise show no strong differential evolution with respect to the field over our redshift range. This suggests that the cluster environment is both suppressing the SF in blue galaxies on long time-scales and rapidly transitioning some fraction of blue galaxies to the quiescent galaxy population on short time-scales. We argue that our results are consistent with both strangulation and ram pressure stripping acting in these clusters, with merger activity occurring in the cluster outskirts.

  14. Dust-obscured star-formation in the outskirts of XMMU J2235.3-2557, a massive galaxy cluster at z=1.4

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, J S; Popesso, P; Strazzullo, V; Valtchanov, I; Berta, S; Bohringer, H; Conversi, L; Demarco, R; Edge, A C; Lidman, C; Lutz, D; Metcalfe, L; Mullis, C R; Pintos-Castro, I; Sanchez-Portal, M; Rawle, T D; Rosati, P; Swinbank, A M; Tanaka, M

    2013-01-01

    Star-formation in the galaxy populations of local massive clusters is reduced with respect to field galaxies, and tends to be suppressed in the core region. Indications of a reversal of the star-formation--density relation have been observed in a few z >1.4 clusters. Using deep imaging from 100-500um from PACS and SPIRE onboard Herschel, we investigate the infrared properties of spectroscopic and photo-z cluster members, and of Halpha emitters in XMMU J2235.3-2557, one of the most massive, distant, X-ray selected clusters known. Our analysis is based mostly on fitting of the galaxies spectral energy distribution in the rest-frame 8-1000um. We measure total IR luminosity, deriving star formation rates (SFRs) ranging from 89-463 Msun/yr for 13 galaxies individually detected by Herschel, all located beyond the core region (r >250 kpc). We perform a stacking analysis of nine star-forming members not detected by PACS, yielding a detection with SFR=48 Msun/yr. Using a color criterion based on a star-forming galaxy ...

  15. Herschel Observations of the W3 GMC (II): Clues to the Formation of Clusters of High-Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera-Ingraham, A; Polychroni, D; Schneider, N; Motte, F; Bontemps, S; Hennemann, M; Men'shchikov, A; Luong, Q Nguyen; Zavagno, A; Andre, Ph; Bernard, J -Ph; Di Francesco, J; Fallscheer, C; Hill, T; Konyves, V; Marston, A; Pezzuto, S; Rygl, K L J; Spinoglio, L; White, G J

    2015-01-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for investigating the formation of high-mass stars and clusters. This second study of W3 within the HOBYS Key Program provides a comparative analysis of subfields within W3 to further constrain the processes leading to the observed structures and stellar population. Probability density functions (PDFs) and cumulative mass distributions (CMDs) were created from dust column density maps, quantified as extinction Av. The shape of the PDF, typically represented with a lognormal function at low Av "breaking" to a power-law tail at high Av, is influenced by various processes including turbulence and self-gravity. The breaks can also be identified, often more readily, in the CMDs. The PDF break from lognormal (Av(SF)= 6-10 mag) appears to shift to higher Av by stellar feedback, so that high-mass star-forming regions tend to have higher PDF breaks. A second break at Av > 50 mag traces structures formed or influenced by a dynamic process. Because such a process has been suggested to drive ...

  16. Near-infrared adaptive optics imaging of infrared luminous galaxies: the brightest cluster magnitude - star formation rate relation

    CERN Document Server

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Vaisanen, Petri; Kankare, Erkki; Kotilainen, Jari; Mattila, Seppo; Ryder, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ~ 40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M_K ~ - 2.6 log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying...

  17. The Elephant Trunk Nebula and the Trumpler 37 cluster: Contribution of triggered star formation to the total population of an HII region

    CERN Document Server

    Getman, Konstantin V; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Broos, Patrick S; Kuhn, Michael A; Garmire, Gordon P

    2012-01-01

    Rich young stellar clusters produce HII regions whose expansion into the nearby molecular cloud is thought to trigger the formation of new stars. However, the importance of this mode of star formation is uncertain. This investigation seeks to quantify triggered star formation (TSF) in IC 1396A (a.k.a., the Elephant Trunk Nebula), a bright rimmed cloud (BRC) on the periphery of the nearby giant HII region IC 1396 produced by the Trumpler 37 cluster. X-ray selection of young stars from Chandra X-ray Observatory data is combined with existing optical and infrared surveys to give a more complete census of the TSF population. Over 250 young stars in and around IC 1396A are identified; this doubles the previously known population. A spatio-temporal gradient of stars from the IC 1396A cloud toward the primary ionizing star HD 206267 is found. We argue that the TSF mechanism in IC 1396A is the radiation-driven implosion process persisting over several million years. Analysis of the X-ray luminosity and initial mass f...

  18. Star formation in bright-rimmed clouds and cluster associated with W5 E H{\\sc ii} region

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Neelam; Ogura, K; Jose, J; Ojha, D K; Samal, M R; Mito, H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of photometric investigations of the central cluster of the W5 E region as well as a follow-up study of the triggered star formation in and around bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs). We have carried out wide field $UBVI_c$ and deep $VI_c$ photometry of the W5 E H{\\sc ii} region. A distance of $\\sim$2.1 kpc and a mean age of $\\sim$1.3 Myr have been obtained for the central cluster. The young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with the region are identified on the basis of near-infrared and mid-infrared observations. We confirmed our earlier results that the average age of the YSOs lying on/inside the rim are younger than those lying outside the rim. The global distribution of the YSOs shows an aligned distribution from the ionising source to the BRCs. These facts indicate that a series of radiation driven implosion processes proceeded from near the central ionising source towards the periphery of the W5 E H{\\sc ii} region. We found that, in general, the age distributions...

  19. Control of star formation by supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    MacLow, M M; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that support by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. In this review we outline a new theory of star formation relying on the control by turbulence. We demonstrate that although supersonic turbulence can provide global support, it nevertheless produces density enhancements that allow local collapse. Inefficient, isolated star formation is a hallmark of turbulent support, while efficient, clustered star formation occurs in its absence. The consequences of this theory are then explored for both local star formation and galactic scale star formation. (Abstract abbreviated)

  20. Gas Reservoirs and Star Formation in a Forming Galaxy Cluster at zbsime0.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-01-01

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep HI Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star

  1. LoCuSS: The steady decline and slow quenching of star formation in cluster galaxies over the last four billion years

    CERN Document Server

    Haines, C P; Smith, G P; Egami, E; Sanderson, A J R; Babul, A; Finoguenov, A; Merluzzi, P; Busarello, G; Rawle., T D; Okabe, N

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the levels and evolution of star formation activity in a representative sample of 30 massive galaxy clusters at 0.1510^10 M_sun) star-forming cluster galaxies within r200 are found to be systematically 28% lower than their counterparts in the field at fixed stellar mass and redshift, a difference significant at the 8.7-sigma level. This is the unambiguous signature of star formation in most (and possibly all) massive star-forming galaxies being slowly quenched upon accretion into massive clusters, their SFRs declining exponentially on quenching time-scales in the range 0.7-2.0 Gyr. We measure the mid-infrared Butcher-Oemler effect over the redshift range 0.0-0.4, finding rapid evolution in the fraction (f_SF) of massive (M_K3M_sun/yr, of the form f_SF (1+z)^7.6. We dissect the origins of the Butcher-Oemler effect, revealing it to be due to the combination of a ~3x decline in the mean specific-SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies since z~0.3 with a ~1.5x decrease in number density. T...

  2. A TALE OF A RICH CLUSTER AT z ∼ 0.8 AS SEEN BY THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF ITS EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna [Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Vazdekis, Alexandre; De la Rosa, Ignacio G., E-mail: aferre@naoj.org [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-12-20

    We present a detailed stellar population analysis for a sample of 24 early-type galaxies (ETGs) belonging to the rich cluster RX J0152.7-1357 at z = 0.83. We have derived the age, metallicity, abundance pattern, and star formation history (SFH) for each galaxy individually to further characterize this intermediate-z reference cluster. We then study how these stellar population parameters depend on the local environment. This provides a better understanding on the formation timescales and subsequent evolution of the substructures in this cluster. We have also explored the evolutionary link between z ∼ 0.8 ETGs and those in the local universe by comparing the trends that the stellar population parameters followed with galaxy velocity dispersion at each epoch. We find that the ETGs in Coma are consistent with being the (passively evolving) descendants of the ETG population in RX J10152.7-1357. Furthermore, our results favor a downsizing picture, where the subclumps centers were formed first. These central parts contain the most massive galaxies, which formed the bulk of their stars in a short, burst-like event at high z. On the contrary, the cluster outskirts are populated with less-massive, smaller galaxies that show a wider variety of SFHs. In general, they present extended star formation episodes over cosmic time, which seems to be related to their posterior incorporation into the cluster around 4 Gyr after the initial event of formation.

  3. The Earliest Phases of Star Formation (EPoS): A Herschel Key Program - The precursors to high-mass stars and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ragan, Sarah; Krause, Oliver; Pitann, Jan; Beuther, Henrik; Linz, Hendrik; Tackenberg, Jochen; Balog, Zoltan; Hennemann, Martin; Launhardt, Ralf; Lippok, Nils; Nielbock, Markus; Schmiedeke, Anika; Schuller, Frederic; Steinacker, Juergen; Stutz, Amelia; Vasyunina, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We present an overview of the sample of high-mass star and cluster forming regions observed as part of the Earliest Phases of Star Formation (EPoS) Herschel Guaranteed Time Key Program. A sample of 45 infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) were mapped at PACS 70, 100, and 160 micron and SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 micron. In this paper, we characterize a population of cores which appear in the PACS bands and place them into context with their host cloud and investigate their evolutionary stage. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 496 cores which appear in all PACS bands, 34% of which lack counterparts at 24 micron. From single-temperature modified blackbody fits of the SEDs, we derive the temperature, luminosity, and mass of each core. These properties predominantly reflect the conditions in the cold, outer regions. Taking into account optical depth effects and performing simple radiative transfer models, we explore the origin of emission at PACS wavelengths. The core population has a median tem...

  4. PAHs and star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Peeters, E; Bakes, ELO; Spoon, HWW; Hony, S; Johnstone, D; Adams, FC; Lin, DNC; Neufeld, DA; Ostriker, EC

    2004-01-01

    Strong IR emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 mum are a common characteristic of regions of massive star formation. These features are carried by large (similar to 50 C-atom) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules which are pumped by the strong FUV photon flux from these stars. Thes

  5. THE GRISM LENS-AMPLIFIED SURVEY FROM SPACE (GLASS). V. EXTENT AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION IN z ∼ 0.5 CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulcani, Benedetta [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8582 (Japan); Treu, Tommaso; Malkan, Matthew; Abramson, Louis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Schmidt, Kasper B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Poggianti, Bianca M. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova (Italy); Dressler, Alan [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Fontana, Adriano; Pentericci, Laura [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Bradac, Marusa; Hoag, Austin; Huang, Kuan-Han; He, Julie [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Trenti, Michele [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Linden, Anja von der [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Morris, Glenn [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study of the spatial distribution of star formation in z ∼ 0.5 cluster galaxies. The analysis is based on data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). We illustrate the methodology by focusing on two clusters (MACS 0717.5+3745 and MACS 1423.8+2404) with different morphologies (one relaxed and one merging) and use foreground and background galaxies as a field control sample. The cluster+field sample consists of 42 galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10{sup 8}–10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙} and star formation rates in the range 1–20 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Both in clusters and in the field, Hα is more extended than the rest-frame UV continuum in 60% of the cases, consistent with diffuse star formation and inside-out growth. In ∼20% of the cases, the Hα emission appears more extended in cluster galaxies than in the field, pointing perhaps to ionized gas being stripped and/or star formation being enhanced at large radii. The peak of the Hα emission and that of the continuum are offset by less than 1 kpc. We investigate trends with the hot gas density as traced by the X-ray emission, and with the surface mass density as inferred from gravitational lens models, and find no conclusive results. The diversity of morphologies and sizes observed in Hα illustrates the complexity of the environmental processes that regulate star formation. Upcoming analysis of the full GLASS data set will increase our sample size by almost an order of magnitude, verifying and strengthening the inference from this initial data set.

  6. Notes on Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of star formation at a level suitable for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in astronomy or physics. The structure of the book is as follows. The first two chapters begin with a discussion of observational techniques, and the basic phenomenology they reveal. The goal is to familiarize students with the basic techniques that will be used throughout, and to provide a common vocabulary for the rest of the book. The next five chapters provide a similar review of the basic physical processes that are important for star formation. Again, the goal is to provide a basis for what follows. The remaining chapters discuss star formation over a variety of scales, starting with the galactic scale and working down to the scales of individual stars and their disks. The book concludes with a brief discussion of the clearing of disks and the transition to planet formation. The book includes five problem sets, complete with solutions.

  7. IAU Commission 37 "Star Clusters and Associations" Legacy report

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Elmegreen, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Geisler, Douglas; Goodwin, Simon; Stetson, Peter; Minniti, Dante

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar...

  8. Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Rasio, F A; Corongiu, A; D'Antona, F; Fabbiano, G; Fregeau, J M; Gebhardt, K; Heinke, C O; Hut, P; Ivanova, N; Maccarone, T J; Ransom, S M; Webb, N A

    2006-01-01

    This article was co-authored by all invited speakers at the Joint Discussion on `Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Star Clusters,' which took place during the IAU General Assembly in Prague, Czech Republic, on August 17 and 18, 2006. Each section presents a short summary of recent developments in a key area of research, incorporating the main ideas expressed during the corresponding panel discussion at the meeting. Our meeting, which had close to 300 registered participants, was broadly aimed at the large community of astronomers around the world working on the formation and evolution of compact objects and interacting binary systems in dense star clusters, such as globular clusters and galactic nuclei. Great advances have occurred in this field during the past few years, including the introduction of fundamentally new theoretical paradigms for the formation and evolution of compact objects in binaries as well as countless new discoveries by astronomers that have challenged many accepted models. Some of the hi...

  9. Molecular Gas in the Inner 500 pc of the Milky Way: Violating Star Formation Relations and on the Verge of Forming Extreme Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmore, Steven N.

    With the HOPS, MALT90 and HiGAL Galactic plane surveys we are mapping a significant fraction of the dense, star-forming, molecular gas in the Galaxy. I present results from two projects based on this combined dataset, namely, (i) looking for variations in the star formation (SF) rate across the Galaxy as a function of environment, and (ii) searching for molecular cloud progenitors of the most extreme (massive and dense) stellar clusters. We find the SF rate per unit mass of dense gas in the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy is at least an order of magnitude lower than that in the disk, directly challenging the predictions of proposed universal column/volume density relations. In particular, the region 1∘ b | Orion-like clusters—but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. I present follow up studies of one molecular cloud we have studied as part of project (ii) which also lies in the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy and is clearly extreme compared to the rest of the Galactic population. With a mass of 105 Msun, a radius of only ˜ 3 pc and almost no signs of star formation it appears to be the progenitor of an Arches-like stellar cluster. Despite detailed observational follow-up searches, this object still appears to be unique in the Galaxy, making it extremely important for testing massive cluster formation models.

  10. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  11. Signatures of star formation by cold collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sub-virial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed SPH simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (sub-virial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of sub-virial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made either early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the grow...

  12. Filamentary Star Formation in NGC 1275

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, R E A; Gallagher, J S; Kotulla, R; O'Connell, R W; Fabian, A C; Johnstone, R M; Conselice, C J; Hicks, A; Rosario, D; Wyse, R F G

    2014-01-01

    We examine the star formation in the outer halo of NGC~1275, the central galaxy in the Perseus cluster (Abell 426), using far ultraviolet and optical images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We have identified a population of very young, compact star clusters with typical ages of a few Myr. The star clusters are organised on multiple-kiloparsec scales. Many of these star clusters are associated with "streaks" of young stars, the combination of which has a cometary appearance. We perform photometry on the star clusters and diffuse stellar streaks, and fit their spectral energy distributions to obtain ages and masses. These young stellar populations appear to be normal in terms of their masses, luminosities and cluster formation efficiency; <10% of the young stellar mass is located in star clusters. Our data suggest star formation is associated with the evolution of some of the giant gas filaments in NGC~1275 that become gravitationally unstable on reaching and possibly stalling in the outer galaxy. ...

  13. Observational constraints on the formation and evolution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster with Keck and Gemini

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Tuan; Morris, Mark; Lu, Jessica; Chappell, Samantha; Feldmeier-Krause, Anja; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Martinez, Gregory David; Murray, Norm; Winsor, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Due to its proximity, the Milky Way nuclear star cluster provides us with a wealth of data not available in other galactic nuclei. In particular, with adaptive optics, we can observe the detailed properties of individual stars, which can offer insight into the origin and evolution of the cluster. We summarize work on the central parsec of the Galactic center based on imaging and spectroscopic observations at the Keck and Gemini telescopes. These observations include stellar positions in two dimension and the velocity in three dimensions. Spectroscopic observations also enable measurements of the physical properties of individual stars, such as the spectral type and in some cases the effective temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity. We present a review of our latest measurements of the density profiles and luminosity functions of the young and old stars in this region. These observations show a complex stellar population with a young (4-6 Myr) compact star cluster in the central 0.5 pc embedded in an ol...

  14. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  15. SPT-CLJ2040-4451: An SZ-Selected Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.478 With Significant Ongoing Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, M B; Ruel, J; Brodwin, M; Aird, K A; Bautz, M W; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; George, E M; Gettings, D; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; de Haan, T; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; Mawatari, K; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Stalder, B; Suhada, R; Spieler, H G; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2013-01-01

    SPT-CLJ2040-4451 -- spectroscopically confirmed at z = 1.478 -- is the highest redshift galaxy cluster yet discovered via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. SPT-CLJ2040-4451 was identified in the first 720 deg^2 of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey, and confirmed in follow-up imaging and spectroscopy. From multi-object spectroscopy with Magellan-I/Baade+IMACS we measure spectroscopic redshifts for 15 cluster member galaxies, all of which have strong [O II] 3727 emission. SPT-CLJ2040-4451 has an SZ-measured mass of M_500,SZ = 3.2 +/- 0.8 X 10^14 M_Sun/h_70, corresponding to M_200,SZ = 5.8 +/- 1.4 X 10^14 M_Sun/h_70. The velocity dispersion measured entirely from blue star forming members is sigma_v = 1500 +/- 520 km/s. The prevalence of star forming cluster members (galaxies with > 1.5 M_Sun/yr) implies that this massive, high-redshift cluster is experiencing a phase of active star formation, and supports recent results showing a marked increase in star formation occurring in galaxy clust...

  16. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project: Unraveling Tarantula's Web. II. Optical and Near Infrared Star Formation History of the Starburst Cluster NGC 2070 in 30 Doradus

    CERN Document Server

    Cignoni, M; van der Marel, R P; Tosi, M; Zaritsky, D; Anderson, J; Lennon, D J; Aloisi, A; de Marchi, G; Gouliermis, D A; Grebel, E K; Smith, L J; Zeidler, P

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the recent star formation of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the panchromatic imaging survey Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). In this paper we focus on the stars within 20 pc of the center of the massive ionizing cluster of 30 Doradus, NGC 2070. We recovered the star formation history by comparing deep optical and NIR color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with state-of-the-art synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PARSEC models, which include all stellar phases from pre-main sequence to post- main sequence. For the first time in this region we are able to measure the star formation using intermediate and low mass stars simultaneously. Our results suggest that NGC2070 experienced a prolonged activity. In particular, we find that the star formation in the region: i) exceeded the average LMC rate ~ 20 Myr ago; ii) accelerated dramatically ~ 7 Myr ago; and iii) reached a peak value 1-3 Myr ago. We did not find significant deviations from a Kroupa initial mass funct...

  17. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I).A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame suggests a merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~ 10' NW to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h=19.0 are newly selected as member candidates. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged samp...

  18. A large H$\\alpha$ survey of star formation in relaxed and merging galaxy cluster environments at $z\\sim0.15-0.3$

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Afonso, Ana; Alegre, Lara; Calhau, João; Santos, Sergio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from the largest H$\\alpha$ survey of star formation and AGN activity in galaxy clusters. Using 9 different narrow band filters, we select $>3000$ H$\\alpha$ emitters within $19$ clusters and their larger scale environment over a total volume of $1.3\\times10^5$ Mpc$^3$. The sample includes both relaxed and merging clusters, covering the $0.15-0.31$ redshift range and spanning from $5\\times10^{14}$ $M_{\\odot}$ to $30\\times10^{14}$ $M_{\\odot}$. We find that the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function (LF) for merging clusters has a higher characteristic density $\\phi^*$ compared to relaxed clusters. $\\phi^*$ drops from cluster core to cluster outskirts for both merging and relaxed clusters, with the merging cluster values $\\sim0.3$ dex higher at each projected radius. The characteristic luminosity $L^*$ drops over the $0.5-2.0$ Mpc distance from the cluster centre for merging clusters and increases for relaxed objects. Among disturbed objects, clusters hosting large-scale shock waves (traced by...

  19. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Elizabeth J; Zentner, Andrew R; Bullock, James S; Wechsler, Risa H

    2007-01-01

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to ``field'' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than ``field'' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N=2 halos) and a control sample of isolated galaxies (N=1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M_Bj ~ 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxi...

  20. PRIMUS+DEEP2: The Dependence of Galaxy Clustering on Stellar Mass and Specific Star Formation Rate at 0.2 < z < 1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Moustakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present results on the clustering properties of galaxies as a function of both stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) using data from the PRIMUS and DEEP2 galaxy redshift surveys spanning 0.2 < z < 1.2. We use spectroscopic redshifts of over 100,000 galaxies covering an area of 7.2 deg^2 over five separate fields on the sky, from which we calculate cosmic variance errors. We find that the galaxy clustering amplitude is a stronger function of sSFR than of stellar mass, and that at a given sSFR, it does not depend on stellar mass, within the range probed here. We further find that within the star-forming population and at a given stellar mass, galaxies above the main sequence of star formation with higher sSFR are more clustered than galaxies below the main sequence with lower sSFR. We also find that within the quiescent population, galaxies with higher sSFR are less clustered than galaxies with lower sSFR, at a given stellar mass. We show that the galaxy clustering amplitude smoothly inc...

  1. SPT-CL J2040–4451: An SZ-selected galaxy cluster at z = 1.478 with significant ongoing star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, M. B.; Ruel, J. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bautz, M. W. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bocquet, S.; Desai, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrosifica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P., E-mail: mbayliss@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); and others

    2014-10-10

    SPT-CL J2040–4451—spectroscopically confirmed at z = 1.478—is the highest-redshift galaxy cluster yet discovered via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. SPT-CL J2040–4451 was a candidate galaxy cluster identified in the first 720 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey, and has been confirmed in follow-up imaging and spectroscopy. From multi-object spectroscopy with Magellan-I/Baade+IMACS we measure spectroscopic redshifts for 15 cluster member galaxies, all of which have strong [O II] λλ3727 emission. SPT-CL J2040–4451 has an SZ-measured mass of M {sub 500,} {sub SZ} = 3.2 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} h {sub 70}{sup −1}, corresponding to M {sub 200,} {sub SZ} = 5.8 ± 1.4 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} h {sub 70}{sup −1}. The velocity dispersion measured entirely from blue star-forming members is σ {sub v} = 1500 ± 520 km s{sup –1}. The prevalence of star-forming cluster members (galaxies with >1.5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) implies that this massive, high-redshift cluster is experiencing a phase of active star formation, and supports recent results showing a marked increase in star formation occurring in galaxy clusters at z ≳ 1.4. We also compute the probability of finding a cluster as rare as this in the SPT-SZ survey to be >99%, indicating that its discovery is not in tension with the concordance ΛCDM cosmological model.

  2. Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Joana M

    2008-01-01

    M16 (the Eagle Nebula) is a striking star forming region, with a complex morphology of gas and dust sculpted by the massive stars in NGC 6611. Detailed studies of the famous ``elephant trunks'' dramatically increased our understanding of the massive star feedback into the parent molecular cloud. A rich young stellar population (2 - 3 Myr) has been identified, from massive O-stars down to substellar masses. Deep into the remnant molecular material, embedded protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and maser sources bear evidence of ongoing star formation in the nebula, possibly triggered by the massive cluster members. M 16 is a excellent template for the study of star formation under the hostile environment created by massive O-stars. This review aims at providing an observational overview not only of the young stellar population but also of the gas remnant of the star formation process.

  3. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rubio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwavelenghts studies of massive star formation regions in the LMC and SMC reveal that a second generation of stars is being formed in dense molecular clouds located in the surroundings of the massive clusters. These dense molecular clouds have survive the action of massive star UV radiation elds and winds and they appear as compact dense H2 knots in regions of weak CO emission. We present results of observations obtained towards massive star forming regions in the low metallicity molecular clouds in the Magellanic Clouds and investigate its implication on star formation in the early universe.

  4. Coronet: A Star-Formation Neighbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    While perhaps not quite as well known as its star-formation cousin Orion, the Corona Australis region (containing, at its heart, the Coronet cluster) is one of the nearest and most active regions of ongoing star formation. At only about 420 light-years away, the Coronet is over three times closer than the Orion nebula is to Earth. The Coronet contains a loose cluster of a few dozen young stars with a wide range of masses and at various stages of evolution, giving astronomers an opportunity to observe embryonic stars simultaneously in several wavelengths. This composite image shows the Coronet in X-rays from Chandra (purple) and infrared from Spitzer (orange, green, and cyan). The Spitzer data show young stars plus diffuse emission from dust. Due to the host of young stars in different life stages in the Coronet, astronomers can use these data to pinpoint details of how the youngest stars evolve.

  5. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C; Anders, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in three galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to H$\\alpha$ data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral-energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  6. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grijs, Richard; Ma, Chao; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C.; Anders, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in two galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to Hα data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  7. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  8. Insights from simulations of star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Richard B [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Although the basic physics of star formation is classical, numerical simulations have yielded essential insights into how stars form. They show that star formation is a highly nonuniform runaway process characterized by the emergence of nearly singular peaks in density, followed by the accretional growth of embryo stars that form at these density peaks. Circumstellar discs often form from the gas being accreted by the forming stars, and accretion from these discs may be episodic, driven by gravitational instabilities or by protostellar interactions. Star-forming clouds typically develop filamentary structures, which may, along with the thermal physics, play an important role in the origin of stellar masses because of the sensitivity of filament fragmentation to temperature variations. Simulations of the formation of star clusters show that the most massive stars form by continuing accretion in the dense cluster cores, and this again is a runaway process that couples star formation and cluster formation. Star-forming clouds also tend to develop hierarchical structures, and smaller groups of forming objects tend to merge into progressively larger ones, a generic feature of self-gravitating systems that is common to star formation and galaxy formation. Because of the large range of scales and the complex dynamics involved, analytic models cannot adequately describe many aspects of star formation, and detailed numerical simulations are needed to advance our understanding of the subject. 'The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.' Richard W Hamming, in Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (1962) 'There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.' William Shakespeare, in Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (1604) (key issues review)

  9. Star Formation and AGN Activity in Galaxy Clusters from $z=1-2$: a Multi-wavelength Analysis Featuring $Herschel$/PACS

    CERN Document Server

    Alberts, Stacey; Brodwin, Mark; Chung, Sun Mi; Cybulski, Ryan; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony; Jannuzi, Buell; Stanford, S Adam; Snyder, Gregory; Stern, Daniel; Zeimann, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed, multi-wavelength study of star formation (SF) and AGN activity in 11 near-infrared (IR) selected, spectroscopically confirmed, massive ($\\gtrsim10^{14}\\,\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$) galaxy clusters at $1cluster galaxies, finding that they can, on average, be well described by field galaxy templates. Identification and decomposition of AGN through SED fittings allows us to include the contribution to cluster SF from AGN host galaxies. We quantify the star-forming fraction, dust-obscured SF rates (SFRs), and specific-SFRs for cluster galaxies as a function of cluster-centric radius and redshift. In good agreement with previous studies, we find that SF in cluster galaxies at $z\\gtrsim1.4$ is largely consistent with field galaxies at similar epochs, indicating an era before significant quenching in the cluster cores ($r<0.5\\,$Mpc). This is followed by a ...

  10. Clustering properties of BzK-selected galaxies in GOODS-N: environmental quenching and triggering of star formation at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lihwai; Jian, Hung-Yu; Merson, A I; Baugh, C M; Scott, Douglas; Foucaud, Sebastien; Wang, Wei-Hao; Yan, Chi-Hung; Yan, Hao-Jing; Cheng, Yi-Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Helly, John; Kirsten, Franz; Koo, David C; Lagos, Claudia del P; Meger, Nicole; Pope, Alexandra; Simard, Luc; Grogin, Norman A; Messias, Hugo; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Using a sample of $\\textit{BzK}$-selected galaxies at $z \\sim 2$ identified from the CFHT/WIRCAM near-infrared survey of GOODS-North, we discuss the relation between star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and stellar mass (\\sm), and the clustering of galaxies as a function of these parameters. For star-forming galaxies (\\textit{sBzK}s), the UV-based SFR, corrected for extinction, scales with the stellar mass as SFR $\\propto$ \\sm$^{\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha = 0.74\\pm0.20$, indicating a weak dependence on the stellar mass of the star formation rate efficiency. We also measure the angular correlation function and hence infer the correlation length for \\textit{sBzK} galaxies as a function of \\sm, SFR, and SSFR, as well as $K$-band apparent magnitude. We show that passive galaxies (\\textit{pBzK}s) are more strongly clustered than \\textit{sBzK} galaxies at a given stellar mass. We also find that the correlation length of \\textit{sBzK} galaxies ranges from 4 to 17 \\mpc, being a strong function o...

  11. Dust formation in carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet stars I. Chemistry of small carbon clusters and silicon species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherchneff, [No Value; Le Teuff, YH; Williams, PM; Tielens, AGGM

    2000-01-01

    The formation of small carbon chains and molecular precursors to silicon carbide grains is investigated in the hot, hostile environment of carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WC) winds. We consider only WC stars which produce dust on a continuous basis and develop for the first time non-equilibrium, chemical ki

  12. The bound fraction of young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, N; Motwani, B; Kroupa, P

    2016-01-01

    The residual gas within newly formed star clusters is expelled through stellar feedback on timescales ~ 1 Myr. The subsequent expansion of the cluster results in an unbinding of a fraction of stars, before the remaining cluster members can re-virialize and form a surviving cluster. We investigate the bound fraction after gas expulsion as a function of initial cluster mass in stars and gauge the influence of primordial mass segregation, stellar evolution and the tidal field at solar distance. We also assess the impact of the star-formation efficiency and gas expulsion velocity. We perform N-body simulations using Sverre Aarseth's NBODY7 code, starting with compact clusters in their embedded phase and approximate the gas expulsion by means of an exponentially depleting external gravitational field. We follow the process of re-virialization through detailed monitoring of different Lagrange radii over several Myr, examining initial half-mass radii of 0.1 pc, 0.3 pc and 0.5 pc and masses usually ranging from 5x10^...

  13. Properties of hierarchically forming star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Maschberger, Th; Bonnell, I A; Kroupa, P

    2010-01-01

    We undertake a systematic analysis of the early (< 0.5 Myr) evolution of clustering and the stellar initial mass function in turbulent fragmentation simulations. These large scale simulations for the first time offer the opportunity for a statistical analysis of IMF variations and correlations between stellar properties and cluster richness. The typical evolutionary scenario involves star formation in small-n clusters which then progressively merge; the first stars to form are seeds of massive stars and achieve a headstart in mass acquisition. These massive seeds end up in the cores of clusters and a large fraction of new stars of lower mass is formed in the outer parts of the clusters. The resulting clusters are therefore mass segregated at an age of 0.5 Myr, although the signature of mass segregation is weakened during mergers. We find that the resulting IMF has a smaller exponent (alpha=1.8-2.2) than the Salpeter value (alpha=2.35). The IMFs in subclusters are truncated at masses only somewhat larger th...

  14. Evolution of Nuclear Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, David

    2008-01-01

    Two-body relaxation times of nuclear star clusters are short enough that gravitational encounters should substantially affect their structure in 10 Gyr or less. In nuclear star clusters without massive black holes, dynamical evolution is a competition between core collapse, which causes densities to increase, and heat input from the surrounding galaxy, which causes densities to decrease. The maximum extent of a nucleus that can resist expansion is derived numerically for a wide range of initial conditions; observed nuclei are shown to be compact enough to resist expansion, although there may have been an earlier generation of low-density nuclei that were dissolved. An evolutionary model for NGC 205 is presented which suggests that the nucleus of this galaxy has already undergone core collapse. Adding a massive black hole to a nucleus inhibits core collapse, and nuclear star clusters with black holes always expand, due primarily to heat input from the galaxy. The expansion rate is smaller for larger black hole...

  15. The Star Formation Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Scowen, Paul A; Beasley, Matthew; Calzetti, Daniela; Desch, Steven; Fullerton, Alex; Gallagher, John; Lisman, Doug; Macenka, Steve; Malhotra, Sangeeta; McCaughrean, Mark; Nikzad, Shouleh; O'Connell, Robert; Oey, Sally; Padgett, Deborah; Rhoads, James; Roberge, Aki; Siegmund, Oswald; Shaklan, Stuart; Smith, Nathan; Stern, Daniel; Tumlinson, Jason; Windhorst, Rogier; Woodruff, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Star Formation Camera (SFC) is a wide-field (~15'x19, >280 arcmin^2), high-resolution (18x18 mas pixels) UV/optical dichroic camera designed for the Theia 4-m space-borne space telescope concept. SFC will deliver diffraction-limited images at lambda > 300 nm in both a blue (190-517nm) and a red (517-1075nm) channel simultaneously. Our aim is to conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and their planetary systems, and to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process. This program addresses the origins and evolution of stars, galaxies, and cosmic structure and has direct relevance for the formation and survival of planetary systems like our Solar System and planets like Earth. We present the design and performance specifications resulting from the implementation study of the camera, conducted ...

  16. The MEGaN project - I. Missing formation of massive nuclear clusters and tidal disruption events by star clusters-massive black hole interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the evolution of a massive galactic nucleus hosting a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with mass MSMBH = 108 M ⊙ surrounded by a population of 42 heavy star clusters (globular clusters, GCs). Using direct N-body modelling, we show here that the assembly of a nuclear star cluster (NSC) through GC orbital decay and merger is efficiently inhibited by the tidal forces exerted from the SMBH. The GC mass-loss induced by tidal forces causes a significant modification of their mass function, leading to a population of low-mass (model. The simulation produced a huge amount of data, which we used to investigate whether the GC debris deposited around the SMBH can enhance the rate of tidal disruption events (TDEs) in our galaxy inner density distribution. Our results suggest that the GC disruption leads to a TDE rate of ∼2 × 10-4 yr-1, about an order of magnitude larger than observed in galactic nuclei with similar density profiles and central SMBH. Our results suggest that the GC disruption shapes the SMBH neighbourhoods, leading to a TDE rate of ∼2 × 10-4 yr-1, a value slightly larger than what expected in previous theoretical modelling of galaxies with similar density profiles and central SMBHs. The simulation presented here is the first of its kind, representing a massive galactic nucleus and its star cluster population on scales ∼100 pc.

  17. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  18. XMM-NEWTON/SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN GALAXY CLUSTERS AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE MATTER-DENSITY PARAMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagana, Tatiana F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Departamento de Astronomia, Cidade Universitaria, CEP:05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zhang Yuying; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Schneider, Peter [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2011-12-10

    It is believed that the global baryon content of clusters of galaxies is representative of the matter distribution of the universe, and can, therefore, be used to reliably determine the matter-density parameter {Omega}{sub m}. This assumption is challenged by the growing evidence from optical and X-ray observations that the total baryon mass fraction increases toward rich clusters. In this context, we investigate the dependence of stellar and total baryon mass fractions as a function of mass. To do so, we used a subsample of 19 clusters extracted from the X-ray flux-limited sample HIFLUGCS that have available Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 data. From the optical analysis we derived the stellar masses. Using XMM-Newton we derived the gas masses. Then, adopting a scaling relation we estimate the total masses. Adding the gas and the stellar mass fractions we obtain the total baryonic content that we find to increase with cluster mass, reaching seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) prediction for clusters with M{sub 500} = 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. We observe a decrease of the stellar mass fraction (from 4.5% to {approx}1.0%) with increasing total mass where our findings for the stellar mass fraction agree with previous studies. This result suggests a difference in the number of stars formed per unit of halo mass, though with a large scatter for low-mass systems. That is, the efficiency of star formation varies on a cluster scale that lower mass systems are likely to have higher star formation efficiencies. It follows immediately that the dependence of the stellar mass fraction on total mass results in an increase of the mass-to-light ratio from lower to higher mass systems. We also discuss the consequences of these results in the context of determining the cosmic matter-density parameter {Omega}{sub m}.

  19. Linking galaxies to dark matter haloes at $z\\sim1$ : dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass and specific star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Edge, Alastair C; Wake, David A; Merson, Alexander I; Jeon, Yiseul

    2015-01-01

    We study the dependence of angular two-point correlation functions on stellar mass ($M_{*}$) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of $M_{*}>10^{10}M_{\\odot}$ galaxies at $z\\sim1$. The data from UKIDSS DXS and CFHTLS covering 8.2 deg$^{2}$ sample scales larger than 100 $h^{-1}$Mpc at $z\\sim1$, allowing us to investigate the correlation between clustering, $M_{*}$, and star formation through halo modeling. Based on halo occupation distributions (HODs) of $M_{*}$ threshold samples, we derive HODs for $M_{*}$ binned galaxies, and then calculate the $M_{*}/M_{\\rm halo}$ ratio. The ratio for central galaxies shows a peak at $M_{\\rm halo}\\sim10^{12}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$, and satellites predominantly contribute to the total stellar mass in cluster environments with $M_{*}/M_{\\rm halo}$ values of 0.01--0.02. Using star-forming galaxies split by sSFR, we find that main sequence galaxies ($\\rm log\\,sSFR/yr^{-1}\\sim-9$) are mainly central galaxies in $\\sim10^{12.5} h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ haloes with the lowest clustering amplitu...

  20. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution V: [NeII], Multiple Clusters, High Efficiency Star Formation and Blue Flows in He 2-10

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Sara C; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We measured the $12.8\\mu$m [NeII] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2-10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TeXeS on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has diffraction-limited spatial resolution $\\sim1^{\\prime\\prime}$ and total velocity resolution including thermal broadening of $\\sim5$km/s. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the $M/R$ of the clusters and the $\\simeq30-40$% star formation efficiencies the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature which we identify with the interface of the HII region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of t...

  1. ZFIRE: Galaxy Cluster Kinematics, H$\\alpha$ Star Formation Rates, and Gas-Phase Metallicities of XMM-LSS J02182-05102 at z=1.6233

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Kim-Vy H; Yuan, Tiantian; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Glazebrook, Karl; Kewley, Lisa J; Momcheva, Ivelina; Papovich, Casey J; Quadri, Ryan; Rudnick, Greg; Saintonge, Amélie; Spitler, Lee R; Straatman, Caroline; Tomczak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We spectroscopically survey the galaxy cluster XMM-LSS J02182-05102 (hereafter IRC 0218) using LRIS (optical) and MOSFIRE (near-infrared) on Keck I as part of the ZFIRE survey. IRC 0218 has a narrow redshift range of $1.612cluster redshift and velocity dispersion are $z_{\\rm cl}=1.6233\\pm0.0003$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm cl}=254\\pm50$ km s$^{-1}$. We reach NIR line sensitivities of $\\sim0.3\\times10^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ that, combined with multi-wavelength photometry, provide extinction-corrected H$\\alpha$ star formation rates (SFR), gas phase metallicities from [NII]/H$\\alpha$, and stellar masses. We measure an integrated H$\\alpha$ SFR of $\\sim325{\\rm M}_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ (26 members; R$_{\\rm proj}<2$ Mpc) and show that the elevated star formation in the cluster core (R$_{\\rm proj}<0.25$ Mpc) is driven by the concentration of star-forming members, but the average SFR per H$\\alpha$-detected galaxy is half th...

  2. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Sara [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Turner, Jean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Lacy, John [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Greathouse, Thomas [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.

  3. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  4. Collaborative Research of Open Star Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alisher S. Hojaev

    2005-06-01

    Preliminary results on observations of open clusters are presented. The project has been initiated in the framework of the Uzbek–Taiwan and Taiwan–Baltic collaboration, mainly to upgrade and make use of facilities at Maidanak Observatory. We present detailed, multiwavelength studies of the young cluster NGC 6823 and the associated complex nebulosity, to diagnose the young stellar population and star formation history in the region. In addition, 7 compact open clusters have been monitored for stellar variability. We show how observations like these could feasibly be used to look for exoplanet transit events. We also expect to join the Whole-Earth Telescope effort in future campaigns for asteroseismology.

  5. Halpha3: an Halpha imaging survey of HI selected galaxies from ALFALFA. II. The star formation properties of galaxies in the Virgo cluster and surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fossati, Matteo; Galardo, Vincenzo; Grossetti, Francesco; Boselli, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2013-01-01

    We present the analysis of Halpha3, an Halpha imaging survey of 409 galaxies selected from the HI Arecibo ALFALFA Survey in the Local Supercluster, including the Virgo cluster. We explore the relations between the stellar mass, the HI mass and the current, massive SFR of nearby galaxies in the Virgo cluster and we compare them with those of isolated galaxies in the Local Supercluster, disentangling the role of the environment in shaping the star formation properties of galaxies at the present cosmological epoch. We investigate the relationships between atomic neutral gas and newly formed stars in different environments, across many morphological types, and over a wide range of stellar masses adopting an updated calibration of the HI deficiency parameter. Studying the mean properties of late-type galaxies in the Local Supercluster, we find that galaxies in increasing local galaxy density conditions (or decreasing projected angular separation from M87) show a significant decrease in the HI content and in the me...

  6. Star Formation History In Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chien, Li-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are known to trigger starbursts. Young massive star clusters formed in interacting galaxies and mergers may become young globular clusters. The ages of these clusters can provide clues about the timing of interaction-triggered events, and thus provide an important way to reconstruct the star formation history of merging galaxies. Numerical simulations of galaxy mergers can implement different star formation rules. For instance, star formation dependent on gas density or triggered by shocks, predicts significantly different star formation histories. To test the validity of these models, multi-object spectroscopy was used to map the ages of young star clusters throughout the bodies and tails of a series of galaxy mergers at different stages (Arp 256, NGC 7469, NGC 4676, Arp 299, IC 883 and NGC 2623). We found that the cumulative distribution of ages becomes shallower as the stage of merger advances. This result suggests a trend of cluster ages as a function of merger stage. In NGC 4676 we fo...

  7. A possible formation channel for blue hook stars in globular cluster - II. Effects of metallicity, mass ratio, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Zhenxin; Zeng, Aihua; Shen, Lihua; Lan, Zhongjian; Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-01-01

    Employing tidally enhanced stellar wind, we studied in binaries the effects of metallicity, mass ratio of primary to secondary, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance on the formation of blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs). A total of 28 sets of binary models combined with different input parameters are studied. For each set of binary model, we presented a range of initial orbital periods that is needed to produce BHk stars in binaries. All the binary models could produce BHk stars within different range of initial orbital periods. We also compared our results with the observation in the Teff-logg diagram of GC NGC 2808 and {\\omega} Cen. Most of the BHk stars in these two GCs locate well in the region predicted by our theoretical models, especially when C/N-enhanced model atmospheres are considered. We found that mass ratio of primary to secondary and tidal enhancement efficiency have little effects on the formation of BHk stars in binaries, while metallicity and helium abundance would...

  8. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at 0.4 < z < 1 Revealed by Star Formation Rates Measured From Hβ and FUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yicheng; Rafelski, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Willner, S. P.; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I.; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at 0.4 models, e.g., non-universal initial mass function or stochastic star formation on star cluster scales, are unable to plausibly explain our results.

  9. Constraining the high-redshift formation of black hole seeds in nuclear star clusters with gas inflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupi, A.; Colpi, M.; Devecchi, B.; Galanti, G.; Volonteri, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore a possible route of black hole seed formation that appeals to a model by Davies, Miller & Bellovary who considered the case of the dynamical collapse of a dense cluster of stellar black holes subjected to an inflow of gas. Here, we explore this case in a broad cosmological

  10. CLUSTERING PROPERTIES OF BzK-SELECTED GALAXIES IN GOODS-N: ENVIRONMENTAL QUENCHING AND TRIGGERING OF STAR FORMATION AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lihwai; Wang Weihao; Yan, Chi-Hung [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Jian, Hung-Yu [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Merson, A. I.; Baugh, C. M.; Helly, John; Lagos, Claudia del P [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Scott, Douglas; Meger, Nicole [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Foucaud, Sebastien [Department of Earth Sciences, National Taiwan Normal University, N Degree-Sign 88, Tingzhou Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yan Haojing [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Cheng, Yi-Wen [Institute of Astronomy, National Central Universe, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Guo Yicheng; Pope, Alexandra [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kirsten, Franz [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, University of Bonn (Germany); Koo, David C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Messias, Hugo [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatorio Astronomico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Simard, Luc, E-mail: lihwailin@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); and others

    2012-09-01

    Using a sample of BzK-selected galaxies at z {approx} 2 identified from the CFHT/WIRCAM near-infrared survey of GOODS-North, we discuss the relation between star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and stellar mass (M{sub *}), and the clustering of galaxies as a function of these parameters. For star-forming galaxies (sBzKs), the UV-based SFR, corrected for extinction, scales with the stellar mass as SFR{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}{sub *} with {alpha} = 0.74 {+-} 0.20 down to M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, indicating a weak dependence on the stellar mass of the SFR efficiency, namely, SSFR. We also measure the angular correlation function and hence infer the correlation length for sBzK galaxies as a function of M{sub *}, SFR, and SSFR, as well as K-band apparent magnitude. We show that passive galaxies (pBzKs) are more strongly clustered than sBzK galaxies at a given stellar mass, mirroring the color-density relation seen at lower redshifts. We also find that the correlation length of sBzK galaxies ranges from 4 to 20 h {sup -1} Mpc, being a strong function of M{sub K} , M{sub *}, and SFR. On the other hand, the clustering dependence on SSFR changes abruptly at 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}, which is the typical value for 'main-sequence' star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2. We show that the correlation length reaches a minimum at this characteristic value, and is larger for galaxies with both smaller and larger SSFRs; a dichotomy that is only marginally implied from the predictions of the semi-analytical models. Our results suggest that there are two types of environmental effects at work at z {approx} 2. Stronger clustering for relatively quiescent galaxies implies that the environment has started to play a role in quenching star formation. At the same time, stronger clustering for galaxies with elevated SSFRs ({sup s}tarbursts{sup )} might be attributed to an increased efficiency for galaxy

  11. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  12. Parametrising Star Formation Histories

    CERN Document Server

    Simha, Vimal; Conroy, Charlie; Dave, Romeel; Fardal, Mark; Katz, Neal; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D

    2014-01-01

    We examine the star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, compare them to parametric models that are commonly used in fitting observed galaxy spectral energy distributions, and examine the efficacy of these parametric models as practical tools for recovering the physical parameters of galaxies. The commonly used tau-model, with SFR ~ exp(-t/tau), provides a poor match to the SFH of our SPH galaxies, with a mismatch between early and late star formation that leads to systematic errors in predicting colours and stellar mass-to-light ratios. A one-parameter lin-exp model, with SFR ~ t*exp(-t/tau), is much more successful on average, but it fails to match the late-time behavior of the bluest, most actively star-forming galaxies and the passive, "red and dead" galaxies. We introduce a 4-parameter model, which transitions from lin-exp to a linear ramp after a transition time, which describes our simulated galaxies very well. We test the ability of these paramet...

  13. Molecular gas in the inner 500pc of the MilkyWay: violating star formation relations and on the verge of forming extreme stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven N

    2012-01-01

    With the HOPS, MALT90 and HiGAL Galactic plane surveys we are mapping a significant fraction of the dense, star-forming, molecular gas in the Galaxy. I present results from two projects based on this combined dataset, namely, (i) looking for variations in the star formation (SF) rate across the Galaxy as a function of environment, and (ii) searching for molecular cloud progenitors of the most extreme (massive and dense) stellar clusters. We find the SF rate per unit mass of dense gas in the inner 500pc of the Galaxy is at least an order of magnitude lower than that in the disk, directly challenging the predictions of proposed universal column/volume density relations. In particular, the region 1 degrees < l < 3.5 degrees, |b| < 0.5 degrees contains ~1E7 Msun of dense molecular gas -- enough to form 1000 Orion-like clusters -- but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. I present follow up studies of one molecular cloud we have studied as part of projec...

  14. Triggered Star Formation Surrounding Wolf-Rayet Star HD 211853

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2012-05-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 103 cm-3 and kinematic temperature ~20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core "A," which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the "collect and collapse" process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core "A" seem to be affected by the "radiation-driven implosion" process.

  15. Triggered star formation surrounding Wolf-Rayet star HD 211853

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Huawei; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2012-01-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet star HD 211853 is studied in molecular emission, infrared emission, as well as radio and HI emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10$^{3}$ cm$^{-3}$ and kinematic temperature $\\sim$20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From SED modeling towards the young stellar objects (YSOs), sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the Wolf-Rayet star to the molecular ring. A small scale sequential star formation is revealed towards core A, which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations is thus suggested. The presence of PDR, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, the large scale sequential star formation indicate the "Collect and Collapse" process functions in this region. The star forming activities in core A seem to be affected by the "Radiation-Driven Implosion" (...

  16. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Qin Shengli, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  17. Hierarchical star formation in M33 : fundamental properties of the star-forming regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastian, N.; Ercolano, B.; Gieles, M.; Rosolowsky, E.; Scheepmaker, R.A.; Gutermuth, R.; Efremov, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Star formation within galaxies appears on multiple scales, from spiral structure, to OB associations, to individual star clusters, and often substructure within these clusters. This multitude of scales calls for objective methods to find and classify star-forming regions, regardless of spatial size.

  18. Formation and dissolution of leaky clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pfalzner, S

    2011-01-01

    Massive Galactic clusters (> 1000 Msun) exhibit a clear correlation between cluster density, size and age and can be sorted in two categories, i.e. starburst and leaky clusters. The reason for the existance of two types of massive clusters is an open question. However, the answer is probably connected to a different formation histories of the two types. In this study we concentrate onleaky clusters only and investigate possible formation scenarios and gas expulsion phase. This is done by using existing observational data and numerical results of embedded cluster properties. Assuming that a clear correlation between cluster density, size and age exists, it is shown that the density-radius development over time forembedded clusters can be approximated by rho \\approx 100*r ^{-1.3} Msun pc^{-3}. The consequences for the star formation process in leaky clusters are discussed and found to favour an inside-out star formation scenario with an initially low but later accelerated star formation rate. It is shown how th...

  19. Star Formation in Turbulent Interstellar Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, R S

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the star formation process is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that supersonic interstellar turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. Supersonic turbulence can provide support against gravitational collapse on global scales, while at the same time it produces localized density enhancements that allow for collapse on small scales. The efficiency and timescale of stellar birth in Galactic molecular clouds strongly depend on the properties of the interstellar turbulent velocity field, with slow, inefficient, isolated star formation being a hallmark of turbulent support, and fast, efficient, clustered star formation occurring in its absence.

  20. A search for RCB stars in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boiardi, Scarlett-Rose; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    There are only about 65 R Coronae Borealis stars known in our Galaxy, and none in globular clusters. As these stars are thought to result from the merger of two white dwarfs, one would expect the higher stellar density of globular clusters to favor their formation. We have searched for such stars in Galactic globular clusters, as their presence in a specific category of clusters might provide more clues as to their formation. We selected from the WISE all-Sky source catalog all the stars within the tidal radius of the 150 globular clusters within 50 kpc, which is the distance to which RCB stars are detectable by WISE. The total number of stars selected in this way was 635989. We then successively applied the eight selection criteria of Tisserand (2012) satisfied by RCB stars to the dereddened photometric WISE and 2MASS data. Only three stars satisfying the conditions were found in the field of three globular clusters. The star in the field of Liller 1 is most probably a protostar. For the two other candidates...

  1. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  2. Deep Chandra, HST-COS, and Megacam Observations of the Phoenix Cluster: Extreme Star Formation and AGN Feedback on Hundred Kiloparsec Scales

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; van Weeren, R J; Applegate, D E; Bayliss, M; Bautz, M W; Benson, B A; Carlstrom, J E; Bleem, L E; Chatzikos, M; Edge, A C; Fabian, A C; Garmire, G P; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Jones-Forman, C; Mantz, A B; Miller, E D; Stalder, B; Veilleux, S; Zuhone, J A

    2015-01-01

    We present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously-undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ~50-100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2x10^9 Msun)), young (~4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 +/- 50 Msun/yr. We report a strong detection of OVI(1032,1038) which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 Msun/yr) from the cooling intracluster medium. We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ~10 kpc, which are amongst the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2-7 x10^45 erg/s. We provide evidence that the AGN inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from "quasar-mode" to "radio-mode", and may currently be insufficient to completely offset ...

  3. A revolution in star cluster research: setting the scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grijs, Richard

    2010-02-28

    Star clusters and their stellar populations play a significant role in the context of galaxy evolution, across space (from local to high redshift) and time (from currently forming to fossil remnants). We are now within reach of answering a number of fundamental questions that will have a significant impact on our understanding of key open issues in contemporary astrophysics, ranging from the formation, assembly and evolution of galaxies to the details of the star-formation process. Our improved understanding of the physics driving star cluster formation and evolution has led to the emergence of crucial new open questions that will most probably be tackled in a systematic way in the next decade.

  4. RCW36: characterizing the outcome of massive star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ellerbroek, L E; Kaper, L; Maaskant, K M; Paalvast, M; Tramper, F; Sana, H; Waters, L B F M; Balog, Z

    2013-01-01

    Massive stars play a dominant role in the process of clustered star formation, with their feedback into the molecular cloud through ionizing radiation, stellar winds and outflows. The formation process of massive stars is poorly constrained because of their scarcity, the short formation timescale and obscuration. By obtaining a census of the newly formed stellar population, the star formation history of the young cluster and the role of the massive stars within it can be unraveled. We aim to reconstruct the formation history of the young stellar population of the massive star-forming region RCW 36. We study several dozens of individual objects, both photometrically and spectroscopically, look for signs of multiple generations of young stars and investigate the role of the massive stars in this process. We obtain a census of the physical parameters and evolutionary status of the young stellar population. Using a combination of near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy we estimate ages and masses of individual ...

  5. STAR FORMATION ACROSS THE W3 COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Académica en Ensenada, Km 103 Carr. Tijuana–Ensenada, Ensenada 22860 (Mexico); Megías, Guillermo D. [Facultad de Física. Universidad de Sevilla. Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla, E-41080 (Spain); Lada, Elizabeth A. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, FL 32611 (United States); Alves, Joáo F. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  6. A tale of a rich cluster at z$\\sim$0.8 as seen by the Star Formation Histories of its ETGs

    CERN Document Server

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Vazdekis, Alexandre; de la Rosa, Ignacio G

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed stellar population analysis for a sample of 24 early-type galaxies belonging to the rich cluster RXJ0152.7-1357 at z=0.83. We have derived the age, metallicity, abundance pattern and star formation history for each galaxy individually, to further characterize this intermediate-z reference cluster. We then study how these stellar population parameters depend on local environment. This provides a better understanding on the formation timescales and subsequent evolution of the substructures in this cluster. We have also explored the evolutionary link between z$\\sim$0.8 ETGs and those in the local Universe by comparing the trends that the stellar population parameters follow with galaxy velocity dispersion at each epoch. We find that the ETGs in Coma are consistent with being the (passively-evolving) descendants of the ETG population in RXJ10152.7-1357. Furthermore, our results favor a downsizing picture, where the subclumps centers were formed first. This central parts contain the most mass...

  7. Deep Chandra, HST-COS, and Megacam Observations of the Phoenix Cluster: Extreme Star Formation and AGN Feedback on Hundred Kiloparsec Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; McNamara, Brian R.; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Applegate, Douglas E.; Bayliss, Matthew; Bautz, Marshall W.; Benson, Bradford A.; Carlstrom, John E.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Edge, Alastair C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Jones-Forman, Christine; Mantz, Adam B.; Miller, Eric D.; Stalder, Brian; Veilleux, Sylvain; ZuHone, John A.

    2015-10-01

    We present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ˜50-100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 109 M⊙), young (˜4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M⊙ yr-1. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M⊙ yr-1) from the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ˜10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2-7 × 1045 erg s-1. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from “quasar-mode” to “radio-mode,” and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ˜100 kpc, with extended “ghost” cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughly 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ˜200 kpc (0.15R500), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.

  8. Physics of primordial star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  9. Formation Channels for Blue Straggler Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Melvyn B

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we consider two formation channels for blue straggler stars: 1) the merger of two single stars via a collision, and 2) those produced via mass transfer within a binary. We review how computer simulations show that stellar collisions are likely to lead to relatively little mass loss and are thus effective in producing a young population of more-massive stars. The number of blue straggler stars produced by collisions will tend to increase with cluster mass. We review how the current population of blue straggler stars produced from primordial binaries decreases with increasing cluster mass. This is because exchange encounters with third, single stars in the most massive clusters tend to reduce the fraction of binaries containing a primary close to the current turn-off mass. Rather, their primaries tend to be somewhat more massive and have evolved off the main sequence, filling their Roche lobes in the past, often converting their secondaries into blue straggler stars (but more than 1 Gyr or so ag...

  10. Ram pressure induced star formation in Abell 3266

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsall, Brittany

    An X-ray observation of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3266 was obtained via the ROSAT PSPC. This information, along with spectroscopic data from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-clusters Survey (i.e. WINGS), were used to investigate whether ram pressure is a mechanism that influences star formation. Galaxies exhibiting ongoing star formation are identified by the presence of strong Balmer lines (Hbeta), known to correspond to early type stars. Older galaxies where a rapid increase in star formation has recently ceased, known as E+A galaxies, are identified by strong Hbeta absorption coupled with little to no [OII] emission. The correlation between recent star formation and "high" ram pressure, as defined by Kapferer et al. (2009) as ≥ 5 x 10-11 dyn cm-2, was tested and lead to a contradiction of the previously held belief that ram pressure influences star formation on the global cluster scale.

  11. The Young Cluster and Star Forming Region NGC 2264

    OpenAIRE

    Dahm, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    NGC 2264 is a young Galactic cluster and the dominant component of the Mon OB1 association lying approximately 760 pc distant within the local spiral arm. The cluster is hierarchically structured, with subclusters of suspected members spread across several parsecs. Associated with the cluster is an extensive molecular cloud complex spanning more than two degrees on the sky. Star formation is ongoing within the region as evidenced by the presence of numerous embedded clusters of protostars, mo...

  12. Star formation and structure formation in galaxy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    A number of theoretical and simulation results on star and structure formation in galaxy interactions and mergers is reviewed, and recent hydrodynamic simulations are presented. The role of gravity torques and ISM turbulence in galaxy interactions, in addition to the tidal field, is highlighted. Interactions can drive gas inflows towards the central kpc and trigger a central starburst, the intensity and statistical properties of which are discussed. A kinematically decoupled core and a supermassive central black hole can be fueled. Outside of the central kpc, many structures can form inside tidal tails, collisional ring, bridges, including super star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. The formation of super star clusters in galaxy mergers can now be directly resolved in hydrodynamic simulations. Their formation mechanisms and long-term evolution are reviewed, and the connection with present-day early-type galaxies is discussed.

  13. Modes of star formation from Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, Leonardo; Longmore, S

    2012-01-01

    We summarize some of the results obtained from Herschel surveys of the nearby star forming regions and the Galactic plane. We show that in the nearby star forming regions the starless core spatial surface density distribution is very similar to that of the young stellar objects. This, taken together with the similarity between the core mass function and the initial mass function for stars and the relationship between the amount of dense gas and star formation rate, suggest that the cloud fragmentation process defines the global outcome of star formation. This "simple" view of star formation may not hold on all scales. In particular dynamical interactions are expected to become important at the conditions required to form young massive clusters. We describe the successes of a simple criterion to identify young massive cluster precursors in our Galaxy based on (sub-)millimetre wide area surveys. We further show that in the location of our Galaxy where the best candidate for a precursor of a young massive cluste...

  14. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  15. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  16. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Román-Zúñiga, C G; Megias, G; Tapia, M; Lada, E A; Alves, J F

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images, combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex, and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters, and constructed K-band luminosity functions (KLF) that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients ...

  17. Star formation in Galactic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  18. Stellar interactions in dense and sparse star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, C.; Pfalzner, S.; Eckart, A.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Stellar encounters potentially affect the evolution of the protoplanetary discs in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). However, the role of encounters in other cluster environments is less known. Aims: We investigate the effect of the encounter-induced disc-mass loss in different cluster environments. Methods: Starting from an ONC-like cluster we vary the cluster size and density to determine the correlation of the collision time scale and disc-mass loss. We use the nbody6++ code to model the dynamics of these clusters and analyse the disc-mass loss due to encounters. Results: We find that the encounter rate strongly depends on the cluster density but remains rather unaffected by the size of the stellar population. This dependency translates directly into the effect on the encounter-induced disc-mass loss. The essential outcome of the simulations are: i) even in clusters of four times lower density than the ONC, the effect of encounters is still apparent; ii) the density of the ONC itself marks a threshold: in less dense and less massive clusters it is the massive stars that dominate the encounter-induced disc-mass loss, whereas in denser and more massive clusters the low-mass stars play the major role for the disc-mass removal. Conclusions: It seems that in the central regions of young dense star clusters - the common sites of star formation - stellar encounters do affect the evolution of the protoplanetary discs. With higher cluster density low-mass stars become more heavily involved in this process. These results can also be applied to extreme stellar systems: in the case of the Arches cluster one would expect stellar encounters to destroy the discs of most of the low- and high-mass stars in several hundred thousand years, whereas intermediate mass stars are able to retain their discs to some extent even under these harsh environmental conditions.

  19. Star Formation in Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The origin and types of spiral arms are reviewed with an emphasis on the connections between these arms and star formation. Flocculent spiral arms are most likely the result of transient instabilities in the gas that promote dense cloud formation, star formation, and generate turbulence. Long irregular spiral arms are usually initiated by gravitational instabilities in the stars, with the gas contributing to and following these instabilities, and star formation in the gas. Global spiral arms triggered by global perturbations, such as a galaxy interaction, can be wavemodes with wave reflection in the inner regions. They might grow and dominate the disk for several rotations before degenerating into higher-order modes by non-linear effects. Interstellar gas flows through these global arms, and through the more transient stellar spiral arms as well, where it can reach a high density and low shear, thereby promoting self-gravitational instabilities. The result is the formation of giant spiral arm cloud complexes,...

  20. Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. I. Models and Star Formation Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2005-01-01

    We model star formation in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies composed of a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas, using a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Absorbing sink particles are used to directly measure the mass of gravitationally collapsing gas. They reach masses characteristic of stellar clusters. In this paper, we describe our galaxy models and numerical methods, followed by an investigation of the gravitational instability in these galaxies. Gravitational collapse forms star clusters with correlated positions and ages, as observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Gravitational instability alone acting in unperturbed galaxies appears sufficient to produce flocculent spiral arms, though not more organized patterns. Unstable galaxies show collapse in thin layers in the galactic plane; associated dust will form thin dust lanes in those galaxies, in agreement with observations. We find an exponential relationship between the global star formation timescale and ...

  1. The Luminosity of Population III Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    DeSouza, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e., with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using 2+1D nonaxisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disk (i.e., $M_{\\rm disk} / M_{*} \\gtrsim 0.1$), whose evolution we follow for a further 30--40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disk. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of $10^6\\,\\LSun$. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5--10${\\times}$ greater th...

  2. Old star clusters: Bench tests of low mass stellar models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaris M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Old star clusters in the Milky Way and external galaxies have been (and still are traditionally used to constrain the age of the universe and the timescales of galaxy formation. A parallel avenue of old star cluster research considers these objects as bench tests of low-mass stellar models. This short review will highlight some recent tests of stellar evolution models that make use of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved old star clusters. In some cases these tests have pointed to additional physical processes efficient in low-mass stars, that are not routinely included in model computations. Moreover, recent results from the Kepler mission about the old open cluster NGC6791 are adding new tight constraints to the models.

  3. Star Formation in Various Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Brosch, N; Spector, O; Zitrin, A

    2008-01-01

    We describe studies of star formation in various galaxies using primarily observations from the Wise Observatory. In addition to surface photometry in the broad band UBVRI, we also use a set of narrow-band H-alpha filters tuned to different redshifts to isolate the emission line. With these observational data, and using models of evolutionary stellar populations, we unravel the star formation histories of the galaxies and connect them to other parameters, such as the galaxy environment.

  4. Hierarchical Formation of Galactic Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G

    2006-01-01

    Young stellar groupings and clusters have hierarchical patterns ranging from flocculent spiral arms and star complexes on the largest scale to OB associations, OB subgroups, small loose groups, clusters and cluster subclumps on the smallest scales. There is no obvious transition in morphology at the cluster boundary, suggesting that clusters are only the inner parts of the hierarchy where stars have had enough time to mix. The power-law cluster mass function follows from this hierarchical structure: n(M_cl) M_cl^-b for b~2. This value of b is independently required by the observation that the summed IMFs from many clusters in a galaxy equals approximately the IMF of each cluster.

  5. Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzard, R. G.; de Mink, S. E.; Pols, O. R.; Langer, N.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    ~Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with the second generation forming from a mixture of pristine gas and ejecta from the first generation. We show that massive binary stars may be a source of much of the material that makes this second generation of stars. Mass transfer in binaries is often non-conservative and the ejected matter moves slowly enough that it can remain inside a globular cluster and remain available for subsequent star formation. Recent studies show that there are more short-period massive binaries than previously thought, hence also more stars that interact and eject nuclear-processed material.

  6. Massive Binary Stars and Self-Enrichment of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Izzard, Robert G; Pols, Onno R; Langer, Norbert; Sana, Hugues; de Koter, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with the second generation forming from a mixture of pristine gas and ejecta from the first generation. We show that massive binary stars may be a source of much of the material that makes this second generation of stars. Mass transfer in binaries is often non-conservative and the ejected matter moves slowly enough that it can remain inside a globular cluster and remain available for subsequent star formation. Recent studies show that there are more short-period massive binaries than previously thought, hence also more stars that interact and eject nuclear-processed material.

  7. A multi-wavelength census of star formation activity in the young embedded cluster around Serpens/G3-G6

    CERN Document Server

    Djupvik, A A; Bontemps, S; Motte, F; Olofsson, G; Gaalfalk, M; Floren, H G; Andre, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this paper is to characterise the star formation activity in the poorly studied embedded cluster Serpens/G3-G6, located ~ 45' (3 pc) to the south of the Serpens Cloud Core, and to determine the luminosity and mass functions of its population of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). Methods. Multi-wavelength broadband photometry was obtained to sample the near and mid-IR spectral energy distributions to separate YSOs from field stars and classify the YSO evolutionary stage. ISOCAM mapping in the two filters LW2 (5-8.5 um) and LW3 (12-18 um) of a 19' x 16' field was combined with JHKs data from 2MASS, Ks data from Arnica/NOT, and L' data from SIRCA/NOT. Continuum emission at 1.3 mm (IRAM) and 3.6 cm (VLA) was mapped to study the cloud structure and the coldest/youngest sources. Deep narrow band imaging at the 2.12 um S(1) line of H2 from NOTCam/NOT was obtained to search for signs of bipolar outflows. Results. We have strong evidence for a stellar population of 31 Class II sources, 5 flat-spectrum sour...

  8. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Leigh, Nathan W. C., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  9. Young star clusters in the circumnuclear region of NGC 2110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durré, Mark; Mould, Jeremy, E-mail: mdurre@swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2014-03-20

    High-resolution observations in the near infrared show star clusters around the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of the Seyfert 1 NGC 2110, along with a 90 × 35 pc bar of shocked gas material around its nucleus. These are seen for the first time in our imaging and gas kinematics of the central 100 pc with the Keck OSIRIS instrument with adaptive optics. Each of these clusters is two to three times brighter than the Arches cluster close to the center of the Milky Way. The core star formation rate is 0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The photoionized gas (He I) dynamics imply an enclosed mass of 3-4 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. These observations demonstrate the physical linkage between AGN feedback, which triggers star formation in massive clusters, and the resulting stellar (and supernovae) winds, which cause the observed [Fe II] emission and feed the black hole.

  10. Young Star Clusters In The Circumnuclear Region Of NGC 2110

    CERN Document Server

    Durré, Mark

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution observations in the near infrared show star clusters around the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of the Seyfert 1 NGC2110, along with a 90 x 35 pc bar of shocked gas material around its nucleus. These are seen for the first time in our imaging and gas kinematics of the central 100pc with the Keck OSIRIS instrument with adaptive optics. Each of these clusters is 2-3 times brighter than the Arches cluster close to the centre of the Milky Way. The core star formation rate (SFR) is 0.3 M$_\\odot$/yr. The photoionized gas (He I) dynamics imply an enclosed mass of 3-4 x 10$^8$ M$_\\odot$. These observations demonstrate the physical linkage between AGN feedback, which triggers star formation in massive clusters, and the resulting stellar (and SNe) winds, which cause the observed [Fe II] emission and feed the black hole.

  11. Star clusters as simple stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzual, A Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I review to what extent we can understand the photometric properties of star clusters, and of low-mass, unresolved galaxies, in terms of population synthesis models designed to describe `simple stellar populations' (SSPs), i.e., groups of stars born at the same time, in the same volume of space, and from a gas cloud of homogeneous chemical composition. The photometric properties predicted by these models do not readily match the observations of most star clusters, unless we properly take into account the expected variation in the number of stars occupying sparsely populated evolutionary stages, due to stochastic fluctuations in the stellar initial mass function. In this case, population synthesis models reproduce remarkably well the full ranges of observed integrated colours and absolute magnitudes of star clusters of various ages and metallicities. The disagreement between the model predictions and observations of cluster colours and magnitudes may indicate problems with or deficiencies in the...

  12. Planet host stars in open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XiaoLing; Chen, YuQin; Zhao, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We have compiled a list of all planet host star candidates reported in the literature, which are likely to be cluster members, and we checked their memberships by the spatial location, radial velocity, proper motion and photometric criteria. We found that only six stars, BD-13 2130, HD 28305, Kepler-66, Kepler-67, Pr0201 and Pr0211, are planet orbiting stars in open clusters to date. Two stars, HD 70573 and HD 89744, belong to moving groups and one star, TYC 8975-2606-1, may not be a planet host star, while three stars, HD 16175, HD 46375 and HD 108874 are not members of open clusters. We note that all these six planetary systems in the stellar cluster environment are younger than ˜1 Gyr, which might indicate that the planetary system in open cluster can not survive for a long time, and we speculate that close stellar encounters between member stars in open cluster can potentially destroy, or at least strongly affect, the presence of planetary systems.

  13. The complex lives of star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, David

    2015-01-01

    As with the author’s recent books Extreme Explosions and Under a Crimson Sun, the complex topic of star clusters is broken down and made accessible with clear links to other areas of astronomy in a language which the non-specialist can easily read and enjoy. The full range of a star cluster's lifespan is depicted, as both globular and open clusters are tracked from birth to eventual death. Why is it some are dense conglomerates of stars while others are looser associations? Are the young, brilliant clusters seen in neighboring galaxies such as the Large Magellanic Cloud, M33 or M82 analogous to the ancient globulars seen in the Milky Way? How will these clusters change as their stars wane and die? More interestingly, how does living in a dense star cluster affect the fates of the stars and any attendant planets that accompany them?   Star clusters form many of the most dazzling objects in the astronomers’ catalogs. Many amateur astronomers are interested in exploring how these objects are created and wh...

  14. STELLAR FEEDBACK AND THE EVOLUTION OF YOUNG EMBEDDED STAR CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Weidner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present the rst results of an theoretical attempt to address the question of the evacuation time-scale but also the star-formation efficiency and the in uence of feedback on the most-massive star in a star cluster. With the use of stellar evolution models, known descriptions for the evolution of an ionised sphere around a star and further models to describe stellar winds, the e ects of young stellar populations of di erent sizes are studied.

  15. Star clusters in a nuclear star-forming ring: The disappearing string of pearls

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, Petri; Randriamanakoto, Zara

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the star cluster population in a low-luminosity early type galaxy, NGC 2328, is presented. The clusters are found in a tight star-forming nuclear spiral/ring pattern and we also identify a bar from structural 2D decomposition. These massive clusters are forming very efficiently in the circum-nuclear environment, they are young, possibly all less than 30 Myr of age. The clusters indicate an azimuthal age gradient, consistent with a "pearls-on-a-string" formation scenario suggesting bar driven gas inflow. The cluster mass function has a robust down-turn at low masses at all age bins. Assuming clusters are born with a power-law distribution, this indicates extremely rapid disruption at time-scales of just several Myr. If found to be typical, it means that clusters born in dense circum-nuclear rings do not survive to become old globular clusters in non-interacting systems.

  16. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  17. The evolutionary tracks of young massive star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pfalzner, S; Steinhausen, M; Vincke, K; Menten, K

    2014-01-01

    Stars mostly form in groups consisting of a few dozen to several ten thousand members. For 30 years, theoretical models provide a basic concept of how such star clusters form and develop: they originate from the gas and dust of collapsing molecular clouds. The conversion from gas to stars being incomplete, the left over gas is expelled, leading to cluster expansion and stars becoming unbound. Observationally, a direct confirmation of this process has proved elusive, which is attributed to the diversity of the properties of forming clusters. Here we take into account that the true cluster masses and sizes are masked, initially by the surface density of the background and later by the still present unbound stars. Based on the recent observational finding that in a given star-forming region the star formation efficiency depends on the local density of the gas, we use an analytical approach combined with \\mbox{N-body simulations, to reveal} evolutionary tracks for young massive clusters covering the first 10 Myr....

  18. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  19. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, Nathan W C; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Binary mass transfer is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this time-scale to the mean time for stable mass transfer to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing mass transfer that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster pro...

  20. Ultra-faint ultraviolet galaxies at z ∼ 2 behind the lensing cluster A1689: The luminosity function, dust extinction, and star formation rate density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian; Freeman, William R.; Dominguez, Alberto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Richard, Johan [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Charles André, F-69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex (France); Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Rm N204, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Scarlata, Claudia [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kewley, Lisa, E-mail: anahita.alavi@email.ucr.edu [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-01-10

    We have obtained deep ultraviolet imaging of the lensing cluster A1689 with the WFC3/UVIS camera onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the F275W (30 orbits) and F336W (4 orbits) filters. These images are used to identify z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies via their Lyman break, in the same manner that galaxies are typically selected at z ≥ 3. Because of the unprecedented depth of the images and the large magnification provided by the lensing cluster, we detect galaxies 100× fainter than previous surveys at this redshift. After removing all multiple images, we have 58 galaxies in our sample in the range –19.5 < M {sub 1500} < –13 AB mag. Because the mass distribution of A1689 is well constrained, we are able to calculate the intrinsic sensitivity of the observations as a function of source plane position, allowing for accurate determinations of effective volume as a function of luminosity. We fit the faint-end slope of the luminosity function to be α = –1.74 ± 0.08, which is consistent with the values obtained for 2.5 < z < 6. Notably, there is no turnover in the luminosity function down to M {sub 1500} = –13 AB mag. We fit the UV spectral slopes with photometry from existing Hubble optical imaging. The observed trend of increasingly redder slopes with luminosity at higher redshifts is observed in our sample, but with redder slopes at all luminosities and average reddening of (E(B – V)) = 0.15 mag. We assume the stars in these galaxies are metal poor (0.2 Z {sub ☉}) compared to their brighter counterparts (Z {sub ☉}), resulting in bluer assumed intrinsic UV slopes and larger derived values for dust extinction. The total UV luminosity density at z ∼ 2 is 4.31{sub −0.60}{sup +0.68}×10{sup 26} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, more than 70% of which is emitted by galaxies in the luminosity range of our sample. Finally, we determine the global star formation rate density from UV-selected galaxies at z ∼ 2 (assuming a constant dust

  1. The Relation between Interstellar Turbulence and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, R S

    2004-01-01

    (ABBREVIATED) Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. In this review the relation between interstellar turbulence and star formation is discussed. Supersonic turbulence can provide support against gravitational collapse on global scales, while at the same time it produces localized density enhancements that allow for collapse on small scales. The efficiency and timescale of stellar birth in Galactic gas clouds strongly depend on the properties of the interstellar turbulent velocity field, with slow, inefficient, isolated star formation being a hallmark of turbulent support, and fast, efficient, clustered star formation occurring in its absence. Star formation on scales of galaxies as a whole is expected to be controlled by the balance between gravity andturbulence, just like star formation on scales of individual interstellar gas clouds, but may be modulated by additional effects like cooling and differential rotation. The dominant mechanism for driving inte...

  2. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the

  3. Orbital circularisation of white dwarfs and the formation of gravitational radiation sources in star clusters containing an intermediate mass black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P. B.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2007-12-01

    Aims:We consider how tight binaries consisting of a super-massive black hole of mass M = 103-104 M⊙ and a white dwarf in quasi-circular orbit can be formed in a globular cluster. We point out that a major fraction of white dwarfs tidally captured by the black hole may be destroyed by tidal inflation during ongoing tidal circularisation, and therefore the formation of tight binaries is inhibited. However some fraction may survive tidal circularisation through being spun up to high rotation rates. Then the rates of energy loss through gravitational wave emission induced by tidally excited pulsation modes and dissipation through non linear effects may compete with the rate of increase of pulsation energy due to dynamic tides. The semi-major axes of these white dwarfs are decreased by tidal interaction below a “critical” value where dynamic tides decrease in effectiveness because pulsation modes retain phase coherence between successive pericentre passages. Methods: We estimate the rate of formation of such circularising white dwarfs within a simple framework, modelling them as n = 1.5 polytropes and assuming that results obtained from the tidal theory for slow rotators can be extrapolated to fast rotators. Results: We estimate the total capture rate as N 2.5 × 10-8 {M}41.3r0.1-2.1 yr-1, where M4 = M/104 M⊙ and r0.1 is the radius of influence of the black hole expressed in units 0.1 pc. We find that the formation rate of tight pairs is approximately 10 times smaller than the total capture rate, for typical parameters of the problem. This result is used to estimate the probability of detection of gravitational waves coming from such tight binaries by LISA. Conclusions: We conclude that LISA may detect such binaries provided that the fraction of globular clusters containing black holes in the mass range of interest is substantial and that the dispersion velocity of the cluster stars near the radius of influence of the black hole exceeds 20 km s-1.

  4. Star clusters in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of observational studies of the star cluster population in the interacting spiral galaxy M51, also known as the Whirlpool galaxy. Observations taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical and the near-UV are used to determine fundamental properties of the star

  5. The effects of supernovae on the dynamical evolution of binary stars and star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter I review the effects of supernovae explosions on the dynamical evolution of (1) binary stars and (2) star clusters. (1) Supernovae in binaries can drastically alter the orbit of the system, sometimes disrupting it entirely, and are thought to be partially responsible for `runaway' massive stars - stars in the Galaxy with large peculiar velocities. The ejection of the lower-mass secondary component of a binary occurs often in the event of the more massive primary star exploding as a supernova. The orbital properties of binaries that contain massive stars mean that the observed velocities of runaway stars (10s - 100s km s$^{-1}$) are consistent with this scenario. (2) Star formation is an inherently inefficient process, and much of the potential in young star clusters remains in the form of gas. Supernovae can in principle expel this gas, which would drastically alter the dynamics of the cluster by unbinding the stars from the potential. However, recent numerical simulations, and observational e...

  6. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  7. NGC 346: Looking in the Cradle of a Massive Star Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Hony, Sacha

    2017-03-01

    How does a star cluster of more than few 10,000 solar masses form? We present the case of the cluster NGC 346 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, still embedded in its natal star-forming region N66, and we propose a scenario for its formation, based on observations of the rich stellar populations in the region. Young massive clusters host a high fraction of early-type stars, indicating an extremely high star formation efficiency. The Milky Way galaxy hosts several young massive clusters that fill the gap between young low-mass open clusters and old massive globular clusters. Only a handful, though, are young enough to study their formation. Moreover, the investigation of their gaseous natal environments suffers from contamination by the Galactic disk. Young massive clusters are very abundant in distant starburst and interacting galaxies, but the distance of their hosting galaxies do not also allow a detailed analysis of their formation. The Magellanic Clouds, on the other hand, host young massive clusters in a wide range of ages with the youngest being still embedded in their giant HII regions. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of such star-forming complexes provide a stellar sampling with a high dynamic range in stellar masses, allowing the detailed study of star formation at scales typical for molecular clouds. Our cluster analysis on the distribution of newly-born stars in N66 shows that star formation in the region proceeds in a clumpy hierarchical fashion, leading to the formation of both a dominant young massive cluster, hosting about half of the observed pre-main-sequence population, and a self-similar dispersed distribution of the remaining stars. We investigate the correlation between stellar surface density (and star formation rate derived from star-counts) and molecular gas surface density (derived from dust column density) in order to unravel the physical conditions that gave birth to NGC 346. A power law fit to the data yields a steep correlation between these

  8. BUDHIES II: A phase-space view of HI gas stripping and star-formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Yara L; Candlish, Graeme N; Poggianti, Bianca M; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A W

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of HI gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z=0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep HI Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity vs. position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their HI gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of HI-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-typ...

  9. Star formation and gas supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  10. Star Formation Isochrone Surfaces: Clues on Star Formation Quenching in Dense Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The star formation history of galaxies is a complex process usually considered to be stochastic in nature, for which we can only give average descriptions such as the color-density relation. In this work we follow star-forming gas particles in a hydrodynamical N-body simulation back in time in order to study their initial spatial configuration. By keeping record of the time when a gas particle started forming stars we can produce gas-star isochrone surfaces delineating the surfaces of accreting gas that begin producing stars at different times. These accretion surfaces are closely packed inside dense regions, intersecting each other, and as a result galaxies inside proto-clusters stop accreting gas early, naturally explaining the color dependence on density. The process described here has a purely gravitational / geometrical origin, arguably operating at a more fundamental level than complex processes such as AGN and supernovae, and providing a conceptual origin for the color-density relation.

  11. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  12. Stellar Clusters in the NGC 6334 Star Forming Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Feigelson, Eric D; McNeill, Collin J; Broos, Patrick S; Garmire, Gordon P

    2009-01-01

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, have not been well-sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95 percent of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20-30,000 pre-main sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with about 10 distinct star clusters. The heavily-obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio HII regions. The lightly-obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formati...

  13. Probing the Initial Conditions of Clustered Star Formation -- Large Scale On-the-Fly Mapping of Orion B at FCRAO

    CERN Document Server

    Ridge, N A; Megeath, S T; Ridge, Naomi A.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2002-01-01

    In order to obtain a census of the pre-stellar and star-forming molecular cores, we have begun an unbiased survey in CS and N2H+ of the L1630 and L1641 molecular clouds. The use of these two molecular species enables us to quantify and disentangle the effects of depletion often seen in CS observations of dense cores. The spectral line data will provide essential kinematical information not present in similar studies of the sub-millimeter dust-continuum, enabling us to examine the overall core to core velocity dispersion and study the effects of infall and outflows around known sub-mm and infra-red sources. Here we present our initial observations of part of L1630, taken during the commissioning phase of the FCRAO On-the-Fly Mapping system in January 2002.

  14. Star Cluster Ecology; 2, Binary evolution with single-star encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, S F P; McMillan, S L W; Verbunt, F; Zwart, Simon F. Portegies; Hut, Piet; Millan, Stephen L. W. Mc; Verbunt, Frank

    1997-01-01

    Three-body effects greatly complicate stellar evolution. We model the effects of encounters of binaries with single stars, based on parameters chosen from conditions prevalent in the cores of globular clusters. For our three-body encounters, we start with a population of primordial binaries, and choose incoming stars from the evolving single star populations of Portgies Zwart, Hut and Verbunt (1997). In addition, we study the formation of new binaries through tidal capture among the single stars. In subsequent papers in this series, we will combine stellar evolution with the dynamics of a full N-body system.

  15. Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, C M; Funes, J G; Ribeiro, M B

    2006-01-01

    We present narrow-band observations of the H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample of 31 satellite orbiting isolated giant spiral galaxies. The sample studied spans the range $-19star formation rates are 0.68 and 3.66 M$_\\sun$ yr$^{-1}$ respectively. Maps of the spatial distribution of ionized gas are presented. The star-forming regions show a rich structure in which frequently discrete complexes are imposed over more diffuse structures. In general, the current star formation rates are smaller that the mean values in the past obtained from the current stellar content; this probably indicates a declining rhythm with time in the generation of new stars. However, the reserve of gas is enough to continue fueling the current levels of star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. Four of the o...

  16. Star Formation in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Star formation is one of the least understood processes in cosmic evolution. It is difficult to formulate a general theory for star formation in part because of the wide range of physical processes involved. The interstellar gas out of which stars form is a supersonically turbulent plasma governed by magnetohydrodynamics. This is hard enough by itself, since we do not understand even subsonic hydrodynamic turbulence very well, let alone supersonic non-ideal MHD turbulence. However, the behavior of star-forming clouds in the ISM is also obviously influenced by gravity, which adds complexity, and by both continuum and line radiative processes. Finally, the behavior of star-forming clouds is influenced by a wide variety of chemical processes, including formation and destruction of molecules and dust grains (which changes the thermodynamic behavior of the gas) and changes in ionization state (which alter how strongly the gas couples to magnetic fields). As a result of these complexities, there is nothing like a g...

  17. The star cluster-field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. I. Data analysis techniques and application to NGC 4395

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Context. It is generally assumed that a large fraction of stars are initially born in clusters. However, a large fraction of these disrupt on short timescales and the stars end up belonging to the field. Understanding this process is of paramount importance if we wish to constrain the star formation

  18. Evolutionary Synthesis Modelling of Young Star Clusters in Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, P; De Grijs, R; Anders, Peter; Alvensleben, Uta Fritze - v.; Grijs, Richard de

    2003-01-01

    The observational properties of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are vital tools to investigate the violent star formation histories of their host galaxies. This violence is thought to have been triggered by galaxy interactions or mergers. The most basic properties of a GCS are its luminosity function (number of clusters per luminosity bin) and color distributions. A large number of observed GCS show bimodal color distributions, which can be translated into a bimodality in either metallicity and/or age. An additional uncertainty comes into play when one considers extinction. These effects can be disentangled either by obtaining spectroscopic data for the clusters or by imaging observations in at least four passbands. This allows us then to discriminate between various formation scenarios of GCSs, e.g. the merger scenario by Ashman & Zepf, and the multi-phase collapse model by Forbes et. al.. Young and metal-rich star cluster populations are seen to form in interacting and merging galaxies. We analyse multi...

  19. Two views of globular cluster stars in the Galactic halo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martell S.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In [1] we reported the discovery in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II/SEGUE spectroscopic database of a small subset of halo red giants, 2.5%, with CN and CH band strengths indicative of globular-cluster-like carbon and nitrogen abundances. Because the formation of stars with unusual light-element abundances is thought to be restricted to high-density environments like globular clusters, this result has strong implications for both cluster formation processes and the assembly history of the Galactic halo. Here we discuss two efforts to expand upon that work.

  20. Structural Parameters of Star Clusters: Stochastic Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Narbutis, D; de Meulenaer, P; Mineikis, T; Vansevičius, V

    2014-01-01

    Stochasticity of bright stars introduces uncertainty and bias into derived structural parameters of star clusters. We have simulated a grid of cluster $V$-band images, observed with Subaru Suprime-Cam with age, mass, and size representing a cluster population in the M31 galaxy and derived their structural parameters by fitting King model to the surface brightness distribution. We have found that clusters less massive than $10^4 M_\\odot$ show significant uncertainty in their core and tidal radii for all ages, while clusters younger than 10 Myr have their sizes systematically underestimated for all masses. This emphasizes the importance of stochastic simulations to asses the true uncertainty of structural parameters in studies of semi-resolved and unresolved clusters.

  1. The Grism lens-amplified survey from space (GLASS). VII. The diversity of the distribution of star formation in cluster and field galaxies at 0.3

    CERN Document Server

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Schmidt, Kasper B; Morishita, Takahiro; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca M; Abramson, Louis; Bradač, Marusa; Brammer, Gabriel B; Hoag, Austin; Malkan, Matthew; Pentericci, Laura; Trenti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the slitless spectroscopy taken as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), we present an extended analysis of the spatial distribution of star formation in 76 galaxies in 10 clusters at 0.3< z <0.7. We use 85 foreground and background galaxies in the same redshift range as a field sample. The samples are well matched in stellar mass (10^8-10^11 M_sun) and star formation rate (0.5-50 M_sun/yr). We visually classify galaxies in terms of broad-band morphology, Halpha morphology and likely physical process acting on the galaxy. Most Halpha emitters have a spiral morphology (41+/-8% in clusters, 51+/-8% in the field), followed by mergers/interactions (28+/-8%, 31+/-7%, respectively) and early-type galaxies (remarkably as high as 29+/-8% in clusters and 15+/-6% in the field). A diversity of Halpha morphologies is detected, suggesting a diversity of physical processes. In clusters, 30+/-8% of the galaxies present a regular morphology, mostly consistent with star formation diffuse...

  2. Ruprecht 3: An old star cluster remnant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, D. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2003-02-01

    2MASS J and H photometry and integrated spectroscopy are employed to study the nature of the poorly populated compact concentration of stars Ruprecht 3, which was previously catalogued as an open cluster. The integrated spectrum remarkably resembles that of a moderately metal-rich globular cluster. The distribution of the object stars in the colour-magnitude diagram is compatible with that of a 1.5 +/- 0.5 Gyr open cluster or older, depending on whether the bluer stars are interpreted as turnoff stars or blue stragglers, respectively. We derive for the object a distance from the Sun dsun = 0.72 +0.04-0.03 kpc and a colour excess E(B-V) = 0.04. Although a globular cluster remnant cannot be ruled out, the integrated spectrum resemblance to that of a globular cluster probably reflects a stochastic effect owing to the few brighter stars. The structural and photometric properties of Ruprecht 3 are compatible with what would be expected for an intermediate-age open cluster remnant. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  3. X-ray insights into star and planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D

    2010-04-20

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the fate of massive stellar winds, X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks, and X-ray flare effects on ancient meteorites. Chandra observations of star-forming regions often show dramatic star clusters, powerful magnetic reconnection flares, and parsec-scale diffuse plasma. X-ray selected samples of premain sequence stars significantly advance studies of star cluster formation, the stellar initial mass function, triggered star-formation processes, and protoplanetary disk evolution. Although X-rays themselves may not play a critical role in the physics of star formation, they likely have important effects on protoplanetary disks by heating and ionizing disk gases.

  4. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds-1: Parameterisation and Classification of 1072 Clusters in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, P. K.; Subramaniam, A.; Choudhury, S.; Indu, G.; Sagar, Ram

    2016-08-01

    We have introduced a semi-automated quantitative method to estimate the age and reddening of 1072 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) III survey data. This study brings out 308 newly parameterised clusters. In a first of its kind, the LMC clusters are classified into groups based on richness/mass as very poor, poor, moderate and rich clusters, similar to the classification scheme of open clusters in the Galaxy. A major cluster formation episode is found to happen at 125±25 Myr in the inner LMC. The bar region of the LMC appears prominently in the age range 60 - 250 Myr and is found to have a relatively higher concentration of poor and moderate clusters. The eastern and the western ends of the bar are found to form clusters initially, which later propagates to the central part. We demonstrate that there is a significant difference in the distribution of clusters as a function of mass, using a movie based on the propagation (in space and time) of cluster formation in various groups. The importance of including the low mass clusters in the cluster formation history is demonstrated. The catalog with parameters, classification, and cleaned and isochrone fitted CMDs of 1072 clusters, which are available as online material, can be further used to understand the hierarchical formation of clusters in selected regions of the LMC.

  5. Star formation in Kiso measle galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2012-05-01

    The Kiso sample of several thousand local ultraviolet-bright galaxies includes galaxies classified as irregular disk galaxies with large star-forming complexes (I,g). We selected a sample of all I,g galaxies with both Sloan Digital Sky Survey images and spectra. They contain up to several dozen giant clumps each, so we refer to them as measle galaxies. We determined ages and masses of the clumps based on a comparison of photometry with population synthesis models of cluster evolution. The spectra were used to determine global star formation rates. Several hundred clumps were measured in the sample, with masses ranging from 10^5 to several x10^8 solar masses, scaling with galaxy absolute g magnitude of -14 to -21 mag. The galaxies are starbursting, sitting above the Groth strip “main sequence” of star formation rate versus galaxy mass by an order of magnitude. These Kiso measle galaxies have 10x the star formation rates of the Kiso tadpole galaxies. We compare their clump luminosity distribution functions with normal disk galaxies.

  6. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  7. The Star Formation History of RCW 36

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ellerbroek; L. Kaper; A. Bik; K.M. Maaskant; L. Podio

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of massive-star forming regions indicate that they can contain multiple generations of young stars. These observations suggest that star formation in these regions is sequential and/or triggered by a previous generation of (massive) stars. Here we present new observations of the star

  8. The Initial Conditions of Clustered Star Formation III. The Deuterium Fractionation of the Ophiuchus B2 Core

    CERN Document Server

    Friesen, R K; Myers, P C; Belloche, A; Shirley, Y L; Bourke, T L; André, P

    2010-01-01

    We present N2D+ 3-2 (IRAM) and H2D+ 1_11 - 1_10 and N2H+ 4-3 (JCMT) maps of the small cluster-forming Ophiuchus B2 core in the nearby Ophiuchus molecular cloud. In conjunction with previously published N2H+ 1-0 observations, the N2D+ data reveal the deuterium fractionation in the high density gas across Oph B2. The average deuterium fractionation R_D = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+) ~ 0.03 over Oph B2, with several small scale R_D peaks and a maximum R_D = 0.1. The mean R_D is consistent with previous results in isolated starless and protostellar cores. The column density distributions of both H2D+ and N2D+ show no correlation with total H2 column density. We find, however, an anticorrelation in deuterium fractionation with proximity to the embedded protostars in Oph B2 to distances >= 0.04 pc. Destruction mechanisms for deuterated molecules require gas temperatures greater than those previously determined through NH3 observations of Oph B2 to proceed. We present temperatures calculated for the dense core gas through the eq...

  9. Structural parameters of young star clusters: fractal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetem, A.

    2017-07-01

    A unified view of star formation in the Universe demand detailed and in-depth studies of young star clusters. This work is related to our previous study of fractal statistics estimated for a sample of young stellar clusters (Gregorio-Hetem et al. 2015, MNRAS 448, 2504). The structural properties can lead to significant conclusions about the early stages of cluster formation: 1) virial conditions can be used to distinguish warm collapsed; 2) bound or unbound behaviour can lead to conclusions about expansion; and 3) fractal statistics are correlated to the dynamical evolution and age. The technique of error bars estimation most used in the literature is to adopt inferential methods (like bootstrap) to estimate deviation and variance, which are valid only for an artificially generated cluster. In this paper, we expanded the number of studied clusters, in order to enhance the investigation of the cluster properties and dynamic evolution. The structural parameters were compared with fractal statistics and reveal that the clusters radial density profile show a tendency of the mean separation of the stars increase with the average surface density. The sample can be divided into two groups showing different dynamic behaviour, but they have the same dynamic evolution, since the entire sample was revealed as being expanding objects, for which the substructures do not seem to have been completely erased. These results are in agreement with the simulations adopting low surface densities and supervirial conditions.

  10. Star Cluster Dissolution in Arp 284

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Bradley W; Smith, Beverly J; Hancock, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We present results from a study of proto-globular cluster candidates in the interacting galaxy system Arp 284 (NGC 7714/5). Studies of the Antennae and M51 have suggested that the majority of these star clusters dissolve within 20 Myr due to mass loss. We obtain cluster colors using archival \\emph{HST} data, and estimate ages and extinctions for over 150 clusters using evolutionary synthesis models. We find that clusters in NGC 7714 are generally less than 20 Myr old, while the data in the bridge is too limited to allow good estimates for individual clusters. We also examine {H {\\sc ii}} region complexes with lower-resolution \\emph{GALEX} and ground-based H$\\alpha$ images. Several of these regions appear to be much older than the detected clusters within them, which may indicate the presence of an older, unresolved population of low mass or dispersed clusters.

  11. Hierarchical Star Formation in Nearby LEGUS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Andrews, Jennifer; Annibali, Francesca; Bright, Stacey N; Calzetti, Daniela; Cignoni, Michele; Evans, Aaron S; Gallagher, John S; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Grebel, Eva K; Hunter, Deidre A; Johnson, Kelsey; Kim, Hwi; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Smith, Linda; Thilker, David; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ~1 to ~200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in 7 galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarf...

  12. Photoionization of Clustered Halos by the First Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Daniel; Smidt, Joseph; Norman, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the photoevaporation of cosmological halos clustered around a 120 M$_\\odot$ primordial star, confining our study to structures capable of hosting Population III star formation. The calculations include self-consistent multifrequency conservative transfer of UV photons together with nine-species primordial chemistry and all relevant radiative processes. The ultimate fates of these halos varies with central density and proximity to the central source but generally fall into one of four categories. Diffuse halos with central densities below 2 - 3 cm$^{-3}$ are completely ionized and evaporated by the central star anywhere in the cluster. More evolved halo cores at densities above 2000 cm$^{-3}$ are impervious to both ionizing and Lyman-Werner flux at most distances from the star and collapse of their cores proceeds without delay. Radiative feedback in halos of intermediate density can be either positive or negative, depending on how the I-front remnant shock both compresses an...

  13. The structure of young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwin, P P; Boffin, H M J; Whitworth, A P

    1998-01-01

    We analyse and compare the clustering of young stars in Chamaeleon I and Taurus. We compute the mean surface-density of companion stars \\bar{N} as a function of angular displacement \\theta from each star. We then fit exponents of the power laws are 1.97 and 0.28, with the elbow at ~0.011 degrees. For Taurus, we obtain 2.02 and 0.87, with the elbow at ~0.013 deg. For both star clusters the observational data make quite large systematic excursions from the best fitting curve in the binary regime. These excursions may be attributable to evolutionary effects of the types discussed recently by Nakajima et al. and Bate et al. In the clustering regime the data conform to the best fitting curve very well. We also calculate the box-dimensions for the two star clusters. However, the limited dynamic range makes these estimates simply descriptors of the large-scale clustering, and not admissible evidence for fractality. We also propose two algorithms for objectively generating maps of constant stellar surface-density in ...

  14. Interrupted Stellar Encounters in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Geller, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single - binary and binary - binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be "interrupted" by an interloping star or binary may be 20-40% (or higher) in the core,...

  15. Super Star Cluster Nebula in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, J. P.; Turner, J. L.; Tsai, C.-W.; Beck, S. C.; Ho, P. T. P.

    2004-12-01

    We have mapped the starburst galaxy NGC 660 at 100mas resolution at K band (1.3 cm) with the NRAO Very Large Array. A peculiar galaxy at a distance of 13 Mpc, NGC 660 contains concentrated central star formation of power ˜ 2 x 1010 Lsun. Our 1.3 cm continuum image reveals a bright, compact source of less than 10 pc extent with a rising spectral index. We infer that this is optically thick free-free emission from a super star cluster nebula. The nebula is less than 10 pc in size, comparable in luminosity to the ``supernebula" in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. We estimate that there are a few thousand O stars contained in this single young cluster. There are a number of other weaker continuum sources, either slightly smaller or more evolved clusters of similar size within the central 300 parsecs of the galaxy. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  16. Searching for Planetary Transits in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Weldrake, David T F

    2007-01-01

    Star clusters provide an excellent opportunity to study the role of environment on determining the frequencies of short period planets. They provide a large sample of stars which can be imaged simultaneously, with a common distance, age and pre-determined physical parameters. This allows the search to be tailor-made for each specific cluster. Several groups are attempting to detect transiting planets in open clusters. Three previous surveys have also targeted the two brightest globular clusters. No cluster survey has yet detected a planet. This contribution presents a brief overview of the field, highlighting the pros and cons of performing such a search, and presents the expected and current results, with implications for planetary frequencies in regions of high stellar density and low metallicity.

  17. A new type of compact stellar population: dark star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran; 10.1088/2041-8205/741/1/L12

    2011-01-01

    Among the most explored directions in the study of dense stellar systems is the investigation of the effects of the retention of supernova remnants, especially that of the massive stellar remnant black holes (BHs), in star clusters. By virtue of their eventual high central concentration, these stellar mass BHs potentially invoke a wide variety of physical phenomena, the most important ones being emission of gravitational waves (GWs), formation of X-ray binaries, and modification of the dynamical evolution of the cluster. Here we propose, for the first time, that rapid removal of stars from the outer parts of a cluster by the strong tidal field in the inner region of our Galaxy can unveil its BH sub-cluster, which appears as a star cluster that is gravitationally bound by an invisible mass. We study the formation and properties of such systems through direct N-body computations and estimate that they can be present in significant numbers in the inner region of the Milky Way. We call such objects "dark star clu...

  18. Star cluster ecology IVa Dissection of an open star cluster-photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, S F P; Hut, P; Makino, J; Zwart, Simon F. Portegies; Millan, Stephen L. W. Mc; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of star clusters is studied using N-body simulations in which the evolution of single stars and binaries are taken self-consistently into account. Initial conditions are chosen to represent relatively young Galactic open clusters, such as the Pleiades, Praesepe and the Hyades. The calculations include a realistic mass function, primordial binaries and the external potential of the parent Galaxy. Our model clusters are generally significantly flattened in the Galactic tidal field, and dissolve before deep core collapse occurs. The binary fraction decreases initially due to the destruction of soft binaries, but increases later because lower mass single stars escape more easily than the more massive binaries. At late times, the cluster core is quite rich in giants and white dwarfs. There is no evidence for preferential evaporation of old white dwarfs, on the contrary the formed white dwarfs are likely to remain in the cluster. Stars tend to escape from the cluster through the first and second Lagra...

  19. Chemical abundances of blue straggler stars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lovisi, L

    2014-01-01

    By using the high resolution spectrograph FLAMES@VLT we performed the first systematic campaign devoted to measure chemical abundances of blue straggler stars (BSSs). These stars, whose existence is not predicted by the canonical stellar evolutionary theory, are likely the product of the interactions between stars in the dense environment of Globular Clusters. Two main scenarios for BSS formation (mass transfer in binary systems and stellar collisions) have been proposed and hydrodynamical simulations predict different chemical patterns in the two cases, in particular C and O depletion for mass transfer BSSs. In this contribution, the main results for BSS samples in 6 Globular Clusters and their interpretation in terms of BSS formation processes are discussed. For the first time, evidence of radiative levitation in the shallow envelopes of BSSs hotter than $\\sim$8000 K has been found. C and O depletion for some BSSs has been detected in 47 Tucanae, M30 and $\\omega$ Centauri thus suggesting a mass transfer ori...

  20. From cloud crash to star birth: star formation in cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Kazuhiro; Tasker, Elizabeth; Habe, Asao

    2015-08-01

    Much speculation surrounds the role of collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the galactic star formation rate.Once thought to be uncommon occurrences, observations and simulation now suggestthese could explain the formation of our most massive stars and super star clusters.To explore the result of such interactions, we simulated idealised GMC collisions with star formation and radiative feedback processes.Our results suggest that the star population formed has a stellar mass function index of -0.1 (compared with -1.4 for the non-collisional population),in good agreement with the observations of the assumed cloud collision case, NGC6334 (Munoz et al. 2007).Radiative feedback has a relatively modest dynamical effect on the collisional gas distribution,but increases the star formation rate post collision as the expanding HII bubbles trigger a subsequent stellar population.

  1. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies I. Data analysis techniques and application to NGC 4395

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Villa, E

    2010-01-01

    It is generally assumed that a large fraction of stars are initially born in clusters. However, a large fraction of these disrupt on short timescales and the stars end up belonging to the field. Understanding this process is of paramount importance if we wish to constrain the star formation histories of external galaxies using star clusters. We attempt to understand the relation between field stars and star clusters by simultaneously studying both in a number of nearby galaxies. As a pilot study, we present results for the late-type spiral NGC 4395 using HST/ACS and HST/WFPC2 images. Different detection criteria were used to distinguish point sources (star candidates) and extended objects (star cluster candidates). Using a synthetic CMD method, we estimated the star formation history. Using simple stellar population model fitting, we calculated the mass and age of the cluster candidates. The field star formation rate appears to have been roughly constant, or to have possibly increased by up to about a factor ...

  2. COCOA: Simulating Observations of Star Cluster Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Dalessandro, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) creates idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. The code can simulate optical observations from simulation snapshots in which positions and magnitudes of objects are known. The parameters for simulating the observations can be adjusted to mimic telescopes of various sizes. COCOA also has a photometry pipeline that can use standalone versions of DAOPHOT (ascl:1104.011) and ALLSTAR to produce photometric catalogs for all observed stars.

  3. Gravothermal Star Clusters - Theory and Computer Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurzem, Rainer

    2010-11-01

    In the George Darwin lecture, delivered to the British Royal Astronomical Society in 1960 by Viktor A. Ambartsumian he wrote on the evolution of stellar systems that it can be described by the "dynamic evolution of a gravitating gas" complemented by "a statistical description of the changes in the physical states of stars". This talk will show how this physical concept has inspired theoretical modeling of star clusters in the following decades up to the present day. The application of principles of thermodynamics shows, as Ambartsumian argued in his 1960 lecture, that there is no stable state of equilibrium of a gravitating star cluster. The trend to local thermodynamic equilibrium is always disturbed by escaping stars (Ambartsumian), as well as by gravothermal and gravogyro instabilities, as it was detected later. Here the state-of-the-art of modeling the evolution of dense stellar systems based on principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (Fokker-Planck approximation) will be reviewed. Recent progress including rotation and internal correlations (primordial binaries) is presented. The models have also very successfully been used to study dense star clusters around massive black holes in galactic nuclei and even (in a few cases) relativistic supermassive dense objects in centres of galaxies (here again briefly touching one of the many research fields of V.A. Ambartsumian). For the modern present time of high-speed supercomputing, where we are tackling direct N-body simulations of star clusters, we will show that such direct modeling supports and proves the concept of the statistical models based on the Fokker-Planck theory, and that both theoretical concepts and direct computer simulations are necessary to support each other and make scientific progress in the study of star cluster evolution.

  4. The search for delta Scuti stars in open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, S.; Arentoft, T.

    1998-05-01

    In order to improve the tests of models of stellar evolution, observations giving tighter constraints on the models were initiated by the formation of an informal group STACC (Frandsen, 1992). The purpose of the group is to search for and make observations of delta Scuti stars in open clusters. This paper presents some of the results of the search, mainly for distant open clusters with a rich population of variables. Included is an announcement of a target list (Frandsen & Arentoft 1998, The Book) and four examples of new Colour-Magnitude (CM) diagrams of open clusters considered to be interesting targets. Finally, we present the fruits of extensive searching: an open cluster that contains many delta Scuti stars. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, the Nordic Optical Telescope, ORM, La Palma and the IAC80, OT, Tenerife

  5. Star Formation in MUSCEL Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary star-formation histories for a subset of the low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the MUSCEL (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry, and Evolution of LSB galaxies) program. These histories are fitted against ground-based IFU spectra in tandem with space-based UV and IR photometry. MUSCEL aims to use these histories along with kinematic analyses to determine the physical processes that have caused the evolution of LSB galaxies to diverge from their high surface brightness counterparts.

  6. On the infant weight loss of low- to intermediate-mass star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, C.; Kroupa, P.; Nürnberger, D. E. A.; Sterzik, M. F.

    2007-04-01

    Star clusters are born in a highly compact configuration, typically with radii of less than about 1 pc roughly independently of mass. Since the star formation efficiency is less than 50 per cent by observation and because the residual gas is removed from the embedded cluster, the cluster must expand. In the process of doing so it only retains a fraction fst of its stars. To date there are no observational constraints for fst, although N-body calculations by Kroupa, Aarseth & Hurley suggest it to be about 20-30 per cent for Orion-type clusters. Here we use the data compiled by Testi et al., Testi, Palla & Natta and Testi, Palla & Natta for clusters around young Ae/Be stars and by de Wit et al. and de Wit et al. around young O stars and the study of de Zeeuw et al. of OB associations and combine these measurements with the expected number of stars in clusters with primary Ae/Be and O stars, respectively, using the empirical correlation between maximal stellar mass and star cluster mass of Weidner & Kroupa. We find that fst < 50 per cent with a decrease to higher cluster masses/more massive primaries. The interpretation would be that cluster formation is very disruptive. It appears that clusters with a birth stellar mass in the range 10-103Msolar keep at most 50 per cent of their stars.

  7. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casiana Muñoz-Tuñon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is rmly  established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP galaxies, we identied tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample - nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and dicult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the star formation is driven by pristine gas falling into the galaxy disk. If conrmed, we could be unveiling, for the rst time, cool  ows in action in our nearby world. The tadpole class is relatively frequent at high redshift - 10% of resolvable galaxies in the Hubble UDF but less than 1% in the local Universe. They are systems that could track cool ows and test models of galaxy formation.

  8. Gravity, Turbulence, and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G

    2004-01-01

    The azimuthal power spectra of optical emission from star formation and dust in spiral galaxies resembles the azimuthal power spectra of HI emission from the LMC. These and other power spectra of whole galaxies all resemble that of velocity in incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence. The reasons for this are unknown but it could be simply that star and cloud formation are the result of a mixture of processes and each gives a power spectrum similar to Kolmogorov turbulence, within the observable errors. The important point is that star and cloud formation are not random but are correlated over large distances by forces that span several orders of magnitude in scale. These forces are probably the usual combination of self-gravity, turbulence, and compression from stellar winds and supernovae, but they have to work in concert to create the structures we see in galaxies. In addition, the identification of flocculant spirals with swing amplified instabilities opens the possibility that a high fraction of turbulence i...

  9. Interactions, Starbursts, and Star Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan H. Knapen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study how interactions between galaxies affect star formation within them by considering a sample of almost 1500 of the nearest galaxies, all within a distance of ∼45 Mpc. We use the far-IR emission to define the massive star formation rate (SFR, and then normalise the SFR by the stellar mass of the galaxy to obtain the specific star formation rate (SSFR. We explore the distribution of (SSFR with morphological type and with stellar mass. We calculate the relative enhancement of SFR and SSFR for each galaxy by normalising them by the median SFR and SSFR values of individual control samples of similar non-interacting galaxies. We find that both the median SFR and SSFR are enhanced in interacting galaxies, and more so as the degree of interaction is higher. The increase is moderate, reaching a maximum of a factor of 1.9 for the highest degree of interaction (mergers. While the SFR and SSFR are enhanced statistically by interactions, in many individual interacting galaxies they are not enhanced at all. Our study is based on a representative sample of nearby galaxies and should be used to place constraints on studies based on samples of galaxies at larger distances.

  10. Probing the Microscopic with the Macroscopic: from Properties of Star Cluster Systems to Properties of Cluster-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, G.

    To understand how systems of star clusters have reached their presently observed properties constitutes a powerful probe into the physics of cluster formation, without needing to resort to high spatial resolution observations of individual cluster-forming regions (CFRg) in distant galaxies. In this contribution I focus on the mass-radius relation of CFRgs, how it can be uncovered by studying the gas expulsion phase of forming star clusters, and what the implications are. I demonstrate that, through the tidal field impact upon exposed star clusters, the CFRg mass-radius relation rules cluster infant weight-loss in dependence of cluster mass. The observational constraint of a time-invariant slope for the power-law young cluster mass function is robustly satisfied by CFRgs with a constant mean volume density. In contrast, a constant mean surface density would be conducive to the preferential destruction of high-mass clusters. A purely dynamical line-of-reasoning leads therefore to a conclusion consistent with star formation a process driven by a volume density threshold. Developing this concept further, properties of molecular clumps and CFRgs naturally get dissociated. This allows to understand: (i) why the star cluster mass function is steeper than the molecular cloud/clump mass function; (ii) the presence of a massive star formation limit in the mass-size space of molecular structures.

  11. On the global triggering mechanism of star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres

    2009-01-01

    We study the large-scale triggering of star formation in galaxies. We find that the largest mass-scale not stabilized by rotation, a well defined quantity in a rotating system and with clear dynamical meaning, strongly correlates with the star formation rate in a wide range of galaxies. We find that this relation can be explained in terms of the threshold for stability and the amount of turbulence allowed to sustain the system in equilibrium. Using this relation we also derived the observed correlation between the star formation rate and the luminosity of the brightest young stellar cluster.

  12. A Spectroscopically Confirmed Excess of 24 micron Sources in a Super Galaxy Group at z=0.37: Enhanced Dusty Star Formation Relative to the Cluster and Field Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Kim-Vy H; Moustakas, John; Bai, Lei; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Holden, Bradford P; Zaritsky, Dennis; Kautsch, Stefan J

    2009-01-01

    To trace how dust-obscured star formation varies with environment, we compare the fraction of 24 micron sources in a super galaxy group to the field and a rich galaxy cluster at z~0.35. We draw on multi-wavelength observations that combine Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer imaging with extensive optical spectroscopy (>1800 redshifts) to isolate galaxies in each environment and thus ensure a uniform analysis. We focus on the four galaxy groups in supergroup 1120-12 that will merge to form a galaxy cluster comparable in mass to Coma. We find that 1) the fraction of supergroup galaxies with SFR(IR)>3 Msun/yr is four times higher than in the cluster (32% vs. 7%); 2) the supergroup's infrared luminosity function confirms that it has a higher density of IR members compared to the cluster and includes bright IR sources not found in galaxy clusters at z0.5 Mpc); once their star formation is quenched, most will evolve into faint red galaxies. Our analysis indicates that the supergroup's 24 micron population also differs fr...

  13. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Silich, S A; Medina-Tanco, G A; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Palous, Jan; Silich, Sergiy; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo A.; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2003-01-01

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that it...

  14. Hierarchical star cluster assembly in globally collapsing molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; González-Samaniego, Alejandro; Colín, Pedro

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in a numerical simulation of a molecular cloud (MC) undergoing global hierarchical collapse, focusing on how the gas motions in the parent cloud control the assembly of the cluster. The global collapse implies that the star formation rate (SFR) increases over time. The collapse is hierarchical because it consists of small-scale collapses within larger scale ones. The latter culminate a few Myr later than the first small-scale ones and consist of filamentary flows that accrete on to massive central clumps. The small-scale collapses consist of clumps that are embedded in the filaments and falling on to the large-scale collapse centres. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall motion of their parent clumps, so that the filaments feed both gas and stars to the massive central clump. This process leads to the presence of a few older stars in a region where new protostars are forming, and also to a self-similar structure, in which each unit is composed of smaller scale subunits that approach each other and may merge. Because the older stars formed in the filaments share the infall motion of the gas on to the central clump, they tend to have larger velocities and to be distributed over larger areas than the younger stars formed in the central clump. Finally, interpreting the initial mass function (IMF) simply as a probability distribution implies that massive stars only form once the local SFR is large enough to sample the IMF up to high masses. In combination with the increase of the SFR, this implies that massive stars tend to appear late in the evolution of the MC, and only in the central massive clumps. We discuss the correspondence of these features with observed properties of young stellar clusters, finding very good qualitative agreement.

  15. Star formation in 30 Doradus

    CERN Document Server

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; Sirianni, Marco; Andersen, Morten; Mutchler, Max; Balick, Bruce; Dopita, Michael A; Frogel, Jay A; Whitmore, Bradley C; Bond, Howard; Clazetti, Daniela; Carollo, C Marcella; Disney, Michael J; Hall, Donald N B; Holtzman, Jon A; Kimble, Randy A; McCarthy, Patrick J; O'Connell, Robert W; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I; Trauger, John T; Walker, Alistair R; Windhorst, Rogier A; Young, Erick T

    2011-01-01

    Using observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterise and quantify this effect using young massive main sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (> 4 sigma) Halpha excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one third of these objects are younger than ~4Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionising cluster R136, whereas the rest have ages up to ~30Myr, with a median age of ~12Myr. Th...

  16. A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER M15 The globular cluster Messier 15 is shown in this color image obtained with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Lying some 40,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Pegasus, M15 is one of nearly 150 known globular clusters that form a vast halo surrounding our Milky Way galaxy. Each of these clusters is a spherical association of hundreds of thousands of ancient stars. The image, prepared by the Hubble Heritage team, attempts to show the stars in M15 in their true colors. The brightest cluster stars are red giants, with an orange color due to surface temperatures lower than our Sun's. Most of the fainter stars are hotter, giving them a bluish-white color. If we lived in the core of M15, our sky would blaze with tens of thousands of brilliant stars both day and night! Nestled among the myriads of stars visible in the Hubble image is an astronomical oddity. The pinkish object to the upper left of the cluster's core is a gas cloud surrounding a dying star. Known as Kuestner 648, this was the first planetary nebula to be identified in a globular cluster. In 1928, F. G. Pease, working at the 100-inch telescope of California's Mount Wilson Observatory, photographed the spectrum of K 648 and discovered the telltale bright emission of a nebular gas cloud rather than a normal star. In the ensuing 70 years, only three more planetary nebulae have been discovered in globular clusters. The stars in M15 and other globular clusters are estimated to be about 12 billion years old. They were among the first generations of stars to form in the Milky Way. Our Sun, by comparison, is a youthful 4.6 billion years old. As a star like the Sun ages, it exhausts the hydrogen that fuels its nuclear fusion, and increases in size to become a red giant. Then it ejects its outer layers into space, producing a planetary nebula. The remnant star at the center of the nebula gradually dies away as a

  17. New Galactic Star Clusters Discovered in the VVV Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostin; Clarke, James R A; Peñaloza, Francisco; Sale, Stuart E; Minniti, Dante; Alonso-García, Javier; Artigau, Étienne; Barbá, Rodolfo; Bica, Eduardo; Baume, Gustavo Luis; Catelan, Márcio; Chené, André-Nicolas; Dias, Bruno; Folkes, Stuart L; Froebrich, Dirk; Geisler, Doug; de Grijs, Richard; Hanson, Margaret M; Hempel, Maren; Ivanov, Valentin D; Kumar, M S Nanda; Lucas, Philip; Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Rejkuba, Marina; Saito, Roberto K; Tamura, Motohide; Toledo, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    VISTA Variables in the V\\'{\\i}a L\\'actea (VVV) is one of the six ESO Public Surveys operating on the new 4-meter Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). VVV is scanning the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, where star formation activity is high. One of the principal goals of the VVV Survey is to find new star clusters of different ages. In order to trace the early epochs of star cluster formation we concentrated our search in the directions to those of known star formation regions, masers, radio, and infrared sources. The disk area covered by VVV was visually inspected using the pipeline processed and calibrated $K_{\\rm S}$-band tile images for stellar overdensities. Subsequently, we examined the composite $JHK_{\\rm S}$ and $ZJK_{\\rm S}$ color images of each candidate. PSF photometry of $15\\times15$ arcmin fields centered on the candidates was then performed on the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit reduced images. After statistical field-star decontamination, color-magnit...

  18. The Hierarchical Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in Six Local Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasha, K.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Kim, H.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Dale, D. A.; Fumagalli, M.; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Kahre, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Messa, M.; Pellerin, A.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Shabani, F.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.

    2017-05-01

    We present a study of the hierarchical clustering of the young stellar clusters in six local (3-15 Mpc) star-forming galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope broadband WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey). We identified 3685 likely clusters and associations, each visually classified by their morphology, and we use the angular two-point correlation function to study the clustering of these stellar systems. We find that the spatial distribution of the young clusters and associations are clustered with respect to each other, forming large, unbound hierarchical star-forming complexes that are in general very young. The strength of the clustering decreases with increasing age of the star clusters and stellar associations, becoming more homogeneously distributed after ˜40-60 Myr and on scales larger than a few hundred parsecs. In all galaxies, the associations exhibit a global behavior that is distinct and more strongly correlated from compact clusters. Thus, populations of clusters are more evolved than associations in terms of their spatial distribution, traveling significantly from their birth site within a few tens of Myr, whereas associations show evidence of disruption occurring very quickly after their formation. The clustering of the stellar systems resembles that of a turbulent interstellar medium that drives the star formation process, correlating the components in unbound star-forming complexes in a hierarchical manner, dispersing shortly after formation, suggestive of a single, continuous mode of star formation across all galaxies.

  19. Star Clusters as Type Ia Supernova Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Shara, M M; Shara, Michael M.; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2002-01-01

    We find a remarkably enhanced production rate in star clusters (relative to the field) of very short period, massive double-white-dwarf stars and of giant-white dwarf binaries. These results are based on N-body simulations performed with the new GRAPE-6 special purpose hardware and are important in identifying and characterizing the progenitors of type Ia supernovae. The high incidence of very close double-white-dwarf systems is the result of dynamical encounters between (mostly) primordial binaries and other cluster stars. Orbital hardening rapidly drives these degenerate binaries to periods under ~10 hours. Gravitational radiation emission and mergers producing supra-Chandrasekhar objects follow in less than a Hubble time. If most stars are born in clusters then estimates of the double white dwarf merger rates in galaxies (due to cluster dynamical interaction) must be increased more than tenfold. A majority of the Roche lobe overflow giant-white dwarf binaries are not primordial; they are produced in exchan...

  20. A Cautionary Note about Composite Galactic Star Formation Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, G.

    2016-07-01

    We explore the pitfalls that affect the comparison of the star formation relation for nearby molecular clouds with that for distant compact molecular clumps. We show that both relations behave differently in the ({{{Σ }}}{{gas}}, {{{Σ }}}{{SFR}}) space, where {{{Σ }}}{{gas}} and {{{Σ }}}{{SFR}} are, respectively, the gas and star formation rate surface densities, even when the physics of star formation is the same. This is because the star formation relation of nearby clouds relates the gas and star surface densities measured locally, that is, within a given interval of gas surface density, or at a given protostar location. We refer to such measurements as local measurements, and the corresponding star formation relation as the local relation. In contrast, the stellar content of a distant molecular clump remains unresolved. Only the mean star formation rate can be obtained, e.g., from the clump infrared luminosity. One clump therefore provides one single point to the ({{{Σ }}}{{gas}}, {{{Σ }}}{{SFR}}) space, that is, its mean gas surface density and star formation rate surface density. We refer to this star formation relation as a global relation since it builds on the global properties of molecular clumps. Its definition therefore requires an ensemble of cluster-forming clumps. We show that although the local and global relations have different slopes, this cannot per se be taken as evidence for a change in the physics of star formation with gas surface density. It therefore appears that great caution should be taken when physically interpreting a composite star formation relation, that is, a relation combining local and global relations.

  1. Simulating Stellar Cluster Formation and Early Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Joshua; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ibañez-Mejia, Juan; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pellegrino, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our current development of a model of stellar cluster formation and evolution in the presence of stellar feedback. We have integrated the MHD code Flash into the Astrophysical Multi-Use Software Environment (AMUSE) and coupled the gas dynamics to an N-body code using a Fujii gravity bridge. Further we have integrated feedback from radiation using the FERVENT module for Flash, supernovae by thermal and kinetic energy injection, and winds by kinetic energy injection. Finally we have developed a method of implementing star formation using the Jeans criterion of the gas. We present initial results from our cluster formation model in a cloud using self-consistent boundary conditions drawn from a model of supernova-driven interstellar turbulence.

  2. `Tail-end' Bondi-Hoyle accretion in young star clusters: Implications for disks, planets, and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Throop, Henry B

    2008-01-01

    Young stars orbiting in the gravitational potential well of forming star clusters pass through the cluster's dense molecular gas and can experience Bondi-Hoyle accretion from reservoirs outside their individual protostellar cloud cores. Accretion can occur for several million years after the stars form, but before the cluster disperses. This accretion is predominantly onto the disk and not the star. N-body simulations of stars orbiting in three young model clusters containing 30, 300, and 3000 stars are presented. The simulations include the gravitational potential of the molecular gas which smoothly disperses over time. The clusters have a star formation efficiency of 33% and a radius of 0.22 pc. We find that the disks surrounding solar-mass stars in the N=30 cluster accretes ~0.01 M_sol (~1 minimum-mass solar nebula, MMSN) per Myr. The accretion rate scales as M^2.1 for stars of mass M. The accretion rate is ~5 times lower for N=3000 cluster, due to its higher stellar velocities and higher temperature. The ...

  3. Quantifying & Understanding Variations in Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Sami

    2017-07-01

    I will discuss some aspects of the variability in the outcome of the star formation process. In particular, I will focus on the origin of the scatter in the star formation scaling relations in galactic disks and on the variability of the IMF in young star forming regions.

  4. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Frau, Pau [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3 E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Li, Hua-Bai [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Padovani, Marco [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, UMR 8112 du CNRS, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bontemps, Sylvain [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Csengeri, Timea, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  5. The Extremely Young Star Cluster Population In Haro 11

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela; Zackrisson, Erik; Hayes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a deep multi-band photometric analysis of the star cluster population of Haro 11. This starburst galaxy (log L_FUV = 10.3 L_sun) is considered a nearby analogue of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at high redshift. The study of the numerous star clusters in the systems is an effective way to investigate the formation and evolution of the starburst phase. In fact, the SED fitting models have revealed a surprisingly young star cluster population, with ages between 0.5 and 40 Myr, and estimated masses between 10^3 and 10^7 solar masses. An independent age estimation has been done with the EW(Halpha) analysis of each cluster. This last analysis has confirmed the young ages of the clusters. We noticed that the clusters with ages between 1 and 10 Myr show a flux excess in H (NIC3/F160W) and/or I (WFPC2/F814W) bands with respect to the evolutionary models. Once more Haro 11 represents a challenge to our understanding.

  6. On the Onset of Secondary Stellar Generations in Giant Star Forming Regions and Massive Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate, and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T $\\sim$ 10$^4$ K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in s...

  7. Extragalactic Star Clusters Speculations on the Future

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, J S; Gallagher, John S.; Grebel, Eva K.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the future possibilities for extragalactic star cluster research with the expected new ground-based and space-based telescopes and instrumentation. Significant gains are expected due to improved angular resolution, sensitivity, and area coverage particularly in the infrared and radio, accompanied by progress in evolutionary and dynamical modelling. Improvements in angular resolution are anticipated, especially through new adaptive optics systems (e.g., Keck, Gemini, VLT), and interferometry (e.g., Keck, VLT, LBT, ALMA, SMA, SkA), and space instrumentation (e.g., Chandra, NGST), enabling studies even of deeply embedded, forming extragalactic star clusters. Tidal disruption of Galactic clusters becomes observable through wide-area surveys such as the SDSS, VISTA, PRIME, including proper motion measurements through high-resolution imaging (e.g., HST, LBT, SIM, GAIA). Sensitive new optical and infrared spectrographs (e.g., HET, SALT, GranTeCan, Magellan, Keck, VLT, CELT, OWL, NGST) will push kinematic ...

  8. Kinematics of Star Clusters in M101

    CERN Document Server

    Simanton, Lesley; Miller, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    We have identified a few thousand star clusters in the nearby, late-type spiral galaxy M101, including approximately 90 candidate ancient globular clusters (GCs), from multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. We obtained follow-up low-resolution (R approximately 2000) optical spectroscopy from Gemini-GMOS for 43 total clusters, of which 18 are old GCs and 25 are young massive clusters (YMCs). We measure radial velocities for these clusters and find that, as expected, the YMCs rotate with the HI disk. The old GCs do not show any obvious evidence for rotation and have a much higher velocity dispersion than the YMCs, suggesting that the GCs in M101 are likely part of a stellar halo or thick disk.

  9. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  10. Star Formation in Henize 206

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    from that explosion impacted a cloud of nearby hydrogen gas, compressed it, and started a new generation of star formation. The death of one star led to the birth of many new stars. This is particularly evident in the MIPS inset, where the 24-micron emission peaks correspond to newly formed stars. The ultraviolet and visible-light photons from the new stars are absorbed by surrounding dust and re-radiated at longer infrared wavelengths, where it is detected by Spitzer. This emission nebula was cataloged by Karl Henize (HEN-eyes) while spending 1948-1951 in South Africa doing research for his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Michigan. Henize later became a NASA astronaut and, at age 59, became the oldest rookie to fly on the Space Shuttle during an eight-day flight of the Challenger in 1985. He died just short of his 67th birthday in 1993 while attempting to climb the north face of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak.

  11. A star cluster at the edge of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.

    2007-03-01

    Context: This paper is part of our ongoing study of star formation in the (far-) outer Galaxy. Aims: Our goal in this paper is to study stars and molecular gas in the direction of IRAS 06145+1455 (WB89-789). The kinematic distance of the associated molecular cloud is 11.9 kpc. With a galactocentric distance of ~ 20.2 kpc, this object is at the edge of the (molecular) disk of the Galaxy. Methods: We use near-IR (J, H, K), molecular line-, and dust continuum observations. Results: The near-IR data show the presence of an (embedded) cluster of about 60 stars, with a radius ˜ 1.3 pc and an average stellar surface density ~ 12 pc-2. We find at least 14 stars with NIR-excess, 3 of which are possibly Class I objects. The cluster is embedded in a ˜ 1000 M⊙ molecular/dust core, from which a molecular outflow originates. The temperature of most of the outflowing gas is ⪉ 40 K, and the total mass of the swept-up material is ⪉ 10 M⊙. Near the center of the flow, indications of much higher temperatures are found, probably due to shocks. A spectrum taken of one of the probable cluster members shows a tentative likeness to that of a K3 III-star (with an age of at least 20 Myr). If correct, this would confirm the kinematic distance. Conclusions: .This cluster is the furthest one from the Galactic center yet detected. The combination of old and recent activity implies that star formation has been going on for at least 20 Myr, which is difficult to understand considering the location of this object, where external triggers are either absent or weak, compared to the inner Galaxy. This suggests that once star formation is occurring, later generations of stars may form through the effect of the first generation of stars on the (remnants of) the original molecular cloud. Partly based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Observer’s guide to star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This book is for amateur astronomers of all expertise, from beginner to experienced. It is intended to be used at the telescope – small, medium, or large – or even by an observer using binoculars or the naked eye. It is organized by constellation and will enable practical observers to locate the approximate positions of important star clusters in the 88 constellations from literally anywhere on Earth.  In practice, GO-TO telescopes can usually locate clusters accurately enough, but this, of course, first requires that the observer knows what is visible in the sky at a given time and from a given location, so as to input a locatable object! This is where the book becomes an essential aid to finding star clusters to observe. Observers who do not have computer-controlled telescopes can of course use the traditional “star-hopping” method to find specific objects, starting from the given reference stars.  The constellation maps in this book are in black and white, so that they can be read by the light of...

  13. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Soeren S

    2015-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies can have very high globular cluster specific frequencies, and the GCs are in general significantly more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars. In some dwarfs, such as Fornax, WLM, and IKN, the fraction of metal-poor stars that belong to GCs can be as high as 20%-25%, an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-2% typical of GCs in halos of larger galaxies. Given that chemical abundance anomalies appear to be present also in GCs in dwarf galaxies, this implies severe difficulties for self-enrichment scenarios that require GCs to have lost a large fraction of their initial masses. More generally, the number of metal-poor field stars in these galaxies is today less than what would originally have been present in the form of low-mass clusters if the initial cluster mass function was a power-law extending down to low masses. This may imply that the initial GC mass function in these dwarf galaxies was significantly more top-heavy than typically observed in present-day star forming environments.

  14. NGC 346: Looking in the Cradle of a Massive Star Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A

    2015-01-01

    [abridged] How does a star cluster of more than few 10,000 solar masses form? We present the case of the cluster NGC 346 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, and its star-forming region N66, and we propose a scenario for its formation, based on observations of the rich stellar populations in the region. Young massive clusters (YMCs) host a high fraction of early-type stars, indicating an extremely high star formation efficiency. The Magellanic Clouds host a wide range of such clusters with the youngest being still embedded in their giant HII regions. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of such star-forming complexes allows the detailed study of star formation at scales typical for molecular clouds. Our cluster analysis of newly-born stars in N66 shows that star formation in the region proceeds in a clumpy hierarchical fashion, leading to the formation of both a dominant YMC, hosting about half of the observed pre--main-sequence population, and a dispersed self-similar distribution of the remaining stars. We investigate ...

  15. Extragalactic Star Clusters: Speculations on the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J. S.; Grebel, E. K.

    We discuss the future possibilities for extragalactic star cluster research with the expected new ground-based and space-based telescopes and instrumentation. Significant gains are expected due to improved angular resolution, sensitivity, and area coverage particularly in the infrared and radio, accompanied by progress in evolutionary and dynamical modelling. Improvements in angular resolution are anticipated, especially through new adaptive optics systems (e.g., Keck, Gemini, VLT), and interferometry (e.g., Keck, VLT, LBT, ALMA, SMA, SkA), and space instrumentation (e.g., Chandra, NGST), enabling studies even of deeply embedded, forming extragalactic star clusters. Tidal disruption of Galactic clusters becomes observable through wide-area surveys such as the SDSS, VISTA, PRIME, including proper motion measurements through high-resolution imaging (e.g., HST, LBT, SIM, GAIA). Sensitive new optical and infrared spectrographs (e.g., HET, SALT, GranTeCan, Magellan, Keck, VLT, CELT, OWL, NGST) will push kinematic and abundance studies to new limits, allowing us detailed comparisons with model predictions. One important wavelength range for the study of young, massive star clusters, the far UV, appears to be neglected by future planned instrumentation.

  16. Cosmic Star Formation History from Local Observations and an Outline for Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwick, F D A

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to reconstruct the cosmic star formation rate density history from local observations and in doing so to gain insight into how galaxies might have formed and evolved. A new chemical evolution model is described which accounts for the formation of globular clusters as well as the accompanying field stars. When this model is used in conjunction with the observed age metallicity relations for the clusters and with input which allows for the formation of the nearly universally observed bimodal distribution of globular clusters, star formation rates are obtained. By confining attention to a representative volume of the local universe, these rates allow a successful reconstruction of the Madau plot while complementary results similtaneously satisfy many local cosmological constraints. A physical framework for galaxy formation is presented which incorporates the results from this chemical evolution model and assumes an anisotropic collapse. In addition to providing the `classical' h...

  17. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  18. Supernova enrichment of planetary systems in low-mass star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Rhana B.; Parker, Richard J.

    2017-02-01

    The presence and abundance of short-lived radioisotopes 26Al and 60Fe in chondritic meteorites implies that the Sun formed in the vicinity of one or more massive stars that exploded as supernovae (SNe). Massive stars are more likely to form in massive star clusters (>1000 M⊙) than lower mass clusters. However, photoevaporation of protoplanetary discs from massive stars and dynamical interactions with passing stars can inhibit planet formation in clusters with radii of ˜1 pc. We investigate whether low-mass (50-200 M⊙) star clusters containing one or two massive stars are a more likely avenue for early Solar system enrichment as they are more dynamically quiescent. We analyse N-body simulations of the evolution of these low-mass clusters and find that a similar fraction of stars experience SN enrichment than in high-mass clusters, despite their lower densities. This is due to two-body relaxation, which causes a significant expansion before the first SN even in clusters with relatively low (100 stars pc-3) initial densities. However, because of the high number of low-mass clusters containing one or two massive stars, the absolute number of enriched stars is the same, if not higher than for more populous clusters. Our results show that direct enrichment of protoplanetary discs from SNe occurs as frequently in low-mass clusters containing one or two massive stars (>20 M⊙) as in more populous star clusters (1000 M⊙). This relaxes the constraints on the direct enrichment scenario and therefore the birth environment of the Solar system.

  19. The Brightest Young Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetti, D; Adamo, A; Gallagher, J S; Andrews, J E; Smith, L J; Clayton, G C; Lee, J C; Sabbi, E; Ubeda, L; Kim, H; Ryon, J E; Thilker, D; Bright, S N; Zackrisson, E; Kennicutt, R C; de Mink, S E; Whitmore, B C; Aloisi, A; Chandar, R; Cignoni, M; Cook, D; Dale, D A; Elmegreen, B G; Elmegreen, D M; Evans, A S; Fumagalli, M; Gouliermis, D A; Grasha, K; Grebel, E K; Krumholz, M R; Walterbos, R; Wofford, A; Brown, T M; Christian, C; Dobbs, C; Herrero, A; Kahre, L; Messa, M; Nair, P; Nota, A; Oestlin, G; Pellerin, A; Sacchi, E; Schaerer, D; Tosi, M

    2015-01-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC5253 hosts a number of young, massive star clusters, the two youngest of which are centrally concentrated and surrounded by thermal radio emission (the `radio nebula'). To investigate the role of these clusters in the starburst energetics, we combine new and archival Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC5253 with wavelength coverage from 1500 Ang to 1.9 micron in 13 filters. These include H-alpha, P-beta, and P-alpha, and the imaging from the Hubble Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey). The extraordinarily well-sampled spectral energy distributions enable modeling with unprecedented accuracy the ages, masses, and extinctions of the 9 optically brightest clusters (M_V < -8.8) and the two young radio nebula clusters. The clusters have ages ~1-15 Myr and masses ~1x10^4 - 2.5x10^5 M_sun. The clusters' spatial location and ages indicate that star formation has become more concentrated towards the radio nebula over the last ~15 Myr. The most massive cluster ...

  20. On the rotation of nuclear star clusters formed by cluster inspirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsi, Athanasia; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; van de Ven, Glenn; Perets, Hagai B.; Bianchini, Paolo; Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are commonly observed in the centres of most galactic nuclei, including our own Milky Way (MW). While their study can reveal important information about the build-up of the innermost regions of galaxies, the physical processes that regulate their formation are still poorly understood. NSCs might have been formed through gas infall and subsequent in situ star formation, and/or through the infall and merging of multiple star clusters into the centre of the galaxy. Here, we investigate the viability of the latter, by studying direct N-body simulations of inspiralling clusters to the centre of an MW-like nuclear bulge that hosts a massive black hole. We find that the NSC formed through this process can show both morphological and kinematical properties that make it comparable with observations of the MW NSC, including significant rotation - a fact that has so far been attributed mainly to gas infall. We explore its kinematic evolution to see if and how the merger history can imprint fossil records on its dynamical structure. Moreover, we study the effect of stellar foreground contamination in the line-of-sight kinematics of the NSC. Our study shows that no fine tuning of the orientation of the infalling globular clusters is necessary to result in a rotating NSC. We suggest that cluster inspiral is a viable mechanism for the formation of rotating NSCs.

  1. THE PROGRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE ROSETTE MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, Elizabeth A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32605 (United States); Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Unidad Academica de Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Balog, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Wang Junfeng [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Dr, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Feigelson, Eric D., E-mail: jybarra@astro.ufl.edu [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Using Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory data, we identify young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC). By being able to select cluster members and classify them into YSO types, we are able to track the progression of star formation locally within the cluster environments and globally within the cloud. We employ the nearest neighbor method analysis to explore the density structure of the clusters and YSO ratio mapping to study age progressions in the cloud. We find a relationship between the YSO ratios and extinction that suggests star formation occurs preferentially in the densest parts of the cloud and that the column density of gas rapidly decreases as the region evolves. This suggests rapid removal of gas may account for the low star formation efficiencies observed in molecular clouds. We find that the overall age spread across the RMC is small. Our analysis suggests that star formation started throughout the complex around the same time. Age gradients in the cloud appear to be localized and any effect the H II region has on the star formation history is secondary to that of the primordial collapse of the cloud.

  2. A Comparative Study of Knots of Star Formation in Interacting vs. Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Beverly J; Struck, Curtis; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published H-alpha images, we have compared the star formation rates of ~700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high star formation rates than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The star formation rates of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest star formation rates, the apparent dust a...

  3. Properties of Star Clusters - II: Scale Height Evolution of Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Buckner, Anne S M

    2014-01-01

    Until now it has been impossible to observationally measure how star cluster scale height evolves beyond 1Gyr as only small samples have been available. Here we establish a novel method to determine the scale height of a cluster sample using modelled distributions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. This allows us to determine the scale height with a 25% accuracy for samples of 38 clusters or more. We apply our method to investigate the temporal evolution of cluster scale height, using homogeneously selected sub-samples of Kharchenko et al. (MWSC), Dias et al. (DAML02), WEBDA, and Froebrich et al. (FSR). We identify a linear relationship between scale height and log(age/yr) of clusters, considerably different from field stars. The scale height increases from about 40pc at 1Myr to 75pc at 1Gyr, most likely due to internal evolution and external scattering events. After 1Gyr, there is a marked change of the behaviour, with the scale height linearly increasing with log(age/yr) to about 550pc at 3.5Gyr. The most likely...

  4. Were All Massive Stars Born in OB Associations and Clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, You-Hua

    2007-01-01

    It has been commonly conjectured that all massive >10 Msun stars are born in OB associations or clusters. Many O and B stars in the Galaxy or the Magellanic Clouds appear to exist in isolation, however. While some of these field OB stars have been ejected from their birthplaces, some are too far away from massive star forming regions to be runaways. Can massive stars form in isolation? The Spitzer survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (aka SAGE) provides a unique opportunity for us to investigate and characterize the formation sites of massive stars for an entire galaxy. We have identified all massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We find that ~85% of the massive YSOs are in giant molecular clouds and ~65% are in OB associations. Only ~7% of the massive YSOs are neither in OB associations nor in giant molecular clouds. This fraction of isolated massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud is comparable to the 5-10% found in the Galaxy.

  5. A 30 kpc CHAIN OF ''BEADS ON A STRING'' STAR FORMATION BETWEEN TWO MERGING EARLY TYPE GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF A STRONG-LENSING GALAXY CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Davis, Timothy A. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Gladders, Michael D.; Florian, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Baum, Stefi A.; O' Dea, Christopher P.; Cooke, Kevin C. [Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science and School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Bayliss, Matthew B. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dahle, Håkon [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Rigby, Jane R. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sharon, Keren [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Soto, Emmaris [Department of Physics, The Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Wuyts, Eva, E-mail: grant.tremblay@eso.org [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr., D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    New Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and optical imaging of the strong-lensing galaxy cluster SDSS J1531+3414 (z = 0.335) reveals two centrally dominant elliptical galaxies participating in an ongoing major merger. The interaction is at least somewhat rich in cool gas, as the merger is associated with a complex network of 19 massive superclusters of young stars (or small tidal dwarf galaxies) separated by ∼1 kpc in projection from one another, combining to an estimated total star formation rate of ∼5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The resolved young stellar superclusters are threaded by narrow Hα, [O II], and blue excess filaments arranged in a network spanning ∼27 kpc across the two merging galaxies. This morphology is strongly reminiscent of the well-known ''beads on a string'' mode of star formation observed on kiloparsec scales in the arms of spiral galaxies, resonance rings, and in tidal tails between interacting galaxies. Nevertheless, the arrangement of this star formation relative to the nuclei of the two galaxies is difficult to interpret in a dynamical sense, as no known ''beads on a string'' systems associated with kiloparsec-scale tidal interactions exhibit such lopsided morphology relative to the merger participants. In this Letter, we present the images and follow-up spectroscopy and discuss possible physical interpretations for the unique arrangement of the young stellar clusters. While we suggest that this morphology is likely to be dynamically short-lived, a more quantitative understanding awaits necessary multiwavelength follow-up, including optical integral field spectroscopy, ALMA submillimeter interferometry, and Chandra X-ray imaging.

  6. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. IV: Candidates for isolated high-mass star formation in 30 Doradus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bressert, E.; Bastian, N.; Evans, C.J.; Sana, H.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Goodwin, S.P.; Parker, R.J.; Gieles, M.; Bestenlehner, J.M.; Vink, J.S.; Taylor, W.D.; Crowther, P.A.; Longmore, S.N.; Gräfener, G.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; de Koter, A.; Cantiello, M.; Kruijssen, J.M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Whether massive stars (≳30 M⊙) can occasionally form in relative isolation (e.g. in clusters with M < 100 M⊙) or if they require a large cluster of lower-mass stars around them is a key test in the differentiation of star-formation theories as well as how the initial mass function of stars is sample

  7. Star Formation in the Outer Filaments of NGC 1275

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, R E A; Johnstone, R M; Sanders, J S; Conselice, C J; Crawford, C S; Gallagher, J S; Zweibel, E

    2010-01-01

    We present photometry of the outer star clusters in NGC 1275, the brightest galaxy in the Perseus cluster. The observations were taken using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. We focus on two stellar regions in the south and south-east, far from the nucleus of the low velocity system (~22 kpc). These regions of extended star formation trace the H alpha filaments, drawn out by rising radio bubbles. In both regions bimodal distributions of colour (B-R)_0 against magnitude are apparent, suggesting two populations of star clusters with different ages; most of the H alpha filaments show no detectable star formation. The younger, bluer population is found to be concentrated along the filaments while the older population is dispersed evenly about the galaxy. We construct colour-magnitude diagrams and derive ages of at most 10^8 years for the younger population, a factor of 10 younger than the young population of star clusters in the inner regions of NGC 1275. We conclude that a formation mechani...

  8. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  9. The luminosity function of young star clusters: implications for the maximum mass and luminosity of clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gieles, M; Bastian, N; Stein, I; Gieles, Mark; Larsen, Soeren; Bastian, Nate; Stein, Ilaan

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a method to relate a possible truncation of the star cluster mass function at the high mass end to the shape of the cluster luminosity function (LF). We compare the observed LFs of five galaxies containing young star clusters with synthetic cluster population models with varying initial conditions. The LF of the SMC, the LMC and NGC 5236 are characterized by a power-law behavior NdL~L^-a dL, with a mean exponent of = 2.0 +/- 0.2. This can be explained by a cluster population formeda with a constant cluster formation rate, in which the maximum cluster mass per logarithmic age bin is determined by the size-of-sample effect and therefore increases with log(age/yr). The LFs of NGC 6946 and M51 are better described by a double power-law distribution or a Schechter function. When a cluster population has a mass function that is truncated below the limit given by the size-of-sample effect, the total LF shows a bend at the magnitude of the maximum mass, with the age of the oldest cluster in the populati...

  10. How a Star Cluster Ruled Out MACHOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Are massive black holes hiding in the halos of galaxies, making up the majority of the universes mysterious dark matter? This possibility may have been ruled out by a star cluster in a small galaxy recently discovered orbiting the Milky Way.Dark Matter CandidatesThe relative amounts of the different constituents of the universe. Dark matter makes up ~27%. [ESA/Planck]Roughly 27% of the mass and energy in the observable universe is made up of dark matter matter invisible to us, which is neither accounted for by observable baryonic matter nor dark energy.What makes up this dark matter? Among the many proposed candidates, one of the least exotic is that of massive compact halo objects, or MACHOs. MACHOs are hypothesized to be black holes that formed in the early universe and now hide in galactic halos. We cant detect light from these objects but their mass adds to the gravitational pull of galaxies.So far, MACHOs prospects arent looking great. They have not been detected in gravitational lensing surveys, ruling out MACHOs between 10-7 and 30 solar masses as the dominant component of dark matter in our galaxy. MACHOs over 100 solar masses have also been ruled out, due to the existence of fragile wide halo binaries that would have been disrupted by the presence of such large black holes.But what about MACHOs between 30 and 100 solar masses? In a new study, Timothy Brandt (NASA Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, NJ) uses a recently discovered faint galaxy, Eridanus II, to place constraints on MACHOs in this mass range.MACHO constraints from the survival of a star cluster in Eri II, assuming a cluster age of 3 Gyr (a lower bound; constraints increase when assuming an age of 12 Gyr). [Adapted from Brandt 2016]A Star Cluster in Eri IIEridanus II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy that lies roughly 1.2 million light-years away from us. This dim object is a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, discovered as part of the Dark Energy Survey

  11. Star formation history written in spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E. Ellerbroek

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, the process of star formation is mapped from large to small scales, using the world's most advanced observatories. Discoveries of several young stars with peculiar environments are reported. Dynamics of circumstellar gas and dust are analyzed in a diverse ensemble of young stars. The

  12. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra M; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is firmly established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies, we identified tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample- nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and difficult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the ...

  13. OGLE Collection of Star Clusters. New Objects in the Outskirts of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Sitek, M; Skowron, D M; Udalski, A; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z; Skowron, J; Karczmarek, P; Cieślar, M; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Kozłowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Soszyński, I; Mróz, P; Pawlak, M; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K

    2016-01-01

    The Magellanic System (MS), consisting of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and the Magellanic Bridge (MBR), contains diverse sample of star clusters. Their spatial distribution, ages and chemical abundances may provide important information about the history of formation of the whole System. We use deep photometric maps derived from the images collected during the fourth phase of The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-IV) to construct the most complete catalog of star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud using the homogeneous photometric data. In this paper we present the collection of star clusters found in the area of about 225 square degrees in the outer regions of the LMC. Our sample contains 679 visually identified star cluster candidates, 226 of which were not listed in any of the previously published catalogs. The new clusters are mainly young small open clusters or clusters similar to associations.

  14. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Shara, Michael M; Mardling, Rosemary A

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary "hot Jupiters" remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for their production is planet-planet interactions, which produces hot Jupiters from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters can be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations of planetary systems inside star clusters answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters' orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32 b, HAT-P-2 b, HD 80606 b and GJ 876 d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters then our simulations predict that these very hot, inner planets are sometimes acc...

  15. Formation of Very Young Massive Clusters and implications for globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2015-01-01

    How Very Young Massive star Clusters (VYMCs; also known as "starburst" clusters), which typically are of $\\gtrsim 10^4M_\\odot$ and are a few Myr old, form out of Giant Molecular Clouds is still largely an open question. Increasingly detailed observations of young star clusters and star-forming molecular clouds and computational studies provide clues about their formation scenarios and the underlying physical processes involved. This chapter is focused on reviewing the decade-long studies that attempt to computationally reproduce the well-observed nearby VYMCs, such as the Orion Nebula Cluster, R136 and NGC 3603 young cluster, thereby shedding light on birth conditions of massive star clusters, in general. On this regard, focus is given on direct N-body modeling of real-sized massive star clusters, with a monolithic structure and undergoing residual gas expulsion, which have consistently reproduced the observed characteristics of several VYMCs and also of young star clusters, in general. The connection of thes...

  16. Magnetic Fields and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, S; Falle, S A E G

    2012-01-01

    Research performed in the 1950s and 1960s by Leon Mestel on the roles of magnetic fields in star formation established the framework within which he and other key figures have conducted subsequent investigations on the subject. This short tribute to Leon contains a brief summary of some, but not all, of his ground breaking contributions in the area. It also mentions of some of the relevant problems that have received attention in the last few years. The coverage is not comprehensive, and the authors have drawn on their own results more and touched more briefly on those of others than they would in a normal review. Theirs is a personal contribution to the issue honouring Leon, one of the truly great gentlemen, wits, and most insightful of astrophysicists.

  17. SMBH Spherically Symmetric Accretion Regulated by Violent Star Formation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Silich, S; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2008-01-01

    The mounting evidence for violent nuclear star formation in Seyfert galaxies has led us to consider the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by massive stars through strong stellar winds and supernovae, under the presence of a central massive BH. We show that in all cases there is a bimodal solution strongly weighted by the location of the stagnation radius (Rst), which splits the star cluster into two different zones. Matter reinserted within the stagnation volume is to be accreted by the BH while its outer counterpart would composed a star cluster wind. The mechanical power of the latter, ensures that there is no accretion of the ISM into the BH and thus the BH accretion and its luminosity is regulated by the star formation feedback. The location of the stagnation radius is a function of three parameters: the BH mass, the mechanical power (or mass) of the star formation event and the size of the star forming region. Here we present our self-consistent, stationary solution, discuss the accretion rates and ...

  18. Gravitational Focusing and the Star Cluster Initial Mass Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Burkert, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the possibility that gravitational focusing is responsible for the power-law mass function of star clusters N({log}M)\\propto {M}-1. This power law can be produced asymptotically when the mass accretion rate of an object depends upon the mass of the accreting body, as \\dot{M}\\propto {M}2. Although Bondi–Hoyle–Lyttleton accretion formally produces this dependence on mass in a uniform medium, realistic environments are much more complicated. However, numerical simulations in SPH that allow for sink formation yield such an asymptotic power-law mass function. We perform pure N-body simulations to isolate the effects of gravity from those of gas physics and to show that clusters naturally result with the power-law mass distribution. We also consider the physical conditions necessary to produce clusters on appropriate timescales. Our results help support the idea that gravitationally dominated accretion is the most likely mechanism for producing the cluster mass function.

  19. Magnetic fields in star formation: from galaxies to stars

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel J; Dobbs, Clare L

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important at every scale in the star formation process: from the dynamics of the ISM in galaxies, to the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars and in the fragmentation of individual star forming cores. The recent development of a robust algorithm for MHD in the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method has enabled us to perform simulations of star formation including magnetic fields at each of these scales. This paper focusses on three questions in particular: What is the effect of magnetic fields on fragmentation in star forming cores? How do magnetic fields affect the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars? and: What effect do magnetic fields have on the dynamics of the interstellar medium?

  20. Merging Timescales and Merger Rates of Star Clusters in Dense Star Cluster Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Fellhauer, M; Kroupa, P; Spurzem, R

    2001-01-01

    Interacting galaxies like the famous Antennae (NGC 4038/4039) or Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92) show considerable star forming activity in their tidal arms. High resolution images (e.g. from HST-observations) indicate that these regions consist of up to hundreds of massive stellar clusters or tidal dwarf galaxies (TDG). In this paper we investigate the future fate of these clusters of massive star clusters (in this work called super-clusters). We simulate compact super-clusters in the tidal field of a host-galaxy and investigate the influence of orbital and internal parameters on the rate and timescale of the merging process. We show that it is possible that such configurations merge and build a dwarf galaxy, which could be the primary mechanism of how long-lived dwarf satellite galaxies form. A detailed study of the merger object will appear in a follow-up paper.

  1. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel scenario for globular cluster (GC) formation, where the ultraviolet (UV) background radiation effectively works so as to produce compact star clusters. Here, we explore the formation of GCs in UV radiation fields. For this purpose, we calculate baryon and dark matter (DM) dynamics in spherical symmetry, incorporating the self-shielding effects by solving the radiative transfer of UV radiation. In addition, we prescribe the star formation in cooled gas components and pursue the dynamics of formed stars. As a result, we find that the evolution of subgalactic objects in UV background radiation are separated into three types, that is, (1) prompt star formation, where less massive clouds ~10^{5-8} M_sun are promptly self-shielded and undergo star formation, (2) delayed star formation, where photoionized massive clouds >10^8 M_sun collapse despite high thermal pressure and are eventually self-shielded to form stars in a delayed fashion, and (3) supersonic infall, where photoionized less massive c...

  2. On the Formation of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Sonnhalter, Cordula

    2002-01-01

    We calculate numerically the collapse of slowly rotating, nonmagnetic, massive molecular clumps of masses 30,60, and 120 Stellar Mass, which conceivably could lead to the formation of massive stars. Because radiative acceleration on dust grains plays a critical role in the clump's dynamical evolution, we have improved the module for continuum radiation transfer in an existing two-dimensional (axial symmetry assumed) radiation hydrodynamic code. In particular, rather than using "gray" dust opacities and "gray" radiation transfer, we calculate the dust's wavelength-dependent absorption and emission simultaneously with the radiation density at each wavelength and the equilibrium temperatures of three grain components: amorphous carbon particles. silicates, and " dirty ice " -coated silicates. Because our simulations cannot spatially resolve the innermost regions of the molecular clump, however, we cannot distinguish between the formation of a dense central cluster or a single massive object. Furthermore, we cannot exclude significant mass loss from the central object(s) that may interact with the inflow into the central grid cell. Thus, with our basic assumption that all material in the innermost grid cell accretes onto a single object. we are able to provide only an upper limit to the mass of stars that could possibly be formed. We introduce a semianalytical scheme for augmenting existing evolutionary tracks of pre-main-sequence protostars by including the effects of accretion. By considering an open outermost boundary, an arbitrary amount of material could, in principal, be accreted onto this central star. However, for the three cases considered (30, 60, and 120 Stellar Mass originally within the computation grid), radiation acceleration limited the final masses to 3 1.6, 33.6, and 42.9 Stellar Mass, respectively, for wavelength-dependent radiation transfer and to 19.1, 20.1, and 22.9 Stellar Mass. for the corresponding simulations with gray radiation transfer. Our

  3. uvbybeta photometry of early type open cluster and field stars

    CERN Document Server

    Handler, G

    2011-01-01

    The beta Cephei stars and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars are massive main sequence variables. The strength of their pulsational driving strongly depends on the opacity of iron-group elements. As many of those stars naturally occur in young open clusters, whose metallicities can be determined in several fundamental ways, it is logical to study the incidence of pulsation in several young open clusters. To provide the foundation for such an investigation, Str\\"omgren-Crawford uvbybeta photometry of open cluster target stars was carried out to determine effective temperatures, luminosities, and therefore cluster memberships. In the course of three observing runs, uvbybeta photometry for 168 target stars was acquired and transformed into the standard system by measurements of 117 standard stars. The list of target stars also included some known cluster and field beta Cephei stars, as well as beta Cephei and SPB candidates that are targets of the asteroseismic part of the Kepler satellite mission. The uvbybeta phot...

  4. Theoretical considerations for star formation at low and high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2015-01-01

    Star formation in strongly self-gravitating cloud cores should be similar at all redshifts, forming single or multiple stars with a range of masses determined by local magneto-hydrodynamics and gravity. The formation processes for these cores, however, as well as their structures, temperatures, Mach numbers, etc., and the boundedness and mass distribution functions of the resulting stars, should depend on environment, as should the characteristic mass, density, and column density at which cloud self-gravity dominates other forces. Because the environments for high and low redshift star formation differ significantly, we expect the resulting gas to stellar conversion details to differ also. At high redshift, the universe is denser and more gas-rich, so the active parts of galaxies are denser and more gas rich too, leading to slightly shorter gas consumption timescales, higher cloud pressures, and denser, more massive, bound stellar clusters at the high mass end. With shorter consumption times corresponding to ...

  5. The Milky Way as a Star Formation Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Molinari, Sergio; Glover, Simon; Moore, Toby; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Plume, René; Testi, Leonardo; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Zavagno, Annie; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The cycling of material from the interstellar medium (ISM) into stars and the return of stellar ejecta into the ISM is the engine that drives the ``galactic ecology'' in normal spirals, a cornerstone in the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time. Major observational and theoretical challenges need to be addressed in determining the processes responsible for converting the low-density ISM into dense molecular clouds, forming dense filaments and clumps, fragmenting them into stars, OB associations and bound clusters, and characterizing the feedback that limits the rate and efficiency of star formation. This formidable task can be now effectively attacked thanks to the combination of new global-scale surveys of the Milky Way Galactic Plane from infrared to radio wavelengths, offering the possibility of bridging the gap between local and extragalactic star formation studies. The Herschel, Spitzer and WISE mid to far infrared continuum surveys, complemented by analogue surveys from ground-based fa...

  6. SimClust - A Program to Simulate Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Deveikis, V; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A; Vansevicius, V

    2009-01-01

    We present a program tool, SimClust, designed for Monte-Carlo modeling of star clusters. It populates the available stellar isochrones with stars according to the initial mass function and distributes stars randomly following the analytical surface number density profile. The tool is aimed at simulating realistic images of extragalactic star clusters and can be used to: (i) optimize object detection algorithms, (ii) perform artificial cluster tests for the analysis of star cluster surveys, and (iii) assess the stochastic effects introduced into photometric and structural parameters of clusters due to random distribution of luminous stars and non-uniform interstellar extinction. By applying SimClust, we have demonstrated a significant influence of stochastic effects on the determined photometric and structural parameters of low-mass star clusters in the M31 galaxy disk. The source code and examples are available at the SimClust website: http://www.astro.ff.vu.lt/software/simclust/

  7. Evolution of star clusters in a cosmological tidal field

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to couple N-body star cluster simulations to a cosmological tidal field, using the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment. We apply this method to star clusters embedded in the CosmoGrid dark matter-only LambdaCDM simulation. Our star clusters are born at z = 10 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of about 500 Myr) by selecting a dark matter particle and initializing a star cluster with 32,000 stars on its location. We then follow the dynamical evolution of t...

  8. X-Raying the Star Formation History of the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere; Giacconi; Menci

    2000-01-10

    The current models of early star and galaxy formation are based upon the hierarchical growth of dark matter halos, within which the baryons condense into stars after cooling down from a hot diffuse phase. The latter is replenished by infall of outer gas into the halo potential wells; this includes a fraction previously expelled and preheated because of momentum and energy fed back by the supernovae which follow the star formation. We identify such an implied hot phase with the medium known to radiate powerful X-rays in clusters and in groups of galaxies. We show that the amount of the hot component required by the current star formation models is enough to be observable out to redshifts z approximately 1.5 in forthcoming deep surveys from Chandra and X-Ray Multimirror Mission, especially in case the star formation rate is high at such and earlier redshifts. These X-ray emissions constitute a necessary counterpart and will provide a much-wanted probe of the star formation process itself (in particular, of the supernova feedback) to parallel and complement the currently debated data from optical and IR observations of the young stars.

  9. Star-formation knots in IRAS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchings, J B

    1995-01-01

    Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

  10. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  11. Star Formation in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Research on Galactic Center star formation is making great advances, in particular due to new data from interferometers spatially resolving molecular clouds in this environment. These new results are discussed in the context of established knowledge about the Galactic Center. Particular attention is paid to suppressed star formation in the Galactic Center and how it might result from shallow density gradients in molecular clouds.

  12. Binaries in star clusters and the origin of the field stellar population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Simon P

    2010-02-28

    Many, possibly most, stars form in binary and higher order multiple systems. Therefore, the properties and frequency of binary systems provide strong clues to the star-formation process, and constraints on star-formation models. However, the majority of stars also form in star clusters in which the birth binary properties and frequency can be altered rapidly by dynamical processing. Thus, we almost never see the birth population, which makes it very difficult to know whether star formation (as traced by binaries, at least) is universal or whether it depends on the environment. In addition, the field population consists of a mixture of systems from different clusters that have all been processed in different ways.

  13. On the dissolution of evolving star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, S F P; Makino, J; McMillan, S; Zwart, Simon F. Portegies; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; Millan, Stephen Mc

    1998-01-01

    Using direct N-body simulations which include both the evolution of single stars and the tidal field of the parent galaxy, we study the dynamical evolution of globular clusters and rich open clusters. We compare our results with other N-body simulations and Fokker-Planck calculations. Our simulations, performed on the GRAPE-4, employ up to 32,768 stars. The results are not in agreement with Fokker-Planck models, in the sense that the lifetimes of stellar systems derived using the latter are an order of magnitude smaller than those obtained in our simulations. For our standard run, Fokker-Planck calculations obtained a lifetime of 0.28 Gyr, while our equivalent N-body calculations find about 4 Gyr. The principal reason for the discrepancy is that a basic assumption of the Fokker-Plank approach is not valid for typical cluster parameters. The stellar evolution timescale is comparable to the dynamical timescale, and therefore the assumption of dynamical equilibrium leads to an overestimate of the dynamical effec...

  14. Star Formation in the Gulf of Mexico

    CERN Document Server

    Armond, Tina; Bally, John; Aspin, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We present an optical/infrared study of the dense molecular cloud, L935, dubbed "The Gulf of Mexico", which separates the North America and the Pelican nebulae, and we demonstrate that this area is a very active star forming region. A wide-field imaging study with interference filters has revealed 35 new Herbig-Haro objects in the Gulf of Mexico. A grism survey has identified 41 Halpha emission-line stars, 30 of them new. A small cluster of partly embedded pre-main sequence stars is located around the known LkHalpha 185-189 group of stars, which includes the recently erupting FUor HBC 722.

  15. Globular cluster system erosion and nucleus formation in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The radial distribution of globular clusters in galaxies is always less peaked to the centre than the halo stars'. Extending previous work to a sample of HST globular cluster systems in ellipticals, we evaluate the number of clusters lost to the galactic centre as the integrals of the difference between the observed globular cluster system distribution and the underlying halo light profile. It results that the initial populations of globular clusters were from 25% to 50% richer than now. This significant number of missing globular clusters supports the hypothesis that a large quantity of globular cluster mass in form of globular clusters decayed and destroyed has been lost to the galactic centres, where plausibly contributed to formation and feeding of a mas sive object therein. It is relevant noting that the observed correlation between the core radius of the globular cluster system and the parent galaxy luminosity can be interpreted as a result of evolution.

  16. Segue 1 - A Compressed Star Formation History Before Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-01-01

    Segue 1 is the current best candidate for a "first galaxy", a system which experienced only a single short burst of star formation and has since remained unchanged. Here we present possible star formation scenarios which can explain its unique metallicity distribution. While the majority of stars in all other ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs) are within 0.5 dex of the mean [Fe/H] for the galaxy, 5 of the 7 stars in Segue 1 have a spread of $\\Delta$[Fe/H] $>0.8$ dex. We show that this distribution of metallicities canot be explained by a gradual build-up of stars, but instead requires clustered star formation. Chemical tagging allows the separate unresolved delta functions in abundance space to be associated with discrete events in space and time. This provides an opportunity to put the enrichment events into a time sequence and unravel the history of the system. We investigate two possible scenarios for the star formation history of Segue 1 using Fyris Alpha simulations of gas in a $10^7$ M$_\\odot$ dark matter halo. ...

  17. Network formation and gelation in telechelic star polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadgaonkar, Indrajit; Chatterji, Apratim

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the efficiency of gelation and network formation in telechelic star polymer melt, where the tips of polymer arms are dipoles while the rest of the monomers are uncharged. Our work is motivated by the experimental observations [A. Kulkarni et al., Macromolecules 48, 6580 (2015)] in which rheological studies of telechelic star polymers of poly-(L-lactide), a bio-degradable polymer, showed a drastic increase in elastic properties (up to 2000 times) compared to corresponding star polymers without the telechelic arm ends. In contrast to previous studies, we avoid using effective attractive Lennard-Jones potentials or dipolar potentials to model telechelic interactions. Instead we use explicit Coulomb positive and negative charges at the tip of polymer-arms of our bead-spring model of star polymers. By our simulations we show that the dipoles at the tip of star arms aggregate together to form clusters of dipoles. Each cluster has contributions from several stars, and in turn each star contributes to several clusters. Thus the entire polymer melt forms a connected network. Network forming tendencies decrease with a decrease of the value of the effective charge constituting the dipole: this can be experimentally realized by choosing a different ionomer for the star tip. We systematically varied the value of dipole charges, the fraction of star-arms with dipoles at the tip, and the length of the arms. The choice of explicit charges in our calculations enables us to make better quantitative predictions about the onset of gelation; moreover we get qualitatively distinct results about structural organization of dipoles within a dipole-cluster.

  18. Lithopanspermia in star-forming clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Fred C; Spergel, David N

    2005-08-01

    This paper considers the lithopanspermia hypothesis in star-forming groups and clusters, where the chances of biological material spreading from one solar system to another is greatly enhanced (relative to action in the field) because of the close proximity of the systems and lower relative velocities. These effects more than compensate for the reduced time spent in such crowded environments. This paper uses approximately 300,000 Monte Carlo scattering calculations to determine the cross sections for rocks to be captured by binaries and provides fitting formulae for other applications. We assess the odds of transfer as a function of the ejection speed v (eject) and number N(.) of members in the birth aggregate. The odds of any given ejected meteoroid being recaptured by another solar system are relatively low, about 1:10(3)-10(6) over the expected range of ejection speeds and cluster sizes. Because the number of ejected rocks (with mass m > 10 kg) per system can be large, N (R) approximately 10(16), virtually all solar systems are likely to share rocky ejecta with all of the other solar systems in their birth cluster. The number of ejected rocks that carry living microorganisms is much smaller and less certain, but we estimate that N (B) approximately 10(7) rocks can be ejected from a biologically active solar system. For typical birth environments, the capture of life-bearing rocks is expected to occur N (bio) asymptotically equal to 10-16,000 times (per cluster), depending on the ejection speeds. Only a small fraction (f (imp) approximately 10(4)) of the captured rocks impact the surfaces of terrestrial planets, so that N (lps) asymptotically equal to 10(3)-1.6 lithopanspermia events are expected per cluster (under favorable conditions). Finally, we discuss the question of internal versus external seeding of clusters and the possibility of Earth seeding young clusters over its biologically active lifetime.

  19. Highly efficient star formation in NGC 5253 possibly from stream-fed accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, J L; Benford, D J; Consiglio, S M; Ho, P T P; Kovács, A; Meier, D S; Zhao, J -H

    2015-01-01

    A local dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253, has a young super star cluster that may provide an example of highly efficient star formation. Here we report the detection and imaging, with the Submillimeter Array, of the J= 3-2 rotational transition of CO at the location of the massive cluster associated with the supernebula. The gas cloud is hot, dense, quiescent, and extremely dusty. Its gas-to-dust ratio is lower than the Galactic value, which we attribute to dust enrichment by Wolf-Rayet stars within the embedded star cluster. Its star formation efficiency exceeds 50%, ten times higher than clouds in the Milky Way: this cloud is a factory of stars and soot. We suggest that high efficiency results from the force-feeding of star formation by a streamer of gas falling into the galaxy.

  20. Highly efficient star formation in NGC 5253 possibly from stream-fed accretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J L; Beck, S C; Benford, D J; Consiglio, S M; Ho, P T P; Kovács, A; Meier, D S; Zhao, J-H

    2015-03-19

    Gas clouds in present-day galaxies are inefficient at forming stars. Low star-formation efficiency is a critical parameter in galaxy evolution: it is why stars are still forming nearly 14 billion years after the Big Bang and why star clusters generally do not survive their births, instead dispersing to form galactic disks or bulges. Yet the existence of ancient massive bound star clusters (globular clusters) in the Milky Way suggests that efficiencies were higher when they formed ten billion years ago. A local dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253, has a young star cluster that provides an example of highly efficient star formation. Here we report the detection of the J = 3→2 rotational transition of CO at the location of the massive cluster. The gas cloud is hot, dense, quiescent and extremely dusty. Its gas-to-dust ratio is lower than the Galactic value, which we attribute to dust enrichment by the embedded star cluster. Its star-formation efficiency exceeds 50 per cent, tenfold that of clouds in the Milky Way. We suggest that high efficiency results from the force-feeding of star formation by a streamer of gas falling into the galaxy.

  1. Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. II. Schmidt Laws and Star Formation Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2005-01-01

    We model star formation in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies, using a three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The model galaxies include a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas. Absorbing sink particles are used to directly measure the mass of gravitationally collapsing gas. Below the density at which they are inserted, the collapsing gas is fully resolved. The star formation rate measured in our models declines exponentially with time. Radial profiles of atomic and molecular gas and star formation rate reproduce observed behavior. We derive from our models and discuss both the global and local Schmidt laws for star formation: power-law relations between surface densities of gas and star formation rate. The global Schmidt law observed in disk galaxies is quantitatively reproduced by our models. We find that the surface density of star formation rate directly correlates with the strength of local gravitational instability. The local Schmidt laws of individual galaxies in...

  2. Size Distribution of Star Clusters and Stellar Groups in IC2574

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Anne; Meyer, Martin J.; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We present an HST/ACS archival study of compact and dispersed star clusters and stellar groups found in the nearby galaxy IC 2574. In this work, we identified and characterized the properties of clusters with spatially unresolved stars. We combined these properties with those found in a companion work on the dispersed stellar groups in IC 2574 with spatially resolved stars. We find that the size distribution of all young stellar groups, sparse and compact together, is consistent with the hierarchical model of star formation.

  3. On the infant weight loss of low- to intermediate-mass star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C; Nürnberger, D; Sterzik, M F

    2007-01-01

    Star clusters are born in a highly compact configuration, typically with radii of less than about 1 pc roughly independently of mass. Since the star-formation efficiency is less than 50 per cent by observation and because the residual gas is removed from the embedded cluster, the cluster must expand. In the process of doing so it only retains a fraction f_st of its stars. To date there are no observational constrains for f_st, although Nbody calculations by Kroupa et al. (2001) suggest it to be about 20-30 per cent for Orion-type clusters. Here we use the data compiled by Testi et al. (1997, 1998, 1999) for clusters around young Ae/Be stars and by de Wit et al. (2004, 2005) around young O stars and the study of de Zeeuw et al. (1999) of OB associations and combine these measurements with the expected number of stars in clusters with primary Ae/Be and O stars, respectively, using the empirical correlation between maximal-stellar-mass and star-cluster mass of Weidner & Kroupa (2006). We find that f_st < ...

  4. Cluster and Double Star observations of dipolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nakamura

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied two types of dipolarization events with different IMF conditions when Cluster and Double Star (TC-1 were located in the same local time sector: 7 August 2004, 18:00-24:00 UT, during a disturbed southward/northward IMF interval, and 14 August 2004, 21:00-24:00 UT, when the IMF was stably northward. Cluster observed dipolarization as well as fast flows during both intervals, but this was not the case for TC-1. For both events the satellites crossed near the conjugate location of the MIRACLE stations. By using multi-point analysis techniques, the direction/speed of the propagation is determined using Cluster and is then compared with the disturbances at TC-1 to discuss its spatial/temporal scale. The propagation direction of the BZ disturbance at Cluster was mainly dawnward with a tailward component for 7 August and with a significant Earthward component for 14 August associated with fast flows. We suggest that the role of the midtail fast flows can be quite different in the dissipation process depending on the condition of the IMF and resultant configuration of the tail.

  5. Environmental effects on stellar populations of star clusters and dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Cropper, Mark; Fujita, Yutaka; Chiosi, Cesare; Grebel, Eva K.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the competitive role of the different dissipative phenomena acting on the onset of star formation of gravitationally bound systems in an external environment. Ram pressure, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, and tidal forces are accounted for separately in an analytical framework and compared in their role in influencing the star forming regions. We present an analytical criterion to elucidate the dependence of star formation in a spherical stellar system on its surrounding environment. We consider the different signatures of these phenomena in synthetically realized colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the orbiting system thus investigating the detectability limits of these different effects for future observational projects and their relevance. The developed theoretical framework has direct applications to the cases of massive star clusters, dwarf galaxies in galaxy clusters and dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way system, as well as any primordial gas-rich cluster of stars orbiting within its host galaxy.

  6. Disentangling Morphology, Star Formation, Stellar Mass, and Environment in Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Christlein, D; Christlein, Daniel; Zabludoff, Ann

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the spectroscopic and photometric properties of galaxies in six nearby clusters. We perform a partial correlation analysis on our dataset to investigate whether the correlation between star formation rates in galaxies and their environment is merely another aspect of correlations of morphology, stellar mass, or mean stellar age with environment, or whether star formation rates vary independently of these other correlations. We find a residual correlation of ongoing star formation with environment, indicating that even galaxies with similar morphologies, stellar masses, and mean stellar ages have lower star formation rates in denser environments. Thus, the current star formation gradient in clusters is not just another aspect of the morphology-density, stellar mass-density, or mean stellar age-density relations. Furthermore, the star formation gradient cannot be solely the result of initial conditions, but must partly be due to subsequent evolution through a mechanism (or mechanisms) sens...

  7. The Formation and Early Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven N; Bastian, Nate; Bally, John; Rathborne, Jill; Testi, Leonardo; Stolte, Andrea; Dale, James; Bressert, Eli; Alves, Joao

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and early evolution of the most massive and dense young stellar clusters, focusing on the role they can play in our understanding of star and planet formation as a whole. Young massive cluster (YMC) progenitor clouds in the Galactic Center can accumulate to a high enough density without forming stars that the initial protostellar densities are close to the final stellar density. For this to hold in the disk, the time scale to accumulate the gas to such high densities must be much shorter than the star formation timescale. Otherwise the gas begins forming stars while it is being accumulated to high density. The distinction between the formation regimes in the two environments is consistent with the predictions of environmentally-dependent density thresholds for star formation. This implies that stars in YMCs of similar total mass and radius can have formed at widely different initial protostellar densities. The fact that no systematic variations in fundamental properties are observed be...

  8. Deriving physical parameters of unresolved star clusters IV. The M33 star cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    de Meulenaer, P; Mineikis, T; Vansevičius, V

    2015-01-01

    Context. When trying to derive the star cluster physical parameters of the M33 galaxy using broad-band unresolved ground-based photometry, previous studies mainly made use of simple stellar population models, shown in the recent years to be oversimplified. Aims. In this study, we aim to derive the star cluster physical parameters (age, mass, and extinction; metallicity is assumed to be LMC-like for clusters with age below 1\\,Gyr and left free for older clusters) of this galaxy using models that take stochastic dispersion of cluster integrated colors into account. Methods. We use three recently published M33 catalogs of cluster optical broad-band photometry in standard $UBVRI$ and in CFHT/MegaCam $u^{*}g'r'i'z'$ photometric systems. We also use near-infrared $JHK$ photometry that we derive from deep 2MASS images. We derive the cluster parameters using a method that takes into account the stochasticity problem, presented in previous papers of this series. Results. The derived differential age distribution of th...

  9. Discovery of two low-luminosity star clusters in the Milky Way halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2015-08-01

    Star clusters in the halo of the Milky Way (MW) hold important clues to the formation and structure of their host galaxy. In the talk, I present the discovery of two new low-luminosity star clusters in the inner and outer halo of the Milky Way. These two star clusters, named as Kim 1 and Kim 2, were first detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and our independent 500 sqr degree survey using the Dark Energy Survey camera (DECam) at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO repectively. Their true identies were confirmed by deep follow-up imaging using DECam and Gemini-South 8-m telescope. Kim 1 and Kim 2 both exhibit unsual physical properties compared to other classically known star clusters. Kim 1, located at a heliocentric distance of 17 kpc, features extremely low luminosity (Mv~0.3 mag) and low star concentration. Together with the high ellipticity (e ~ 0.4) and irregular isophotes, these properties suggest that we are seeing an intermediate mass star cluster being stripped by the Galactic tidal field. In the case of Kim 2, ~ 104 kpc away from the sun, is the faintest globular cluster ever found in the outer halo of the Milky Way. The globular cluster exhibits evidence of significant mass loss such as extra-tidal stars and mass-segregation. The observed properties of the new star cluster also raise the question about how such a low luminosity star cluster could have survived until today. One possible scenario is that Kim 2 is a star cluster originally located in a satellite dwarf galaxy and was accreted into the Milky Way's halo.

  10. The Center for Star Formation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, D.; Bell, K. R.; Laughlin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Star Formation Studies, a consortium of scientists from the Space Science Division at Ames and the Astronomy Departments of the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Cruz, conducts a coordinated program of theoretical research on star and planet formation. Under the directorship of D. Hollenbach (Ames), the Center supports postdoctoral fellows, senior visitors, and students; meets regularly at Ames to exchange ideas and to present informal seminars on current research; hosts visits of outside scientists; and conducts a week-long workshop on selected aspects of star and planet formation each summer.

  11. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf-Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sokal, Kimberly R; Indebetouw, Remy; Massey, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We investigate Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4m Mayall Telescope at...

  12. Formation of innovative clusters in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav V. Koshcheev

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern preconditions of development innovative clusters in Russian economy are analyzed. The importance of application of cluster approach to management of innovations in tourism is shown. Necessity formation of innovative clusters in region of tourist specialization for increase of competitiveness of territory is reflected. The model of formation of innovative clusters in tourism is offered.

  13. The star formation activity in cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardelli, Elena; Varela, Jesus; Quilis, Vicent

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of cosmic voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we study the star formation activity of void galaxies. The properties of galaxies living in voids are compared with those of galaxies living in the void shells and with a control sample, representing the general galaxy population. Void galaxies appear to form stars more efficiently than shell galaxies and the control sample. This result can not be interpreted as a consequence of the bias towards low masses in underdense regions, as void galaxy subsamples with the same mass distribution as the control sample also show statistically different specific star formation rates. This highlights the fact that galaxy evolution in voids is slower with respect to the evolution of the general population. Nevertheless, when only the star forming galaxies are considered, we find that the star formation rate is insensitive to the environment, as the main sequence is remarkably constant in the three samples under consideration. This fact...

  14. Star formation history in forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.; Kravchuk, S. G.

    The processes of formation and evolution of isolated dwarf galaxies over the Hubble timescale is followed by means of SPH techniques. As an initial protogalaxy perturbation we consider an isolated, uniform, solid -- body rotated sphere involved into the Hubble flow and made of dark and baryonic matter in a 10:1 ratio. The simulations are carried out for the set of models having spin parameters lambda in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 and the total mass of dark matter 1011 M_odot . Our model includes gasdynamics, radiative processes, star formation, supernova feedback and simplified chemistry. The application of modified star formation criterion which accounts for chaotic motions and the time lag between initial development of suitable conditions for star formation and star formation itself (Berczik P.P, Kravchuk S.G. 1997, Ap.Sp.Sci.) provides the realistic description of the process of galaxy formation and evolution. Two parameters: total mass and initial angular momentum of the dwarf protogalaxy play the crucial role in its star